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Sample records for vestibular stochastic resonance

  1. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  2. Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrado, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Studies have shown that imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standard balance task of standing on a block of foam with their eyes closed. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system using constant current stimulation through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. Amplitude of the signals varied in the range of 0-700 microamperes. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block, and inertial motion sensors were placed on the torso and head. Balance performance with stimulation was significantly greater (10%-25%) than with no stimulation. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-300 microamperes. Optimization of the amplitude of the stochastic signals for maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration space flight or in patients with balance disorders.

  3. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  4. Improving balance function using vestibular stochastic resonance: optimizing stimulus characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Fiedler, Matthew J; Kofman, Igor S; Wood, Scott J; Serrador, Jorge M; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen S; Reschke, Millard F; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2011-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon whereby the response of a non-linear system to a weak periodic input signal is optimized by the presence of a particular non-zero level of noise. Stochastic resonance using imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, has been shown to significantly improve ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt; improved balance performance during postural disturbances and optimize covariance between the weak input periodic signals introduced via venous blood pressure receptors and the heart rate responses. In our study, 15 subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed. They were given low-amplitude binaural bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular organs in two frequency ranges of 1-2 and 0-30 Hz over the amplitude range of 0 to ±700 μA. Subjects were instructed to maintain an upright stance during 43-s trials, which consisted of baseline (zero amplitude) and stimulation (non-zero amplitude) periods. Measures of stability of the head and trunk using inertial motion unit sensors attached to these segments and the whole body using a force plate were measured and quantified in the mediolateral plane. Using a multivariate optimization criterion, our results show that the low levels of vestibular stimulation given to the vestibular organs improved balance performance in normal healthy subjects in the range of 5-26% consistent with the stochastic resonance phenomenon. In our study, 8 of 15 and 10 of 15 subjects were responsive for the 1-2- and 0-30-Hz stimulus signals, respectively. The improvement in balance performance did not differ significantly between the stimulations in the two frequency ranges. The amplitude of optimal stimulus for improving balance performance was predominantly in the range of ±100 to ±400 μA. A device based on SR stimulation of the vestibular system might be useful as either a training

  5. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  6. Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Method to Improve Balance Function: Optimization of Stimulus Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrador, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Application of imperceptible SR noise coupled with sensory input through the proprioceptive, visual, or vestibular sensory systems has been shown to improve motor function. Specifically, studies have shown that that vestibular electrical stimulation by imperceptible stochastic noise, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standardized balance task of standing on a block of 10 cm thick medium density foam with their eyes closed for a total of 40 seconds. Stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears during the last 20 seconds of the test period. A custom built constant current stimulator with subject isolation delivered the stimulus. Stimulation signals were generated with frequencies in the bandwidth of 1-2 Hz and 0.01-30 Hz. Amplitude of the signals were varied in the range of 0- +/-700 micro amperes with the RMS of the signal increased by 30 micro amperes for each 100 micro amperes increase in the current range. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block and inertial motion sensors placed on the torso and head segments. Preliminary results indicate that balance performance is improved in the range of 10-25% compared to no stimulation conditions. Subjects improved their performance consistently across the blocks of stimulation. Further the signal amplitude at which the performance was maximized was different in the two frequency ranges. Optimization of the frequency and

  7. Stochastic resonance in the synaptic transmission between hair cells and vestibular primary afferents in development.

    PubMed

    Flores, A; Manilla, S; Huidobro, N; De la Torre-Valdovinos, B; Kristeva, R; Mendez-Balbuena, I; Galindo, F; Treviño, M; Manjarrez, E

    2016-05-13

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of nonlinear systems in which the addition of an intermediate level of noise improves the response of such system. Although SR has been studied in isolated hair cells and in the bullfrog sacculus, the occurrence of this phenomenon in the vestibular system in development is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the existence of SR via natural mechanical-stimulation in the hair cell-vestibular primary afferent transmission. In vitro experiments were performed on the posterior semicircular canal of the chicken inner ear during development. Our experiments showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent multiunit activity from E15 to P5 stages of development exhibited the SR phenomenon, which was characterized by an inverted U-like response as a function of the input noise level. The inverted U-like graphs of SR acquired their higher amplitude after the post-hatching stage of development. Blockage of the synaptic transmission with selective antagonists of the NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors abolished the SR of the afferent multiunit activity. Furthermore, computer simulations on a model of the hair cell - primary afferent synapse qualitatively reproduced this SR behavior and provided a possible explanation of how and where the SR could occur. These results demonstrate that a particular level of mechanical noise on the semicircular canals can improve the performance of the vestibular system in their peripheral sensory processing even during embryonic stages of development.

  8. Stochastic resonance in the synaptic transmission between hair cells and vestibular primary afferents in development.

    PubMed

    Flores, A; Manilla, S; Huidobro, N; De la Torre-Valdovinos, B; Kristeva, R; Mendez-Balbuena, I; Galindo, F; Treviño, M; Manjarrez, E

    2016-05-13

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of nonlinear systems in which the addition of an intermediate level of noise improves the response of such system. Although SR has been studied in isolated hair cells and in the bullfrog sacculus, the occurrence of this phenomenon in the vestibular system in development is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the existence of SR via natural mechanical-stimulation in the hair cell-vestibular primary afferent transmission. In vitro experiments were performed on the posterior semicircular canal of the chicken inner ear during development. Our experiments showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent multiunit activity from E15 to P5 stages of development exhibited the SR phenomenon, which was characterized by an inverted U-like response as a function of the input noise level. The inverted U-like graphs of SR acquired their higher amplitude after the post-hatching stage of development. Blockage of the synaptic transmission with selective antagonists of the NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors abolished the SR of the afferent multiunit activity. Furthermore, computer simulations on a model of the hair cell - primary afferent synapse qualitatively reproduced this SR behavior and provided a possible explanation of how and where the SR could occur. These results demonstrate that a particular level of mechanical noise on the semicircular canals can improve the performance of the vestibular system in their peripheral sensory processing even during embryonic stages of development. PMID:26926966

  9. Functional stochastic resonance in human baroreflex induced by 1/f-type noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    We hypothesized that 1/f noise is more beneficial than the conventional white noise in optimizing the brain's response to a weak input signal, and showed that externally added 1/f noise outperforms white noise in sensitizing human baroreflex centers in the brain. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor, while adding either 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem by electrically stimulating the bilateral vestibular afferents cutaneously. This stochastic galvanic vestibular stimulation, activating the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway in the brain stem, optimized covariance between weak input signals and the heart rate responses both with 1/f and white noise. Further, the optimal noise level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than that with white noise, suggesting the functional benefit of 1/f noise for the neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  10. Stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca; Hänggi, Peter; Jung, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Over the last two decades, stochastic resonance has continuously attracted considerable attention. The term is given to a phenomenon that is manifest in nonlinear systems whereby generally feeble input information (such as a weak signal) can be be amplified and optimized by the assistance of noise. The effect requires three basic ingredients: (i) an energetic activation barrier or, more generally, a form of threshold; (ii) a weak coherent input (such as a periodic signal); (iii) a source of noise that is inherent in the system, or that adds to the coherent input. Given these features, the response of the system undergoes resonance-like behavior as a function of the noise level; hence the name stochastic resonance. The underlying mechanism is fairly simple and robust. As a consequence, stochastic resonance has been observed in a large variety of systems, including bistable ring lasers, semiconductor devices, chemical reactions, and mechanoreceptor cells in the tail fan of a crayfish. In this paper, the authors report, interpret, and extend much of the current understanding of the theory and physics of stochastic resonance. They introduce the readers to the basic features of stochastic resonance and its recent history. Definitions of the characteristic quantities that are important to quantify stochastic resonance, together with the most important tools necessary to actually compute those quantities, are presented. The essence of classical stochastic resonance theory is presented, and important applications of stochastic resonance in nonlinear optics, solid state devices, and neurophysiology are described and put into context with stochastic resonance theory. More elaborate and recent developments of stochastic resonance theory are discussed, ranging from fundamental quantum properties-being important at low temperatures-over spatiotemporal aspects in spatially distributed systems, to realizations in chaotic maps. In conclusion the authors summarize the achievements

  11. Estimation of an Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). The goal of this project was to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection.

  12. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  13. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance in a Discordant Sensory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, D. R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Layne, C. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges incurred when readapting to a gravitational environment. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training has been proposed as a countermeasure to improve locomotor performance during re-adaptation, and it is suggested that the benefits of SA training may be further enhanced by improving detection of weak sensory signals via mechanisms such as stochastic resonance when a non-zero level of stochastic white noise based electrical stimulation is applied to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of using SVS to improve short-term adaptation in a sensory discordant environment during performance of a locomotor task.

  14. Improving Sensorimotor Function and Adaptation using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during adaption to G-transitions that occur when entering and exiting microgravity. Post space flight, these sensorimotor disturbances can include postural and gait instability, visual performance changes, manual control disruptions, spatial disorientation, and motion sickness, all of which can hinder the operational capabilities of the astronauts. Crewmember safety would be significantly increased if sensorimotor changes brought on by gravitational changes could be mitigated and adaptation could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate and develop the use of electrical stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a countermeasure to augment sensorimotor function and facilitate adaptation. For this project, SVS will be applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes at imperceptible amplitude levels. We hypothesize that SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through the phenomena of stochastic resonance, which occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. In line with the theory of stochastic resonance, a specific optimal level of SVS will be found and tested for each subject [1]. Three experiments are planned to investigate the use of SVS in sensory-dependent tasks and performance. The first experiment will aim to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system through perception based motion recognition thresholds obtained using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform in the Jenks Vestibular Laboratory at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. A range of SVS amplitudes will be applied to each subject and the subjectspecific optimal SVS level will be identified as that which results in the lowest motion recognition threshold, through previously established, well developed methods [2,3,4]. The second experiment will investigate the use of optimal SVS in facilitating sensorimotor adaptation to system

  15. Determine Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J.J.; Mulavara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface [1]. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training applications customized to each crewmember. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds [2]. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s long sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. Comparison of threshold of motion detection obtained from joystick data versus body sway suggests that perceptual thresholds were significantly lower. In the balance task, subjects stood on an unstable surface and had to maintain balance

  16. Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Sensorimotor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that is wearable or portable and provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for SR training applications customized to each crewmember. Customizing stimulus intensity can maximize treatment effects. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. First we determined the percent time during stimulation periods for which perception of motion (activity above a pre-defined threshold) was reported using the joystick, and body sway (two

  17. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability

    PubMed Central

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Kofman, Igor S.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T.; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0–1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  18. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Kofman, Igor S; De Dios, Yiri E; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0-1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100-500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  19. Stochastic resonance on a circle

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenfeld, K. ); Pierson, D.; Pantazelou, E.; Dames, C.; Moss, F. )

    1994-04-04

    We describe a new realization of stochastic resonance, applicable to a broad class of systems, based on an underlying excitable dynamics with deterministic reinjection. A simple but general theory of such single-trigger'' systems is compared with analog simulations of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, as well as experimental data obtained from stimulated sensory neurons in the crayfish.

  20. Stochastic resonance in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yee-Joon; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2006-02-01

    When a different image is presented to each eye, visual awareness spontaneously alternates between the two images--a phenomenon called binocular rivalry. Because binocular rivalry is characterized by two marginally stable perceptual states and spontaneous, apparently stochastic, switching between them, it has been speculated that switches in perceptual awareness reflect a double-well-potential type computational architecture coupled with noise. To characterize this noise-mediated mechanism, we investigated whether stimulus input, neural adaptation, and inhibitory modulations (thought to underlie perceptual switches) interacted with noise in such a way that the system produced stochastic resonance. By subjecting binocular rivalry to weak periodic contrast modulations spanning a range of frequencies, we demonstrated quantitative evidence of stochastic resonance in binocular rivalry. Our behavioral results combined with computational simulations provided insights into the nature of the internal noise (its magnitude, locus, and calibration) that is relevant to perceptual switching, as well as provided novel dynamic constraints on computational models designed to capture the neural mechanisms underlying perceptual switching.

  1. The effects of stochastic monopolar galvanic vestibular stimulation on human postural sway.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Anthony P; Inglis, J Timothy; Collins, J J

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a technique in which small currents are delivered transcutaneously to the afferent nerve endings of the vestibular system through electrodes placed over the mastoid bones. The applied current alters the firing rates of the peripheral vestibular afferents, causing a shift in a standing subject's vestibular perception and a corresponding postural sway. Previously, we showed that in subjects who are facing forward, stochastic bipolar binaural GVS leads to coherent stochastic mediolateral postural sway. The goal of this pilot study was to extend that work and to test the hypothesis that in subjects who are facing forward, stochastic monopolar binaural GVS leads to coherent stochastic anteroposterior postural sway. Stochastic monopolar binaural GVS was applied to ten healthy young subjects. Twenty-four trials, each containing a different galvanic input stimulus from among eight different frequency ranges, were conducted on each subject. Postural sway was evaluated through analysis of the center-of-pressure (COP) displacements under each subject's feet. Spectral analysis was performed on the galvanic stimuli and the COP displacement time series to calculate the coherence spectra. Significant coherence was found between the galvanic input signal and the anteroposterior COP displacement in some of the trials (i.e., at least one) in nine of the ten subjects. In general, the coherence values were highest for the mid-range frequencies that were tested, and lowest for the low- and high-range frequencies. However, the coherence values we obtained were lower than those we previously reported for stochastic bipolar binaural GVS and mediolateral sway. These differences may be due to fundamental characteristics of the vestibular system such as lower sensitivity to symmetric changes in afferent firing dynamics, and/or differences between the biomechanics of anteroposterior and mediolateral sway.

  2. Using Low Levels of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rahul; Kofman, Igor; Jeevarajan, Jerome; De Dios, Yiri; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) has been associated with improved postural responses in the medio-lateral (ML) direction, but its effect in improving balance function in both the ML and anterior-posterior (AP) directions has not been studied. In this series of studies, the efficacy of applying low amplitude SVS in 0–30 Hz range between the mastoids in the ML direction on improving cross-planar balance function was investigated. Forty-five (45) subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in ML, AP and combined APML directions. Results show that binaural bipolar SVS given in the ML direction significantly improved balance performance with the peak of optimal stimulus amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA for all the three directions, exhibiting stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. Objective perceptual and body motion thresholds as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and were given 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli were also measured. In general, there was no significant difference between estimates of perceptual and body motion thresholds. The average optimal SVS amplitude that improved balance performance (peak SVS amplitude normalized to perceptual threshold) was estimated to be 46% in ML, 53% in AP, and 50% in APML directions. A miniature patch-type SVS device may be useful to improve balance function in people with disabilities due to aging, Parkinson’s disease or in astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. PMID:26295807

  3. Using Low Levels of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Balance Function.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rahul; Kofman, Igor; Jeevarajan, Jerome; De Dios, Yiri; Cohen, Helen S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P

    2015-01-01

    Low-level stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) has been associated with improved postural responses in the medio-lateral (ML) direction, but its effect in improving balance function in both the ML and anterior-posterior (AP) directions has not been studied. In this series of studies, the efficacy of applying low amplitude SVS in 0-30 Hz range between the mastoids in the ML direction on improving cross-planar balance function was investigated. Forty-five (45) subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in ML, AP and combined APML directions. Results show that binaural bipolar SVS given in the ML direction significantly improved balance performance with the peak of optimal stimulus amplitude predominantly in the range of 100-500 μA for all the three directions, exhibiting stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. Objective perceptual and body motion thresholds as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and were given 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli were also measured. In general, there was no significant difference between estimates of perceptual and body motion thresholds. The average optimal SVS amplitude that improved balance performance (peak SVS amplitude normalized to perceptual threshold) was estimated to be 46% in ML, 53% in AP, and 50% in APML directions. A miniature patch-type SVS device may be useful to improve balance function in people with disabilities due to aging, Parkinson's disease or in astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. PMID:26295807

  4. Behavioral Stochastic Resonance within the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajo, Keiichi; Nozaki, Daichi; Ward, Lawrence M.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    We provide the first evidence that stochastic resonance within the human brain can enhance behavioral responses to weak sensory inputs. We asked subjects to adjust handgrip force to a slowly changing, subthreshold gray level signal presented to their right eye. Behavioral responses were optimized by presenting randomly changing gray levels separately to the left eye. The results indicate that observed behavioral stochastic resonance was mediated by neural activity within the human brain where the information from both eyes converges.

  5. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  6. Stochastic resonance in models of neuronal ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, D.R. Longtin, A.; Mueller-Gerkin, J.

    1997-02-01

    Two recently suggested mechanisms for the neuronal encoding of sensory information involving the effect of stochastic resonance with aperiodic time-varying inputs are considered. It is shown, using theoretical arguments and numerical simulations, that the nonmonotonic behavior with increasing noise of the correlation measures used for the so-called aperiodic stochastic resonance (ASR) scenario does not rely on the cooperative effect typical of stochastic resonance in bistable and excitable systems. Rather, ASR with slowly varying signals is more properly interpreted as linearization by noise. Consequently, the broadening of the {open_quotes}resonance curve{close_quotes} in the multineuron {ital stochastic resonance without tuning} scenario can also be explained by this linearization. Computation of the input-output correlation as a function of both signal frequency and noise for the model system further reveals conditions where noise-induced firing with aperiodic inputs will benefit from stochastic resonance rather than linearization by noise. Thus, our study clarifies the tuning requirements for the optimal transduction of subthreshold aperiodic signals. It also shows that a single deterministic neuron can perform as well as a network when biased into a suprathreshold regime. Finally, we show that the inclusion of a refractory period in the spike-detection scheme produces a better correlation between instantaneous firing rate and input signal. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity.

  8. From stochastic resonance to brain waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázsi, G.; Kish, L. B.

    2000-01-01

    Biological neurons are good examples of a threshold device - this is why neural systems are in the focus when looking for realization of Stochastic Resonance (SR) and spatio-temporal stochastic resonance (STSR) phenomena. In this Letter a simple integrate-and fire model is used to demonstrate the possibility of STSR in a chain of neurons. The theoretical and computational models so far suggest that SR and STSR could occur in neural systems. However, how significant is the role played by these phenomena and what implications might they have on neurobiology is still a question. Because the direct biological proof of SR and STSR seems to be a tough issue one might look at indirect ways to decide whether the internal noise plays any constructive role in the nervous system. A loop of neurons is shown to have interesting features (frequency selection) which might supply a clue for answering the previous question.

  9. Improved sensorimotor performance via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Manjarrez, Elias; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Huethe, Frank; Tapia, Jesus A; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2012-09-01

    Several studies about noise-enhanced balance control in humans support the hypothesis that stochastic resonance can enhance the detection and transmission in sensorimotor system during a motor task. The purpose of the present study was to extend these findings in a simpler and controlled task. We explored whether a particular level of a mechanical Gaussian noise (0-15 Hz) applied on the index finger can improve the performance during compensation for a static force generated by a manipulandum. The finger position was displayed on a monitor as a small white point in the center of a gray circle. We considered a good performance when the subjects exhibited a low deviation from the center of this circle and when the performance had less variation over time. Several levels of mechanical noise were applied on the manipulandum. We compared the performance between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high noise (HN). In all subjects (8 of 8) the data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the inverse of the mean variation in position and the input noise level. In other words, the mean variation was significantly smaller during ON than during ZN or HN. The findings suggest that the application of a tactile-proprioceptive noise can improve the stability in sensorimotor performance via stochastic resonance. Possible explanations for this improvement in motor precision are an increase of the peripheral receptors sensitivity and of the internal stochastic resonance, causing a better sensorimotor integration and an increase in corticomuscular synchronization.

  10. Crossing resonance of stochastically interacting wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatchenko, V. A. Polukhin, D. S.

    2013-02-15

    The dynamic susceptibilities (Green's functions) of the system of two interacting wave fields of different physical natures with a stochastically inhomogeneous coupling parameter between them with zero mean value have been examined. The well-known self-consistent approximation taking into account all diagrams with noncrossing correlation/interaction lines has been generalized to the case of stochastically interacting wave fields. The analysis has been performed for spin and elastic waves. The results obtained taking into account the processes of multiple scattering of waves from inhomogeneities are significantly different from those obtained for this situation earlier in the Bourret approximation [R.C. Bourret, Nuovo Cimento 26, 1 (1962)]. Instead of frequencies degeneracy removal in the wave spectrum and the splitting of resonance peaks of dynamic susceptibilities, a wide single-mode resonance peak should be observed at the crossing point of the unperturbed dispersion curves. The fine structure appears at vertices of these wide peaks in the form of a narrow resonance on the Green's-function curve of one field and a narrow antiresonance on the vertex of the Green's-function curve of the other field.

  11. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckman, B.J.; So, P.; Netoff, T.I.; Spano, M.L.; Schiff, S.J. |

    1998-09-01

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Improving the detection sensitivity of chromatography by stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jianru; Xiang, Bingren; Fan, Hongyan; Xu, Fengguo

    2014-05-01

    Improving the detection sensitivity of analytical instruments has been a challenging task for chemometricians since undetectability has been almost unavoidable in trace analysis, even under optimized experimental conditions and with the use of modern instruments. Various chemometrics methods have been developed which attempt to address this detection problem but with limited success (e.g., fast Fourier transform and wavelet transform). However, the application of stochastic resonance (SR) creates an entirely new and effective methodology. Stochastic resonance is a phenomenon which is manifested in non-linear systems where a weak signal can be amplified and optimized with the assistance of noise. In this review, we summarize the use of basic SR, optimization of parameters and its modifications, including periodic modulation stochastic resonance (PSRA), linear modulation stochastic resonance (LSRA), single-well potential stochastic resonance (SSR) and the Duffing oscillator algorithm (DOA) for amplifying sub-threshold small signals. We also review the advantages and the disadvantages of various SR procedures. PMID:24622614

  13. Entropic stochastic resonance of a self-propelled Janus particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Du, Luchun; Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Entropic stochastic resonance is investigated when a self-propelled Janus particle moves in a double-cavity container. Numerical simulation results indicate the entropic stochastic resonance can survive even if there is no symmetry breaking in any direction. This is the essential distinction between the property of a self-propelled Janus particle and that of a passive Brownian particle, for the symmetry breaking is necessary for the entropic stochastic resonance of a passive Brownian particle. With the rotational noise intensity growing at small fixed noise intensity of translational motion, the signal power amplification increases monotonically towards saturation which also can be regarded as a kind of stochastic resonance effect. Besides, the increase in the natural frequency of the periodic driving depresses the degree of the stochastic resonance, whereas the rise in its amplitude enhances and then suppresses the behavior.

  14. Stochastic resonance for nonlinear sensors with saturation.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, David; Rojas Varela, Julio; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2003-02-01

    We analyze the transmission of a noisy signal by sensor devices which are linear for small inputs and saturate at large inputs. Large information-carrying signals are thus distorted in their transmission. We demonstrate conditions where addition of noise to such large input signals can reduce the distortion that they undergo in the transmission. This is established for periodic, as well as aperiodic, and random information-carrying signals. Various measures characterizing the transmission, such as signal-to-noise ratio, input-output cross correlation, and mutual information, are shown improvable by addition of noise. These results constitute another instance of the nonlinear phenomenon of stochastic resonance where addition of noise enhances the signal. PMID:12636648

  15. Stochastic resonance for nonlinear sensors with saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, David; Rojas Varela, Julio; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2003-02-01

    We analyze the transmission of a noisy signal by sensor devices which are linear for small inputs and saturate at large inputs. Large information-carrying signals are thus distorted in their transmission. We demonstrate conditions where addition of noise to such large input signals can reduce the distortion that they undergo in the transmission. This is established for periodic, as well as aperiodic, and random information-carrying signals. Various measures characterizing the transmission, such as signal-to-noise ratio, input-output cross correlation, and mutual information, are shown improvable by addition of noise. These results constitute another instance of the nonlinear phenomenon of stochastic resonance where addition of noise enhances the signal.

  16. Noise-free stochastic resonance at an interior crisis.

    PubMed

    Jüngling, Thomas; Benner, Hartmut; Stemler, Thomas; Just, Wolfram

    2008-03-01

    We report on the observation of noise-free stochastic resonance in an externally driven diode resonator close to an interior crisis. At sufficiently high excitation amplitudes the diode resonator shows a strange attractor which after the collision with an unstable period-three orbit exhibits crisis-induced intermittency. In the intermittency regime the system jumps between the previously stable chaotic attractor and the phase space region which has been made accessible by the crisis. This random process can be used to amplify a weak periodic signal through the mechanism of stochastic resonance. In contrast to conventional stochastic resonance no external noise is needed. The chaotic intrinsic dynamics plays the role of the stochastic forcing. Our data obtained from the diode resonator are compared with numerical simulations of the logistic map where a similar crisis-induced intermittency is observed. PMID:18517494

  17. Stochastic resonance in human vision and audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lawrence M.; Desai, Simren; Rootman, Daniel; Tata, Matthew; Moss, Frank

    2001-03-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been demonstrated in numerous dynamical systems, both model and real, including peripheral sensory neurons and whole animal behavior. We present the first direct evidence that SR is demonstrable also, at a level relevant to behavior in the natural environment, in human visual and auditory signal detection. Human subjects detected either square or sine wave gratings presented mixed with different amounts of pixel noise in the dark on a high-resolution computer monitor, or 3 Hz beats in a 70-Hz base tone, again mixed with different amounts of auditory noise and presented in a sound attenuation chamber while wearing industrial-quality sound-attenuating headphones. In both cases an unbiased index of performance was maximal for intermediate amounts of added noise, indicating that SR enhanced detection of subthreshold signals in both modalities. We present simple and approximate theories of performance in these experiments based on a nondynamical, or threshold, version of SR. We also discuss the possibility that SR is a general property of biological information processing that has been utilized by evolutionary processes.

