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Sample records for vascular permeability index

  1. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  2. Vascular Permeability and Drug Delivery in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Hebda, Jagoda K.; Gavard, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia, and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents. PMID:23967403

  3. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  4. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  5. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. Methods The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ≥ 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Results Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P < 0.01). PVPI was higher in ALI/ARDS patients than in cardiogenic edema or pleural effusion with atelectasis patients (3.2 ± 1.4, 2.0 ± 0.8, and 1.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.01). In ALI/ARDS patients, EVLWI increased with increasing pulmonary vascular permeability (r = 0.729, P < 0.01) and was weakly

  6. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  7. In Vivo Measurement of Glioma-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisook; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The normal blood–brain barrier (BBB) consists of tight interendothelial cell junctions and adjacent astrocyte end feet separated by a basal lamina surrounding the endothelium. The interactions between the different cell types of BBB are disrupted in distinct patterns in the microenvironment of glioma. Malignant gliomas infiltrate the surrounding normal brain parenchyma; a process associated with vascular permeability (VP) and breakdown of the BBB. Herein, we describe methods to quantitatively measure glioma-induced vascular permeability, utilizing an orthotopic xenograft model of glioma. PMID:21874468

  8. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  9. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  10. Neuropilin-1 mediates vascular permeability independently of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lise; Prahst, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Tina; Savant, Soniya; Weström, Simone; Fantin, Alessandro; Riedel, Maria; Héroult, Mélanie; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2016-04-26

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) regulates developmental and pathological angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and vascular permeability, acting as a coreceptor for semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and the 165-amino acid isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A165). NRP1 is also the receptor for the CendR peptides, a class of cell- and tissue-penetrating peptides with a specific R-x-x-R carboxyl-terminal motif. Because the cytoplasmic domain of NRP1 lacks catalytic activity, NRP1 is mainly thought to act through the recruitment and binding to other receptors. We report here that the NRP1 intracellular domain mediates vascular permeability. Stimulation with VEGF-A165, a ligand-blocking antibody, and a CendR peptide led to NRP1 accumulation at cell-cell contacts in endothelial cell monolayers, increased cellular permeability in vitro and vascular leakage in vivo. Biochemical analyses, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) silencing, and the use of a specific VEGFR blocker established that the effects induced by the CendR peptide and the antibody were independent of VEGFR-2. Moreover, leakage assays in mice expressing a mutant NRP1 lacking the cytoplasmic domain revealed that this domain was required for NRP1-induced vascular permeability in vivo. Hence, these data define a vascular permeability pathway mediated by NRP1 but independent of VEGFR-2 activation.

  11. The effects of Bordetella pertussis vaccine on cerebral vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Amiel, S A

    1976-12-01

    The effect of Bordetella pertussis vaccine on the cerebral vascular permeability in the mouse was studied by a radio-isotope method (131I-labelled HSA). Intravenous injection of 4 x 1010 heat-killed pertussis organisms caused a measurable increase in permeability in normal mice. Cryoinjury to the cerebral hemispheres resulted in a striking increase in vascular permeability at 24 h. This declined within 48 h and stabilized at a level fractionally higher than normal at 7 days ("healed lesion"). When pertussis organisms were injected into mice bearing ("healed lesion"). When pertussis organisms were injected into mice bearing "healed lesions" the increase in permeability was similar in magnitude to that in uninjured brain. The effect was increased by a second administration of pertussis 24 h after the first. The action of pertussis on a newly inflicted cryoinjury was protective. It is suggested that permeability changes in the cerebral vessels may be involved in the evolution of the encephalopathy attributed to the use of Bordetella pertussis vaccine in man.

  12. Ocular Albumin Fluorophotometric Quantitation of Endotoxin-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Guss, Robert B.; Egbert, Peter R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) is known to alter systemic vascular permeability, but this effect is difficult to monitor and quantitate in vivo. The ocular vessels of the rabbit are particularly sensitive to LPS. Using a slit lamp equipped with a fluorophotometer, we have adapted a method to quantitate endotoxin-induced ocular vascular permeability by measuring the accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin into the anterior chamber of the eye. After intravenous administration of Salmonella typhimurim LPS, the anterior chamber fluorescence and blood fluorescence were measured at intervals of 15 min and 1 h, respectively, over 4 h. In controls, maximal fluorescence in the anterior chamber was 3.1 ± 0.8% of blood fluorescence. Doses of LPS as low as 0.25 μg/kg produced an ocular/serum fluorescence ratio of 17.6 ± 4.9. A dose of 2.5 μg of LPS per kg tended to produce a higher ratio (68.0 ± 7.1) than a larger dose of 50 μg/kg (30.5 ± 16.6). Permeability changes began within 30 min after LPS, and the rate of dye accumulation varied over time, with maximal leakage usually occurring 90 min after LPS, but occasionally occurring much later. Repeated doses produced tolerance. By conjugating albumin to rhodamine and utilizing a second filter with the slit lamp to measure accumulation of this dye, we demonstrated the persistence of marked permeability during a period when intraocular fluorescein isothiocyanate and albumin levels were relatively constant. This methodology indicates that extremely low doses of LPS induce ocular permeability changes and that neither the time course nor the dose response of this effect is linear. Ocular fluorophotometry is a sensitive, noninvasive technique to study the dynamics and pharmacology of LPS-induced permeability changes. PMID:6806194

  13. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre

  14. Tumor vascular permeability factor stimulates endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, D T; Heuvelman, D M; Nelson, R; Olander, J V; Eppley, B L; Delfino, J J; Siegel, N R; Leimgruber, R M; Feder, J

    1989-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF) is an Mr 40-kD protein that has been purified from the conditioned medium of guinea pig line 10 tumor cells grown in vitro, and increases fluid permeability from blood vessels when injected intradermally. Addition of VPF to cultures of vascular endothelial cells in vitro unexpectedly stimulated cellular proliferation. VPF promoted the growth of new blood vessels when administered into healing rabbit bone grafts or rat corneas. The identity of the growth factor activity with VPF was established in four ways: (a) the molecular weight of the activity in preparative SDS-PAGE was the same as VPF (Mr approximately 40 kD); (b) multiple isoforms (pI greater than or equal to 8) for both VPF and the growth-promoting activity were observed; (c) a single, unique NH2-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained; (d) both growth factor and permeability-enhancing activities were immunoadsorbed using antipeptide IgG that recognized the amino terminus of VPF. Furthermore, 125I-VPF was shown to bind specifically and with high affinity to endothelial cells in vitro and could be chemically cross-linked to a high-molecular weight cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating a mechanism whereby VPF can interact directly with endothelial cells. Unlike other endothelial cell growth factors, VPF did not stimulate [3H]thymidine incorporation or promote growth of other cell types including mouse 3T3 fibroblasts or bovine smooth muscle cells. VPF, therefore, appears to be unique in its ability to specifically promote increased vascular permeability, endothelial cell growth, and angio-genesis. Images PMID:2478587

  15. Mechanism of dexamethasone suppression of brain tumor-associated vascular permeability in rats. Involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor and vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, J D; Papavassiliou, E; Merrill, M J; Nieman, L; Knightly, J J; Walbridge, S; Edwards, N A; Oldfield, E H

    1996-01-01

    Brain tumor-associated cerebral edema arises because tumor capillaries lack normal blood-brain barrier function; vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) is a likely mediator of this phenomenon. Clinically, dexamethasone reduces brain tumor-associated vascular permeability through poorly understood mechanisms. Our goals were to determine if suppression of permeability by dexamethasone might involve inhibition of VPF action or expression, and if dexamethasone effects in this setting are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In two rat models of permeability (peripheral vascular permeability induced by intradermal injection of 9L glioma cell-conditioned medium or purified VPF, and intracerebral vascular permeability induced by implanted 9L glioma), dexamethasone suppressed permeability in a dose-dependent manner. Since 80% of the permeability-inducing activity in 9L-conditioned medium was removed by anti-VPF antibodies, we examined dexamethasone effects of VPF expression in 9L cells. Dexamethasone inhibited FCS- and PDGF-dependent induction of VPF expression. At all levels (intradermal, intracranial, and cell culture), dexamethasone effects were reversed by the GR antagonist mifepristone (RU486). Dexamethasone may decrease brain tumor-associated vascular permeability by two GR-dependent mechanisms: reduction of the response of the vasculature to tumor-derived permeability factors (including VPF), and reduction of VPF expression by tumor cells. PMID:8823305

  16. Non-invasive optical modulation of local vascular permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-03-01

    For a systemically administered drug to act, it first needs to cross the vascular wall. This step represents a bottleneck for drug development, especially in the brain or retina, where tight junctions between endothelial cells form physiological barriers. Here, we demonstrate that femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation focused on the blood vessel wall induces transient permeabilization of plasma. Nonlinear absorption of the pulsed laser enabled the noninvasive modulation of vascular permeability with high spatial selectivity in three dimensions. By combining this method with systemic injection, we could locally deliver molecular probes in various tissues, such as brain cortex, meninges, ear, striated muscle, and bone. We suggest this method as a novel delivery tool for molecular probes or drugs.

  17. Increased lung vascular permeability after pancreatitis and trypsin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tahamont, M. V.; Barie, P. S.; Blumenstock, F. A.; Hussain, M. H.; Malik, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the role of proteases in mediating lung vascular injury after acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Studies were made in sheep in which pulmonary lymph was collected for assessment of the changes in transvascular fluid and protein exchange. The induction of pancreatitis by injection of trypsin and sodium taurocholate into the pancreas resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance (lymph flow x lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio). The pulmonary vascular pressures did not change significantly after pancreatitis, indicating that the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and protein clearance were due to increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. The response to pancreatitis was also characterized by decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was a common morphologic feature in this group. In another group, an intravenous infusion of trypsin, which produced decreases in antiprotease activity comparable to those observed after pancreatitis, also resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance. These increases in lymph fluxes were comparable to those observed after pancreatitis and were also associated with decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was evident in this group upon histologic examination. In a third group, pretreatment with Trasylol prevented the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance after pancreatitis, suggesting that the pancreatitis-induced pulmonary vascular injury is the result of the release of proteases. The results indicate a common pulmonary vascular response to acute pancreatitis and trypsin infusion. The release of proteases into the circulation after acute pancreatitis may be the initiating event mediating the pulmonary vascular injury. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:6181692

  18. Vascular permeability in a human tumour xenograft: molecular charge dependence

    PubMed Central

    Dellian, M; Yuan, F; Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Jain, R K

    2000-01-01

    Molecular charge is one of the main determinants of transvascular transport. There are, however, no data available on the effect of molecular charge on microvascular permeability of macromolecules in solid tumours. To this end, we measured tumour microvascular permeability to different proteins having similar size but different charge. Measurements were performed in the human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T transplanted in transparent dorsal skinfold chambers in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and IgG were fluorescently labelled and were either cationized by conjugation with hexamethylenediamine or anionized by succinylation. The molecules were injected i.v. and the fluorescence in tumour tissue was quantified by intravital fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence intensity and pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate the microvascular permeability. We found that tumour vascular permeability of cationized BSA (pI-range: 8.6–9.1) and IgG (pI: 8.6–9.3) was more than two-fold higher (4.25 and 4.65 × 10−7cm s−1) than that of the anionized BSA (pI ≈ 2.0) and IgG (pI: 3.0–3.9; 1.11 and 1.93 × 10−7cm s−1, respectively). Our results indicate that positively charged molecules extravasate faster in solid tumours compared to the similar-sized compounds with neutral or negative charges. However, the plasma clearance of cationic molecules was ∼2 × faster than that of anionic ones, indicating that the modification of proteins enhances drug delivery to normal organs as well. Therefore, caution should be exercised when such a strategy is used to improve drug and gene delivery to solid tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10789717

  19. Vascular permeability in a human tumour xenograft: molecular charge dependence.

    PubMed

    Dellian, M; Yuan, F; Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Molecular charge is one of the main determinants of transvascular transport. There are, however, no data available on the effect of molecular charge on microvascular permeability of macromolecules in solid tumours. To this end, we measured tumour microvascular permeability to different proteins having similar size but different charge. Measurements were performed in the human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T transplanted in transparent dorsal skinfold chambers in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and IgG were fluorescently labelled and were either cationized by conjugation with hexamethylenediamine or anionized by succinylation. The molecules were injected i.v. and the fluorescence in tumour tissue was quantified by intravital fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence intensity and pharmacokinetic data were used to calculate the microvascular permeability. We found that tumour vascular permeability of cationized BSA (pI-range: 8.6-9.1) and IgG (pI: 8.6-9.3) was more than two-fold higher (4.25 and 4.65x10(-7) cm s(-1)) than that of the anionized BSA (pI approximately 2.0) and IgG (pI: 3.0-3.9; 1.11 and 1.93x10(-7) cm s(-1), respectively). Our results indicate that positively charged molecules extravasate faster in solid tumours compared to the similar-sized compounds with neutral or negative charges. However, the plasma clearance of cationic molecules was approximately 2x faster than that of anionic ones, indicating that the modification of proteins enhances drug delivery to normal organs as well. Therefore, caution should be exercised when such a strategy is used to improve drug and gene delivery to solid tumours.

  20. Changes in lung vascular permeability after heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, M C; Borovetz, H S; Griffith, B P; Hardesty, R L

    1985-10-01

    We have employed multiple indicator dilution techniques (MID) in six patients after heart-lung transplantation to assess changes in the lung vascular permeability-surface area product for urea (PS). Serial PS values for the patients when normalized to the predicted total lung capacity (TLC) in liters, ranged between 1.04 and 6.27 ml/sec/TLC (patient 1), 0 and 2.76 ml/sec/TLC (patient 2), 0.59 and 2.88 ml/sec/TLC (patient 3), 0.13 and 1.23 ml/sec/TLC (patient 4). The elevated values for PS in patient 1 exceed the lethal range described by K.L. Brigham et al. (J. Clin. Invest. 72:339, 1983) for severe ARDS. This strongly suggests a severely increased lung microvascular permeability in this patient possibly secondary to rejection as indicated by endomyocardial biopsy. PS values for surviving patients 2-6 fell well below the corresponding lethal value for ARDS patients. We conclude that PS urea derived from MID provides an indicator of the status of lung microvascular integrity in heart-lung transplant recipients.

  1. Hantaviruses direct endothelial cell permeability by sensitizing cells to the vascular permeability factor VEGF, while angiopoietin 1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate inhibit hantavirus-directed permeability.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Gorbunova, Elena E; Mackow, Natalie A; Mackow, Erich R

    2008-06-01

    Hantaviruses infect human endothelial cells and cause two vascular permeability-based diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Hantavirus infection alone does not permeabilize endothelial cell monolayers. However, pathogenic hantaviruses inhibit the function of alphav beta3 integrins on endothelial cells, and hemorrhagic disease and vascular permeability deficits are consequences of dysfunctional beta3 integrins that normally regulate permeabilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) responses. Here we show that pathogenic Hantaan, Andes, and New York-1 hantaviruses dramatically enhance the permeability of endothelial cells in response to VEGF, while the nonpathogenic hantaviruses Prospect Hill and Tula have no effect on endothelial cell permeability. Pathogenic hantaviruses directed endothelial cell permeability 2 to 3 days postinfection, coincident with pathogenic hantavirus inhibition of alphav beta3 integrin functions, and hantavirus-directed permeability was inhibited by antibodies to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). These studies demonstrate that pathogenic hantaviruses, similar to alphav beta3 integrin-deficient cells, specifically enhance VEGF-directed permeabilizing responses. Using the hantavirus permeability assay we further demonstrate that the endothelial-cell-specific growth factor angiopoietin 1 (Ang-1) and the platelet-derived lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) inhibit hantavirus directed endothelial cell permeability at physiologic concentrations. These results demonstrate the utility of a hantavirus permeability assay and rationalize the testing of Ang-1, S1P, and antibodies to VEGFR2 as potential hantavirus therapeutics. The central importance of beta3 integrins and VEGF responses in vascular leak and hemorrhagic disease further suggest that altering beta3 or VEGF responses may be a common feature of additional viral hemorrhagic diseases. As a result, our findings provide a potential mechanism

  2. Effect of leukotriene receptor antagonists on vascular permeability during endotoxic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.A.; Li, E.J.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-11-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sulfidopeptide leukotrienes are significant pathogenic mediators of certain hematologic and hemodynamic sequelae of endotoxic shock. In the present study, the effects of a selective LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, LY171883 (LY), or a selective LTD4 receptor antagonist, SKF-104353 (SKF), were assessed on splanchnic and pulmonary localization of 99mTechnetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) in acute endotoxic shock in the rat. Dynamic gamma camera imaging of heart (H), midabdominal (GI), and lung regions of interest generated time activity curves for baseline and at 5-35 min after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Slopes of GI/H and lung/H activity (permeability index, GI/H or lung/H X 10(-3)/min) provided indices of intestinal and lung localization. Rats received LY (30 mg/kg, i.v.), LY vehicle (LY Veh), SKF (10 mg/kg), or SKF vehicle (SK Veh) 10 min prior to endotoxin or endotoxin vehicle. In rats receiving the LY Veh and endotoxin (n = 8) or SKF Veh and endotoxin (n = 12), the splanchnic permeability indices to 99mTc-HSA were increased 11.2-fold and 5.1-fold, respectively (P less than 0.05) compared to vehicle control groups not given endotoxin (n = 5). Pulmonary permeability index for 99mTc-HSA was increased (P less than 0.05) to a lesser extent (3.2-fold) by endotoxin compared to vehicle controls. Pretreatment with SKF reduced the mesenteric permeability index to control levels (P less than 0.05) during the 5-35 min time interval post-endotoxin. LY reduced the mesenteric permeability index by 70%. Pulmonary relative permeability to 99mTc-HSA was not affected by LY pretreatment. Both splanchnic and lung relative permeability to the isotope was transient; at 135-225 min post-endotoxin, splanchnic localization of 99mTc-HSA (n = 4) was not significantly different from vehicle controls in these vascular beds.

  3. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yun-Liang; Zhang, Sheng; Tian, Zhao-Tao; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intact endothelial structure and function are critical for maintaining microcirculatory homeostasis. Dysfunction of the latter is an underlying cause of various organ pathologies. In a previous study, we showed that rhubarb, a traditional Chinese medicine, protected intestinal mucosal microvascular endothelial cells in rats with metastasizing septicemia. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of rhubarb on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)-induced vascular endothelial (VE) permeability. Methods: Rhubarb monomers were extracted and purified by a series of chromatography approaches. The identity of these monomers was analyzed by hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), carbon-13 NMR, and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We established a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer on a Transwell insert. We measured the HUVEC permeability, proliferation, and the secretion of VE-cadherin into culture medium using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, in response to treatment with MMP9 and/or rhubarb monomers. Results: A total of 21 rhubarb monomers were extracted and identified. MMP9 significantly increased the permeability of the HUVEC monolayer, which was significantly reduced by five individual rhubarb monomer (emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, 1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl)-β-D-glucose, daucosterol linoleate, and rhein) or a combination of all five monomers (1 μmol/L for each monomer). Mechanistically, the five-monomer mixture at 1 μmol/L promoted HUVEC proliferation. In addition, MMP9 stimulated the secretion of VE-cadherin into the culture medium, which was significantly inhibited by the five-monomer mixture. Conclusions: The rhubarb mixture of emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates angiogenesis and vascular permeability in Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, E.; Zietz, C.; Benelli, R.; Weninger, W.; Masiello, L.; Breier, G.; Tschachler, E.; Albini, A.; Stürzl, M.

    1996-01-01

    Abundant vasculature with increased permeability is a prominent histological feature of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a multifocal, cytokine-regulated tumor. Here we report on the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in AIDS-KS angiogenesis and vascular permeability. We demonstrate that different cytokines, which were previously shown to be active in KS development, modulate VEGF expression in KS spindle cells and cooperate with VEGF on the functional level. Northern blot analysis as well as studies on single cells using in situ hybridization revealed that VEGF expression in cultivated AIDS-KS spindle cells is up-regulated by platelet-derived growth factor-B and interleukin-1 beta. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of cell culture supernatants demonstrated that the VEGF protein is secreted by stimulated AIDS-KS spindle cells in sufficiently high amounts to activate proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor did not increase VEGF expression but acted synergistically with VEGF in the induction of angiogenic KS-like lesions in a mouse model in vivo. Angiogenesis and cellularity of KS-like lesions were clearly increased when both factors were injected simultaneously into the flanks of mice, compared with separate injection of each factor. A comparable angiogenic reaction as obtained by simultaneous injection of basic fibroblast growth factor and VEGF was observed when cell culture supernatants of AIDS-KS spindle cells were used for these experiments. Finally, analysis of primary human AIDS-KS lesions revealed that high amounts of VEGF mRNA and protein were present in KS spindle cells in vivo. These data provide evidence that VEGF, in concert with platelet-derived growth factor-B, interleukin-1 beta, and basic fibroblast growth factor, is a key mediator of angiogenesis and vascular permeability in KS lesions in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8

  5. CD8 T Cell-Initiated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Promotes Central Nervous System Vascular Permeability under Neuroinflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Chen, Yi; McDole, Jeremiah R.; Tripathi, Pulak; Pirko, Istvan; Seroogy, Kim B.; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark feature of numerous neurologic disorders as diverse as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, viral hemorrhagic fevers, cerebral malaria, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. CD8 T cells are one immune cell type that have been implicated in promoting vascular permeability in these conditions. Our laboratory has created a murine model of CD8 T cell-mediated CNS vascular permeability using a variation of the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus system traditionally used to study multiple sclerosis. Previously, we demonstrated that CD8 T cells have the capacity to initiate astrocyte activation, cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein alterations and CNS vascular permeability through a perforin-dependent process. To address the downstream mechanism by which CD8 T cells promote BBB dysregulation, in this study, we assess the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in this model. We demonstrate that neuronal expression of VEGF is significantly upregulated prior to, and coinciding with, CNS vascular permeability. Phosphorylation of fetal liver kinase-1 is significantly increased early in this process indicating activation of this receptor. Specific inhibition of neuropilin-1 significantly reduced CNS vascular permeability and fetal liver kinase-1 activation, and preserved levels of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein occludin. Our data demonstrate that CD8 T cells initiate neuronal expression of VEGF in the CNS under neuroinflammatory conditions, and that VEGF may be a viable therapeutic target in neurologic disease characterized by inflammation-induced BBB disruption. PMID:20008293

  6. Tumor Vascular Permeability to a Nanoprobe Correlates to Tumor-Specific Expression Levels of Angiogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Chan, Leslie; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; McNeeley, Kathleen; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 is the major mediator of the mitogenic, angiogenic, and vascular hyperpermeability effects of VEGF on breast tumors. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 is associated with the degree of pathomorphosis of the tumor tissue and unfavorable prognosis. In this study, we demonstrate that non-invasive quantification of the degree of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe correlates with the VEGF and its receptor levels and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an imaging nanoprobe and a methodology to detect the intratumoral deposition of a 100 nm-scale nanoprobe using mammography allowing measurement of the tumor vascular permeability in a rat MAT B III breast tumor model. The tumor vascular permeability varied widely among the animals. Notably, the VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 gene expression of the tumors as measured by qRT-PCR displayed a strong correlation to the imaging-based measurements of vascular permeability to the 100 nm-scale nanoprobe. This is in good agreement with the fact that tumors with high angiogenic activity are expected to have more permeable blood vessels resulting in high intratumoral deposition of a nanoscale agent. In addition, we show that higher intratumoral deposition of the nanoprobe as imaged with mammography correlated to a faster tumor growth rate. This data suggest that vascular permeability scales to the tumor growth and that tumor vascular permeability can be a measure of underlying VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 expression in individual tumors. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that quantitative imaging of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe represents a form of a surrogate, functional biomarker of underlying molecular markers of angiogenesis. PMID:19513111

  7. Increased Sheep Lung Vascular Permeability Caused by Pseudomonas Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Kenneth L.; Woolverton, William C.; Blake, Lynn H.; Staub, Norman C.

    1974-01-01

    In awake sheep, we compared the responses of lung lymph flow and lymph and plasma protein concentrations to steady state elevations of pulmonary vascular pressures made by inflating a left atrial balloon with those after an intravenous infusion of 105-1010Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lymph flow increased when pressure was increased, but lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios always fell and lymph protein flow (lymph flow × lymph protein concentration) increased only slightly. After Pseudomonas, sheep had transient chills, fever, leukopenia, hypoxemia, increased pulmonary artery pressure and lymph flow and decreased left atrial pressure and lymph protein concentration, 3-5 h after Pseudomonas, when vascular pressures and lymph protein concentrations had returned to near base line, lymph flow increased further to 3-10 times base line and remained at a steady level for many hours. During this steady state period, lymph-plasma protein concentration ratios were similar to base line and lymph protein flow was higher than in the increased pressure studies. Two sheep died of pulmonary edema 7 and 9 h after Pseudomonas, but in 16 studies, five other sheep appeared well during the period of highest lymph flow and all variables returned to base line in 24-72 h. Six serial indicator dilution lung water studies in five sheep changed insignificantly from base line after Pseudomonas. Postmortem lung water was high in the two sheep dead of pulmonary edema and one other, but six sheep killed 1-6 h after Pseudomonas had normal lung water. Because of the clear difference between the effects of increased pressure and Pseudomonas on lymphplasma protein concentration ratios and lymph protein flow, we conclude that Pseudomonas causes a prolonged increase in lung vessel permeability to protein. Because we saw lung lymph flow as high as 10 times base line without pulmonary edema, we conclude that lung lymphatics are a sensitive high-capacity mechanism for removing excess filtered fluid. An

  8. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X.; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia. PMID:25601765

  9. Semaphorin3A elevates vascular permeability and contributes to cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng Tao; Nilchi, Ladan; Li, Xuesheng; Gangaraju, Sandhya; Jiang, Susan X; Aylsworth, Amy; Monette, Robert; Slinn, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) increased significantly in mouse brain following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of Sema3A in stroke brain remains unknown. Our aim was to determine wether Sema3A functions as a vascular permeability factor and contributes to ischemic brain damage. Recombinant Sema3A injected intradermally to mouse skin, or stereotactically into the cerebral cortex, caused dose- and time-dependent increases in vascular permeability, with a degree comparable to that caused by injection of a known vascular permeability factor vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF). Application of Sema3A to cultured endothelial cells caused disorganization of F-actin stress fibre bundles and increased endothelial monolayer permeability, confirming Sema3A as a permeability factor. Sema3A-mediated F-actin changes in endothelial cells were through binding to the neuropilin2/VEGFR1 receptor complex, which in turn directly activates Mical2, a F-actin modulator. Down-regulation of Mical2, using specific siRNA, alleviated Sema3A-induced F-actin disorganization, cellular morphology changes and endothelial permeability. Importantly, ablation of Sema3A expression, cerebrovascular permeability and brain damage were significantly reduced in response to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) and in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/haemorrhagic transformation. Together, these studies demonstrated that Sema3A is a key mediator of cerebrovascular permeability and contributes to brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia.

  10. Resistance of essential fatty acid-deficient rats to endotoxin-induced increases in vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, E.J.; Cook, J.A.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Rokach, J.; Halushka, P.V. )

    1990-06-01

    Resistance to endotoxin in essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) rats is associated with reduced synthesis of certain arachidonic acid metabolites. It was hypothesized that EFAD rats would manifest decreased vascular permeability changes during endotoxemia as a consequence of reduced arachidonic acid metabolism. To test this hypothesis, changes in hematocrit (HCT) and mesenteric localization rate of technetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) and red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) were assessed in EFAD and normal rats using gamma-camera imaging. Thirty minutes after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin, EFAD rats exhibited less hemoconcentration as determined by % HCT than normal rats. Endotoxin caused a less severe change in permeability index in the splanchnic region in EFAD rats than in normal rats (1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10(-3)min-1 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.7 x 10(-3)min-1 respectively, P less than 0.05). In contrast to 99mTc-HSA, mesenteric localization of 99mTc-RBC was not changed by endotoxin in control or EFAD rats. Supplementation with ethyl-arachidonic acid did not enhance susceptibility of EFAD rats to endotoxin-induced splanchnic permeability to 99mTc-HSA. Leukotrienes have been implicated as mediators of increased vascular permeability in endotoxin shock. Since LTC3 formation has been reported to be increased in EFA deficiency, we hypothesized that LTC3 may be less potent than LTC4. Thus the effect of LTC3 on mean arterial pressure and permeability was compared to LTC4 in normal rats. LTC3-induced increases in peak mean arterial pressure were less than LTC4 at 10 micrograms/kg (39 +/- 5 mm Hg vs. 58 +/- 4 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05) and at 20 micrograms/kg (56 +/- 4 mm Hg vs. 75 +/- 2 mm Hg respectively, P less than 0.05). LY171883 (30 mg/kg), an LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, attenuated the pressor effect of LTC4, LTD4, and LTC3.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  12. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability after systemic lipopolysaccharide administration in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Nakahara, Kazuki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-09-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) has highly permeable fenestrated vasculature and is a key site for immune-to-brain communications. Recently, we showed the occurrence of continuous angiogenesis in the SFO. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced the vascular permeability and endothelial cell proliferation. In LPS-administered mice, the SFO vasculature showed a significant decrease in the immunoreactivity of plasmalemma vesicle associated protein-1, a marker of endothelial fenestral diaphragms. These data suggest that vasculature undergoes structural change to decrease vascular permeability in response to systemic LPS administration. PMID:27609286

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  14. Wogonin inhibits LPS-induced vascular permeability via suppressing MLCK/MLC pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujie; Luo, Xuwei; Li, Xiaorui; Song, Xiuming; Wei, Libin; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2015-09-01

    Wogonin, a naturally occurring monoflavonoid extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities and inhibits oxidant stress-induced vascular permeability. However, the influence of wogonin on vascular hyperpermeability induced by overabounded inflammatory factors often appears in inflammatory diseases and tumor is not well known. In this study, we evaluate the effects of wogonin on LPS induced vascular permeability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and investigate the underlying mechanisms. We find that wogonin suppresses the LPS-stimulated hyperactivity and cytoskeleton remodeling of HUVECs, promotes the expression of junctional proteins including VE-Cadherin, Claudin-5 and ZO-1, as well as inhibits the invasion of MDA-MB-231 across EC monolayer. Miles vascular permeability assay proves that wogonin can restrain the extravasated Evans in vivo. The mechanism studies reveal that the expressions of TLR4, p-PLC, p-MLCK and p-MLC are decreased by wogonin without changing the total steady state protein levels of PLC, MLCK and MLC. Moreover, wogonin can also inhibit KCl-activated MLCK/MLC pathway, and further affect vascular permeability. Significantly, compared with wortmannin, the inhibitor of MLCK/MLC pathway, wogonin exhibits similar inhibition effects on the expression of p-MLCK, p-MLC and LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Taken together, wogonin can inhibit LPS-induced vascular permeability by suppressing the MLCK/MLC pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential for the diseases associated with the development of both inflammatory and tumor. PMID:25956732

  15. New insight in quantitative analysis of vascular permeability during immune reaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Molodij, Guillaume; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Smolyakov, Yuri; Israeli, David; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging of vascular permeability becomes a golden standard for assessing the inflammation process during experimental immune response in vivo. The use of the optical fluorescence imaging provides a very useful and simple tool to reach this purpose. The motivation comes from the necessity of a robust and simple quantification and data presentation of inflammation based on a vascular permeability. Changes of the fluorescent intensity, as a function of time is a widely accepted method to assess the vascular permeability during inflammation related to the immune response. In the present study we propose to bring a new dimension by applying a more sophisticated approach to the analysis of vascular reaction by using a quantitative analysis based on methods derived from astronomical observations, in particular by using a space-time Fourier filtering analysis followed by a polynomial orthogonal modes decomposition. We demonstrate that temporal evolution of the fluorescent intensity observed at certain pixels correlates quantitatively to the blood flow circulation at normal conditions. The approach allows to determine the regions of permeability and monitor both the fast kinetics related to the contrast material distribution in the circulatory system and slow kinetics associated with extravasation of the contrast material. Thus, we introduce a simple and convenient method for fast quantitative visualization of the leakage related to the inflammatory (immune) reaction in vivo.

  16. Suppressions of serotonin-induced increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration by Bixa orellana leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yoke Keong; Sulaiman, NurShahira; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Lian, Gwendoline Ee Cheng; Zakaria, Zainul Amirudin; Othman, Fauziah; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Bixa orellana (AEBO) leaves and its possible mechanisms in animal models. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was evaluated using serotonin-induced rat paw edema, increased peritoneal vascular permeability, and leukocyte infiltrations in an air-pouch model. Nitric oxide (NO), indicated by the sum of nitrites and nitrates, and vascular growth endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in paw tissues of rats to determine their involvement in the regulation of increased permeability. Pretreatments with AEBO (50 and 150 mg kg⁻¹) prior to serotonin inductions resulted in maximum inhibitions of 56.2% of paw volume, 45.7% of Evans blue dye leakage in the peritoneal vascular permeability model, and 83.9% of leukocyte infiltration in the air-pouch model. 57.2% maximum inhibition of NO and 27% of VEGF formations in rats' paws were observed with AEBO at the dose of 150 mg kg⁻¹. Pharmacological screening of the extract showed significant (P < 0.05) anti-inflammatory activity, indicated by the suppressions of increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration. The inhibitions of these inflammatory events are probably mediated via inhibition of NO and VEGF formation and release. PMID:24224164

  17. Suppressions of Serotonin-Induced Increased Vascular Permeability and Leukocyte Infiltration by Bixa orellana Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, NurShahira; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Lian, Gwendoline Ee Cheng; Zakaria, Zainul Amirudin; Othman, Fauziah; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extract of Bixa orellana (AEBO) leaves and its possible mechanisms in animal models. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract was evaluated using serotonin-induced rat paw edema, increased peritoneal vascular permeability, and leukocyte infiltrations in an air-pouch model. Nitric oxide (NO), indicated by the sum of nitrites and nitrates, and vascular growth endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in paw tissues of rats to determine their involvement in the regulation of increased permeability. Pretreatments with AEBO (50 and 150 mg kg−1) prior to serotonin inductions resulted in maximum inhibitions of 56.2% of paw volume, 45.7% of Evans blue dye leakage in the peritoneal vascular permeability model, and 83.9% of leukocyte infiltration in the air-pouch model. 57.2% maximum inhibition of NO and 27% of VEGF formations in rats' paws were observed with AEBO at the dose of 150 mg kg−1. Pharmacological screening of the extract showed significant (P < 0.05) anti-inflammatory activity, indicated by the suppressions of increased vascular permeability and leukocyte infiltration. The inhibitions of these inflammatory events are probably mediated via inhibition of NO and VEGF formation and release. PMID:24224164

  18. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niyanta N; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13-17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  19. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niyanta N.; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J.; Wolak, Daniel J.; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13–17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  20. Vascular bursts enhance permeability of tumour blood vessels and improve nanoparticle delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Nichols, Joseph W.; Toh, Kazuko; Nomoto, Takahiro; Cabral, Horacio; Miura, Yutaka; Christie, R. James; Yamada, Naoki; Ogura, Tadayoshi; Kano, Mitsunobu R.; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Bae, You Han; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced permeability in tumours is thought to result from malformed vascular walls with leaky cell-to-cell junctions. This assertion is backed by studies using electron microscopy and polymer casts that show incomplete pericyte coverage of tumour vessels and the presence of intercellular gaps. However, this gives the impression that tumour permeability is static amid a chaotic tumour environment. Using intravital confocal laser scanning microscopy we show that the permeability of tumour blood vessels includes a dynamic phenomenon characterized by vascular bursts followed by brief vigorous outward flow of fluid (named ‘eruptions’) into the tumour interstitial space. We propose that ‘dynamic vents’ form transient openings and closings at these leaky blood vessels. These stochastic eruptions may explain the enhanced extravasation of nanoparticles from the tumour blood vessels, and offer insights into the underlying distribution patterns of an administered drug.

  1. Vascular bursts enhance permeability of tumour blood vessels and improve nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yu; Nichols, Joseph W; Toh, Kazuko; Nomoto, Takahiro; Cabral, Horacio; Miura, Yutaka; Christie, R James; Yamada, Naoki; Ogura, Tadayoshi; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Bae, You Han; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced permeability in tumours is thought to result from malformed vascular walls with leaky cell-to-cell junctions. This assertion is backed by studies using electron microscopy and polymer casts that show incomplete pericyte coverage of tumour vessels and the presence of intercellular gaps. However, this gives the impression that tumour permeability is static amid a chaotic tumour environment. Using intravital confocal laser scanning microscopy we show that the permeability of tumour blood vessels includes a dynamic phenomenon characterized by vascular bursts followed by brief vigorous outward flow of fluid (named 'eruptions') into the tumour interstitial space. We propose that 'dynamic vents' form transient openings and closings at these leaky blood vessels. These stochastic eruptions may explain the enhanced extravasation of nanoparticles from the tumour blood vessels, and offer insights into the underlying distribution patterns of an administered drug. PMID:26878143

  2. Glycocalyx and sepsis-induced alterations in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Chelazzi, Cosimo; Villa, Gianluca; Mancinelli, Paola; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; Adembri, Chiara

    2015-01-28

    Endothelial cells line the inner portion of the heart, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels; a basal membrane of extracellular matrix lines the extraluminal side of endothelial cells. The apical side of endothelial cells is the site for the glycocalyx, which is a complex network of macromolecules, including cell-bound proteoglycans and sialoproteins. Sepsis-associated alterations of this structure may compromise endothelial permeability with associated interstitial fluid shift and generalized edema. Indeed, in sepsis, the glycocalyx acts as a target for inflammatory mediators and leukocytes, and its ubiquitous nature explains the damage of tissues that occurs distant from the original site of infection. Inflammatory-mediated injury to glycocalyx can be responsible for a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and hepatic dysfunction. Moreover, some markers of glycocalyx degradation, such as circulating levels of syndecan or selectins, may be used as markers of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. Although a great deal of experimental evidence shows that alteration of glycocalyx is widely involved in endothelial damage caused by sepsis, therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving its integrity did not significantly improve the outcome of these patients.

  3. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  4. Lack of R-Ras Leads to Increased Vascular Permeability in Ischemic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vähätupa, Maria; Prince, Stuart; Vataja, Suvi; Mertimo, Teija; Kataja, Marko; Kinnunen, Kati; Marjomäki, Varpu; Uusitalo, Hannu; Komatsu, Masanobu; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Uusitalo–Järvinen, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of R-Ras in retinal angiogenesis and vascular permeability was evaluated in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model using R-Ras knockout (KO) mice and in human diabetic neovascular membranes. Methods Mice deficient for R-Ras and their wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to 75% oxygen from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P12 and then returned to room air. At P17 retinal vascularization was examined from whole mounts, and retinal vascular permeability was studied using Miles assay. Real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of R-Ras in retina during development or in the OIR model. The degree of pericyte coverage and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin expression on WT and R-Ras KO retinal blood vessels was quantified using confocal microscopy. The correlation of R-Ras with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and human serum albumin on human proliferative diabetic retinopathy membranes was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In retina, R-Ras expression was mostly restricted to the vasculature. Retinal vessels in the R-Ras KO mice were significantly more permeable than WT controls in the OIR model. A significant reduction in the direct physical contact between pericytes and blood vessel endothelium as well as reduced VE-cadherin immunostaining was found in R-Ras–deficient mice. In human proliferative diabetic retinopathy neovascular membranes, R-Ras expression negatively correlated with increased vascular leakage and expression of VEGFR2, a marker of blood vessel immaturity. Conclusions Our results suggest that R-Ras has a role in controlling retinal vessel maturation and stabilization in ischemic retinopathy and provides a potential target for pharmacologic manipulation to treat diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27654416

  5. Protective effect of Anzer honey against ethanol-induced increased vascular permeability in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Asli; Kolankaya, Dürdane

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effect of Anzer honey on ethanol-induced increased vascular permeability in rats. Evan's Blue (EB) dye, administered intracardiacly and extravasation of EB into the stomach, served as an indicator of vascular permeability following exposure to alcohol. Ethanol was given orally to the ethanol group for 90 days, and N-etylmaleimide (NEM) was given subcutaneously to the NEM group, and we observed increased extravasation of EB in the stomach in both groups. For this reason, we used NEM as a positive control for ethanol. Anzer honey, which contains 25.44 mg/g ascorbic acid, was given to the honey+ethanol group orally 30 min before beginning the 90-day ethanol administration. The mean amount of EB that leaked into the stomach of rats in the ethanol group and the NEM group was higher than that of the control group. Furthermore, if compared to the control, EB values in the stomachs were significantly reduced when receiving honey before administration of ethanol in rats. Histopathologically, the incidence and severity of gastric mucosal congestion were significantly reduced in the honey+ethanol group when compared to the ethanol group. These result indicate that Anzer honey is able to protect the stomach of the rat against ethanol-induced increased vascular permeability, which may be correlated with the ascorbic acid content.

  6. Neutrophil-derived heparin binding protein--a mediator of increased vascular permeability after burns?

    PubMed

    Johansson, Joakim; Lindbom, Lennart; Herwald, Heiko; Sjöberg, Folke

    2009-12-01

    Increased vascular permeability and oedema formation constitute a major clinical challenge following burns. Several clinical studies show that leukocytes are systemically activated following burns. Neutrophils have the capability to increase vascular permeability via mechanisms thought to involve the release of heparin binding protein (HBP). We hypothesised that HBP is elevated in plasma after major burns due to a systemic inflammatory response and investigated plasma-HBP concentrations in 10 severely burned patients daily for 1 week following the burn. Five-fold higher levels in plasma-HBP concentration compared to a control group were detected on the first day after injury, followed by a steep reduction in the time-period that corresponds to the last part of the hyperpermeability phase. These data are in accordance with the hypothesis that HBP may function as a mediator of the early burn-induced increase in vascular permeability, and call for further studies to confirm a possible cause-and-effect relationship between HBP and oedema formation following burns.

  7. Truncated netrin-1 contributes to pathological vascular permeability in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miloudi, Khalil; Binet, François; Wilson, Ariel; Cerani, Agustin; Oubaha, Malika; Menard, Catherine; Henriques, Sullivan; Mawambo, Gaelle; Dejda, Agnieszka; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Rezende, Flavio A.; Bourgault, Steve; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness in the working-age population. Impaired blood-retinal barrier function leads to macular edema that is closely associated with the deterioration of central vision. We previously demonstrated that the neuronal guidance cue netrin-1 activates a program of reparative angiogenesis in microglia within the ischemic retina. Here, we provide evidence in both vitreous humor of diabetic patients and in retina of a murine model of diabetes that netrin-1 is metabolized into a bioactive fragment corresponding to domains VI and V of the full-length molecule. In contrast to the protective effects of full-length netrin-1 on retinal microvasculature, the VI-V fragment promoted vascular permeability through the uncoordinated 5B (UNC5B) receptor. The collagenase matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9), which is increased in patients with diabetic macular edema, was capable of cleaving netrin-1 into the VI-V fragment. Thus, MMP-9 may release netrin-1 fragments from the extracellular matrix and facilitate diffusion. Nonspecific inhibition of collagenases or selective inhibition of MMP-9 decreased pathological vascular permeability in a murine model of diabetic retinal edema. This study reveals that netrin-1 degradation products are capable of modulating vascular permeability, suggesting that these fragments are of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of DR. PMID:27400127

  8. A neurodegenerative vascular burden index and the impact on cognition.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Roeben, Benjamin; Nasi-Kordhishti, Isabella; Suenkel, Ulrike; Wurster, Isabel; Brockmann, Kathrin; Fritsche, Andreas; Niebler, Raphael; Metzger, Florian G; Eschweiler, Gerhard W; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of vascular burden factors has been identified to impact vascular function and structure as indicated by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). On the basis of their impact on IMT, vascular factors may be selected and clustered in a vascular burden index (VBI). Since many vascular factors increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a multifactorial neurodegenerative VBI may be related to early pathological processes in AD and cognitive decline in its preclinical stages. We investigated an elderly cohort at risk for neurodegeneration (TREND study, n = 1102) for the multifactorial influence of vascular burden factors on IMT measured by ultrasound. To create a VBI for this cohort, vascular factors and their definitions (considering medical history, medication, and/or blood marker data) were selected based on their statistical effects on IMT in multiple regressions including age and sex. The impact of the VBI on cognitive performance was assessed using the Trail-Making Test (TMT) and the consortium to establish a registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery. IMT was significantly predicted by age (standardized β = 0.26), sex (0.09; males > females) and the factors included in the VBI: obesity (0.18), hypertension (0.14), smoking (0.08), diabetes (0.07), and atherosclerosis (0.05), whereas other cardiovascular diseases or hypercholesterolemia were not significant. Individuals with 2 or more VBI factors compared to individuals without had an odds ratio of 3.17 regarding overly increased IMT ( ≥ 1.0 mm). The VBI showed an impact on executive control [log(TMT B-A), p = 0.047] and a trend toward decreased global cognitive function (CERAD total score, p = 0.057) independent of age, sex, and education. A VBI established on the basis of IMT may help to identify individuals with overly increased vascular burden linked to decreased cognitive function indicating neurodegenerative processes. The longitudinal study of

  9. Interleukin-1beta induced vascular permeability is dependent on induction of endothelial tissue factor (TF) activity.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, Markus; Weinreich, David M; Farma, Jeffrey M; Carroll, Nancy M; Turner, Ewa M; Alexander, H Richard

    2005-09-30

    IL-1beta is a pleotropic cytokine that may mediate increased procoagulant activity and permeability in endothelial tissue during inflammatory conditions. The procoagulant effects of IL-1beta are mediated through induction of tissue factor (TF) but its alterations on vascular permeability are not well characterized. We found that IL-1beta induced a rapid and dose-dependent increase in TF activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) under routine culture conditions. However, IL-1beta caused a rapid and marked increase in permeability across confluent EC monolayers using a two-compartment in vitro model only in the presence of factor VIII-deficient plasma that was completely abrogated by neutralizing anti-TF antibody pre-treatment. In vitro permeability was associated with loss of EC surface expression of VE-cadherin and contraction of F-actin cytoskeletal elements that resulted in EC intercellular gap formation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta induces marked changes in permeability across activated endothelium via a TF dependent mechanism and suggest that modulation of TF activity may represent a strategy to treat various acute and chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by this cytokine.

  10. Bradykinin actively modulates pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index relationships.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Clougherty, P W; Goll, H M; Murray, P A

    1987-07-01

    Our objectives were to investigate the pulmonary vascular effects of exogenously administered bradykinin at normal and reduced levels of cardiac index in intact conscious dogs and to assess the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to bradykinin is the result of either cyclooxygenase pathway activation or reflex activation of sympathetic beta-adrenergic and -cholinergic receptors. Multipoint pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were constructed during normoxia in conscious dogs by step-wise constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava to reduce Q. In intact dogs, bradykinin (2 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1 iv) caused systemic vasodilation, i.e., systemic arterial pressure was slightly decreased (P less than 0.05), Q was markedly increased (P less than 0.01), and mixed venous PO2 and oxygen saturation (SO2) were increased (P less than 0.01). Bradykinin decreased (P less than 0.01) the pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure) over the entire range of Q studied (140-60 ml X min-1 X kg-1) in intact dogs. During cyclooxygenase pathway inhibition with indomethacin, bradykinin again decreased (P less than 0.05) pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure at every level of Q, although the magnitude of the vasodilator response was diminished at lower levels of Q (60 ml X min-1 X kg-1). Following combined administration of sympathetic beta-adrenergic and -cholinergic receptor antagonists, bradykinin still decreased (P less than 0.01) pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure over the range of Q from 160 to 60 ml X min-1 X kg-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3114215

  11. Histamine H3 receptors regulate vascular permeability changes in the skin of mast cell-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Maria Alejandra; Fujii, Yoko; Sugimoto, Yukio; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Kamei, Chiaki

    2003-11-01

    The participation of histamine H(3) receptors in the regulation of skin vascular permeability changes in mast cell-deficient mice was studied. Although intradermal injection of histamine H(3) antagonists, iodophenpropit and clobenpropit, at a dose of 100 nmol/site caused significant increases in skin vascular permeability in both mast cell-deficient (WBB6F1 W/W(v)) and wild-type (WBB6F1 +/+) mice, this response was significantly lower in mast cell-deficient mice than in the wild-type controls. Histamine also caused dose-related increases in skin vascular permeability in both wild-type and mast cell-deficient mice. Significant effects were observed at doses of 10 and 100 nmol/site, and no significant difference in skin vascular permeability was observed between mast cell-deficient and wild-type mice. However, histamine contents of dorsal skin in mast cell-deficient mice were significantly lower than in wild-type mice. In addition, the H(1) antagonists diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine and the NK(1) antagonists, L-732,138 and L-733,060, were able to antagonize H(3) antagonist-induced skin vascular permeability. These results indicated that blockade of H(3) receptors by H(3) antagonists induce skin vascular permeability through mast cell-dependent mechanisms. In addition, histamine and, to a lesser extent substance P are involved in the reaction.

  12. Cadmium induces vascular permeability via activation of the p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Fengyun; Guo, Fang; Li, Liqun; Guo, Ling; Hou, Yinglong; Hao, Enkui; Yan, Suhua; Allen, Thaddeus D.; Liu, Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Low-dose cadmium (Cd) induces vascular hyper-permeability. • p38 MAPK mediates Cd-induced disruption of endothelial cell barrier function. • SB203850 inhibits Cd-induced membrane dissociation of VE-cadherin and β-catenin. • SB203850 reduces Cd-induced expression and secretion of TNF-α. - Abstract: The vasculature of various organs is a targeted by the environmental toxin, cadmium (Cd). However, mechanisms leading to pathological conditions are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At 4 μM, CdCl{sub 2} induced a hyper-permeability defect in HUVECs, but not the inhibition of cell growth up to 24 h. This effect of CdCl{sub 2} was dependent on the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203850 suppressed the CdCl{sub 2}-induced alteration in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in HUVEC monolayers, a model measurement of vascular endothelial barrier integrity. SB203850 also inhibited the Cd-induced membrane dissociation of vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin and β-catenin, the important components of the adherens junctional complex. In addition, SB203850 reduces the Cd-induced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Taken together, our findings suggest that Cd induces vascular hyper-permeability and disruption of endothelial barrier integrity through stimulation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  13. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  14. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  15. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  16. Estimating retinal vascular permeability using the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model with fluorescein videoangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Osswald, Christian R.; Dosmar, Emily; Guthrie, Micah J.; Hones, Logan; Sinha, Lagnojita; Xu, Xiaochun; Mieler, William F.; St. Lawrence, Keith; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J.

    2015-06-01

    Clinical symptoms of diabetic retinopathy are not detectable until damage to the retina reaches an irreversible stage, at least by today's treatment standards. As a result, there is a push to develop new, "sub-clinical" methods of predicting the onset of diabetic retinopathy before the onset of irreversible damage. With diabetic retinopathy being associated with the accumulation of long-term mild damage to the retinal vasculature, retinal blood vessel permeability has been proposed as a key parameter for detecting preclinical stages of retinopathy. In this study, a kinetic modeling approach used to quantify vascular permeability in dynamic contrast-enhanced medical imaging was evaluated in noise simulations and then applied to retinal videoangiography data in a diabetic rat for the first time to determine the potential for this approach to be employed clinically as an early indicator of diabetic retinopathy. Experimental levels of noise were found to introduce errors of less than 15% in estimates of blood flow and extraction fraction (a marker of vascular permeability), and fitting of rat retinal fluorescein angiography data provided stable maps of both parameters.

  17. Increased pulmonary vascular permeability as a cause of re-expansion edema in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlin, D.J.; Nessly, M.L.; Cheney, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism(s) underlying re-expansion edema, we measured the concentration of labeled albumin (RISA) in the extravascular, extracellular water (EVECW) of the lung as a measure of pulmonary vascular permeability. Re-expansion edema was first induced by rapid re-expansion of rabbit lungs that had been collapsed for 1 wk by pneumothorax. The RISA in EVECW was expressed as a fraction of its plasma concentration: (RISA)L/(RISA)PL. The volume of EVECW (ml/gm dry lung) was measured using a /sup 24/Na indicator. Results in re-expansion edema were compared with normal control lungs and with oleic acid edema as a model of permeability edema. In re-expanded lungs, EVECW (3.41 +/- SD 1.24 ml/g) and (RISA)L/(RISA)PL 0.84 +/- SD 0.15) were significantly increased when compared with normal control lungs (2.25 +/- 0.41 ml/g and 0.51 +/- 0.20, respectively). Results in oleic acid edema (5.66 +/- 2.23 ml/g and 0.84 +/- 0.23) were similar to re-expansion edema. This suggested that re-expansion edema is due to increased pulmonary vascular permeability caused by mechanical stresses applied to the lung during re-expansion.

  18. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  19. Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Kills Mice by Inducing a Major Increase in Lung Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Geny, Blandine; Khun, Huot; Fitting, Catherine; Zarantonelli, Leticia; Mazuet, Christelle; Cayet, Nadège; Szatanik, Marek; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Michel; Popoff, Michel R.

    2007-01-01

    When intraperitoneally injected into Swiss mice, Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin reproduces the fatal toxic shock syndrome observed in humans and animals after natural infection. This animal model was used to study the mechanism of lethal toxin-induced death. Histopathological and biochemical analyses identified lung and heart as preferential organs targeted by lethal toxin. Massive extravasation of blood fluid in the thoracic cage, resulting from an increase in lung vascular permeability, generated profound modifications such as animal dehydration, increase in hematocrit, hypoxia, and finally, cardiorespiratory failure. Vascular permeability increase induced by lethal toxin resulted from modifications of lung endothelial cells as evidenced by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that VE-cadherin, a protein participating in intercellular adherens junctions, was redistributed from membrane to cytosol in lung endothelial cells. No major sign of lethal toxin-induced inflammation was observed that could participate in the toxic shock syndrome. The main effect of the lethal toxin is the glucosylation-dependent inactivation of small GTPases, in particular Rac, which is involved in actin polymerization occurring in vivo in lungs leading to E-cadherin junction destabilization. We conclude that the cells most susceptible to lethal toxin are lung vascular endothelial cells, the adherens junctions of which were altered after intoxication. PMID:17322384

  20. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Vascular Permeability of Circumventricular Organs in the Adult Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Mercado, Y. K.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Bañuelos-Pineda, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Feria-Velasco, A.

    2008-08-01

    The present work deals with the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on blood vessels permeability to non liposoluble substances of the circumventricular organs (CVO) of adult rats. Male Wistar adult rats were exposed to ELF-EMF and vascular permeability to colloidal carbon was investigated with the use of histological techniques. Results were compared to corresponding data from sham-exposed and control groups of animals. Exposure to ELF-EMF increased the CVO vascular permeability to colloidal carbon intravascularly injected, particularly in the subfornical organ, the median eminence, the pineal gland and the area postrema.

  1. Heterogeneous vascular permeability and alternative diffusion barrier in sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Fenestrated capillaries of the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the subfornical organ and the area postrema, lack completeness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to sense a variety of blood-derived molecules and to convey the information into other brain regions. We examine the vascular permeability of blood-derived molecules and the expression of tight-junction proteins in sensory CVOs. The present tracer assays revealed that blood-derived dextran 10 k (Dex10k) having a molecular weight (MW) of 10,000 remained in the perivascular space between the inner and outer basement membranes, but fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC; MW: 389) and Dex3k (MW: 3000) diffused into the parenchyma. The vascular permeability of FITC was higher at central subdivisions than at distal subdivisions. Neither FITC nor Dex3k diffused beyond the dense network of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes/tanycytes. The expression of tight-junction proteins such as occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was undetectable at the central subdivisions of the sensory CVOs but some was expressed at the distal subdivisions. Electron microscopic observation showed that capillaries were surrounded with numerous layers of astrocyte processes and dendrites. The expression of occludin and ZO-1 was also observed as puncta on GFAP-positive astrocytes/tanycytes of the sensory CVOs. Our study thus demonstrates the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and expression of tight-junction proteins and indicates that the outer basement membrane and dense astrocyte/tanycyte connection are possible alternative mechanisms for a diffusion barrier of blood-derived molecules, instead of the BBB. PMID:26048259

  2. Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom induces oedema formation and increases vascular permeability in the mouse hind paw.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, A L; de Souza, A O; da Cruz-Höfling, M A; Flores, C A; Bon, C

    2000-02-01

    The ability of snake venoms to increase vascular permeability and to induce oedema through the release of pharmacologically active substances is well known. We have studied the oedema and vascular permeability induced by Bothrops lanceolatus venom in male Swiss white mice. Paw oedema was induced by the subplantar injection of B. lanceolatus venom (125-1000 ng/paw) and was quantified as the increase in paw weight. Changes in vascular permeability were assessed by measuring the amount of Evans blue dye extravasation. The oedema and the increase in vascular permeability were maximal within 2 h and had resolved after 24 h. The administration of the vasodilator iloprost (20 ng/paw) immediately after B. lanceolatus venom potentiated the oedema and the increase in vascular permeability by approximately four-fold. Pretreating the mice with indomethacin, dexamethasone, NDGA or BW A4C inhibited the venom-induced oedema and the increase in vascular permeability. In contrast, histamine, serotonin and PAF-acether antagonists (mepyramine, cyproheptadine and WEB 2086, respectively) were ineffective. Histological examination showed that B. lanceolatus venom (250 ng and 500 ng/paw) caused thickening of the inner dermal layers which was accompanied by extensive intercellular spaces indicative of oedema. In addition, there was a marked infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils, into the underlying muscle layer. The latter, however, remained morphologically unaffected during the 3 h of observation. Venom doses larger than 500 ng/paw produced intense haemorrhage. These results indicate that B. lanceolatus venom induces oedema and increases vascular permeability in the mouse hind paw. The principal mediators of this inflammatory response are cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products. PMID:10665802

  3. Protein Kinase Cβ Phosphorylates Occludin Regulating Tight Junction Trafficking in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Induced Permeability In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Frey, Tiffany; Lin, Chengmao; Antonetti, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–induced breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier requires protein kinase C (PKC)β activation. However, the molecular mechanisms related to this process remain poorly understood. In this study, the role of occludin phosphorylation and ubiquitination downstream of PKCβ activation in tight junction (TJ) trafficking and endothelial permeability was investigated. Treatment of bovine retinal endothelial cells and intravitreal injection of PKCβ inhibitors as well as expression of dominant-negative kinase was used to determine the contribution of PKCβ to endothelial permeability and occludin phosphorylation at Ser490 detected with a site-specific antibody. In vitro kinase assay was used to demonstrate direct occludin phosphorylation by PKCβ. Ubiquitination was measured by immunoblotting after occludin immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopy revealed organization of TJ proteins. The results reveal that inhibition of VEGF-induced PKCβ activation blocks occludin Ser490 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and TJ trafficking in retinal vascular endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo and prevents VEGF-stimulated vascular permeability. Occludin Ser490 is a direct target of PKCβ, and mutating Ser490 to Ala (S490A) blocks permeability downstream of PKCβ. Therefore, PKCβ activation phosphorylates occludin on Ser490, leading to ubiquitination required for VEGF-induced permeability. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism for PKCβ targeted inhibitors in regulating vascular permeability. PMID:22438576

  4. [Subclinical atherosclerosis. An objective index of susceptibility and vascular risk].

    PubMed

    Werba, P; Cuniberti, L A; Martínez, V; Rey, R H

    1999-01-01

    Clinical data suggest that the individual susceptibility to atherosclerosis is not accounted for only by exposure to classical or "emerging" vascular risk factors. Although recent investigations with transgenic animals have revealed new genetic determinants of susceptibility, little is known concerning this situation in human beings. Even though the human genome project might uncover specific genetic markers in the future, the only early and objective method to identify the susceptible individual at present is to detect atherosclerosis non-invasively. High resolution B-mode ultrasonography of superficial arteries coupled with advanced computer-assisted image processing systems is a highly reproducible method to perform a quali-quantitative early evaluation of already developed wall lesions. Clinically more significant, the detection of silent atherosclerosis has an additional value for risk factor assessment in the prediction of global vascular risk, a relevant index for decision-making in cardiovascular prevention. It is conceivable that the introduction of non-invasive measures of the atherosclerotic burden in risk stratification of asymptomatic subjects will help to target interventions for more rational risk factor control and to reduce the cost/benefit ratio of primary prevention.

  5. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Brant M; Hu, Meng; Zheng, Anni; Zhao, Xueke; Che, Pulin; Brandon, Angela; Anjum, Naseem; Snapper, Scott; Creighton, Judy; Guan, Jun-Lin; Han, Qimei; Cai, Guo-Qiang; Han, Xiaosi; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Ding, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    TGF-β1 induces an increase in paracellular permeability and actin stress fiber formation in lung microvascular endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells via small Rho GTPase. The molecular mechanism involved is not fully understood. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) has an essential role in actin structure dynamics. We hypothesized that N-WASP plays a critical role in these TGF-β1-induced responses. In these cell monolayers, we demonstrated that N-WASP down-regulation by short hairpin RNA prevented TGF-β1-mediated disruption of the cortical actin structure, actin stress filament formation, and increased permeability. Furthermore, N-WASP down-regulation blocked TGF-β1 activation mediated by IL-1β in alveolar epithelial cells, which requires actin stress fiber formation. Control short hairpin RNA had no effect on these TGF-β1-induced responses. TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Y256 of N-WASP via activation of small Rho GTPase and focal adhesion kinase mediates TGF-β1-induced paracellular permeability and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In vivo, compared with controls, N-WASP down-regulation increases survival and prevents lung edema in mice induced by bleomycin exposure-a lung injury model in which TGF-β1 plays a critical role. Our data indicate that N-WASP plays a crucial role in the development of TGF-β1-mediated acute lung injury by promoting pulmonary edema via regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics.-Wagener, B. M., Hu, M., Zheng, A., Zhao, X., Che, P., Brandon, A., Anjum, N., Snapper, S., Creighton, J., Guan, J.-L., Han, Q., Cai, G.-Q., Han, X., Pittet, J.-F., Ding, Q. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability.

  6. Tumour-derived SPARC drives vascular permeability and extravasation through endothelial VCAM1 signalling to promote metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tichet, Mélanie; Prod'Homme, Virginie; Fenouille, Nina; Ambrosetti, Damien; Mallavialle, Aude; Cerezo, Michael; Ohanna, Mickaël; Audebert, Stéphane; Rocchi, Stéphane; Giacchero, Damien; Boukari, Fériel; Allegra, Maryline; Chambard, Jean-Claude; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Michiels, Jean-François; Borg, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Marcel; Tartare-Deckert, Sophie

    2015-04-30

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier by tumour-derived secreted factors is a critical step in cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. Here, by comparative proteomic analysis of melanoma secretomes, we identify the matricellular protein SPARC as a novel tumour-derived vascular permeability factor. SPARC deficiency abrogates tumour-initiated permeability of lung capillaries and prevents extravasation, whereas SPARC overexpression enhances vascular leakiness, extravasation and lung metastasis. SPARC-induced paracellular permeability is dependent on the endothelial VCAM1 receptor and p38 MAPK signalling. Blocking VCAM1 impedes melanoma-induced endothelial permeability and extravasation. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by high levels of SPARC detected in tumour from human pulmonary melanoma lesions. Our study establishes tumour-produced SPARC and VCAM1 as regulators of cancer extravasation, revealing a novel targetable interaction for prevention of metastasis.

  7. Involvement of Protein Kinase C-δ in Vascular Permeability in Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong J; Jung, Jong P; Park, Soon E; Lee, Minhyun; Kwon, Byungsuk; Cho, Hong R

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary edema is a major cause of mortality due to acute lung injury (ALI). The involvement of protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) in ALI has been a controversial topic. Here we investigated PKC-δ function in ALI using PKC-δ knockout (KO) mice and PKC inhibitors. Our results indicated that although the ability to produce proinflammatory mediators in response to LPS injury in PKC-δ KO mice was similar to that of control mice, they showed enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more severe pulmonary edema. PKC-δ inhibition promoted barrier dysfunction in an endothelial cell layer in vitro, and administration of a PKC-δ-specific inhibitor significantly increased steady state vascular permeability. A neutrophil transmigration assay indicated that the PKC-δ inhibition increased neutrophil transmigration through an endothelial monolayer. This suggests that PKC-δ inhibition induces structural changes in endothelial cells, allowing extravasation of proteins and neutrophils.

  8. Measurement of vascular permeability in spinal cord using Evans Blue spectrophotometry and correction for turbidity.

    PubMed

    Warnick, R E; Fike, J R; Chan, P H; Anderson, D K; Ross, G Y; Gutin, P H

    1995-05-01

    Vascular permeability can be visualized by Evans Blue (EB) extravasation and quantified by spectrophotometry after formamide extraction of the tissue. However, formamide extracts show significant turbidity, which may contribute to the total optical density at the wavelength of measurement (e.g., 620 lambda). We developed a simple method for estimating the component of the total optical density of a dyed specimen contributed by turbidity. Our method, which uses a determination of turbidity made at another point of the light spectrum (740 lambda), was more precise than two other EB quantification techniques. We therefore recommend it for individual correction of formamide extracts of spinal cord specimens. The application of this technique to the brain remains to be determined.

  9. Cardiopulmonary bypass increases pulmonary microvascular permeability through the Src kinase pathway: Involvement of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNWEN; JIANG, ZHAOLEI; BAO, CHUNRONG; MEI, JU; ZHU, JIAQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Changes in pulmonary microvascular permeability following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB and the underlying mechanism. The pulmonary microvascular permeability was measured using Evans Blue dye (EBD) exclusion, and the neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine secretion was investigated. In addition, the activation of Src kinase and the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) was examined. The results revealed that CPB increased pulmonary microvascular leakage, neutrophil count and proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and activated Src kinase. The administration of PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase, decreased the activation of Src kinase and attenuated the increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability observed following CPB. Two important proteins associated with vascular permeability, caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin, were significantly activated at 24 h in the lung tissues following CPB, which correlated with the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability and Src kinase. PP2 administration inhibited their activation, suggesting that they are downstream factors of Src kinase activation. The data indicated that the Src kinase pathway increased pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB, and the activation of caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin may be involved. Inhibition of this pathway may provide a potential therapy for acute lung injury following cardiac surgery. PMID:26847917

  10. Differential permeability of uterine and liver vascular beds to estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Verheugen, C; Pardridge, W M; Judd, H L; Chaudhuri, G

    1984-12-01

    The role of capillary membrane permeability and the effect of plasma protein binding on the influx of unconjugated and conjugated estrogens into a target organ, the uterus, and a metabolic organ, the liver, were studied in anesthetized rats. In the absence of plasma proteins, estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) were freely diffusible through the uterine capillaries, but influx was significantly reduced for estriol (E3) and estetrol. In the uterus, the influx of the conjugated estrogens was markedly restricted and approximated the influx of dextran, a vascular space marker. The polarity of the compound (based on the number of hydrogen bond-forming functional groups and the presence of charged groups) appeared to predict uterine endothelial membrane permeability better than the octanol/Ringer's partition coefficient. In contrast to the selective permeability properties of the uterine endothelial barrier, the limiting membrane lining the hepatic microcirculation, the hepatocyte cell membrane, was highly permeable to all unconjugated and conjugated estrogens. The addition of 4% albumin to the injection solution led to a significant inhibition of uterine influx of E2, but not E1 or E3. In the liver, only the influx of E1 sulfate was slightly diminished by 4% albumin. In all cases, the influx of estrogens greatly exceeded the rate that would be expected if only the fraction that was free (dialyzable) in vitro was diffusible in vivo. Human sera containing sex hormone-binding globulin and albumin caused inhibition of influx of E1 and E2 through the uterine capillary barriers, whereas in the liver, the influx of E2 sulfate, and E3 glucuronide were diminished. The results are compatible with a difference in permeability of the microvasculature of the two organs and a differential availability of protein-bound estrogen for influx into liver and uterus. With the exception of E1, which is nearly completely diffusible into both organs, the influx of estrogens and estrogen conjugates

  11. Pirfenidone exhibits cardioprotective effects by regulating myocardial fibrosis and vascular permeability in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kiyoshi; Oka, Toru; Wang, Qi; Ishizu, Takamaru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Miwa, Keiko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sakata, Yasushi; Komuro, Issei

    2015-08-01

    Although cardiac fibrosis causes heart failure, its molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis and examined the effects of the antifibrotic drug pirfenidone (PFD) on chronic heart failure. To understand the responsible mechanisms, we generated an in vivo pressure-overloaded heart failure model via transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and examined the effects of PFD on chronic-phase cardiac fibrosis and function. In the vehicle group, contractile dysfunction and left ventricle fibrosis progressed further from 4 to 8 wk after TAC but were prevented by PFD treatment beginning 4 wk after TAC. We isolated cardiac fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells from the left ventricles of adult male mice and investigated the cell-type-specific effects of PFD. Transforming growth factor-β induced upregulated collagen 1 expression via p38 phosphorylation and downregulated claudin 5 (Cldn5) expression in cardiac fibroblasts and endothelial cells, respectively; both processes were inhibited by PFD. Moreover, PFD inhibited changes in the collagen 1 and Cldn5 expression levels, resulting in reduced fibrosis and serum albumin leakage into the interstitial space during the chronic phase in TAC hearts. In conclusion, PFD inhibited cardiac fibrosis by suppressing both collagen expression and the increased vascular permeability induced by pressure overload.

  12. Effect of forskolin on alterations of vascular permeability induced with bradykinin, prostaglandin E1, adenosine, histamine and carrageenin in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugio, K; Daly, J W

    1983-07-01

    The effect of the diterpene forskolin on vascular permeability alone and in combination with bradykinin, prostaglandin E1, adenosine or histamine has been investigated in rats. Vascular permeability in rat skin was measured using [125I]-labelled bovine serum albumin ([125I]BSA) as a tracer. In addition, the effect of forskolin on footpad edema induced by the injection of a mixture of 2% carrageenin was determined. Forskolin caused a marked potentiation of the increase in vascular permeability in rat skin elicited by the intradermal injection of histamine or bradykinin. However, forskolin caused a significant suppression of the prostaglandin E1-induced vascular permeability response and at a low concentration suppressed the response to adenosine. Forskolin greatly potentiated the footpad edema induced with carrageenin in rats. Intravenous administration of the enzyme bromelain, which reduces plasma kininogen levels, inhibited the footpad edema induced with carrageenin or with a mixture of carrageenin and forskolin. Parenteral administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed the footpad edema induced with carrageenin, but did not inhibit the footpad edema induced with a mixture of carrageenin and forskolin. An antihistamine, cyproheptadine, had no effect on carrageenin-induced footpad edema either in the presence or absence of forskolin. These results suggest that both bradykinin and prostaglandins are essential for the development of carrageenin-induced footpad edema and that bradykinin plays an important role in the potentiative effect of forskolin on footpad edema induced with carrageenin in rats.

  13. PEDF improves cardiac function in rats with acute myocardial infarction via inhibiting vascular permeability and cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Zheng; Feng, Shou-Jie; Xu, Lei; Shi, He-Xian; Chen, Li-Li; Yuan, Guang-Da; Yan, Wei; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Yi-Qian; Zhang, Zhong-Ming; Dong, Hong-Yan

    2015-03-11

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a pleiotropic gene with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-angiogenic properties. However, recent reports about the effects of PEDF on cardiomyocytes are controversial, and it is not known whether and how PEDF acts to inhibit hypoxic or ischemic endothelial injury in the heart. In the present study, adult Sprague-Dawley rat models of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were surgically established. PEDF-small interfering RNA (siRNA)-lentivirus (PEDF-RNAi-LV) or PEDF-LV was delivered into the myocardium along the infarct border to knockdown or overexpress PEDF, respectively. Vascular permeability, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarct size and animal cardiac function were analyzed. We also evaluated PEDF's effect on the suppression of the endothelial permeability and cardiomyocyte apoptosis under hypoxia in vitro. The results indicated that PEDF significantly suppressed the vascular permeability and inhibited hypoxia-induced endothelial permeability through PPARγ-dependent tight junction (TJ) production. PEDF protected cardiomyocytes against ischemia or hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro via preventing the activation of caspase-3. We also found that PEDF significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and enhanced cardiac function in rats with AMI. These data suggest that PEDF could protect cardiac function from ischemic injury, at least by means of reducing vascular permeability, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and myocardial infarct size.

  14. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability.

  15. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability. PMID:20954712

  16. Measurement of injectivity indexes in geothermal wells with two permeable zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acuna, Jorge A.

    1994-01-20

    Injectivity tests in wells with two permeable zones and internal flow is analyzed in order to include the usually severe thermal transient effects. A theoretical analysis is performed and a method devised to obtain information from the thermal transient, provided that temperature is measured simultaneously with pressure. The technique is illustrated with two real tests performed at Miravalles, Costa Rica. It allows to estimate total injectivity index as well as the injectivity index of each one of the two zones separately. Correct position of measuring tools and nature of spontaneous internal flow is also discussed.

  17. Effect of nitroglycerin administration on cardio-ankle vascular index

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Mao; Sato, Shuji; Noike, Hirofumi; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference between effects of nitroglycerin (NTG) on the functional stiffness in patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) using a newly developed stiffness index, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Subjects and methods The two subject groups in this study were normal controls (n=31) and CAD patients (n=25). The normal controls had no medical history and were not on regular medications. On the other hand, the CAD patients had received various treatments like antihypertensive drugs, hypoglycemic agents, and statins. This study was conducted in CAD patients under medications. After a single sublingual administration of NTG 0.3 mg, CAVI, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured every 5 minutes for 20 minutes. Comparisons of each parameter before and after taking NTG were evaluated for statistical significance using analysis of variance and post hoc tests. Tukey–Kramer test was used for post hoc comparisons. Results In the normal controls, CAVI significantly decreased from baseline after 5, 10, and 15 minutes (from 6.5±0.9 to 5.2±0.9, 5.5±0.9, and 5.7±0.9, respectively). Systolic BP and HR were not significantly changed. Diastolic BP significantly decreased from baseline after 5 and 10 minutes (from 72±8 to 64±9 and 63±9 mmHg, respectively). On the other hand, CAVI, HR, and diastolic BP were not changed significantly in CAD patients. Systolic BP was significantly decreased from baseline after 5, 10, and 15 minutes (from 147±16 to 131±14, 129±12, and 129±13 mmHg, respectively). In the comparison of the two groups, ΔCAVI was not significantly different between the normal controls and CAD patients (−1.4±0.7 vs −1.4±0.9, −1.1±0.7 vs −1.4±1.0, −0.8±0.7 vs −1.2±1.0, and −0.5±0.7 vs −1.1±1.0 at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes, respectively). ΔHR was not significantly different between the two groups. ΔSystolic BP in the CAD patients was significantly higher than

  18. Asef controls vascular endothelial permeability and barrier recovery in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Meng, Fanyong; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in injured lungs may reflect a compensatory response to diminish acute lung injury (ALI). HGF-induced activation of Rac1 GTPase stimulates endothelial barrier protective mechanisms. This study tested the involvement of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in HGF-induced endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal dynamics and barrier protection in vitro and in a two-hit model of ALI. HGF induced membrane translocation of Asef and stimulated Asef Rac1-specific nucleotide exchange activity. Expression of constitutively activated Asef mutant mimicked HGF-induced peripheral actin cytoskeleton enhancement. In contrast, siRNA-induced Asef knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Asef attenuated HGF-induced Rac1 activation evaluated by Rac-GTP pull down and FRET assay with Rac1 biosensor. Molecular inhibition of Asef attenuated HGF-induced peripheral accumulation of cortactin, formation of lamellipodia-like structures, and enhancement of VE-cadherin adherens junctions and compromised HGF-protective effect against thrombin-induced RhoA GTPase activation, Rho-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling, and EC permeability. Intravenous HGF injection attenuated lung inflammation and vascular leak in the two-hit model of ALI induced by excessive mechanical ventilation and thrombin signaling peptide TRAP6. This effect was lost in Asef−/− mice. This study shows for the first time the role of Asef in HGF-mediated protection against endothelial hyperpermeability and lung injury. PMID:25518936

  19. Dissociation of cutaneous vascular permeability and the development of cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keahey, T.M.; Indrisano, J.; Kaliner, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    Cutaneous late-phase allergic reactions (LPR) are characterized by an early, immediate hypersensitivity whealing reaction followed by persistent, localized induration that peaks 6 to 8 hours later. In this study we used rodents to examine the relationship between vascular permeability (VP) and induration during LPR. Efflux of macromolecular tracers from the vasculature into skin was measured with the use of radiolabeled albumin and neutral dextran tracers having large molecular radii. To induce LPR immunologically, we used either intradermal injections of antirat IgE or passive cutaneous sensitization with IgE antidinitrophenyl followed 24 hours later by intravenous injection of albumin-dinitrophenyl. (/sup 125/I)albumin and (/sup 3/H)dextran tracers were injected intravenously before and at various intervals after the induction of LPR. Although a marked increase in VP occurred within the first 30 minutes after induction of mast cell degranulation, analysis of radiolabeled tracer accumulation at 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours failed to demonstrate any further increase in VP. These findings indicate that the induration observed in rodent LPR is not associated with increased VP beyond the immediate hypersensitivity stage and suggest that impairment of lymphatic drainage, cellular infiltration, and/or fibrin deposition are contributing factors.

  20. Asef controls vascular endothelial permeability and barrier recovery in the lung.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Meng, Fanyong; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-02-15

    Increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in injured lungs may reflect a compensatory response to diminish acute lung injury (ALI). HGF-induced activation of Rac1 GTPase stimulates endothelial barrier protective mechanisms. This study tested the involvement of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in HGF-induced endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal dynamics and barrier protection in vitro and in a two-hit model of ALI. HGF induced membrane translocation of Asef and stimulated Asef Rac1-specific nucleotide exchange activity. Expression of constitutively activated Asef mutant mimicked HGF-induced peripheral actin cytoskeleton enhancement. In contrast, siRNA-induced Asef knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Asef attenuated HGF-induced Rac1 activation evaluated by Rac-GTP pull down and FRET assay with Rac1 biosensor. Molecular inhibition of Asef attenuated HGF-induced peripheral accumulation of cortactin, formation of lamellipodia-like structures, and enhancement of VE-cadherin adherens junctions and compromised HGF-protective effect against thrombin-induced RhoA GTPase activation, Rho-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling, and EC permeability. Intravenous HGF injection attenuated lung inflammation and vascular leak in the two-hit model of ALI induced by excessive mechanical ventilation and thrombin signaling peptide TRAP6. This effect was lost in Asef(-/-) mice. This study shows for the first time the role of Asef in HGF-mediated protection against endothelial hyperpermeability and lung injury. PMID:25518936

  1. Dengue virus NS1 triggers endothelial permeability and vascular leak that is prevented by NS1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beatty, P Robert; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Glasner, Dustin R; Hopkins, Kaycie; Harris, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to DENV4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause up to ~100 million cases of dengue annually worldwide. Severe disease is thought to result from immunopathogenic processes involving serotype cross-reactive antibodies and T cells that together induce vasoactive cytokines, causing vascular leakage that leads to shock. However, no viral proteins have been directly implicated in triggering endothelial permeability, which results in vascular leakage. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is secreted and circulates in patients' blood during acute infection; high levels of NS1 are associated with severe disease. We show that inoculation of mice with DENV NS1 alone induces both vascular leakage and production of key inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, simultaneous administration of NS1 with a sublethal dose of DENV2 results in a lethal vascular leak syndrome. We also demonstrate that NS1 from DENV1, DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4 triggers endothelial barrier dysfunction, causing increased permeability of human endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. These pathogenic effects of physiologically relevant amounts of NS1 in vivo and in vitro were blocked by NS1-immune polyclonal mouse serum or monoclonal antibodies to NS1, and immunization of mice with NS1 from DENV1 to DENV4 protected against lethal DENV2 challenge. These findings add an important and previously overlooked component to the causes of dengue vascular leak, identify a new potential target for dengue therapeutics, and support inclusion of NS1 in dengue vaccines. PMID:26355030

  2. Effect of oxymetazoline nose drops on vascular permeability of the nasal mucosa in the rabbit after provocation with leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Bende, M; Hansell, P; Intaglietta, M; Arfors, K E

    1992-01-01

    The effects of oxymetazoline nose drops on the vascular permeability of the nasal mucosa in a provoked inflammatory reaction was studied in anesthetized rabbits. Vascular permeability (125I-albumin) was 53% higher in the leukotriene B4-provoked nostril (LTB4) compared with the vehicle-treated contralateral nostril (p < 0.05). The amount of secretions was, however, not different from the vehicle-treated side. The LTB4-induced increase in permeability was decreased by 22% when oxymetazoline was introduced (p < 0.05), and the amount of secretions was reduced by 22% (p < 0.01). The effect of oxymetazoline on the vascular permeability of the nasal mucosa can be attributed to a vascular constriction (decrease in blood flow) and/or a change in the permeability characteristics. The LTB4-induced increase in vascular permeability was not attenuated by the monoclonal antibody IB4 directed against the neutrophil adhesion complex CD11/CD18. The latter suggests that LTB4-induced vascular permeability does not require CD18-mediated neutrophil adherence in the nasal mucosa.

  3. Lack of adrenomedullin in mouse endothelial cells results in defective angiogenesis, enhanced vascular permeability, less metastasis, and more brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a vasodilating peptide involved in the regulation of circulatory homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of certain cardiovascular diseases. AM plays critical roles in blood vessels, including regulation of vascular stability and permeability. To elucidate the autocrine/paracrine function of AM in endothelial cells (EC) in vivo, a conditional knockout of AM in EC (AMEC-KO) was used. The amount of vascularization of the matrigel implants was lower in AMEC-KO mice indicating a defective angiogenesis. Moreover, ablation of AM in EC revealed increased vascular permeability in comparison with wild type (WT) littermates. In addition, AMEC-KO lungs exhibited significantly less tumor growth than littermate WT mice using a syngeneic model of metastasis. Furthermore, following middle cerebral artery permanent occlusion, there was a significant infarct size decrease in animals lacking endothelial AM when compared to their WT counterparts. AM is an important regulator of EC function, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and brain response to ischemia. Studies of AM should bring novel approaches to the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27640364

  4. Lack of adrenomedullin in mouse endothelial cells results in defective angiogenesis, enhanced vascular permeability, less metastasis, and more brain damage.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a vasodilating peptide involved in the regulation of circulatory homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of certain cardiovascular diseases. AM plays critical roles in blood vessels, including regulation of vascular stability and permeability. To elucidate the autocrine/paracrine function of AM in endothelial cells (EC) in vivo, a conditional knockout of AM in EC (AM(EC-KO)) was used. The amount of vascularization of the matrigel implants was lower in AM(EC-KO) mice indicating a defective angiogenesis. Moreover, ablation of AM in EC revealed increased vascular permeability in comparison with wild type (WT) littermates. In addition, AM(EC-KO) lungs exhibited significantly less tumor growth than littermate WT mice using a syngeneic model of metastasis. Furthermore, following middle cerebral artery permanent occlusion, there was a significant infarct size decrease in animals lacking endothelial AM when compared to their WT counterparts. AM is an important regulator of EC function, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and brain response to ischemia. Studies of AM should bring novel approaches to the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27640364

  5. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  6. Expression of vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor by human granulosa and theca lutein cells. Role in corpus luteum development.

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, B. R.; Brown, L. F.; Manseau, E. J.; Senger, D. R.; Dvorak, H. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) is a cytokine that is overexpressed in many tumors, in healing wounds, and in rheumatoid arthritis. VPF/VEGF is thought to induce angiogenesis and accompanying connective tissue stroma in two ways: 1), by increasing microvascular permeability, thereby modifying the extracellular matrix and 2), as an endothelial cell mitogen. VPF/VEGF has been reported in animal corpora lutea and we investigated the possibility that it might be present in human ovaries and have a role in corpus luteum formation. We here report that VPF/VEGF mRNA and protein are expressed by human ovarian granulosa and theca cells late in follicle development and, subsequent to ovulation, by granulosa and theca lutein cells. Therefore, VPF/VEGF is ideally positioned to provoke the increased permeability of thecal blood vessels that occurs shortly before ovulation. VPF/VEGF likely also contributes to the angiogenesis and connective tissue stroma generation that accompany corpus luteum/corpus albicans formation. Finally, VPF/VEGF was overexpressed in the hyperthecotic ovarian stroma of Stein-Leventhal syndrome in which it may also have a pathophysiological role. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7531945

  7. The inhibition of advanced glycation end-products-induced retinal vascular permeability by silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sheikpranbabu, Sardarpasha; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Eom, Soo Hyun; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-03-01

    The increased permeability of the blood-retinal barrier is known to occur in patients with diabetes, and this defect contributes to retinal edema. This study aimed to determine the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)-induced endothelial cell permeability. Cultured porcine retinal endothelial cells (PRECs) were exposed to AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) and the endothelial cell permeability was detected by measuring the flux of RITC-dextran across the PREC monolayers. We found that AGE-BSA increased the dextran flux across a PREC monolayer and Ag-NPs blocked the solute flux induced by AGE-BSA. In order to understand the underlying signaling mechanism of Ag-NPs on the inhibitory effect of AGE-BSA-induced permeability, we demonstrated that Ag-NPs could inhibit the AGE-BSA-induced permeability via Src kinase pathway. AGE-BSA also increased the PREC permeability by stimulating the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and decreased the expression of occludin and ZO-1. Further, Ag-NPs inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced permeability by increased expression of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, co-incident with an increase in barrier properties of endothelial monolayer. Together, our results indicate that Ag-NPs could possibly act as potent anti-permeability molecule by targeting the Src signaling pathway and tight junction proteins and it offers potential targets to inhibit the ocular related diseases. PMID:19963272

  8. Superconducting artificial materials with a negative permittivity, a negative permeability, or a negative index of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Michael Christopher

    Artificial materials are media made of inclusions such that the sizes and spacing of the inclusions is much smaller than the incident electromagnetic radiation. This allows a medium to act as an effective bulk medium to electromagnetic radiation. Artificial materials can be tailored to produce desired values of the permittivity, permeability, and index of refraction at specific frequencies. The applications of this tailoring include electromagnetic cloaking, and, theoretically, subwavelength imaging resolution. However, the success of these applications depends on their sensitivity to loss. This research uses superconducting niobium (Nb) metals to create arrays of wires, split-ring resonators, and a combination of wires and split-ring resonators, with very low loss. These arrays are used to investigate properties of a medium with an index of refraction that contains a bandwidth of frequency where the real part is negative. The Nb wire arrays produce a frequency bandwidth with a negative real part of the permittivity, while the Nb split-ring resonators produce a frequency bandwidth with a negative real part of the permeability. The combination of Nb wires and Nb split-ring resonators creates an artificial medium with a negative real part of the index of refraction. The electromagnetic transmission of the wires, split-ring resonators, and combination medium is measured in a waveguide as a function of frequency, and models of the permittivity and permeability are used to fit this data. For a single Nb split-ring resonator, the change in the resonant frequency and quality factor with temperature is measured and fit with a two-fluid model of superconductivity. The change in the resonant frequency and quality factor with an applied dc H field and applied power is also measured and compared to, respectively, magneto-optical imaging and laser scanning photoresponse measurements. Bianisotropy and perturbations in the resonant frequency are investigated, and simulated with

  9. Protective effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide-induced monocytic adhesion and vascular endothelial permeability through regulation of vascular endothelial cadherin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, W N; Han, H Z; Xie, K L; Wang, G L; Yu, Y H

    2015-06-11

    We observed the effect of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and permeability of the endothelium. Endotheliocytes were inoculated on 6-well plates and randomly divided into 4 groups: control, H2, LPS, LPS+H2, H2, and LPS+H2 in saturated hydrogen-rich medium. We applied Wright's stain-ing to observe conglutination of hyaline leukocytes and HUVECs, flow cytometry to determine the content of vascular cell adhesion protein 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the E-selectin concentration in the cell liquor, the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) to test the permeability of endothelial cells, and Western blot and immunofluorescence to test the expression and distribution of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Compared with control cells, there was an increase in endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin, and the TEER value increased obviously. Compared with LPS, there was an obvious reduction in the conglutination of LPS+H2 cells, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin levels, and a reduction in the TEER-resistance value, while the expression of VE-cadherin increased. Fluorescence results showed that, compared with control cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS cells was in-complete at the cell joints. Compared with LPS cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS+H2 cells was even and complete at the cell joints. Liquid rich in hydrogen could reduce LPS-induced production of adhesion molecules and endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and influence the expression and distribution of VE-cadherin to regulate the permeability of the endothelium.

  10. Duration of action of topical antiallergy drugs in a Guinea pig model of histamine-induced conjunctival vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Clay; Stephens, Donna; Roberts, Leighann; Gamache, Daniel; Yanni, John

    2007-08-01

    The topical application of 0.1% olopatadine has been shown to provide significant attenuation of histamine-induced conjunctival vascular permeability (CVP) within 5 min and for as long as 24 h following a topical administration. The duration of the action of olopatadine was compared to that of epinastine, azelastine, and ketotifen. Male Hartley outbred guinea pigs (weighing 250-300 g) were administered a drug or vehicle as single O.D. topical drops, at times ranging from 4 to 24 h prior to histamine challenge. One (1) h prior to histamine challenge, the animals were administered 1 mL of Evans blue dye (1 mg/mL) through the marginal ear vein. Histamine (300 ng) was administered by a subconjunctival injection, and the guinea pigs were sacrificed 30 min later. CVP was assessed as the area and color intensity stained with Evans blue dye. The potencies of each drug were determined by calculating a 50% effective dose (ED(50)) for the inhibition of vascular leakage, compared to vehicle treatment, at each time point. Olopatadine was the only compound tested that was significantly effective 16 h following a single topical application. The ED(50) for olopatadine at 16 h was 0.031%. Epinastine, azelastine, and ketotifen were only significantly effective for up to 4 h. Olopatadine exhibited the longest duration of action for inhibition of histamine-induced vascular permeability in guinea pigs of any topical antiallergic drug tested. Concentrations of olopatadine, which provided a greater than 50% inhibition of the histamine-induced vascular response, were consistently less than 0.1% over a 16-h pretreatment interval.

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of vascular morphology, blood volume and transvascular permeability using SPION-based, dual-contrast MRI: imaging optimization and feasibility test.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heon-Ju; Shim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Gyunggoo; Cho, Hyung Joon; Jung, Hoe Su; Lee, Chang Kyung; Lee, Yong Seok; Baek, Jin Hee; Kim, Eun Ju; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Sung, Yu Sub; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Young Ro; Kim, Jeong Kon

    2015-06-01

    Exploiting ultrashort-T(E) (UTE) MRI, T1-weighted positive contrast can be obtained from superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), which are widely used as a robust T2-weighted, negative contrast agent on conventional MR images. Our study was designed (a) to optimize the dual-contrast MRI method using SPIONs and (b) to validate the feasibility of simultaneously evaluating the vascular morphology, blood volume and transvascular permeability using the dual-contrast effect of SPIONs. All studies were conducted using 3 T MRI. According to numerical simulation, 0.15 mM was the optimal blood SPION concentration for visualizing the positive contrast effect using UTE MRI (T(E) = 0.09 ms), and a flip angle of 40° could provide sufficient SPION-induced enhancement and acceptable measurement noise for UTE MR angiography. A pharmacokinetic study showed that this concentration can be steadily maintained from 30 to 360 min after the injection of 29 mg/kg of SPIONs. An in vivo study using these settings displayed image quality and CNR of SPION-enhanced UTE MR angiography (image quality score 3.5; CNR 146) comparable to those of the conventional, Gd-enhanced method (image quality score 3.8; CNR 148) (p > 0.05). Using dual-contrast MR images obtained from SPION-enhanced UTE and conventional spin- and gradient-echo methods, the transvascular permeability (water exchange index 1.76-1.77), cerebral blood volume (2.58-2.60%) and vessel caliber index (3.06-3.10) could be consistently quantified (coefficient of variation less than 9.6%; Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement 0.886-1.111) and were similar to the literature values. Therefore, using the optimized setting of combined SPION-based MRI techniques, the vascular morphology, blood volume and transvascular permeability can be comprehensively evaluated during a single session of MR examination. PMID:25865029

  12. Crosstalk between ACE2 and PLGF regulates vascular permeability during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lantao; Li, Yong; Qin, Hao; Xing, Dong; Su, Jie; Hu, Zhenjie

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI), through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII) and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with placental growth factor (PLGF) remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and PLGF in ALI model in mice. We used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of PLGF in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5 µg/kg Visudyne. PLGF pump or soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) pump was given to augment or suppress PLGF effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. We found that ACE2 treatment did not alter PLGF levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of PLGF on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic PLGF abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. On the other hand, suppression of PLGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Thus, ACE2 may antagonize the PLGF-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI. PMID:27158411

  13. Stress-induced dura vascular permeability does not develop in mast cell-deficient and neurokinin-1 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Gheorghe, Daniela; Priller, Josef; Esposito, Pamela; Huang, Man; Gerard, Norma; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2003-08-01

    Migraine headaches are often precipitated by stress and seem to involve neurogenic inflammation (NI) of the dura mater associated with the sensation of throbbing pain. Trigeminal nerve stimulation had been reported to activate rat dura mast cells and increase vascular permeability, effects inhibited by neonatal pretreatment with capsaicin implicating sensory neuropeptides, such as substance P (SP). The aim of the present study was to investigate NI, assessed by extravasation of 99-Technetium-gluceptate (99Tc-G), as well as the role of mast cells, SP and its receptor (NK-1R) in dura mater of mice in response to acute stress. Restraint stress for thirty min significantly increased 99Tc-G extravasation in the dura mater of C57BL mice. This effect was absent in W/W(v) mast cell-deficient mice and NK-1 receptor knockout mice (NK-1R-/-), but was unaltered in SP knockout mice (SP-/-). Acute restraint stress also resulted in increased dura mast cell activation in C57BL mice, but not in NK-1R-/- mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that acute stress triggers NI and mast cell activation in mouse dura mater through the activation of NK-1 receptors. The fact that SP-/- mice had intact vascular permeability response to stress indicates that some other NK-1 receptor agonist may substitute for SP. These results may help explain initial events in pathogenesis of stress-induced migraines.