  18. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    PubMed

    Buchin, Anatoly; Rieubland, Sarah; Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S; Roth, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  19. Endogenous neural noise and stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, Lauren; Kitajo, Keiichi; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2007-06-01

    We discuss the relationship of endogenous neural noise (ENN) to performance of behavioral tasks and to information processing in the brain. Spontaneous neural activity is closely linked to development and perception, and is correlated with behavior. Some of this activity is probably related to internal processing of task- and goal-relevant information, but some is simply noise. Two previous studies have reported correlations between performance on behavioral tasks and measures of neural noise and have characterized these relationships as intrinsic stochastic resonance (SR). We argue that neither of these studies demonstrated intrinsic SR, and discuss several alternative ways of measuring ENN in humans from EEG or MEG records. Using one of these, random-phase power in the 30-50 Hz range 1 sec before the onset of the signal, we demonstrate a kind of intrinsic SR that optimizes detection of weak visual signals. Minimum response time was obtained when this EEG measure of ENN was in a middle decile. No other measure of ENN was related either to response time or to an unbiased measure of detection accuracy (e.g., d'). A discussion of the implications of these findings for the study of intrinsic SR concludes the paper.

  20. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  1. Spatiotemporal stochastic resonance and its consequences in neural model systems.

    PubMed

    Balazsi, Gabor; Kish, Laszlo B.; Moss, Frank E.

    2001-09-01

    The realization of spatiotemporal stochastic resonance is studied in a two-dimensional FitzHugh-Nagumo system, and in a one-dimensional system of integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that spatiotemporal stochastic resonance occurs in these neural model systems, independent of the method of modeling. Moreover, the ways of realization are analogous in the two model systems. The biological implications and open questions are discussed. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779493

  2. Coherent stochastic resonance in the presence of a field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe; Weiss, George H.

    1995-11-01

    A recent paper by Bulsara, Lowen, and Rees [Phys. Rev. E 49, 4989 (1994)] presents a perturbation analysis of coherent stochastic resonance in a half-space in the presence of a field. We believe that the analysis there was flawed due to an improper use of the method of images and that a correct version of a perturbation analysis can be given by using a transformation of the underlying equations. The result still exhibits stochastic resonance.

  3. A microprocessor-based multichannel subsensory stochastic resonance electrical stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gwo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic resonance electrical stimulation is a novel intervention which provides potential benefits for improving postural control ability in the elderly, those with diabetic neuropathy, and stroke patients. In this paper, a microprocessor-based subsensory white noise electrical stimulator for the applications of stochastic resonance stimulation is developed. The proposed stimulator provides four independent programmable stimulation channels with constant-current output, possesses linear voltage-to-current relationship, and has two types of stimulation modes, pulse amplitude and width modulation.

  4. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  5. A Model of Bone Remodelling Based on Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, M.; Zaikin, A.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2008-06-01

    One of the most crucial medical challenges for long-term space flights is the prevention of bone loss affecting astronauts and its dramatic consequences on their return to gravitational field. Recently, a new noise-induced phenomenon in bone formation has been reported experimentally [1]. With this contribution we propose a model for this findings based on Stochastic Resonance [2]. Our simulations suggest new countermeasures for bone degeneration during long space fights using the effect of Stochastic Resonance.

  6. Stochastic resonance in psychophysics and in animal behavior.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lawrence M; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2002-08-01

    A recent analysis of the energy detector model in sensory psychophysics concluded that stochastic resonance does not occur in a measure of signal detectability ( d'), but can occur in a percent-correct measure of performance as an epiphenomenon of nonoptimal criterion placement [Tougaard (2000) Biol Cybern 83: 471-480]. When generalized to signal detection in sensory systems in general, this conclusion is a serious challenge to the idea that stochastic resonance could play a significant role in sensory processing in humans and other animals. It also seems to be inconsistent with recent demonstrations of stochastic resonance in sensory systems of both nonhuman animals and humans using measures of system performance such as signal-to-noise ratio of power spectral densities and percent-correct detections in a two-interval forced-choice paradigm, both closely related to d'. In this paper we address this apparent dilemma by discussing several models of how stochastic resonance can arise in signal detection systems, including especially those that implement a "soft threshold" at the input transform stage. One example involves redefining d' for energy increments in terms of parameters of the spike-count distribution of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons. Another involves a Poisson spike generator that receives an exponentially transformed noisy periodic signal. In this case it can be shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectral density at the signal frequency, which exhibits stochastic resonance, is proportional to d'. Finally, a variant of d' is shown to exhibit stochastic resonance when calculated directly from the distributions of power spectral densities at the signal frequency resulting from transformation of noise alone and a noisy signal by a sufficiently steep nonlinear response function. All of these examples, and others from the literature, imply that stochastic resonance is more than an epiphenomenon, although significant limitations to the extent to which

  7. Stochastic resonance in the brusselator model

    PubMed

    Osipov; Ponizovskaya

    2000-04-01

    Using the Brusselator model, we show that in a simple dynamical system small noise can be converted into stochastic spikewise oscillations of huge amplitude (bursting noises) in the vicinity of a Hopf bifurcation. Small periodic signals with amplitude several times less than the noise intensity transform these stochastic oscillations into quasiperiodic large-amplitude spikewise oscillations or small-amplitude quasiharmonic oscillations, depending on the signal form. PMID:11088262

  8. Coherent signal amplification in bistable nanomechanical oscillators by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badzey, Robert L.; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2005-10-01

    Stochastic resonance is a counterintuitive concept: the addition of noise to a noisy system induces coherent amplification of its response. First suggested as a mechanism for the cyclic recurrence of ice ages, stochastic resonance has been seen in a wide variety of macroscopic physical systems: bistable ring lasers, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), magnetoelastic ribbons and neurophysiological systems such as the receptors in crickets and crayfish. Although fundamentally important as a mechanism of coherent signal amplification, stochastic resonance has yet to be observed in nanoscale systems. Here we report the observation of stochastic resonance in bistable nanomechanical silicon oscillators. Our nanomechanical systems consist of beams that are clamped at each end and driven into transverse oscillation with the use of a radiofrequency source. Modulation of the source induces controllable switching of the beams between two stable, distinct states. We observe that the addition of white noise causes a marked amplification of the signal strength. Stochastic resonance in nanomechanical systems could have a function in the realization of controllable high-speed nanomechanical memory cells, and paves the way for exploring macroscopic quantum coherence and tunnelling.

  9. Tracking stochastic resonance curves using an assisted reference model

    SciTech Connect

    Calderón Ramírez, Mario; Rico Martínez, Ramiro; Parmananda, P.

    2015-06-15

    The optimal noise amplitude for Stochastic Resonance (SR) is located employing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) reference model with a nonlinear predictive capability. A modified Kalman Filter (KF) was coupled to this reference model in order to compensate for semi-quantitative forecast errors. Three manifestations of stochastic resonance, namely, Periodic Stochastic Resonance (PSR), Aperiodic Stochastic Resonance (ASR), and finally Coherence Resonance (CR) were considered. Using noise amplitude as the control parameter, for the case of PSR and ASR, the cross-correlation curve between the sub-threshold input signal and the system response is tracked. However, using the same parameter the Normalized Variance curve is tracked for the case of CR. The goal of the present work is to track these curves and converge to their respective extremal points. The ANN reference model strategy captures and subsequently predicts the nonlinear features of the model system while the KF compensates for the perturbations inherent to the superimposed noise. This technique, implemented in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, enabled us to track the resonance curves and eventually locate their optimal (extremal) values. This would yield the optimal value of noise for the three manifestations of the SR phenomena.

  10. Didactic discussion of stochastic resonance effects and weak signals

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, R.K.

    1996-12-01

    A simple, paradigmatic, model is used to illustrate some general properties of effects subsumed under the label stochastic resonance. In particular, analyses of the transparent model show that (1) a small amount of noise added to a much larger signal can greatly increase the response to the signal, but (2) a weak signal added to much larger noise will not generate a substantial added response. The conclusions drawn from the model illustrate the general result that stochastic resonance effects do not provide an avenue for signals that are much smaller than noise to affect biology. A further analysis demonstrates the effects of small signals in the shifting of biologically important chemical equilibria under conditions where stochastic resonance effects are significant.

  11. Stochastic resonance and coherence resonance in groundwater-dependent plant ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Fabio; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2012-01-21

    Several studies have shown that non-linear deterministic dynamical systems forced by external random components can give rise to unexpectedly regular temporal behaviors. Stochastic resonance and coherence resonance, the two best known processes of this type, have been studied in a number of physical and chemical systems. Here, we explore their possible occurrence in the dynamics of groundwater-dependent plant ecosystems. To this end, we develop two eco-hydrological models, which allow us to demonstrate that stochastic and coherence resonance may emerge in the dynamics of phreatophyte vegetation, depending on their deterministic properties and the intensity of external stochastic drivers.

  12. Delayed-feedback chimera states: Forced multiclusters and stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V.; Zakharova, A.; Maistrenko, Y.; Schöll, E.

    2016-07-01

    A nonlinear oscillator model with negative time-delayed feedback is studied numerically under external deterministic and stochastic forcing. It is found that in the unforced system complex partial synchronization patterns like chimera states as well as salt-and-pepper–like solitary states arise on the route from regular dynamics to spatio-temporal chaos. The control of the dynamics by external periodic forcing is demonstrated by numerical simulations. It is shown that one-cluster and multi-cluster chimeras can be achieved by adjusting the external forcing frequency to appropriate resonance conditions. If a stochastic component is superimposed to the deterministic external forcing, chimera states can be induced in a way similar to stochastic resonance, they appear, therefore, in regimes where they do not exist without noise.

  13. Delayed-feedback chimera states: Forced multiclusters and stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V.; Zakharova, A.; Maistrenko, Y.; Schöll, E.

    2016-07-01

    A nonlinear oscillator model with negative time-delayed feedback is studied numerically under external deterministic and stochastic forcing. It is found that in the unforced system complex partial synchronization patterns like chimera states as well as salt-and-pepper-like solitary states arise on the route from regular dynamics to spatio-temporal chaos. The control of the dynamics by external periodic forcing is demonstrated by numerical simulations. It is shown that one-cluster and multi-cluster chimeras can be achieved by adjusting the external forcing frequency to appropriate resonance conditions. If a stochastic component is superimposed to the deterministic external forcing, chimera states can be induced in a way similar to stochastic resonance, they appear, therefore, in regimes where they do not exist without noise.

  14. Stochastic resonance in feedforward acupuncture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ying-Mei; Wang, Jiang; Men, Cong; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Yu, Hai-Tao; Chan, Wai-Lok

    2014-10-01

    Effects of noises and some other network properties on the weak signal propagation are studied systematically in feedforward acupuncture networks (FFN) based on FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model. It is found that noises with medium intensity can enhance signal propagation and this effect can be further increased by the feedforward network structure. Resonant properties in the noisy network can also be altered by several network parameters, such as heterogeneity, synapse features, and feedback connections. These results may also provide a novel potential explanation for the propagation of acupuncture signal.

  15. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications. PMID:26067911

  16. Reconstruction of pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan

    2015-06-01

    We investigate a practical technology for reconstructing nanosecond pulse noisy images via stochastic resonance, which is based on the modulation instability. A theoretical model of this method for optical pulse signal is built to effectively recover the pulse image. The nanosecond noise-hidden images grow at the expense of noise during the stochastic resonance process in a photorefractive medium. The properties of output images are mainly determined by the input signal-to-noise intensity ratio, the applied voltage across the medium, and the correlation length of noise background. A high cross-correlation gain is obtained by optimizing these parameters. This provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse images in various imaging applications.

  17. Stochastic resonance in two-frequency signal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui; Huang, Shengming; Liu, Xuemei

    2016-04-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in two-frequency signal systems is investigated in the presence of the correlated multiplicative and white additive noises. From the Wiener-Khinchin theorem, the exact expression of the SNR is obtained. It is found that stochastic resonance (SR) appears when two frequencies are almost the same, while SR gradually disappears when the frequency difference increases. We also found that there exists an optimized value of the frequency at which SNR takes its maximal value.

  18. Stochastic resonance-a nonlinear control theory interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Farris, K. A.

    2010-07-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an effect that has been known (Benzi, R., Sutera, A., and Vulpiani, A. (1981), 'The Mechanism of Stochastic Resonance', Journal of Physics, A14, L453-L457) for almost three decades and has been extensively studied in biology, statistics, signal processing and in numerous other eclectic areas (Wiesenfeld, K., and Moss, F. (1995), 'Stochastic Resonance and the Benefits of Noise: From Ice Ages to Crayfish and Squids', Nature, 373, 33-36). Herein, a nonlinear control theory analysis is conducted on how to better understand the class of systems that may exhibit the SR effect. Using nonlinear control theory methods, equilibrium points are manipulated to create the SR response (similar to shaping dynamical response in a phase plane). From this approach, a means of synthesising and designing the appropriate class of nonlinear systems is introduced. New types of nonlinear dynamics that demonstrate the SR effects are discovered, which may have utility in control theory as well as in many diverse applications. A numerical simulation illustrates some powerful attributes of these systems.

  19. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  20. Intrinsic periodic and aperiodic stochastic resonance in an electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ishant; Phogat, Richa; Parmananda, P.; Ocampo-Espindola, J. L.; Rivera, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we show the interaction of a composite of a periodic or aperiodic signal and intrinsic electrochemical noise with the nonlinear dynamics of an electrochemical cell configured to study the corrosion of iron in an acidic media. The anodic voltage setpoint (V0) in the cell is chosen such that the anodic current (I ) exhibits excitable fixed point behavior in the absence of noise. The subthreshold periodic (aperiodic) signal consists of a train of rectangular pulses with a fixed amplitude and width, separated by regular (irregular) time intervals. The irregular time intervals chosen are of deterministic and stochastic origins. The amplitude of the intrinsic internal noise, regulated by the concentration of chloride ions, is then monotonically increased, and the provoked dynamics are analyzed. The signal to noise ratio and the cross-correlation coefficient versus the chloride ions' concentration curves have a unimodal shape indicating the emergence of an intrinsic periodic or aperiodic stochastic resonance. The abscissa for the maxima of these unimodal curves correspond to the optimum value of intrinsic noise where maximum regularity of the invoked dynamics is observed. In the particular case of the intrinsic periodic stochastic resonance, the scanning electron microscope images for the electrode metal surfaces are shown for certain values of chloride ions' concentrations. These images, qualitatively, corroborate the emergence of order as a result of the interaction between the nonlinear dynamics and the composite signal.

  1. Intrinsic periodic and aperiodic stochastic resonance in an electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ishant; Phogat, Richa; Parmananda, P; Ocampo-Espindola, J L; Rivera, M

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we show the interaction of a composite of a periodic or aperiodic signal and intrinsic electrochemical noise with the nonlinear dynamics of an electrochemical cell configured to study the corrosion of iron in an acidic media. The anodic voltage setpoint (V_{0}) in the cell is chosen such that the anodic current (I) exhibits excitable fixed point behavior in the absence of noise. The subthreshold periodic (aperiodic) signal consists of a train of rectangular pulses with a fixed amplitude and width, separated by regular (irregular) time intervals. The irregular time intervals chosen are of deterministic and stochastic origins. The amplitude of the intrinsic internal noise, regulated by the concentration of chloride ions, is then monotonically increased, and the provoked dynamics are analyzed. The signal to noise ratio and the cross-correlation coefficient versus the chloride ions' concentration curves have a unimodal shape indicating the emergence of an intrinsic periodic or aperiodic stochastic resonance. The abscissa for the maxima of these unimodal curves correspond to the optimum value of intrinsic noise where maximum regularity of the invoked dynamics is observed. In the particular case of the intrinsic periodic stochastic resonance, the scanning electron microscope images for the electrode metal surfaces are shown for certain values of chloride ions' concentrations. These images, qualitatively, corroborate the emergence of order as a result of the interaction between the nonlinear dynamics and the composite signal. PMID:27627301

  2. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-09-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  3. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  4. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  5. Stochastic resonance in a generalized Von Foerster population growth model

    SciTech Connect

    Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    The stochastic dynamics of a population growth model, similar to the Von Foerster model for human population, is studied. The influence of fluctuating environment on the carrying capacity is modeled as a multiplicative dichotomous noise. It is established that an interplay between nonlinearity and environmental fluctuations can cause single unidirectional discontinuous transitions of the mean population size versus the noise amplitude, i.e., an increase of noise amplitude can induce a jump from a state with a moderate number of individuals to that with a very large number, while by decreasing the noise amplitude an opposite transition cannot be effected. An analytical expression of the mean escape time for such transitions is found. Particularly, it is shown that the mean transition time exhibits a strong minimum at intermediate values of noise correlation time, i.e., the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. Applications of the results in ecology are also discussed.

  6. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems.

  7. Dynamical structure underlying inverse stochastic resonance and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntarla, Muhammet; Cressman, John R.; Ozer, Mahmut; Barreto, Ernest

    2013-10-01

    We investigate inverse stochastic resonance (ISR), a recently reported phenomenon in which the spiking activity of a Hodgkin-Huxley model neuron subject to external noise exhibits a pronounced minimum as the noise intensity increases. We clarify the mechanism that underlies ISR and show that its most surprising features are a consequence of the dynamical structure of the model. Furthermore, we show that the ISR effect depends strongly on the procedures used to measure it. Our results are important for the experimentalist who seeks to observe the ISR phenomenon.

  8. Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert

    2007-11-02

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body system000.

  9. Stochastic dipolar recoupling in nuclear magnetic resonance of solids

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    I describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, called stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR), that permits continuous experimental control of the character of spin dynamics between coherent and incoherent limits in a system of magnetic dipole-coupled nuclei. In the fully incoherent limit of SDR, spin polarization transfers occur at distance-dependent rates without the quantum mechanical interferences among pairwise dipole-dipole couplings that often limit the feasibility or precision of structural studies of solids by NMR. In addition to facilitating structural studies, SDR represents a possible route to experimental studies of effects of decoherence on the dynamics of quantum many-body systems. PMID:17995438

  10. Stochastic resonance with colored noise for neural signal detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-01-01

    We analyze signal detection with nonlinear test statistics in the presence of colored noise. In the limits of small signal and weak noise correlation, the optimal test statistic and its performance are derived under general conditions, especially concerning the type of noise. We also analyze, for a threshold nonlinearity-a key component of a neural model, the conditions for noise-enhanced performance, establishing that colored noise is superior to white noise for detection. For a parallel array of nonlinear elements, approximating neurons, we demonstrate even broader conditions allowing noise-enhanced detection, via a form of suprathreshold stochastic resonance.

  11. Suprathreshold stochastic resonance in neural processing tuned by correlation.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Simon; Kang, Yanmei; Stocks, Nigel; Feng, Jianfeng

    2011-07-01

    Suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) is examined in the context of integrate-and-fire neurons, with an emphasis on the role of correlation in the neuronal firing. We employed a model based on a network of spiking neurons which received synaptic inputs modeled by Poisson processes stimulated by a stepped input signal. The smoothed ensemble firing rate provided an output signal, and the mutual information between this signal and the input was calculated for networks with different noise levels and different numbers of neurons. It was found that an SSR effect was present in this context. We then examined a more biophysically plausible scenario where the noise was not controlled directly, but instead was tuned by the correlation between the inputs. The SSR effect remained present in this scenario with nonzero noise providing improved information transmission, and it was found that negative correlation between the inputs was optimal. Finally, an examination of SSR in the context of this model revealed its connection with more traditional stochastic resonance and showed a trade-off between supratheshold and subthreshold components. We discuss these results in the context of existing empirical evidence concerning correlations in neuronal firing.

  12. Suprathreshold stochastic resonance in neural processing tuned by correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, Simon; Kang, Yanmei; Stocks, Nigel; Feng, Jianfeng

    2011-07-01

    Suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) is examined in the context of integrate-and-fire neurons, with an emphasis on the role of correlation in the neuronal firing. We employed a model based on a network of spiking neurons which received synaptic inputs modeled by Poisson processes stimulated by a stepped input signal. The smoothed ensemble firing rate provided an output signal, and the mutual information between this signal and the input was calculated for networks with different noise levels and different numbers of neurons. It was found that an SSR effect was present in this context. We then examined a more biophysically plausible scenario where the noise was not controlled directly, but instead was tuned by the correlation between the inputs. The SSR effect remained present in this scenario with nonzero noise providing improved information transmission, and it was found that negative correlation between the inputs was optimal. Finally, an examination of SSR in the context of this model revealed its connection with more traditional stochastic resonance and showed a trade-off between supratheshold and subthreshold components. We discuss these results in the context of existing empirical evidence concerning correlations in neuronal firing.

  13. Planetary gearbox fault diagnosis using an adaptive stochastic resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Han, Dong; Lin, Jing; He, Zhengjia

    2013-07-01

    Planetary gearboxes are widely used in aerospace, automotive and heavy industry applications due to their large transmission ratio, strong load-bearing capacity and high transmission efficiency. The tough operation conditions of heavy duty and intensive impact load may cause gear tooth damage such as fatigue crack and teeth missed etc. The challenging issues in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes include selection of sensitive measurement locations, investigation of vibration transmission paths and weak feature extraction. One of them is how to effectively discover the weak characteristics from noisy signals of faulty components in planetary gearboxes. To address the issue in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes, an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed in this paper. The ASR method utilizes the optimization ability of ant colony algorithms and adaptively realizes the optimal stochastic resonance system matching input signals. Using the ASR method, the noise may be weakened and weak characteristics highlighted, and therefore the faults can be diagnosed accurately. A planetary gearbox test rig is established and experiments with sun gear faults including a chipped tooth and a missing tooth are conducted. And the vibration signals are collected under the loaded condition and various motor speeds. The proposed method is used to process the collected signals and the results of feature extraction and fault diagnosis demonstrate its effectiveness.

  14. PULSAR STATE SWITCHING FROM MARKOV TRANSITIONS AND STOCHASTIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.

    2013-09-20

    Markov processes are shown to be consistent with metastable states seen in pulsar phenomena, including intensity nulling, pulse-shape mode changes, subpulse drift rates, spin-down rates, and X-ray emission, based on the typically broad and monotonic distributions of state lifetimes. Markovianity implies a nonlinear magnetospheric system in which state changes occur stochastically, corresponding to transitions between local minima in an effective potential. State durations (though not transition times) are thus largely decoupled from the characteristic timescales of various magnetospheric processes. Dyadic states are common but some objects show at least four states with some transitions forbidden. Another case is the long-term intermittent pulsar B1931+24 that has binary radio-emission and torque states with wide, but non-monotonic duration distributions. It also shows a quasi-period of 38 ± 5 days in a 13 yr time sequence, suggesting stochastic resonance in a Markov system with a forcing function that could be strictly periodic or quasi-periodic. Nonlinear phenomena are associated with time-dependent activity in the acceleration region near each magnetic polar cap. The polar-cap diode is altered by feedback from the outer magnetosphere and by return currents from the equatorial region outside the light cylinder that may also cause the neutron star to episodically charge and discharge. Orbital perturbations of a disk or current sheet provide a natural periodicity for the forcing function in the stochastic-resonance interpretation of B1931+24. Disk dynamics may introduce additional timescales in observed phenomena. Future work can test the Markov interpretation, identify which pulsar types have a propensity for state changes, and clarify the role of selection effects.

  15. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances on scale-free neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan, Zhisheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2009-06-01

    We study the effects of periodic subthreshold pacemaker activity and time-delayed coupling on stochastic resonance over scale-free neuronal networks. As the two extreme options, we introduce the pacemaker, respectively, to the neuron with the highest degree and to one of the neurons with the lowest degree within the network, but we also consider the case when all neurons are exposed to the periodic forcing. In the absence of delay, we show that an intermediate intensity of noise is able to optimally assist the pacemaker in imposing its rhythm on the whole ensemble, irrespective to its placing, thus providing evidences for stochastic resonance on the scale-free neuronal networks. Interestingly thereby, if the forcing in form of a periodic pulse train is introduced to all neurons forming the network, the stochastic resonance decreases as compared to the case when only a single neuron is paced. Moreover, we show that finite delays in coupling can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances independently of the placing of the pacemaker, but they can also altogether destroy stochastic resonance. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances manifest as well-expressed maxima of the correlation measure, appearing at every multiple of the pacemaker period. We argue that fine-tuned delays and locally active pacemakers are vital for assuring optimal conditions for stochastic resonance on complex neuronal networks.

  16. A Neuron Model of Stochastic Resonance Using Rectangular Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Zachary; Grill, Warren M

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is the enhanced representation of a weak input signal by the addition of an optimal level of broadband noise to a nonlinear (threshold) system. Since its discovery in the 1980s the domain of input signals shown to be applicable to SR has greatly expanded, from strictly periodic inputs to now nearly any aperiodic forcing function. The perturbations (noise) used to generate SR have also expanded, from white noise to now colored noise or vibrational forcing. This study demonstrates that a new class of perturbations can achieve SR, namely, series of stochastically generated biphasic pulse trains. Using these pulse trains as ‘noise’ we show that a Hodgkin Huxley model neuron exhibits SR behavior when detecting weak input signals. This result is of particular interest to neuroscience because nearly all artificial neural stimulation is implemented with square current or voltage pulses rather than broadband noise, and this new method may facilitate the translation of the performance gains achievable through SR to neural prosthetics. PMID:25186655

  17. Single-Electron Stochastic Resonance Using Si Nanowire Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Akira

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate stochastic resonance (SR) with single electrons (SEs) using nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Input signal applied to a MOSFET modulates SE transport in an average manner based on nonlinear characteristics. On the other hand, an individual SE goes through the MOSFET in a completely random manner, which corresponds to shot noise. SEs transferred to a storage node are counted precisely by the other MOSFET and used as an output signal. The correlation between the input and output signals is improved by taking advantage of extrinsic noise as well as the intrinsic shot noise composed of SEs. It is confirmed that the shot-noise-assisted SR allows fast operation with a simple system. Pattern perception utilizing SR is also demonstrated.

  18. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2014-11-01

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  19. On square-wave-driven stochastic resonance for energy harvesting in a bistable system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dongxu; Zheng, Rencheng; Nakano, Kimihiko; Cartmell, Matthew P

    2014-11-15

    Stochastic resonance is a physical phenomenon through which the throughput of energy within an oscillator excited by a stochastic source can be boosted by adding a small modulating excitation. This study investigates the feasibility of implementing square-wave-driven stochastic resonance to enhance energy harvesting. The motivating hypothesis was that such stochastic resonance can be efficiently realized in a bistable mechanism. However, the condition for the occurrence of stochastic resonance is conventionally defined by the Kramers rate. This definition is inadequate because of the necessity and difficulty in estimating white noise density. A bistable mechanism has been designed using an explicit analytical model which implies a new approach for achieving stochastic resonance in the paper. Experimental tests confirm that the addition of a small-scale force to the bistable system excited by a random signal apparently leads to a corresponding amplification of the response that we now term square-wave-driven stochastic resonance. The study therefore indicates that this approach may be a promising way to improve the performance of an energy harvester under certain forms of random excitation.

  20. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  1. The ghost of stochastic resonance: an introductory review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balenzuela, Pablo; Braun, Holger; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear systems driven by noise and periodic forces with more than one frequency exhibit the phenomenon of Ghost Stochastic Resonance (GSR) found in a wide and disparate variety of fields ranging from biology to geophysics. The common novel feature is the emergence of a 'ghost' frequency in the system's output which is absent in the input. As reviewed here, the uncovering of this phenomenon helped to understand a range of problems, from the perception of pitch in complex sounds or visual stimuli, to the explanation of climate cycles. Recent theoretical efforts show that a simple mechanism with two ingredients are at work in all these observations. The first one is the linear interference between the periodic inputs and the second a nonlinear detection of the largest constructive interferences, involving a noisy threshold. These notes are dedicated to review the main aspects of this phenomenon, as well as its different manifestations described on a bewildering variety of systems ranging from neurons, semiconductor lasers, electronic circuits to models of glacial climate cycles.

  2. Stochastic Resonance in Time-to-Contact Judgments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Manish; Gazula, Harshvardhan; Hsiang, Simon M.; Delucia, Patricia R.

    2015-04-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a counterintuitive phenomenon in which additive noise enhances performance of a nonlinear system. Previous studies demonstrated SR effect on human tactile sensitivity by adding noise of same modality and cross modality. Similarly, enhancement of human hearing through additive noise has been studied. In this study, we investigate the effect of noise in visual perception, specifically time-to-contact (TTC) judgments. This study explores four research questions: (1) Does noise help in TTC judgments? (2) How does noise affect speed and accuracy of TTC judgments? (3) Does cross modal noise help in TTC judgments? (4) How does cross modal noise affect speed and accuracy of TTC judgments? Through simulation, we show that noise in optical cue can enhance weak signals. We also demonstrate that noise can improve speed of TTC judgments at the expense of accuracy. Similarly, we demonstrate SR by adding noise of cross modality. These findings provide plausible hypotheses regarding how much noise should be added to enhance TTC judgments.

  3. Stochastic resonance in ion channels characterized by information theory.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, I; Hänggi, P

    2000-04-01

    We identify a unifying measure for stochastic resonance (SR) in voltage dependent ion channels which comprises periodic (conventional), aperiodic, and nonstationary SR. Within a simplest setting, the gating dynamics is governed by two-state conductance fluctuations, which switch at random time points between two values. The corresponding continuous time point process is analyzed by virtue of information theory. In pursuing this goal we evaluate for our dynamics the tau information, the mutual information, and the rate of information gain. As a main result we find an analytical formula for the rate of information gain that solely involves the probability of the two channel states and their noise averaged rates. For small voltage signals it simplifies to a handy expression. Our findings are applied to study SR in a potassium channel. We find that SR occurs only when the closed state is predominantly dwelled upon. Upon increasing the probability for the open channel state the application of an extra dose of noise monotonically deteriorates the rate of information gain, i.e., no SR behavior occurs.

  4. Entropic stochastic resonance without external force in oscillatory confined space

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-05-21

    We have studied the dynamics of Brownian particles in a confined geometry of dumbbell-shape with periodically oscillating walls. Entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) behavior, characterizing by a maximum value of the coherent factor Q at some optimal level of noise, is observed even without external periodic force in the horizontal direction, which is necessary for conventional ESR where the wall is static and the particle is subjected to the force. Interestingly, the ESR can be remarkably enhanced by the particle gravity G, in contrast to the conventional case. In addition, Q decreases (increases) with G in the small (large) noise limit, respectively, while it non-monotonically changes with G for moderate noise levels. We have applied an effective 1D coarsening description to illustrate such a nontrivial dependence on G, by investigating the property of the 1D effective potential of entropic nature and paying special attention to the excess part resulting from the boundary oscillation. Dependences of the ESR strength with other related parameters are also discussed.

  5. Stochastic resonance-enhanced laser-based particle detector.

    PubMed

    Dutta, A; Werner, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Laser-based particle detector whose response was enhanced by modulating the Laser diode with a white-noise generator. A Laser sheet was generated to cast a shadow of the object on a 200 dots per inch, 512 x 1 pixels linear sensor array. The Laser diode was modulated with a white-noise generator to achieve stochastic resonance. The white-noise generator essentially amplified the wide-bandwidth (several hundred MHz) noise produced by a reverse-biased zener diode operating in junction-breakdown mode. The gain in the amplifier in the white-noise generator was set such that the Receiver Operating Characteristics plot provided the best discriminability. A monofiber 40 AWG (approximately 80 microm) wire was detected with approximately 88% True Positive rate and approximately 19% False Positive rate in presence of white-noise modulation and with approximately 71% True Positive rate and approximately 15% False Positive rate in absence of white-noise modulation.

  6. Noise and stochastic resonance in voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo techniques, I calculate the effects of internally generated noise on information transfer through the passage of action potential spikes along unmyelinated axons in a simple nervous system. I take the Hodgkin–Huxley (HH) description of Na and K channels in squid giant axons as the basis of the calculations and find that most signal transmission noise is generated by fluctuations in the channel open and closed populations. To bring the model closer to conventional descriptions in terms of thermal noise energy, kT, and to determine gating currents, I express the HH equations in the form of simple relations from statistical mechanics where the states are separated by a Gibbs energy that is modified by the action of the transmembrane potential on dipole moments held by the domains. Using the HH equations, I find that the output response (in the probability of action potential spikes) from small input potential pulses across the cell membrane is increased by added noise but falls off when the input noise becomes large, as in stochastic resonance models. That output noise response is sharply reduced by a small increase in the membrane polarization potential or a moderate increase in the channel densities. Because any reduction of noise incurs metabolic and developmental costs to an animal, the natural noise level is probably optimal and any increase in noise is likely to be harmful. Although these results are specific to signal transmission in unmyelinated axons, I suggest that the conclusions are likely to be general. PMID:14506291

  7. COMMUNICATION: Stochastic resonance and the evolution of Daphnia foraging strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dees, Nathan D.; Bahar, Sonya; Moss, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Search strategies are currently of great interest, with reports on foraging ranging from albatrosses and spider monkeys to microzooplankton. Here, we investigate the role of noise in optimizing search strategies. We focus on the zooplankton Daphnia, which move in successive sequences consisting of a hop, a pause and a turn through an angle. Recent experiments have shown that their turning angle distributions (TADs) and underlying noise intensities are similar across species and age groups, suggesting an evolutionary origin of this internal noise. We explore this hypothesis further with a digital simulation (EVO) based solely on the three central Darwinian themes: inheritability, variability and survivability. Separate simulations utilizing stochastic resonance (SR) indicate that foraging success, and hence fitness, is maximized at an optimum TAD noise intensity, which is represented by the distribution's characteristic width, σ. In both the EVO and SR simulations, foraging success is the criterion, and the results are the predicted characteristic widths of the TADs that maximize success. Our results are twofold: (1) the evolving characteristic widths achieve stasis after many generations; (2) as a hop length parameter is changed, variations in the evolved widths generated by EVO parallel those predicted by SR. These findings provide support for the hypotheses that (1) σ is an evolved quantity and that (2) SR plays a role in evolution.

  8. Optimal weighted suprathreshold stochastic resonance with multigroup saturating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liyan; Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2016-09-01

    Suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) describes a noise-enhanced effect that occurs, not in a single element, but rather in an array of nonlinear elements when the signal is no longer subthreshold. Within the context of SSR, we investigate the optimization problem of signal recovery through an array of saturating sensors where the response of each element can be optimally weighted prior to summation, with a performance measure of mean square error (MSE). We consider groups of sensors. Individual sensors within each group have identical parameters, but each group has distinct parameters. We find that optimally weighting the sensor responses provides a lower MSE in comparison with the unweighted case for weak and moderate noise intensities. Moreover, as the slope parameter of the nonlinear sensors increases, the MSE superiority of the optimally weighted array shows a peak, and then tends to a fixed value. These results indicate that SSR with optimal weights, as a general mechanism of enhancement by noise, is of potential interest to signal recovery.

  9. Static Magnetic Field Induced Stochastic Resonance in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Megan; Frisch, Paul; McLeod, Kenneth; Laramee, Craig

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems are naturally complex, making singular responses difficult to detect. However, when the emergent behavior is investigated, the collective properties may be observed and characterized. These responses to external stimuli at are often evident at the genomic level. When an optimal dose of external noise is used to perturb the system, it may work in synergy with the system's intrinsic noise to produce a change in stable state. This phenomenon, known as stochastic resonance (SR), is responsible for shifts in gene expression. This paper proposes that static magnetic fields (SMFs) elicit a SR genomic response in biological systems under environmentally relevant exposures. Using single reporter biomarkers as well as gene expression microarrays, the responses of three cell model systems (MCF-10A; Rat-1; Caco-2) to SMF exposure were examined. Results show that while responses for a single gene do occur, they are difficult to replicate and are near the detection cutoff limits. However, the system as a whole displays a shift in the pattern of gene expression. The replication of this pattern across different experimental platforms provides evidence that the cells are responding to the noise presented by the SMFs.

  10. A linear modulation-based stochastic resonance algorithm applied to the detection of weak chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Xiang, Bingren; Liao, Xuewei; Xie, Shaofei

    2006-12-01

    A simple stochastic resonance algorithm based on linear modulation was developed to amplify and detect weak chromatographic peaks. The output chromatographic peak is often distorted when using the traditional stochastic resonance algorithm due to the presence of high levels of noise. In the new algorithm, a linear modulated double-well potential is introduced to correct for the distortion of the output peak. Method parameter selection is convenient and intuitive for linear modulation. In order to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio for the output signal, the performance of two-layer stochastic resonance was evaluated by comparing it with wavelet-based stochastic resonance. The proposed algorithm was applied to the quantitative analysis of dimethyl sulfide and the determination of chloramphenicol residues in milk, and the good linearity of the method demonstrated that it is an effective tool for detecting weak chromatographic peaks.

  11. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  12. Robust stochastic resonance: Signal detection and adaptation in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2001-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs when noise improves a system performance measure such as a spectral signal-to-noise ratio or a cross-correlation measure. All SR studies have assumed that the forcing noise has finite variance. Most have further assumed that the noise is Gaussian. We show that SR still occurs for the more general case of impulsive or infinite-variance noise. The SR effect fades as the noise grows more impulsive. We study this fading effect on the family of symmetric α-stable bell curves that includes the Gaussian bell curve as a special case. These bell curves have thicker tails as the parameter α falls from 2 (the Gaussian case) to 1 (the Cauchy case) to even lower values. Thicker tails create more frequent and more violent noise impulses. The main feedback and feedforward models in the SR literature show this fading SR effect for periodic forcing signals when we plot either the signal-to-noise ratio or a signal correlation measure against the dispersion of the α-stable noise. Linear regression shows that an exponential law γopt(α)=cAα describes this relation between the impulsive index α and the SR-optimal noise dispersion γopt. The results show that SR is robust against noise ``outliers.'' So SR may be more widespread in nature than previously believed. Such robustness also favors the use of SR in engineering systems. We further show that an adaptive system can learn the optimal noise dispersion for two standard SR models (the quartic bistable model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model) for the signal-to-noise ratio performance measure. This also favors practical applications of SR and suggests that evolution may have tuned the noise-sensitive parameters of biological systems.

  13. Stochastic Resonance and Global Synchronization In The Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Rahmstorf, S.; Calov, R.

    Paleoclimate data present strong evidences that during glacial age the climate sys- tem unlike recent 10,000 yr was characterized by strong variability on millennial time scale. Moreover, two the most pronounced types of variability, Dansgaard-Oeshger (D/O) oscillations and Heinrich events, were closely locked in time and the latter re- veal clear 1500 years pacing. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that peculiar timing and synchronism of different types of abrupt climate events during glacial age is a consequence of internal instability of the components of the climate system. In Ganopolski and Rahmstorf (2001) we proposed an explanation of D/O oscillations as a temporary state transitions triggered by a small-amplitude freshwater forcing in the high latitude North Atlantic, which causes rapid jumps of the thermohaline ocean cir- culation from the stable (cold) mode to the unstable (warm) mode. Such an excitable system is prone to stochastic resonance. In Ganopolski and Rahmstorf (2002) we have shown that when the climate system is driven by random noise of realistic amplitude, combined with a very weak climate cycle of 1500 yr, D/O oscillations result which are similar in time evolution and spatial patterns to those recorded in the Greenland ice core. In particularly, simulated warm events have preferred interspike intervals of 1500, 3000 and 4500 yr. Ice sheets alike thermohaline ocean circulation can be de- scribed as an excitable system. In Calov et al. (2002), using coupled climate-ice sheet mode, we simulated large-scale oscillations of the Laurentide Ice Sheet resembling Heinrich events in geographical pattern, amplitude and temporal evolution. Although, a typical period of simulated Heinrich events is controlled by climate forcing and in- ternal ice sheet dynamics, the precise timing of individual Heinrich events is locked to small-scale instabilities in the area of Hudson Strait. We speculate that in the real climate system such perturbations can

  14. Stochastic Resonance Modulates Neural Synchronization within and between Cortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Lawrence M.; MacLean, Shannon E.; Kirschner, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Neural synchronization is a mechanism whereby functionally specific brain regions establish transient networks for perception, cognition, and action. Direct addition of weak noise (fast random fluctuations) to various neural systems enhances synchronization through the mechanism of stochastic resonance (SR). Moreover, SR also occurs in human perception, cognition, and action. Perception, cognition, and action are closely correlated with, and may depend upon, synchronized oscillations within specialized brain networks. We tested the hypothesis that SR-mediated neural synchronization occurs within and between functionally relevant brain areas and thus could be responsible for behavioral SR. We measured the 40-Hz transient response of the human auditory cortex to brief pure tones. This response arises when the ongoing, random-phase, 40-Hz activity of a group of tuned neurons in the auditory cortex becomes synchronized in response to the onset of an above-threshold sound at its “preferred” frequency. We presented a stream of near-threshold standard sounds in various levels of added broadband noise and measured subjects' 40-Hz response to the standards in a deviant-detection paradigm using high-density EEG. We used independent component analysis and dipole fitting to locate neural sources of the 40-Hz response in bilateral auditory cortex, left posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus. We found that added noise enhanced the 40-Hz response in all these areas. Moreover, added noise also increased the synchronization between these regions in alpha and gamma frequency bands both during and after the 40-Hz response. Our results demonstrate neural SR in several functionally specific brain regions, including areas not traditionally thought to contribute to the auditory 40-Hz transient response. In addition, we demonstrated SR in the synchronization between these brain regions. Thus, both intra- and inter-regional synchronization of neural activity are

  15. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  16. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  17. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  18. Vestibular Hyperacusis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a Top Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Vestibular Hyperacusis Are you sensitive to certain sounds? Hyperacusis ... parade to a person with hyperacusis. Cochlear vs. vestibular hyperacusis With cochlear hyperacusis, subjects feel ear pain, ...

  19. Information transfer with rate-modulated Poisson processes: a simple model for nonstationary stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, I

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic resonance in a simple model of information transfer is studied for sensory neurons and ensembles of ion channels. An exact expression for the information gain is obtained for the Poisson process with the signal-modulated spiking rate. This result allows one to generalize the conventional stochastic resonance (SR) problem (with periodic input signal) to the arbitrary signals of finite duration (nonstationary SR). Moreover, in the case of a periodic signal, the rate of information gain is compared with the conventional signal-to-noise ratio. The paper establishes the general nonequivalence between both measures notwithstanding their apparent similarity in the limit of weak signals.

  20. Information transfer with rate-modulated Poisson processes: A simple model for nonstationary stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic resonance in a simple model of information transfer is studied for sensory neurons and ensembles of ion channels. An exact expression for the information gain is obtained for the Poisson process with the signal-modulated spiking rate. This result allows one to generalize the conventional stochastic resonance (SR) problem (with periodic input signal) to the arbitrary signals of finite duration (nonstationary SR). Moreover, in the case of a periodic signal, the rate of information gain is compared with the conventional signal-to-noise ratio. The paper establishes the general nonequivalence between both measures notwithstanding their apparent similarity in the limit of weak signals.

  1. Collective behavior of globally coupled Langevin equations with colored noise in the presence of stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Mao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    The long-time collective behavior of globally coupled Langevin equations in a dichotomous fluctuating potential driven by a periodic source is investigated. By describing the collective behavior using the moments of the mean field and single-particle displacements, we study stochastic resonance and synchronization using the exact steady-state solutions and related stability criteria. Based on the simulation results and the criterion of the stationary regime, the notable differences between the stationary and nonstationary regimes are demonstrated. For the stationary regime, stochastic resonance with synchronization is discussed, and for the nonstationary regime, the volatility clustering phenomenon is observed.

  2. Stochastic resonance is a method to improve the biosynthetic response of chondrocytes to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D

    2016-02-01

    Cellular mechanosensitivity is an important factor during the mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage. While the application of mechanical stimuli improves tissue growth and properties, chondrocytes also rapidly desensitize under prolonged loading thereby limiting its effectiveness. One potential method to mitigate load-induced desensitization is by superimposing noise on the loading waveforms ("stochastic resonance"). Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stochastic resonance on chondrocyte matrix metabolism. Chondrocyte-seeded agarose gels were subjected to dynamic compressive loading, with or without, superimposed vibrations of different amplitudes and frequency bandwidths. Changes in matrix biosynthesis were determined by radioisotope incorporation and subsequent effects on intracellular calcium signaling were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Although dependent on the duration of loading, superimposed vibrations improved cellular sensitivity to mechanical loading by further increasing matrix synthesis between 20-60%. Stochastic resonance also appeared to limit load-induced desensitization by maintaining sensitivity under desensitized loading conditions. While superimposed vibrations had little effect on the magnitude of intracellular calcium signaling, recovery of mechanosensitivity after stimulation was achieved at a faster rate suggesting that less time may be required between successive loading applications. Thus, stochastic resonance appears to be a valuable tool during the mechanical stimulation of cartilage constructs, even when suboptimal stimulation conditions are used.

  3. Investigations of stochastic resonance in two-terminal device with vanadium dioxide film

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, V. Sh. Bortnikov, S. G.; Badmaeva, I. A.

    2014-05-28

    The results of stochastic resonance investigation in a nonlinear system, consisting of a microstructure with a polycrystalline vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) film grown on sapphire and resistor in series are reported. Nonlinearity of the system was provided due to insulator-metal phase transition in VO{sub 2}. In the stochastic resonance regime at 100 Hz signal frequency, the transition coefficient of signal-to-noise ratio reached 87 in contrast to 250 for microstructures with VO{sub 2} films grown on silica in our previous investigations. The measured characteristics of microstructures with VO{sub 2} films grown on silica and sapphire substrates were found to be qualitatively similar. For both substrates, a stochastic resonance was observed at threshold switching voltage from insulating to metallic state of VO{sub 2}. For sapphire substrate the output signal-to-noise ratio rose at higher signal frequencies. The stochastic resonance phenomenon in VO{sub 2} films is explained in terms of the monostable damped oscillator model.

  4. Synchronization and stochastic resonance of the small-world neural network based on the CPG.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Tian, Juan

    2014-06-01

    According to biological knowledge, the central nervous system controls the central pattern generator (CPG) to drive the locomotion. The brain is a complex system consisting of different functions and different interconnections. The topological properties of the brain display features of small-world network. The synchronization and stochastic resonance have important roles in neural information transmission and processing. In order to study the synchronization and stochastic resonance of the brain based on the CPG, we establish the model which shows the relationship between the small-world neural network (SWNN) and the CPG. We analyze the synchronization of the SWNN when the amplitude and frequency of the CPG are changed and the effects on the CPG when the SWNN's parameters are changed. And we also study the stochastic resonance on the SWNN. The main findings include: (1) When the CPG is added into the SWNN, there exists parameters space of the CPG and the SWNN, which can make the synchronization of the SWNN optimum. (2) There exists an optimal noise level at which the resonance factor Q gets its peak value. And the correlation between the pacemaker frequency and the dynamical response of the network is resonantly dependent on the noise intensity. The results could have important implications for biological processes which are about interaction between the neural network and the CPG.

  5. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  6. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  7. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  8. Two-level noise and stochastic resonance in individual permalloy nanoscale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Bern Willem

    We present the results of a study on stochastic resonance in individual magnetic random telegraph oscillators. We have fabricated sub-micron magnetic samples, which have multiple stable magnetic states. We are able to observe random telegraph switching between magnetic states and tune the energetics by varying the temperature and applied external field. If a small AC field is applied to the system, it will modulate the energy well depth for the two states and the system shows stochastic resonance near the matching condition 2fA = oD, where o D is the drive frequency and fA is the characteristic frequency of magnetic transitions. We fit our measured data for the resonance amplitude and phase of the particle as a function of temperature to a linear-response model and obtain good agreement. At low temperatures we observe a peak in the phase lag of the returned signal, which is consistent with linear-response theories. At higher temperatures, our fitted model parameters suggest that the particle has an energy surface that is not sinusoidal. This contradicts our initial approximation for the energy surface, but it is consistent with a model for magnetic energy that takes into account the magnetization dynamics near the conditions for random telegraph switching. Our work is the first clear observation of stochastic resonance in a single superparamagnetic particle where the energetics are modulated by an applied field. In addition, our work is the first physical system where stochastic resonance has been characterized with sufficient detail to allow for comparison to linear-response models.