  14. Angiomodulin, a marker of cancer vasculature, is upregulated by vascular endothelial growth factor and increases vascular permeability as a ligand of integrin αvβ3

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Eriko; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Naoko; Ise, Marii; Higashi, Shouichi; Miyagi, Yohei; Miyazaki, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Angiomodulin (AGM) is a member of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) superfamily and often called IGFBP-rP1 or IGFBP-7. AGM was originally identified as a tumor-derived cell adhesion factor, which was highly accumulated in blood vessels of human cancer tissues. AGM is also overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and activates fibroblasts. However, some studies have shown tumor-suppressing activity of AGM. To understand the roles of AGM in cancer progression, we here investigated the expression of AGM in benign and invasive breast cancers and its functions in cancer vasculature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that AGM was highly expressed in cancer vasculature even in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as compared to normal vasculature, while its expression in CAFs was more prominent in invasive carcinomas than DCIS. In vitro analyses showed that AGM was strongly induced by vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) in vascular endothelial cells. Although AGM stimulated neither the growth nor migration of endothelial cells, it supported efficient adhesion of endothelial cells. Integrin αvβ3 was identified as a novel major receptor for AGM in vascular endothelial cells. AGM retracted endothelial cells by inducing actin stress fibers and loosened their VE-cadherin-mediated intercellular junction. Consequently, AGM increased vascular permeability both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AGM and integrin αvβ3 were highly expressed and colocalized in cancer vasculature. These results suggest that AGM cooperates with VEGF to induce the aberrant functions of cancer vasculature as a ligand of integrin αvβ3. PMID:24737780

  15. Strong expression of kinase insert domain-containing receptor, a vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor in AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma and cutaneous angiosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L. F.; Tognazzi, K.; Dvorak, H. F.; Harrist, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF), also known as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), plays an important role in the angiogenesis associated with the growth of many human and animal tumors. VPF/VEGF stimulates endothelial cell growth and increases microvascular permeability by interacting with two endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptors, KDR and flt-1. We studied 16 cases of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), 2 cases of cutaneous angiosarcoma, and 6 cases of capillary hemangioma by in situ hybridization for expression of VPF/VEGF, KDR, and flt-1 mRNAs. We also performed immunohistochemical staining for VPF/VEGF protein in 15 cases. Tumor cells in KS and angiosarcoma strongly expressed KDR but not flt-1 mRNA. Endothelial cells in small stromal vessels in and around these tumors strongly expressed both KDR and flt-1 mRNAs. Tumor cells expressed VPF/VEGF mRNA strongly in only one case of KS, adjacent to an area of necrosis. This was also the only case in which the tumor cells stained substantially for VPF/VEGF protein. VPF/VEGF mRNA and protein were, however, strongly expressed by squamous epithelium in areas of hyperplasia and near areas of ulceration overlying tumors. VPF/VEGF mRNA was also expressed focally at lower levels by infiltrating inflammatory cells, probably macrophages. The strong expression of both KDR and flt-1 in small stromal vessels in and around tumors suggests that VPF/VEGF may be an important regulator of the edema and angiogenesis seen in these tumors. The strong expression of KDR by tumor cells in KS and angiosarcoma implies that VPF/VEGF may also have a direct effect on tumor cells. Tumor cells in four of six capillary hemangiomas strongly expressed both KDR and flt-1 mRNAs in contrast to the high level expression of only KDR observed in the malignant vascular tumors studied. Neither VPF/VEGF mRNA or protein were strongly expressed in capillary hemangiomas. VPF/VEGF and its receptors may play an important but as yet incompletely

  16. Src inhibitor reduces permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevents bone destruction in steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Pan, Xiaohua; Li, Defang; Tang, Tao; Chen, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    To examine the therapeutic effect of Src inhibitor on the VEGF mediating vascular hyperpermeability and bone destruction within steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Rabbits with high risk for progress to destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis were selected according to our published protocol. The selected rabbits were systemically administrated with either Anti-VEGF antibody (Anti-VEGF Group) or Src inhibitor (Src-Inhibition Group) or VEGF (VEGF-Supplement Group) or a combination of VEGF and Src inhibitor (Supplement & Inhibition Group) or control vehicle (Control Group) for 4 weeks. At 0, 2 and 4 weeks after administration, in vivo dynamic MRI, micro-CT based-angiography, histomorphometry and immunoblotting were employed to evaluate the vascular and skeletal events in different groups. The incidence of the destructive repair in the Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group was all significantly lower than that in the Control Group. The angiogenesis was promoted in VEGF-Supplement Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group, while the hyperpermeability was inhibited in Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. The trabecular structure was improved in Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. Src inhibitor could reduce permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevent destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PMID:25748225

  17. Genetic delivery of bevacizumab to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-06-01

    High-permeability pulmonary edema causing acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality. Using a model of intratracheal adenovirus (Ad)-mediated overexpression of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A(165) in mouse lung to induce alveolar permeability and consequent pulmonary edema, we hypothesized that systemic administration of a second adenoviral vector expressing an anti-VEGF antibody (AdalphaVEGFAb) would protect the lung from pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was induced in mice by intratracheal administration of AdVEGFA165. To evaluate anti-VEGF antibody therapy, the mice were treated intravenously with AdalphaVEGFAb, an adenoviral vector encoding the light and heavy chains of an anti-human VEGF antibody with the bevacizumab (Avastin) antigen-binding site. Lung VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 levels, histology, lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of total protein were assessed. Administration of AdalphaVEGFAb to mice decreased AdVEGFA165-induced levels of human VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGFR-2 in the lung. Histological analysis of AdalphaVEGFAb-treated mice demonstrated a reduction of edema fluid in the lung tissue that correlated with a reduction of lung wet-to-dry ratios and BALF total protein levels. Importantly, administration of AdalphaVEGFAb 48 hr after induction of pulmonary edema with AdVEGFA165 was effective in suppressing pulmonary edema. Administration of an adenoviral vector encoding an anti-VEGF antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab effectively suppresses VEGF-A(165)-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema, suggesting that anti-VEGF antibody therapy may represent a novel therapy for high-permeability pulmonary edema.

  18. Role of actin and myosin in the control of paracellular permeability in pig, rat and human vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Schnittler, H J; Wilke, A; Gress, T; Suttorp, N; Drenckhahn, D

    1990-01-01

    1. We have investigated the endothelial actomyosin system with particular emphasis on its possible role in actively opening a paracellular route for permeability. 2. Actin and myosin comprised 16% of total endothelial protein with a molar actin/myosin ratio of 16.2 which is close to the actin/myosin ratio of muscle (studies on freshly isolated pig pulmonary arterial endothelial cells, PAEC). 3. By immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels the bulk of actin and myosin was colocalized in close vicinity to the intercellular clefts of both micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells in situ and in vitro. 4. Calcium-ionophore-induced rise in permeability of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC) and PAEC monolayers grown on filters in a two-chamber permeability system was caused by opening of intercellular gaps. Gap formation depended on the rise in intracellular Ca2+ and could be blocked by the calmodulin-binding drugs trifluperazine (TFP) and W7. 5. In skinned monolayers of cultured PAEC and in isolated sheets of HUVEC gap formation was shown to require ATP and occurred only when free myosin binding sites were available on endothelial actin filaments (experiments with myosin subfragment 1 modified by N-ethylmaleimide, S1-NEM). 6. These experiments suggest that actin and myosin in endothelial cells play a central role in regulating the width of the intercellular clefts, thereby controlling the paracellular pathway of vascular permeability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2100310

  19. Vascular permeability changes in the central nervous system of rats with hyperacute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis induced with the aid of a substance from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, R K; Munoz, J J; Portis, J L

    1978-01-01

    Development of hyperacute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats after intraperitoneal administration of a mixture of guinea pig spinal cord emulsion and pertussigen from Bordetella pertussis was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability in the central nervous system. The increased permeability was most striking in the spinal cord and seemed to be associated with the ascending development of paralysis. Rats that had completely recovered from paralysis did not have any increased permeability in the central nervous system. Rats which developed paralysis after inoculation with either guinea pig spinal cord emulsion alone or with complete Freund adjuvant had only a small degree, if any, of increased permeability in the vascular system of the central nervous system. Images PMID:211087

  20. Vascular Physiology according to Clinical Scenario in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Evaluation using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Mori, Kento; Kikuchi, Shohei; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness may be an important cause of acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical scenario (CS), which classifies the pathophysiology of AHF based on the initial systolic blood pressure (sBP), was proposed to provide the most appropriate therapy for AHF patients. In CS, elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, has been considered as a feature of patients categorized as CS1 (sBP > 140 mmHg at initial presentation). However, whether elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, is present in such patients has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we assessed aortic stiffness in AHF patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), which is considered to be independent of instantaneous blood pressure. Sixty-four consecutive AHF patients (mean age, 70.6 ± 12.8 years; 39 men) were classified with CS, based on their initial sBP: CS1: sBP > 140 mmHg (n = 29); CS2: sBP 100-140 mmHg (n = 22); and CS3: sBP < 100 mmHg (n = 13). There were significant group differences in CAVI (CS1 vs. CS2 vs. CS3: 9.7 ± 1.4 vs. 8.4 ± 1.7 vs. 8.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.006, analysis of variance). CAVI was significantly higher in CS1 than in CS2 (p = 0.02) and CS3 (p = 0.04). CAVI did not significantly correlate with sBP at the time of measurement of CAVI (r = 0.24 and p = 0.06). Aortic stiffness assessed using blood pressure-independent methodology apparently increased in CS1 AHF patients. We conclude that vascular failure is a feature of CS1 AHF initiation. PMID:27594650

  1. Differential expression and selective localization of vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor in the rat uterus during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Karuri, A R; Kumar, A M; Mukhopadhyay, D

    1998-12-01

    This study examines the expression of the multi-functional cytokine, vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) in the rat uterus during early proestrus, proestrus, estrus and diestrus. Groups of ovariectomized or hypophysectomized rats served as endocrine controls. Expression of VPF/VEGF mRNA was 2-fold greater in uteri during proestrus and estrus than in other phases of the estrous cycle. In situ hybridization techniques indicated that VPF/VEGF mRNA expression was confined to the luminal epithelium during proestrus, but shifted to the stromal compartment during estrus. Ovariectomized, hypophysectomized or diestrus rats exhibited scattered localization of VPF/VEGF mRNA among glandular epithelium and endometrial stromal compartments. Although VPF/VEGF mRNA was expressed throughout the estrous cycle, but in different compartments of the endometrium depending on the stage of the estrous cycle, VPF/VEGF protein expression appears to be restricted to the epithelial compartment during proestrus and estrus. Results indicate that circulating levels of gonadal steroids and LH may be associated with the differential expression of VPF/VEGF mRNA and its translation activity in the endometrium during different stages of the estrous cycle.

  2. Characterization of vascular disruption and blood-spinal cord barrier permeability following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figley, Sarah A; Khosravi, Ramak; Legasto, Jean M; Tseng, Yun-Fan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-03-15

    Significant vascular changes occur subsequent to spinal cord injury (SCI), which contribute to progressive pathophysiology. In the present study, we used female Wistar rats (300-350 g) and a 35-g clip-compression injury at T6 to T7 to characterize the spatial and temporal vascular changes that ensue post-SCI. Before sacrifice, animals were injected with vascular tracing dyes (2% Evans Blue (EB) or fluorescein isothiocyanate/Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [FITC-LEA]) to assess blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity or vascular architecture, respectively. Spectrophotometry of EB tissue showed maximal BSCB disruption at 24 h postinjury, with significant disruption observed until 5 days postinjury (p<0.01). FITC-LEA-identified functional vasculature was dramatically reduced by 24 h. Similarly, RECA-1 immunohistochemistry showed a significant decrease in the number of vessels at 24 h postinjury, compared to uninjured animals (p<0.01), with slight increases in endogenous revascularization by 10 days postinjury. White versus gray matter (GM) quantification showed that GM vessels are more susceptible to SCI. Finally, we observed an endogenous angiogenic response between 3 and 7 days postinjury: maximal endothelial cell proliferation was observed at day 5. These data indicate that BSCB disruption and endogenous revascularization occur at specific time points after injury, which may be important for developing effective therapeutic interventions for SCI. PMID:24237182

  3. Amyloid beta-peptide induces cell monolayer albumin permeability, impairs glucose transport, and induces apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, E M; Toborek, M; Mark, R J; Hennig, B; Mattson, M P

    1997-05-01

    Amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) is deposited as insoluble fibrils in the brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neuronal degeneration, cerebral vascular alterations indicative of damage to vascular endothelial cells and disruption of the blood-brain barrier occur in AD. Here we report that A beta25-35 can impair regulatory functions of endothelial cells (ECs) from porcine pulmonary artery and induce their death. Subtoxic exposures to A beta25-35 induced albumin transfer across EC monolayers and impaired glucose transport into ECs. Cell death induced by A beta25-35 was of an apoptotic form, characterized by DNA condensation and fragmentation, and prevented by inhibitors of macromolecular synthesis and endonucleases. The effects of A beta25-35 were specific because A beta1-40 also induced apoptosis in ECs with the apoptotic cells localized to the microenvironment of A beta1-40 aggregates and because astrocytes did not undergo similar changes after exposure to A beta25-35. Damage and death of ECs induced by A beta25-35 were attenuated by antioxidants, a calcium channel blocker, and a chelator of intracellular calcium, indicating the involvement of free radicals and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. The data show that A beta induces increased permeability of EC monolayers to macromolecules, impairs glucose transport, and induces apoptosis. If similar mechanisms are operative in vivo, then A beta and other amyloidogenic peptides may be directly involved in vascular EC damage documented in AD and other disorders that involve vascular amyloid accumulation. PMID:9109512

  4. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  5. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs.

  6. Force control of endothelium permeability in mechanically stressed pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Caluch, Adam; Fodil, Redouane; Féréol, Sophie; Zadigue, Patricia; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) as contributing to alveolo-capillary barrier dysfunction. This study aims at elucidating the role of the cytoskeleton (CSK) and cell-matrix adhesion system in the stressed endothelium and more precisely in the loss of integrity of the endothelial barrier. We purposely develop a cellular model made of a monolayer of confluent Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMVECs) whose cytoskeleton (CSK) is directly exposed to sustained cyclic mechanical stress for 1 and 2 h. We used RGD-coated ferromagnetic beads and measured permeability before and after stress application. We find that endothelial permeability increases in the stressed endothelium, hence reflecting a loss of integrity. Structural and mechanical results suggest that this endothelial barrier alteration would be due to physically-founded discrepancies in latero-basal reinforcement of adhesion sites in response to the global increase in CSK stiffness or centripetal intracellular forces. Basal reinforcement of adhesion is presently evidenced by the marked redistribution of αvβ3 integrin with cluster formation in the stressed endothelium. PMID:22766716

  7. The genesis of peritumoral vasogenic brain edema and tumor cysts: a hypothetical role for tumor-derived vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Criscuolo, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Cerebral edema and fluid-filled cysts are common accompaniments of brain tumors. They contribute to the mass effect imposed by the primary tumor and are often responsible for a patient's signs and symptoms. Cerebral edema significantly increases the morbidity associated with tumor biopsy, excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Both edema and cyst formation are thought to result from a deficiency in the blood-brain barrier, with consequent extravasation of water, electrolytes, and plasma proteins from altered tumor microvessels. The resultant expansion of the cerebral interstitial space contributes to the elevated intracranial pressure observed with brain tumors. Departure from the typical blood-brain barrier microvascular architecture may only partially explain the occurrence of edema and tumor cyst formation. Biochemical mediators have also been implicated in vascular extravasation. Vascular permeability factor or vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) is a protein that has recently been isolated from a variety of tumors including human brain tumors. VPFb is an extraordinarily potent inducer of both microvascular extravasation (edemagenesis) and the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). Its role in tumor growth and progression would therefore appear pivotal. Herein, the author presents an updated account of the investigation of VPF. Historical and clinical perspectives of the study and treatment of tumor associated edema are provided. The efficacy of high-dose dexamethasone in the treatment of neoplastic brain edema is discussed. A hypothetical role for VPF in edemagenesis is presented and discussed. It is hoped that an expanded understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the genesis of edema will ultimately facilitate therapeutic intervention. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7516104

  8. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  9. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, M; Schmelzer, J D; Poduslo, J F; Curran, G L; Nickander, K K; Low, P A

    1991-01-01

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, we examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG (25 mg.kg-1.day-1), group II received STZ plus AG (50 mg.kg-1.day-1), group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. We monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to 125I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. We suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:2068089

  10. Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate inhibits ocular neovascularization and vascular permeability in human retinal pigment epithelial and human retinal microvascular endothelial cells via suppression of MMP-9 and VEGF activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Sung; Jun, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Eun-Ha; Koo, Bon Am; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2014-08-13

    Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the main polyphenol component of green tea (leaves of Camellia sinensis). EGCG is known for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Here, we identify EGCG as a new inhibitor of ocular angiogenesis and its vascular permeability. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play a key role in the processes of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and microvascular permeability during angiogenesis. We investigated the inhibitory effects of EGCG on ocular neovascularization and vascular permeability using the retina oriented cells and animal models induced by VEGF and alkaline burn. EGCG treatment significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-9 in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPECs). EGCG also effectively protected ARPE-19 cells from cell death and attenuated mRNA expressions of key angiogenic factors (MMP-9, VEGF, VEGF Receptor-2) by inhibiting generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). EGCG significantly inhibited proliferation, vascular permeability, and tube formation in VEGF-induced human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). Furthermore, EGCG significantly reduced vascular leakage and permeability by blood-retinal barrier breakdown in VEGF-induced animal models. In addition, EGCG effectively limited upregulation of MMP-9 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM/CD31) on corneal neovascularization (CNV) induced by alkaline burn. Our data suggest that MMP-9 and VEGF are key therapeutic targets of EGCG for treatment and prevention of ocular angiogenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and corneal neovascularization.

  11. Silencing of C5a receptor gene with siRNA for protection from Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-ming; Zhu, Shi-ming; Qin, Xiang-jing; Cheng, Zhi-de; Liu, Meng-yuan; Zhang, Hai-mou; Liu, Dong-xu

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction leading to increased permeability and vascular leakage is an underlying cause of several pathological conditions. Whereas these changes have been shown to be associated with activation of the complement system, leading to the release of C5a and interaction of C5a-C5a receptor (C5aR), the role of C5aR in endothelial cells remain(s) ill-defined. Here, we report an essential role of C5aR in endothelial cell injury and vascular permeability through silencing of the C5aR gene using siRNA. In the cultured mouse dermal microvascular endothelial cells (MEMECs) monolayer transfected with C5aR-siRNA, endotoxin-induced cell injury by evaluated as transendothelial flux, cell detachment, and cytoskeletal disorganization was inhibited. Upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was also suppressed. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of siRNA-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-kappaB activation and nuclear localization of both p50 and p65. The effect was associated with inhibition in activation of protein kinase Cdelta(PKC-delta) and induction of PKC-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases-1 (MKP-1) leading to the increased activity of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. In the model of mice administrated with C5aR-siRNA, endotoxin-induced plasma leakage was inhibited in local abdominal skin. Systemic administration of endotoxin to mice resulted in increased microvascular permeability in multiple organs was reduced. These studies demonstrate that the C5aR responsible for vascular endothelial cell injury and plasma permeability is an important factor, and that blockade of C5aR may be useful therapeutic targets for the prevention of vascular permeability in pathogenic condition.

  12. Clinical assessment of arterial stiffness with cardio-ankle vascular index: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Takahara, Akira; Shirai, Kohji

    2015-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is often assessed in clinical medicine, because it is not only an important factor in the pathophysiology of blood circulation but also a marker for the diagnosis and the prognosis of cardiovascular diseases. Many parameters have so far been proposed to quantitatively represent arterial stiffness and distensibility, such as pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep), stiffness parameter (β), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and vascular compliance (Cv). Among these, PWV has been most frequently applied to clinical medicine. However, this is dependent on blood pressure at the time of measurement, and therefore it is not appropriate as a parameter for the clinical evaluation of arterial stiffness, especially for the studies on hypertension. On the contrary, stiffness parameter β is an index reflecting arterial stiffness without the influence of blood pressure. Recently, this parameter has been applied to develop a new arterial stiffness index called cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Although this index is obtained from the PWV between the heart and the ankle, it is essentially similar to the stiffness parameter β, and therefore it does not depend on blood pressure changes during the measurements. CAVI is being extensively used in clinical medicine as a measure for the evaluation of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors related to arteriosclerosis. In the present article, we will explain the theoretical background of stiffness parameter β and the process to obtain CAVI. And then, the clinical utility of CAVI will be overviewed by reference to recent studies.

  13. Cross-talk between the complement and the kinin system in vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Fleur; Peerschke, Ellinor I; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Tedesco, Francesco

    2011-10-30

    The endothelium is a continuous physical barrier that regulates coagulation and selective passage of soluble molecules and circulating cells through the vessel wall into the tissue. Due to its anatomic localization, the endothelium may establish contact with components of the complement, the kinin and the coagulation systems which are the main, though not exclusive, inducers of vascular leakage. Although the complement and the kinin systems may act independently, increasing evidence suggest that there is a crosstalk that involve different components of both systems. Activation is required for the function of the two systems which are involved in pathological conditions such as hereditary and acquired angioedema (AE) and vasculitidis. The aim of this review is to discuss the contribution of complement and kinin systems to vascular leakage and the cross-talk between the two systems in the development of AE. This clinical condition is characterized by episodic and recurrent local edema of subcutaneous and submucosal tissues and is due to inherited or acquired C1-INH deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of the swelling in patients with AE was originally thought to be mediated by C2, ample evidence indicate bradykinin (BK) as the most effective mediator even though the possibility that both the complement and the kinin-forming systems may contribute to the edema has not been completely excluded. BK induces endothelial leakage interacting with B2 receptors but other molecules may be involved in the onset and maintenance of AE. In this review we shall discuss the role of B1 receptors and gC1qR/p33 in addition to that of B2 receptors in the onset of AE attacks and the importance of these receptors as new possible molecular targets for therapy.

  14. Radiation-induced changes in the profile of spinal cord serotonin, prostaglandin synthesis, and vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, T.; Pfeffer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the profile of biochemical and physiological changes induced in the rat spinal cord by radiation, over a period of 8 months. The thoraco-lumbar spinal cords of Fisher rats were irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. The rats were then followed and killed at various times afterward. Serotonin (5-HT) and its major metabolite 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were assayed as well as prostaglandin synthesis. Microvessel permeability was assessed by quantitative evaluation of Evans blue dye extravasation. None of the rats developed neurologic dysfunction, and histologic examination revealed only occasional gliosis in the ventral white matter at 240 days after irradiation. Serotonin levels were unchanged at 2, 14, and 56 days after radiation but increased at 120 and 240 days in the irradiated cord segments when compared to both the nonirradiated thoracic and cervical segments (p < 0.01) and age-matched controls (p < 0.03). The calculated utilization ratio of serotonin (5-HIAA/5-HT) remained unchanged. Immediately after radiation (at 3 and 24 h) an abrupt but brief increase in the synthesis of prostaglandin-E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), thromboxane (TXB{sub 2}), and prostacyclin [6 keto-PGF1{alpha} (6KPGF)] was noted, which returned to normal at 3 days. This was followed after 7 and 14 days by a significant fall off in synthesis of all three prostaglandins. Thereafter, at 28, 56, 120, and 240 days, escalated production of thromboxane followed, white prostacyclin synthesis remained markedly reduced (-88% of control level at 240 days). Up to 7 days after radiation the calculated TXB{sub 2}/6KPGF ratio remained balanced, regardless of the observed abrupt early fluctuations in their rate of synthesis. Later, between 7 and 240 days after radiation, a significant imbalance was present which became more pronounced over time. In the first 24 h after radiation, a 104% increase in microvessel permeability was observed which returned to normal by 3 days. 57 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Systems-level analysis of proteolytic events in increased vascular permeability and complement activation in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Prudova, Anna; Eckhard, Ulrich; Fingleton, Barbara; Overall, Christopher M

    2013-01-15

    During inflammation, vascular permeability is increased by various proteolytic events, such as the generation of bradykinin, that augment local tissue responses by enabling tissue penetration of serum proteins, including complement and acute-phase proteins. Proteases also govern inflammatory responses by processing extracellular matrix proteins and soluble bioactive mediators. We quantified changes in the proteome and the nature of protein amino termini (the N-terminome) and the altered abundance of murine proteases and inhibitors during skin inflammation. Through analysis of the N-terminome by iTRAQ-TAILS, we identified cotranslational and posttranslational αN-acetylation motifs, quantitative increases in protein abundance, and qualitative changes in the proteolytic signature during inflammation. Of the proteins identified in normal skin, about half were cleaved, and phorbol ester-induced inflammation increased the proportion of cleaved proteins, including chemokines and complement proteins, that were processed at previously uncharacterized sites. In response to phorbol ester-induced inflammation, mice deficient in matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) showed reduced accumulation of serum proteins in the skin and exhibited different proteolytic networks from those of wild-type mice. We found that the complement 1 (C1) inhibitor attenuated the increase in serum protein accumulation in inflamed skin. Cleavage and inactivation of the C1 inhibitor by MMP2 increased complement activation and bradykinin generation in wild-type mice, leading to increased vessel permeability during inflammation, which was diminished in Mmp2(-/-) mice. Thus, our systems-level analysis of proteolysis dissected cleavage events associated with skin inflammation and demonstrated that loss of a single protease could perturb the proteolytic signaling network and enhance inflammation.

  16. Measurement of canine gastric vascular permeability to plasma proteins in the normal and protein-losing states

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.G.; Davenport, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    An isolated segment of the greater curvature of a dog's stomach was perfused at constant flow through a single cannulated artery with donor blood containing 131I-albumin, 125I-fibrinogen, and papaverine. Perfusion pressure was 30-50 mmHg, and venous pressure was set at 15 mmHg. Venous blood was collected in 1-min samples for 60 min. Filtration of fluid and loss of labeled proteins were calculated as the difference between measured arterial inflow and venous outflow. Permeability-surface area products (PS) were calculated for the proteins, and reflection coefficients (sigma) were calculated from solute flux and filtration. Intraarterial infusion of histamine (1.6-1.9 microgram . ml-1) increased filtration and PS and decreased sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen. When protein-losing was established by topical irrigation with 10 mM dithiothreitol in neutral solution, filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Irrigation of the mucosa with 10 mM salicylic acid in 100 mN HCl caused bleeding that was quantitated by addition of 51Cr-erythrocytes to perfusing blood. Filtration and PS increased, and sigma for albumin but not fibrinogen decreased. Hematocrit of blood lost remained low during extensive mucosal damage. Effects of histamine infusion were attenuated or abolished by cimetidine (4 mg . kg-1 loading, 1.4 mg . kg-1 . h-1 continuous infusion) or by pyrilamine maleate (5 mg . kg-1 bolus injection at beginning of irrigation, repeated at 40-50 min). Pyrilamine attenuated or abolished effects of topical dithiothreitol or salicylic acid. We conclude that during protein loss caused by dithiothreitol or salicylic acid, histamine released within the mucosa causes increased vascular permeability for plasma proteins.

  17. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guangliang; Chen, Jieli; Chopp, Michael; Li, Lian; Yan, Tao; Li, Qingjiang; Cui, Chengcheng; Davarani, Siamak P N; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg) of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8) or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (n = 8) via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI. PMID:26900843

  18. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guangliang; Chen, Jieli; Chopp, Michael; Li, Lian; Yan, Tao; Li, Qingjiang; Cui, Chengcheng; Davarani, Siamak P. N.; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg) of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8) or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (n = 8) via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI. PMID:26900843

  19. Application of the Red List Index for conservation assessment of Spanish vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan Carlos Moreno; Lozano, Felipe Domínguez; Gómez, Manuel Marrero; Baudet, Ángel Bañares

    2015-06-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List Index (RLI) is used to measure trends in extinction risk of species over time. The development of 2 red lists for Spanish vascular flora during the past decade allowed us to apply the IUCN RLI to vascular plants in an area belonging to a global biodiversity hotspot. We used the Spanish Red Lists from 2000 and 2010 to assess changes in level of threat at a national scale and at the subnational scales of Canary Islands, Balearic Islands, and peninsular Spain. We assigned retrospective IUCN categories of threat to 98 species included in the Spanish Red List of 2010 but absent in the Spanish Red List of 2000. In addition, we tested the effect of different random and taxonomic and spatial Spanish samples on the overall RLI value. From 2000 to 2010, the IUCN categories of 768 species changed (10% of Spanish flora), mainly due to improved knowledge (63%), modifications in IUCN criteria (14%), and changes in threat status (12%). All measured national and subnational RLI values decreased during this period, indicating a general decline in the conservation status of the Spanish vascular flora. The Canarian RLI value (0.84) was the lowest, although the fastest deterioration in conservation status occurred on peninsular Spain (from 0.93 in 2000 to 0.92 in 2010). The RLI values based on subsamples of the Spanish Red List were not representative of RLI values for the entire country, which would discourage the use of small areas or small taxonomic samples to assess general trends in the endangerment of national biotas. The role of the RLI in monitoring of changes in biodiversity at the global and regional scales needs further reassessment because additional areas and taxa are necessary to determine whether the index is sufficiently sensitive for use in assessing temporal changes in species' risk of extinction. PMID:25580521

  20. Application of the Red List Index for conservation assessment of Spanish vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan Carlos Moreno; Lozano, Felipe Domínguez; Gómez, Manuel Marrero; Baudet, Ángel Bañares

    2015-06-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List Index (RLI) is used to measure trends in extinction risk of species over time. The development of 2 red lists for Spanish vascular flora during the past decade allowed us to apply the IUCN RLI to vascular plants in an area belonging to a global biodiversity hotspot. We used the Spanish Red Lists from 2000 and 2010 to assess changes in level of threat at a national scale and at the subnational scales of Canary Islands, Balearic Islands, and peninsular Spain. We assigned retrospective IUCN categories of threat to 98 species included in the Spanish Red List of 2010 but absent in the Spanish Red List of 2000. In addition, we tested the effect of different random and taxonomic and spatial Spanish samples on the overall RLI value. From 2000 to 2010, the IUCN categories of 768 species changed (10% of Spanish flora), mainly due to improved knowledge (63%), modifications in IUCN criteria (14%), and changes in threat status (12%). All measured national and subnational RLI values decreased during this period, indicating a general decline in the conservation status of the Spanish vascular flora. The Canarian RLI value (0.84) was the lowest, although the fastest deterioration in conservation status occurred on peninsular Spain (from 0.93 in 2000 to 0.92 in 2010). The RLI values based on subsamples of the Spanish Red List were not representative of RLI values for the entire country, which would discourage the use of small areas or small taxonomic samples to assess general trends in the endangerment of national biotas. The role of the RLI in monitoring of changes in biodiversity at the global and regional scales needs further reassessment because additional areas and taxa are necessary to determine whether the index is sufficiently sensitive for use in assessing temporal changes in species' risk of extinction.

  1. Choroidal Vascularity Index (CVI) - A Novel Optical Coherence Tomography Parameter for Monitoring Patients with Panuveitis?

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Salman, Mohammed; Tan, Kara-Anne; Karampelas, Michael; Sim, Dawn A.; Keane, Pearse A.; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compute choroidal vascularity index (CVI) using an image binarization tool on enhanced depth imaging (EDI)-optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans as a non-invasive optical tool to monitor progression in panuveitis and to investigate the utility of volumetric data from EDI-OCT scans using custom image analysis software. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, segmented EDI-OCT scans of both eyes in 19 patients with panuveitis were taken at baseline and at 3-month follow-up and were compared with EDI-OCT scans of normal eyes. Subfoveal choroidal area was segmented into luminal (LA) and stromal interstitial area (SA). Choroidal vascularity index (CVI) was defined as the proportion of LA to the total circumscribed subfoveal choroidal area (TCA). Results The mean choroidal thickness was 265.5±100.1μm at baseline and 278.4±102.6μm at 3 months follow up (p = 0.06). There was no statistically significant difference in TCA between study and control eyes (p = 0.08). CVI in the control group was 66.9±1.5% at baseline and 66.4±1.5% at follow up. CVI was 74.1±4.7% at baseline and 69.4±4.8% at 3 months follow up for uveitic eyes (p<0.001). The % change in CVI was 6.2 ±3.8 (4.3 to 8.0) for uveitic eyes, which was significantly higher from % change in CVI for control eyes (0.7±1.1, 0.2 to 1.3, p<0.001). Conclusion The study reports composite OCT-derived parameters and CVI as a possible novel tool in monitoring progression in panuveitis. CVI may be further validated in larger studies as a novel optical tool to quantify choroidal vascular status. PMID:26751702

  2. Monitoring Vascular Permeability and Remodeling After Endothelial Injury in a Murine Model Using a Magnetic Resonance Albumin-Binding Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Lorrio, Silvia; Zaragoza, Carlos; Botnar, René M.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Despite the beneficial effects of vascular interventions, these procedures may damage the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability and remodeling. Re-endothelialization of the vessel wall, with functionally and structurally intact cells, is controlled by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) and is crucial for attenuating adverse effects after injury. We investigated the applicability of the albumin-binding MR contrast agent, gadofosveset, to noninvasively monitor focal changes in vascular permeability and remodeling, after injury, in NOS3-knockout (NOS3−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice in vivo. Methods and Results— WT and NOS3−/− mice were imaged at 7, 15, and 30 days after aortic denudation or sham-surgery. T1 mapping (R1=1/T1, s−1) and delayed-enhanced MRI were used as measurements of vascular permeability (R1) and remodeling (vessel wall enhancement, mm2) after gadofosveset injection, respectively. Denudation resulted in higher vascular permeability and vessel wall enhancement 7 days after injury in both strains compared with sham-operated animals. However, impaired re-endothelialization and increased neovascularization in NOS3−/− mice resulted in significantly higher R1 at 15 and 30 days post injury compared with WT mice that showed re-endothelialization and lack of neovascularization (R1 [s−1]=15 days: NOS3−/−4.02 [interquartile range, IQR, 3.77–4.41] versus WT2.39 [IQR, 2.35–2.92]; 30 days: NOS3−/−4.23 [IQR, 3.94–4.68] versus WT2.64 [IQR, 2.33–2.80]). Similarly, vessel wall enhancement was higher in NOS3−/− but recovered in WT mice (area [mm2]=15 days: NOS3−/−5.20 [IQR, 4.68–6.80] versus WT2.13 [IQR, 0.97–3.31]; 30 days: NOS3−/−7.35 [IQR, 5.66–8.61] versus WT1.60 [IQR, 1.40–3.18]). Ex vivo histological studies corroborated the MRI findings. Conclusions— We demonstrate that increased vascular permeability and remodeling, after injury, can be assessed noninvasively using an

  3. Ankle brachial index screening for occult vascular disease is not useful in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Johns, Kevin; Saeedi, Ramesh; Mancini, G B John; Bondy, Greg

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic complications common to the HIV-positive population may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is a screening tool commonly used for the detection of asymptomatic PAD. The prevalence of asymptomatic PAD based on ABI in HIV-positive patients is unknown. This study was cross-sectional in design and assessed PAD by measuring the systolic ABI as determined by a handheld 8-MHz Doppler probe with the patient at rest in a supine position. A brief medical history including pertinent risk factors was obtained. One hundred and sixty-seven HIV-positive patients were evaluated (97.6% male; mean age 52.0 years; 31.2% current smokers, 29.4% former smokers, 26.3% diabetes mellitus). Asymptomatic PAD (ABI < or = 0.9) was found in four patients (2.4%, 95% CI: 0.3-4.5%). Smoking was a significant predictor of PAD. Patients with a positive test for PAD had at least two major risk factors for the disease including smoking, a history of disease in another vascular bed, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension. All patients with a positive test for PAD had a high risk (>20%) for cardiovascular disease according to the Framingham risk score. Three of the four patients with positive tests had previously diagnosed vascular disease (CAD, stroke). Three patients presenting with PAD were evaluated and all had a positive ABI. The prevalence of PAD compared to previous studies on PAD in HIV was low and identified only those patients with high cardiovascular risk based on other features. ABI was not useful in detecting occult vascular disease in HIV-positive patients and offers no additional information to that derived from cardiovascular risk stratification.

  4. Magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in progressive supranuclear palsy and vascular parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Mostile, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Cicero, Calogero Edoardo; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Bruno, Elisa; Dibilio, Valeria; Luca, Antonina; Sciacca, Giorgia; Raciti, Loredana; Contrafatto, Donatella; Chiaramonte, Ignazio; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    To investigate accuracy of the magnetic resonance parkinsonism index (MRPI) in differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from vascular parkinsonism (VP). We retrospectively analyzed radiological data of 12 PSP patients and 17 VP patients group-matched by age and sex who performed a standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analysis of selected structures morphometry was performed to all study subjects and the MRPI was calculated for each selected patient. MRI midbrain area as well as superior cerebellar peduncle width were significantly lower in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI was significantly larger in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI value ≥13 distinguished the two groups with a sensitivity of 100 % (95 % CI 69.9-100) and a specificity of 100 % (95 % CI 77.1-100). MRPI may represent an accurate tool in differentiating PSP from VP. PMID:26820655

  5. Choroidal Vascularity Index in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: An EDI-OCT Derived Tool for Monitoring Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Lilian Koh Hui; Nakhate, Vikram; Khandelwal, Neha; Mahendradas, Padmamalini

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the application of the choroidal vascularity index (CVI) in the follow-up of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH) patients derived from image binarization of enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) images with Fiji software. Our secondary objective was to derive the retinochoroidal vascularity index based on en face fundus fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography (FFA and ICGA). Methods In this retrospective cohort study, EDI-OCT scans of 18 eyes of 9 patients with VKH were obtained at baseline within 2 weeks of acute presentation, and again at 6 to 12 months. Images with poor quality were excluded. Choroidal thickness (CT) and CVI were analyzed and compared to 13 eyes of 13 healthy controls. En face FFA and ICGA obtained from 12 eyes of 7 patients were segmented to derive retinochoroidal vascularity index. Results There was no statistical difference in age or sex between the study group and controls. Choroidal thickness of patients with VKH was 359.23 ± 57.63 μm at baseline, compared to 274.09 ± 56.98 μm in controls (P = 0.003). Follow-up CT in VKH patients was 282.62 ± 42.51 μm, which was significantly decreased from baseline (P = 0.0001). Choroidal vascularity index in VKH patients was 70.03 ± 1.93% at baseline, compared to 64.63 ± 1.92% in controls (P < 0.001). Choroidal vascularity index was 66.94 ± 1.82% at follow-up, significantly reduced from baseline (P < 0.0001). Fundus fluorescein angiography and ICGA retinochoroidal vascularity indices at baseline were 70.67 ± 2.65% and 66.42 ± 2.16%, respectively. Conclusions In this small series of VKH patients, EDI-OCT–derived CVI had a statistically significant reduction over time, similar to CT. We propose that OCT, FFA, and ICGA-derived vascularity indices may be potential novel supportive tools in monitoring disease progression in VKH. Translational Relevance Choroidal vascularity index can be used potentially to study and analyze the structural changes in

  6. Transactivation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 by Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) Is Required for IL-8/CXCL8-induced Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Petreaca, Melissa L.; Yao, Min; Liu, Yan; DeFea, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8) is a chemokine that increases endothelial permeability during early stages of angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms involved in IL-8/CXCL8-induced permeability are poorly understood. Here, we show that permeability induced by this chemokine requires the activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/fetal liver kinase 1/KDR). IL-8/CXCL8 stimulates VEGFR2 phosphorylation in a VEGF-independent manner, suggesting VEGFR2 transactivation. We investigated the possible contribution of physical interactions between VEGFR2 and the IL-8/CXCL8 receptors leading to VEGFR2 transactivation. Both IL-8 receptors interact with VEGFR2 after IL-8/CXCL8 treatment, and the time course of complex formation is comparable with that of VEGFR2 phosphorylation. Src kinases are involved upstream of receptor complex formation and VEGFR2 transactivation during IL-8/CXCL8-induced permeability. An inhibitor of Src kinases blocked IL-8/CXCL8-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation, receptor complex formation, and endothelial permeability. Furthermore, inhibition of the VEGFR abolishes RhoA activation by IL-8/CXCL8, and gap formation, suggesting a mechanism whereby VEGFR2 transactivation mediates IL-8/CXCL8-induced permeability. This study points to VEGFR2 transactivation as an important signaling pathway used by chemokines such as IL-8/CXCL8, and it may lead to the development of new therapies that can be used in conditions involving increases in endothelial permeability or angiogenesis, particularly in pathological situations associated with both IL-8/CXCL8 and VEGF. PMID:17928406

  7. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  8. Flow Structures in a Healthy and Plaqued Artificial Artery using Fully Index Matched Vascular Flow Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Jain, Akash; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry measurements are made in a closed loop fully index matched flow facility to study the flow structures and flow wall interactions in healthy and diseased model arteries. The test section is 0.63 m long and the facility is capable of emulating both steady and pulsatile flows under physiologically relevant conditions. The model arteries are in-house developed compliant polymer (PDMS) tubes with 1 cm diameter and 1 mm wall thickness. The Reynolds numbers of flows vary up to 20,000. The plaque is simulated by introducing a radially asymmetric bump that can be varied in shape, size and compliancy. The overall compliancy of the model can be also controlled by varying ratio between the elastomer and the curing agent. The tubes are doped with particles allowing the simultaneous measurements of wall deformation and flows over it. The working fluid in the facility is NaI and is refractive index matched to the PDMS model. This allows flow measurement very close to the wall and measurement of wall shear stress. The aim of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy and geometry of blood vessels change due to age or disease. These differences can be used to develop a diagnostic tool to detect early onset of vascular diseases.

  9. Lignans from the stems and leaves of Brandisia hancei and their effects on VEGF-induced vascular permeability and migration of HRECs and DLAV formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Young Sook; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Yu, Song Yi; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Sun, Hang; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    In our continuing search for novel antiangiogenic agents, a new lignan glycoside, (7R,8R)-1-(4-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-{2-methoxy-4-[1-(E)-propene-3-ol]-phenoxyl}-propane-1,3-diol (1), along with three known lignans (2-4), were isolated from the 80% EtOH extract of Brandisia hancei stems and leaves. These isolates (1-4) were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability and migration of human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs). Of the compounds tested, compound 1 resulted in the greatest reduction in VEGF-induced vascular permeability by about 31.5% at 10 μM compared to the VEGF-treated control. In the migration assay, compounds 1 and 2 significantly decreased VEGF-induced HREC migration. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos treated with compounds 1 and 2 showed mild reductions of dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel (DLAV) formation.

  10. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator transiently enhances blood-brain barrier permeability during cerebral ischemia through vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial endocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Yamakawa, Kasumi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Hokamura, Kazuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) modulates cerebrovascular permeability and exacerbates brain injury in ischemic stroke, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We studied the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated endocytosis in the increase of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability potentiated by rt-PA after ischemic stroke. The rt-PA treatment at 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion induced a transient increase in BBB permeability after ischemic stroke in mice, which was suppressed by antagonists of either low-density lipoprotein receptor families (LDLRs) or VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). In immortalized bEnd.3 endothelial cells, rt-PA treatment upregulated VEGF expression and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation under ischemic conditions in an LDLR-dependent manner. In addition, rt-PA treatment increased endocytosis and transcellular transport in bEnd.3 monolayers under ischemic conditions, which were suppressed by the inhibition of LDLRs, VEGF, or VEGFR-2. The rt-PA treatment also increased the endocytosis of endothelial cells in the ischemic brain region after stroke in mice. These findings indicate that rt-PA increased BBB permeability via induction of VEGF, which at least partially mediates subsequent increase in endothelial endocytosis. Therefore, inhibition of VEGF induction may have beneficial effects after thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA treatment after stroke.

  11. Complete structure of an increasing capillary permeability protein (ICPP) purified from Vipera lebetina venom. ICPP is angiogenic via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Ammar; Bourcier, Christine; Aloui, Zohra; Srairi, Najet; Marchetti, Sandrine; Gimond, Clotilde; Wedge, Stephen R; Hennequin, Laurent; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2002-08-16

    The partial sequence of the increasing capillary permeability protein (ICPP) purified from Vipera lebetina venom revealed a strong homology to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. We now report its complete amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and its biological effects on mouse and human vascular endothelial cells. ICPP is a homodimeric protein linked by cysteine disulfide bonds of 25115 Da revealed by mass spectrometry. Each monomer is composed of 110 amino acids including eight cysteine residues and a pyroglutamic acid at the N-terminal extremity. ICPP shares 52% sequence identity with human VEGF but lacks the heparin binding domain and Asn glycosylation site. Besides its strong capillary permeability activity, ICPP was found to be a potent in vitro angiogenic factor when added to mouse embryonic stem cells or human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ICPP was found to be as potent as human VEGF165 in activating p42/p44 MAPK, in reinitiation of DNA synthesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and in promoting in vitro angiogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells. All these biological actions, including capillary permeability in mice, were fully inhibited by 1 microm of a new specific VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ZM317450) from AstraZeneca that belongs to the anilinocinnoline family of compounds. Indeed, up to a 30 times higher concentration of inhibitor did not affect platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, FGF-2, insulin, alpha-thrombin, or fetal calf serum-induced p42/p44 MAPK and reinitiation of DNA synthesis. Therefore, we conclude that this venom-derived ICPP exerts its biological action (permeability and angiogenesis) through activation of VEGF receptor signaling (VEGF-R2 and possibly VEGF-R1).