  9. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    von Brevern, M; Lempert, T

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades a new vestibular syndrome has emerged that is now termed vestibular migraine (VM). The main body of evidence for VM is provided by epidemiologic data demonstrating a strong association between migraine and vestibular symptoms. Today, VM is recognized as one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. The clinical presentation of VM is heterogeneous in terms of vestibular symptoms, duration of episodes, and association with migrainous accompaniments. Similar to migraine, there is no clinical or laboratory confirmation for VM and the diagnosis relies on the history and the exclusion of other disorders. Recently, diagnostic criteria for VM have been elaborated jointly by the International Headache Society and the Bárány Society. Clinical examination of patients with acute VM has clarified that the vast majority of patients with VM suffer from central vestibular dysfunction. Findings in the interval may yield mild signs of damage to both the central vestibular and ocular motor system and to the inner ear. These interictal clinical signs are not specific to VM but can be also observed in migraineurs without a history of vestibular symptoms. How migraine affects the vestibular system is still a matter of speculation. In the absence of high-quality therapeutic trials, treatment is targeted at the underlying migraine. PMID:27638080

  10. Role of spin-transfer torques on synchronization and resonance phenomena in stochastic magnetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Artur; Locatelli, Nicolas; Mizrahi, Alice; Querlioz, Damien; Pereira, Luis G.; Grollier, Julie; Kim, Joo-Von

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical study on how synchronization and resonance-like phenomena in superparamagnetic tunnel junctions can be driven by spin-transfer torques is presented. We examine the magnetization of a superparamagnetic free layer that reverses randomly between two well-defined orientations due to thermal fluctuations, acting as a stochastic oscillator. When subject to an external ac forcing, this system can present stochastic resonance and noise-enhanced synchronization. We focus on the roles of the mutually perpendicular damping-like and field-like torques, showing that the response of the system is very different at low and high frequencies. We also demonstrate that the field-like torque can increase the efficiency of the current-driven forcing, especially at sub-threshold electric currents. These results can be useful for possible low-power, more energy efficient applications.

  11. Numerical analysis of pulse signal restoration by stochastic resonance in a buckled microcavity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heng; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Han, Jing

    2016-04-20

    A novel scheme is proposed to restore weak pulse signals immersed in noise by stochastic resonance based on photothermal-effect-induced optical bistability in a buckled dome microcavity. The bistable properties of the dome microcavity are analyzed with different initial detuning wavelengths and effective cavity lengths, and bistable transmission can be obtained for input powers in submilliwatt range. A theoretical model is derived to interpret the nonlinear process of pulse signal recovery through double-well potential theory. The cross-correlation coefficient between output signals and pure input pulses is calculated to quantitatively analyze the influence of noise intensity on stochastic resonance. A cross-correlation gain of 7 is obtained, and the noise-hidden signal can be recovered effectively though the buckled dome microcavity with negligible distortion. The simulation results show the potential of using this structure to restore low-level or noise-hidden pulse signals in all-optical integrated systems. PMID:27140110

  12. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N(2)) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm. PMID:25725879

  13. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  14. Optimizing the Adaptive Stochastic Resonance and Its Application in Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaole; Yang, Jianhua; Liu, Houguang; Cheng, Gang; Chen, Xihui; Xu, Dan

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive stochastic resonance method based on the improved artificial fish swarm algorithm. By this method, we can enhance the weak characteristic signal which is submerged in a heavy noise. We can also adaptively lead the stochastic resonance to be optimized to the greatest extent. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by both numerical simulation and lab experimental vibration signals including normal, a chipped tooth and a missing tooth of planetary gearboxes under the loaded condition. Both theoretical and experimental results show that this method can effectively extract weak characteristics in a heavy noise. In the experiment, each weak fault feature is extracted successfully from the fault planetary gear. When compared with the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) method, the method proposed in this paper has been found to give remarkable performance.

  15. Broadband vibration energy harvesting by application of stochastic resonance from rotational environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zheng, R.; Kaizuka, T.; Su, D.; Nakano, K.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    A model for energy harvesting from a rotating automotive tyre is suggested in which the principle of stochastic resonance is advantageously exploited. A bistable response characteristic is obtained by recourse a small harvester comprising a magnetically repellant configuration in which an instrumented cantilever beam can flip between two physical response states when suitably excited by the rotation of a car wheel into which it is fitted. The rotation of the wheel creates a periodic modulation which enables stochastic resonance to take place and as a consequence of this for energy to be harvested from road noise transmitted through the tyre. An optimised mathematical model of the system is presented based on a series of experimental tests and it is shown that a ten-fold increase in harvested energy over a comparable monostable case is feasible. The suggested application for this harvester is to provide electrical power for a tyre pressure monitoring system.

  16. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N(2)) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  17. Internal additive noise effects in stochastic resonance using organic field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Matsubara, Kiyohiko; Asakawa, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Stochastic resonance phenomenon was observed in organic field effect transistor using poly(3-hexylthiophene), which enhances performance of signal transmission with application of noise. The enhancement of correlation coefficient between the input and output signals was low, and the variation of correlation coefficient was not remarkable with respect to the intensity of external noise, which was due to the existence of internal additive noise following the nonlinear threshold response. In other words, internal additive noise plays a positive role on the capability of approximately constant signal transmission regardless of noise intensity, which can be said "homeostatic" behavior or "noise robustness" against external noise. Furthermore, internal additive noise causes emergence of the stochastic resonance effect even on the threshold unit without internal additive noise on which the correlation coefficient usually decreases monotonically.

  18. Functional Stochastic Resonance in the Human Brain: Noise Induced Sensitization of Baroreflex System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that noise can enhance the homeostatic function in the human blood pressure regulatory system. The results show that the compensatory heart rate response to the weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor is optimized by adding noise to the arterial blood pressure receptor. We conclude that this functional stochastic resonance most likely results from the interaction of noise with signal in the brain stem, where the neuronal inputs from these two different receptors first join together.

  19. Noise-Induced Entrainment and Stochastic Resonance in Human Brain Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Toshio; Kai, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    We present the first observation of stochastic resonance (SR) in the human brain's visual processing area. The novel experimental protocol is to stimulate the right eye with a subthreshold periodic optical signal and the left eye with a noisy one. The stimuli bypass sensory organs and are mixed in the visual cortex. With many noise sources present in the brain, higher brain functions, e.g., perception and cognition, may exploit SR.

  20. Friction-induced Resonance of a Stochastic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Laas, K.; Mankin, R.

    2009-10-29

    The influence of the friction coefficient on the long-time behavior of the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force and an additive thermal noise is considered. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a three-level Markovian telegraph noise. The main purpose of this work is to demonstrate, based on exact expressions, that the resonance is manifested in the dependence of the response function and the complex susceptibility of the oscillator upon the friction coefficient. The advantage of the latter effect is that the control parameter is the damping coefficient, which can easily be varied in possible experiments as well as potential technological applications.

  1. Using Resonant Bars and Interferometers to Search for Stochastic Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, John T.

    2002-10-01

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGW) may result from gravitational waves emitted in the early universe (e.g., during inflation) or from a superposition of many unresolved astrophysical sources. Pairs of resonant bar detectors, as well as pairs of prototype interferometers, have been used to set limits on SBGW strength by looking for correlations between the random signals in the two detectors, and data from the two LIGO interferometers are being analyzed right now for this purpose. I will describe a parallel analysis being carried out to look for SBGW-induced correlations between the LIGO detector in Livingston, LA and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA.

  2. Stochastic resonance in the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative noise and periodically modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Mao-Kang

    2013-10-01

    First we study the time and frequency characteristics of fractional calculus, which reflect the memory and gain properties of fractional-order systems. Then, the fractional Langevin equation driven by multiplicative colored noise and periodically modulated noise is investigated in the over-damped case. Using the moment equation method, the exact analytical expression of the output amplitude is derived. Numerical results indicate that the output amplitude presents stochastic resonance driven by periodically modulated noise. For low frequency signal, the higher the system order is, the bigger the resonance intensity will be; while the result of high frequency signal is quite the contrary. This is consistent with the frequency characteristics of fractional calculus.

  3. Far from Equilibrium Percolation, Stochastic and Shape Resonances in the Physics of Life

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, Nicola; Ansuini, Alessio; Bianconi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Key physical concepts, relevant for the cross-fertilization between condensed matter physics and the physics of life seen as a collective phenomenon in a system out-of-equilibrium, are discussed. The onset of life can be driven by: (a) the critical fluctuations at the protonic percolation threshold in membrane transport; (b) the stochastic resonance in biological systems, a mechanism that can exploit external and self-generated noise in order to gain efficiency in signal processing; and (c) the shape resonance (or Fano resonance or Feshbach resonance) in the association and dissociation processes of bio-molecules (a quantum mechanism that could play a key role to establish a macroscopic quantum coherence in the cell). PMID:22072921

  4. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  5. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  6. Stochastic resonance and noise delayed extinction in a model of two competing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study the role of the noise in the dynamics of two competing species. We consider generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of a multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. The interaction parameter between the species is a random process which obeys a stochastic differential equation with a generalized bistable potential in the presence of a periodic driving term, which accounts for the environment temperature variation. We find noise-induced periodic oscillations of the species concentrations and stochastic resonance phenomenon. We find also a nonmonotonic behavior of the mean extinction time of one of the two competing species as a function of the additive noise intensity.

  7. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  8. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  9. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, B.deB. |

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  10. Stochastic resonance and stability for a stochastic metapopulation system subjected to non-Gaussian noise and multiplicative periodic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang-Kang, Wang; Xian-Bin, Liu; Yu, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the stability and stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by the multiplicative periodic signal for a metapopulation system driven by the additive Gaussian noise, multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and noise correlation time is investigated. By using the fast descent method, unified colored noise approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld’s SR theory, the analytical expressions of the stationary probability distribution function and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are derived in the adiabatic limit. Via numerical calculations, each effect of the addictive noise intensity, the multiplicative noise intensity and the correlation time upon the steady state probability distribution function and the SNR is discussed, respectively. It is shown that multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter from the Gaussian noise can all destroy the stability of the population system. However, the noise correlation time can consolidate the stability of the system. On the other hand, the correlation time always plays an important role in motivating the SR and enhancing the SNR. Under different parameter conditions of the system, the multiplicative, additive noises and the departure parameter can not only excite SR phenomenon, but also restrain the SR phenomenon, which demonstrates the complexity of different noises upon the nonlinear system.

  11. Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator subject to random mass and signal-modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Cheng-Yin; Cheng, Xiao-Feng; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator with random mass and signal-modulated noise is investigated. Applying linear system theory and the characteristics of the noises, the analysis expression of the mean output-amplitude-gain (OAG) is obtained. It is shown that the OAG varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensity of the multiplicative dichotomous noise, with the increase of the frequency of the driving force, as well as with the increase of the system frequency. In addition, the OAG is a non-monotonic function of the system friction coefficient, as a function of the viscous damping coefficient, as a function of the fractional exponent.

  12. Entropic stochastic resonance of a flexible polymer chain in a confined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hanshuang; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2012-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a flexible polymer chain in constrained dumb-bell-shape geometry subject to a periodic force and external noise along the longitudinal direction. It is found that the system exhibits a feature of entropic stochastic resonance (ESR), i.e., the temporal coherence of the polymer motion can reach a maximum level for an optimal noise intensity. We demonstrate that the occurrence of ESR is robust to the change of chain length, while the bottleneck width should be properly chosen. A gravity force in the vertical direction is not necessary for the ESR here, however, the elastic coupling between polymer beads is crucial.

  13. Conductance with stochastic resonance in Mn{sub 12} redox network without tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Yoshiaki; Segawa, Yuji; Kawai, Tomoji; Kuroda-Sowa, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2014-06-09

    Artificial neuron-based information processing is one of the attractive approaches of molecular-scale electronics, which can exploit the ability of molecular system for self-assembling or self-organization. The self-organized Mn{sub 12}/DNA redox network shows nonlinear current-voltage characteristics that can be described by the Coulomb blockade network model. As a demonstration of the nonlinear network system, we have observed stochastic resonance without tuning for weak periodic input signals and thermal noise, which suggests a route to neural network composed of molecular materials.

  14. Note: On-line weak signal detection via adaptive stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-06-01

    We design an instrument with a novel embedded adaptive stochastic resonance (SR) algorithm that consists of a SR module and a digital zero crossing detection module for on-line weak signal detection in digital signal processing applications. The two modules are responsible for noise filtering and adaptive parameter configuration, respectively. The on-line weak signal detection can be stably achieved in seconds. The prototype instrument exhibits an advance of 20 dB averaged signal-to-noise ratio and 5 times averaged adjust R-square as compared to the input noisy signal, in considering different driving frequencies and noise levels.

  15. A method based on stochastic resonance for the detection of weak analytical signal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojing; Guo, Weiming; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang; Pan, Zhongxiao

    2003-12-23

    An effective method for detection of weak analytical signals with strong noise background is proposed based on the theory of stochastic resonance (SR). Compared with the conventional SR-based algorithms, the proposed algorithm is simplified by changing only one parameter to realize the weak signal detection. Simulation studies revealed that the method performs well in detection of analytical signals in very high level of noise background and is suitable for detecting signals with the different noise level by changing the parameter. Applications of the method to experimental weak signals of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum are also investigated. It is found that reliable results can be obtained.

  16. Fisher-information condition for enhanced signal detection via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2011-11-01

    Various situations where a signal is enhanced by noise through stochastic resonance are now known. This paper contributes to determining general conditions under which improvement by noise can be a priori decided as feasible or not. We focus on the detection of a known signal in additive white noise. Under the assumptions of a weak signal and a sufficiently large sample size, it is proved, with an inequality based on the Fisher information, that improvement by adding noise is never possible, generically, in these conditions. However, under less restrictive conditions, an example of signal detection is shown with favorable action of adding noise.

  17. Entropic stochastic resonance of a flexible polymer chain in a confined system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hanshuang; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2012-07-28

    We have studied the dynamics of a flexible polymer chain in constrained dumb-bell-shape geometry subject to a periodic force and external noise along the longitudinal direction. It is found that the system exhibits a feature of entropic stochastic resonance (ESR), i.e., the temporal coherence of the polymer motion can reach a maximum level for an optimal noise intensity. We demonstrate that the occurrence of ESR is robust to the change of chain length, while the bottleneck width should be properly chosen. A gravity force in the vertical direction is not necessary for the ESR here, however, the elastic coupling between polymer beads is crucial.

  18. Note: On-line weak signal detection via adaptive stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-06-01

    We design an instrument with a novel embedded adaptive stochastic resonance (SR) algorithm that consists of a SR module and a digital zero crossing detection module for on-line weak signal detection in digital signal processing applications. The two modules are responsible for noise filtering and adaptive parameter configuration, respectively. The on-line weak signal detection can be stably achieved in seconds. The prototype instrument exhibits an advance of 20 dB averaged signal-to-noise ratio and 5 times averaged adjust R-square as compared to the input noisy signal, in considering different driving frequencies and noise levels. PMID:24985875

  19. Non-linear resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves using stochastic earthquake source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear resonant coupling of edge waves can occur with tsunamis generated by large-magnitude subduction zone earthquakes. Earthquake rupture zones that straddle beneath the coastline of continental margins are particularly efficient at generating tsunami edge waves. Using a stochastic model for earthquake slip, it is shown that a wide range of edge-wave modes and wavenumbers can be excited, depending on the variability of slip. If two modes are present that satisfy resonance conditions, then a third mode can gradually increase in amplitude over time, even if the earthquake did not originally excite that edge-wave mode. These three edge waves form a resonant triad that can cause unexpected variations in tsunami amplitude long after the first arrival. An M ∼ 9, 1100 km-long continental subduction zone earthquake is considered as a test case. For the least-variable slip examined involving a Gaussian random variable, the dominant resonant triad includes a high-amplitude fundamental mode wave with wavenumber associated with the along-strike dimension of rupture. The two other waves that make up this triad include subharmonic waves, one of fundamental mode and the other of mode 2 or 3. For the most variable slip examined involving a Cauchy-distributed random variable, the dominant triads involve higher wavenumbers and modes because subevents, rather than the overall rupture dimension, control the excitation of edge waves. Calculation of the resonant period for energy transfer determines which cases resonant coupling may be instrumentally observed. For low-mode triads, the maximum transfer of energy occurs approximately 20–30 wave periods after the first arrival and thus may be observed prior to the tsunami coda being completely attenuated. Therefore, under certain circumstances the necessary ingredients for resonant coupling of tsunami edge waves exist, indicating that resonant triads may be observable and implicated in late, large-amplitude tsunami arrivals.

  20. Stochastic resonance in an ensemble of bistable systems under stable distribution noises and nonhomogeneous coupling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yang; Zou, Wei; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, stochastic resonance of an ensemble of coupled bistable systems driven by noise having an α-stable distribution and nonhomogeneous coupling is investigated. The α-stable distribution considered here is characterized by four intrinsic parameters: α∈(0,2] is called the stability parameter for describing the asymptotic behavior of stable densities; β∈[-1,1] is a skewness parameter for measuring asymmetry; γ∈(0,∞) is a scale parameter for measuring the width of the distribution; and δ∈(-∞,∞) is a location parameter for representing the mean value. It is demonstrated that the resonant behavior is optimized by an intermediate value of the diversity in coupling strengths. We show that the stability parameter α and the scale parameter γ can be well selected to generate resonant effects in response to external signals. In addition, the interplay between the skewness parameter β and the location parameter δ on the resonance effects is also studied. We further show that the asymmetry of a Lévy α-stable distribution resulting from the skewness parameter β and the location parameter δ can enhance the resonance effects. Both theoretical analysis and simulation are presented to verify the results of this paper. PMID:22680556

  1. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  2. The resonance overlap criterion and the onset of stochastic behavior in the restricted three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, J.

    1980-01-01

    The resonance overlap criterion for the onset of stochastic behavior is applied to the planar circular-restricted three-body problem with small mass ratio (mu). Its predictions for mu = 0.001, 0.0001, and 0.00001 are compared to the transitions observed in the numerically determined Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and found to be in remarkably good agreement. In addition, an approximate scaling law for the onset of stochastic behavior is derived.

  3. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  4. A novel diversiform stochastic resonance of a domain wall and its performance at different states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Ouyang, Kesai; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The response of an underdamped stochastic resonance (SR) with a new pining potential model of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips driven by additive Gaussian white noise to an additive weak harmonic forcing is investigated. We address that the new nonlinear system can be converted between bi-stable and mono-stable freely by tuning the system parameters. Analytical expressions of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the bi-stable stage is obtained based on the linear response theory. In addition, another type of SR, which occurs when the system is mono-stable, is also reported with the intrinsic frequency derived analytically. The SR in mono-stable stage confirms to the typical physical resonance better with frequency-selection characteristic. Numerical simulation of both stages is carried out with outputs conforming to the theoretical derivation. Owing to the diversity of potential model, the new system possesses considerable merits for engineering applications.

  5. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: stochastic Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Earle, K A; Mielczarek, A; Kubica, A; Milewska, A; Moscicki, J

    2011-12-14

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000)] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed. PMID:22168707

  6. A framework to analyze the stochastic harmonics and resonance of wind energy grid interconnection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Youngho; Lee, Choongman; Hur, Kyeon; Kang, Yong Cheol; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Sang -Ho; Choy, Young -Do; Yoon, Gi -Gab

    2016-08-31

    This study addresses a modeling and analysis methodology for investigating the stochastic harmonics and resonance concerns of wind power plants (WPPs). Wideband harmonics from modern wind turbines are observed to be stochastic, associated with real power production, and they may adversely interact with the grid impedance and cause unexpected harmonic resonance if not comprehensively addressed in the planning and commissioning of the WPPs. These issues should become more critical as wind penetration levels increase. We thus propose a planning study framework comprising the following functional steps: First, the best-fitted probability density functions (PDFs) of the harmonic components of interest inmore » the frequency domain are determined. In operations planning, maximum likelihood estimations followed by a chi-square test are used once field measurements or manufacturers' data are available. Second, harmonic currents from the WPP are represented by randomly-generating harmonic components based on their PDFs (frequency spectrum) and then synthesized for time-domain simulations via inverse Fourier transform. Finally, we conduct a comprehensive assessment by including the impacts of feeder configurations, harmonic filters, and the variability of parameters. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed study approach for a 100-MW offshore WPP consisting of 20 units of 5-MW full-converter turbines, a realistic benchmark system adapted from a WPP under development in Korea, and discuss lessons learned through this research.« less

  7. Postural Stability in Parkinson's Disease Patients Is Improved after Stochastic Resonance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaut, Oliver; Brenig, Daniel; Marek, Milena; Allert, Niels; Wüllner, Ullrich

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) increases the risk of falls and is not improved by pharmacological therapy. Objective. We performed a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled study to test the effects of stochastic resonance (whole body vibration) therapy on postural stability in PD. Methods. Fifty-six PD participants were allocated to either experimental or sham groups. The experimental group received four series of vibration over eight days, with each series consisting of six stimulus trains of 60-second duration using a randomized whole body vibration. Participants allocated to the control group received a sham treatment. Results. Within-group analysis revealed that postural stability in the experimental group improved by 17.5% (p = 0.005) comparing experimental and sham groups. The between-group analysis of change after treatment comparing both groups also showed a significant improvement of postural stability (p = 0.03). Only in the within-group analysis several items were improved after Bonferroni correction, too, rigor 41.6% (p = 0.001), bradykinesia 23.7% (p = 0.001), tremor 30.8% (p = 0.006), and UPDRSIII sum score 23.9% (p = 0.000), but did not reach the level of significance in the between-group analysis. Conclusions. Stochastic resonance therapy significantly enhanced postural stability even in individuals with increased risk of falling. Thus it offers a potential supplementation to canonical treatments of PD.

  8. Correlated noise-based switches and stochastic resonance in a bistable genetic regulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can-Jun; Yang, Ke-Li

    2016-07-01

    The correlated noise-based switches and stochastic resonance are investigated in a bistable single gene switching system driven by an additive noise (environmental fluctuations), a multiplicative noise (fluctuations of the degradation rate). The correlation between the two noise sources originates from on the lysis-lysogeny pathway system of the λ phage. The steady state probability distribution is obtained by solving the time-independent Fokker-Planck equation, and the effects of noises are analyzed. The effects of noises on the switching time between the two stable states (mean first passage time) is investigated by the numerical simulation. The stochastic resonance phenomenon is analyzed by the power amplification factor. The results show that the multiplicative noise can induce the switching from "on" → "off" of the protein production, while the additive noise and the correlation between the noise sources can induce the inverse switching "off" → "on". A nonmonotonic behaviour of the average switching time versus the multiplicative noise intensity, for different cross-correlation and additive noise intensities, is observed in the genetic system. There exist optimal values of the additive noise, multiplicative noise and cross-correlation intensities for which the weak signal can be optimal amplified.

  9. The stochastic dynamics of a nanobeam near an optomechanical resonator in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, S.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    We quantify the Brownian driven, stochastic dynamics of an elastic nanobeam immersed in a viscous fluid that is partially wrapped around a microdisk optical resonator. This configuration has been proposed as an optomechanical and nanoscale analog of the atomic force microscope [Srinivasan et al., Nano Lett. 11, 791 (2011)]. A small gap between the nanobeam and microdisk is necessary for the optomechanical transduction of the mechanical motion of the nanobeam. We compute the stochastic dynamics of the nanobeam in fluid for the precise conditions of the laboratory using deterministic finite element simulations and the fluctuation dissipation theorem. We investigate the dynamics of a nanobeam in water and in air and quantify the significance of the fluid-solid interaction between the nanobeam and the optical resonator. Our results in air show that, despite the complex geometry of the nanobeam, it can still be represented approximately as a damped simple harmonic oscillator. On the other hand, when the nanobeam is immersed in water there are significant deviations from the dynamics of a simple harmonic oscillator. The small gap between the nanobeam and the microdisk is found to be a significant source of additional dissipation. In air, the quality factor of the mechanical oscillation of the nanobeam is reduced by an order of magnitude due to the presence of the microdisk, however, the dynamics remain underdamped even in the presence of the microdisk. On the other hand, when placed in water, the dynamics without the microdisk is underdamped and with the microdisk the dynamics become strongly over damped.

  10. M-ary suprathreshold stochastic resonance: Generalization and scaling beyond binary threshold nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Gao, Xiao

    2014-12-01

    Suprathreshold stochastic resonance is a form of noise-enhanced processing that is observed only when more than one noisy nonlinear signal processing element is combined in a parallel array, such as in biological and engineered sensory transduction. The case of binary threshold nonlinearities combined into arrays of independently noisy components has previously been studied extensively, and quantified in terms of how information transmission through the array varies with the input noise level, and the number of elements, N. Here we generalise this setup to arrays of N identical M-ary threshold nonlinearities. We show that enhanced suprathreshold stochastic resonance occurs for M≥ 1 and N > 1, implying that M identical quantizing sensors can be combined to provide higher resolution than a single sensor, provided they are independently noisy. We also study the system's scaling with M and N and conclude that although binary quantizing nonlinearities are superior to M-ary nonlinearities in the presence of large noise, the opposite holds in the presence of small noise. This suggests that multiple identical but coarse-resolution sensors can be useful for acquiring low SNR signals while few high-resolution identical sensors are superior for high SNR signals.

  11. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work.

  12. Stochastic resonance is applied to quantitative analysis for weak chromatographic signal of roxithromycin in beagle dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Bingren; Wu, Yanwei; Shang, Erxin

    2006-02-01

    Based on the theory of stochastic resonance, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of HPLC/UV chromatographic signal of roxithromycin is enhanced by cooperation of signal, noise and nonlinear system. A simple new method for the determination of low concentration of roxithromycin in beagle dog plasma is presented. Using signal enhancement by stochastic resonance, this method extends the limit of quantitation from the reported 0.5 to 0.1 microg/ml. During validation of the new method, HPLC/MS was used as a comparison technique. The results indicate that the recovery and low concentrations of roxithromycin in beagle dog plasma were equivalent between the two methods (P>0.05). Stochastic resonance may be a promising tool for improving detection limits in trace analysis.