  12. Common variants of chemokine receptor gene CXCR3 and its ligands CXCL10 and CXCL11 associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hoh, B P; Umi-Shakina, H; Zuraihan, Z; Zaiharina, M Z; Rafidah-Hanim, S; Mahiran, M; Khairudin, N Y Nik; Benedict, L H Sim; Masliza, Z; Christopher, K C Lee; Sazaly, A B

    2015-06-01

    Dengue causes significantly more human disease than any other arboviruses. It causes a spectrum of illness, ranging from mild self-limited fever, to severe and fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever, as evidenced by vascular leakage and multifactorial hemostatic abnormalities. There is no specific treatment available till date. Evidence shows that chemokines CXCL10, CXCL11 and their receptor CXCR3 are involved in severity of dengue, but their genetic association with the susceptibility of vascular leakage during dengue infection has not been reported. We genotyped 14 common variants of these candidate genes in 176 patients infected with dengue. rs4859584 and rs8878 (CXCL10) were significantly associated with vascular permeability of dengue infection (P<0.05); while variants of CXCL11 showed moderate significance of association (P=0.0527). Haplotype blocks were constructed for genes CXCL10 and CXCL11 (5 and 7 common variants respectively). Haplotype association tests performed revealed that, "CCCCA" of gene CXCL10 and "AGTTTAC" of CXCL11 were found to be significantly associated with vascular leakage (P=0.0154 and 0.0366 respectively). In summary, our association study further strengthens the evidence of the involvement of CXCL10 and CXCL11 in the pathogenesis of dengue infection.

  13. Silver nanoparticles inhibit VEGF-and IL-1β-induced vascular permeability via Src dependent pathway in porcine retinal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheikpranbabu, Sardarpasha; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Venkataraman, Deepak; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Jongsun; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-induced vascular permeability, and to detect the underlying signaling mechanisms involved in endothelial cells. Porcine retinal endothelial cells (PRECs) were exposed to VEGF, IL-1β and Ag-NP at different combinations and endothelial cell permeability was analyzed by measuring the flux of RITC-dextran across the PRECs monolayer. We found that VEGF and IL-1β increase flux of dextran across a PRECs monolayer, and Ag-NP block solute flux induced by both VEGF and IL-1β. To explore the signalling pathway involved VEGF- and IL-1β-induced endothelial alteration, PRECs were treated with Src inhibitor PP2 prior to VEGF and IL-1β treatment, and the effects were recorded. Further, to clarify the possible involvement of the Src pathways in endothelial cell permeability, plasmid encoding dominant negative(DN) and constitutively active(CA) form of Src kinases were transfected into PRECs, 24 h prior to VEGF and IL-1β exposure and the effects were recorded. Overexpression of DN Src blocked both VEGF-and IL-1β-induced permeability, while overexpression of CA Src rescues the inhibitory action of Ag-NP in the presence or absence of VEGF and IL-1β. Further, an in vitro kinase assay was performed to identify the presence of the Src phosphorylation at Y419. We report that VEGF and IL-1β-stimulate endothelial permeability via Src dependent pathway by increasing the Src phosphorylation and Ag-NP block the VEGF-and IL-1β-induced Src phosphorylation at Y419. These results demonstrate that Ag-NP may inhibit the VEGF-and IL-1β-induced permeability through inactivation of Src kinase pathway and this pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target to inhibit the ocular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:19878566

  14. Choroidal vascularity index as a measure of vascular status of the choroid: Measurements in healthy eyes from a population-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Kara-Anne; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The vascularity of the choroid has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various eye diseases. To date, no established quantifiable parameters to estimate vascular status of the choroid exists. Choroidal vascularity index (CVI) may potentially be used to assess vascular status of the choroid. We aimed to establish normative database for CVI and identify factors associated with CVI in healthy eyes. In this population-based study on 345 healthy eyes, choroidal enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography scans were segmented by modified image binarization technique. Total subfoveal choroidal area (TCA) was segmented into luminal (LA) and stromal (SA) area. CVI was calculated as the proportion of LA to TCA. Linear regression was used to identify ocular and systemic factors associated with CVI and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT). Subfoveal CVI ranged from 60.07 to 71.27% with a mean value of 65.61 ± 2.33%. CVI was less variable than SFCT (coefficient of variation for CVI was 3.55 vs 40.30 for SFCT). Higher CVI was associated with thicker SFCT, but not associated with most physiological variables. CVI was elucidated as a significant determinant of SFCT. While SFCT was affected by many factors, CVI remained unaffected suggesting CVI to be a more robust marker of choroidal diseases.

  15. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) differentiates pharmacological properties of vasodilators nicardipine and nitroglycerin in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tatsuo; Yamanaka, Mari; Takagi, Sachie; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Shirai, Kohji; Takahara, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) has been developed for measurement of vascular stiffness from the aorta to tibial artery, which is clinically utilized for assessing the progress of arteriosclerosis. In this study, we established measuring system of the CAVI in rabbits, and assessed whether the index could reflect different pharmacological actions of nitroglycerin and nicardipine on the systemic vasculature. Rabbits were anesthetized with halothane, and the CAVI was calculated from the well-established basic equations with variables obtained from brachial and tibial blood pressure and phonocardiogram. Nicardipine (1, 3 and 10 μg/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Meanwhile, no significant change was detected in the CAVI at the low or middle dose, which reflects the defining feature of the CAVI that is independent of blood pressure. The index increased at the high dose. Nitroglycerin (2, 4 and 8 μg/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and haPWV. Meanwhile, the CAVI was decreased during the nitroglycerin infusion, which may reflect its well-known pharmacological action dilating conduit arteries. These results suggest that the CAVI differentiates the properties of these vasodilators in vivo. PMID:26238254

  16. Coronary vascular and aortic endothelial permeability during estrogen therapy: a study in DOCA-salt hypertensive ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, M; Nematbakhsh, M

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major source of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Premenopausal and estrogen-treated postmenopausal women have a lower incidence of CVD. It has been suggested that circulating endogenous estrogens are probably responsible for this protection. This study investigated the hypothesis that the reduction of endothelial permeability is responsible for cardioprotective effects of estrogen in hypertensive animals. Fourty-four rats were ovariectomized and divided into five groups: groups 1, 2 and 4 received DOCA-salt and groups 3 and 5 received normal saline (N/S) injection for four weeks. Then, in groups 4 and 5 the blood pressure was measured. Group 1 received estradiol valerate and in groups 2 and 3 continued with DOCA-salt and N/S injection for six weeks, respectively. Endothelial permeability was measured by Evans Blue extraction method. There was no significant difference in endothelial permeability in coronary circulation in estrogen-treated group and controls (12.97+/-2.32 vs. 9.96+/-1.01, respectively). Also, aortic endothelial permeability in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats did not change significantly after estrogen treatment (28.34+/-3.65 vs. 41.60+/-5.98). This study showed that the cardioprotective effects of estrogen in DOCA-salt hypertensive animals are not mediated by a reduction of endothelial permeability.

  17. Potent In Vitro Protection Against PM₂.₅-Caused ROS Generation and Vascular Permeability by Long-Term Pretreatment with Ganoderma tsugae.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chia-Yi; Chung, Meng-Chi; Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chang, Yu-Jung; Chang, Jing-Fen; Lin, Chin-Hung; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show increased particulate matter (PM[Formula: see text]) particles in ambient air are correlated with increased myocardial infarctions. Given the close association of capillaries and alveoli, the dysfunction is caused when inhaled PM[Formula: see text] particles come in close proximity to capillary endothelial cells. We previously suggested that the inhalation of PM[Formula: see text] diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces oxidative stress and upregulates the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway, inducing vascular permeability factor VEGFA secretion, which results in cell-cell adherens junction disruption and PM[Formula: see text] transmigratation into circulation. Here, we minimized the level that PM[Formula: see text] traveled in the bloodstream by pre-supplementing with a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Ganoderma tsugae DMSO extract (GTDE) prior to PM[Formula: see text] exposure. Our results show that PM[Formula: see text] caused alterations in enzyme activities and cellular anti-oxidant balance. We found decreased glutathione levels, a reduced cellular redox ratio, increased ROS generation and cytotoxicity in the cellular fractions. The oxidative stress caused DNA damage and apoptosis, likely causing downstream molecular events that trigger vasculature permeabilization and, eventually, cardiovascular disorders. Our results show long-term GTDE treatment increased endogenous glutathione level, while PM[Formula: see text]-reduced glutathione levels and the cellular redox ratio. GTDE was protective against the genotoxic and apoptotic effects initiated by PM[Formula: see text] oxidative stress. Vascular permeability revealed that PM[Formula: see text] only accumulated on the surface of cells after GTDE treatment; no penetration was detected. After two weeks of GTDE treatment, VEGFA secretion was significantly reduced in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and endothelial cell migration was blocked. Our results suggest GTDE prevents PM

  18. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chia-Yi; Chang, Jing-Fen; Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chang, Yu-Jung; Gordon, Marion K.; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione. PMID:26148005

  19. Transforming growth factor-alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the vascular permeability factor (VPF/VEGF) gene requires AP-2-dependent DNA binding and transactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, J; Swerlick, R A; Caughman, S W

    1997-01-01

    The endothelial cell-specific mitogen vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) represents a central regulator of cutaneous angiogenesis. Increased VPF/VEGF expression has recently been reported in psoriatic skin and healing wounds, both conditions in which transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) and its ligand, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are markedly up-regulated. Since TGF alpha strongly induces VPF/VEGF synthesis in keratinocytes, TGF alpha-mediated VPF/VEGF expression is likely to play a significant role in the initiation and maintenance of increased vascular hyperpermeability and hyperproliferation in skin biology. The objectives of the present studies were to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for TGF alpha-induced transcriptional activation of the VPF/VEGF gene. We have identified a GC-rich TGF alpha-responsive region between -88 bp and -65 bp of the VPF/VEGF promoter that is necessary for constitutive and TGF alpha-inducible transcriptional activation. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, this region binds Sp1-dependent protein complexes constitutively and an additional TGF alpha-inducible protein complex that is distinct from Sp1 protein. Both AP-2 and Egr-1 transcription factors were detected as components of the TGF alpha-inducible protein complex in supershift EMSA studies. In co-transfection studies, an AP-2 but not an Egr-1 expression vector activated VPF/VEGF transcription, thus indicating that AP-2 protein is functionally important in TGF alpha-induced VPF/VEGF gene expression. By clarifying regulatory mechanisms that are critical for angiogenic processes in the skin, these studies may form the basis for new therapeutic strategies to modulate VPF/VEGF expression in cutaneous inflammation and wound healing. PMID:9049304

  20. Simultaneous optical and mr imaging of tissue within implanted window chamber: System development and application in measuring vascular permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan Salek, Mir Farrokh

    Simultaneous optical imaging and MRI of a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model is investigated as a novel methodology to study the tumor microenvironment. Simultaneous imaging with two modalities allows for cross-validation of results, integration of the capabilities of the two modalities in one study and mitigation of invasive factors, such as surgery and anesthesia, in an in-vivo experiment. To make this investigation possible, three optical imaging systems were developed that operated inside the MRI scanner. One of the developed systems was applied to estimate vascular kinetic parameters of tumors in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model with simultaneous optical and MRI imaging. The target of imaging was a molecular agent that was dual labeled with both optical and MRI contrast agents. The labeling of the molecular agent, characteristics of the developed optical systems, the methodologies of measuring vascular kinetic parameters using optical imaging and MRI data, and the obtained results are described and illustrated.

  1. Novel CCR3 Antagonists Are Effective Mono- and Combination Inhibitors of Choroidal Neovascular Growth and Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Nori; Ju, Meihua; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Robbie, Scott J.; Bainbridge, James W.; Gale, David C.; Pierre, Esaie; Krauss, Achim H.P.; Adamson, Peter; Shima, David T.; Ng, Yin-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a defining feature of wet age-related macular degeneration. We examined the functional role of CCR3 in the development of CNV in mice and primates. CCR3 was associated with spontaneous CNV lesions in the newly described JR5558 mice, whereas CCR3 ligands localized to CNV-associated macrophages and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid complex. Intravitreal injection of neutralizing antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CCR3, CC chemokine ligand 11/eotaxin-1, and CC chemokine ligand 24/eotaxin-2 all reduced CNV area and lesion number in these mice. Systemic administration of the CCR3 antagonists GW766994X and GW782415X reduced spontaneous CNV in JR5558 mice and laser-induced CNV in mouse and primate models in a dose-dependent fashion. Combination treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody and GW766994X yielded additive reductions in CNV area and hyperpermeability in mice. Interestingly, topical GW766994X and intravitreal anti-CCR3 antibody yielded strong systemic effects, reducing CNV in the untreated, contralateral eye. Contrarily, ocular administration of GW782415X in primates failed to substantially elevate plasma drug levels or to reduce the development of grade IV CNV lesions. These findings suggest that CCR3 signaling may be an attractive therapeutic target for CNV, utilizing a pathway that is at least partly distinct from that of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. The findings also demonstrate that systemic exposure to CCR3 antagonists may be crucial for CNV-targeted activity. PMID:26188133

  2. Chorioallantoic Membrane Microtumor Model to Study the Mechanisms of Tumor Angiogenesis, Vascular Permeability, and Tumor Cell Intravasation.

    PubMed

    Deryugina, Elena I

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the development of angiogenic blood vessels, which not only deliver the nutrients to growing tumors but also provide the conduits for tumor cell dissemination, are still not fully resolved. The model systems based on the grafting of human tumor cells onto the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick embryo offer several advantages to study complex processes underlying tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell dissemination. In particular, the CAM model described here allows for investigation of multiple microtumors as independent entities, thereby greatly facilitating quantification and statistical analyses of tumor neovascularization and cancer spreading. This CAM microtumor system was designed specifically to measure the level of tumor cell intravasation in combination with quantitative analyses of the microarchitecture and permeability of the intratumoral angiogenic blood vessels. By using this newly established microtumor model we have demonstrated the functional involvement of tumor matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in regulating the development of a distinct angiogenic vasculature capable of sustaining tumor cell intravasation and metastasis. PMID:27172961

  3. Cardioankle vascular index evaluations revealed that cotreatment of ARB Antihypertension medication with traditional Chinese medicine improved arterial functionality.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Yan, Hua; Yao, Min J; Ma, Jie; Jia, Jun M; Ruan, Fen X; Yao, Zeng C; Huang, Hua M; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ting; Lv, Hua; Endler, Alexander M

    2013-05-01

    Qian Yang He Ji (QYHJ) is a traditional Chinese medicine composed of Digitalis purpurea, Uncaria gambir, Fructus tribuli terrestris, and Ligustrum lucidum. Here, we explored whether combining an antihypertensive angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy with QYHJ can improve the arterial functionality of hypertensive patients. One hundred and eight hypertensive patients were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group (n = 53) was treated with ARB and the other group (n = 55) was treated with ARB combined with QYHJ. Each of the 2 groups included 3 subgroups (pure hypertension, hypertension with diabetes, and hypertension with coronary heart disease) and was further divided into patients with and without complications. The cardioankle vascular index and intima-media thickness and pulse pressure were the outcome evaluation parameter. Combined QYHJ and ARB treatment reduced the values of cardioankle vascular index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure to significantly lower levels than ARB treatment alone did in hypertension patients after 6 months of treatment. ARB improves hypertension, but a combined QYHJ treatment can additionally ameliorate the arterial functionality not only in solely hypertensive patients but also in hypertensive patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease complications. QYHJ coapplication might be a choice to further improve the arterial functionality during an ARB hypertension treatment. PMID:23188130

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor increases during blood-brain barrier-enhanced permeability caused by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Monique C P; Soares, Edilene S; Stávale, Leila M; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2014-01-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV) causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb). The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  5. MicroRNA-497 impairs the growth of chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells by targeting cell cycle, survival and vascular permeability genes

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Aroa; París-Coderch, Laia; Jubierre, Luz; Martínez, Alba; Zhou, Xiangyu; Piskareva, Olga; Bray, Isabella; Vidal, Isaac; Almazán-Moga, Ana; Molist, Carla; Roma, Josep; Bayascas, José R.; Casanovas, Oriol; Stallings, Raymond L.; de Toledo, José Sánchez; Gallego, Soledad; Segura, Miguel F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal therapies, a high percentage of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) become refractory to current treatments, most of which interfere with cell cycle and DNA synthesis or function, activating the DNA damage response (DDR). In cancer, this process is frequently altered by deregulated expression or function of several genes which contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR). MicroRNAs are outstanding candidates for therapy since a single microRNA can modulate the expression of multiple genes of the same or different pathways, thus hindering the development of resistance mechanisms by the tumor. We found several genes implicated in the MDR to be overexpressed in high-risk NB which could be targeted by microRNAs simultaneously. Our functional screening identified several of those microRNAs that reduced proliferation of chemoresistant NB cell lines, the best of which was miR-497. Low expression of miR-497 correlated with poor patient outcome. The overexpression of miR-497 reduced the proliferation of multiple chemoresistant NB cell lines and induced apoptosis in MYCN-amplified cell lines. Moreover, the conditional expression of miR-497 in NB xenografts reduced tumor growth and inhibited vascular permeabilization. MiR-497 targets multiple genes related to the DDR, cell cycle, survival and angiogenesis, which renders this molecule a promising candidate for NB therapy. PMID:26824183

  6. Tumor Vascular Permeability Pattern Is Associated With Complete Response in Immunocompetent Patients With Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sae Rom; Choi, Young Jun; Kim, Ho Sung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide the information about tumor drug delivery efficacy. We investigated the potential utility of the permeability pattern of DCE-MRI for predicting tumor response to high dose-methotrexate treatment and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL). Clinical and conventional imaging parameters were assessed as potential predictors of tumor response in 48 immunocompetent PCNSL patients in a preliminary study. Fifty additional immunocompetent patients (27 men and 23 women; mean age, 60.6 years) with PCNSL underwent DCE-MRI before starting first-line treatment with high dose-methotrexate. The DCE-MRI pattern was categorized as diffuse or nondiffuse. After 4 courses of high dose methotrexate, patients underwent follow-up brain MR imaging to identify their complete response (CR). Predictors of CR and PFS were analyzed using clinical parameters, conventional MRI, and DCE-MRI. CR was noted in 20 (74.1%) of 27 patients with diffuse DCE-MRI pattern and in 4 (17.4%) of 23 patients with nondiffuse DCE-MRI pattern. The diffuse DCE-MRI pattern showed a significantly higher association with CR than the nondiffuse pattern (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model revealed that the DCE-MRI pattern (hazard ratio = 0.70; P = 0.045), age (hazard ratio = 1.47; P = 0.041), and adjuvant autologous stem-cell transplantation (hazard ratio = 6.97; P = 0.003) tended to be associated with a PFS. The pretreatment diffuse DCE-MRI pattern can be used as a potential imaging biomarker for predicting CR and a longer PFS in patients with newly diagnosed PCNSLs. PMID:26871782

  7. BET Bromodomain Suppression Inhibits VEGF-induced Angiogenesis and Vascular Permeability by Blocking VEGFR2-mediated Activation of PAK1 and eNOS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingcheng; Qiu, Qian; Xiao, Youjun; Zeng, Shan; Zhan, Mingying; Shi, Maohua; Zou, Yaoyao; Ye, Yujin; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a critical modulator of angiogenesis. Increasing evidence indicate the important role of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) of chromatin adaptors in regulating tumor growth and inflammatory response. However, whether BET proteins have a role in angiogenesis and endothelial permeability is unclear. In this study, we observed that treatment with JQ1, a specific BET inhibitor, suppressed in vitro tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo angiogenesis in a Matrigel plug and oxygen-induced retinopathy neovascularization. JQ1 attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER in HUVECs and prevented Evans blue dye leakage in the VEGF-induced Miles assay in athymic Balb/c nude mice. BET inhibition with JQ1 or shRNA for Brd2 or Brd4 suppressed VEGF-induced migration, proliferation, and stress fiber formation of HUVECs. Furthermore, BET inhibition suppressed phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and PAK1, as well as eNOS activation in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs. Inhibition with VEGFR2 and PAK1 also reduced migration and proliferation, and attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER. Thus, our observations suggest the important role of BET bromodomain in regulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Strategies that target the BET bromodomain may provide a new therapeutic approach for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:27044328

  8. BET Bromodomain Suppression Inhibits VEGF-induced Angiogenesis and Vascular Permeability by Blocking VEGFR2-mediated Activation of PAK1 and eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingcheng; Qiu, Qian; Xiao, Youjun; Zeng, Shan; Zhan, Mingying; Shi, Maohua; Zou, Yaoyao; Ye, Yujin; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a critical modulator of angiogenesis. Increasing evidence indicate the important role of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) of chromatin adaptors in regulating tumor growth and inflammatory response. However, whether BET proteins have a role in angiogenesis and endothelial permeability is unclear. In this study, we observed that treatment with JQ1, a specific BET inhibitor, suppressed in vitro tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in vivo angiogenesis in a Matrigel plug and oxygen-induced retinopathy neovascularization. JQ1 attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER in HUVECs and prevented Evans blue dye leakage in the VEGF-induced Miles assay in athymic Balb/c nude mice. BET inhibition with JQ1 or shRNA for Brd2 or Brd4 suppressed VEGF-induced migration, proliferation, and stress fiber formation of HUVECs. Furthermore, BET inhibition suppressed phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and PAK1, as well as eNOS activation in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs. Inhibition with VEGFR2 and PAK1 also reduced migration and proliferation, and attenuated the VEGF-induced decrease in TEER. Thus, our observations suggest the important role of BET bromodomain in regulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Strategies that target the BET bromodomain may provide a new therapeutic approach for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:27044328

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor present in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) are induced by inflammatory cytokines and synergize to promote vascular permeability and KS lesion development.

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, F.; Markham, P. D.; Gendelman, R.; Watanabe, Y.; Kao, V.; Kowalski, K.; Sonnabend, J. A.; Pintus, A.; Gallo, R. C.; Ensoli, B.

    1998-01-01

    All forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) are characterized by spindle cell proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and edema. We have previously reported that spindle cells of primary KS lesions and KS-derived spindle cell cultures express high levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which is promoted by the inflammatory cytokines identified in these lesions. These cytokines, namely, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interferon-gamma, induce production and release of bFGF, which stimulates angiogenesis and spindle cell growth in an autocrine fashion. Here we show that both AIDS-KS and classical KS lesions co-express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bFGF. VEGF production by KS cells is promoted synergistically by inflammatory cytokines present in conditioned media from activated T cells and in KS lesions. KS cells show synthesis of VEGF isoforms that are mitogenic to endothelial cells but not to KS spindle cells, suggesting a prevailing paracrine effect of this cytokine. This may be due to the level of expression of the flt-1-VEGF receptor that is down-regulated in KS cells as compared with endothelial cells. KS-derived bFGF and VEGF synergize in inducing endothelial cell growth as shown by studies using both neutralizing antibodies and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against these cytokines. In addition, VEGF and bFGF synergize to induce angiogenic KS-like lesions in nude mice and vascular permeability and edema in guinea pigs. These results indicate that inflammatory cytokines present in KS lesions stimulate the production of bFGF and VEGF, which, in turn, cooperate to induce angiogenesis, edema, and KS lesion formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9626048

  10. The Role of Monitoring Arterial Stiffness with Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in the Control of Lifestyle-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kohji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao

    2015-09-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. One of the difficulties in controlling those diseases is the lack of a suitable indicator of arteriosclerosis or arterial injury in routine clinical practice. Arterial stiffness was supposed to be one of the monitoring indexes of arteriosclerosis. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is reflecting the stiffness of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and one of the features of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at a measuring time. When doxazosin, an α1-adrenergic blocker, was administered, CAVI decreased, indicating that arterial stiffness is composed of both organic stiffness and functional stiffness, which reflects the contraction of arterial smooth muscle. CAVI shows a high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases, and is also high in persons possessing main coronary risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and smoking. Furthermore, when the most of those risk factors were controlled by proper methods, CAVI improved. Furthermore, the co-relationship between CAVI and heart function was demonstrated during treatment of heart failure. This paper reviews the principle and rationale of CAVI, and discusses the meaning of monitoring CAVI in following up so-called lifestyle-related diseases and cardiac dysfunction in routine clinical practice. PMID:26587461

  11. Role of type II pneumocytes in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis: dose response of radiation-induced lung changes in the transient high vascular permeability period.

    PubMed

    Osterreicher, Jan; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Skopek, Jirí; Mokrỳ, Jaroslav; Vilasová, Zdena; Psutka, Jan; Vávrová, Jirina; Mazurová, Yvona

    2004-12-01

    We studied the dose response of pulmonary changes at 3 weeks after 1-25 Gy irradiation and we investigated the effects of an anti-inflammatory drug. Wistar rats were given a single dose of 1-25Gy irradiation to the thorax. Group one was treated with saline only, while group two was administered subcutaneously a combination of pentoxifylline (35 mg/kg) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) twice per week. Lungs were examined histochemically and number of neutrophile granulocytes, alveolar septal thickness, air/tissue ratio, number of alveoli per field, number of type II pneumocytes per alveolus, and occludin 1 expression were measured. A significant dose-dependent depletion of type II pneumocytes was found after irradiation with a dose of 1 Gy and higher. Alveolar neutrophils increased after 1 Gy with a dose dependency noted after 10-25Gy and alveolar septa thickening followed 5-25 Gy. A lower occludin 1 expression was observed in animals irradiated with the doses of 5 20 Gy, indicating an effect on vascular permeability. Anti-inflammatory therapy partially inhibited the increase of neutrophils at all radiation doses and the depletion of type II pneumocytes after doses of 1, 10, and 15 Gy. Occludin 1 did not decrease in the lungs of rats treated with the anti-inflammatory drugs as it did in most rats treated only with saline. Our results suggest that pneumocytes depletion is a major factor responsible for radiation pneumonitis development and that these changes may be compensated for provided radiation doses are below the threshold.

  12. Pathogenesis of periodontitis: a major arginine-specific cysteine proteinase from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces vascular permeability enhancement through activation of the kallikrein/kinin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Pike, R N; Potempa, J; Travis, J

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of production of an inflammatory exudate, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), from periodontal pockets in periodontitis, we examined the vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity induced by an arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, Arg-gingipain-1 (RGP-1), produced by a major periopathogenic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intradermal injections into guinea pigs of RGP-1 (> 10(-8) M), or human plasma incubated with RGP-1 (> 10(-9) M), induced VPE in a dose- and activity-dependent manner but with different time courses for the two routes of production. VPE activity induced by RGP-1 was augmented by kininase inhibitors, inhibited by a kallikrein inhibitor and unaffected by an antihistamine drug. The VPE activity in human plasma incubated with RGP-1 also correlated closely with generation of bradykinin (BK). RGP-1 induced 30-40% less VPE activity in Hageman factor-deficient plasma and no VPE in plasma deficient in either prekallikrein (PK) or high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK). After incubation with RGP-1, plasma deficient in PK or HMWK, reconstituted with each missing protein, caused VPE, as did a mixture of purified PK and HMWK, but RGP-1 induced no VPE from HMWK. The VPE of extracts of clinically isolated P. gingivalis were reduced to about 10% by anti-RGP-1-IgG, leupeptin, or tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, which paralleled effects observed with RGP-1. These results indicate that RGP-1 is the major VPE factor of P. gingivalis, inducing this activity through PK activation and subsequent BK release, resulting in GCF production at sites of periodontitis caused by infection with this organism. Images PMID:8040277

  13. Association Between Increased Vascular Nitric Oxide Bioavailability and Progression to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in Adults.

    PubMed

    Thein, Tun-Linn; Wong, Joshua; Leo, Yee-Sin; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Lye, David; Yeo, Tsin W

    2015-09-01

    In a prospective longitudinal adult study, vascular nitric oxide bioavailability measured as reactive hyperemia index was significantly higher at enrollment in patients who developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) (n = 11), compared with the non-DHF group (n = 63) and those with other febrile illnesses (n = 25) (P = .01). After adjustment for age, fever day, and body mass index, enrollment reactive hyperemia index was associated with a 4-fold increased risk for DHF, and predicted DHF with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.86. Increased vascular nitric oxide in dengue is associated with increased vascular permeability and impaired homeostasis and may have utility as a predictor of DHF.

  14. Physiological Cost Index and Comfort Walking Speed in Two Level Lower Limb Amputees Having No Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vllasolli, Teuta Osmani; Orovcanec, Nikola; Zafirova, Beti; Krasniqi, Blerim; Murtezani, Ardiana; Krasniqi, Valbona; Rama, Bukurije

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) was introduced by MacGregor to estimate the energy cost in walking of healthy people, also it has been reported for persons with lower limb amputation, walking with prosthesis. Objective: To assess energy cost and walking speed in two level lower limb amputation: transfemoral and transtibial amputation and to determine if the age and prosthetic walking supported with walking aids have impact on energy cost and walking speed. Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was performed in two level lower limb amputees with no vascular disease who were rehabilitated at the Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) was assessed by five minutes of continuous indoor walking at Comfort Walking Speed (CWS). Results: Eighty three lower limb amputees were recruited. It is shown relevant impact of level of amputation in PCI (t=6.8, p<0.001) and CWS (T=487, p<0.001). The great influence of using crutches during prosthetic walking in PCI (ANOVA F= 39.5 P < 0.001) and CWS (ANOVA F=32.01, P <0.001) has been shown by One Way ANOVA test. The correlation coefficient (R) showed a significant correlation of age with PCI and CWS in both groups of amputation. Conclusions: Walking with transfemoral prosthesis or using walking aids during prosthetic ambulation is matched with higher cost of energy and slower walking speed. Advanced age was shown with high impact on PCI and CWS in both groups of amputees. PMID:25870485

  15. Measurement of absolute cell volume, osmotic membrane water permeability, and refractive index of transmembrane water and solute flux by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Jourdain, Pascal; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    A dual-wavelength digital holographic microscope to measure absolute volume of living cells is proposed. The optical setup allows us to reconstruct two quantitative phase contrast images at two different wavelengths from a single hologram acquisition. When adding the absorbing dye fast green FCF as a dispersive agent to the extracellular medium, cellular thickness can be univocally determined in the full field of view. In addition to the absolute cell volume, the method can be applied to derive important biophysical parameters of living cells including osmotic membrane water permeability coefficient and the integral intracellular refractive index (RI). Further, the RI of transmembrane flux can be determined giving an indication about the nature of transported solutes. The proposed method is applied to cultured human embryonic kidney cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, human red blood cells, mouse cortical astrocytes, and neurons. PMID:23487181

  16. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF/NAMPT/Visfatin) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cooperate to increase the permeability of the human placental amnion.

    PubMed

    Astern, J M; Collier, A C; Kendal-Wright, C E

    2013-01-01

    Fluid efflux across the region of the amnion overlying the placenta is an essential component of the intramembranous absorption pathway that maintains amniotic fluid volume homeostasis. Dysregulation of this pathway may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes, however the factors controlling amnion permeability are unknown. Here, we report a novel mechanism that increases placental amnion permeability. Pre-B Cell Colony Enhancing Factor (PBEF) is a stress-responsive cytokine expressed by the human amnion, and is known to induce Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) production by other cell types. Interestingly, VEGF is up-regulated in the ovine amnion when intramembranous absorption is augmented. In this study, we show that PBEF induced VEGF secretion by primary human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from the placental amnion, as well as from the reflected amnion that lines the remainder of the gestational sac. Further, PBEF treatment led to the increased expression of VEGFR2 in placental AEC, but not reflected AEC. To test the hypothesis that PBEF and VEGF increase placental amnion permeability, we monitored the transfer of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) from the fetal to the maternal side of human amnion explants. A treatment regimen including both PBEF and VEGF increased the rate of DCF transfer across the placental amnion, but not the reflected amnion. In summary, our results suggest that by augmenting VEGFR2 expression in the placental amnion, PBEF primes the tissue for a VEGF-mediated increase in permeability. This mechanism may have important implications in amniotic fluid volume control throughout gestation.

  17. Determination of permeability index using Stoneley slowness analysis, NMR models, and formation evaluations: a case study from a gas reservoir, south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mirhasan; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Movahed, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    In hydrocarbon reservoirs, permeability is one of the most critical parameters with a significant role in the production of hydrocarbon resources. Direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves has always had some difficulties. In addition, some un-calibrated empirical models such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) models and petrophysical evaluation model (intrinsic permeability) do not provide reliable estimates of permeability in carbonate formations. Therefore, utilizing an appropriate numerical method for direct determination of permeability using Stoneley waves as well as an appropriate calibration method for the empirical models is necessary to have reliable results. This paper shows the application of a numerical method, called bisection method, in the direct determination of permeability from Stoneley wave slowness. In addition, a linear regression (least squares) method was used to calibrate the NMR models including Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) and Timur-Coates models as well as the intrinsic permeability equation (permeability from petrophysical evaluations). The Express Pressure Tester (XPT) permeability was considered as an option for the reference permeability. Therefore, all permeability models were validated for the Stoneley permeability and calibrated for the empirical models with the XPT permeability. In order to have a quantitative assessment on the results and compare the results before and after the calibration, the Root Mean Squares Error (RMSE) was calculated for each of the used models. The results for the Stoneley permeability showed that, in many points there was not much difference between the Stoneley permeability calculated by the bisection method and the XPT permeability. Comparing the results showed that the calibration of the empirical models reduced their RMSE values. As a result of the calibration, the RMSE was decreased by about 39% for the SDR model, 18% for the Timur-Coates model, and 91% for the petrophysical

  18. Using refractive index matching to image flow above and within a highly-permeable laboratory stream bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtner, Derek; Best, Jim; Blois, Gianluca; Kim, Taehoon; Christensen, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent flow over a rough, porous gravel bed is investigated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) and refractive index matching (RIM). A model stream bed was constructed with 4224 pre-cast acrylic spheres (D = 1.27 cm) in a fixed cubic pattern. The flow above and within the bed was measured in the streamwise-wall-normal plane at Reb = 3.20 × 10, with an image resolution of 11 Mpixel, and the flow was seeded with silver-coated hollow glass spheres (ρ = 1700 kg m-3). The highpermeability of the interface in these experiments permits large, instantaneous, near-bed streamwise momentum due to vertical exchange viaturbulence. The mean velocity flow structure exhibitsa significant slip velocity at the bed interface. In the pore spaces, mean velocities are near-horizontal and 5-10% of the maximum free stream velocity. High Reynolds stresses near the bed, particularly around the crests of spherical roughness elements, suggest turbulence is produced by flow separation and the shedding of vortices from streambed grains. The dimensions of turbulent flow structures, determined via two-point correlations and Galilean decompositions, appear similar to those of hairpin vortices, although the resemblance remains unconfirmed without time-resolved data.

  19. Evidence that prolonged histamine suffusions produce transient increases in vascular permeability subsequent to the formation of venular macromolecular leakage sites. Proof of the Majno-Palade hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horan, K. L.; Adamski, S. W.; Ayele, W.; Langone, J. J.; Grega, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether histamine-stimulated increases in macromolecular efflux are dependent on the formation of specific vascular leakage sites, or whether other mechanisms need to be invoked to explain the increase in macromolecular efflux produced by this inflammatory mediator. Intravital light microscopy was used to localize and quantitate vascular macromolecular leakage sites in the noneverted hamster cheek pouch. Fluorimetric measurements of plasma and suffusate tracer (FITC-D 70,000 mol wt) concentrations were utilized to quantitate changes in macromolecular efflux. In some experiments, the FITC-D was injected intravenously either at the start of or after the start of a prolonged histamine suffusion for estimation of the duration of the vascular FITC-D leakage response. In saline control cheek pouches there were few, if any, visible FITC-D vascular leakage sites and only small increases in the [FITC-D]s. The arteriolar vasodilators papaverine (1 X 10(-5) M) and isoproterenol (1 X 10(-5) M) failed to increase the formation of vascular FITC-D leakage sites, and the magnitude of the increase in [FITC-D]s produced by these agents was similar to that observed in saline controls. Histamine (1 X 10(-5) M) suffused for either 15, 60, or 120 minutes produced marked increases in [FITC-D]s and in the number of venular FITC-D leakage sites. The venular FITC-D leakage sites began to fade after 10-20 minutes, eventually disappearing altogether. In contrast, the [FITC-D]s was markedly increased throughout the 120-minute observation period. Treatment with papaverine prior to and during the 60-minute histamine suffusion failed to prevent the mediator-stimulated vascular leakage response. In contrast, similar treatment with isoproterenol inhibited the histamine-stimulated increases in [FITC-D]s and the formation of venular FITC-D leakage sites. When the tracer was injected intravenously at the start of the 60-minute histamine suffusion (1 X 10(-5) M

  20. FECAL CALPROTECTIN AND GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) PERMEABILITY CORRELATE WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY INDEX, AND HISTOLOGIC, ENDOSCOPIC, AND RADIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CROHN DISEASE (CD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal calprotectin and permeability are noninvasive measures of GI inflammation and damage, respectively. However, there are scant data as to the possible association between the tests and CD disease activity in children. We hypothesized that levels of fecal calprotectin and permeability would corre...

  1. Abnormal peripheral circulation in type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index associates with coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Suzuki, Eiji; Egawa, Katsuya; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2005-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes arises from different aspects of vascular abnormalities even when accompanied by a normal ankle-brachial index (ABI>0.9). One hundred fourteen type 2 diabetic patients with normal ABI and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital were enrolled. The Agatston coronary artery calcium score (CACS), as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis, was obtained using electron-beam computed tomography. An automatic device was used to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as an index of arterial distensibility. Total flow volume and resistive index (RI), as a marker of peripheral vascular resistance, at the popliteal artery were evaluated using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Diabetic patients had baPWV (P<0.001) and RI (P<0.001) higher than those in the non-diabetic subjects, indicating that those parameters are characteristically altered in diabetic patients. When diabetic patients were grouped into three subgroups according to their levels of total flow volume, those with the lowest range showed the highest log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001) among the groups. Total flow volume was negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001). Waveform at the popliteal artery could be clearly separated into systolic and early and late diastolic blood flows, which were negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), RI (P<0.001), and baPWV (P<0.001), respectively. These results suggest that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes is attributable to coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance even when ABI is normal.

  2. Carbohydrates and Endothelial Function: Is a Low-Carbohydrate Diet or a Low-Glycemic Index Diet Favourable for Vascular Health?

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovski, Elena; Zurbau, Andreea

    2015-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate diets have become increasingly popular in both media and clinical research settings. Although they may improve some metabolic markers, their effects on arterial function remain unclear. Endothelial dysfunction is the well-established response to cardiovascular risk factors and a pivotal feature that precedes atherosclerotic diseases. It has been demonstrated that a high carbohydrate-induced hyperglycemia and subsequent oxidative stress acutely worsen the efficacy of the endothelial vasodilatory system. Thus, in theory, a carbohydrate restricted diet may preserve the integrity of the arterial system. This review attempts to provide insight on whether low-carbohydrate diets have a favorable or detrimental impact on vascular function, or it is perhaps the quality of carbohydrate that should direct dietary recommendations. Research to date suggests that diets low in carbohydrate amount may negatively impact vascular endothelial function. Conversely, it appears that maintaining recommended carbohydrate intake with utilization of low glycemic index foods generates a more favorable vascular profile. Understanding these relationships will aid in deciphering the diverging role of modulating quantity and quality of carbohydrates on cardiovascular risk. PMID:25954727

  3. Carbohydrates and endothelial function: is a low-carbohydrate diet or a low-glycemic index diet favourable for vascular health?

    PubMed

    Jovanovski, Elena; Zurbau, Andreea; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Low-carbohydrate diets have become increasingly popular in both media and clinical research settings. Although they may improve some metabolic markers, their effects on arterial function remain unclear. Endothelial dysfunction is the well-established response to cardiovascular risk factors and a pivotal feature that precedes atherosclerotic diseases. It has been demonstrated that a high carbohydrate-induced hyperglycemia and subsequent oxidative stress acutely worsen the efficacy of the endothelial vasodilatory system. Thus, in theory, a carbohydrate restricted diet may preserve the integrity of the arterial system. This review attempts to provide insight on whether low-carbohydrate diets have a favorable or detrimental impact on vascular function, or it is perhaps the quality of carbohydrate that should direct dietary recommendations. Research to date suggests that diets low in carbohydrate amount may negatively impact vascular endothelial function. Conversely, it appears that maintaining recommended carbohydrate intake with utilization of low glycemic index foods generates a more favorable vascular profile. Understanding these relationships will aid in deciphering the diverging role of modulating quantity and quality of carbohydrates on cardiovascular risk.

  4. Production of Experimental Malignant Pleural Effusions Is Dependent on Invasion of the Pleura and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor/Vascular Permeability Factor by Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Seiji; Shinohara, Hisashi; Herbst, Roy S.; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Bucana, Corazon D.; Ellis, Lee M.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2000-01-01

    We determined the molecular mechanisms that regulate the pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion (PE) associated with advanced stage of human, non-small-cell lung cancer. Intravenous injection of human PC14 and PC14PE6 (adenocarcinoma) or H226 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells into nude mice yielded numerous lung lesions. PC14 and PC14PE6 lung lesions invaded the pleura and produced PE containing a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-localized vascular hyperpermeability. Lung lesions produced by H226 cells were confined to the lung parenchyma with no PE. The level of expression of VEGF mRNA and protein by the cell lines directly correlated with extent of PE formation. Transfection of PC14PE6 cells with antisense VEGF165 gene did not inhibit invasion into the pleural space but reduced PE formation. H226 cells transfected with either sense VEGF 165 or sense VEGF 121 genes induced localized vascular hyperpermeability and produced PE only after direct implantation into the thoracic cavity. The production of PE was thus associated with the ability of tumor cells to invade the pleura, a property associated with expression of high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and low levels of TIMP-2. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the production of malignant PE requires tumor cells to invade the pleura and express high levels of VEGF/VPF. PMID:11106562

  5. Expansion duroplasty improves intraspinal pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure, and vascular pressure reactivity index in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: injured spinal cord pressure evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-06-15

    We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone.

  6. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  7. A disorder of sympathomimetic amines leading to increased vascular permeability may be the etiologic factor in various treatment refractory health problems in women.

    PubMed

    Check, J H; Katsoff, D; Kaplan, H; Liss, J; Boimel, P

    2008-01-01

    There is an evidence that increased capillary permeability in the standing position is related to a deficit in the sympathetic nervous system. The leakage of this fluid leads to various clinical conditions which frequently puzzle the consulting physician because despite the frequency of this condition intelligent physicians and patients are unaware of the cause of their condition. One of the most common manifestations is the inability to lose weight despite proper dieting. A randomized study comparing the efficacy of a diuretic, a converting enzyme inhibitor, spironolactone and a sympathomimetic amine on weight loss in diet refractory women found that only the latter in the form of dextroamphetamine sulfate demonstrated significant weight reduction over a six month time span. In fact, the dextroamphetamine sulfate proved effective when given in the next 6 months to the three groups failing to respond for the first 6 months. The diagnosis of a deficit in sympathomimetic amines is established by demonstrating an abnormal clearance of a water load in the erect position and exclusion of other conditions that are associated with an abnormal free water clearance, e.g., hypothyroidism, renal or liver disease or congestive heart failure. The original definition of an abnormal water load test was excretion of <55% of a 1500 ml water load in 6h but we found that <75% defines a greater population who suffer from this problem. There are several conditions that have proven refractory to conventional theory that respond quickly and effectively to sympathomimetic amines. There have been many anecdotal reports of relieving interactable pain syndromes quickly and efficiently with sympathomimetic amine theory, despite failure with a multitude of other therapies. These include interstitial cystitis and pelvic pain that was attributed to endometriosis, gastrointestinal pain including esophagitis and gastroparesis, headaches, joint pain, fibromyalgia, and carpal tunnel syndrome. It is

  8. Myocardial performance index is sensitive to changes in cardiac contractility, but is also affected by vascular load condition.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial performance index (MPI), or Tei index, is measured by Doppler echocardiography in clinical practice. MPI has been shown to be useful in evaluating left ventricular (LV) performance and predicting prognosis in cardiac patients. However, the effects of LV load and contractile states on MPI remain to be thoroughly investigated. In 14 anesthetized dogs, we obtained LV pressure-volume relationship with use of sonomicrometry and catheter-tip manometry. MPI was determined from the time derivative of LV volume and pressure. LV end-systolic pressure-volume ratio (Ees'), effective arterial elastance (Ea) and LV end-diastolic volume (Ved) were used as indices of LV contractility, afterload and preload, respectively. Hemodynamic conditions were varied over wide ranges [heart rate (HR), 66-192 bpm; mean arterial pressure, 71-177 mmHg] by infusing cardiovascular agents, by inducing ischemic heart failure and by electrical atrial pacing. Multiple linear regression analysis of pooled data (66 data sets) indicated that MPI (0.6-1.8) significantly correlated with Ees' [1.5-17.5 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.0001, standard partial regression coefficient (β) =-0.66], Ea (3.6-21.9 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.001, β = 0.4) and Ved (11-100 ml, p<0.0001, β = -0.69). MPI directly correlated with the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (19-66 ms, p<0.05), but not with HR or LV diastolic-stiffness (all p>0.1). Theoretical analysis also indicated that MPI decreases following the increases in LV contractility and in preload, while it increases in response to an increase in LV afterload. We conclude that MPI sensitively detects changes in LV contractility. However, MPI is also affected by changes in LV afterload and preload. PMID:24109782

  9. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness.

  10. Impact of Body Mass Index on Vascular Calcification and Pericardial Fat Volume Among Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer; Elwali, Hayder; Al-Nafakh, Hasan; Tawfeq, Raad; Nafakhi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the relationship between pericardial fat volume (PFV), aortic root calcification (ARC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and December 2014 at the Kufa University Teaching Hospital, Najaf, Iraq. A total of 130 consecutive patients with an intermediate pretest probability of ischaemic heart disease who underwent 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography during the study period were recruited. Of these, 111 were included in the study and divided into groups according to BMI. Imaging markers were measured on CT angiography. Results: A total of 28 patients were obese, while 42 and 41 were overweight and normal weight, respectively. The median PFV, CAC and ARC was 109 cm3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 52–176 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–52 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–15 Agatston score), respectively, in the normal weight group in comparison to 79 cm3 (IQR: 43–138 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–54 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–0 Agatston score), respectively, in the obese group. Significant correlations were observed between PFV and CAC (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.002) and ARC and CAC (r2 = 0.37; P <0.001) in the normal weight group. However, no significant correlations were observed for obese and overweight patients. Conclusion: These findings indicate that BMI may not be an accurate tool for measuring adiposity or assessing subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected CAD.

  11. Impact of Body Mass Index on Vascular Calcification and Pericardial Fat Volume Among Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer; Elwali, Hayder; Al-Nafakh, Hasan; Tawfeq, Raad; Nafakhi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the relationship between pericardial fat volume (PFV), aortic root calcification (ARC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) among patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between January and December 2014 at the Kufa University Teaching Hospital, Najaf, Iraq. A total of 130 consecutive patients with an intermediate pretest probability of ischaemic heart disease who underwent 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (CT) angiography during the study period were recruited. Of these, 111 were included in the study and divided into groups according to BMI. Imaging markers were measured on CT angiography. Results: A total of 28 patients were obese, while 42 and 41 were overweight and normal weight, respectively. The median PFV, CAC and ARC was 109 cm3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 52–176 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–52 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–15 Agatston score), respectively, in the normal weight group in comparison to 79 cm3 (IQR: 43–138 cm3), 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–54 Agatston score) and 0 Agatston score (IQR: 0–0 Agatston score), respectively, in the obese group. Significant correlations were observed between PFV and CAC (r2 = 0.22; P = 0.002) and ARC and CAC (r2 = 0.37; P <0.001) in the normal weight group. However, no significant correlations were observed for obese and overweight patients. Conclusion: These findings indicate that BMI may not be an accurate tool for measuring adiposity or assessing subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected CAD. PMID:27606110

  12. Tumor vascular targeting with tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corti, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    The poor selectivity of chemotherapeutic drugs for neoplastic cells may lead to dose-limiting side effects that compromise clinical outcomes. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and increased interstitial pressure, could represent critical barriers that limit the penetration of drugs into neoplastic cells distant from tumor vessels and, consequently, the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have recently developed two strategies for increasing the local concentration of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumors and their therapeutic index, based on tumor vascular targeting. First, we have found that vascular targeting with minute amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammatory cytokine able to increase vascular permeability, alters tumor barriers and increases the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in subcutaneous tumors in mouse models. Targeted delivery of TNF-alpha to tumor vessels was achieved by coupling this cytokine with cyclic CNGRC peptide, an aminopeptidase N (CD13) ligand that targets the tumor neovasculature. Second, we have observed that encapsulation of doxorubicin into liposomes able to home to tumor vessels markedly improves drug uptake by neuroblastoma tumors, in an orthotopic xenograft model, and its therapeutic index. Targeted delivery of liposomes was achieved by coupling linear GNGRG peptide to the surface of liposomal doxorubicin. Vascular targeting, either indirectly with NGR-TNF-alpha or directly with NGR-targeted liposomes, could be a novel strategy for increasing the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  13. The percentage flow-mediated dilation index: a large-sample investigation of its appropriateness, potential for bias and causal nexus in vascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Greg; Batterham, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    The percentage flow-mediated dilation index (FMD%) scales the increase in arterial diameter (Ddiff) as a constant proportion of baseline artery diameter (Dbase). We have demonstrated, albeit with small samples, that the scaling properties of FMD% can lead to biased inferences on endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the underlying rationale and potential bias of FMD% using a selection of new examples from the large (n = 3499) and diverse Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). In this dataset, we found that smaller values of Ddiff are associated with larger values of Dbase, which contradicts the scaling properties of FMD%. Consequently, FMD% 'over-scales' and naturally generates an even stronger negative correlation between itself and Dbase. Using a data simulation, we show that this FMD%-Dbase correlation can be a statistical artefact due to inappropriate scaling. The new examples we present from MESA indicate that FMD% biases the differences in flow-mediated response between men and women, Framingham risk score categories, and diseased and healthy people. We demonstrate how FMD%, as an exposure for predicting cardiovascular disease, is confounded by its dependency on Dbase, which itself could be clinically important. This critical review, incorporating an allometric analysis of a large dataset, suggests that the FMD% index has a less-than-clear rationale, can itself generate the Dbase-dependency problem, provides biased estimates of differences in the flow-mediated response, complicates the interpretation of the flow-mediated protocol and clouds the causal pathway to vascular disease. These interpretative problems can be resolved by applying accepted allometric principles to the flow-mediated response.

  14. Survey of ocular irritation predictive capacity using Chorioallantoic Membrane Vascular Assay (CAMVA) and Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) test historical data for 319 personal care products over fourteen years.

    PubMed

    Donahue, D A; Kaufman, L E; Avalos, J; Simion, F A; Cerven, D R

    2011-03-01

    The Chorioallantoic Membrane Vascular Assay (CAMVA) and Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (BCOP) test are widely used to predict ocular irritation potential for consumer-use products. These in vitro assays do not require live animals, produce reliable predictive data for defined applicability domains compared to the Draize rabbit eye test, and are rapid and inexpensive. Data from 304 CAMVA and/or BCOP studies (319 formulations) were surveyed to determine the feasibility of predicting ocular irritation potential for various formulations. Hair shampoos, skin cleansers, and ethanol-based hair styling sprays were repeatedly predicted to be ocular irritants (accuracy rate=0.90-1.00), with skin cleanser and hair shampoo irritation largely dependent on surfactant species and concentration. Conversely, skin lotions/moisturizers and hair styling gels/lotions were repeatedly predicted to be non-irritants (accuracy rate=0.92 and 0.82, respectively). For hair shampoos, ethanol-based hair stylers, skin cleansers, and skin lotions/moisturizers, future ocular irritation testing (i.e., CAMVA/BCOP) can be nearly eliminated if new formulations are systematically compared to those previously tested using a defined decision tree. For other tested product categories, new formulations should continue to be evaluated in CAMVA/BCOP for ocular irritation potential because either the historical data exhibit significant variability (hair conditioners and mousses) or the historical sample size is too small to permit definitive conclusions (deodorants, make-up removers, massage oils, facial masks, body sprays, and other hair styling products). All decision tree conclusions should be made within a conservative weight-of-evidence context, considering the reported limitations of the BCOP test for alcohols, ketones, and solids.

  15. Comparison of two methods for calculating the mean vascularization index of ovarian stroma on the basis of spatio-temporal image correlation high-definition flow technology.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Kandzia, Tomasz; Alcázar, Juan Luis

    2013-11-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the agreement between two different methods for calculating the mean vascularization index (VI) of ovarian stroma using spatio-temporal image correlation-high definition flow (STIC-HDF) technology. Stored 4-D STIC-HDF volume data for ovaries of 34 premenopausal women were assessed retrospectively. We calculated the mean VI from the VI values derived for each 3-D volume within the STIC sequence. Then, the examiner subjectively selected the two volumes with the highest and lowest color signals, respectively. We averaged these two values. Agreement between VI measurements was estimated by calculating intra-class correlation coefficients. The intra-class correlation coefficient for the VI was 0.999 (95% confidence interval: 0.999-1.000). The mean time needed to calculate the mean VI using the entire 4-D STIC sequence was significantly longer than the mean time needed to calculate the average value from the volumes with the highest and lowest color signals determined by the operator (p < 0001). We conclude that there is significant agreement between the two methods. Calculating the average VI from the highest and lowest values is less time consuming than calculating the mean VI from the complete STIC sequence.

  16. Vascular Hyperpermeability and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Ryan; Tharakan, Binu

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability, the excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from blood vessels to the interstitial space, commonly occurs in traumatic and ischemic injuries. This hyperpermeability causes tissue vasogenic edema, which often leads to multiple organ failure resulting in patient death. Vascular hyperpermeability occurs most readily in small blood vessels as their more delicate physical constitution makes them an easy target for barrier dysfunction. A single layer of endothelial cells, linked to one another by cell adhesion molecules, covers the interior surface of each blood vessel. The cell adhesion molecules play a key role in maintaining barrier functions like the regulation of permeability. Aging is a major risk factor for microvascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability. Apart from age-related remodeling of the vascular wall, endothelial barrier integrity and function declines with the advancement of age. Studies that address the physiological and molecular basis of vascular permeability regulation in aging are currently very limited. There have been many cellular and molecular mechanisms proposed to explain aging-related endothelial dysfunction but their true relationship to barrier dysfunction and hyperpermeability is not clearly known. Among the several mechanisms that promote vascular dysfunction and hyperpermeability, the following are considered major contributors: oxidative stress, inflammation, and the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways. In this review we highlighted (a) the physiological, cellular and molecular changes that occur in the vascular system as a product of aging; (b) the potential mechanisms by which aging leads to barrier dysfunction and vascular hyperpermeability in the peripheral and the blood-brain barrier; (c) the mechanisms by which the age-related increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory markers and apoptotic signaling etc. cause endothelial dysfunction and their relationship to hyperpermeability; and (d) the

  17. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  18. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  19. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  20. Effects of amlodipine and candesartan on arterial stiffness estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index in patients with essential hypertension: A 24-week study

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Mie; Okura, Takafumi; Watanabe, Sanae; Irita, Jun; Enomoto, Daijiro; Johtoku, Masanori; Miyoshi, Ken-ichi; Koresawa, Mitsuko; Fukuoka, Tomikazu; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aortic stiffness assessed by brachio-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) can be used to predict cardiovascular events. However, baPWV is dependent on blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs have been reported to reduce baPWV; but it is difficult to determine if this effect is associated with lowered blood pressure or reduced arterial stiffness. Objectives: The primary end point of this study was to assess whether antihypertensive drugs reduce arterial stiffness as estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). The secondary end point was to compare the effects of 2 widely used drugs, the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine and the angiotensin II receptor blocker candesartan, on arterial stiffness. Methods: Between October 2005 and September 2006, consecutive Japanese outpatients with essential hypertension (EHT) (defined as using antihypertensive drugs at screening, systolic blood pressure [SBP] > 140 mm Hg, or diastolic BP [DBP] >90 mm Hg) were assigned to treatment for 24 weeks with either amlodipine (5–10 mg/d) or candesartan (8–12 mg/d). Arterial stiffness was evaluated with CAVI before and after 24 weeks of treatment. Relative change in arterial stiffness from baseline was also compared. The evaluator was blinded to treatment. Results: Twenty patients (11 men, 9 women; mean [SD] age, 62 [10] years) were included in the study. There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups. At baseline, mean (SD) CAVI was not significantly different in the amlodipine group compared with the candesartan group (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.46 [1.34], respectively). During the 24-week treatment period, mean SBP and DBP decreased significantly in both the amlodipine (14/10 mm Hg; P = 0.006 and P = 0.005) and the candesartan groups (13/11 mm Hg; P = 0.033 and P = 0.005). Amlodipine was associated with a significant change in CAVI from baseline (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.60 [1.50]; P = 0.017), whereas candesartan was not (8.46 [1.34] vs 8.81 [1

  1. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, F; Winkler, J

    2016-07-01

    Parkinsonism may result from cerebral vascular disorders that feature white matter lesions and small vessel pathology. Vascular Parkinsonism typically presents as lower body Parkinsonism with predominant gait impairment. Urinary incontinence and cognitive decline are additional features of the disease. There is a considerable overlap between vascular Parkinsonism and vascular dementia. We review the clinical characteristics of vascular Parkinsonism and discuss the current treatment approaches, as well as the role of brain imaging for the diagnostic workup. . PMID:27299942

  2. MRI of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, James R.; Chopp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability using MRI and its application to cerebral ischemia are reviewed. Measurement of BBB permeability using MRI has been employed to evaluate ischemic damage during acute and subacute phases of stroke and to predict hemorrhagic transformation. There is also an emerging interest on the development and use of MRI to monitor vascular structural changes and angiogenesis during stroke recovery. In this review, we describe MRI BBB permeability and susceptibility-weighted MRI measurements and its applications to evaluate ischemic damage during the acute and subacute phases of stroke and vascular remodeling during stroke recovery. PMID:23997835

  3. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  4. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  5. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  6. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Intensive multifactorial treatment aimed at cardiovascular (CV) risk factor reduction in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria can diminish fatal and non-fatal CV. Plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP predicts CV mortality in diabetic patients but the utility of P-NT-proBNP in screening for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. Methods and Results P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score ≥400, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) > 0.90 mm, ankle-brachial index < 0.90, and/or toe-brachial index < 0.64, respectively. Carotid artery compliance was also determined and the reactive hyperaemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral artery tonometry was used as a surrogate for endothelial function. P-NT-proBNP was associated with atherosclerosis in the unadjusted analysis, but not after adjustment for conventional risk factors. P-NT-proBNP was not associated with vascular dysfunction. The prevalence of atherosclerosis in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries was 35%, 10% and 21% of all patients, respectively. In total 49% had atherosclerosis in one territory and 15.6% and 1.0% in two and three territories. Low RHI was an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis (odds ratio [CI], 2.60 [1.15-5.88] and systolic blood pressure was the only independent determinant of CIMT (0.02 mm increase in CIMT per 10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure [p = 0.003]). Conclusions Half of asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria had significant

  7. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  8. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Vascular permeability—the essentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The vasculature, composed of vessels of different morphology and function, distributes blood to all tissues and maintains physiological tissue homeostasis. In pathologies, the vasculature is often affected by, and engaged in, the disease process. This may result in excessive formation of new, unstable, and hyperpermeable vessels with poor blood flow, which further promotes hypoxia and disease propagation. Chronic vessel permeability may also facilitate metastatic spread of cancer. Thus, there is a strong incentive to learn more about an important aspect of vessel biology in health and disease: the regulation of vessel permeability. The current review aims to summarize current insights into different mechanisms of vascular permeability, its regulatory factors, and the consequences for disease. PMID:26220421

  10. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  11. Involvement of K+ channel permeability changes in the L-NAME and indomethacin resistant part of adenosine-5′-O-(2-thiodiphosphate)-induced relaxation of pancreatic vascular bed

    PubMed Central

    Hillaire-Buys, D; Chapal, J; Linck, N; Blayac, J P; Petit, P; Loubatières-Mariani, M M

    1998-01-01

    μM) did not significantly change pancreatic vascular resistance whatever the experimental conditions (in the absence or in presence of L-NAME or L-NAME/indomethacin). In the presence of L-NAME, the closure of SKCa channels changed the one minute vasodilator effect of ADPβS into a potent vasoconstriction and thereafter modified only the beginning of the second part of the L-NAME-resistant part of the ADPβS-induced vasodilatation. In contrast, the L-NAME/indomethacin resistant part of ADPβS-induced relaxation remained unchanged in the presence of apamin.Charybdotoxin (0.2 μM), an inhibitor of BKCa, increased pancreatic vascular resistance in the presence of L-NAME/indomethacin. In the presence of L-NAME, the closure of BKCa channels reversed the one minute vasodilator effect of ADβPS into a potent vasoconstriction and drastically diminished the sustained vasodilatation. In contrast the L-NAME/indomethacin resistant part of ADPβS-induced relaxation was not modified by the presence of charybdotoxin. Under L-NAME/indomethacin/charybdotoxin/apamin infusions, ADPβS evoked a drastic and transient vasoconstriction reaching a maximum at the second minute, which was followed by a sustained increase in the flow rate throughout the ADPβS infusion. The maximal vasodilator effect of ADPβS observed was not modified by the addition of apamin.The results suggest that the L-NAME-resistant relaxation induced by ADPβS in the pancreatic vascular bed involves activation of BKCa, KATP and to a lesser extent of SKCa channels, but the L-NAME/indomethacin resistant part of ADPβS-induced relaxation is insensitive to the closure of KATP, SKCa and BKCa channels. PMID:9630354

  12. [Vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Dichgans, M

    2010-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) constitutes the second most frequent cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast to AD, VaD encompasses a variety of conditions and dementia mechanisms including multiple and strategic infarcts, widespread white matter lesions and hemorrhages. The diagnosis of VaD is based on the patient history, the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging. Treatment of VaD should account for the underlying vascular condition and is directed towards the control of vascular risk factors and stroke prevention. The need for early diagnosis and preventive treatment has promoted the concept of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Harmonization standards for the description and study of VCI have recently been published. A common and distinct subtype of VaD is subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) which is related to cerebral small vessel disease. SIVD is clinically characterized by impairment of executive functions and processing speed with relatively preserved memory. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of SIVD, represents an important differential diagnosis and may serve as a model of SIVD.

  13. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose).

  14. Pulmonary blood volume indexed to lung volume is reduced in newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis compared to normals – a prospective clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance study addressing pulmonary vascular changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary involvement, manifested as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary fibrosis, is the most common cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting early pulmonary involvement in SSc using recently developed non-invasive quantitative measures of pulmonary physiology using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Twenty-seven SSc patients (9 men, 57 ± 13 years) and 10 healthy controls (3 men, 54 ± 9 years) underwent CMR to determine the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and the PBV variation (PBVV) throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients underwent Doppler echocardiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and pulmonary function testing by spirometry. Comparisons were performed using the unpaired t-test and linear regression analysis was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Results Compared to healthy controls, the PBV indexed to lung volume (PBVI) was lower in patients (16 ± 4 vs 20 ± 5%, p < 0.05). There was no difference in PBV (466 ± 87 vs 471 ± 122 mL, p = 0.91) or PBVV/stroke volume (45 ± 10 vs 40 ± 6%, p = 0.09). There were no significant correlations between PBVI and pulmonary artery pressure estimated by Doppler (p = 0.08) the lung’s diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (p = 0.09), vital capacity (p = 0.45), or pulmonary fibrosis by HRCT (p = 0.74). Conclusions This study is the first to measure the PBV in humans using CMR. Compared to healthy controls, newly diagnosed SSc patients have a reduced amount of blood in the pulmonary vasculature (PBVI) but unchanged pulmonary vascular distensibility (PBVV/stroke volume). PBVI is unrelated to DLCO, pulmonary artery pressure, vital capacity, and the presence of pulmonary fibrosis. PBVI may be a novel parameter reflecting vascular lung involvement in early-stage SSc, and these findings may be consistent with pathophysiological changes of

  15. Vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Semashko, D C

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the initial assessment and emergent management of several common as well as uncommon vascular emergencies. Aortic dissection, aneurysms, and arterial occlusive disease are familiar but challenging clinical entities. Less frequently encountered conditions are also discussed including an aortic enteric fistula, mesenteric venous thrombosis, phlegmasia alba dolens, and subclavian vein thrombosis.

  16. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide.

  17. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  18. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  19. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio–ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight – a case with 8 years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio–ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient’s conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  20. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio-ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight - a case with 8 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient's conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  1. Mechanosensing at the Vascular Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Simon, Scott I.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer—the glycocalyx (GCX)—that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  2. The structure of turbulence overlying impermeable and permeable rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flow overlying complex topographies, both impermeable and permeable, occur across a broad range of scales in both natural and engineering environments. Permeability of the wall introduces a higher degree of both structural and conceptual complexity, with previous studies suggesting that interactions between the turbulent free flow and pore flow occur along the permeable interface and play a defining role in momentum exchange across the interface. Here we employ a Refractive-Index-Matching (RIM) technique in order to access the flow across the permeable interface with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method, resulting in unimpeded optical access to the fluid flow at and within a permeable bed. Cubic-packed hemispheres are studied in both impermeable and permeable configurations, with models cast by an acrylic resin whose refractive index matched that of the working fluid (aqueous sodium iodide). The statistical and structural features of the flow in the near-wall region of the impermeable case and the interfacial region of the permeable case are compared to understand the role of permeability in driving momentum exchange processes as a function of Reynolds number. Comparisons to recent numerical simulations are also made.

  3. Effect of Polycaprolactone Scaffold Permeability on Bone Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mitsak, Anna G.; Kemppainen, Jessica M.; Harris, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering depends on the scaffold's ability to allow nutrient diffusion to and waste removal from the regeneration site, as well as provide an appropriate mechanical environment. Since bone is highly vascularized, scaffolds that provide greater mass transport may support increased bone regeneration. Permeability encompasses the salient features of three-dimensional porous scaffold architecture effects on scaffold mass transport. We hypothesized that higher permeability scaffolds will enhance bone regeneration for a given cell seeding density. We manufactured poly-ɛ-caprolactone scaffolds, designed to have the same internal pore design and either a low permeability (0.688×10−7m4/N-s) or a high permeability (3.991×10−7m4/N-s), respectively. Scaffolds were seeded with bone morphogenic protein-7-transduced human gingival fibroblasts and implanted subcutaneously in immune-compromised mice for 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-CT evaluation showed better bone penetration into high permeability scaffolds, with blood vessel infiltration visible at 4 weeks. Compression testing showed that scaffold design had more influence on elastic modulus than time point did and that bone tissue infiltration increased the mechanical properties of the high permeability scaffolds at 8 weeks. These results suggest that for polycaprolactone, a more permeable scaffold with regular architecture is best for in vivo bone regeneration. This finding is an important step toward the end goal of optimizing a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. PMID:21395465

  4. The Permeable Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Leo R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the concept of permeability as knowledge flow into and out of the classroom and applies it to three college courses taught by the author at Plymouth State College (New Hampshire). Experiential knowledge comes into the classroom through interviews, guest speakers, and panel presentations, and flows out through service-learning students…

  5. Scales of rock permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Gavrilenko, P.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1996-05-01

    Permeability is a transport property which is currently measured in Darcy units. Although this unit is very convenient for most purposes, its use prevents from recognizing that permeability has units of length squared. Physically, the square root of permeability can thus be seen as a characteristic length or a characteristic pore size. At the laboratory scale, the identification of this characteristic length is a good example of how experimental measurements and theoretical modelling can be integrated. Three distinct identifications are of current use, relying on three different techniques: image analysis of thin sections, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. In each case, one or several theoretical models allow us to derive permeability from the experimental data (equivalent channel models, statistical models, effective media models, percolation and network models). Permeability varies with pressure and temperature and this is a decisive point for any extrapolation to crustal conditions. As far as pressure is concerned, most of the effect is due to cracks and a model which does not incorporate this fact will miss its goal. Temperature induced modifications can be the result of several processes: thermal cracking (due to thermal expansion mismatch and anisotropy, or to fluid pressure build up), and pressure solution are the two main ones. Experimental data on pressure and temperature effects are difficult to obtain but they are urgently needed. Finally, an important issue is: up to which point are these small scale data and models relevant when considering formations at the oil reservoir scale, or at the crust scale? At larger scales the identification of the characteristic scale is also a major goal which is examined.

  6. Fractal Analysis of Stress Sensitivity of Permeability in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-12-01

    A permeability model for porous media considering the stress sensitivity is derived based on mechanics of materials and the fractal characteristics of solid cluster size distribution. The permeability of porous media considering the stress sensitivity is related to solid cluster fractal dimension, solid cluster fractal tortuosity dimension, solid cluster minimum diameter and solid cluster maximum diameter, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, as well as power index. Every parameter has clear physical meaning without the use of empirical constants. The model predictions of permeability show good agreement with those obtained by the available experimental expression. The proposed model may be conducible to a better understanding of the mechanism for flow in elastic porous media.

  7. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  8. Transient increase in interleukin-8 and pulmonary microvascular permeability following aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Raijmakers, P G; Groeneveld, A B; Rauwerda, J A; Schneider, A J; Teule, G J; Hack, C E; Thijs, L G

    1995-03-01

    Aortic surgery results in ischemia/reperfusion of the lower body. This may liberate inflammatory mediators that activate neutrophils, and may result in lung microvascular changes with increased permeability and respiratory failure. We studied circulating inflammatory mediators and the pulmonary leak index (PLI) of 67Ga, a measure of transvascular transferrin transport and permeability, in patients scheduled for elective aortic and peripheral vascular surgery, before and after surgery. Aortic surgery patients in Groups 1 (n = 10) and 2 (n = 7) were studied before and at a median of 2.5 and 21.0 h after surgery, respectively. A control Group 3 (n = 6) was studied before and at a median of 2.9 h after peripheral vascular surgery. The PLI (median) increased from a median of 9.1 (range, 6.6 to 14.7) before to a median of 23.4 (range, 18.7 to 86.4) x 10(-3)/min after surgery in Group 1 but not in the other groups (p < 0.001). The postoperative increase in circulating neutrophils and elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin, a marker of neutrophil activation, was similar among the groups. Plasma levels of activated complement 3a and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) did not change in any of the groups. In contrast, plasma levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) increased in Group 1 from < 3 (range, < 3 to 37) before to 324 (range, 36 to 868) pg/ml after surgery, but did not change in the other groups (p < 0.005). The decrease in plasma levels of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was greater in Group 1 than in the other groups (p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  10. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  11. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  12. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  13. Hemodynamics analysis of patient-specific carotid bifurcation: a CFD model of downstream peripheral vascular impedance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingliang; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tu, Jiyuan

    2013-04-01

    The study of cardiovascular models was presented in this paper based on medical image reconstruction and computational fluid dynamics. Our aim is to provide a reality platform for the purpose of flow analysis and virtual intervention outcome predication for vascular diseases. By connecting two porous mediums with transient permeability at the downstream of the carotid bifurcation branches, a downstream peripheral impedance model was developed, and the effect of the downstream vascular bed impedance can be taken into consideration. After verifying its accuracy with a healthy carotid bifurcation, this model was implemented in a diseased carotid bifurcation analysis. On the basis of time-averaged wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, and the relative residence time, fractions of abnormal luminal surface were highlighted, and the atherosclerosis was assessed from a hemodynamic point of view. The effect of the atherosclerosis on the transient flow division between the two branches because of the existence of plaque was also analysed. This work demonstrated that the proposed downstream peripheral vascular impedance model can be used for computational modelling when the outlets boundary conditions are not available, and successfully presented the potential of using medical imaging and numerical simulation to provide existing clinical prerequisites for diagnosis and therapeutic treatment.

  14. Changes in mast cells and in permeability of mesenteric microvessels under the effect of immobilization and electrostimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorizontova, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a reduction in the amount of mast cells in the mesentery and an increase in their degranulation was accompanied by an increase in vascular permeability of rat mesentery. It is supposed that immobilization and electrostimulation causing degranulation of mast cells prompted histamine and serotonin release from them, thus increasing the permeability of the venular portion of the microvascular bed. Prophylactic use of esculamin preparation with P-vitaminic activity decreased mast cell degranulation, which apparently prolonged the release of histamine and serotonin from them and normalized vascular permeability.

  15. [Research on permeability of landfill's body in primary compression].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Chi

    2009-12-01

    Refuse degradation and landfill leachate treatment are the main research directions of landfill technology at present, but permeability characteristics of landfill body are paid little attention on. According to this actuality, the study selected four kinds of landfill's bodies under different pressures as study objects and tested the permeability characteristics in the stage of main compression settlement. Through the laboratory physical simulation experiments, the results show that the data of determination and analysis on landfill's bodies under four difference pressures conform to Darcy's law. Because the change of COD is in the phase of acid producing, its impact on permeability can not be considered. Based on these conditions, the calculation results of permeability coefficient indicate that during the course of the main compression settlement, the change law of landfill permeability coefficient index is approximately agreed with nature exponential law, expect for the condition of landfill body without pressure. Meanwhile, the landfill permeability coefficient values under four difference pressures are in the range of 10(-4.5)-10(-5.3) m x s(-1), which are consistent with the typical representative values of garbage permeability coefficient.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  17. Glassy Dynamics, Cell Mechanics and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Corey; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of all inflammatory processes is disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier. Such disruption is initiated in part through active contraction of the cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell (EC). Because contractile forces are propagated from cell to cell across a great many cell-cell junctions, this contractile process is strongly cooperative and highly nonlocal. We show here that the characteristic length scale of propagation is modulated by agonists and antagonists that impact permeability of the endothelial barrier. In the presence of agonists including thrombin, histamine, and H202, force correlation length increases, whereas in the presence of antagonists including sphingosine-1-phosphate, hepatocyte growth factor, and the rho kinase inhibitor, Y27632, force correlation length decreases. Intercellular force chains and force clusters are also evident, both of which are reminiscent of soft glassy materials approaching a glass transition. PMID:23638866

  18. Microcirculation-on-a-Chip: A Microfluidic Platform for Assaying Blood- and Lymphatic-Vessel Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Miwa; Sasaki, Naoki; Ato, Manabu; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Kiichi; Sato, Kae

    2015-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic model of microcirculation containing both blood and lymphatic vessels for examining vascular permeability. The designed microfluidic device harbors upper and lower channels that are partly aligned and are separated by a porous membrane, and on this membrane, blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were cocultured back-to-back. At cell-cell junctions of both BECs and LECs, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin were detected. The permeability coefficient measured here was lower than the value reported for isolated mammalian venules. Moreover, our results showed that the flow culture established in the device promoted the formation of endothelial cell-cell junctions, and that treatment with histamine, an inflammation-promoting substance, induced changes in the localization of tight and adherens junction-associated proteins and an increase in vascular permeability in the microdevice. These findings indicated that both BECs and LECs appeared to retain their functions in the microfluidic coculture platform. Using this microcirculation device, the vascular damage induced by habu snake venom was successfully assayed, and the assay time was reduced from 24 h to 30 min. This is the first report of a microcirculation model in which BECs and LECs were cocultured. Because the micromodel includes lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels, the model can be used to evaluate both vascular permeability and lymphatic return rate. PMID:26332321

  19. Modeling of microvascular permeability changes after electroporation.

    PubMed

    Corovic, Selma; Markelc, Bostjan; Dolinar, Mitja; Cemazar, Maja; Jarm, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelium selectively controls the transport of plasma contents across the blood vessel wall. The principal objective of our preliminary study was to quantify the electroporation-induced increase in permeability of blood vessel wall for macromolecules, which do not normally extravasate from blood into skin interstitium in homeostatic conditions. Our study combines mathematical modeling (by employing pharmacokinetic and finite element modeling approach) with in vivo measurements (by intravital fluorescence microscopy). Extravasation of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules of two different sizes (70 kDa and 2000 kDa) following the application of electroporation pulses was investigated in order to simulate extravasation of therapeutic macromolecules with molecular weights comparable to molecular weight of particles such as antibodies and plasmid DNA. The increase in blood vessel permeability due to electroporation and corresponding transvascular transport was quantified by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficients for skin microvessel wall (D [μm2/s]) for both molecular sizes. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficients were D = 0.0086 μm2/s and D = 0.0045 μm2/s for 70 kDa and 2000 kDa dextran molecules, respectively. The results of our preliminary study have important implications in development of realistic mathematical models for prediction of extravasation and delivery of large therapeutic molecules to target tissues by means of electroporation. PMID:25793292

  20. Modeling of microvascular permeability changes after electroporation.

    PubMed

    Corovic, Selma; Markelc, Bostjan; Dolinar, Mitja; Cemazar, Maja; Jarm, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelium selectively controls the transport of plasma contents across the blood vessel wall. The principal objective of our preliminary study was to quantify the electroporation-induced increase in permeability of blood vessel wall for macromolecules, which do not normally extravasate from blood into skin interstitium in homeostatic conditions. Our study combines mathematical modeling (by employing pharmacokinetic and finite element modeling approach) with in vivo measurements (by intravital fluorescence microscopy). Extravasation of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules of two different sizes (70 kDa and 2000 kDa) following the application of electroporation pulses was investigated in order to simulate extravasation of therapeutic macromolecules with molecular weights comparable to molecular weight of particles such as antibodies and plasmid DNA. The increase in blood vessel permeability due to electroporation and corresponding transvascular transport was quantified by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficients for skin microvessel wall (D [μm2/s]) for both molecular sizes. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficients were D = 0.0086 μm2/s and D = 0.0045 μm2/s for 70 kDa and 2000 kDa dextran molecules, respectively. The results of our preliminary study have important implications in development of realistic mathematical models for prediction of extravasation and delivery of large therapeutic molecules to target tissues by means of electroporation.

  1. Modeling of Microvascular Permeability Changes after Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Corovic, Selma; Markelc, Bostjan; Dolinar, Mitja; Cemazar, Maja; Jarm, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelium selectively controls the transport of plasma contents across the blood vessel wall. The principal objective of our preliminary study was to quantify the electroporation-induced increase in permeability of blood vessel wall for macromolecules, which do not normally extravasate from blood into skin interstitium in homeostatic conditions. Our study combines mathematical modeling (by employing pharmacokinetic and finite element modeling approach) with in vivo measurements (by intravital fluorescence microscopy). Extravasation of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules of two different sizes (70 kDa and 2000 kDa) following the application of electroporation pulses was investigated in order to simulate extravasation of therapeutic macromolecules with molecular weights comparable to molecular weight of particles such as antibodies and plasmid DNA. The increase in blood vessel permeability due to electroporation and corresponding transvascular transport was quantified by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficients for skin microvessel wall (D [μm2/s]) for both molecular sizes. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficients were D = 0.0086 μm2/s and D = 0.0045 μm2/s for 70 kDa and 2000 kDa dextran molecules, respectively. The results of our preliminary study have important implications in development of realistic mathematical models for prediction of extravasation and delivery of large therapeutic molecules to target tissues by means of electroporation. PMID:25793292

  2. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  3. Tubedown regulation of retinal endothelial permeability signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nhu; Gendron, Robert L.; Grozinger, Kindra; Whelan, Maria A.; Hicks, Emily Anne; Tennakoon, Bimal; Gardiner, Danielle; Good, William V.; Paradis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tubedown (Tbdn; Naa15), a subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatA, complexes with the c-Src substrate Cortactin and supports adult retinal homeostasis through regulation of vascular permeability. Here we investigate the role of Tbdn expression on signaling components of retinal endothelial permeability to understand how Tbdn regulates the vasculature and supports retinal homeostasis. Tbdn knockdown-induced hyperpermeability to Albumin in retinal endothelial cells was associated with an increase in the levels of activation of the Src family kinases (SFK) c-Src, Fyn and Lyn and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421). The knockdown of Cortactin expression reduced Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and the levels of activated SFK. Inhibition of SFK in retinal endothelial cells decreased Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421) levels. Retinal lesions of endothelial-specific Tbdn knockdown mice, with tissue thickening, fibrovascular growth, and hyperpermeable vessels displayed an increase in the levels of activated c-Src. Moreover, the retinal lesions of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) associated with a loss of Tbdn expression and hyperpermeability to Albumin displayed increased levels of activated SFK in retinal blood vessels. Taken together, these results implicate Tbdn as an important regulator of retinal endothelial permeability and homeostasis by modulating a signaling pathway involving c-Src and Cortactin. PMID:26142315

  4. Indexing Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic indexing. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to Indexing Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based Indexing; (5) Content-Based Indexing; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)

  5. Branding of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  6. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Berryman, James

    2003-10-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery.

  7. Design and development of multilayer vascular graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Vascular graft is a widely-used medical device for the treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysm as well as for the use of vascular access and pediatric shunt, which are major causes of mortality and morbidity in this world. Dysfunction of vascular grafts often occurs, particularly for grafts with diameter less than 6mm, and is associated with the design of graft materials. Mechanical strength, compliance, permeability, endothelialization and availability are issues of most concern for vascular graft materials. To address these issues, we have designed a biodegradable, compliant graft made of hybrid multilayer by combining an intimal equivalent, electrospun heparin-impregnated poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanofibers, with a medial equivalent, a crosslinked collagen-chitosan-based gel scaffold. The intimal equivalent is designed to build mechanical strength and stability suitable for in vivo grafting and to prevent thrombosis. The medial equivalent is designed to serve as a scaffold for the activity of the smooth muscle cells important for vascular healing and regeneration. Our results have shown that genipin is a biocompatible crosslinker to enhance the mechanical properties of collagen-chitosan based scaffolds, and the degradation time and the activity of smooth muscle cells in the scaffold can be modulated by the crosslinking degree. For vascular grafting and regeneration in vivo, an important design parameter of the hybrid multilayer is the interface adhesion between the intimal and medial equivalents. With diametrically opposite affinities to water, delamination of the two layers occurs. Physical or chemical modification techniques were thus used to enhance the adhesion. Microscopic examination and graft-relevant functional characterizations have been performed to evaluate these techniques. Results from characterization of microstructure and functional properties, including burst strength, compliance, water permeability and suture

  8. Endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction in disease: albuminuria and increased microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Satchell, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Appreciation of the glomerular microcirculation as a specialized microcirculatory bed, rather than as an entirely separate entity, affords important insights into both glomerular and systemic microvascular pathophysiology. In this review we compare regulation of permeability in systemic and glomerular microcirculations, focusing particularly on the role of the endothelial glycocalyx, and consider the implications for disease processes. The luminal surface of vascular endothelium throughout the body is covered with endothelial glycocalyx, comprising surface-anchored proteoglycans, supplemented with adsorbed soluble proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and plasma constituents. In both continuous and fenestrated microvessels, this endothelial glycocalyx provides resistance to the transcapillary escape of water and macromolecules, acting as an integral component of the multilayered barrier provided by the walls of these microvessels (ie acting in concert with clefts or fenestrae across endothelial cell layers, basement membranes and pericytes). Dysfunction of any of these capillary wall components, including the endothelial glycocalyx, can disrupt normal microvascular permeability. Because of its ubiquitous nature, damage to the endothelial glycocalyx alters the permeability of multiple capillary beds: in the glomerulus this is clinically apparent as albuminuria. Generalized damage to the endothelial glycocalyx can therefore manifest as both albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability. This triad of altered endothelial glycocalyx, albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability occurs in a number of important diseases, such as diabetes, with accumulating evidence for a similar phenomenon in ischaemia-reperfusion injury and infectious disease. The detection of albuminuria therefore has implications for the function of the microcirculation as a whole. The importance of the endothelial glycocalyx for other aspects of vascular function

  9. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  10. Vascular response to radiation injury in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L M; Evans, M L; Graham, M M; Eary, J F; Dahlen, D D

    1992-02-01

    Changes in relative left-to-right lung blood flow ratios were followed as an index of vascular radiation injury in left-hemithorax-irradiated Sprague-Dawley rats. Single doses of 11 to 21 Gy gamma radiation resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in relative blood flow to the irradiated lung from 3 to 5 weeks after exposure during the development of pneumonitis. Blood flow returned to near normal by 5 weeks after lower doses (11-13.5 Gy). After a single dose of 15 Gy the left-to-right blood flow ratio recovered to 75% of normal at 12 weeks and leveled off. Following 18 Gy irradiation a second period of reduced flow began 16 weeks after exposure. After 21 Gy irradiation flow to the irradiated side remained low for 1 year after exposure. Rats that received a single dose of 18 Gy to the left hemithorax were also treated with one or two of the following drugs: captopril, cyproheptadine, dexamethasone, diethylcarbamazine, penicillamine, or theophylline. Dexamethasone was most effective at preventing the decrease in blood flow to the irradiated lung when treatment was continued through the pneumonitis period and dose was not tapered until 8 weeks after radiation exposure. All other drugs and drug combinations were, for the most part, virtually ineffective after the pneumonitis period. There was a relatively poor correlation with earlier vascular permeability surface area product studies. This suggests that endothelial damage, as well as damage to other cell types, contributes to the development of post-irradiation fibrosis in the lung. PMID:1734443

  11. Vascular permeabilization by intravenous arachidonate in the rat peritoneal cavity: antagonism by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hannaert, Patrick; Hider, Hamida; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P

    2003-04-11

    Arachidonic acid was investigated for its vascular permeabilizing potential in the rat peritoneal cavity and for its mechanism of action. The antagonistic potential of antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C and troxerutin) was also evaluated. Vascular permeability was equated to the rate of extravasation of Evans blue dye from plasma into the peritoneal cavity. Baseline permeability was linear up to 2 h, with a rate constant (k) of 0.0031+/-0.0007 h(-1). Intravenous arachidonate (from 30 microg/kg to 3 mg/kg) induced an immediate, dose-related and significant increase in permeability (ranging from 80% to 150%), which was comparable to the effect induced by similar doses of serotonin. Aspirin (10 mg/kg) reduced the arachidonate-induced permeability by 75%, but interestingly neither the stable thromboxane A(2) receptor agonist U46619 (prostaglandin H(2) endoperoxide epoxymethane) nor prostacyclin was able to increase peritoneal vascular permeability. In contrast, the permeabilizing action of arachidonic acid was very sensitive to antioxidant agents. Thus, vitamin C and the flavonoid compound troxerutin (100 mg/kg) fully abolished arachidonate-induced permeability, whereas vitamin E had only a partial effect (40-100% inhibition). In conclusion, intravenous administration of arachidonic acid strongly enhanced peritoneal vascular permeability in the rat, apparently via free radical generation. This rat peritoneal model can be used to evaluate the in vivo antinflammatory potential of antioxidant drugs.

  12. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  13. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  14. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  15. Platelets mediate increased endothelium permeability in dengue through NLRP3-inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Hottz, Eugenio D; Lopes, Juliana F; Freitas, Carla; Valls-de-Souza, Rogério; Oliveira, Marcus F; Bozza, Marcelo T; Da Poian, Andrea T; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patricia T

    2013-11-14

    Dengue is the most frequent hemorrhagic viral disease and re-emergent infection in the world. Although thrombocytopenia is characteristically observed in mild and severe forms of dengue, the role of platelet activation in dengue pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that platelets have major roles in inflammatory amplification and increased vascular permeability during severe forms of dengue. Here we investigate interleukin (IL)-1β synthesis, processing, and secretion in platelets during dengue virus (DV) infection and potential contribution of these events to endothelial permeability during infection. We observed increased expression of IL-1β in platelets and platelet-derived microparticles from patients with dengue or after platelet exposure to DV in vitro. We demonstrated that DV infection leads to assembly of nucleotide-binding domain leucine rich repeat containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasomes, activation of caspase-1, and caspase-1-dependent IL-1β secretion. Our findings also indicate that platelet-derived IL-1β is chiefly released in microparticles through mechanisms dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-triggered NLRP3 inflammasomes. Inflammasome activation and platelet shedding of IL-1β-rich microparticles correlated with signs of increased vascular permeability. Moreover, microparticles from DV-stimulated platelets induced enhanced permeability in vitro in an IL-1-dependent manner. Our findings provide new evidence that platelets contribute to increased vascular permeability in DV infection by inflammasome-dependent release of IL-1β.

  16. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  17. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  18. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-03-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations. PMID:27607324

  19. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  20. Angiopoietin-2 is critical for cytokine-induced vascular leakage.

    PubMed

    Benest, Andrew V; Kruse, Karoline; Savant, Soniya; Thomas, Markus; Laib, Anna M; Loos, Elias K; Fiedler, Ulrike; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2013-01-01

    Genetic experiments (loss-of-function and gain-of-function) have established the role of Angiopoietin/Tie ligand/receptor tyrosine kinase system as a regulator of vessel maturation and quiescence. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) acts on Tie2-expressing resting endothelial cells as an antagonistic ligand to negatively interfere with the vessel stabilizing effects of constitutive Ang-1/Tie-2 signaling. Ang-2 thereby controls the vascular response to inflammation-inducing as well as angiogenesis-inducing cytokines. This study was aimed at assessing the role of Ang-2 as an autocrine (i.e. endothelial-derived) regulator of rapid vascular responses (within minutes) caused by permeability-inducing agents. Employing two independent in vivo assays to quantitatively assess vascular leakage (tracheal microsphere assay, 1-5 min and Miles assay, 20 min), the immediate vascular response to histamine, bradykinin and VEGF was analyzed in Ang-2-deficient (Ang-2(-/-)) mice. In comparison to the wild type control mice, the Ang2(-/-) mice demonstrated a significantly attenuated response. The Ang-2(-/-) phenotype was rescued by systemic administration (paracrine) of an adenovirus encoding Ang-2. Furthermore, cytokine-induced intracellular calcium influx was impaired in Ang-2(-/-) endothelioma cells, consistent with reduced phospholipase activation in vivo. Additionally, recombinant human Ang-2 (rhAng-2) alone was unable to induce vascular leakage. In summary, we report here in a definite genetic setting that Ang-2 is critical for multiple vascular permeability-inducing cytokines. PMID:23940579

  1. Effect on capillary permeability in rabbits of iridoids from Buddleia scordioides.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Perez; Solis, Rosario Vargas; Baez, Efren Garcia; Martinez, Francisco Martinez

    2006-07-01

    The methanol soluble fraction of the leaves of Buddleia scordioides after column chromatography resulted in the isolation of two known iridoid glucosides, catalpol and methylcatalpol. The structures were elucidated by extensive 1D-2D-NMR spectroscopy. The structure of methylcatalpol was confirmed by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. These compounds showed protective activity against increased (both chloroform and histamine) skin vascular permeability in rabbits. The protective effect was measured as the reduction in leakage of Evans blue. The results showed that the iridoids produced a significant inhibition of microvascular permeability. A comparison was made between the action of the iridoids and a known inhibitor of vascular permeability, troxerutin (50 mg/kg). Methylcatalpol and catalpol were found to be less effective than troxerutin.

  2. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of selective DPP-4 inhibitor in experimental vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Both forms of dementia are posing greater risk to the world population and are increasing at a faster rate. In the past we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the role of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. Pancreatectomy diabetes rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of vildagliptin has significantly attenuated pancreatectomy induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor may be considered as potential pharmacological agents for the management of pancreatectomy induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. The selective modulators of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 may further be explored for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:26382939

  4. Permeability Asymmetry in Composite Porous Ceramic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcharov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Uvarov, V. I.; Kurchatova, O. V.

    The results from the investigation of transport characteristics and gas transport asymmetry in bilayer composite membranes are submitted. These membranes are produced by SHS method. Asymmetric effect and hysteresis of permeability in nanoporous membranes are detected. It's shown, that permeability ratio (asymmetry value of permeability) increases up to several times. The asymmetry of permeability usually decreases monotonically with the pressure decrease.

  5. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  6. Permeability of stylolite-bearing chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, I.; Nykjaer, O.; Priisholm, S. ); Springer, N.

    1994-11-01

    Permeabilities were measured on core plugs from stylolite-bearing chalk of the Gorm field in the Danish North Sea. Air and liquid permeabilities were measured in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the stylolite surface. Permeability was measured with sleeve pressure equal to in-situ reservoir stress. Permeabilities of plugs with stylolites but without stylolite-associated fractures were equal in the two directions. The permeability is equal to the matrix permeability of non-stylolite-bearing chalk. In contrast, when fractures were associated with the stylolites, permeability was enhanced. The enhancement was most significant in the horizontal direction parallel to the stylolites.

  7. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  8. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  9. Vascular grading of angiogenesis: prognostic significance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, F B; Bak, M; Vach, W; Rose, C

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11 years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers was moderately reproduced (κ = 0.59). Vascular grade was significantly associated with axillary node involvement, tumour size, malignancy grade, oestrogen receptor status and histological type. In univariate analyses vascular grade significantly predicted recurrence free survival and overall survival for all patients (P< 0.0001), node-negative patients (P< 0.0001) and node-positive patients (P< 0.0001). Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that vascular grading contributed with independent prognostic value in all patients (P< 0.0001). A prognostic index including the vascular grade had clinical impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646886

  10. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  11. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  12. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast. PMID:27321288

  13. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast.

  14. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  15. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  16. Update on Pharmacologic Retinal Vascular Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Wasinska-Borowiec, Weronika; Flynn, Harry W; Mieler, William F

    2015-01-01

    Several medications are associated with retinal vascular toxicity. These include intraocular aminoglycosides, oral contraceptives, interferon alpha, several other agents, and talc, which occurs as a vehicle in some oral medications that may be abused intravenously. As a group, these entities represent a small but clinically relevant category of retinal toxicity from medications. Some of the manifestations (e.g., retinal vascular occlusion) are nonspecific, but others are more specific, including clinically visible talc emboli in retinal vessels. Toxicity may be asymptomatic or may cause irreversible visual loss. By maintaining a high index of suspicion, the correct diagnosis can usually be made.