  13. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  14. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  15. Efficiency of the unstable resonator of a high-power laser with stochastic phase inhomogeneities in the active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2006-02-28

    The specific features of operation of the unstable optical resonator of a large gas laser with an active medium containing stochastic phase inhomogeneities are considered. The output power of the laser, the Strehl number, the angular divergence and average far-field radiation intensity are studied as functions of the spatial scale and structure of random inhomogeneities of the refractive index of the active medium. Physical effects related to the deformation of the radiation pattern caused by a change in the spatial frequency of stochastic perturbations are analysed. (resonators, modes, beams)

  16. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R2 = 0 .99396. PMID:25920547

  17. Resonant excitation of the magnetosphere by stochastic and unsteady hydromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A.

    2011-05-15

    The effect of the magnetospheric MHD cavity on the excitation of the magnetosphere by stochastic and unsteady hydromagnetic waves incident from the solar wind is investigated theoretically by using a one-dimensional nonuniform model of the medium. It is shown that most of the energy of stochastic waves is reflected from the magnetopause and that the only waves that penetrate into the magnetosphere are those with frequencies in narrow spectral ranges near the eigenfrequencies of the cavity. These waves lead to steadystate excitation of the eigenmodes of the cavity, the energy of which is determined by the spectral density of the energy flux of the incident waves at the corresponding eigenfrequencies. The energy of the eigenmodes penetrates through the opacity barrier in the vicinity of the Alfven resonance points (each corresponding to a particular mode), where the perturbation amplitude is sharply amplified, so the total energy localized close to the Alfven resonance point is much higher than the total energy of the corresponding eigenmode. In the vicinities, the perturbation energy is dissipated by the finite conductivity of the ionosphere, the dissipation power being equal to the energy flux of the incident waves that penetrates into the magnetosphere. The case of unsteady waves is analyzed by considering a wave pulse as an example. It is shown that most of the energy of the wave pulse is reflected from the magnetopause. The portion of the incident perturbation that penetrates into the magnetosphere leads to unsteady excitation of the eigenmodes of the magnetospheric cavity, which are then slowly damped because part of the energy of the cavity is emitted through the magnetopause back to the solar wind while the other part penetrates into the vicinities of the Alfven resonance points. In the vicinities, the perturbation is an Alfven wave standing between magnetically conjugate ionospheres and its energy is dissipated by the finite conductivity of the ionosphere at

  18. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help indicate whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance ...

  19. Detecting and quantifying temporal correlations in stochastic resonance via information theory measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, O. A.; Masoller, C.

    2009-05-01

    We show that Information Theory quantifiers are suitable tools for detecting and for quantifying noise-induced temporal correlations in stochastic resonance phenomena. We use the Bandt & Pompe (BP) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 174102 (2002)] to define a probability distribution, P, that fully characterizes temporal correlations. The BP method is based on a comparison of neighboring values, and here is applied to the temporal sequence of residence-time intervals generated by the paradigmatic model of a Brownian particle in a sinusoidally modulated bistable potential. The probability distribution P generated via the BP method has associated a normalized Shannon entropy, H[P], and a statistical complexity measure, C[P], which is defined as proposed by Rosso et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 154102 (2007)]. The statistical complexity quantifies not only randomness but also the presence of correlational structures, the two extreme circumstances of maximum knowledge (“perfect order") and maximum ignorance (“complete randomness") being regarded an “trivial", and in consequence, having complexity C = 0. We show that both, H and C, display resonant features as a function of the noise intensity, i.e., for an optimal level of noise the entropy displays a minimum and the complexity, a maximum. This resonant behavior indicates noise-enhanced temporal correlations in the sequence of residence-time intervals. The methodology proposed here has great potential for the precise detection of subtle signatures of noise-induced temporal correlations in real-world complex signals.

  20. Stochastic bifurcations and coherencelike resonance in a self-sustained bistable noisy oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, A; Vadivasova, T; Anishchenko, V; Koseska, A; Kurths, J

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the influence of additive Gaussian white noise on two different bistable self-sustained oscillators: Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator with hard excitation and a model of a synthetic genetic oscillator. In the deterministic case, both oscillators are characterized with a coexistence of a stable limit cycle and a stable equilibrium state. We find that under the influence of noise, their dynamics can be well characterized through the concept of stochastic bifurcation, consisting in a qualitative change of the stationary amplitude distribution. For the Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator analytical results, obtained for a quasiharmonic approach, are compared with the result of direct computer simulations. In particular, we show that the dynamics is different for isochronous and anisochronous systems. Moreover, we find that the increase of noise intensity in the isochronous regime leads to a narrowing of the spectral line. This effect is similar to coherence resonance. However, in the case of anisochronous systems, this effect breaks down and a new phenomenon, anisochronous-based stochastic bifurcation occurs. PMID:20365322

  1. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  2. Noise-Induced Sensitization of Human Brain: Toward the Neurological Application of Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Kwak, Shin

    2003-05-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  3. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon.

  4. The mean first passage time and stochastic resonance in gene transcriptional system with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. L.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, M.; Gao, L. L.; Liu, Y. F.; Dong, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the gene transcriptional dynamics driven by correlated noises are investigated, where the time delay for the synthesis of transcriptional factor is introduced. The effects of the noise correlation strength and time delay on the stationary probability distribution (SPD), the mean first passage time and the stochastic resonance (SR) are analyzed in detail based on the delay Fokker-Planck equation. It is found that both the time delay and noise correlation strength play important roles in the bistable transcriptional system. The effect of the correlation strength reduces but the time delay enhances the mean first passage time (MFPT). Finally, the SR for this gene transcriptional system is found to be enhanced by the time delay.

  5. Simulating electron spin resonance spectra of nitroxide spin labels from molecular dynamics and stochastic trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Deniz; Freed, Jack H.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Simulating electron spin resonance spectra of nitroxide spin labels from motional models is necessary for the quantitative analysis of experimental spectra. We present a framework for modeling the spin label dynamics by using trajectories such as those from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with stochastic treatment of the global protein tumbling. This is achieved in the time domain after two efficient numerical integrators are developed: One for the quantal dynamics of the spins and the other for the classical rotational diffusion. For the quantal dynamics, we propagate the relevant part of the spin density matrix in Hilbert space. For the diffusional tumbling, we work with quaternions, which enables the treatment of anisotropic diffusion in a potential expanded as a sum of spherical harmonics. Time-averaging arguments are invoked to bridge the gap between the smaller time step of the MD trajectories and the larger time steps appropriate for the rotational diffusion and∕or quantal spin dynamics. PMID:18447510

  6. Noise-assisted information transfer in crayfish mechanoreceptors: stochastic resonance in a neuronal receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, John K.; Wilkens, Lon A.; Moss, Frank

    1993-11-01

    Adding random noise to a weak periodic signal can enhance the flow of information through certain nonlinear physical systems, via a process known as stochastic resonance (SR). We have used crayfish mechanoreceptor cells to investigate the possibility that SR can be induced in neurophysiological systems. Various signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were derived from the action potentials (spikes) of single receptor cells stimulated with weak periodic signals. Spike noise was controlled by one of two methods: (1) adding external noise to the stimulus, or (2) altering internal noise sources by changing the temperature of the cell. In external noise experiments, an optimal noise level can be identified at which the SNR is maximized. In internal noise experiments, although the SNR increases with increasing noise, no SNR maximum has been observed. These results demonstrate that SR can be induced in single neurons, and suggest that neuronal systems may also be capable of exploiting SR.

  7. Noise enhancement of information transfer in crayfish mechanoreceptors by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, John K.; Wilkens, Lon; Pantazelou, Eleni; Moss, Frank

    1993-09-01

    IN linear information theory, electrical engineering and neurobiology, random noise has traditionally been viewed as a detriment to information transmission. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a nonlinear, statistical dynamics whereby information flow in a multistate system is enhanced by the presence of optimized, random noise1 4. A major consequence of SR for signal reception is that it makes possible substantial improvements in the detection of weak periodic signals. Although SR has recently been demonstrated in several artificial physical systems5,6, it may also occur naturally, and an intriguing possibility is that biological systems have evolved the capability to exploit SR by optimizing endogenous sources of noise. Sensory systems are an obvious place to look for SR, as they excel at detecting weak signals in a noisy environment. Here we demonstrate SR using external noise applied to crayfish mechanoreceptor cells. Our results show that individual neurons can provide a physiological substrate for SR in sensory systems.

  8. A novel parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomena in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Huiqi; Lv, Wangyong; Zhong, Suchuan

    2016-08-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a novel self-adaptive dynamical system driven by linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and additive noise is considered from the view of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the dynamical system can be perfectly analyzed by equivalently transforming it into a traditional first-order linear dynamical system driven by periodic signal and additive noise in fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain with an optimal rotated angle, and the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that output SNR exhibits the SR behavior when it is plotted as a function of the system parameter. Furthermore, the optimal value of adjusted parameter is obtained, and the possible area of SNR gain is theoretically determined only by center-frequency and modulated frequency of the driving LFM signal.

  9. The recovery of weak impulsive signals based on stochastic resonance and moving least squares fitting.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuosheng; Xu, Guanghua; Liang, Lin; Tao, Tangfei; Gu, Fengshou

    2014-07-29

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test.

  10. Encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance on stimulus-specific information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) based on a local information-theoretic measure of stimulus-specific information (SSI), which is the average specific information of responses associated with a particular stimulus. The theoretical and numerical analyses of SSIs reveal that noise can improve neuronal coding efficiency for a large population of neurons, which leads to produce increased information-rich responses. The SSI measure, in contrast to the global measure of average mutual information, can characterize the noise benefits in finer detail for describing the enhancement of neuronal encoding efficiency of a particular stimulus, which may be of general utility in the design and implementation of a SSR coding scheme.

  11. Global spatiotemporal order and induced stochastic resonance due to a locally applied signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoletov, A.; Chaplain, M.; Levi, V.

    2004-04-01

    We study the phenomenon of spatiotemporal stochastic resonance (STSR) in a chain of diffusively coupled bistable oscillators. In particular, we examine the situation in which the global STSR response is controlled by a locally applied signal and reveal a wave-front propagation. In order to deepen the understanding of the system dynamics, we introduce, on the time scale of STSR, the study of the effective statistical renormalization of a generic lattice system. Using this technique we provide a criterion for STSR, and predict and observe numerically a bifurcationlike behavior that reflects the difference between the most probable value of the local quasiequilibrium density and its mean value. Our results, tested with a chain of nonlinear oscillators, appear to possess some universal qualities and may stimulate a deeper search for more generic phenomena.

  12. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon. PMID:25329563

  13. Improving Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Long Duration Space Flight by Enhancing Vestibular Information Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E; Galvan, R.; Goel, R.; Miller, C.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Jeevarajan, J.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bergquist, F.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after gravitational transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" - immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals (Vestibular Stochastic Resonance, VSR) especially when combined with balance training exercises such as sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. This countermeasure to improve detection of vestibular signals is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation). To determine efficacy of vestibular stimulation on physiological and perceptual responses during otolith-canal conflicts and dynamic perturbations we have conducted a series of studies: We have shown that imperceptible binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system across the mastoids enhances balance performance in the mediolateral (ML) plane while standing on an unstable surface. We have followed up on the previous study showing VSR stimulation improved balance

  14. Model for biological communication in a nanofabricated cell-mimic driven by stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Siuti, Piro; Dar, Roy D.; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Simpson, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Cells offer natural examples of highly efficient networks of nanomachines. Accordingly, both intracellular and intercellular communication mechanisms in nature are looked to as a source of inspiration and instruction for engineered nanocommunication. Harnessing biological functionality in this manner requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology, and nanofabrication. Recent years have seen the amassing of a tremendous wealth of data from the sequencing of new organisms and from high throughput expression experiments. At the same time, a deeper fundamental understanding of individual cell function has been developed, as exemplified by the growth of fields such as noise biology, which seeks to characterize the role of noise in gene expression. The availability of well characterized biological components coupled with a deeper understanding of cell function has led to efforts to engineer both living cells and to create bio-like functionality in non-living substrates in the field of synthetic biology. Here, we present a model system that exemplifies the synergism between these realms of research. We propose a synthetic gene network for operation in a nanofabricated cell mimic array that propagates a biomolecular signal over long distances using the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Our system consists of a bacterial quorum sensing signal molecule, a bistable genetic switch triggered by this signal, and an array of nanofabricated cell mimic wells that contain the genetic system. An optimal level of noise in the system helps to propagate a time-varying AHL signal over long distances through the array of mimics. This noise level is determined both by the system volume and by the parameters of the genetic network. Our proposed genetically driven stochastic resonance system serves as a testbed for exploring the potential harnessing of gene expression noise to aid in the transmission of a time-varying molecular signal.

  15. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  16. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  17. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  18. The vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The end organs, central nervous system connections, and static and dynamic characteristics of the vestibular system are presented. Vestibular servation in man and vestibular side effect prevention from space missions involving artificial gravity generation are also considered. Vestibular models and design criteria for rotating space vehicles are appended.

  19. Noise-induced Hypersensitivity and Stochastic Resonance: Can Living Systems Use Them at a Molecular Level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, O. V.; Ginzburg, S. L.; Pustovoit, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    Living organisms are known to receive and transduce useful signals in a very noisy environment. A natural question whether they can use this noise constructively is still lacking solid answer. Some recent works demonstrated that one of the phenomena where noise plays a constructive role, the stochastic resonance (SR), occurs in biology at system and cellular levels of organization. Its existence at molecular level, in ionic channels of cell membranes, is now a subject for intensive, though mainly theoretical, studies. In the present work we study a simple two-state model of ionic channel together with its continuous equivalent, the asymmetrical Kramers oscillator, with external periodic signal and dichotomous external noise. We found that the new kind of SR appears for adiabatically slow external noise, when its amplitude becomes equal to static bias, thus dynamically recovering the system symmetry. These findings are confirmed with analog circuit simulations. The next promising effect is the noise-induced hypersensitivity to small signals. The phenomenon arises in stochastic systems with on-off intermittency. Such a system at optimal external noise intensity and correlation time becomes sensitive to an ultrasmall signal, amplifying it by many orders of magnitude. Such a hypersensitivity is often robust to additive thermal noise. We speculate that a similar effect might occur in various sensory systems that are known to be very noisy and to display unique sensitivity to environmental signals. A simple model system of two neurons with common strong noise source is hypersensitive to small differential signal only in the ideal case of absence of internal noise.

  20. Enhancement of positron emission tomography-computed tomography image quality using the principle of stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Patel, Chetan; Sarkar, Kaushik; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Acquisition of higher counts improves visual perception of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) image. Larger radiopharmaceutical doses (implies more radiation dose) are administered to acquire this count in a short time period. However, diagnostic information does not increase after a certain threshold of counts. This study was conducted to develop a post processing method based on principle of “stochastic resonance” to improve visual perception of the PET-CT image having a required threshold counts. Materials and Methods: PET-CT images (JPEG file format) with low, medium, and high counts in the image were included in this study. The image was corrupted with the addition of Poisson noise. The amplitude of the Poisson noise was adjusted by dividing each pixel by a constant 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. The best amplitude of the noise that gave best images quality was selected based on high value of entropy of the output image, high value of structural similarity index and feature similarity index. Visual perception of the image was evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The variation in structural and feature similarity of the image was not appreciable visually, but statistically images deteriorated as the noise amplitude increases although maintaining structural (above 70%) and feature (above 80%) similarity of input images in all cases. We obtained the best image quality at noise amplitude “4” in which 88% structural and 95% feature similarity of the input images was retained. Conclusion: This method of stochastic resonance can be used to improve the visual perception of the PET-CT image. This can indirectly lead to reduction of radiation dose. PMID:25400362

  1. [Vestibular migraine].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars Juul; Kirchmann, Malene; Friis, Morten

    2015-12-14

    Dizziness caused by migraine, vestibular migraine (VM), has been highly debated over the last three decades. The co-morbidity of migraine and dizziness is higher than a random concurrence. One third of the patients with migraine and dizziness have VM. Recently, The International Headache Society approved VM as a diagnostic entity and the diagnostic criteria for VM appear in the appendix for The International Classification of Headache Disorders. VM is common but often underdiagnosed. Treatment follows migraine management guidelines although evidence is sparse.

  2. Stochastic resonance in the presence or absence of external signal in the continuous stirred tank reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhonghuai; Xin, Houwen

    1999-07-01

    A two variable model, which has been proposed to describe a first-order, exothermic, irreversible reaction A→B carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), is investigated when the control parameter is modulated by random and/or periodic forces. Within the bistable region where a limit cycle and a stable node coexist, stochastic resonance (SR) is observed when both random and periodic modulations are present. In the absence of periodic external signal noise induced coherent oscillations (NICO) appear when the control parameter is randomly modulated near the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point. In addition, the NICO-strength goes through a maximum with the increment of the noise intensity, characteristic for the occurrence of internal signal stochastic resonance (ISSR).

  3. Sucrose quantitative and qualitative analysis from tastant mixtures based on Cu foam electrode and stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hui, Guohua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Li, Jian; Zheng, Le

    2016-04-15

    Quantitative and qualitative determination of sucrose from complex tastant mixtures using Cu foam electrode was investigated in this study. Cu foam was prepared and its three-dimensional (3-D) mesh structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cu foam was utilized as working electrode in three-electrode electrochemical system. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) scanning results exhibited the oxidation procedure of sucrose on Cu foam electrode. Amperometric i-t scanning results indicated that Cu foam electrode selectively responded to sucrose from four tastant mixtures with low limit of detection (LOD) of 35.34 μM, 49.85 μM, 45.89 μM, and 26.81 μM, respectively. The existence of quinine, NaCl, citric acid (CA) and their mixtures had no effect on sucrose detection. Furthermore, mixtures containing different tastants could be discriminated by non-linear double-layered cascaded series stochastic resonance (DCSSR) output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen peak parameters of CV measurement data. The proposed method provides a promising way for sweetener analysis of commercial food.

  4. Logical stochastic resonance in bistable system under α-stable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Song, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In the presence of α-stable noise, the logical stochastic resonance (LSR) phenomenon in a class of double well nonlinear system is investigated in this paper. LSR effect is obtained under α-stable noise. The probability of getting correct logic outputs is used to evaluate LSR behavior. Four main results are presented. Firstly, in the optimal band of noise intensity, Gaussian white noise is considered a better choice than heavy tailed noise to obtain clean logic operation. But at weak noise background, the success probability of getting the right logic outputs is higher when the system is subjected to heavy tailed noise. Secondly, it is shown that over the entire range of noise variance, the asymmetric noise induced LSR performs better than that induced by the symmetric noise. Furthermore, we find which side the tail skews also affects the correct probability of LSR. At last, the fractional Fokker-Planck equation is presented to show when the characteristic exponent of α-stable noise is less than 1, LSR behavior will not be obtained irrespective of the setting for other parameters.

  5. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:24353303

  6. A new multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in wind turbine drivetrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingbing; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    It is very difficult to detect weak fault signatures due to the large amount of noise in a wind turbine system. Multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance (MSTSR) has proved to be an effective way to extract weak signals buried in strong noise. However, the MSTSR method originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance and the aliasing effects in engineering application. In this paper, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is introduced into the MSTSR method, which makes it possible to further improve the system output signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of fault diagnosis by the merits of DTCWT (nearly shift invariant and reduced aliasing effects). Moreover, this method utilizes the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of matching the single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed, which may speed up the signal processing and be employed in on-line engineering monitoring. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of bearing outer ring and shaft coupling vibration signals carrying fault information. The results confirm that the method performs better in extracting the fault features than the original DWT-based MSTSR, the wavelet transform with post spectral analysis, and EMD-based spectral analysis methods.

  7. Parameter allocation of parallel array bistable stochastic resonance and its application in communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, You-Guo; Zhai, Qi-Qing; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a parameter allocation scheme in a parallel array bistable stochastic resonance-based communication system (P-BSR-CS) to improve the performance of weak binary pulse amplitude modulated (BPAM) signal transmissions. The optimal parameter allocation policy of the P-BSR-CS is provided to minimize the bit error rate (BER) and maximize the channel capacity (CC) under the adiabatic approximation condition. On this basis, we further derive the best parameter selection theorem in realistic communication scenarios via variable transformation. Specifically, the P-BSR structure design not only brings the robustness of parameter selection optimization, where the optimal parameter pair is not fixed but variable in quite a wide range, but also produces outstanding system performance. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that in the P-BSR-CS the proposed parameter allocation scheme yields considerable performance improvement, particularly in very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61179027), the Qinglan Project of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. QL06212006), and the University Postgraduate Research and Innovation Project of Jiangsu Province (Grant Nos. KYLX15_0829, KYLX15_0831).

  8. Enhanced Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearing Based on Cepstrum Editing and Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Hu, Lei; Fan, Bin; Cheng, Zhe

    2012-05-01

    By signal pre-whitening based on cepstrum editing,the envelope analysis can be done over the full bandwidth of the pre-whitened signal, and this enhances the bearing characteristic frequencies. The bearing faults detection could be enhanced without knowledge of the optimum frequency bands to demodulate, however, envelope analysis over full bandwidth brings more noise interference. Stochastic resonance (SR), which is now often used in weak signal detection, is an important nonlinear effect. By normalized scale transform, SR can be applied in weak signal detection of machinery system. In this paper, signal pre-whitening based on cepstrum editing and SR theory are combined to enhance the detection of bearing fault. The envelope spectrum kurtosis of bearing fault characteristic components is used as indicators of bearing faults. Detection results of planted bearing inner race faults on a test rig show the enhanced detecting effects of the proposed method. And the indicators of bearing inner race faults enhanced by SR are compared to the ones without enhancement to validate the proposed method.

  9. Stochastic resonance with Woods-Saxon potential for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes a weak signal detection strategy for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis by investigating a new mechanism to realize stochastic resonance (SR) based on the Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The WS potential has the distinct structure with smooth potential bottom and steep potential wall, which guarantees a stable particle motion within the potential and avoids the unexpected noises for the SR system. In the Woods-Saxon SR (WSSR) model, the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be optimized just by tuning the WS potential's parameters, which delivers the most significant merit that the limitation of small parameter requirement of the classical bistable SR can be overcome, and thus a wide range of driving frequencies can be detected via the SR model. Furthermore, the proposed WSSR model is also insensitive to the noise, and can detect the weak signals with different noise levels. Additionally, the WS potential can be designed accurately due to its parameter independence, which implies that the proposed method can be matched to different input signals adaptively. With these properties, the proposed weak signal detection strategy is indicated to be beneficial to rolling element bearing fault diagnosis. Both the simulated and the practical bearing fault signals verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed WSSR method in comparison with the traditional bistable SR method.

  10. Behavioral stochastic resonance associated with large-scale synchronization of human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajo, Keiichi; Yamanaka, Kentaro; Nozaki, Daichi; Ward, Lawrence M.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-05-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that enhanced detection of weak visual signals by addition of visual noise is accompanied by an increase in phase synchronization of EEG signals across widely-separated areas of the human brain. In our sensorimotor integration task, observers responded to a weak rectangular gray-level signal presented to their right eyes by pressing and releasing a button whenever they detected an increment followed by a decrement in brightness. Signal detection performance was optimized by presenting randomly-changing-gray-level noise separately to observers' left eyes using a mirror stereoscope. We measured brain electrical activity at the scalp by electroencephalograph (EEG), calculated the instantaneous phase for each EEG signal, and evaluated the degree of large-scale phase synchronization between pairs of EEG signals. Dynamic synchronization-desynchronization patterns were observed and we found evidence of noise-enhanced large-scale synchronization associated with detection of the brightness changes under conditions of noise-enhanced performance. Our results suggest that behavioral stochastic resonance might arise from noise-enhanced synchronization of neural activities across widespread brain regions.