  17. Update on Pharmacologic Retinal Vascular Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Wasinska-Borowiec, Weronika; Flynn, Harry W; Mieler, William F

    2015-01-01

    Several medications are associated with retinal vascular toxicity. These include intraocular aminoglycosides, oral contraceptives, interferon alpha, several other agents, and talc, which occurs as a vehicle in some oral medications that may be abused intravenously. As a group, these entities represent a small but clinically relevant category of retinal toxicity from medications. Some of the manifestations (e.g., retinal vascular occlusion) are nonspecific, but others are more specific, including clinically visible talc emboli in retinal vessels. Toxicity may be asymptomatic or may cause irreversible visual loss. By maintaining a high index of suspicion, the correct diagnosis can usually be made. PMID:26350526

  18. VE-cadherin facilitates BMP-induced endothelial cell permeability and signaling.

    PubMed

    Benn, Andreas; Bredow, Clara; Casanova, Isabel; Vukičević, Slobodan; Knaus, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Several vascular disorders, such as aberrant angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension, have been linked to dysfunctional BMP signaling. Vascular hyperpermeability via distortion of endothelial cell adherens junctions is a common feature of these diseases, but the role of BMPs in this process has not been investigated. BMP signaling is initiated by binding of ligand to, and activation of, BMP type I (BMPRI) and type II (BMPRII) receptors. Internalization of VE-cadherin as well as c-Src kinase-dependent phosphorylation have been implicated in the loosening of cell-cell contacts, thereby modulating vascular permeability. Here we demonstrate that BMP6 induces hyperpermeabilization of human endothelial cells by inducing internalization and c-Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. Furthermore, we show BMP-dependent physical interaction of VE-cadherin with the BMP receptor ALK2 (BMPRI) and BMPRII, resulting in stabilization of the BMP receptor complex and, thereby, the support of BMP6-Smad signaling. Our results provide first insights into the molecular mechanism of BMP-induced vascular permeability, a hallmark of various vascular diseases, and provide the basis for further investigations of BMPs as regulators of vascular integrity, both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26598555

  19. VE-cadherin facilitates BMP-induced endothelial cell permeability and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Andreas; Bredow, Clara; Casanova, Isabel; Vukičević, Slobodan; Knaus, Petra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several vascular disorders, such as aberrant angiogenesis, atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension, have been linked to dysfunctional BMP signaling. Vascular hyperpermeability via distortion of endothelial cell adherens junctions is a common feature of these diseases, but the role of BMPs in this process has not been investigated. BMP signaling is initiated by binding of ligand to, and activation of, BMP type I (BMPRI) and type II (BMPRII) receptors. Internalization of VE-cadherin as well as c-Src kinase-dependent phosphorylation have been implicated in the loosening of cell–cell contacts, thereby modulating vascular permeability. Here we demonstrate that BMP6 induces hyperpermeabilization of human endothelial cells by inducing internalization and c-Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. Furthermore, we show BMP-dependent physical interaction of VE-cadherin with the BMP receptor ALK2 (BMPRI) and BMPRII, resulting in stabilization of the BMP receptor complex and, thereby, the support of BMP6-Smad signaling. Our results provide first insights into the molecular mechanism of BMP-induced vascular permeability, a hallmark of various vascular diseases, and provide the basis for further investigations of BMPs as regulators of vascular integrity, both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26598555

  20. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  1. HABP2 is a Novel Regulator of Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, N.; Mirzapoiazova, T.; Mambetsariev, B.; Sammani, S.; Lennon, F.E.; Garcia, J.G.N.; Singleton, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the role of the extracellular serine protease, Hyaluronic Acid Binding Protein 2 (HABP2), in vascular barrier regulation. Methods and Results Using immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induces HABP2 expression in murine lung endothelium in vivo and in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) in vitro. High molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA, ~1 million Da) decreased HABP2 protein expression in HPMVEC and decreased purified HABP2 enzymatic activity whereas low MW HA (LMW-HA, ~2,500 Da) increased these activities. The effects of LMW-HA on HABP2 activity, but not HMW-HA, were inhibited with a peptide of the polyanion binding domain (PABD) of HABP2. Silencing (siRNA) HABP2 expression augmented HMW-HA-induced EC barrier enhancement and inhibited LPS and LMW-HA-mediated EC barrier disruption, results which were reversed with overexpression of HABP2. Silencing PAR receptors 1 and 3, RhoA or ROCK expression attenuated LPS, LMW-HA and HABP2-mediated EC barrier disruption. Utilizing murine models of acute lung injury, we observed that LPS- and ventilator-induced pulmonary vascular hyper-permeability were significantly reduced with vascular silencing (siRNA) of HABP2. Conclusions HABP2 negatively regulates vascular integrity via activation of PAR receptor/RhoA/ROCK signaling and represents a potentially useful therapeutic target for syndromes of increased vascular permeability. PMID:20042707

  2. Thromboxane A{sub 2} increases endothelial permeability through upregulation of interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su-Ryun; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Koanhoi; Park, Shi-Young; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il; Kim, Yung-Jin; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2010-07-02

    Thromboxane A{sub 2} (TXA{sub 2}), a major prostanoid formed from prostaglandin H{sub 2} by thromboxane synthase, is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of vascular diseases. In this study, we report that TXA{sub 2} mimetic U46619 significantly increases the endothelial permeability both in vitro and in vivo. U46619 enhanced the expression and secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major inducer of vascular permeability, in endothelial cells. Promoter analysis showed that the U46619-induced expression of IL-8 was mainly regulated by nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). U46619 induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B through I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) activation, I{kappa}B phosphorylation and NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation. Furthermore, the inhibition of IL-8 or blockade of the IL-8 receptor attenuated the U46619-induced endothelial cell permeability by modulating the cell-cell junctions. Overall, these results suggest that U46619 promotes vascular permeability through the production of IL-8 via NF-{kappa}B activation in endothelial cells.

  3. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  4. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sessions June 14-17, 2017 Sheraton New Orleans New Orleans, LA USA Board Review Course June 16-18, 2017 SVM in the Vascular Lab June 17, 2017 Learn more Patient Information Pages from Vascular Medicine October 2016 Smoking Cessation More info for patients. SVM Case ...

  5. [Vascular graft prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakfé, N; Dieval, F; Thaveau, F; Rinckenbach, S; Hassani, O; Camelot, G; Durand, B; Kretz, J-G

    2004-06-01

    Performed since the 1950s, vascular grafting has opened modern era of vascular surgery. Autologous venous grafts are of first choice for revascularisation of small arteries. Synthetic grafts are mainly modelled using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene or terephtalate polyethylene. These prosthesis are mainly used for revascularization of medium and large size arteries. PMID:15220107

  6. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow over a permeable rough wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Permeable walls are encountered in a variety of geophysical flows, including alluvial river beds, canopies and urban environments. Permeable walls possess very different boundary conditions as compared to classic impermeable walls (i.e. the slip condition and penetration of flow into the bed). Permeability allows flow interactions across the wall interface, resulting in notable mass, momentum and energy exchange. Such exchange takes place in the so-called transition layer and often occurs through turbulent flow mechanisms. It is increasingly recognized that turbulence plays a key role in a number of important natural functions, including biogeochemical as well as geomorphological processes. However, the flow physics of the transition layer are still poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative investigation of these permeable systems within which physical and optical access are severely compromised. This is particularly true for state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that require unaberrated optical access to the measurement locations. To overcome optical limitations, a refractive index matching (RIM) technique was employed herein to gain full optical access to the transition layer. Sodium Iodide aqueous solution (63% by weight and RI ~ 1.496 at 20°C) served as a working fluid, and an acrylic resin (RI ~ 1.499) was chosen for fabricating wall models. Measurements were performed using high-resolution planar PIV in different configurations to characterize the turbulent boundary layer and the transition layer. The wall models comprised uniform spheres packed in a cubic arrangement, and two cases were modeled - impermeable and permeable walls that were both rough. To eliminate the effect of roughness, and thus isolate the effect of permeability, the surface roughness of the two wall models was kept identical. This allowed us to obtain a more meaningful comparison and highlight the impact of wall permeability in natural

  7. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation.

  8. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  9. High membrane permeability for melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be "secreted" from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  10. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  11. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  12. Vascular ring diagnosis following respiratory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Evie Alexandra; Scott, Alison; Chetcuti, Philip; Crabbe, David

    2014-01-01

    Vascular rings can present with non-specific respiratory and/or oesophageal symptoms. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. This case report describes an uncommon acute presentation of a vascular ring. We report a thriving 14-month-old child with a long history of recurrent wheeze and ‘noisy breathing’. He presented acutely with food bolus impaction in the oesophagus which led to a respiratory arrest. Oesophagoscopy and bronchoscopy suggested vascular ring anomaly. A contrast-enhanced CT scan demonstrated a right-sided aortic arch with left ligamentum arteriosum encircling the oesophagus and airway. The ligament was ligated and divided. At follow-up 6 months later, the infant had mild persistent stridor but was otherwise well. PMID:24895385

  13. Slit2-Robo4 receptor responses inhibit ANDV directed permeability of human lung microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2013-08-01

    Hantaviruses nonlytically infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause edematous and hemorrhagic diseases. Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), and Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Hantaviruses enhance vascular endothelial growth factor directed EC permeability resulting in the disassembly of inter-endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). Recent studies demonstrate that Slit2 binding to Robo1/Robo4 receptors on ECs has opposing effects on AJ disassembly and vascular fluid barrier functions. Here we demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits ANDV and HTNV induced permeability and AJ disassembly of pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMECs) by interactions with Robo4. In contrast, Slit2 had no effect on the permeability of ANDV infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Analysis of Robo1/Robo4 expression determined that PMECs express Robo4, but not Robo1, while HUVECs expressed both Robo4 and Robo1 receptors. SiRNA knockdown of Robo4 in PMECs prevented Slit2 inhibition of ANDV induced permeability demonstrating that Robo4 receptors determine PMEC responsiveness to Slit2. Collectively, this data demonstrates a selective role for Slit2/Robo4 responses within PMECs that inhibits ANDV induced permeability and AJ disassembly. These findings suggest Slit2s utility as a potential HPS therapeutic that stabilizes the pulmonary endothelium and antagonizes ANDV induced pulmonary edema.

  14. Iloprost attenuates the increased permeability in skeletal muscle after ischemia and reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Blebea, J.; Cambria, R.A.; DeFouw, D.; Feinberg, R.N.; Hobson, R.W. 2d.; Duran, W.N. )

    1990-12-01

    Increased vascular permeability is an early and sensitive indicator of ischemic muscle injury, occurring before significant histologic or radionuclide changes are evident. We investigated the effect of iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, on microvascular permeability in a rat striated muscle model. In six control and six experimental animals the cremaster muscle was dissected, placed in a closed-flow acrylic chamber, and suffused with a bicarbonate buffer solution. Dextran labeled with fluorescein was injected intravenously as a macromolecular tracer, and microvascular permeability was determined on the basis of clearance of the fluorescent tracer. Two hours of ischemia were followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. In the experimental group iloprost (0.5 microgram/kg/min) was given in a continuous intravenous infusion. Microvascular permeability increased significantly during reperfusion in both control and experimental animals (p less than 0.0001). Treatment with iloprost, however, significantly attenuated this response compared to the control group, 4.8 +/- 0.3 versus 7.3 +/- 0.5 microliters/gm/min, respectively (p less than 0.0001). Iloprost decreases the rise in vascular permeability after ischemia and reperfusion. Experimental clinical use of iloprost under controlled conditions in the treatment of patients with acute skeletal muscle ischemia appears justified.

  15. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  16. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  17. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  18. Role of connexin 43 in vascular hyperpermeability and relationship to Rock1-MLC20 pathway in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Guang-Ming; Zhu, Yu; Peng, Xiao-Yong; Li, Tao; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Connexin (Cx)43 has been shown to participate in several cardiovascular diseases. Increased vascular permeability is a common and severe complication in sepsis or septic shock. Whether or not Cx43 takes part in the regulation of vascular permeability in severe sepsis is not known, and the underlying mechanism has not been described. With cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) from pulmonary veins, the role of Cx43 in increased vascular permeability and its relationship to the RhoA/Rock1 pathway were studied. It was shown that vascular permeability in the lungs, kidneys, and mesentery in sepsis rats and LPS-stimulated monolayer pulmonary vein VECs was significantly increased and positively correlated with the increased expression of Cx43 and Rock1 in these organs and cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone (10 mg/kg iv) and the Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 (2 mg/kg iv) alleviated the vascular leakage of lung, mesentery, and kidney in sepsis rats. Overexpressed Cx43 increased the phosphorylation of 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC20) and the expression of Rock1 and increased the vascular permeability and decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance of pulmonary vein VECs. Cx43 RNA interference decreased the phosphorylation of MLC20 and the expression of Rock1 and decreased LPS-stimulated hyperpermeability of cultured pulmonary vein VECs. The Rock1 inhibitor Y-27632 alleviated LPS- and overexpressed Cx43-induced hyperpermeability of monolayer pulmonary vein VECs. This report shows that Cx43 participates in the regulation of vascular permeability in sepsis and that the mechanism is related to the Rock1-MLC20 phosphorylation pathway. PMID:26342084

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  20. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  1. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  2. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  3. Radiation Effects on the Cytoskeleton of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Monolayer Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrys, Dorota; Greco, Olga; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Kanthou, Chryso

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on the endothelial cytoskeleton and endothelial monolayer permeability and to evaluate associated signaling pathways, which could reveal potential mechanisms of known vascular effects of radiation. Methods and Materials: Cultured endothelial cells were X-ray irradiated, and actin filaments, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junctions were examined by immunofluorescence. Permeability was determined by the passage of fluorescent dextran through cell monolayers. Signal transduction pathways were analyzed using RhoA, Rho kinase, and stress-activated protein kinase-p38 (SAPK2/p38) inhibitors by guanosine triphosphate-RhoA activation assay and transfection with RhoAT19N. The levels of junction protein expression and phosphorylation of myosin light chain and SAPK2/p38 were assessed by Western blotting. The radiation effects on cell death were verified by clonogenic assays. Results: Radiation induced rapid and persistent actin stress fiber formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin junctions in microvascular, but not umbilical vein endothelial cells, and microtubules and intermediate filaments remained unaffected. Radiation also caused a rapid and persistent increase in microvascular permeability. RhoA-guanosine triphosphatase and Rho kinase were activated by radiation and caused phosphorylation of downstream myosin light chain and the observed cytoskeletal and permeability changes. SAPK2/p38 was activated by radiation but did not influence either the cytoskeleton or permeability. Conclusion: This study is the first to show rapid activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase by radiation in endothelial cells and has demonstrated a link between this pathway and cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability. The results also suggest that the RhoA pathway might be a useful target for modulating the permeability and other effects of radiation for therapeutic gain.

  4. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Brian R; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bromhal, Grant S; McIntyre, Dustin L; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of -0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  5. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Brian R; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bromhal, Grant S; McIntyre, Dustin L; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of -0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock.

  6. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO2 at 40°C and 10 MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of −0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock. PMID:23633894

  7. Dissolution-Driven Permeability Reduction of a Fractured Carbonate Caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Brian R.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Bromhal, Grant S.; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Tappero, Ryan; Peters, Catherine A.

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical reactions may alter the permeability of leakage pathways in caprocks, which serve a critical role in confining CO{sub 2} in geologic carbon sequestration. A caprock specimen from a carbonate formation in the Michigan sedimentary Basin was fractured and studied in a high-pressure core flow experiment. Inflowing brine was saturated with CO{sub 2} at 40°C and 10MPa, resulting in an initial pH of 4.6, and had a calcite saturation index of -0.8. Fracture permeability decreased during the experiment, but subsequent analyses did not reveal calcite precipitation. Instead, experimental observations indicate that calcite dissolution along the fracture pathway led to mobilization of less soluble mineral particles that clogged the flow path. Analyses of core sections via electron microscopy, synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction imaging, and the first application of microbeam Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure, provided evidence that these occlusions were fragments from the host rock rather than secondary precipitates. X-ray computed tomography showed a significant loss of rock mass within preferential flow paths, suggesting that dissolution also removed critical asperities and caused mechanical closure of the fracture. The decrease in fracture permeability despite a net removal of material along the fracture pathway demonstrates a nonintuitive, inverse relationship between dissolution and permeability evolution in a fractured carbonate caprock.

  8. Permeability relation for periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A; Bergman, D J

    1998-01-01

    The permeability relation for periodic porous media is studied with respect to other petrophysical parameters such as formation factor, porosity, surface-to-volume ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time. All these quantities were computed for periodic structures of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic arrays of touching and overlapping spheres. The formation factors were calculated by using a method which is based on a Fourier-space representation of an integral equation for the electric potential in a two-component composite. The nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time for the case where surface-enchanced relaxation plays a dominant role is known to be V P/rho S (VP is the pore volume, S is the pore surface, is the surface relaxation strength) when rho is not too large. Previously calculated permeabilities for these structures from the literature were used for correlation studies with other petrophysical parameters. Various correlation schemes among these quantities, such as k = aTbFc, and k = aTb phi c, were investigated, where k is permeability, T is the NMR relaxation time, phi is the porosity, and F is the formation factor. PMID:9803908

  9. Power-averaging method to characterize and upscale permeability in DFNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dreuzy, J. R.; Davy, P.; Pichot, G.; Le Goc, R.; Maillot, J.; Darcel, C.; Meheust, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In a lot of geological environments, permeability is dominated by the existence of fractures and by their degree of interconnections. Flow properties depend mainly on the statistical properties of the fracture population (length, apertures, orientation), on the network topology, as well as on some detailed properties within fracture planes. None of them can be a priori discarded as fracture networks are potentially close to some percolation threshold. Still, most details are strongly homogenized by the inherent diffusive nature of flows. It should thus be possible to upscale permeability on the basis of a limited number of descriptors. Based on an extensive analysis of 2D and 3D DFNs as well as on reference connectivity structures, we investigate the relation between the local fracture structures and the effective permeability. On one hand poor connectivity, small intersections and fracture closures limit permeability. If these patterns control flow, permeability would derive from a suite of fracture in series dominated by its weakest element. Effective permeability could then be approached by the harmonic mean of the local permeabilities. On the other hand, extended fractures and locally higher fracture densities, enhance permeability. If these patterns control flow, all fractures would take equally part to flow and effective permeability would tend to the arithmetic mean of the local permeabilities. Defined as the relative weight between the two extreme harmonic and arithmetic means, the power-law averaging exponent gives a compact way to compare fracture network hydraulics. It may further lead to some comprehensive upscaling rules. Permeability is not only determined by global connectivity but also by more local effects. We measure them by defining a local connectivity index equal to the number of fracture connections at some reference local scale. Knowledge of the relative local to global effects should help optimizing characterization strategies.

  10. [Vascular factors in dementia].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrovascular factors are a common cause of dementia or contribute to cognitive decline in other dementias. Studies showing that cerebrovascular factors are the risk factors for neurodegenerative dementias, especially Alzheimer's disease. Practically all neurodegenerative dementias have a vascular component that reduces cerebral perfusion and has great impact on the clinical picture. Recent data support the view that the neurodegenerative process is caused by cerebrovascular mechanisms. The results showed that patients with vascular cognitive impairment have a typical clinical picture. Various important non-cognitive features are caused by cerebrovascular factors and are associated with a more rapid course of illness. On the other hand the term vascular diseases or cerebrovascular factors include a variety of vascular pathologies. PMID:16358596

  11. Vascular ring (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ring is a term used to describe a number of abnormal formations of the aorta, the large artery ... the pulmonary artery. The abnormal vessel(s) forms a ring, which encircles and may press down on the ...

  12. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan of the heart Stress tests (many different types of stress tests exist) Vascular ultrasound, such as carotid ultrasound Venous ultrasound of the arms and legs SURGERIES AND INTERVENTIONS ... these types of procedures, a catheter is inserted through the ...

  13. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  14. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  15. Sinuosities in vascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.-B.; Martin, J.-L.

    2007-12-01

    In most organs, depending on the scale, the nature of the heart pump, the geometry and topology of the organ, some of the blood vessels tend to exhibit sinuous trajectories. We describe a part of this sinuous behavior, including partial biological and strong physical effects in a global physical framework. We will voluntarily focus on physical and topological effects. This study is performed on the vitelline membrane of the chicken embryo. Crossing angles, sinuosity, and the oscillation amplitude of the vascular system are analyzed. Surprisingly, the equation of river meandering dynamics is found to model the sinuosities in the vascular system, and an extension of this equation to non planar case is able to explain the effect of tissue global curvature on the vascular system. Results of this study could lead to a new understanding of the interplay between biological signaling and physical effects in determining the vascular pattern in different tissues.

  16. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  17. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  18. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  19. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  20. INDEXING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Kock, L.J.

    1959-09-22

    A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

  1. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  2. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  3. Assessing vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Forette, F; Rigaud, A S; Morin, M; Gisselbrecht, M; Bert, P

    1995-10-01

    Vascular dementia is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly after Alzheimer's disease. Many forms of vascular dementia have been described: multi-infarct dementia, lacunar dementia, Binswanger's subcortical encephalopathy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, white matter lesions associated with dementias, single infarct dementia, dementia linked to hypoperfusion and haemorrhagic dementia. The difficulty of diagnosing vascular dementia must not be underestimated and an international consensus is needed for epidemiological studies. The NINCDS-AIREN group has recently published diagnostic criteria. The State of California Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers also proposed some which differ from the NINCDS-AIREN criteria in considering only ischaemic vascular dementia and not other mechanisms such as haemorrhagic or hypoxic lesions. Most studies stress hypertension as the most powerful risk factor for all forms of vascular dementia. The incidence rate ranges from 7 per 1000 person-years in normal volunteers to 16 per 1000 person-years in hypertensive patients. No therapeutic attempt has influenced the course of the disease once the dementing condition is established. The only effective approach is preventive treatment. The objective of the SYST-EUR Vascular Dementia project is to confirm that the treatment of isolated systolic hypertension is able to reduce its incidence.

  4. A review of recent advances in the assessment of bone porosity, permeability, and interstitial fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P.; Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reviews recent research performed to assess the porosity and permeability of bone tissue with the objective of understanding interstitial fluid movement. Bone tissue mechanotransduction is considered to occur due to the passage of interstitial pore fluid adjacent to dendritic cell structures in the lacunar-canalicular porosity. The movement of interstitial fluid is also necessary for the nutrition of osteocytes. This review will focus on four topics related to improved assessment of bone interstitial fluid flow. First, the advantages and limitations of imaging technologies to visualize bone porosities and architecture at several length scales are summarized. Second, recent efforts to measure the vascular porosity and lacunar-canalicular microarchitecture are discussed. Third, studies associated with the measurement and estimation of the fluid pressure and permeability in the vascular and lacunar-canalicular domains are summarized. Fourth, the development of recent models to represent the interchange of fluids between the bone porosities is described. PMID:23174418

  5. Endothelial Cell Permeability and Adherens Junction Disruption Induced by Junín Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Heather M.; Grant, Ashley M.; Albrecht, Thomas; Hill, Terence; Peters, Clarence J.

    2014-01-01

    Junín virus (JUNV) is endemic to the fertile Pampas of Argentina, maintained in nature by the rodent host Calomys musculinus, and the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is characterized by vascular dysfunction and fluid distribution abnormalities. Clinical as well as experimental studies implicate involvement of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of AHF, although little is known of its role. JUNV has been shown to result in productive infection of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro with no visible cytopathic effects. In this study, we show that direct JUNV infection of primary human ECs results in increased vascular permeability as measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and transwell permeability assays. We also show that EC adherens junctions are disrupted during virus infection, which may provide insight into the role of the endothelium in the pathogenesis of AHF and possibly, other viral hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:24710609

  6. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  7. Experimental Determination of the Permeability in the Lacunar-Canalicular Porosity of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed; Mahamud, Rashal; Cowin, Stephen C.; Cardoso, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Permeability of the mineralized bone tissue is a critical element in understanding fluid flow occurring in the lacunar-canalicular porosity (PLC) compartment of bone and its role in bone nutrition and mechanotransduction. However, the estimation of bone permeability at the tissue level is affected by the influence of the vascular porosity (PV) in macroscopic samples containing several osteons. In this communication, both analytical and experimental approaches are proposed to estimate the lacunar-canalicular permeability in a single osteon. Data from an experimental stress-relaxation test in a single osteon is used to derive the PLC permeability by curve fitting to theoretical results from a compressible transverse isotropic poroelastic model of a porous annular disk under a ramp loading history (Cowin and Mehrabadi 2007; Gailani and Cowin 2008). The PLC tissue intrinsic permeability in the radial direction of the osteon was found to be dependent on the strain rate used and within the range of O(10−24)−O(10−25). The reported values of PLC permeability are in reasonable agreement with previously reported values derived using FEA and nanoindentation approaches. PMID:19831477

  8. Different contributions of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of vascular endothelial cadherin to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Shijin; Tan, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common pathogenic process in cases of severe trauma and sepsis. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) is a key regulatory molecule involved in this process, although the detailed mechanism through which this molecule acts remains unclear. We assessed the role of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad in LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability in the human vascular endothelial cell line CRL-2922 and determined that vascular permeability and VE-cad localization at the plasma membrane were negatively correlated after LPS treatment. Additionally, the loss of VE-cad at the plasma membrane was caused by both clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was dominant early after LPS treatment, and caveolae-mediated endocytosis was dominant hours after LPS treatment. The caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad was activated through the LPS-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-Src signaling pathway. Structural changes in the actin cytoskeleton, specifically from polymerization to depolymerization, were important reasons for the switching of the VE-cad endocytosis pathway from clathrin-mediated to caveolae-mediated. Our findings suggest that clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad contribute to LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability, although they contribute via different mechanism. The predominant means of endocytosis depends on the time since LPS treatment.

  9. Essential Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Vascular Leakage in the Retina of Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sungeun; Hwang, JongYun; Kim, Soo-Youl; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we designed an in vivo transglutaminase (TGase) activity assay in mouse retina and demonstrated that hyperglycemia induced vascular leakage by activating TGase2 in diabetic retina. VEGF elevated TGase2 activity through sequential elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in endothelial cells. The TGase inhibitors cystamine and monodansylcadaverin or TGase2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of two TGase inhibitors or TGase2 siRNA successfully inhibited hyperglycemia-induced TGase activation and microvascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. C-peptide or ROS scavengers also inhibited TGase activation in diabetic mouse retinas. The role of TGase2 in VEGF-induced vascular leakage was further supported using diabetic TGase2(-/-) mice. Thus, our findings suggest that ROS-mediated activation of TGase2 plays a key role in VEGF-induced vascular leakage by stimulating stress fiber formation and VE-cadherin disruption. PMID:27207524

  10. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  11. Angiopoietin-4 increases permeability of blood vessels and promotes lymphatic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Cristina T; Pereira, Ethel R; Cui, Cheryl H; Nelson, Gregory M; Masuck, David J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P

    2015-09-01

    The angiopoietin (Ang) ligands are potential therapeutic targets for lymphatic related diseases, which include lymphedema and cancer. Ang-1 and Ang-2 functions are established, but those of Ang-4 are poorly understood. We used intravital fluorescence microscopy to characterize Ang-4 actions on T241 murine fibrosarcoma-associated vessels in mice. The diameters of lymphatic vessels draining Ang-4- or VEGF-C (positive control)-expressing tumors increased to 123 and 135 μm, respectively, and parental, mock-transduced (negative controls) and tumors expressing Ang-1 or Ang-2 remained at baseline (∼60 μm). Ang-4 decreased human dermal lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer permeability by 27% while increasing human dermal blood endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer permeability by 200%. In vivo, Ang-4 stimulated a 4.5-fold increase in tumor-associated blood vessel permeability compared with control when measured using intravital quantitative multiphoton microscopy. Ang-4 activated receptor signaling in both LECs and BECs, evidenced by tyrosine kinase with Ig and endothelial growth factor homology domains-2 (TIE2) receptor, protein kinase B, and Erk1,2 phosphorylation detectable by immunoblotting. These data suggest that Ang-4 actions are mediated through cell-type-specific networks and that lymphatic vessel dilation occurs secondarily to increased vascular leakage. Ang-4 also promoted survival of LECs. Thus, blocking Ang-4 may prune the draining lymphatic vasculature and decrease interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) by reducing vascular permeability.

  12. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  13. γ-Aminbuturic Acid A Receptor Mitigates Homocysteine-Induced Endothelial Cell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Moshal, Karni S.; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Lominadze, David

    2010-01-01

    Many cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased homocysteine (Hcy) levels. We have previously shown that acute hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) leads to an increased microvascular permeability in the mouse brain. Hcy competitively binds to γ -aminbuturic acid (GABA) receptors and may increase vascular permeability by acting as an excitatory neurotransmitter. However, the role of GABA-A (GABAA) receptor in Hcy-induced endothelial cell (EC) permeability remains unclear. In the present study we attempted to determine the role of GABAA receptor and the possible mechanisms involved in Hcy-induced EC layer permeability. Mouse aortic and brain ECs were grown in Transwells and treated with 50 μM Hcy in the presence or absence of GABAA-specific agonist muscimol. Role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was determined using its activity inhibitor GM-6001. Involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was assessed using its kinase activity inhibitors PD98059 or U0126. EC permeability to the known content of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated with Alexa Flour-488 was assessed by measuring fluorescence intensity of the solutes in the Transwell's lower chambers. It was found that Hcy induced the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin). Hcy-induced EC permeability to BSA was significantly decreased by GABA and muscimol treatments. Presence of MMP-9 or ERK kinase activity inhibitors restored the Hcy-induced EC permeability to its baseline level. The mediation BSA leakage through the ECs was further confirmed in the experiments where Hcy-induced alterations in transendothelial electrical resistance of confluent ECs were assessed. The data suggest that Hcy increases EC layer permeability through inhibition of GABAA receptor and F-actin formation, in part, by transducing ERK and MMP-9 activation. PMID:18080868

  14. Novel Fluorescein Angiography-Based Computer-Aided Algorithm for Assessment of Retinal Vessel Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Chassidim, Yoash; Parmet, Yisrael; Tomkins, Oren; Knyazer, Boris; Friedman, Alon; Levy, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel method for quantitative assessment of retinal vessel permeability using a fluorescein angiography-based computer algorithm. Methods Twenty-one subjects (13 with diabetic retinopathy, 8 healthy volunteers) underwent fluorescein angiography (FA). Image pre-processing included removal of non-retinal and noisy images and registration to achieve spatial and temporal pixel-based analysis. Permeability was assessed for each pixel by computing intensity kinetics normalized to arterial values. A linear curve was fitted and the slope value was assigned, color-coded and displayed. The initial FA studies and the computed permeability maps were interpreted in a masked and randomized manner by three experienced ophthalmologists for statistical validation of diagnosis accuracy and efficacy. Results Permeability maps were successfully generated for all subjects. For healthy volunteers permeability values showed a normal distribution with a comparable range between subjects. Based on the mean cumulative histogram for the healthy population a threshold (99.5%) for pathological permeability was determined. Clear differences were found between patients and healthy subjects in the number and spatial distribution of pixels with pathological vascular leakage. The computed maps improved the discrimination between patients and healthy subjects, achieved sensitivity and specificity of 0.974 and 0.833 respectively, and significantly improved the consensus among raters for the localization of pathological regions. Conclusion The new algorithm allows quantification of retinal vessel permeability and provides objective, more sensitive and accurate evaluation than the present subjective clinical diagnosis. Future studies with a larger patients’ cohort and different retinal pathologies are awaited to further validate this new approach and its role in diagnosis and treatment follow-up. Successful evaluation of vasculature permeability may be used for the early

  15. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  16. Peripheral vascular diseases resulting from chronic arsenical poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2002-03-01

    Drinking water contaminated by arsenic remains a major public health problem. Long-term arsenic exposure has been found to be associated with peripheral vascular diseases in a variety of studies. Reports of vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water, which span almost 100 years, have been published in Taiwan, Chile, Mexico, and China. This paper reviewed the association of peripheral vascular diseases resulting from arsenic exposure to drinking water from the clinical and pathological points of view. An endemic peripheral vascular disorder called "blackfoot disease" has been noticed in a limited area in Taiwan. This disease results in gangrene in the extremities. It has been associated with the ingestion of high concentrations of arsenic-tainted artesian well water. Epidemiological studies confirmed a dose-response relationship between long-term arsenic exposure and the occurrence of blackfoot disease. Whereas arsenic has induced various clinical manifestations of vascular effects in Chile, Mexico and China, they do not compare in magnitude or severity to the blackfoot disease found in Taiwan. The pathogenesis of vascular effects induced by arsenic is still controversial. The possible mechanisms include endothelial cell destruction, arsenic-associated atherogenesis, carotene and zinc deficiency, and/or some immunological mechanism. Microcirculatory assessments revealed that deficits of capillary blood flow and permeability exist in clinically normal skin of patients with chronic arsenical poisoning. The vascular effects of chronic arsenic poisoning may involve cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems as well. In view of the increasing public health problems caused by arsenic exposure, vascular effects should be included in the future study of health effects of arsenic.

  17. Vicenin-2 and scolymoside inhibit high-glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-03-01

    The vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in this study, we attempted to determine whether 2 structurally related flavonoids found in Cyclopia subternata, vicenin-2 and scolymoside, can suppress high-glucose (HG)-induced vascular inflammatory processes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The effects of vicenin-2 and scolymoside on HG-induced vascular inflammation were determined by measuring vascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion and migration, cell adhesion molecule (CAM) expression levels, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. In addition, the anti-inflammation mechanism was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. The data showed that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expression of CAMs, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Remarkably, pretreatment with vicenin-2 and scolymoside attenuated all of the above-mentioned vascular inflammatory effects of HG. HG-induced vascular inflammatory responses are critical events underlying the development of various diabetic complications; therefore, our results suggest that vicenin-2 and scolymoside have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  18. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  19. [Corticosteroids and cerebral vessel permeability during embryonic development].

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Virgintino, D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cortisol on the development of the blood-brain barrier (b.b.b.) were microscopically investigated in the chick embryo optic tectum using horseradish peroxidase (hrp) as marker of vascular permeability. Hrp was injected intracardially at the 15th and 21st incubation day (i.d.), i.e. 5 and 11 days after the last administration of the drug (10 micrograms/50 microliters saline solution at the 8th and 10th i.d.). This treatment caused damage to the maturation process of the b.b.b. to hrp. The intraneural blood vessel walls were not able to prevent the marker extravasation which was massive at the 15th i.d. and circumscribed to limited perivascular areas at the 21st i.d. A possible pathogenetic mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. PMID:2739535

  20. Dammarenediol-II Prevents VEGF-Mediated Microvascular Permeability in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Jung, Se-Hui; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Han, Jung Yeon; Choi, Yong-Eui; Hong, Hae-Deun; Jeon, Hye-Yoon; Hwang, JongYun; Na, SungHun; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major diabetic complication predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability in the retina; however, treatments targeting glycemic control have not been successful. Here, we investigated the protective effect of dammarenediol-II, a precursor of triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis, on VEGF-induced vascular leakage using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and diabetic mice. We overproduced the compound in transgenic tobacco expressing Panax ginseng dammarenediol-II synthase gene and purified using column chromatography. Analysis of the purified compound using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system revealed identical retention time and fragmentation pattern to those of authentic standard dammarenediol-II. Dammarenediol-II inhibited VEGF-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, but it had no effect on the levels of intracellular Ca(2+) in HUVECs. We also found that dammarenediol-II inhibited VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial-cadherin disruption, both of which play critical roles in modulating endothelial permeability. Notably, microvascular leakage in the retina of diabetic mice was successfully inhibited by intravitreal dammarenediol-II injection. Our results suggest that the natural drug dammarenediol-II may have the ability to prevent diabetic microvascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26400610

  1. Orientin inhibits high glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-12-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Orientin, a C-glycosyl flavonoid, is known to have anxiolytic and antioxidative activity. In this study, we assessed whether orientin can suppress vascular inflammation induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. Our data indicate that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Remarkably, the vascular inflammatory effects of HG were attenuated by pretreatment with orientin. Since vascular inflammation induced by HG is critical in the development of diabetic complications, our results suggest that orientin may have significant benefits in the treatment of diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  2. Studies on the structure and permeability of the microvasculature in normal rat lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A. O.; Anderson, N. D.

    1975-01-01

    The structure and permeability of the microvasculature in normal rat lymph nodes was studied by regional perfusion techniques. The results indicated that characteristic vascular units supplied each cortical lobule of lymphatic tissue. Numerous arteriovenous communications and venous sphincters innervated by unmyelinated nerve fibers were found in this vascular bed. These specialized vascular structures permitted regional control of blood flow through high endothelial venules. Lymphocytes migrated across these venular walls by moving through intercellular spaces in the endothelium and between gaps in the laminated, reticular sheath. No direct anastomoses between blood vessels and lymphatics were seen, but tracer studies with horseradish peroxidase suggested that functional lymph node-venous communications were present in the walls of high endothelial venules. Images Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:1163637

  3. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  4. Predicting skin permeability from complex chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jim E. . E-mail: Jim_Riviere@ncsu.edu; Brooks, James D.

    2005-10-15

    index, polarizability and log (1/Henry's Law Constant) of the mixture components. These factors should not be considered final as the focus of these studies was solely to determine if knowledge of the physical properties of a mixture would improve predicting skin permeability. Inclusion of multiple mixture factors should further improve predictability. The importance of these findings is that there is an approach whereby the effects of a mixture on dermal absorption of a penetrant of interest can be quantitated in a standard QSPeR model if physicochemical properties of the mixture are also incorporated.

  5. RhoC maintains vascular homeostasis by regulating VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Luke H.; Sinha, Sutapa; Wang, Ying; Bhattacharya, Resham; Dutta, Shamit; Gong, Xun; Bedell, Victoria M.; Suresh, Sandip; Chun, Changzoon; Ramchandran, Ramani; Ekker, Stephen C.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are controlled by vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). Dysregulation of these physiological processes contributes to the pathologies of heart disease, cancer and stroke. Rho GTPase proteins play an integral role in VEGF-mediated formation and maintenance of blood vessels. The regulatory functions of RhoA and RhoB in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are well defined, whereas the purpose of RhoC remains poorly understood. Here, we describe how RhoC promotes vascular homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell migration, proliferation and permeability. RhoC stimulates proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by stabilizing nuclear β-catenin, which promotes transcription of cyclin D1 and subsequently drives cell cycle progression. RhoC negatively regulates endothelial cell migration through MAPKs and downstream MLC2 signaling, and decreases vascular permeability through downregulation of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)–Ca2+–eNOS cascade in HUVECs. Using a VEGF-inducible zebrafish (Danio rerio) model, we observed significantly less vascular permeability in RhoC morpholino (MO)-injected zebrafish than control MO-injected zebrafish. Taken together, our findings suggest that RhoC is a key regulator of vascular homeostasis in endothelial cells. PMID:26136364

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor in central nervous system injuries - a vascular growth factor getting nervous?

    PubMed

    Sköld, Mattias K; Kanje, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is recognized as a central factor in growth, survival and permeability of blood vessels in both physiological and pathological conditions. It is as such of importance for vascular responses in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Accumulating evidence suggest that VEGF may also act as a neuroprotective and neurotrophic factor supporting neuronal survival and neuronal regeneration. Findings of neuropilins as shared co-receptors between molecules with such seemingly different functions as the axon guidance molecules semaphorins and VEGF has further boosted the interest in the role of VEGF in neural tissue injury and repair mechanisms. Thus, VEGF most likely act in parallel or concurrent on cells in both the vascular and nervous system. The present review gives a summary of known or potential aspects of the VEGF system in the healthy and diseased nervous system. The potential benefits but also problems and pitfalls in intervening in the actions of such a multifunctional factor as VEGF in the disordered CNS are also covered.

  7. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  8. Vascular air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, Stephanie; Rowell, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Vascular air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal event. It may occur in a variety of procedures and surgeries but is most often associated as an iatrogenic complication of central line catheter insertion. This article reviews the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this phenomenon. PMID:23724390

  9. Adhesion in vascular biology

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature delivers vital support for all other tissues by supplying oxygen and nutrients for growth and by transporting the immune cells that protect and cure them. Therefore, the microvasculature developed a special barrier that is permissive for gasses like oxygen and carbon dioxide, while fluids are kept inside and pathogens are kept out. While maintaining this tight barrier, the vascular wall also allows immune cells to exit at sites of inflammation or damage, a process that is called transmigration. The endothelial cell layer that forms the inner lining of the vasculature is crucial for the vascular barrier function as well as the regulation of transmigration. Therefore, adhesions between vascular endothelial cells are both tight and dynamic and the mechanisms by which they are established, and the mechanisms by which they are controlled have been extensively studied over the past decades. Because of our fundamental strive to understand biology, but also because defects in vascular barrier control cause a variety of clinical problems and treatment strategies may evolve from our detailed understanding of its mechanisms. This special focus issue features a collection of articles that review key components of the development and control of the endothelial cell-cell junction that is central to endothelial barrier function. PMID:25422845

  10. Engineered Vascularized Muscle Flap.

    PubMed

    Egozi, Dana; Shandalov, Yulia; Freiman, Alina; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the thickness of a tissue construct and its consequential viability and applicability in vivo, is the control of oxygen supply to the cell microenvironment, as passive diffusion is limited to a very thin layer. Although various materials have been described to restore the integrity of full-thickness defects of the abdominal wall, no material has yet proved to be optimal, due to low graft vascularization, tissue rejection, infection, or inadequate mechanical properties. This protocol describes a means of engineering a fully vascularized flap, with a thickness relevant for muscle tissue reconstruction. Cell-embedded poly L-lactic acid/poly lactic-co-glycolic acid constructs are implanted around the mouse femoral artery and vein and maintained in vivo for a period of one or two weeks. The vascularized graft is then transferred as a flap towards a full thickness defect made in the abdomen. This technique replaces the need for autologous tissue sacrifications and may enable the use of in vitro engineered vascularized flaps in many surgical applications. PMID:26779840

  11. Mechanisms of Microgravity Effect on Vascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Ralph E.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of the project is to characterize the effects of simulated microgravity on vascular function. Microgravity is simulated using the hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat, and the following vessels are removed from HU and paired control rats for in vitro analysis: abdominal aorta, carotid and femoral arteries, jugular and femoral veins. These vessels are cut into 3 mm long rings and mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of either isometric contraction, or relaxation of pre- contracted vessels. The isolated mesenteric vascular bed is perfused for the measurement of changes in perfusion pressure as an index of arteriolar constriction or dilation. This report presents, in addition to the statement of the overall goal of the project, a summary list of the specific hypotheses to be tested. These are followed by sections on results, conclusions, significance and plans for the next year.

  12. CD44 regulates vascular endothelial barrier integrity via a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kelly M; Michaud, Michael; Canosa, Sandra; Madri, Joseph A

    2013-07-01

    Vascular integrity is a critical parameter in normal growth and development. Loss of appropriate vascular barrier function is present in various immune- and injury-mediated pathological conditions. CD44 is an adhesion molecule expressed by multiple cell types, including endothelial cells (EC). The goal of the present study was to examine how loss of CD44 affected vascular permeability. Using C57BL/6 WT and CD44-KO mice, we found no significant permeability to Evan's Blue in either strain at baseline. However, there was significantly increased histamine-induced permeability in CD44-deficient mice compared to WT counterparts. Similar results were observed in vitro, where CD44-deficient endothelial monolayers were also impermeable to 40kD-FITC dextran in the absence of vasoactive challenge, but exhibited enhanced and prolonged permeability following histamine. However, CD44-KO monolayers have reduced baseline barrier strength by electrical resistance, which correlated with increased permeability, at baseline, to smaller molecular weight 4-kD FITC-dextran, suggesting weakly formed endothelial junctions. The CD44-KO EC displayed several characteristics consistent with impaired barrier function/dysfunctional EC junctions, including differential expression, phosphorylation, and localization of endothelial junction proteins, increased matrix metalloprotease expression, and altered cellular morphology. Reduced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression by CD44-KO EC in vivo and in vitro was also observed. Reconstitution of murine CD44 or PECAM-1 restored these defects to near WT status, suggesting CD44 regulates vascular permeability and integrity through a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

  13. Negative News: Cl- and HCO3- in the Vascular Wall.

    PubMed

    Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Boedtkjer, Donna M B; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) are the most prevalent membrane-permeable anions in the intra- and extracellular spaces of the vascular wall. Outwardly directed electrochemical gradients for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) permit anion channel opening to depolarize vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Transporters and channels for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) also modify vascular contractility and structure independently of membrane potential. Transport of HCO3 (-) regulates intracellular pH and thereby modifies the activity of enzymes, ion channels, and receptors. There is also evidence that Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport proteins affect gene expression and protein trafficking. Considering the extensive implications of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) in the vascular wall, it is critical to understand how these ions are transported under physiological conditions and how disturbances in their transport can contribute to disease development. Recently, sensing mechanisms for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) have been identified in the vascular wall where they modify ion transport and vasomotor function, for instance, during metabolic disturbances. This review discusses current evidence that transport (e.g., via NKCC1, NBCn1, Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, volume-regulated anion channels, and CFTR) and sensing (e.g., via WNK and RPTPγ) of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) influence cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27511463

  14. Negative News: Cl- and HCO3- in the Vascular Wall.

    PubMed

    Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Boedtkjer, Donna M B; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) are the most prevalent membrane-permeable anions in the intra- and extracellular spaces of the vascular wall. Outwardly directed electrochemical gradients for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) permit anion channel opening to depolarize vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Transporters and channels for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) also modify vascular contractility and structure independently of membrane potential. Transport of HCO3 (-) regulates intracellular pH and thereby modifies the activity of enzymes, ion channels, and receptors. There is also evidence that Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport proteins affect gene expression and protein trafficking. Considering the extensive implications of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) in the vascular wall, it is critical to understand how these ions are transported under physiological conditions and how disturbances in their transport can contribute to disease development. Recently, sensing mechanisms for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) have been identified in the vascular wall where they modify ion transport and vasomotor function, for instance, during metabolic disturbances. This review discusses current evidence that transport (e.g., via NKCC1, NBCn1, Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, volume-regulated anion channels, and CFTR) and sensing (e.g., via WNK and RPTPγ) of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) influence cardiovascular health and disease.

  15. Improving vascular maturation using noncoding RNAs increases antitumor effect of chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Wang, Hongyu; Jiang, Dahai; Wu, Sherry Y.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Volk, David E.; Lokesh, Ganesh L. R.; Li, Xin; Pradeep, Sunila; Yang, Xianbin; Haemmerle, Monika; Nagaraja, Archana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Bayraktar, Recep; Li, Li; Tanaka, Takemi; Hu, Wei; Gharpure, Kshipra M; McGuire, Michael H.; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Zhang, Xinna; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Bulayeva, Nataliya; Dorniak, Piotr L.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Gorenstein, David G.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Current antiangiogenesis therapy relies on inhibiting newly developed immature tumor blood vessels and starving tumor cells. This strategy has shown transient and modest efficacy. Here, we report a better approach to target cancer-associated endothelial cells (ECs), reverse permeability and leakiness of tumor blood vessels, and improve delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the tumor. First, we identified deregulated microRNAs (miRs) from patient-derived cancer-associated ECs. Silencing these miRs led to decreased vascular permeability and increased maturation of blood vessels. Next, we screened a thioaptamer (TA) library to identify TAs selective for tumor-associated ECs. An annexin A2–targeted TA was identified and used for delivery of miR106b-5p and miR30c-5p inhibitors, resulting in vascular maturation and antitumor effects without inducing hypoxia. These findings could have implications for improving vascular-targeted therapy. PMID:27777972

  16. Dynamic permeability of the lacunar–canalicular system in human cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Benalla, M.; Palacio-Mancheno, P. E.; Fritton, S. P.; Cardoso, L.

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the experimental determination of the permeability of a small sample of a fluid-saturated hierarchically structured porous material is described and applied to the determination of the lacunar–canalicular permeability (KLC) in bone. The interest in the permeability of the lacunar–canalicular pore system (LCS) is due to the fact that the LCS is considered to be the site of bone mechanotransduction due to the loading-driven fluid flow over cellular structures. The permeability of this space has been estimated to be anywhere from 10−17 to 10−25 m2. However, the vascular pore system and LCS are intertwined, rendering the permeability of the much smaller-dimensioned LCS challenging to measure. In this study, we report a combined experimental and analytical approach that allowed the accurate determination of the KLC to be on the order of 10−22 m2 for human osteonal bone. It was found that the KLC has a linear dependence on loading frequency, decreasing at a rate of 2 × 10−24 m2/Hz from 1 to 100 Hz, and using the proposed model, the porosity alone was able to explain 86 % of the KLC variability. PMID:24146291

  17. Plasma From Patients With HELLP Syndrome Increases Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tremble, Sarah M.; Owens, Michelle Y.; Morris, Rachael; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25194151

  18. Quantifying single microvessel permeability in isolated blood-perfused rat lung preparation.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement.

  19. Review of gestational diabetes mellitus effects on vascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise A; Chik, Constance L; Ryan, Edmond A

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dysfunction has been described in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, previous gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Factors contributing to vascular changes remain uncertain. The aim of this review was to summarize vascular structure and function changes found to occur in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify factors that contribute to vascular dysfunction. A systematic search of electronic databases yielded 15 publications from 1998 to March 2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Our review confirmed that previous gestational diabetes mellitus contributes to vascular dysfunction, and the most consistent risk factor associated with previous gestational diabetes mellitus and vascular dysfunction was elevated body mass index. Heterogeneity existed across studies in determining the relationship of glycaemic levels and insulin resistance to vascular dysfunction.

  20. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  1. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  2. Overexpression of VEGF165b in Podocytes Reduces Glomerular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne; Oltean, Sebastian; Neal, Chris R.; Kaura, Amit; Bevan, Heather; Wood, Emma; Sage, Leslie M.; Lanati, Silvia; Nowak, Dawid G.; Salmon, Andy H.J.; Bates, David

    2010-01-01

    The observation that therapeutic agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) associate with renal toxicity suggests that VEGF plays a role in the maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. Alternative mRNA splicing produces the VEGFxxxb family, which consists of antiangiogenic peptides that reduce permeability and inhibit tumor growth; the contribution of these peptides to normal glomerular function is unknown. Here, we established and characterized heterozygous and homozygous transgenic mice that overexpress VEGF165b specifically in podocytes. We confirmed excess production of glomerular VEGF165b by reverse transcriptase–PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA in both heterozygous and homozygous animals. Macroscopically, the mice seemed normal up to 18 months of age, unlike the phenotype of transgenic podocyte-specific VEGF164-overexpressing mice. Animals overexpressing VEGF165b, however, had a significantly reduced normalized glomerular ultrafiltration fraction with accompanying changes in ultrastructure of the glomerular filtration barrier on the vascular side of the glomerular basement membrane. These data highlight the contrasting properties of VEGF splice variants and their impact on glomerular function and phenotype. PMID:20688932

  3. Pulmonary vascular destabilization in the premetastatic phase facilitates lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujie; Song, Nan; Ding, Yanping; Yuan, Shaopeng; Li, Xuhui; Cai, Hongchen; Shi, Hubing; Luo, Yongzhang

    2009-10-01

    Before metastasis, certain organs have already been influenced by primary tumors. However, the exact alterations and regulatory mechanisms of the premetastatic organs remain poorly understood. Here, we report that, in the premetastatic stage, angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 3, and MMP10 are up-regulated in the lung by primary B16/F10 tumor, which leads to the increased permeability of pulmonary vasculatures and extravasation of circulating tumor cells. Subsequent studies show that Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10 have a synergistic effect on disrupting vascular integrity in both in vitro and in vivo models. Lentivirus-based in vivo RNA interference of Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10 attenuates the pulmonary vascular permeability and suppresses the infiltration of myeloid cells in the premetastatic lung. Moreover, knocking down these factors significantly inhibits the spontaneous lung metastasis in the model by orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-Luc-D3H1 cells in nude mice. Further investigations reveal that the malignancy of tumor cells is positively correlated with their capabilities to induce the expression of Angpt2, MMP3, and MMP10. Luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also suggest that transforming growth factor-beta1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha signaling are involved in the regulation of these premetastatic factors. Our study shows that pulmonary vascular destabilization in the premetastatic phase promotes the extravasation of tumor cells and facilitates lung metastasis, which may provide potential targets for clinical prevention of metastasis. PMID:19773447

  4. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  5. Seeking a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular properties.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Gottschalk, Allan; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2016-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure (PP) are blood pressure (BP)-dependent surrogates for vascular stiffness. Considering that there are no clinically useful markers for arterial stiffness that are BP-independent, our objective was to identify novel indices of arterial stiffness and compare them with previously described markers. PWV and PP were measured in young and old male Fisher rats and in young and old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) over a wide range of BPs. The BP dependence of these and several other indices of vascular stiffness were evaluated. An index incorporating PWV and PP was also constructed. Both PWV and PP increase in a non-linear manner with rising BP for both strains of animals (Fisher and SHRs). Age markedly changes the relationship between PWV or PP and BP. The previously described Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) was able to differentiate between young and old vasculature, whereas the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) did not reliably differentiate between the two. The novel Arterial Stiffness Index (ASI) differentiated stiffer from more compliant vasculature. Considering the limitations of the currently available indices of arterial stiffness, we propose a novel index of intrinsic arterial stiffness, the ASI, which is robust over a range of BPs and allows one to distinguish between compliant and stiff vasculature in both Fisher rats and SHRs. Further studies are necessary to validate this index in other settings.

  6. Seeking a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular properties.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Gottschalk, Allan; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2016-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure (PP) are blood pressure (BP)-dependent surrogates for vascular stiffness. Considering that there are no clinically useful markers for arterial stiffness that are BP-independent, our objective was to identify novel indices of arterial stiffness and compare them with previously described markers. PWV and PP were measured in young and old male Fisher rats and in young and old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) over a wide range of BPs. The BP dependence of these and several other indices of vascular stiffness were evaluated. An index incorporating PWV and PP was also constructed. Both PWV and PP increase in a non-linear manner with rising BP for both strains of animals (Fisher and SHRs). Age markedly changes the relationship between PWV or PP and BP. The previously described Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) was able to differentiate between young and old vasculature, whereas the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) did not reliably differentiate between the two. The novel Arterial Stiffness Index (ASI) differentiated stiffer from more compliant vasculature. Considering the limitations of the currently available indices of arterial stiffness, we propose a novel index of intrinsic arterial stiffness, the ASI, which is robust over a range of BPs and allows one to distinguish between compliant and stiff vasculature in both Fisher rats and SHRs. Further studies are necessary to validate this index in other settings. PMID:26490088

  7. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  8. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  9. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  10. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  11. The Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Directs Basal Endothelial Cell Permeability by Activating RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Elena E.; Simons, Matthew J.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) predominantly infects microvascular endothelial cells (MECs) and nonlytically causes an acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In HPS patients, virtually every pulmonary MEC is infected, MECs are enlarged, and infection results in vascular leakage and highly lethal pulmonary edema. We observed that MECs infected with the ANDV hantavirus or expressing the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein showed increased size and permeability by activating the Rheb and RhoA GTPases. Expression of ANDV N in MECs increased cell size by preventing tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) repression of Rheb-mTOR-pS6K. N selectively bound the TSC2 N terminus (1 to 1403) within a complex containing TSC2/TSC1/TBC1D7, and endogenous TSC2 reciprocally coprecipitated N protein from ANDV-infected MECs. TSCs normally restrict RhoA-induced MEC permeability, and we found that ANDV infection or N protein expression constitutively activated RhoA. This suggests that the ANDV N protein alone is sufficient to activate signaling pathways that control MEC size and permeability. Further, RhoA small interfering RNA, dominant-negative RhoA(N19), and the RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors fasudil and Y27632 dramatically reduced the permeability of ANDV-infected MECs by 80 to 90%. Fasudil also reduced the bradykinin-directed permeability of ANDV and Hantaan virus-infected MECs to control levels. These findings demonstrate that ANDV activation of RhoA causes MEC permeability and reveal a potential edemagenic mechanism for ANDV to constitutively inhibit the basal barrier integrity of infected MECs. The central importance of RhoA activation in MEC permeability further suggests therapeutically targeting RhoA, TSCs, and Rac1 as potential means of resolving capillary leakage during hantavirus infections. PMID:27795403

  12. Angiotensin II increases the permeability and PV-1 expression of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Csaba; Nagy, János Péter; Végh, Borbála; Németh, Adrienn; Jenei, Attila; MirzaHosseini, Shahrokh; Sebe, Attila; Rosivall, László

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II), the major effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is a powerful vasoactive mediator associated with hypertension and renal failure. In this study the permeability changes and its morphological attributes in endothelial cells of human umbilical vein (HUVECs) were studied considering the potential regulatory role of ANG II. The effects of ANG II were compared with those of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Permeability was determined by 40 kDa FITC-Dextran and electrical impedance measurements. Plasmalemmal vesicle-1 (PV-1) mRNA levels were measured by PCR. Endothelial cell surface was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and caveolae were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in HUVEC monolayers. ANG II (10(-7) M), similarly to VEGF (100 ng/ml), increased the endothelial permeability parallel with an increase in the number of cell surface openings and caveolae. AT1 and VEGF-R2 receptor blockers (candesartan and ZM-323881, respectively) blunted these effects. ANG II and VEGF increased the expression of PV-1, which could be blocked by candesartan or ZM-323881 pretreatments and by the p38 mitogem-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor SB-203580. Additionally, SB-203580 blocked the increase in endothelial permeability and the number of surface openings and caveolae. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that ANG II plays a role in regulation of permeability and formation of cell surface openings through AT1 receptor and PV-1 protein synthesis in a p38 MAP kinase-dependent manner in endothelial cells. The surface openings that increase in parallel with permeability may represent transcellular channels, caveolae, or both. These morphological and permeability changes may be involved in (patho-) physiological effects of ANG II. PMID:22012329

  13. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  14. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  15. Composites with tuned effective magnetic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2007-07-01

    Pendry et al. [J. B. Pendry, A. J. Holden, D. J. Robbins, and W. J. Stewart, IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999)] and Smith et al. [D. R. Smith, W. J. Padilla, D. C. Vier, S. C. Nemat-Nasser, and S. Schultz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4184 (2000)] have shown that the effective magnetic permeability, μ, of free space can be rendered negative over a certain frequency range by a periodic arrangement of very thin conductors with suitable magnetic resonance properties, the so-called split-ring resonators. Because of its rather bulky architecture, this structure does not lend itself to a proper integration into a reasonably thin real composite structural panel. To remedy this fundamental barrier, we invented a new magnetic resonator consisting of very thin folded plates that are suitably nested within one another to form folded-doubled resonators (FDRs) that can be integrated into an actual composite panel. Measurements, using a focused beam electromagnetic characterization system combined with time-domain numerical simulations of the reflection and transmission coefficients of such a composite slab have revealed that indeed the composite has a negative μ over a frequency range of about 9.1-9.35 GHz [S. Nemat-Nasser, S. C. Nemat-Nasser, T. A. Plaisted, A. Starr, and A. Vakil Amirkhizi, in Biomimetics: Biologically Inspired Technologies, edited by Y. Bar Cohen (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2006)]. Thus, it has become possible to construct a structural composite panel with negative index of refraction by simultaneously creating negative effective ɛ and μ [V. G. Veselago, Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509 (1968); R. A. Shelby, D. R. Smith, and S. Schultz, Science 292, 77 (2001); A. F. Starr, P. M. Rye, D. R. Smith, and S. Nemat-Nasser, Phys. Rev. B 70, 113102 (2004)].

  16. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  17. Neurobiology of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Enciu, Ana-Maria; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Popescu, Laurenţiu M.; Mureşanu, Dafin F.; Popescu, Bogdan O.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular dementia is, in its current conceptual form, a distinct type of dementia with a spectrum of specific clinical and pathophysiological features. However, in a very large majority of cases, these alterations occur in an already aged brain, characterized by a milieu of cellular and molecular events common for different neurodegenerative diseases. The cell signaling defects and molecular dyshomeostasis might lead to neuronal malfunction prior to the death of neurons and the alteration of neuronal networks. In the present paper, we explore some of the molecular mechanisms underlying brain malfunction triggered by cerebrovascular disease and risk factors. We suggest that, in the age of genetic investigation and molecular diagnosis, the concept of vascular dementia needs a new approach. PMID:21876809

  18. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  19. [Vascular variability syndromes].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kuniaki; Okajima, Kiyotaka; Yamanaka, Takashi; Cornelissen, Germaine

    2014-08-01

    Analytical global and local methods applied to human blood pressure (BP) records of around-the-clock measurements. The chronobiological interpretation of ambulatory BP monitoring records in the light of time-specified reference values derived from healthy peers matched by sex and age identify vascular variability disorders (VVDs) for an assessment of cardio-, cerebro-, and renovascular disease risk. VVD includes circadian BP over-swinging (CHAT, short for circadian hyper-amplitude tension), deficient heart rate variability, MESOR (midline-estimating statistic of rhythm) hypertension, excessively elevated pulse pressure over 60 mmHg, BP ecphasia (an odd timing of the circadian rhythms in BP but not in that of heart rate) and frequency alteration. The term MESOR-hypertension indicates only one of several VVDs that can combine to for sets of 2, 3 and n-component vascular variability syndromes. PMID:25167758

  20. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  1. Congenital Vascular Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gravereaux, Edwin C.; Nguyen, Louis L.; Cunningham, Leslie D.

    2004-04-01

    Congenital vascular anomalies are rare. The cardiovascular specialist should nevertheless be aware of the more common types of vascular anomalies and understand the implications for patient treatment and the likelihood of associated morbidity. The presentation of congenital arteriovenous malformations can range from asymptomatic or cosmetic lesions, to those causing ischemia, ulceration, hemorrhage, or high-output congestive heart failure. Treatment of large, symptomatic arteriovenous malformations often requires catheter-directed embolization prior to the attempt at complete surgical excision. Later recurrence, due to collateral recruitment, is frequent. Graded compression stockings and leg elevation are the mainstays of treatment for the predominantly venous congenital vascular anomalies. Most congenital central venous disorders are clinically silent. An exception is the retrocaval ureter. Retroaortic left renal vein, circumaortic venous ring, and absent, left-sided or duplicated inferior vena cava are relevant when aortic or inferior vena cava procedures are planned. The treatment of the venous disorders is directed at prevention or management of symptoms. Persistent sciatic artery, popliteal entrapment syndrome, and aberrant right subclavian artery origin are congenital anomalies that are typically symptomatic at presentation. Because they mimic more common diseases, diagnosis is frequently delayed. Delay can result in significant morbidity for the patient. Failure to make the diagnosis of persistent sciatic artery and popliteal entrapment can result in critical limb ischemia and subsequent amputation. Unrecognized aberrant right subclavian artery origin associated with aneurysmal degeneration can rupture and result in death. The treatment options for large-vessel arterial anomalies are surgical, sometimes in combination with endovascular techniques.

  2. Changes in Permeability Produced By Distant Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Shi, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Oscillations in stress, such as those created by earthquakes, can increase permeability and fluid mobility in geologic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes as small as 10-6 can increase discharge in streams and springs, change the water level of wells, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to pre-stimulated values over a period of months to years. This presentation will review some of the observations that indicate that dynamic stresses produced by seismic waves change permeability. We use the response of a set of wells distributed throughout China to multiple large earthquakes to probe the relationship between earthquake-generated stresses and water-level changes in wells. We find that dynamic stresses dominate the responses at distances more than 1 fault length from the earthquake and that permeability changes may explain the water level changes. Regions with high deformation rates are most sensitive to seismic waves. We also consider the response of a large alluvial fan in Taiwan to the 1999 M7.5 Chi-Chi earthquake where there were sustained changes in groundwater temperature after the earthquake. Using groundwater flow models, we infer that permeability increased by an order of magnitude over horizontal scales of tens of km, and vertical scales of several km. Permeability returned to the pre-earthquake value over many months. As much as half the total transport in the fan occurs during the short time periods with enhanced permeability.

  3. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  4. Using magnetic permeability bits to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Mencia, Raymond; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cress, C. D.; Newburgh, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Steps are described in the development of a new magnetic memory technology, based on states with different magnetic permeability, with the capability to reliably store large amounts of information in a high-density form for decades. The advantages of using the permeability to store information include an insensitivity to accidental exposure to magnetic fields or temperature changes, both of which are known to corrupt memory approaches that rely on remanent magnetization. The high permeability media investigated consists of either films of Metglas 2826 MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18) or bilayers of permalloy (Ni78Fe22)/Cu. Regions of films of the high permeability media were converted thermally to low permeability regions by laser or ohmic heating. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting changes of an external 32 Oe probe field using a magnetic tunnel junction 10 μm away from the media. Metglas bits were written with 100 μs laser pulses and arrays of 300 nm diameter bits were read. The high and low permeability bits written using bilayers of permalloy/Cu are not affected by 10 Mrad(Si) of gamma radiation from a 60Co source. An economical route for writing and reading bits as small at 20 nm using a variation of heat assisted magnetic recording is discussed.

  5. Low-level X-radiation effects on functional vascular changes in Syrian hamster cheek pouch epithelium during hydrocarbon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, A.G.; Coghill, J.E.; Rippey, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    Effects of repeated low-level X radiation on functional microvascular changes in hamster cheek pouch epithelium during and following carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were studied. Hamsters were treated with either radiation, DMBA, radiation + DMBA, or no treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 3-week intervals from 0 to 39 weeks after treatments began. Pouch vascular volume and permeability changes were studied by fractional distributions of radiotracers and were analyzed by a variety of statistical methods which explored the vascular parameters, treatment types, elapsed time, presence of the carcinogen, and histopathologic changes. All treatments resulted in significant changes in vascular volume with time, while only DMBA treatments alone resulted in significant changes in vascular permeability with time. As in prior studies, there were significant vascular volume differences between DMBA and DMBA + radiation groups of tumor-bearing cheek pouches. Radiation significantly affected DMBA-associated vascular volume and permeability changes during carcinogenesis. Several possible explanations for the relationship of these changes to the enhancement of DMBA carcinogenesis are discussed.

  6. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  7. Real-time estimation of paracellular permeability of cerebral endothelial cells by capacitance sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Jo, Dong; Lee, Rimi; Hyoung Kim, Jin; Oh Jun, Hyoung; Geol Lee, Tae; Hun Kim, Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Vascular integrity is important in maintaining homeostasis of brain microenvironments. In various brain diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, increased paracellular permeability due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier is linked with initiation and progression of pathological conditions. We developed a capacitance sensor array to monitor dielectric responses of cerebral endothelial cell monolayer, which could be utilized to evaluate the integrity of brain microvasculature. Our system measured real-time capacitance values which demonstrated frequency- and time-dependent variations. With the measurement of capacitance at the frequency of 100 Hz, we could differentiate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a representative permeability-inducing factor, on endothelial cells and quantitatively analyse the normalized values. Interestingly, we showed differential capacitance values according to the status of endothelial cell monolayer, confluent or sparse, evidencing that the integrity of monolayer was associated with capacitance values. Another notable feature was that we could evaluate the expression of molecules in samples in our system with the reference of real-time capacitance values. We suggest that this dielectric spectroscopy system could be successfully implanted as a novel in vitro assay in the investigation of the roles of paracellular permeability in various brain diseases.

  8. Characterization of tumor microvascular structure and permeability: comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and intravital confocal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reitan, Nina Kristine; Thuen, Marte; Goa, Pål Erik; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2010-01-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by abnormal blood vessel organization, structure, and function. These abnormalities give rise to enhanced vascular permeability and may predict therapeutic responses. The permeability and architecture of the microvasculature in human osteosarcoma tumors growing in dorsal window chambers in athymic mice were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Dextran (40 kDa) and Gadomer were used as molecular tracers for CLSM and DCE-MRI, respectively. A significant correlation was found between permeability indicators. The extravasation rate Ki as measured by CLSM correlated positively with DCE-MRI parameters, such as the volume transfer constant Ktrans and the initial slope of the contrast agent concentration-time curve. This demonstrates that these two techniques give complementary information. Extravasation was further related to microvascular structure and was found to correlate with the fractal dimension and vascular density. The structural parameter values that were obtained from CLSM images were higher for abnormal tumor vasculature than for normal vessels. PMID:20615006

  9. Permeability-increasing activity in hereditary angioneurotic edema plasma. II. Mechanism of formation and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, V H; Ratnoff, O D; Dias Da Silva, W; Rosen, F S

    1969-04-01

    Plasma from persons with hereditary angioneurotic edema readily developed the capacity to increase vascular permeability and to induce the isolated rat uterus to contract. Both activities resided in a small, heat-stable molecule that was apparently a polypeptide. Crude preparations of the polypeptide were inactivated during incubation with trypsin. They also failed to produce pain and erythema, but caused markedly increased vascular permeability in human skin. These characteristics differ from those of bradykinin, from which crude preparations of the polypeptide could also be distinguished by electrophoretic mobility and paper chromatographic behavior. Proof that the polypeptide is truly different from bradykinin must await its further purification. Histamine played no role in the activities observed. Although the enzymes functioning to release the permeability factor and kinin activities in hereditary angioneurotic edema plasma were not clearly defined, one or more plasma enzymes other than C'1 esterase presumably participated either in conjunction with C'1 esterase or in pari passu events to release the polypeptide mediating these activities. PMID:5813121

  10. Noncontact monitoring of vascular lesion phototherapy efficiency by RGB multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Kuzmina, Ilona; Berzina, Anna; Valeine, Lauma; Spigulis, Janis

    2013-12-01

    A prototype low-cost RGB imaging system consisting of a commercial RGB CMOS sensor, RGB light-emitting diode ring light illuminator, and a set of polarizers was designed and tested for mapping the skin erythema index, in order to monitor skin recovery after phototherapy of vascular lesions, such as hemangiomas and telangiectasias. The contrast of erythema index (CEI) was proposed as a parameter for quantitative characterization of vascular lesions. Skin recovery was characterized as a decrease of the CEI value relative to the value before the treatment. This approach was clinically validated by examining 31 vascular lesions before and after phototherapy.

  11. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  12. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  13. Targeting vascular and leukocyte communication in angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kreuger, Johan; Phillipson, Mia

    2016-02-01

    Regulation of vascular permeability, recruitment of leukocytes from blood to tissue and angiogenesis are all processes that occur at the level of the microvasculature during both physiological and pathological conditions. The interplay between microvascular cells and leukocytes during inflammation, together with the emerging roles of leukocytes in the modulation of the angiogenic process, make leukocyte-vascular interactions prime targets for therapeutics to potentially treat a wide range of diseases, including pathological and dysfunctional vessel growth, chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In this Review, we discuss how the different cell types that are present in and around microvessels interact, cooperate and instruct each other, and in this context we highlight drug targets as well as emerging druggable processes that can be exploited to restore tissue homeostasis.

  14. Optical methods for measuring plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Javier Anibal

    Optical methods were developed to measure water permeability in cell layers and used to characterize water channel transfected cells and measure individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells. The general approach was to measure the rate of change of cell volume in response to osmotic gradients. Changes in solute concentration resulting from cell volume changes were used to generate optical signals. Because of the high data acquisition rates obtainable with optical instruments, very high water permeabilities found in cells containing water channels can be measured. Total internal reflection microfluorimetry was used to measure water permeability in cells grown on transparent, solid supports. The fluorescence measured from cells containing a cytosolic fluorophore was inversely proportional to cell volume. The method was applied to transfected cells which expressed water channels and to investigate a cell model of the vasopressin-regulated shuttling of AQP2. Interferometry was used to measure cell volume and water permeability in adherent or non-adherent epithelial cell layers. Volume changes were shown to alter the optical path length of light passing through a cell layer. An interferometer was used to convert the small changes in optical path length to measurable changes in intensity. Cell membrane osmotic water permeability was determined from the time course of interference signal in response to osmotic gradients. Individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells were measured. To overcome the difficulties associated with interferometry, a spatial filtering microscopy method was developed based on changes in transmitted light intensity in a phase contrast microscope occurring after volume changes induced by osmotic gradients. A theory based on the refractive index changes observed in cells by interferometry was developed to explain the dependence of transmitted light intensity on cell volume. The method was applied to

  15. Therapeutic effect of apatinib-loaded nanoparticles on diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Lee, Jung Eun; Suh, Wonhee

    2016-01-01

    Apatinib, a novel and selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2, has been demonstrated recently to exhibit anticancer efficacy by inhibiting the VEGF signaling pathway. Given the importance of VEGF in retinal vascular leakage, the present study was designed to investigate whether apatinib-loaded polymeric nanoparticles inhibit VEGF-mediated retinal vascular hyperpermeability and block diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage. For the delivery of water-insoluble apatinib, the drug was encapsulated in nanoparticles composed of human serum albumin (HSA)-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG). In vitro paracellular permeability and transendothelial electric resistance assays showed that apatinib-loaded HSA-PEG (Apa-HSA-PEG) nanoparticles significantly inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, they substantially reduced the VEGF-induced junctional loss and internalization of vascular endothelial-cadherin, a major component of endothelial junction complexes. In vivo intravitreal injection of Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles in mice blocked VEGF-induced retinal vascular leakage. These in vitro and in vivo data indicated that Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles efficiently blocked VEGF-induced breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. In vivo experiments with streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice showed that an intravitreal injection of Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles substantially inhibited diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage. These results demonstrated, for the first time, that apatinib-loaded nanoparticles may be a promising therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced retinal vascular disorders. PMID:27462154

  16. Therapeutic effect of apatinib-loaded nanoparticles on diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Lee, Jung Eun; Suh, Wonhee

    2016-01-01

    Apatinib, a novel and selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2, has been demonstrated recently to exhibit anticancer efficacy by inhibiting the VEGF signaling pathway. Given the importance of VEGF in retinal vascular leakage, the present study was designed to investigate whether apatinib-loaded polymeric nanoparticles inhibit VEGF-mediated retinal vascular hyperpermeability and block diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage. For the delivery of water-insoluble apatinib, the drug was encapsulated in nanoparticles composed of human serum albumin (HSA)-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG). In vitro paracellular permeability and transendothelial electric resistance assays showed that apatinib-loaded HSA-PEG (Apa-HSA-PEG) nanoparticles significantly inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, they substantially reduced the VEGF-induced junctional loss and internalization of vascular endothelial-cadherin, a major component of endothelial junction complexes. In vivo intravitreal injection of Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles in mice blocked VEGF-induced retinal vascular leakage. These in vitro and in vivo data indicated that Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles efficiently blocked VEGF-induced breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier. In vivo experiments with streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice showed that an intravitreal injection of Apa-HSA-PEG nanoparticles substantially inhibited diabetes-induced retinal vascular leakage. These results demonstrated, for the first time, that apatinib-loaded nanoparticles may be a promising therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced retinal vascular disorders. PMID:27462154

  17. [The effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Tang, Na-Ping; Li, Hua; Qiu, Yun-Liang; Zhou, Guo-Mina; Wang, Yan; Ma, Jing; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2014-10-01

    The dysfunction of vascular system is one of the main causes of orthostatic intolerance induced by microgravity. Vascular endothelial cell is a single layer on the inner wall of the blood vessel and is the important component of the blood vessel wall. Vascular endothelial cell plays a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular functions, such as serving as a permeability barrier, regulating vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Recent studies have demonstrated that microgravity may have different effects on vascular sys- tem and vascular endothelial cells in different parts of the body, such as increasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and decreasing vasodilator reactivity of cerebral arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor and vasodilator reactivity of carotid and abdominal aortic arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and increasing vasodilator reactivity of pulmonary arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity of mesenteric arteries and veins and lower extremity arteries. In addition, microgravity can promote the growth of vascular endothelial cells in the large vessels and inhibit the growth of microvascular endothelial cells. This paper summarized the research progress in the effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells.

  18. Biomimetic carriers mimicking leukocyte plasma membrane to increase tumor vasculature permeability

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, R.; Parodi, A.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Acciardo, S.; Corbo, C.; de Rosa, E.; Yazdi, I. K.; Scaria, S.; Molinaro, R.; Furman, N. E. Toledano; You, J.; Ferrari, M.; Salvatore, F.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine have demonstrated that biomimicry can further improve targeting properties of current nanotechnologies while simultaneously enable carriers with a biological identity to better interact with the biological environment. Immune cells for example employ membrane proteins to target inflamed vasculature, locally increase vascular permeability, and extravasate across inflamed endothelium. Inspired by the physiology of immune cells, we recently developed a procedure to transfer leukocyte membranes onto nanoporous silicon particles (NPS), yielding Leukolike Vectors (LLV). LLV are composed of a surface coating containing multiple receptors that are critical in the cross-talk with the endothelium, mediating cellular accumulation in the tumor microenvironment while decreasing vascular barrier function. We previously demonstrated that lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) transferred onto LLV was able to trigger the clustering of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells. Herein, we provide a more comprehensive analysis of the working mechanism of LLV in vitro in activating this pathway and in vivo in enhancing vascular permeability. Our results suggest the biological activity of the leukocyte membrane can be retained upon transplant onto NPS and is critical in providing the particles with complex biological functions towards tumor vasculature. PMID:27703233

  19. Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease Using Permeability Rates: Quantification by Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Mashiatulla, Maleeha; Morrisett, Joel D.; Larin, Kirill V.

    In order to prevent major damage to the cardiovascular system, it is of vital importance to monitor molecular changes in vascular tissues. Symptoms of cardiovascular diseases frequently do not manifest themselves until it is too late for effective treatment; therefore, methodologies that facilitate early detection are crucial. Atherosclerosis is a major underlying cause of many cardiovascular diseases; thus, elucidating the mechanisms of atherosclerosis is essential for shedding light on the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Atherosclerosis includes an inflammatory process in arterial tissue that involves subintimal accumulation of lipoproteins particles, mainly low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein[a]. Measurement of the permeation rates of these particles should extend our understanding of this disease and lead to methods for early disease detection. Over the past decade, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become widely used in research and, more recently, has been used as a high-resolution imaging technique, capable of quantifying molecular permeability in biological tissues. OCT enables highly sensitive and accurate measurement of permeability rates of molecules and particles in vascular tissue. This sensitivity is due to high in-depth and transverse resolution along with a high dynamic range. In this chapter, we discuss the permeation of molecules and particles through human and animal vascular tissue.

  20. Biomimetic carriers mimicking leukocyte plasma membrane to increase tumor vasculature permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomba, R.; Parodi, A.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Acciardo, S.; Corbo, C.; De Rosa, E.; Yazdi, I. K.; Scaria, S.; Molinaro, R.; Furman, N. E. Toledano; You, J.; Ferrari, M.; Salvatore, F.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine have demonstrated that biomimicry can further improve targeting properties of current nanotechnologies while simultaneously enable carriers with a biological identity to better interact with the biological environment. Immune cells for example employ membrane proteins to target inflamed vasculature, locally increase vascular permeability, and extravasate across inflamed endothelium. Inspired by the physiology of immune cells, we recently developed a procedure to transfer leukocyte membranes onto nanoporous silicon particles (NPS), yielding Leukolike Vectors (LLV). LLV are composed of a surface coating containing multiple receptors that are critical in the cross-talk with the endothelium, mediating cellular accumulation in the tumor microenvironment while decreasing vascular barrier function. We previously demonstrated that lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) transferred onto LLV was able to trigger the clustering of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells. Herein, we provide a more comprehensive analysis of the working mechanism of LLV in vitro in activating this pathway and in vivo in enhancing vascular permeability. Our results suggest the biological activity of the leukocyte membrane can be retained upon transplant onto NPS and is critical in providing the particles with complex biological functions towards tumor vasculature.

  1. Sac-0601 prevents retinal vascular leakage in a mouse model of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Sony; Lee, Sujin; Agrawal, Vijayendra; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2011-04-25

    Endothelium integrity is important for the normal functioning of vessels, the disruption of which can lead to disease. The blood-retinal barrier required for normal retinal function is compromised in diabetic retinopathy, causing retinal vascular leakage. Previously, we demonstrated the ability of Sac-0601[((2R,3S)-3-acetoxy-6-((3S,10R,13R,17R)-10,13-dimethyl-17-((R)-6-methylheptan-2-yl)-2,3,4,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17-tetradecahydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-3-yloxy)-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)methyl acetate], a pseudo-sugar derivative of cholesterol, to increase survival of retinal endothelial cells. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of Sac-0601 to prevent retinal vascular leakages in vitro and in vivo. Sac-0601 treatment blocked VEGF-induced formation of actin stress fibers and stabilized the cortical actin ring in retinal endothelial cells. It also inhibited degradation of occludin, an important tight junction protein, and blocked VEGF-induced disruption of its linear pattern at the cell border. The [(14)C] sucrose permeability assay demonstrated that Sac-0601 was able to prevent VEGF-induced retinal endothelial permeability. The compound inhibited the vascular leakage in retina of mice intravitreally injected with VEGF. And it also significantly reduced the leakage in retina of diabetic retinopathy mice model. Taken together, our findings suggest the potential therapeutic usefulness of Sac-0601 for retinal vascular permeability diseases.

  2. Measuring Permeability of Composite Cryotank Laminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Stanley T.; Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a test method developed to identify whether certain materials and material systems are suitable candidates for large pressurized reusable cryogenic tanks intended for use in current and future manned launch systems. It provides a quick way to screen numerous candidate materials for permeability under anticipated loading environments consistent with flight conditions, as well as addressing reusability issues. cryogenic tank, where the major design issue was hydrogen permeability. It was successfully used to evaluate samples subjected to biaxial loading while maintaining test temperatures near liquid hydrogen. After each sample was thermally preconditioned, a cyclic pressure load was applied to simulate the in-plane strain. First permeability was measured while a sample was under load. Then the sample was unloaded and allowed to return to ambient temperature. The test was repeated to simulate reusability, in order to evaluate its effects on material permeability.

  3. ULTRASTRUCTURE AND PERMEABILITY OF NUCLEAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Joseph; Spiro, David; Loewenstein, Werner R.

    1965-01-01

    The fine structures of nuclear envelopes known to have different permeability properties were compared. Membranes of salivary gland cell nuclei of Drosophila (third instar) and Chironomus (prepupae), which are strong barriers to ion diffusion, and membranes of oocyte nuclei (germinal vesicle) of Xenopus and Triturus, which are much more ion-permeable, show no essential difference in size, frequency, and distribution of their membrane gaps ("pores") which could account for the marked disparities in membrane permeability. The gaps are occupied by diffuse electron-opaque material with occasional central regions of strong opacity. This material may possibly account for the high diffusion resistance of Drosophila and Chironomus nuclear envelopes, where the resistance is far too great to allow free diffusion through the gaps. But material of this kind is also present in the more permeable nuclear envelopes of Xenopus and Triturus oocytes, and there are no convincing structural differences discernible with the techniques employed. PMID:5892850

  4. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, J. A.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    An entry length is always observed before laminar flow is achieved in fluid flowing in a conduit. This depends on the Reynolds number of the flow and the degree of smoothness of the conduit. This work examined this region and the point where laminar flow commences in the context of flow through conduit packed with porous material like beads, of known porosity. Using some theoretical assumptions, it is demonstrated that permeability varies from zero at wall-fluid boundary to maximum at mid-stream, creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus porosity revealed that they are linearly related.

  5. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  6. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  7. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  8. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  9. Regulation of endothelial permeability by second messengers.

    PubMed

    Siflinger-Birnboim, A; Malik, A B

    1996-02-01

    The mechanisms by which mediators such as oxidants released by neutrophil (PMN) activation increase endothelial permeability are poorly understood. The focus of this article is to identify some of these mechanisms. Studies using endothelial cell monolayers in culture have shown that PMN activation increases endothelial permeability both in the presence and absence of PMN-endothelial monolayer contact. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an oxidant released by PMN activation, plays an important role in PMN-induced increases in endothelial permeability. The results of these studies suggest that, as with other mediators of inflammation (e.g., histamine, thrombin) the mechanism of H2O2-induced increase in endothelial permeability involves activation of endothelial protein kinase C (PKC) and increase in endothelial cytosolic Ca2+.

  10. NASA In-step: Permeable Membrane Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Permeable Membrane Experiment are presented. An experiment overview is given. The Membrane Phase Separation Experiment, Membrane Diffusion Interference Experiment, and Membrane Wetting Experiment are described. Finally, summary and conclusions are discussed.

  11. Lunar electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Improved analytical techniques are applied to a large Apollo magnetometer data set to yield values of electroconductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance. Average bulk electroconductivity of the moon is calculated to be .0007 mho/m; a rapid increase with depth to about .003 mho/m within 250 km is indicated. The temperature profile, obtained from the electroconductivity profile for olivine, indicates high lunar temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Magnetic permeability of the moon relative to its environment is calculated to be 1.008 plus or minus .005; a permeability relative to free space of 1.012 plus 0.011, minus 0.008 is obtained. Lunar iron abundances corresponding to this permeability value are 2.5 plus 2.3, minus 1.7 wt% free iron and 5.0-13.5 wt% total iron for a moon composed of a combination of free iron, olivine, and orthopyroxene.

  12. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  13. Potential vascular damage from radiation in the space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griem, M. L.; Robotewskyj, A.; Nagel, R. H.

    1994-10-01

    Cultured endothelial cells of blood vessels have a Do of 2 Gy for X-rays. A dose of 0.5 Gy of X-rays has an acute effect on vessel diameter. The vessels may show other acute effects such as change in permeability including a change in the blood brain barrier. Changes occurring from late effects of chronic exposure in vascular architecture include telangiectasia and decrease in vascular density. Changes in the perivascular connective tissue particularly collagen may play a role in these changes. After charged particle exposure of 15 and 30 Gy, radiation changes in the blood brain barrier and vascular changes are noted in the nervous system. These long term changes are recorded by PET, MRI, and CT imaging. Chronic exposure to alpha particles causes vascular damage in compact bone resulting in bone infarcts. Using tandem scanning confocal microscopy in-situ imaging of the capillaries and collagen of the papillary dermis provides a non-invasive method of serial recording of changes in irradiated microvasculature.

  14. Vascular CaMKII: heart and brain in your arteries.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Fanny; Charbel, Chimène; Allen, Bruce G; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    First characterized in neuronal tissues, the multifunctional calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key signaling component in several mammalian biological systems. Its unique capacity to integrate various Ca(2+) signals into different specific outcomes is a precious asset to excitable and nonexcitable cells. Numerous studies have reported roles and mechanisms involving CaMKII in brain and heart tissues. However, corresponding functions in vascular cell types (endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells) remained largely unexplored until recently. Investigation of the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics, their impact on vascular cell function, the regulatory processes involved and more recently the spatially restricted oscillatory Ca(2+) signals and microdomains triggered significant interest towards proteins like CaMKII. Heteromultimerization of CaMKII isoforms (four isoforms and several splice variants) expands this kinase's peculiar capacity to decipher Ca(2+) signals and initiate specific signaling processes, and thus controlling cellular functions. The physiological functions that rely on CaMKII are unsurprisingly diverse, ranging from regulating contractile state and cellular proliferation to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular permeability. This review will focus on emerging evidence of CaMKII as an essential component of the vascular system, with a focus on the kinase isoform/splice variants and cellular system studied. PMID:27306369

  15. Vascular effects of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Almeida Rezende, Bruno; Pereira, Aline Carvalho; Cortes, Steyner F; Lemos, Virginia Soares

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with various biological properties particularly in the cardiovascular system, including antiatherogenic, antioxidant, vasodilation, antihypertensive, and antiplatelet activities. These biological properties have been evaluated in several experimental and clinical studies. In addition, extensive reviews have discussed the antiatherogenic effect of these polyphenols. However, limited studies have investigated the potential therapeutic vascular effects of these compounds. This review brings together some recent studies, to establish the different signaling pathways involved in the molecular mechanisms that underlie the vasodilation induced by flavonoids.

  16. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  17. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor as a key inducer of angiogenesis in the asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Norbert; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by structural airway changes, which are known as airway remodeling, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Vascular remodeling in asthmatic lungs results from increased angiogenesis, which is mainly mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a key regulator of blood vessel growth in the airways of asthma patients by promoting proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and inducing vascular leakage and permeability. In addition, VEGF induces allergic inflammation, enhances allergic sensitization, and has a role in Th2 type inflammatory responses. Specific inhibitors of VEGF and blockers of its receptors might be useful to control chronic airway inflammation and vascular remodeling, and might be a new therapeutic approach for chronic inflammatory airway disease like asthma.

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A: a multifunctional molecular player in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Bao, Shisan; Hambly, Brett D; Gillies, Mark C

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), first described as "vascular permeability factor", is a critical molecule in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy at several levels. Previous studies have outlined the importance of VEGF-A in mediating vascular pathology in both experimental models and clinical diabetic retinopathy, which are characterized by retinal vascular leakage, preretinal neovascularisation and neuronal degeneration. Paradoxically, recent reports have emphasized the potential neurotrophic effects of VEGF-A on the quiescent vasculature, as well as its direct and indirect protective effects on retinal neurons. VEGF-A has also been identified as an important signalling regulator in the normal central nervous system. Consequently, anti-VEGF therapy for diabetic retinopathy has become a controversal issue. This review outlines recently developed concepts relating to the role of VEGF-A in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, with particular emphasis on its implications for clinical practice. PMID:19646547

  20. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Vascular function and ocular involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Paraskevopoulos, Theodoros; Gialafos, Elias; Rapti, Aggeliki; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Zaromitidou, Marina; Mourouzis, Konstantinos; Siasou, Georgia; Gouliopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsalamandris, Sotiris; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    Ocular involvement occurs in sarcoidosis (Sar) patients mainly in the form of uveitis. This study was designed to determine if uveitis in Sar patients is associated with vascular impairment. We enrolled 82 Sar patients and 77, age and sex matched, control subjects (Cl). Sar patients were divided into those with ocular sarcoidosis (OS) and those without ocular sarcoidosis (WOS). Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured as an index of aortic stiffness and augmentation index (AIx) as a measure of arterial wave reflections. Although there was no significant difference in sex, age and mean arterial pressure, patients with OS compared to WOS patients and Cl subjects had impaired FMD (p<0.001), increased AIx (p=0.02) and increased PWV (p=0.001). Interestingly, impaired FMD in Sar patients was independently, from possible covariates (age, sex, smoking habits, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia), associated with increased odds of ocular involvement (odds ratio=1.69, p=0.001). More precisely ROC curve analysis revealed that FMD had a significant diagnostic ability for the detection of OS (AUC=0.77, p<0.001) with a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 68% for an FMD value below 6.00%. To conclude in the present study we have shown that ocular involvement in Sar patients is associated with impaired endothelial function and increased arterial stiffness. These results strengthen the vascular theory which considers uveitis a consequence of vascular dysfunction in Sar patients and reveals a possible clinical importance of the use of endothelial function tests.

  2. Vascular Risk Factors and Clinical Progression in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Raymond Y.; Figueroa, Karla P.; Pulst, Stefan M.; Lin, Chi-Ying; Perlman, Susan; Wilmot, George; Gomez, Christopher M.; Schmahmann, Jeremy; Paulson, Henry; Shakkottai, Vikram G.; Ying, Sarah H.; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Bushara, Khalaf; Geschwind, Michael; Xia, Guangbin; Subramony, S. H.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Kuo, Sheng-Han

    2015-01-01

    Background The contributions of vascular risk factors to spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) are not known. Methods We studied 319 participants with SCA 1, 2, 3, and 6 and repeatedly measured clinical severity using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) for 2 years. Vascular risk factors were summarized by CHA2DS2-VASc scores as the vascular risk factor index. We employed regression models to study the effects of vascular risk factors on ataxia onset and progression after adjusting for age, sex, and pathological CAG repeats. Our secondary analyses took hyperlipidemia into account. Results Nearly 60% of SCA participants were at low vascular risks with CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, and 31% scored 2 or greater. Higher CHA2DS2-VASc scores were not associated with either earlier onset or faster progression of ataxia. These findings were not altered after accounting for hyperlipidemia. Discussion Vascular risks are not common in SCAs and are not associated with earlier onset or faster ataxia progression. PMID:25713748

  3. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  4. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  5. Quantitative analysis of cytokine-induced vascular toxicity and vascular leak in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Irwan, Yetty Y; Feng, Yi; Gach, H Michael; Symanowski, James T; McGregor, John R; Veni, Gopalkrishna; Schabel, Matthias; Samlowski, Wolfram E

    2009-09-30

    A storm of inflammatory cytokines is released during treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), closely approximating changes initially observed during sepsis. These signals induce profound changes in neurologic function and cognition. Little is known about the mechanisms involved. We evaluated a number of experimental methods to quantify changes in brain blood vessel integrity in a well-characterized IL-2 treatment mouse model. Measurement of wet versus dry weight and direct measurement of small molecule accumulation (e.g. [(3)H]-H(2)O, sodium fluorescein) were not sensitive or reliable enough to detect small changes in mouse brain vascular permeability. Estimation of brain water content using proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements using a 7T mouse MRI system was sensitive to 1-2% changes in brain water content, but was difficult to reproduce in replicate experiments. Successful techniques included use of immunohistochemistry using specific endothelial markers to identify vasodilation in carefully matched regions of brain parenchyma and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI. Both techniques indicated that IL-2 treatment induced vasodilation of the brain blood vessels. DCE MRI further showed a 2-fold increase in the brain blood vessel permeability to gadolinium in IL-2 treated mice compared to controls. Both immunohistochemistry and DCE MRI data suggested that IL-2 induced toxicity in the brain results from vasodilation of the brain blood vessels and increased microvascular permeability, resulting in perivascular edema. These experimental techniques provide us with the tools to further characterize the mechanism responsible for cytokine-induced neuropsychiatric toxicity.