  11. Theory of Stochastic Dipolar Recoupling in Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Dipolar recoupling techniques in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) consist of radio-frequency (rf) pulse sequences applied in synchrony with magic-angle spinning (MAS) that create non-zero average magnetic dipole-dipole couplings under MAS. Stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR) is a variant in which randomly chosen rf carrier frequency offsets are introduced to cause random phase modulations of individual pairwise couplings in the dipolar spin Hamiltonian. Several aspects of SDR are investigated through analytical theory and numerical simulations: (1) An analytical expression for the evolution of nuclear spin polarization under SDR in a two-spin system is derived and verified through simulations, which show a continuous evolution from coherent, oscillatory polarization exchange to incoherent, exponential approach to equilibrium as the range of random carrier offsets (controlled by a parameter fmax) increases; (2) In a many-spin system, polarization transfers under SDR are shown to be described accurately by a rate matrix in the limit of large fmax, with pairwise transfer rates that are proportional to the inverse sixth power of pairwise internuclear distances; (3) Quantum mechanical interferences among non-commuting pairwise dipole-dipole couplings, which are a complicating factor in solid state NMR studies of molecular structures by traditional dipolar recoupling methods, are shown to be absent from SDR data in the limit of large fmax, provided that coupled nuclei have distinct NMR chemical shifts. PMID:18085769

  12. Theory of stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2008-05-15

    Dipolar recoupling techniques in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) consist of radio frequency (rf) pulse sequences applied in synchrony with magic-angle spinning (MAS) that create nonzero average magnetic dipole-dipole couplings under MAS. Stochastic dipolar recoupling (SDR) is a variant in which randomly chosen rf carrier frequency offsets are introduced to cause random phase modulations of individual pairwise couplings in the dipolar spin Hamiltonian. Several aspects of SDR are investigated through analytical theory and numerical simulations: (1) An analytical expression for the evolution of nuclear spin polarization under SDR in a two-spin system is derived and verified through simulations, which show a continuous evolution from coherent, oscillatory polarization exchange to incoherent, exponential approach to equilibrium as the range of random carrier offsets (controlled by a parameter f(max)) increases; (2) in a many-spin system, polarization transfers under SDR are shown to be described accurately by a rate matrix in the limit of large f(max), with pairwise transfer rates that are proportional to the inverse sixth power of pairwise internuclear distances; (3) quantum mechanical interferences among noncommuting pairwise dipole-dipole couplings, which are a complicating factor in solid-state NMR studies of molecular structures by traditional dipolar recoupling methods, are shown to be absent from SDR data in the limit of large f(max), provided that coupled nuclei have distinct NMR chemical shifts. PMID:18085769

  13. Stochastic and equilibrium pictures of the ultracold Fano-Feshbach-resonance molecular conversion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi; Zhang, Chen; Greene, Chris H.

    2013-05-01

    The ultracold molecular conversion rate occurring in an adiabatic ramp through a Fano-Feshbach resonance is studied and compared in two statistical models. One model, the so-called stochastic phase-space sampling (SPSS) [Hodby , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.120402 94, 120402 (2005)] evaluates the overlap of two atomic distributions in phase space by sampling atomic pairs according to a phase-space criterion. The other model, the chemical equilibrium theory (ChET) [Watabe and Nikuni, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.77.013616 77, 013616 (2008)] considers atomic and molecular distributions in the limit of the chemical and thermal equilibrium. The present study applies SPSS and ChET to a prototypical system of K+K→ K2 in all the symmetry combinations, namely Fermi-Fermi, Bose-Bose, and Bose-Fermi cases. To examine implications of the phase-space criterion for SPSS, the behavior of molecular conversion is analyzed using four distinct geometrical constraints. Our comparison of the results of SPSS with those of ChET shows that while they appear similar in most situations, the two models give rise to rather dissimilar behaviors when the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate strongly affects the molecule formation.

  14. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system. PMID:26343662

  15. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-28

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  16. Achieving high bit rate logical stochastic resonance in a bistable system by adjusting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Gu, Feng-Shou; Feng, Guo-Jin; Yang, Yong-Min; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in a nonlinear bistable system is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments. However, the bit rates of the logical signals are relatively low and not suitable for practical applications. First, we examine the responses of the bistable system with fixed parameters to different bit rate logic input signals, showing that an arbitrary high bit rate LSR in a bistable system cannot be achieved. Then, a normalized transform of the LSR bistable system is introduced through a kind of variable substitution. Based on the transform, it is found that LSR for arbitrary high bit rate logic signals in a bistable system can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the system, setting bias value and amplifying the amplitudes of logic input signals and noise properly. Finally, the desired OR and AND logic outputs to high bit rate logic inputs in a bistable system are obtained by numerical simulations. The study might provide higher feasibility of LSR in practical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51379526).

  17. Electrical Vestibular Stimulation after Vestibular Deafferentation and in Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Swee Tin; Todd, Michael John; Lehnen, Nadine; Aw, Grace Elizabeth; Weber, Konrad Peter; Eggert, Thomas; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic) vestibular stimulation (EVS), are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR) output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. Methods EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0]mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD), 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD), four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS) patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. Results After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. Conclusions The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear. PMID:24349188

  18. Enhanced detection of rolling element bearing fault based on stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Cheng, Zhe; Hu, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Early bearing faults can generate a series of weak impacts. All the influence factors in measurement may degrade the vibration signal. Currently, bearing fault enhanced detection method based on stochastic resonance(SR) is implemented by expensive computation and demands high sampling rate, which requires high quality software and hardware for fault diagnosis. In order to extract bearing characteristic frequencies component, SR normalized scale transform procedures are presented and a circuit module is designed based on parameter-tuning bistable SR. In the simulation test, discrete and analog sinusoidal signals under heavy noise are enhanced by SR normalized scale transform and circuit module respectively. Two bearing fault enhanced detection strategies are proposed. One is realized by pure computation with normalized scale transform for sampled vibration signal, and the other is carried out by designed SR hardware with circuit module for analog vibration signal directly. The first strategy is flexible for discrete signal processing, and the second strategy demands much lower sampling frequency and less computational cost. The application results of the two strategies on bearing inner race fault detection of a test rig show that the local signal to noise ratio of the characteristic components obtained by the proposed methods are enhanced by about 50% compared with the band pass envelope analysis for the bearing with weaker fault. In addition, helicopter transmission bearing fault detection validates the effectiveness of the enhanced detection strategy with hardware. The combination of SR normalized scale transform and circuit module can meet the need of different application fields or conditions, thus providing a practical scheme for enhanced detection of bearing fault.

  19. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 13C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different 13C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly 13C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly 13C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled 13C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of 13C-labeled solids. PMID:22979851

  20. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-01

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 13C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different 13C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly 13C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly 13C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled 13C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of 13C-labeled solids.

  1. The mechanism for stochastic resonance enhancement of mammalian auditory information processing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dawei; Martin, Joseph V; Saidel, William M

    2006-01-01

    Background In a mammalian auditory system, when intrinsic noise is added to a subthreshold signal, not only can the resulting noisy signal be detected, but also the information carried by the signal can be completely recovered. Such a phenomenon is called stochastic resonance (SR). Current analysis of SR commonly employs the energies of the subthreshold signal and intrinsic noise. However, it is difficult to explain SR when the energy addition of the signal and noise is not enough to lift the subthreshold signal over the threshold. Therefore, information modulation has been hypothesized to play a role in some forms of SR in sensory systems. Information modulation, however, seems an unlikely mechanism for mammalian audition, since it requires significant a priori knowledge of the characteristics of the signal. Results We propose that the analysis of SR cannot rely solely on the energies of a subthreshold signal and intrinsic noise or on information modulation. We note that a mammalian auditory system expends energy in the processing of a noisy signal. A part of the expended energy may therefore deposit into the recovered signal, lifting it over threshold. We propose a model that in a rigorous mathematical manner expresses this new theoretical viewpoint on SR in the mammalian auditory system and provide a physiological rationale for the model. Conclusion Our result indicates that the mammalian auditory system may be more active than previously described in the literature. As previously recognized, when intrinsic noise is used to generate a noisy signal, the energy carried by the noise is added to the original subthreshold signal. Furthermore, our model predicts that the system itself should deposit additional energy into the recovered signal. The additional energy is used in the processing of the noisy signal to recover the original subthreshold signal. PMID:17140437

  2. Spike-interval triggered averaging reveals a quasi-periodic spiking alternative for stochastic resonance in catfish electroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lankheet, Martin J M; Klink, P Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G; Noest, André J

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  3. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  4. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction When is surgery necessary? When medical treatment ... organ (cochlea) is also sacrificed with this procedure. Vestibular nerve section A vestibular nerve section is a ...

  5. Review of book vestibular crises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical practice, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with vestibular crises is discussed. Classifications for vestibular disorders are given. Information on the frequency of vestibular crises is given.

  6. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  7. Principles of vestibular pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chabbert, C

    2016-01-01

    Ideally, vestibular pharmacotherapy is intended, through specific and targeted molecular actions, to significantly alleviate vertigo symptoms, to protect or repair the vestibular sensory network under pathologic conditions, and to promote vestibular compensation, with the eventual aim of improving the patient's quality of life. In fact, in order to achieve this aim, considerable progress still needs to be made. The lack of information on the etiology of vestibular disorders and the pharmacologic targets to modulate, as well as the technical challenge of targeting a drug to its effective site are some of the main issues yet to be overcome. In this review, my intention is to provide an account of the therapeutic principles that have shaped current vestibular pharmacotherapy and to further explore crucial questions that must be taken into consideration in order to develop targeted and specific pharmacologic therapies for each type and stage of vestibular disorders. PMID:27638072

  8. Chronic unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Kerber, K A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unilateral vestibular loss is a condition defined by the presence of reduced function of the peripheral vestibular system on one side, which has generally persisted for 3 or more months. The deficit is demonstrated by a reduction of the vestibular-ocular reflex either at the bedside or on laboratory testing. Though some patients with chronic vestibular loss have disabling symptoms, others are asymptomatic. Causes include a viral/postviral disorder, Menière's disease, structural lesions, ischemia, and trauma. Any other systemic or genetic disorder would be expected to involve both sides at some point. PMID:27638074

  9. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  10. Stochastic mass-reconstruction: a new technique to reconstruct resonance masses of heavy particles decaying into tau lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Sho

    2015-12-15

    The invariant mass of tau lepton pairs turns out to be smaller than the resonant mass of their mother particle and the invariant mass distribution is stretched wider than the width of the resonant mass as significant fraction of tau lepton momenta are carried away by neutrinos escaping undetected at collider experiments. This paper describes a new approach to reconstruct resonant masses of heavy particles decaying to tau leptons at such experiments. A typical example is a Z or Higgs boson decaying to a tau pair. Although the new technique can be used for each tau lepton separately, I combine two tau leptons to improve mass resolution by requiring the two tau leptons are lined up in a transverse plane. The method is simple to implement and complementary to the collinear approximation technique that works well when tau leptons are not lined up in a transverse plane. The reconstructed mass can be used as another variable in analyses that already use a visible tau pair mass and missing transverse momentum as these variables are not explicitly used in the stochastic mass-reconstruction to select signal-like events.

  11. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  12. Study of detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance model.

    PubMed

    Jingyi, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance (MSR) model was studied in this paper. A numerically stimulating model based on MSR was established. And gas-ionizing experiment by adding electronic white noise to induce 1.65 MHz periodic component in the carbon nanotubes gas sensor was performed. It was found that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum displayed 2 maximal values, which accorded to the change of the broken-line potential function. The experimental results of gas-ionizing experiment demonstrated that periodic component of 1.65 MHz had multiple MSR phenomena, which was in accordance with the numerical stimulation results. In this way, the numerical stimulation method provides an innovative method for the detecting mechanism research of carbon nanotubes gas sensor.

  13. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  14. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  15. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-08-28

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application.

  16. Study of detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Jingyi, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The detecting mechanism of carbon nanotubes gas sensor based on multi-stable stochastic resonance (MSR) model was studied in this paper. A numerically stimulating model based on MSR was established. And gas-ionizing experiment by adding electronic white noise to induce 1.65 MHz periodic component in the carbon nanotubes gas sensor was performed. It was found that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum displayed 2 maximal values, which accorded to the change of the broken-line potential function. The experimental results of gas-ionizing experiment demonstrated that periodic component of 1.65 MHz had multiple MSR phenomena, which was in accordance with the numerical stimulation results. In this way, the numerical stimulation method provides an innovative method for the detecting mechanism research of carbon nanotubes gas sensor. PMID:26198910

  17. A kinetic and kinematic analysis of the effect of stochastic resonance electrical stimulation and knee sleeve during gait in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Collins, Amber; Blackburn, Troy; Olcott, Chris; Jordan, Joanne M; Yu, Bing; Weinhold, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Extended use of knee sleeves in populations at risk for knee osteoarthritis progression has shown functional and quality of life benefits; however, additional comprehensive kinematic and kinetic analyses are needed to determine possible physical mechanisms of these benefits which may be due to the sleeve's ability to enhance knee proprioception. A novel means of extending these enhancements may be through stochastic resonance stimulation. Our goal was to determine whether the use of a knee sleeve alone or combined with stochastic resonance electrical stimulation improves knee mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Gait kinetics and kinematics were assessed in subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis when presented with four conditions: control1, no electrical stimulation/sleeve, 75% threshold stimulation/sleeve, and control2. An increase in knee flexion angle throughout stance and a decrease in flexion moment occurring immediately after initial contact were seen in the stimulation/sleeve and sleeve alone conditions; however, these treatment conditions did not affect the knee adduction angle and internal knee abduction moment during weight acceptance. No differences were found between the sleeve alone and the stochastic resonance with sleeve conditions. A knee sleeve can improve sagittal-plane knee kinematics and kinetics, although adding the current configuration of stochastic resonance did not enhance these effects.

  18. Effects of aging and tactile stochastic resonance on postural performance and postural control in a sensory conflict task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Postural control in certain situations depends on functioning of tactile or proprioceptive receptors and their respective dynamic integration. Loss of sensory functioning can lead to increased risk of falls in challenging postural tasks, especially in older adults. Stochastic resonance, a concept describing better function of systems with addition of optimal levels of noise, has shown to be beneficial for balance performance in certain populations and simple postural tasks. In this study, we tested the effects of aging and a tactile stochastic resonance stimulus (TSRS) on balance of adults in a sensory conflict task. Nineteen older (71-84 years of age) and younger participants (22-29 years of age) stood on a force plate for repeated trials of 20 s duration, while foot sole stimulation was either turned on or off, and the visual surrounding was sway-referenced. Balance performance was evaluated by computing an Equilibrium Score (ES) and anterior-posterior sway path length (APPlength). For postural control evaluation, strategy scores and approximate entropy (ApEn) were computed. Repeated-measures ANOVA, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were conducted for statistical analysis. Our results showed that balance performance differed between older and younger adults as indicated by ES (p = 0.01) and APPlength (0.01), and addition of vibration only improved performance in the older group significantly (p = 0.012). Strategy scores differed between both age groups, whereas vibration only affected the older group (p = 0.025). Our results indicate that aging affects specific postural outcomes and that TSRS is beneficial for older adults in a visual sensory conflict task, but more research is needed to investigate the effectiveness in individuals with more severe balance problems, for example, due to neuropathy. PMID:25884289

  19. Vestibular and visual responses in human posterior insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Frank, Sebastian M; Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-11-15

    The central hub of the cortical vestibular network in humans is likely localized in the region of posterior lateral sulcus. An area characterized by responsiveness to visual motion has previously been described at a similar location and named posterior insular cortex (PIC). Currently it is not known whether PIC processes vestibular information as well. We localized PIC using visual motion stimulation in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and investigated whether PIC also responds to vestibular stimuli. To this end, we designed an MRI-compatible caloric stimulation device that allowed us to stimulate bithermally with hot temperature in one ear and simultaneously cold temperature in the other or with warm temperatures in both ears for baseline. During each trial, participants indicated the presence or absence of self-motion sensations. We found activation in PIC during periods of self motion when vestibular stimulation was carried out with minimal visual input. In combined visual-vestibular stimulation area PIC was activated in a similar fashion during congruent and incongruent stimulation conditions. Our results show that PIC not only responds to visual motion but also to vestibular stimuli related to the sensation of self motion. We suggest that PIC is part of the cortical vestibular network and plays a role in the integration of visual and vestibular stimuli for the perception of self motion.

  20. Making Sense of the Body: the Role of Vestibular Signals.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The role of the vestibular system in posture and eye movement control has been extensively described. By contrast, how vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions is a more recent research area in the field of cognitive neuroscience. In the present review article, I will summarize recent findings showing that vestibular signals play a crucial role in making sense of the body. First, data will be presented showing that vestibular signals contribute to bodily perceptions ranging from low-level bodily perceptions, such as touch, pain, and the processing of the body's metric properties, to higher level bodily perceptions, such as the sense of owning a body, the sense of being located within this body (embodiment), and the anchoring of the visuo-spatial perspective to this body. In the second part of the review article, I will show that vestibular information seems to be crucially involved in the visual perception of biological motion and in the visual perception of human body structure. Reciprocally, observing human bodies in motion influences vestibular self-motion perception, presumably due to sensorimotor resonance between the self and others. I will argue that recent advances in the mapping of the human vestibular cortex afford neuroscientific models of the vestibular contributions to human bodily self-consciousness.

  1. New concepts in molecular and energy transport within carbon nanotubes: thermopower waves and stochastically resonant ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Our laboratory has been interested in how carbon nanotubes can be utilized to illustrate new concepts in molecular and energy transfer. In the first example, we predict and demonstrate the concept of thermopower waves for energy generation [1]. Coupling an exothermic chemical reaction with a thermally conductive CNT creates a self-propagating reactive wave driven along its length. We realize such waves in MWNT and show that they produce concomitant electrical pulses of high specific power >7 kW/kg. Such waves of high power density may find uses as unique energy sources. In the second system, we fabricate and study SWNT ion channels for the first time [2] and show that the longest, highest aspect ratio, and smallest diameter synthetic nanopore examined to date, a 500 μm SWNT, demonstrates oscillations in electro-osmotic current at specific ranges of electric field, that are the signatures of coherence resonance, yielding self-generated rhythmic and frequency locked transport. The observed oscillations in the current occur due to a coupling between stochastic pore blocking and a diffusion limitation that develops at the pore mouth during proton transport. [4pt] [1] Choi W, Hong S, Abrahamson JT, Han JH, Song C, Nair N, Baik S, Strano MS: Chemically driven carbon-nanotube-guided thermopower waves. NATURE MATERIALS, 9 (2010) 423-429.[0pt] [2] Lee, CY, Choi W, Han, JH, Strano MS: Coherence Resonance in a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Ion Channel. SCIENCE, 239

  2. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis On this page: ... more information about vestibular schwannomas? What is a vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma)? Inner ear with vestibular schwannoma ( ...

  3. Medication (for Vestibular Disorders)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and should be carried out in every patient. Eye movement evaluation is one of the major windows in this respect because particular eye movements are evoked by particular vestibular conditions. A precise ...

  4. Vestibular Disorders Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... your journey to diagnosis and recovery. VEDA Resource Library Visit VEDA's Resource Library to get more information about your vestibular disorder ... VEDA | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED | SITE MAINTAINED BY BROOKS DIGITAL Did this information help you? Become a member ...

  5. Resonant control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a tunnel diode by multiple time-delayed feedback.

    PubMed

    Majer, Niels; Schöll, Eckehard

    2009-01-01

    We study the control of noise-induced spatiotemporal current density patterns in a semiconductor nanostructure (double-barrier resonant tunneling diode) by multiple time-delayed feedback. We find much more pronounced resonant features of noise-induced oscillations compared to single time feedback, rendering the system more sensitive to variations in the delay time tau . The coherence of noise-induced oscillations measured by the correlation time exhibits sharp resonances as a function of tau , and can be strongly increased by optimal choices of tau . Similarly, the peaks in the power spectral density are sharpened. We provide analytical insight into the control mechanism by relating the correlation times and mean frequencies of noise-induced breathing oscillations to the stability properties of the deterministic stationary current density filaments under the influence of the control loop. Moreover, we demonstrate that the use of multiple time delays enlarges the regime in which the deterministic dynamical properties of the system are not changed by delay-induced bifurcations. PMID:19257003

  6. Stochastic approach to diffusion inside the chaotic layer of a resonance.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Martín F; Bazzani, Armando; Cincotta, Pablo M; Giordano, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    We model chaotic diffusion in a symplectic four-dimensional (4D) map by using the result of a theorem that was developed for stochastically perturbed integrable Hamiltonian systems. We explicitly consider a map defined by a free rotator (FR) coupled to a standard map (SM). We focus on the diffusion process in the action I of the FR, obtaining a seminumerical method to compute the diffusion coefficient. We study two cases corresponding to a thick and a thin chaotic layer in the SM phase space and we discuss a related conjecture stated in the past. In the first case, the numerically computed probability density function for the action I is well interpolated by the solution of a Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, whereas it presents a nonconstant time shift with respect to the concomitant FP solution in the second case suggesting the presence of an anomalous diffusion time scale. The explicit calculation of a diffusion coefficient for a 4D symplectic map can be useful to understand the slow diffusion observed in celestial mechanics and accelerator physics. PMID:24580301

  7. Stochastic approach to diffusion inside the chaotic layer of a resonance.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Martín F; Bazzani, Armando; Cincotta, Pablo M; Giordano, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    We model chaotic diffusion in a symplectic four-dimensional (4D) map by using the result of a theorem that was developed for stochastically perturbed integrable Hamiltonian systems. We explicitly consider a map defined by a free rotator (FR) coupled to a standard map (SM). We focus on the diffusion process in the action I of the FR, obtaining a seminumerical method to compute the diffusion coefficient. We study two cases corresponding to a thick and a thin chaotic layer in the SM phase space and we discuss a related conjecture stated in the past. In the first case, the numerically computed probability density function for the action I is well interpolated by the solution of a Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, whereas it presents a nonconstant time shift with respect to the concomitant FP solution in the second case suggesting the presence of an anomalous diffusion time scale. The explicit calculation of a diffusion coefficient for a 4D symplectic map can be useful to understand the slow diffusion observed in celestial mechanics and accelerator physics.

  8. Constructing the davies process of resonance fluorescence with quantum stochastic calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouten, L.; Maassen, H.; Kümmerer, B.

    2003-06-01

    The starting point is a given semigroup of completely positive maps on the 2×2 matrices. This semigroup describes the irreversible evolution of a decaying two-level atom. By using the integral-sum kernel approach to quantum stochastic calculus, the two-level atom is coupled to an environment, which in this case will be interpreted as the electromagnetic field. The irreversible time evolution of the two-level atom then stems from the reversible time evolution of the atom and the field together. Mathematically speaking, a Markov dilation of the semigroup has been constructed. The next step is to drive the atom by a laser and to count the photons emitted into the field by the decaying two-level atom. For every possible sequence of photon counts, a map is constructed that gives the time evolution of the two-level atom implied by that sequence. The family of maps obtained in this way forms a so-called Davies process. In his book, Davies describes the structure of these processes, which brings us into the field of quantum trajectories. Within the model presented in this paper, the jump operators are calculated and the resulting counting process is briefly described.

  9. Gravitational-wave stochastic background detection with resonant-mass detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, S.; Cerdonio, M.; Coccia, E.; Ortolan, A.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we discuss how the standard optimal Wiener filter theory can be applied, within a linear approximation, to the detection of an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background with two or more detectors. We apply then the method to the AURIGA-NAUTILUS pair of ultralow temperature bar detectors, soon to operate in coincidence in Italy, obtaining an estimate for the sensitivity to the background spectral density of ~10-49 Hz-1, that converts to an energy density per unit logarithmic frequency of ~8×10-5×ρc, with ρc~1.9×10-26 kg/m3 the closure density of the Universe. We also show that by adding the VIRGO interferometric detector under construction in Italy to the array, and by properly reorienting the detectors, one can reach a sensitivity of ~6×10-5×ρc. We then calculate that the pair formed by VIRGO and one large mass spherical detector properly located in one of the nearby available sites in Italy can reach a sensitivity of ~2×10-5×ρc while a pair of such spherical detectors at the same sites of AURIGA and NAUTILUS can achieve sensitivities of ~2×10-6×ρc.

  10. A Stochastic, Resonance-Free Multiple Time-Step Algorithm for Polarizable Models That Permits Very Large Time Steps.

    PubMed

    Margul, Daniel T; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics remains one of the most widely used computational tools in the theoretical molecular sciences to sample an equilibrium ensemble distribution and/or to study the dynamical properties of a system. The efficiency of a molecular dynamics calculation is limited by the size of the time step that can be employed, which is dictated by the highest frequencies in the system. However, many properties of interest are connected to low-frequency, long time-scale phenomena, requiring many small time steps to capture. This ubiquitous problem can be ameliorated by employing multiple time-step algorithms, which assign different time steps to forces acting on different time scales. In such a scheme, fast forces are evaluated more frequently than slow forces, and as the former are often computationally much cheaper to evaluate, the savings can be significant. Standard multiple time-step approaches are limited, however, by resonance phenomena, wherein motion on the fastest time scales limits the step sizes that can be chosen for the slower time scales. In atomistic models of biomolecular systems, for example, the largest time step is typically limited to around 5 fs. Previously, we introduced an isokinetic extended phase-space algorithm (Minary et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2004, 93, 150201) and its stochastic analog (Leimkuhler et al. Mol. Phys. 2013, 111, 3579) that eliminate resonance phenomena through a set of kinetic energy constraints. In simulations of a fixed-charge flexible model of liquid water, for example, the time step that could be assigned to the slow forces approached 100 fs. In this paper, we develop a stochastic isokinetic algorithm for multiple time-step molecular dynamics calculations using a polarizable model based on fluctuating dipoles. The scheme developed here employs two sets of induced dipole moments, specifically, those associated with short-range interactions and those associated with a full set of interactions. The scheme is demonstrated on

  11. Cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections on synchronization and coherence resonance in diffusively coupled calcium oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Maosheng; Sun, Runzhi

    2014-03-01

    The cooperative effects of inherent stochasticity and random long-range connections (RLRCs) on synchronization and coherence resonance in networks of calcium oscillators have been investigated. Two different types of collective behaviors, coherence resonance (CR) and synchronization, have been studied numerically in the context of chemical Langevin equations (CLEs). In the CLEs, the reaction steps are all stochastic, including the exchange of calcium ions between adjacent and non-adjacent cells through the gap junctions. The calcium oscillators’ synchronization was characterized by the standard deviation of the cytosolic calcium concentrations. Meanwhile, the temporal coherence of the calcium spike train was characterized by the reciprocal coefficient of variance (RCV). Synchronization induced by RLRCs was observed, namely, the exchange of calcium ions between non-adjacent cells can promote the synchronization of the cells. Moreover, it was found that the RCV shows a clear peak when both inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are optimal, indicating the existence of CR. Since inherent stochasticity and RLRCs are two essential ingredients of cellular processes, synchronization and CR are also important for cells’ functions. The results reported in this paper are expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of intercellular calcium signaling processes in vivo.

  12. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders. PMID:27638061

  13. An improved multiscale noise tuning of stochastic resonance for identifying multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR), a noise-assisted tool, has been proved to be very powerful in weak signal detection. The multiscale noise tuning SR (MSTSR), which breaks the restriction of the requirement of small parameters and white noise in classical SR, has been applied to identify the characteristic frequency of a bearing. However, the multiscale noise tuning (MST), which is originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), limits the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement of SR and the performance in identifying multiple bearing faults. In this paper, the wavelet packet transform (WPT) is developed and incorporated into the MSTSR method to overcome its shortcomings and to further enhance its capability in multiple faults detection of bearings. The WPT-based MST can achieve a finer tuning of multiscale noise and aims at detecting multiple target frequencies separately. By introducing WPT into the MST of SR, this paper proposes an improved SR method particularly suited for the identification of multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings. Simulated and practical bearing signals carrying multiple characteristic frequencies are employed to validate the performance improvement of the proposed method as compared to the original DWT-based MSTSR method. The results confirm the good capability of the proposed method in multi-fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings.

  14. Noise-improved signal detection in cat primary visual cortex via a well-balanced stochastic resonance-like procedure.

    PubMed

    Funke, Klaus; Kerscher, Nicolas J; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-09-01

    Adding noise to a weak signal can paradoxically improve signal detection, a process called 'stochastic resonance' (SR). In the visual system, noise might be introduced by the image jitter resulting from high-frequency eye movements, like eye microtremor and microsaccades. To test whether this kind of noise might be beneficial or detrimental for cortical signal detection, we performed single-unit recordings from area 17 of anaesthetized cats while jittering the visual stimulus in a frequency and amplitude range resembling the possible range of eye movements. We used weak, sub- and peri-threshold visual stimuli, on top of which we superimposed noise with variable jitter amplitude. In accordance with the typical SR effect, we found that small noise levels actually increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of previously weak cortical visual responses, while originally strong responses were little affected or even reduced. Above a certain noise level, the SNR dropped a little, but not as a result of increased background activity - as would be proposed by SR theory - but because of a lowered response to signal and noise. Therefore, it seems that the ascending visual pathway optimally utilizes signal detection improvement by a SR-like process, while at the same time preventing spurious noise-induced activity and keeping the SNR sufficiently high.

  15. Delayed feedback control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, G; Balanov, A G; Schöll, E

    2006-01-01

    The influence of time-delayed feedback upon the spatiotemporal current density patterns is investigated in a model of a semiconductor nanostructure, namely a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode. The parameters are chosen below the Hopf bifurcation, where the only stable state of the system is a spatially inhomogeneous "filamentary" steady state. The addition of weak Gaussian white noise to the system gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous self-sustained temporal oscillations that can be quite coherent. We show that applying a time-delayed feedback can either increase or decrease the regularity of the noise-induced dynamics in this spatially extended system. Using linear stability analysis, we can explain these effects, depending on the length of the delay interval. Furthermore, we study the influence of this additional control term upon the deterministic behavior of the system, which can change significantly depending on the choice of parameters. PMID:16486254

  16. Can Electrical Vestibular Noise Be Used for the Treatment of Brain Diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kwak, Shin

    2005-11-01

    The therapy currently available for the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases is far from satisfactory, and a novel therapeutic strategy, especially for pharmacologically unresponsive patients, would be welcomed. The vestibular nerves are known to influence neuronal circuits in the medullary cardiovascular areas and, through the cerebellar vermis, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. By means of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), it may now be possible to ameliorate blunted responsiveness of degenerated neuronal circuits in the brains of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, through a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. We evaluate the effect of 24-hour noisy GVS on long-term heart rate dynamics in seven MSA patients, and on daytime locomotor activity dynamics in twelve patients with either PD or levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism. Short-range heart rate variability and long-range anti-correlation of trunk activity are significantly increased by the noisy GVS compared with sham stimulation, suggestive of improved autonomic and motor responsiveness. The noisy GVS is effective in boosting the neuro-degenerative brains of MSA and/or PD patients, including those unresponsive to standard levodopa therapy.

  17. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  18. Central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne

    2007-05-01

    Dizziness or vertigo is an erroneous perception of selfmotion or object-motion as well as an unpleasant distortion of static gravitational orientation. It is caused by a mismatch between the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems. Thanks to their functional overlap, the three systems are able to compensate, in part, for each other's deficiencies. Thus, vertigo is not a well-defined disease entity, but rather a multisensory syndrome that results when there is a pathological dysfunction of any of the stabilizing sensory systems (e.g., central vestibular disorders, peripheral vestibular diseases with asymmetric input into the vestibular nuclei). This article provides an overview of the most important and frequent forms of central vestibular vertigo syndromes, including basilar/vestibular migraine, which are characterized by ocular motor, postural, and perceptual signs. In a simple clinical classification they can be separated according to the three major planes of action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex: yaw, roll, and pitch. A tonic imbalance in yaw is characterized by horizontal nystagmus, lateropulsion of the eyes, past-pointing, rotational and lateral body falls, and lateral deviation of the perceived straight-ahead. A tonic imbalance in roll is defined by torsional nystagmus, skew deviation, ocular torsion, tilts of head, body, and the perceived vertical. Finally, a tonic imbalance in pitch can be characterized by some forms of upbeat or downbeat nystagmus, fore-aft tilts and falls, and vertical deviation of the perceived straight ahead. The thus defined syndromes allow for a precise topographic diagnosis as regards their level and side.

  19. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  20. Modern vestibular function testing.

    PubMed Central

    Baloh, R W; Furman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Current tests of vestibular function concentrate on the horizontal semicircular canal-ocular reflex because it is the easiest reflex to stimulate (calorically and rotationally) and record (using electro-oculography). Tests of the other vestibulo-ocular reflexes (vertical semicircular canal and otolith) and of the vestibulospinal reflexes have yet to be shown useful in the clinical setting. Digital video recording of eye movements and vestibular-evoked responses are promising new technologies that may affect clinical testing in the near future. PMID:2660408

  1. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-01-01

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5–2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s−2) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300–350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30–180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. Key points Human activity exposes the vestibular organs to a wide dynamic range of motion. We aimed to discover whether the CNS regulates sensitivity to vestibular afference during exposure to ambient motion. Balance and perceptual

  2. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-05-15

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5-2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s(-2) ) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300-350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30-180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing.

  3. Improving Early Adaptation Following Long Duration Spaceflight by Enhancing Vestibular Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Kofman, Igor; DeDios, Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen; Jeevarajan, Jerome; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after g-transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" -immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance (SR) to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals especially when combined with balance training exercises for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. The countermeasure to improve post-flight balance and locomotor disturbances is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The techniques for improving signal detection using SVS may thus provide additional information to improve such strategic abilities and thus help in significantly reducing the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long duration space flight. We have conducted a series of studies to document the efficacy of SVS stimulation on balance/locomotion tasks on unstable surfaces and motion tracking tasks during intra-vestibular system conflicts. In an initial study, we showed that SVS improved overall balance

  4. Functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Staab, J P

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years. Even their nomenclature has had different meanings in different eras. This chapter will review functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders. Terminology will follow the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, beta draft and the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. Anxiety plays a central role in behavioral vestibular morbidity. Anxiety, traumatic stress, obsessive, and depressive disorders may be primary causes of episodic and chronic vestibular symptoms or secondary complications of other vestibular disorders. These psychiatric illnesses affect 30-50% of patients who consult neurologists or otologists for vestibular symptoms. Coexisting psychiatric disorders adversely affect treatment for patients with structural vestibular diseases, especially when unrecognized. Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness is the leading cause of long-term vestibular disability. Fortunately, pharmacologic, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitative treatments of these illnesses have improved in recent years. PMID:27638082

  5. The vestibular body: Vestibular contributions to bodily representations.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are integrated with signals from other sensory modalities. This convergence could reflect an important mechanism for maintaining the perception of the body. Here we review the current literature in order to develop a framework for understanding how the vestibular system contributes to body representation. According to recent models, we distinguish between three processes for body representation, and we look at whether vestibular signals might influence each process. These are (i) somatosensation, the primary sensory processing of somatic stimuli, (ii) somatoperception, the processes of constructing percepts and experiences of somatic objects and events and (iii) somatorepresentation, the knowledge about the body as a physical object in the world. Vestibular signals appear to contribute to all three levels in this model of body processing. Thus, the traditional view of the vestibular system as a low-level, dedicated orienting module tends to underestimate the pervasive role of vestibular input in bodily self-awareness. PMID:27389959

  6. Management of growing vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Gian Gaetano; Pirodda, Antonio; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Fioravanti, Antonio; Calbucci, Fabio; Modugno, Giovanni Carlo

    2013-07-01

    Conservative management of small vestibular schwannomas is frequently proposed as most tumours do not grow. Anyway, tumour growth is reported in 30-40 % of the cases, so that surgery is consequently generally proposed. We primarily observed 161 patients affected by unilateral vestibular schwannomas. All patients were examined by means of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans. Tumour growth was recorded in 58 cases (35.8 %) and these subjects set up the group of study. Twenty-two (37.9 %) patients were surgically treated; tumour was always completely removed, all patients had normal facial function after surgery and only one patient suffered from a major complication (cerebellar haematoma). Fourteen patients (24.1 %) were submitted to radiotherapy, while one patient was lost at follow-up and another one died because of other medical reasons. Finally, 20 (34.5 %) subjects continued to be observed for different reasons. The mean follow-up period after identification of growth was 6.1 years. Nine tumours continued to grow, nine tumours stopped growing, one tumour grew and then regressed in size and one tumour decreased. Sixty percent of patients with useful hearing at diagnosis preserved it during the entire observation period. In conclusion, most of VS do not grow; in case of tumour growth, a surgical procedure may be suggested and the outcomes are not negatively influenced by the delay of the procedure. But in some cases, patients can still follow the "wait and scan" policy. In fact, only less than half of the growing tumours continued to grow. Moreover, most of the patients continued to retain a useful hearing. PMID:23135237

  7. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: ... more information about enlarged vestibular aqueducts? What are vestibular aqueducts? The inner ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts ...

  8. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; Fusconi, M.; De Virgilio, A.; Pagliuca, G.; Marinelli, C.; de Vincentiis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes. PMID:24741601

  9. Interaction of brain areas of visual and vestibular simultaneous activity with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Della-Justina, Hellen M; Gamba, Humberto R; Lukasova, Katerina; Nucci-da-Silva, Mariana P; Winkler, Anderson M; Amaro, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Static body equilibrium is an essential requisite for human daily life. It is known that visual and vestibular systems must work together to support equilibrium. However, the relationship between these two systems is not fully understood. In this work, we present the results of a study which identify the interaction of brain areas that are involved with concurrent visual and vestibular inputs. The visual and the vestibular systems were individually and simultaneously stimulated, using flickering checkerboard (without movement stimulus) and galvanic current, during experiments of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-four right-handed and non-symptomatic subjects participated in this study. Single visual stimulation shows positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses (PBR) in the primary and associative visual cortices. Single vestibular stimulation shows PBR in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, inferior parietal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and lobules V and VI of the cerebellar hemisphere. Simultaneous stimulation shows PBR in the middle and inferior frontal gyri and in the precentral gyrus. Vestibular- and somatosensory-related areas show negative BOLD responses (NBR) during simultaneous stimulation. NBR areas were also observed in the calcarine gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus during simultaneous and single visual stimulations. For static visual and galvanic vestibular simultaneous stimulation, the reciprocal inhibitory visual-vestibular interaction pattern is observed in our results. The experimental results revealed interactions in frontal areas during concurrent visual-vestibular stimuli, which are affected by intermodal association areas in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes.

  10. Interaction of brain areas of visual and vestibular simultaneous activity with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Della-Justina, Hellen M; Gamba, Humberto R; Lukasova, Katerina; Nucci-da-Silva, Mariana P; Winkler, Anderson M; Amaro, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Static body equilibrium is an essential requisite for human daily life. It is known that visual and vestibular systems must work together to support equilibrium. However, the relationship between these two systems is not fully understood. In this work, we present the results of a study which identify the interaction of brain areas that are involved with concurrent visual and vestibular inputs. The visual and the vestibular systems were individually and simultaneously stimulated, using flickering checkerboard (without movement stimulus) and galvanic current, during experiments of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-four right-handed and non-symptomatic subjects participated in this study. Single visual stimulation shows positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses (PBR) in the primary and associative visual cortices. Single vestibular stimulation shows PBR in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, inferior parietal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and lobules V and VI of the cerebellar hemisphere. Simultaneous stimulation shows PBR in the middle and inferior frontal gyri and in the precentral gyrus. Vestibular- and somatosensory-related areas show negative BOLD responses (NBR) during simultaneous stimulation. NBR areas were also observed in the calcarine gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus during simultaneous and single visual stimulations. For static visual and galvanic vestibular simultaneous stimulation, the reciprocal inhibitory visual-vestibular interaction pattern is observed in our results. The experimental results revealed interactions in frontal areas during concurrent visual-vestibular stimuli, which are affected by intermodal association areas in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. PMID:25300959

  11. An overview of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S L; Alghwiri, A A; Alghadir, A

    2016-01-01

    Data related to the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation and its evolution as an intervention are provided. Concepts and various treatment strategies are described, with explanations of why people with uncompensated peripheral and central vestibular disorders might improve with rehabilitation. Various tests and measures are described that are commonly used to examine patients and determine their level of ability to participate in their environment. Factors that affect recovery, both positively and negatively, are described in order to better prognosticate recovery. A case utilizing many of the principles discussed is included to provide insight into how to utilize vestibular rehabilitation with a person with an uncompensated peripheral vestibular loss. PMID:27638071

  12. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. PMID:27638068

  13. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  14. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  15. Childhood Vestibular Disorders: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Zarin; Stakiw, Daria B.

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that childhood disorders affecting the vestibular system, although rare, do exist. Describing symptoms associated with the vestibular mechanism for children may be difficult, resulting in misdiagnosing or under-diagnosing these conditions. The pathophysiology, symptoms, and management options of the more common…

  16. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition.

    PubMed

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the "vestibular cortical projection areas", defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition.

  17. Role of the Insula and Vestibular System in Patients with Chronic Subjective Dizziness: An fMRI Study Using Sound-Evoked Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Indovina, Iole; Riccelli, Roberta; Chiarella, Giuseppe; Petrolo, Claudio; Augimeri, Antonio; Giofrè, Laura; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Passamonti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence), long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD. We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC. We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients with CSD

  18. Vestibular disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is the major sensory (special proprioceptive) system that, along with the general proprioceptive and visual systems, maintains balance. Clinical signs of vestibular disease include asymmetric ataxia, head tilt, and pathologic nystagmus. Neuroanatomic localization of observed vestibular signs to either the peripheral or central components of the vestibular system is paramount to the management of the patient with vestibular dysfunction, as the etiology, diagnostic approaches, and prognoses are dependent on the neuroanatomic diagnosis. This article reviews functional vestibular neuroanatomy as well as the diagnosis and treatment of common causes of small animal vestibular disease. PMID:19942058

  19. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  20. Vestibular symptoms and history taking.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, A

    2016-01-01

    History taking is an essential part in the diagnostic process of vestibular disorders. The approach to focus strongly on the quality of symptoms, like vertigo, dizziness, or unsteadiness, is not that useful as these symptoms often coexist and are all nonspecific, as each of them may arise from vestibular and nonvestibular diseases (like cardiovascular disease) and do not permit to distinguish potentially dangerous from benign causes. Instead, patients should be categorized if they have an acute, episodic, or chronic vestibular syndrome (AVS, EVS, or CVS) to narrow down the spectrum of differential diagnosis. Typical examples of disorders provoking an AVS would be vestibular neuritis or stroke of peripheral or central vestibular structures, of an EVS Menière's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or vestibular migraine and of a CVS long-standing uni- or bilateral vestibular failure or cerebellar degeneration. The presence of triggers should be established with a main distinction between positional (change of head orientation with respect to gravity), head motion-induced (time-locked to head motion regardless of direction) and orthostatic position change as the underlying disorders are quite different. Accompanying symptoms also help to orient to the underlying cause, like aural or neurologic symptoms, but also chest pain or dyspnea. PMID:27638064

  1. Theoretical analysis of destabilization resonances in time-delayed stochastic second-order dynamical systems and some implications for human motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patanarapeelert, K.; Frank, T. D.; Friedrich, R.; Beek, P. J.; Tang, I. M.

    2006-02-01

    A linear stochastic delay differential equation of second order is studied that can be regarded as a Kramers model with time delay. An analytical expression for the stationary probability density is derived in terms of a Gaussian distribution. In particular, the variance as a function of the time delay is computed analytically for several parameter regimes. Strikingly, in the parameter regime close to the parameter regime in which the deterministic system exhibits Hopf bifurcations, we find that the variance as a function of the time delay exhibits a sequence of pronounced peaks. These peaks are interpreted as delay-induced destabilization resonances arising from oscillatory ghost instabilities. On the basis of the obtained theoretical findings, reinterpretations of previous human motor control studies and predictions for future human motor control studies are provided.

  2. Theoretical analysis of destabilization resonances in time-delayed stochastic second-order dynamical systems and some implications for human motor control.

    PubMed

    Patanarapeelert, K; Frank, T D; Friedrich, R; Beek, P J; Tang, I M

    2006-02-01

    A linear stochastic delay differential equation of second order is studied that can be regarded as a Kramers model with time delay. An analytical expression for the stationary probability density is derived in terms of a Gaussian distribution. In particular, the variance as a function of the time delay is computed analytically for several parameter regimes. Strikingly, in the parameter regime close to the parameter regime in which the deterministic system exhibits Hopf bifurcations, we find that the variance as a function of the time delay exhibits a sequence of pronounced peaks. These peaks are interpreted as delay-induced destabilization resonances arising from oscillatory ghost instabilities. On the basis of the obtained theoretical findings, reinterpretations of previous human motor control studies and predictions for future human motor control studies are provided.

  3. Theoretical analysis of destabilization resonances in time-delayed stochastic second-order dynamical systems and some implications for human motor control.

    PubMed

    Patanarapeelert, K; Frank, T D; Friedrich, R; Beek, P J; Tang, I M

    2006-02-01

    A linear stochastic delay differential equation of second order is studied that can be regarded as a Kramers model with time delay. An analytical expression for the stationary probability density is derived in terms of a Gaussian distribution. In particular, the variance as a function of the time delay is computed analytically for several parameter regimes. Strikingly, in the parameter regime close to the parameter regime in which the deterministic system exhibits Hopf bifurcations, we find that the variance as a function of the time delay exhibits a sequence of pronounced peaks. These peaks are interpreted as delay-induced destabilization resonances arising from oscillatory ghost instabilities. On the basis of the obtained theoretical findings, reinterpretations of previous human motor control studies and predictions for future human motor control studies are provided. PMID:16605356

  4. Vertical torque responses to vestibular stimulation in standing humans.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Raymond F

    2011-08-15

    The effects of electrical vestibular stimulation upon movement and perception suggest two evoked sensations: head roll and inter-aural linear acceleration. The head roll vector causes walking subjects to turn in a direction dependent on head pitch, requiring generation of torque around a vertical axis. Here the effect of vestibular stimulation upon vertical torque (T(z)) was investigated during quiet stance. With the head tilted forward, square-wave stimuli applied to the mastoid processes evoked a polarity-specific T(z) response accompanied by trunk yaw. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) was used to investigate the effect of head pitch with greater precision; the SVS–T(z) cross-correlation displayed a modulation pattern consistent with the head roll vector and this was also reflected by changes in coherence at 2–3 Hz. However, a separate response at 7–8 Hz was unaffected by head pitch. Head translation (rather than rotation) had no effect upon this high frequency response either, suggesting it is not caused by a sense of body rotation induced by an inter-aural acceleration vector offset from the body. Instead, high coherence between medio-lateral shear force and T(z) at the same frequency range suggests it is caused by mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. Consistent with this explanation, the 7–8 Hz response was attenuated by 90 deg head roll or yaw, both of which uncouple the inter-aural axis from the medio-lateral sway axis. These results demonstrate two vertical torque responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in standing subjects. The high frequency response can be attributed to mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. The low frequency response is consistent with a reaction to a sensation of head roll, and provides a novel method for investigating proprioceptive-vestibular interactions during stance.

  5. Vertical torque responses to vestibular stimulation in standing humans

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Raymond F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The effects of electrical vestibular stimulation upon movement and perception suggest two evoked sensations: head roll and inter-aural linear acceleration. The head roll vector causes walking subjects to turn in a direction dependent on head pitch, requiring generation of torque around a vertical axis. Here the effect of vestibular stimulation upon vertical torque (Tz) was investigated during quiet stance. With the head tilted forward, square-wave stimuli applied to the mastoid processes evoked a polarity-specific Tz response accompanied by trunk yaw. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) was used to investigate the effect of head pitch with greater precision; the SVS–Tz cross-correlation displayed a modulation pattern consistent with the head roll vector and this was also reflected by changes in coherence at 2–3 Hz. However, a separate response at 7–8 Hz was unaffected by head pitch. Head translation (rather than rotation) had no effect upon this high frequency response either, suggesting it is not caused by a sense of body rotation induced by an inter-aural acceleration vector offset from the body. Instead, high coherence between medio-lateral shear force and Tz at the same frequency range suggests it is caused by mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. Consistent with this explanation, the 7–8 Hz response was attenuated by 90 deg head roll or yaw, both of which uncouple the inter-aural axis from the medio-lateral sway axis. These results demonstrate two vertical torque responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in standing subjects. The high frequency response can be attributed to mechanical coupling to evoked medio-lateral sway. The low frequency response is consistent with a reaction to a sensation of head roll, and provides a novel method for investigating proprioceptive-vestibular interactions during stance. PMID:21690188

  6. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  7. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  8. Neuropharmacology of Vestibular System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the neuropharmacology of the vestibular system, with an emphasis on the mechanism of action of drugs used in the treatment of vestibular disorders. Otolaryngologists are confronted with a rapidly changing field in which advances in the knowledge of ionic channel function and synaptic transmission mechanisms have led to the development of new scientific models for the understanding of vestibular dysfunction and its management. In particular, there have been recent advances in our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of vestibular system function and drug mechanisms of action. In this work, drugs acting on vestibular system have been grouped into two main categories according to their primary mechanisms of action: those with effects on neurotransmitters and neuromodulator receptors and those that act on voltage-gated ion channels. Particular attention is given in this review to drugs that may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of vestibular diseases. A critical review of the pharmacology and highlights of the major advances are discussed in each case. PMID:20808544

  9. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. PMID:27638066

  10. Perspectives on Aging Vestibular Function.

    PubMed

    Anson, Eric; Jeka, John

    2015-01-01

    Much is known about age-related anatomical changes in the vestibular system. Knowledge regarding how vestibular anatomical changes impact behavior for older adults continues to grow, in line with advancements in diagnostic testing. However, despite advancements in clinical diagnostics, much remains unknown about the functional impact that an aging vestibular system has on daily life activities such as standing and walking. Modern diagnostic tests are very good at characterizing neural activity of the isolated vestibular system, but the tests themselves are artificial and do not reflect the multisensory aspects of natural human behavior. Also, the majority of clinical diagnostic tests are passively applied because active behavior can enhance performance. In this perspective paper, we review anatomical and behavioral changes associated with an aging vestibular system and highlight several areas where a more functionally relevant perspective can be taken. For postural control, a multisensory perturbation approach could be used to bring balance rehabilitation into the arena of precision medicine. For walking and complex gaze stability, this may result in less physiologically specific impairments, but the trade-off would be a greater understanding of how the aging vestibular system truly impacts the daily life of older adults. PMID:26779116

  11. Vestibular Deficits Following Youth Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Master, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence and recovery of pediatric patients with concussion who manifest clinical vestibular deficits, and to describe the correlation of these deficits with neurocognitive function, based on computerized neurocognitive testing, in a sample of pediatric patients with concussion. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients age 5–18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from 7/1/2010–12/31/2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits was obtained, and all related visits for those patients were reviewed. Results 247 patients were chosen from 3740 eligible visits for detailed review and abstraction. 81% showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical exam. Those patients with vestibular signs on initial exam took a significantly longer time to return to school (median 59 days vs. 6 days, p=0.001) or to be fully cleared (median 106 days vs. 29 days, p=0.001). They additionally scored more poorly on initial computerized neurocognitive testing, and took longer for neurocognitive deficits to recover. Those patients with three or more prior concussions had a higher prevalence of vestibular deficits and took longer for those deficits to resolve. Conclusion Vestibular deficits in children and adolescents with a history of concussion are highly prevalent. These deficits appear to be associated with extended recovery times and poorer performance on neurocognitive testing. Further studies evaluating the effectiveness of vestibular therapy on improving such deficits are warranted. PMID:25748568

  12. Vestibular hearing and speech processing.

    PubMed

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Pourbakht, Akram; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Kamali, Mohammad; Behnoud, Fatholah; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular hearing in human is evoked as a result of the auditory sensitivity of the saccule to low-frequency high-intensity tone. The objective was to investigate the relationship between vestibular hearing using cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) and speech processing via word recognition scores in white noise (WRSs in wn). Intervention comprised of audiologic examinations, cVEMPs, and WRS in wn. All healthy subjects had detectable cVEMPs (safe vestibular hearing). WRSs in wn were obtained for them (66.9 ± 9.3% in the right ears and 67.5 ± 11.8% in the left ears). Dizzy patients in the affected ears, had the cVEMPs abnormalities (insecure vestibular hearing) and decreased the WRS in wn (51.4 ± 3.8% in the right ears and 52.2 ± 3.5% in the left ears). The comparison of the cVEMPs between the subjects revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Therefore, the vestibular hearing can improve the speech processing in the competing noisy conditions. PMID:23724272

  13. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  14. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in vestibular schwannoma and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Giannuzzi, Annalisa; Astore, Serena; Trabalzini, Franco; Nuti, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the incidence and characteristics of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVN) in 49 patients with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging evidence of vestibular schwannoma and 53 patients with idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and normal radiological findings. The sensitivity and specificity of the hyperventilation test were compared with other audio-vestibular diagnostic tests (bedside examination of eye movements, caloric test, auditory brainstem responses) in the two groups of patients. The hyperventilation test scored the highest diagnostic efficiency (sensitivity 65.3 %; specificity 98.1 %) of the four tests in the differential diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma and idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Small tumors with a normal caloric response or caloric paresis were associated with ipsilateral HVN and larger tumors and severe caloric deficits with contralateral HVN. These results confirm that the hyperventilation test is a useful diagnostic test for predicting vestibular schwannoma in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

  15. [Vestibular evoked potentials in people].