  6. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns.

  7. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  8. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability.

  9. Vascularization of engineered teeth.

    PubMed

    Nait Lechguer, A; Kuchler-Bopp, S; Hu, B; Haïkel, Y; Lesot, H

    2008-12-01

    The implantation of cultured dental cell-cell re-associations allows for the reproduction of fully formed teeth, crown morphogenesis, epithelial histogenesis, mineralized dentin and enamel deposition, and root-periodontium development. Since vascularization is critical for organogenesis and tissue engineering, this work aimed to study: (a) blood vessel formation during tooth development, (b) the fate of blood vessels in cultured teeth and re-associations, and (c) vascularization after in vivo implantation. Ex vivo, blood vessels developed in the dental mesenchyme from the cap to bell stages and in the enamel organ, shortly before ameloblast differentiation. In cultured teeth and re-associations, blood-vessel-like structures remained in the peridental mesenchyme, but never developed into dental tissues. After implantation, both teeth and re-associations became revascularized, although later in the case of the re-associations. In implanted re-associations, newly formed blood vessels originated from the host, allowing for their survival, and affording conditions organ growth, mineralization, and enamel secretion.

  10. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  11. Vascular graft infections.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Barbara; Husmann, Lars; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Weber, Rainer; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Vascular procedures are rarely complicated by infection, but if prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI) occurs, morbidity and mortality are high. Several patient-related, surgery-related and postoperative risk factors are reported, but they are not well validated. PVGI is due to bacterial colonisation of the wound and the underlying prosthetic graft, generally as a result of direct contamination during the operative procedure, mainly from the patient's skin or adjacent bowel. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria or on the best management of PVGI. On the basis of reported clinical studies and our own experience, we advocate a surgical approach combining repeated radical local debridement, with graft preservation whenever possible or partial excision of the infected graft, depending on its condition, plus simultaneous negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In addition, antimicrobial therapy is recommended, but there is no consensus on which classes of agent are adequate for the treatment of PVGI and whether certain infections may be treated by means of NPWT alone. Since staphylococci and Gram-negative rods are likely to be isolated, empirical treatment might include a penicillinase-resistant beta-lactam or a glycopeptide, plus an aminoglycoside, the latter for Gram-negative coverage and synergistic treatment of Gram-positive cocci. Additionally, empirical treatment might include rifampicin since it penetrates well into biofilms.

  12. A fast nonlinear regression method for estimating permeability in CT perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Edwin; Riordan, Alan J; Horsch, Alexander D; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, Birgitta K; de Jong, Hugo W

    2013-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier damage, which can be quantified by measuring vascular permeability, is a potential predictor for hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke. Permeability is commonly estimated by applying Patlak analysis to computed tomography (CT) perfusion data, but this method lacks precision. Applying more elaborate kinetic models by means of nonlinear regression (NLR) may improve precision, but is more time consuming and therefore less appropriate in an acute stroke setting. We propose a simplified NLR method that may be faster and still precise enough for clinical use. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reliability of in total 12 variations of Patlak analysis and NLR methods, including the simplified NLR method. Confidence intervals for the permeability estimates were evaluated using simulated CT attenuation–time curves with realistic noise, and clinical data from 20 patients. Although fixating the blood volume improved Patlak analysis, the NLR methods yielded significantly more reliable estimates, but took up to 12 × longer to calculate. The simplified NLR method was ∼4 × faster than other NLR methods, while maintaining the same confidence intervals (CIs). In conclusion, the simplified NLR method is a new, reliable way to estimate permeability in stroke, fast enough for clinical application in an acute stroke setting. PMID:23881247

  13. Nanomedicine for drug targeting: strategies beyond the enhanced permeability and retention effect

    PubMed Central

    Nehoff, Hayley; Parayath, Neha N; Domanovitch, Laura; Taurin, Sebastien; Greish, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The growing research interest in nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory-related pathologies is yielding encouraging results. Unfortunately, enthusiasm is tempered by the limited specificity of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Factors such as lack of cellular specificity, low vascular density, and early release of active agents prior to reaching their target contribute to the limitations of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, improved nanomedicine designs are creating opportunities to overcome these problems. In this review, we present examples of the advances made in this field and endeavor to highlight the potential of these emerging technologies to improve targeting of nanomedicine to specific pathological cells and tissues. PMID:24904213

  14. Correlation of soil radon and permeability with indoor radon potential in Ottawa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Falcomer, Renato; Bergman, Lauren; Wierdsma, Jessica; Ly, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Soil gas radon and soil gas permeability measurements were conducted at 32 sites across the five most populated communities in the city of Ottawa where indoor radon measurements were available for 167 houses. A soil radon index (SRI) determined from the soil radon concentration and the soil gas permeability was used to characterise radon availability from soil to air. This study demonstrated that the average SRI in a community area correlates with the indoor radon potential (the percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3)) in that community. Soil gas radon concentrations together with soil gas permeability measurements can be a useful tool for the prediction of the indoor radon potential in the development of a Canadian radon risk map.

  15. Numerical study of a quasi-zero-index photonic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiuli; Meng, Qingxin; Wang, Xiaoou; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructures made of metallic cube are arranged in Kagome lattice. Transmitted and reflected electromagnetic fields of normally incident circular polarized plane waves are computed using a tri-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm. Equivalent refractive index, equivalent permittivity, equivalent permeability and normalized impedance are calculated using the modified S-parameter retrieval method. Around the 7.912×1014 Hz and 9.376×1014 Hz, the structure performance for quasi-zero-index frequency bands.

  16. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  17. Intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 is a hypoxia-induced endothelial peptide that stabilizes pulmonary microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Paddenberg, Renate; Quanz, Karin; Chang, Chia L.; Park, Jae-Il; Gries, Barbara; Rafiq, Amir; Faulhammer, Petra; Goldenberg, Anna; Papadakis, Tamara; Noll, Thomas; Hsu, Sheau Y. T.; Weissmann, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) signaling pathway in preventing damage of the lung by stabilizing pulmonary barrier function. Intermedin (IMD), also termed adrenomedullin-2, is the most recently identified peptide targeting this receptor. Here we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the expression of IMD in the murine lung and cultured murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) as well as the role of IMD in regulating vascular permeability. Monoclonal IMD antibodies were generated, and transcript levels were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR. The promoter region of IMD gene was analyzed, and the effect of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α on IMD expression was investigated in HEK293T cells. Isolated murine lungs and a human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer model were used to study the effect of IMD on vascular permeability. IMD was identified as a pulmonary endothelial peptide by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Hypoxia caused an upregulation of IMD mRNA in the murine lung and PMEC. As shown by these results, HIF-1α enhances IMD promoter activity. Our functional studies showed that IMD abolished the increase in pressure-induced endothelial permeability. Moreover, IMD decreased basal and thrombin-induced hyperpermeability of an endothelial cell monolayer in a receptor-dependent manner and activated PKA in these cells. In conclusion, IMD is a novel hypoxia-induced gene and a potential interventional agent for the improvement of endothelial barrier function in systemic inflammatory responses and hypoxia-induced vascular leakage. PMID:19684198

  18. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  19. RhoA and ROCK mediate histamine-induced vascular leakage and anaphylactic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Simaan, May; Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Sakurai, Atsuko; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Adams, Ralf; Offermanns, Stefan; Mochizuki, Naoki; Zheng, Yi; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Histamine-induced vascular leakage is an integral component of many highly prevalent human diseases, including allergies, asthma, and anaphylaxis. Yet, how histamine induces the disruption of the endothelial barrier is not well defined. By using genetically modified animal models, pharmacologic inhibitors, and a synthetic biology approach, here we show that the small GTPase RhoA mediates histamine-induced vascular leakage. Histamine causes the rapid formation of focal adherens junctions, disrupting the endothelial barrier by acting on H1R Gαq-coupled receptors, which is blunted in endothelial Gαq/11 KO mice. Interfering with RhoA and ROCK function abolishes endothelial permeability, while phospholipase Cβ plays a limited role. Moreover, endothelial-specific RhoA gene deletion prevents vascular leakage and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in vivo, and ROCK inhibitors protect from lethal systemic anaphylaxis. This study supports a key role for the RhoA signaling circuitry in vascular permeability, thereby identifying novel pharmacological targets for many human diseases characterized by aberrant vascular leakage. PMID:25857352

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of dabrafenib on polyphosphate-mediated vascular disruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suyeon; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-08-25

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new treatments for human diseases. Previous studies have reported polyphosphate (PolyP)-mediated vascular inflammatory responses such as disruption of vascular integrity. Dabrafenib is a B-Raf inhibitor and initially used for the treatment of metastatic melanoma therapy. This study illustrates drug repositioning with dabrafenib (DAB) for the modulation of PolyP-mediated vascular inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Dabrafenib suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, dabrafenib demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of dabrafenib on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of dabrafenib on polyphosphate-mediated vascular disruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suyeon; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-08-25

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new treatments for human diseases. Previous studies have reported polyphosphate (PolyP)-mediated vascular inflammatory responses such as disruption of vascular integrity. Dabrafenib is a B-Raf inhibitor and initially used for the treatment of metastatic melanoma therapy. This study illustrates drug repositioning with dabrafenib (DAB) for the modulation of PolyP-mediated vascular inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Dabrafenib suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, dabrafenib demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of dabrafenib on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. PMID:27458080

  2. RhoA and ROCK mediate histamine-induced vascular leakage and anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Mikelis, Constantinos M; Simaan, May; Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Sakurai, Atsuko; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Adams, Ralf H; Offermanns, Stefan; Mochizuki, Naoki; Zheng, Yi; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2015-04-10

    Histamine-induced vascular leakage is an integral component of many highly prevalent human diseases, including allergies, asthma and anaphylaxis. Yet, how histamine induces the disruption of the endothelial barrier is not well defined. By using genetically modified animal models, pharmacologic inhibitors and a synthetic biology approach, here we show that the small GTPase RhoA mediates histamine-induced vascular leakage. Histamine causes the rapid formation of focal adherens junctions, disrupting the endothelial barrier by acting on H1R Gαq-coupled receptors, which is blunted in endothelial Gαq/11 KO mice. Interfering with RhoA and ROCK function abolishes endothelial permeability, while phospholipase Cβ plays a limited role. Moreover, endothelial-specific RhoA gene deletion prevents vascular leakage and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in vivo, and ROCK inhibitors protect from lethal systemic anaphylaxis. This study supports a key role for the RhoA signalling circuitry in vascular permeability, thereby identifying novel pharmacological targets for many human diseases characterized by aberrant vascular leakage.

  3. Correlations between effective permeability and marrow contact channels surface of vertebral endplates.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Accadbled, Franck; Molinier, François; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; de Gauzy, Jérôme Sales; Swider, Pascal

    2010-09-01

    Homeostasis of the intervertebral disc relies on nutrient supply and waste clearance through the dense capillary network that is in contact with the cartilage endplate (CEP). We developed a micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) method to quantify the marrow contact channel surface (MCCS) with the CEP and to validate the hypothesis according to which MCCS was correlated to the effective permeability of the vertebral endplate (VEP) and influenced by the mechanical stimuli. The influence of compression loading on local vascularization was investigated. Six 4-week-old skeletally immature pigs were instrumented with left pedicle screws and rod at both T5-T6 and L1-L2 levels to create asymmetrical spine tethers. After 3 months of growth, three cylindrical specimens of the VEP (one central and two lateral right and left) were obtained from both the instrumented and the control levels. We used a previously validated method for measuring permeability. Micro-CT analysis (resolution 12 microm) yielded a gray-scale 2D-image of the discal end of each specimen converted into a binary 2D-image to derive the MCCS. Correlations between MCCS and effective permeability were assessed. Effective permeability and MCCS were significantly decreased compared to the control group especially on the tethered side (-41.5%, p = 0.004 and -52.5%, p = 0.0009, respectively). Correlations were significant and showed maximal value (r(2) = 0.430, p < 0.0001) on the tethered side involving maximal compressive loadings. Mechanical stimuli, due to unbalanced growth, altered the vascularization and the convective properties of the CEP. The cascade of mechanobiological events should offer perspectives for research on disc degeneration and attempted treatment. PMID:20225324

  4. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    A measure of indexing consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on indexing consistency…

  5. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  6. Endothelial cell permeability during hantavirus infection involves factor XII-dependent increased activation of the kallikrein-kinin system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shannon L; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Copeland, Anna Maria; Jahrling, Peter B; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC) display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK), and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL) and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK). Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation during

  7. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is

  8. Permeability evolution in carbonate fractures: Competing roles of confining stress and fluid pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Takuya; McGuire, Thomas P.; Watanabe, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi; Elsworth, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We explore the permeability evolution of fractures in carbonate rock that results from the effects of mechanical stress and nonequilibrium chemistry (pH of fluid). Core plugs of Capitan limestone are saw cut to form a smooth axial fracture that is subsequently roughened to simulate a natural fracture with controlled surface topography. Aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride (pH 5˜7) transit these plugs at confining stresses of 3-10 MPa, with flow rates and mineral mass fluxes measured to constrain competing mechanisms of permeability evolution. The effluent calcium concentrations are always much lower than equilibrium calcium solubility, resulting in the dissolution-dominant permeability evolution in our experiments. Depending on the combination of confining stress and fluid pH, the fracture apertures either gape (permeability increase) or close (permeability reduction). We quantitatively constrain the transition between gaping (pH < 6.1) and closing (pH > 6.5) with this transition independent of confining stress up to 10 MPa. A transitional regime (6.1 < pH < 6.5) of invariant aperture represents a balance between the two mechanisms of free-face dissolution and pressure solution at the bridging asperities. We employ a lumped-parameter model to interpret the dissolution-dominant evolution of permeability. By considering different dissolution rate constants between noncontacting asperities and the stagnant water film at the contacting asperities, this model replicates the principal characteristics of permeability evolution of the fracture. Observed rates of aperture change are ill matched when the influent pH is 5-6, since wormhole formation is not accommodated in the model. These observations offer a promising pathway to index the switch from aperture gaping to aperture closing for reactive flow as reactivity is reduced and stress effects become more important.

  9. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  10. Vascular surgery: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, P

    1999-09-01

    Isaac Newton, among others, observed that 'we see so far because we are standing upon the shoulders of giants'. In vascular surgery most of the giants have been European, and this is a heritage which we as Europeans can take pride in and build upon if we chose to do so. As in other areas of life, commitment is essential in order to influence the future. For vascular surgeons in Europe this means active participation in the European scientific societies for vascular surgery and in the UEMS. The main value of the EBSQ.VASC assessments to date has been to expose the uneven standards of training in vascular surgery within the European Union. Only if action follows to address these inequalities will the tactics of the European Board of Vascular Surgery be vindicated.

  11. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  12. Numerical-Simulation-Based Determination of Relative Permeability in Laminated Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Mohammad H.; Gerke, Kirill; Azizmohammadi, Siroos; Matthai, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir simulation using the extended Darcy's law approach requires relative permeability curves derived either via analytic saturation functions (Corey models etc.) or from special core analysis (SCAL). Since such experimental exploration of the space of influential parameters (pore geometry and wettability) is costly and time consuming, establishing ways to extract ensemble relative permeability from numerical simulation, kri, over the entire range of water saturation is highly desirable. Recent work has highlighted that the shape of relative permeability strongly depends on the balance between viscous, gravitational, and capillary forces. Our work focuses on finding accurate ways to compute ensemble kri(sw) for layered rocks when both capillary and viscous forces are strong. Two methods are proposed: an unsteady state saturation variation (USSV) method and a steady state saturation variation (SSSV) technique. To evaluate these approaches, SCAL data was extracted numerically from a real mm-scale layered sample. Results obtained with a Finite Element-Centered Finite Volume (FECFM) simulator, suggest that either of the approaches work significantly better than conventional unsteady state and JBN (Johnson-Bossler-Naumann) methods. Also, investigating saturation and velocity profiles within the sample indicates that bed-by-bed variations in wettability influence the flow pattern along/across interfaces making equipermeable layers behave like zones with different flow velocity. This dramatically challenges conventional relative permeability models and is addressed in terms of a new variable called relative permeability index.

  13. Effect of cotton, hemp, and flax dust extracts on lung permeability in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Bates, P J; Farr, S J; Nicholls, P J

    1995-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational lung disease in textile mill workers exposed to the respirable dusts of cotton, hemp, and flax. This study investigated the influence of aqueous extracts from these dusts on overall lung permeability in the guinea pig as an index of respiratory epithelial damage. Lung permeability was assessed by absorption into blood from the lung of inhaled technetium-99m diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (Tc-DTPA) using gamma-scintigraphy. The half-life for Tc-DTPA absorption (t1/2) was significantly reduced following a 4-week inhalation treatment with cotton, hemp, or flax dust extracts when compared to saline control. There was at least a partial return to normal permeability 7 days after stopping treatment. A single inhalation of extract did not affect the t1/2, but increased the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h postexposure. Neutrophil migration into the airspaces therefore appeared to precede the increased lung permeability. Long-term exposure was not associated with respiratory epithelial shedding, suggesting that the increased permeability reflects a loss of epithelial tight junction integrity arising from repeated exposure to as yet undefined agents in these dusts.

  14. Changes in permeability caused by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Shi, Zheming

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes induce a range of hydrological responses, including changes in streamflow and changes in the water level in wells. Here we show that many of these responses are caused the changes in permeability produced by the passage of seismic waves. First we analyze streams that were dry or nearly dry before the 2014 M6 Napa, California, earthquake butstarted to flow after the earthquake. We show that the new flows were meteoric in origin and originate in the nearby mountains. Responses are not correlated with the sign of static strains implying seismic waves liberated this water, presumably by changing permeability. We also analyze a large network of wells in China that responded to 4 large earthquakes. We monitor permeability changes through their effect on the water level response to solid Earth tides. We find that when earthquakes produce sustained changes in water level, permeability also changes. Wells with water level changes that last for only days show no evidence for changes in aquifer permeability.

  15. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  16. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  17. Permeability evolution in sandstone: Digital rock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Ayako

    Permeability is perhaps one of the most important yet elusive reservoir properties, since it poorly correlates with elastic properties, and as a result, cannot be mapped remotely. Physical permeability measurements may be augmented or even partially replaced by numerical experiments, provided that a numerical simulation accurately mimics the physical process. Numerical simulation of laboratory experiments on rocks, or digital rock physics, is an emerging field that may benefit the petroleum industry. For numerical experimentation to find its way into the mainstream, it has to be practical and easily repeatable, i.e., implemented on standard hardware and in real time. This condition reduces the feasible size of a digital sample to just a few grains across. Will the results be meaningful for a larger rock volume? The answer is that small fragments of medium- to high-porosity sandstone, such as cuttings, which are not statistically representative of a larger sample, cannot be used to numerically calculate the exact porosity and permeability of the sample. However, by using a significant number of such small fragments, it may be possible to establish a site-specific permeability-porosity trend, which can be used to estimate the absolute permeability from independent porosity data, obtained in the well or inferred from seismic measurements.

  18. Gas Permeability in Rubbery Polyphosphazene Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and gas permeability of ten new polyphosphazenes has been studied. Additionally, the first gas permeation data has been collected on hydrolytically unstable poly[bis-(chloro)phosphazene]. Gases used in this study include CO2, CH4, O2, N2, H2, and Ar. CO2 was the most permeable gas through any of the phosphazenes and a direct correlation between the Tg of the polymer and CO2 transport was noted with permeability increasing with decreasing polymer Tg. To a lesser degree, permeability of all the other gases studied also yielded increases with decreasing polymer Tg. The trend observed for these new polymers was further supported by published data for other phosphazenes. Furthermore, permeability data for all gases were found to correlate to the gas condensability and the gas critical pressures, except for hydrogen, suggesting that the nature of the gas is also a significant factor for permeation through rubbery phosphazene membranes. Ideal separation factors (á) for the CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 gas pairs were calculated. For CO2/CH4, no increase in á was observed with decreasing Tg, however increases in á were noted for the CO2/H2 pair.

  19. Novel vascular endothelial growth factor blocker improves cellular viability and reduces hypobaric hypoxia-induced vascular leakage and oedema in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Deepika; Nehra, Sarita; Chaudhary, Kamal; CVS, Siva Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important cerebral angiogenic and permeability factor under hypoxia. There is a need to find effective molecules that may ameliorate hypoxia-induced cerebral oedema. In silico identification of novel candidate molecules that block VEGF-A site were identified and validated with a Ramachandran plot. The active site residues of VEGF-A were detected by Pocketfinder, CASTp, and DogSiteScorer. Based on in silico data, three VEGF-A blocker (VAB) candidate molecules (VAB1, VAB2, and VAB3) were checked for improvement in cellular viability and regulation of VEGF levels in N2a cells under hypoxia (0.5% O2 ). Additionally, the best candidate molecule's efficacy was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats for its ameliorative effect on cerebral oedema and vascular leakage under hypobaric hypoxia 7260 m. All experimental results were compared with the commercially available VEGF blocker sunitinib. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 was found most effective in increasing cellular viability and maintaining normal VEGF levels under hypoxia (0.5% oxygen) in N2a cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 effectively restored VEGF levels, decreased cerebral oedema, and reduced vascular leakage under hypobaric hypoxia when compared to sunitinib-treated rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 may be a promising candidate molecule for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced vasogenic oedema by regulating VEGF levels.

  20. Moss and vascular plant indices in Ohio wetlands have similar environmental predictors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Schumacher, William; Gara, Brian; Adams, Jean V.; Viau, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Mosses and vascular plants have been shown to be reliable indicators of wetland habitat delineation and environmental quality. Knowledge of the best ecological predictors of the quality of wetland moss and vascular plant communities may determine if similar management practices would simultaneously enhance both populations. We used Akaike's Information Criterion to identify models predicting a moss quality assessment index (MQAI) and a vascular plant index of biological integrity based on floristic quality (VIBI-FQ) from 27 emergent and 13 forested wetlands in Ohio, USA. The set of predictors included the six metrics from a wetlands disturbance index (ORAM) and two landscape development intensity indices (LDIs). The best single predictor of MQAI and one of the predictors of VIBI-FQ was an ORAM metric that assesses habitat alteration and disturbance within the wetland, such as mowing, grazing, and agricultural practices. However, the best single predictor of VIBI-FQ was an ORAM metric that assessed wetland vascular plant communities, interspersion, and microtopography. LDIs better predicted MQAI than VIBI-FQ, suggesting that mosses may either respond more rapidly to, or recover more slowly from, anthropogenic disturbance in the surrounding landscape than vascular plants. These results supported previous predictive studies on amphibian indices and metrics and a separate vegetation index, indicating that similar wetland management practices may result in qualitatively the same ecological response for three vastly different wetland biological communities (amphibians, vascular plants, and mosses).

  1. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  2. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  3. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  4. Transpulmonary thermodilution-derived cardiac function index identifies cardiac dysfunction in acute heart failure and septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There is limited clinical experience with the single-indicator transpulmonary thermodilution (pulse contour cardiac output, or PiCCO) technique in critically ill medical patients, particularly in those with acute heart failure (AHF). Therefore, we compared the cardiac function of patients with AHF or sepsis using the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and the PiCCO technology. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted in the medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Twelve patients with AHF and nine patients with severe sepsis or septic shock had four simultaneous hemodynamic measurements by PAC and PiCCO during a 24-hour observation period. Comparisons between groups were made with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Including all measurements, correlations between data pairs were established using linear regression analysis and are expressed as the square of Pearson's correlation coefficients (r2). Results Compared to septic patients, AHF patients had a significantly lower cardiac index, cardiac function index (CFI), global ejection fraction, mixed venous oxygen saturation (SmvO2) and pulmonary vascular permeability index, but higher pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. All patients with a CFI less than 4.5 per minute had an SmvO2 not greater than 70%. In both groups, the CFI correlated with the left ventricular stroke work index (sepsis: r2 = 0.30, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.23, P < 0.05) and cardiac power (sepsis: r2 = 0.39, P < 0.05; AHF: r2 = 0.45, P < 0.05). Conclusions In critically ill medical patients, assessment of cardiac function using transpulmonary thermodilution technique is an alternative to the PAC. A low CFI identifies cardiac dysfunction in both AHF and septic patients. PMID:19671146

  5. GROUNDWATER FLOW IN LOW-PERMEABILITY ENVIRONMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow systems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of petroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters.

  6. Blood flow and permeability in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanics of blood flow in microvessels and microvessel permeability are reviewed. In the first part, characteristics of blood flow in vivo and in vitro are described from a fluid-mechanical point of view, and mathematical models for blood flow in microvessels are presented. Possible causes of the increased flow resistance obtained in vivo compared to in vitro are examined, including the effects of irregularities of vessel lumen, the presence of endothelial surface glycocalyx and white blood cells. In the second part, the ultrastructural pathways and mechanisms whereby endothelial cells and the clefts between the cells modulate microvessel permeability to water and solutes are introduced. Previous and current models for microvessel permeability to water and solutes are reviewed. These models examine the role of structural components of interendothelial cleft, such as junction strands and surface glycocalyx, in the determination of water and solute transport across the microvessel walls. Transport models in the tissue space surrounding the microvessel are also described.

  7. Virtual screening of intestinal drug permeability.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, P; Luthman, K; Artursson, P

    2000-03-01

    Lead compounds generated in high throughput drug discovery programmes often have unfavorable biopharmaceutical properties, resulting in a low success rate of such drug candidates in clinical development. Drug companies and researchers would thus like to have methods of predicting biopharmaceutical properties accurately. The intestinal permeability to a lead compound is one such property which is particularly important. Therefore, access to methods to accurately predict biopharmaceutical properties, such as the intestinal permeability of a large series of compounds, is of particular importance. This review deals with new theoretical methods used to predict intestinal drug permeability. There are several possible transport routes across the intestine, but theoretical methods generally deal with only one of them, the passive transcellular route. Therefore, this review will also discuss the relative importance of passive and active drug transport and efflux routes using recent data generated in cell cultures, animal models and human subjects.

  8. A dual energy CT study on vascular effects of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Hoye, Jocelyn; Deland, Katherine; Whitley, Melodi; Qi, Yi; Moding, Everett; Kirsch, David G.; West, Jennifer; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are emerging as promising agents for both cancer therapy and CT imaging. AuNPs are delivered to tumors via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and they preferentially accumulate in close proximity to the tumor blood vessels. AuNPs produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiation therapy (RT), boosting dose. This work is focused on understanding how tumor vascular permeability is influenced by AuNP-augmented radiation therapy (RT), and how this knowledge can potentially improve the delivery of additional nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics. We use dual energy (DE) CT to detect accumulation of AuNPs and increased vascular permeability to liposomal iodine (i.e. a surrogate for chemotherapeutics with liposome encapsulation) following RT. We used sarcoma tumors generated in LSL-KrasG12D; p53FL/FL conditional mutant mice. A total of n=37 mice were used in this study. The treated mice were injected with 20 mg AuNP (0.1 ml/25 g mouse) 24 hours before delivery of 5 Gy RT (n=5), 10 Gy RT (n=3) or 20 Gy RT (n=6). The control mice received no AuNP injection and either no RT (n=6), 5 Gy RT (n=3), 10 Gy RT (n=3), 20 Gy RT (n=11). Twenty four hours post-RT, the mice were injected with liposomal iodine (0.3 ml/25 mouse) and imaged with DE-CT three days later. The results suggest that independent of any AuNP usage, RT levels of 10 Gy and 20 Gy increase the permeability of tumor vasculature to liposomal iodine and that the increase in permeability is dose-dependent. We found that the effect of RT on vasculature may already be at its maximum response i.e. saturated at 20 Gy, and therefore the addition of AuNPs had almost no added benefit. Similarly, at 5 Gy RT, our data suggests that there was no effect of AuNP augmentation on tumor vascular permeability. However, by using AuNPs with 10 Gy RT, we observed an increase in the vascular permeability, however this is not yet statistically significant due to the small

  9. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 ..mu..darcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section.

  10. [Journal selection and indexing for Index Medicus and Chinese periodicals indexed in Index Medicus].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Ling, Chang-Quan; Bai, Yu-Jin; Yin, Hui-Xia

    2005-01-01

    Index Medicus/MEDLINE/PubMed published by U. S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) is the most important and commonly used biomedical literature retrieval system in the world. According to the"List of Journals Indexed in Index Medicus (2004)", 4,098 journals are indexed for Index Medicus, including 70 journals from mainland China and Hong Kong and 9 journals from Taiwan. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine established in May, 2003 is indexed in Index Medicus in 2004. This article outlines the critical elements of journal selection for Index Medicus/MEDLINE and the journal selection process for indexing at NLM, and introduces some measures for the Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine being indexed in Index Medicus/MEDLINE.

  11. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function.

  12. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  13. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Increases Vascular Leakage in Retina through VE-cadherin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon-Soo; Kim, Yun Gi; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Jonghanne; Jeong, Heewon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The inhibitors of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4; DPP4) have been widely prescribed to control glucose level in diabetic patients. DPP4-inhibitors, however, accumulate stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), a well-known inducer of vascular leakage and angiogenesis both of which are fundamental pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DPP4-inhibitors on vascular permeability and diabetic retinopathy. DPP4-inhibitor (diprotin A or sitagliptin) increased the phosphorylation of Src and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) in human endothelial cells and disrupted endothelial cell-to-cell junctions, which were attenuated by CXCR4 (receptor of SDF-1α)-blocker or Src-inhibitor. Disruption of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions in the immuno-fluorescence images correlated with the actual leakage of the endothelial monolayer in the transwell endothelial permeability assay. In the Miles assay, vascular leakage was observed in the ears into which SDF-1α was injected, and this effect was aggravated by DPP4-inhibitor. In the model of retinopathy of prematurity, DPP4-inhibitor increased not only retinal vascularity but also leakage. Additionally, in the murine diabetic retinopathy model, DPP4-inhibitor increased the phosphorylation of Src and VE-cadherin and aggravated vascular leakage in the retinas. Collectively, DPP4-inhibitor induced vascular leakage by augmenting the SDF-1α/CXCR4/Src/VE-cadherin signaling pathway. These data highlight safety issues associated with the use of DPP4-inhibitors. PMID:27381080

  14. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  15. Magnetic permeability measurements and a lunar core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field induced in the moon while it is in the geomagnetic tail lobes have been interpreted in terms of lunar magnetic permeability due to free iron content; such studies ignored the possibility that a highly conducting lunar core (Fe or FeS) would exclude magnetic fields with an apparent diamagnetic effect. Using lunar chemical and thermal models to determine plausible limits of magnetic permeability, we interpret measurements of the induced moment. The maximum likely radius of a lunar core is 580 km. Subsatellite and ALSEP measurements of the induced field are in disagreement. Resolving the differences is critical to determining whether a core could or does exist.

  16. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  17. Permeability-controlled optical modulator with Tri-gate metamaterial: control of permeability on InP-based photonic integration platform

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Toru; Kang, JoonHyung; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Takuo; Arai, Shigehisa

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials are artificially structured materials that can produce innovative optical functionalities such as negative refractive index, invisibility cloaking, and super-resolution imaging. Combining metamaterials with semiconductors enables us to develop novel optoelectronic devices based on the new concept of operation. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of a permeability-controlled waveguide optical modulator consisting of an InGaAsP/InP Mach-Zehnder interferometer with ‘tri-gate’ metamaterial attached on its arms. The tri-gate metamaterial consists of metal resonator arrays and triple-gate field effect elements. It changes its permeability with a change in the controlling gate voltage, thereby changing the refractive index of the interferometer arm to switch the modulator with an extinction ratio of 6.9 dB at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The result shows the feasibility of InP-based photonic integrated devices that can produce new functions by controlling their permeability as well as their permittivity. PMID:25797041

  18. Permeability-controlled optical modulator with Tri-gate metamaterial: control of permeability on InP-based photonic integration platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Toru; Kang, Joonhyung; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Takuo; Arai, Shigehisa

    2015-03-01

    Metamaterials are artificially structured materials that can produce innovative optical functionalities such as negative refractive index, invisibility cloaking, and super-resolution imaging. Combining metamaterials with semiconductors enables us to develop novel optoelectronic devices based on the new concept of operation. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of a permeability-controlled waveguide optical modulator consisting of an InGaAsP/InP Mach-Zehnder interferometer with `tri-gate' metamaterial attached on its arms. The tri-gate metamaterial consists of metal resonator arrays and triple-gate field effect elements. It changes its permeability with a change in the controlling gate voltage, thereby changing the refractive index of the interferometer arm to switch the modulator with an extinction ratio of 6.9 dB at a wavelength of 1.55 μm. The result shows the feasibility of InP-based photonic integrated devices that can produce new functions by controlling their permeability as well as their permittivity.

  19. Geriatric syndromes--vascular disorders?

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Timo E; Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Tilvis, Reijo S; O'Neill, Desmond; Erkinjuntti, Timo J

    2013-05-01

    The term geriatric syndrome is used to characterize multifactorial clinical conditions among older people which are not subsumed readily into disease entities, but which nevertheless predispose older people to disability and death. Commonly included are frailty, dementia, delirium, incontinence, falls, and dizziness. Geriatric syndromes are common among older people: in a recent survey, 50% of those aged more than 65 had one or more of these conditions. Better methods for prevention and treatment are needed, but current strategies have lacked a coherent conceptual and diagnostic framework. Prevention and interventions need to be targeted at earlier ages, with geriatrics expertise needed in the definition and operationalization of these complex entities. In this review we consolidate evidence that vascular disorders, including vascular ageing and vascular diseases, are key etiological factors of geriatric syndromes. Identifying this vascular dimension would offer opportunities for more efficient preventive strategies and mandates earlier intervention, especially for women, among whom vascular disease is often expressed more insidiously than among men. This would entail a sensitization of the health care system to the systematic detection of the syndromes, which are currently underdiagnosed. Further disentangling of the mechanisms of vascular ageing may offer therapies for vascular diseases and geriatric syndromes alike.

  20. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  1. [The future of vascular medicine].

    PubMed

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step.

  2. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  3. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations.

  4. Long-Term Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in Binswanger’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huisa, Branko N; Caprihan, Arvind; Thompson, Jeffrey; Prestopnik, Jillian; Qualls, Clifford R; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The blood brain-barrier (BBB) is disrupted in small vessel disease (SVD) patients with lacunes and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). The relationship of WMHs and regional BBB permeability changes has not been studied. We hypothesized that BBB disruption occurs in normal appearing WM (NAWM) and regions near the WMHs. To test the hypothesis, we repeated BBB permeability measurements in patients with extensive WMHs related to Binswanger’s disease (BD). Methods We selected a subset of 22 BD subjects from a well-characterized larger prospective vascular cognitive impairment cohort. We used 16 age-matched controls for comparison. The abnormal WM permeability (WMP) was measured twice over several years using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI). WMP maps were constructed from voxels above a predetermined threshold. Scans from first and second visits were co-registered. WM was divided into 3 regions: NAWM, WMH ring and WMH core. The ring was defined as 2mm on each side of the WMH border. WMP was calculated in each of the three specific regions. We used paired t-test, ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test to compare individual changes. Results WMP was significantly higher in subjects than controls (p<0.001). There was no correlation between WMH load and WMP. High permeability regions had minimal overlap between first and second scans. Nine percent of WMP was within the WMHs, 49% within the NAWM, and 52% within the WMH ring (p<0.001; ANOVA). Conclusions Increased BBB permeability in NAWM and close to the WMH borders supports a relationship between BBB disruption and development of WMHs. PMID:26205374

  5. General Surgery Resident Vascular Operative Experience in the Era of Endovascular Surgery and Vascular Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Kim, Jerry J; Smith, Brian; Kim, Dennis; Koopmann, Matthew; DeVirgilio, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advances in endovascular surgery have resulted in a decline in major open arterial reconstructions nationwide. Our objective is to investigate the effect of endovascular surgery on general surgery resident experience with open vascular surgery. Between 2004 and 2014, 112 residents graduated from two academic institutions in Southern California. Residents were separated into those who graduated in 2004 to 2008 (period 1) and in 2009 to 2014 (period 2). Case volumes of vascular procedures were compared using two-sample t test. A total of 43 residents were in period 1 and 59 residents were in period 2. In aggregate, there was no significant difference in open cases recorded between the two periods (84 vs 87, P = 0.194). Subgroup analysis showed period 2 recorded significantly fewer cases of open aneurysm repair (5 vs 3, P < 0.001), cerebrovascular (14 vs 10, P = 0.007), and peripheral obstructive procedures (16 vs 13, P = 0.017). Dialysis access procedures constituted the largest group of procedures and remained similar between the two periods (35 vs 42, P = 0.582). General surgery residents experienced a significant decline in several index open major arterial reconstruction cases. This decline was offset by maintenance of dialysis access procedures. If the trend continues, future general surgeons will not be proficient in open vascular procedures.

  6. Vascular calcification: Mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  7. The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Cronenwett, Jack L; Kraiss, Larry W; Cambria, Richard P

    2012-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) is designed to improve the quality, safety, effectiveness, and cost of vascular health care. It uses the structure of a Patient Safety Organization to permit collection of patient-identified information but protect benchmarked comparisons from legal discovery. The SVS VQI is uniquely organized as a distributed network of regional quality groups to facilitate local translation of registry data into practice change while maintaining the power of a national registry. Detailed data specific to each commonly performed open and endovascular procedure are collected, both in-hospital and at ≥ 1 year of follow-up. Quality measures are reported to physicians and hospitals, which allow anonymous risk-adjusted benchmarking within regions or nationally. All specialties that perform vascular procedures are included, and international participation is encouraged. This review describes the current status of the SVS VQI.

  8. Defining excellence in vascular neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Success as a vascular neurosurgeon almost always begins with passion, an inherent love for the work that drives an insatiable desire for personal improvement. A personal definition of excellence in vascular neurosurgery includes several fundamental qualities: mastery of the basics, refinement of technique, advancement of technology, investigative study, advanced decision making, microsurgical innovation, a well-rounded surgical armamentarium, and a lifelong commitment to teaching. Ultimately, the reward for these efforts is the ability to influence generations to come, particularly as one follows the rising careers of former trainees, each redefining the term "excellence" in vascular neurosurgery.

  9. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2015-07-01

    Using end-member permeabilities defined by a worldwide compilation of sediment permeabilities at convergent margins, we compare permeability predictions using a geometric mean and a two-component effective medium theory (EMT). Our implementation of EMT includes a threshold fraction of the high-permeability component that determines whether flow occurs dominantly in the high- or low-permeability component. We find that this threshold fraction in most cases is equal to the silt + sand-sized fraction of the sediment. This suggests that sediments undergoing primary consolidation tend to exhibit flow equally distributed between the high- and low-permeability components. We show that the EMT method predicts permeability better than the weighted geometric mean of the end-member values for clay fractions <0.6. This work provides insight into the microstructural controls on permeability in subducting sediments and valuable guidance for locations which lack site-specific permeability results but have available grain-size information.

  10. Indexing Consistency and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.

    Proposed is a measure of indexing consistency based on the concept of "fuzzy sets." By this procedure a higher consistency value is assigned if indexers agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an indexer's work and exhaustivity of indexing are also proposed. Experimental data on…

  11. Comparative Index Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Muhammad Abdur

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that compared indexing terms suggested by authors of articles in "The American Journal of the Medical Science" and indexing terms assigned to the same articles in MEDLARS. Case studies are used to examine the differences between author and indexer indexing. (CLB)

  12. Quaker Resources Online Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke-Harrigan, Heidi

    The Quaker Resources Online Index is a World Wide Web-based index, including author, title, subject, and meeting indexes, that provides access to Quaker materials available on the Web. Given the current failings and shortcomings of search engines and automated key word searches, this index brings together information from a variety of sources and…

  13. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    1999-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  14. Nucleic acid indexing

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen

    2001-01-01

    A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

  15. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  16. Quantifying the Evolution of Vascular Barrier Disruption in Advanced Atherosclerosis with Semipermeant Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiying; Zhang, Lei; Myerson, Jacob; Bibee, Kristin; Scott, Michael; Allen, John; Sicard, Gregorio; Lanza, Gregory; Wickline, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Acute atherothrombotic occlusion in heart attack and stroke implies disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier that exposes a highly procoagulant intimal milieu. However, the evolution, severity, and pathophysiological consequences of vascular barrier damage in atherosclerotic plaque remain unknown, in part because quantifiable methods and experimental models are lacking for its in vivo assessment. Objective To develop quantitative nondestructive methodologies and models for detecting vascular barrier disruption in advanced plaques. Methods and Results Sustained hypercholesterolemia in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits for >7–14 months engendered endothelial barrier disruption that was evident from massive and rapid passive penetration and intimal trapping of perfluorocarbon-core nanoparticles (PFC-NP: ∼250 nm diameter) after in vivo circulation for as little as 1 hour. Only older plaques (>7 mo), but not younger plaques (<3 mo) demonstrated the marked enhancement of endothelial permeability to these particles. Electron microscopy revealed a complex of subintimal spongiform channels associated with endothelial apoptosis, superficial erosions, and surface-penetrating cholesterol crystals. Fluorine (19F) magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) enabled absolute quantification (in nanoMolar) of the passive permeation of PFC-NP into the disrupted vascular lesions by sensing the unique spectral signatures from the fluorine core of plaque-bound PFC-NP. Conclusions The application of semipermeant nanoparticles reveals the presence of profound barrier disruption in later stage plaques and focuses attention on the disrupted endothelium as a potential contributor to plaque vulnerability. The response to sustained high cholesterol levels yields a progressive deterioration of the vascular barrier that can be quantified with fluorine MRI/MRS of passively permeable nanostructures. The possibility of plaque classification based on the metric of

  17. Dual energy micro-CT imaging of radiation-induced vascular changes in primary mouse sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials The Cre-loxP system was used to generate primary sarcomas with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared to tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A long-circulating PEGylated liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered one day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and three days later (day 4) using DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically using CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between CT-measurement of tumor FBV and extravasated iodine with microvascular density (MVD) (R2=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R2=0.63), respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs. 0.091, P<0.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation with dextran fractional area increasing 4.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 3.0-fold. Conclusions DE micro-CT is an effective tool for non-invasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment. PMID:23122984

  18. Ablation of MMP9 gene ameliorates paracellular permeability and fibrinogen-amyloid beta complex formation during hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Muradashvili, Nino; Tyagi, Reeta; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C; Lominadze, David

    2014-09-01

    Increased blood level of homocysteine (Hcy), called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accompanies many cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that HHcy-enhanced cerebrovascular permeability occurs via activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and leads to an increased formation of fibrinogen-β-amyloid (Fg-Aβ) complex. Cerebrovascular permeability changes were assessed in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT), cystathionine-β-synthase heterozygote (Cbs+/-, a genetic model of HHcy), MMP9 gene knockout (Mmp9-/-), and Cbs and Mmp9 double knockout (Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/-) mice using a dual-tracer probing method. Expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and Fg-Aβ complex formation was assessed in mouse brain cryosections by immunohistochemistry. Short-term memory of mice was assessed with a novel object recognition test. The cerebrovascular permeability in Cbs+/- mice was increased via mainly the paracellular transport pathway. VE-cadherin expression was the lowest and Fg-Aβ complex formation was the highest along with the diminished short-term memory in Cbs+/- mice. These effects of HHcy were ameliorated in Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/- mice. Thus, HHcy causes activation of MMP9 increasing cerebrovascular permeability by downregulation of VE-cadherin resulting in an enhanced formation of Fg-Aβ complex that can be associated with loss of memory. These data may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention that can modulate HHcy-induced cerebrovascular permeability and resultant pathologies. PMID:24865997

  19. The vascular contribution to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Rutledge, John C.

    2010-01-01

    AD (Alzheimer’s disease) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin. Despite questions as to the underlying cause(s) of this disease, shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease indicate that vascular mechanisms may critically contribute to the development and progression of both AD and atherosclerosis. An increased risk of developing AD is linked to the presence of the apoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) allele, which is also strongly associated with increased risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Recent studies also indicate that cardiovascular risk factors, including elevated blood cholesterol and triacylglycerol (triglyceride), increase the likelihood of AD and vascular dementia. Lipids and lipoproteins in the circulation interact intimately with the cerebrovasculature, and may have important effects on its constituent brain microvascular endothelial cells and the adjoining astrocytes, which are components of the neurovascular unit. The present review will examine the potential mechanisms for understanding the contributions of vascular factors, including lipids, lipoproteins and cerebrovascular Aβ (amyloid β), to AD, and suggest therapeutic strategies for the attenuation of this devastating disease process. Specifically, we will focus on the actions of apoE, TGRLs (triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins) and TGRL lipolysis products on injury of the neurovascular unit and increases in blood–brain barrier permeability. PMID:20684749

  20. Piezo1 integration of vascular architecture with physiological force

    PubMed Central

    Tumova, Sarka; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Bruns, Alexander; Ludlow, Melanie J; Sedo, Alicia; Hyman, Adam J; McKeown, Lynn; Young, Richard S; Yuldasheva, Nadira Y; Majeed, Yasser; Wilson, Lesley A; Rode, Baptiste; Bailey, Marc A; Kim, Hyejeong R; Fu, Zhaojun; Carter, Deborah AL; Bilton, Jan; Imrie, Helen; Ajuh, Paul; Dear, T Neil; Cubbon, Richard M; Kearney, Mark T; Prasad, Raj K; Evans, Paul C; Ainscough, Justin FX; Beech, David J

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which physical forces regulate endothelial cells to determine the complexities of vascular structure and function are enigmatic1-5. Studies of sensory neurons have suggested Piezo proteins as subunits of Ca2+-permeable non-selective cationic channels for detection of noxious mechanical impact6-8. Here we show Piezo1 (FAM38A) channels as sensors of frictional force (shear stress) and determinants of vascular structure in both development and adult physiology. Global or endothelial-specific disruption of mouse Piezo1 profoundly disturbed the developing vasculature and was embryonic lethal within days of the heart beating. Haploinsufficiency was not lethal but endothelial abnormality was detected in mature vessels. Importance of Piezo1 channels as sensors of blood flow was shown by Piezo1 dependence of shear stress-evoked ionic current and calcium influx in endothelial cells and the ability of exogenous Piezo1 to confer sensitivity to shear stress on otherwise resistant cells. Downstream of this calcium influx was protease activity and spatial organization of endothelial cells to the polarity of the applied force. The data suggest Piezo1 channels as pivotal integrators in vascular biology. PMID:25119035