    PubMed

    Fraczkowski, K; Pośpiech, L; Orendorz-Fraczkowska, K

    1997-01-01

    In the article had been presented the structure and functioning of a prototype system for stimulation and registration vestibular evoked potentials, and the first recording of evoked vestibular potentials (VsEPs) in human beings. This system consist of a original stimulator accelerated for the stimulation of vestibular organ, modul registratory VsEPs as well as string elements and synchronizing stimulation with recording. IMB PC 486 is quickly process of investigation with help of standard interface and a original computer programme. Vestibular organ had been evoked by 200 to 500 cyclicly repealed angular decelerations of 4000 degrees/s2. During investigation white noise was used for masking to avoid the evoking of auditory potentials. Seven of the examined healthy persons (including one deaf person whose vestibular organ was not damaged) had registered a response consisting of several waves with vertex positive peaks. The first two waves P1 and P2 with the mean value 2.02 ms and 5.6 ms are most often during in the 10 ms. The registered deaf persons response does not differ from the record of healthy persons. PMID:9518319

  16. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  17. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. PMID:26098730

  18. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information.

  19. Application of the stochastic resonance algorithm to the simultaneous quantitative determination of multiple weak peaks of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Shang, Erxin; Xiang, Bingren; Xie, Shaofei; Tang, Yuping; Duan, Jin-ao; Zhan, Ying; Chi, Yumei; Tan, Defei

    2011-03-15

    The stochastic resonance algorithm (SRA) has been developed as a potential tool for amplifying and determining weak chromatographic peaks in recent years. However, the conventional SRA cannot be applied directly to ultra-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOFMS). The obstacle lies in the fact that the narrow peaks generated by UPLC contain high-frequency components which fall beyond the restrictions of the theory of stochastic resonance. Although there already exists an algorithm that allows a high-frequency weak signal to be detected, the sampling frequency of TOFMS is not fast enough to meet the requirement of the algorithm. Another problem is the depression of the weak peak of the compound with low concentration or weak detection response, which prevents the simultaneous determination of multi-component UPLC/TOFMS peaks. In order to lower the frequencies of the peaks, an interpolation and re-scaling frequency stochastic resonance (IRSR) is proposed, which re-scales the peak frequencies via linear interpolating sample points numerically. The re-scaled UPLC/TOFMS peaks could then be amplified significantly. By introducing an external energy field upon the UPLC/TOFMS signals, the method of energy gain was developed to simultaneously amplify and determine weak peaks from multi-components. Subsequently, a multi-component stochastic resonance algorithm was constructed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of multiple weak UPLC/TOFMS peaks based on the two methods. The optimization of parameters was discussed in detail with simulated data sets, and the applicability of the algorithm was evaluated by quantitative analysis of three alkaloids in human plasma using UPLC/TOFMS. The new algorithm behaved well in the improvement of signal-to-noise (S/N) compared to several normally used peak enhancement methods, including the Savitzky-Golay filter, Whittaker-Eilers smoother and matched filtration.

  20. Representation of visual gravitational motion in the human vestibular cortex.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Bosco, Gianfranco; Zago, Myrka; Macaluso, Emiliano; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2005-04-15

    How do we perceive the visual motion of objects that are accelerated by gravity? We propose that, because vision is poorly sensitive to accelerations, an internal model that calculates the effects of gravity is derived from graviceptive information, is stored in the vestibular cortex, and is activated by visual motion that appears to be coherent with natural gravity. The acceleration of visual targets was manipulated while brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In agreement with the internal model hypothesis, we found that the vestibular network was selectively engaged when acceleration was consistent with natural gravity. These findings demonstrate that predictive mechanisms of physical laws of motion are represented in the human brain. PMID:15831760

  1. The Vestibular Implant: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Stokroos, Robert J.; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Kingma, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant (VI) and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: A search was performed in Pubmed, Medline, and Embase. Key words used were “vestibular prosth*” and “VI.” The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation. Study selection: All studies about the VI and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the VI. Data extraction and synthesis: Data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: To use a basic VI in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation), complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt. PMID:21991260

  2. Vestibular findings in military band musicians.

    PubMed

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-04-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  3. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076

  4. Dysconnectivity Within the Default Mode in First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Stochastic Dynamic Causal Modeling Study With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bastos-Leite, António J.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Silveira, Celeste; Norton, Andreia; Reis, Salomé; Friston, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first stochastic dynamic causal modeling (sDCM) study of effective connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) in schizophrenia. Thirty-three patients (9 women, mean age = 25.0 years, SD = 5) with a first episode of psychosis and diagnosis of schizophrenia—according to the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, revised criteria—were studied. Fifteen healthy control subjects (4 women, mean age = 24.6 years, SD = 4) were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) interspersed with 2 periods of continuous picture viewing. The anterior frontal (AF), posterior cingulate (PC), and the left and right parietal nodes of the DMN were localized in an unbiased fashion using data from 16 independent healthy volunteers (using an identical fMRI protocol). We used sDCM to estimate directed connections between and within nodes of the DMN, which were subsequently compared with t tests at the between subject level. The excitatory effect of the PC node on the AF node and the inhibitory self-connection of the AF node were significantly weaker in patients (mean values = 0.013 and −0.048 Hz, SD = 0.09 and 0.05, respectively) relative to healthy subjects (mean values = 0.084 and −0.088 Hz, SD = 0.15 and 0.77, respectively; P < .05). In summary, sDCM revealed reduced effective connectivity to the AF node of the DMN—reflecting a reduced postsynaptic efficacy of prefrontal afferents—in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. PMID:24939881

  5. DARA vestibular equipment onboard MIR.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, P; Kellig, A; Hoffmann, H U; Ruyters, G

    1998-01-01

    In space, the weightless environment provides a different stimulus to the otolith organs of the vestibular system, and the resulting signals no longer correspond with the visual and other sensory signals sent to the brain. This signal conflict causes disorientation. To study this and also to understand the vestibular adaptation to weightlessness, DARA has developed scientific equipment for vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric investigations. Especially, two video-oculography systems (monocular--VOG--and binocular--BIVOG, respectively) as well as stimuli such as an optokinetic stimulation device have successfully been employed onboard MIR in the frame of national and European missions since 1992. The monocular VOG was used by Klaus Flade during the MIR '92 mission, by Victor Polyakov during his record 15 months stay onboard MIR in 1993/94 as well as by Ulf Merbold during EUROMIR '94. The binocular version was used by Thomas Reiter and Sergej Avdeyev during the 6 months EUROMIR '95 mission. PIs of the various experiments include H. Scherer and A. Clarke (FU Berlin), M. Dieterichs and S. Krafczyk (LMU Munchen) from Germany as well as C.H. Markham and S.G. Diamond from the United States. Video-Oculography (VOG) is a technique for examining the function of the human balance system located in the inner ear (vestibular system) and the visio-oculomotor interactions of the vestibular organ. The human eye movements are measured, recorded and evaluated by state-of-the-art video techniques. The method was first conceived and designed at the Vestibular Research Laboratory of the ENT Clinic in Steglitz, FU Berlin (A. Clarke, H. Scherer). Kayser-Threde developed, manufactured and tested the facilities for space application under contract to DARA. Evaluation software was first provided by the ENT Clinic, Berlin, later by our subcontractor Sensomotoric Instruments (SMI), Teltow. Optokinetic hardware to support visuo-oculomotoric investigations, has been shipped to MIR for EUROMIR '95

  6. Molecular aging of the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Brosel, Sonja; Laub, Christoph; Averdam, Anne; Bender, Andreas; Elstner, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Dizziness and imbalance frequently affect the elderly and contribute to falls and frailty. In many geriatric patients, clinical testing uncovers a dysfunction of the vestibular system, but no specific etiology can be identified. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated age-related degeneration of peripheral and central vestibular neurons, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In contrast, recent studies into age-related hearing loss strongly implicate mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death of cochlear hair cells. While some data suggest that analogous biological pathomechanisms may underlie vestibular dysfunction, actual proof is missing. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular causes of vestibular dysfunction. PMID:26739358

  7. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  8. Vestibular dysfunction in occupational chronic solvent intoxication.

    PubMed

    Arlien-Søborg, P; Zilstorff, K; Grandjean, B; Milling Pedersen, L

    1981-08-01

    Neurotoxic volatile organic solvents used by house and car painters may lead to professional toxic encephalopathy after several years of exposure. The symptoms are memory impairment, fatigue, personality changes, headache and dizziness. Vestibular dysfunction was found in 55% of 113 painters examined, mainly in the form of reduced caloric vestibular reactions. No correlation between vestibular dysfunction and the duration of exposure, cerebral atrophy or intellectual impairment could be demonstrated. Vestibular examination may be helpful in detecting early changes in exposed persons and in determining more accurate safety limits for harmful chemicals.

  9. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  10. Occupational noise induced vestibular malfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Hinchcliffe, R; Coles, R R; King, P F

    1992-01-01

    This paper comprises a review of the evidence for the possibility that exposure to noise may damage the vestibular receptors in the internal ear as well as those in the cochlea. The review covers lay and medical publications, observations on patients, experimental studies, and compensation claims. It concludes that the verdict must be "not proven"--that is, although such damage is possible, the evidence is not strong enough to regard it as probable. PMID:1733458

  11. Endoscopic Resection of Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Pradeep; D'Andrea, Kenneth P.; Stucken, Emily Z.; Babu, Seilesh; LaRouere, Michael J.; Pieper, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report our results and the technical details of fully endoscopic resection of vestibular schwannomas. Design Prospective observational study. Setting A single academic institution involving neurosurgery and neurotology. Participants Twelve consecutive patients who underwent fully endoscopic resection of a vestibular schwannoma. Main Outcome Measures Hearing preservation, based on the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgeons (AAO-HNS) score as well as the Gardener and Robertson Modified Hearing Classification (GR). Facial nerve preservation based on the House-Brackmann (HB) score. Results All patients successfully underwent gross total resection. Facial nerve preservation rate was 92% with 11 of 12 patients retaining an HB score of 1/6 postoperatively. Hearing preservation rate was 67% with 8 of 12 patients maintaining a stable AAO-HNS grade and GR score at follow-up. Mean tumor size was 1.5 cm (range: 1–2 cm). No patients experienced postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak, infection, or cranial nerve palsy for a complication rate of 0%. Mean operative time was 261.6 minutes with an estimated blood loss of 56.3 mL and average length of hospital stay of 3.6 days. Conclusion A purely endoscopic approach is a safe and effective option for hearing preservation surgery for vestibular schwannomas in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26225307

  12. Electrical Stimulation to Restore Vestibular Function – Development of a 3-D Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Patel, Amit H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients who fail to compensate for bilateral loss of vestibular sensory function are disabled by disequilibrium and illusory movement of the visual field during head movement. An implantable prosthesis that restores vestibular sensation could significantly improve quality of life for these patients. To be effective, such a device should encode head rotation in all 3 dimensions. We describe the 3-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex of normal chinchillas and vestibular-deficient chinchillas undergoing functional electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve. We also describe the design and fabrication of a head-mounted, 8 electrode vestibular prosthesis that encodes head movement in 3 dimensions. PMID:17281986

  13. Stochastic games

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Eilon; Vieille, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In 1953, Lloyd Shapley contributed his paper “Stochastic games” to PNAS. In this paper, he defined the model of stochastic games, which were the first general dynamic model of a game to be defined, and proved that it admits a stationary equilibrium. In this Perspective, we summarize the historical context and the impact of Shapley’s contribution. PMID:26556883

  14. Compensation of Vestibular Function and Plasticity of Vestibular Nucleus after Unilateral Cochleostomy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Hyun, Jaihwan; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Kim, Dong Woon; Park, Sung Jae; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo frequently occur after cochlear implantation (CI) surgery, particularly during the early stages. It could recover over time but some of the patients suffered from delayed or sustained vestibular symptoms after CI. This study used rat animal models to investigate the effect of unilateral cochleostomy on the vestibular organs over time. Twenty-seven Sprague Dawley rats underwent cochleostomy to evaluate the postoperative changes in hearing threshold, gain and symmetry of the vestibular ocular response, overall balance function, number of hair cells in the crista, and the c-Fos activity in the brainstem vestibular nucleus. Loss of vestibular function was observed during the early stages, but function recovered partially over time. Histopathological findings demonstrated a mild decrease in vestibular hair cells numbers. Increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the vestibular nucleus, observed in the early stages after cochleostomy, decreased over time. Cochleostomy is a risk factor for peripheral vestibular organ damage that can cause functional impairment in the peripheral vestibular organs. Altered vestibular nucleus activity may be associated with vestibular compensation and plasticity after unilateral cochleostomy. PMID:26881130

  15. Incomplete segregation of endorgan-specific vestibular ganglion cells in mice and rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maklad, A.; Fritzsch, B.

    1999-01-01

    The endorgan-specific distribution of vestibular ganglion cells was studied in neonatal and postnatal rats and mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) and dextran amines for retrograde and anterograde labeling. Retrograde DiI tracing from the anterior vertical canal labeled neurons scattered throughout the whole superior vestibular ganglion, with denser labeling at the dorsal and central regions. Horizontal canal neurons were scattered along the dorsoventral axis with more clustering toward the dorsal and ventral poles of this axis. Utricular ganglion cells occupied predominantly the central region of the superior vestibular ganglion. This utricular population overlapped with both the anterior vertical and horizontal canals' ganglion cells. Posterior vertical canal neurons were clustered in the posterior part of the inferior vestibular ganglion. The saccular neurons were distributed in the two parts of the vestibular ganglion, the superior and inferior ganglia. Within the inferior ganglion, the saccular neurons were clustered in the anterior part. In the superior ganglion, the saccular neurons were widely scattered throughout the whole ganglion with more numerous neurons at the posterior half. Small and large neurons were labeled from all endorgans. Examination of the fiber trajectory within the superior division of the vestibular nerve showed no clear lamination of the fibers innervating the different endorgans. These results demonstrate an overlapping pattern between the different populations within the superior ganglion, while in the inferior ganglion, the posterior canal and saccular neurons show tighter clustering but incomplete segregation. This distribution implies that the ganglion cells are assigned for their target during development in a stochastic rather than topographical fashion.

  16. Advances in Auditory and Vestibular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2010-01-01

    Auditory and Vestibular medicine is becoming more accepted as a specialty of its own, Medical NeurOtology. Recent advances in the field have been instrumental in the understanding of the scientific foundations, pathophysiology, clinical approach and management of patients with hearing and vestibular disorders. This paper will review these advances. PMID:20711412

  17. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  18. Clinical and Radiographic Factors Predicting Hearing Preservation Rates in Large Vestibular Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Westerberg, Brian D; Dong, Charles; Akagami, Ryojo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Postoperative hearing preservation rates for patients with large vestibular schwannomas range from 0 to 43%. The clinical and radiographic factors predicting hearing preservation in smaller vestibular schwannomas are well described; however, their importance in larger tumors is unclear. We investigated factors predicting hearing preservation in large vestibular schwannomas. Design Retrospective review. Setting Quaternary care academic center. Participants A total of 85 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas > 3 cm underwent retrosigmoid resections. Main Outcomes Measures Preoperative and postoperative serviceable hearing rates. Methods Clinical and radiographic data including preoperative and postoperative audiograms, preoperative symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and postoperative facial weakness were analyzed. Results Hearing was preserved in 41% of patients (17 of 42) with preoperative serviceable hearing. Hypertension and diabetes increased the likelihood of preoperative hearing loss. Preoperative tinnitus predicted a lower likelihood of hearing preservation. No radiographic factors predicted hearing preservation; however, larger tumor size, smaller fourth ventricular width, and the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid cleft surrounding the tumor predicted postoperative facial weakness. Conclusion Systemic comorbidities may influence hearing loss preoperatively in patients with large vestibular schwannomas. The absence of tinnitus may reflect hearing reserve and propensity for hearing preservation. Preoperative radiographic features did not predict hearing preservation despite some associations with postoperative facial weakness. PMID:27175312

  19. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  20. Endolymphatic space size in patients with vestibular migraine and Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takafumi; Yoshida, Tadao; Suga, Kenji; Kato, Masahiro; Otake, Hironao; Kato, Ken; Teranishi, Masaaki; Sone, Michihiko; Sugiura, Saiko; Kuno, Kayao; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Naganawa, Shinji; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    Ménière's disease (MD) is characterized by episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus. Vestibular migraine (VM) is a relatively new disorder that is characterized by episodic vertigo or dizziness, coexisting migraine and absence of hearing loss. It is occasionally difficult to distinguish between VM and vestibular MD with headache. Because endolymphatic hydrops (EH) is a characteristic sign of MD, we attempted to evaluate endolymphatic space size in both diseases. Endolymphatic space size in the vestibule and the cochlea was evaluated in seven patients with VM and in seven age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular MD. For visualization of the endolymphatic space, 3T magnetic resonance imaging was taken 4 h after intravenous injection of gadolinium contrast agents using three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and HYbriD of reversed image of positive endolymph signal and native image of positive perilymph signal techniques. In the vestibule of VM patients, EH was not observed, with the exception of two patients with unilateral or bilateral EH. In contrast, in the vestibule of patients with vestibular MD, all patients had significant EH, bilaterally or unilaterally. These results indicate that endolymphatic space size is significantly different between patients with VM and vestibular MD.

  1. Galvanic vestibular stimulation improves the results of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Sergio; Ferrero, Antonela; Pianetti, Guillermina; Escolá, Natalia; Arteaga, María Victoria; Frankel, Lilian

    2011-09-01

    Here, we present findings from a three-step investigation of the effect of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in normal subjects and in subjects undergoing vestibular rehabilitation (VR). In an initial study, we examined the body sway of 10 normal subjects after one minute of 2 mA GVS. The effect of the stimulation lasted for at least 20 minutes in all subjects and up to two hours in 70% of the subjects. We then compared a group of patients who received conventional VR (40 patients) with a group that received a combination of VR and GVS. Results suggest a significant improvement in the second group. Finally, we attempted to establish the optimal number of GVS sessions and to rule out a placebo effect. Fifteen patients received "systematic" GVS: five sessions, once a week. Five patients received "nonsystematic" galvanic stimulation in a sham protocol, which included two stimulations of the clavicle. These data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test and indicated that the best results were obtained after three sessions of GVS and no placebo effect was observed. PMID:22360772

  2. Stochastic Modeling of Laminar-Turbulent Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Choudhari, Meelan

    2002-01-01

    Stochastic versions of stability equations are developed in order to develop integrated models of transition and turbulence and to understand the effects of uncertain initial conditions on disturbance growth. Stochastic forms of the resonant triad equations, a high Reynolds number asymptotic theory, and the parabolized stability equations are developed.

  3. Vestibular perceptual thresholds to angular rotation in acute unilateral vestibular paresis and with galvanic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Cousins, Sian; Seemungal, Barry M; Gresty, Michael A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2011-09-01

    Studies of compensation of injury to the human vestibular system have, in the main, focused on the vestibular-ocular reflex. Probing vestibular perception allows more of the sensory pathway to be assessed. We present a novel paradigm for simultaneously testing vestibular perceptual and nystagmic thresholds to angular acceleration around an earth vertical axis. The perceptual thresholds can be modulated asymmetrically in normal subjects by DC galvanic stimulation with the head flexed in the roll plane, as expected from the main torsional plane of action of the galvanic stimulus. The perceptual and nystagmic thresholds were bilaterally elevated in acute vestibular neuritis, a unilateral condition, possibly due to central suppression of vestibular input. The degree of asymmetry in thresholds was small in comparison with the large caloric asymmetry present in the patients, indicating a relatively preserved capacity for near-threshold performance of the non-damaged labyrinth both in the "on" and "off" directions.

  4. Aging of the Human Vestibular System.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Christopher K

    2015-08-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  5. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  6. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  7. Vestibular implants: Hope for improving the quality of life of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Guinand, N; van de Berg, R; Ranieri, M; Cavuscens, S; DiGiovanna, J; Nguyen, T A K; Micera, S; Stokroos, R; Kingma, H; Guyot, J P; Perez Fornos, A

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system plays an essential role in crucial tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation. Currently, there is no effective treatment for a bilateral loss of the vestibular function (BVL). The quality of life of affected patients is significantly impaired. During the last decade, our group has explored the potential of using electrical stimulation to artificially restore the vestibular function. Our vestibular implant prototype consists of a custom modified cochlear implant featuring one to three vestibular electrodes implanted in the proximity of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve; in addition to the main cochlear array. Special surgical techniques for safe implantation of these devices have been developed. In addition, we have developed stimulation strategies to generate bidirectional eye movements as well as the necessary interfaces to capture the signal from a motion sensor (e.g., gyroscope) and use it to modulate the stimulation signals delivered to the vestibular nerves. To date, 24 vestibular electrodes have been implanted in 11 BVL patients. Using a virtual motion profile to modulate the "baseline" electrical stimulation, vestibular responses could be evoked with 21 electrodes. Eye movements with mean peak eye velocities of 32°/s and predominantly in the plane of the stimulated canal were successfully generated. These are within the range of normal compensatory eye movements during walking and were large enough to have a significant effect on the patients' visual acuity. These results indicate that electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve has a significant functional impact; eye movements generated this way could be sufficient to restore gaze stabilization during essential everyday tasks such as walking. The innovative concept of the vestibular implant has the potential to restore the vestibular function and have a central role in improving the quality of life of BVL patients in the near future

  8. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  9. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  10. Vestibular reactions to spaceflight: human factors issues.

    PubMed

    Young, L R

    2000-09-01

    Vestibular function, along with other sensory systems influencing spatial orientation, can have a profound influence on the ability of astronauts to function effectively. Beyond the well-known problems of space motion sickness, vestibular effects can influence astronaut well-being and performance during all phases of a space mission. This paper discusses some of the major vestibular reactions affecting human factors encountered in all space missions, and covers them chronologically in the following sequence: launch, early on-orbit, late on-orbit, EVA, artificial gravity, re-entry, and post-landing.

  11. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  12. Beamlets from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Perri, Silvia; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a realization of the stochastic Fermi acceleration mechanism. The model consists of test particles moving between two oscillating magnetic clouds and differs from the usual Fermi-Ulam model in two ways. (i) Particles can penetrate inside clouds before being reflected. (ii) Particles can radiate a fraction of their energy during the process. Since the Fermi mechanism is at work, particles are stochastically accelerated, even in the presence of the radiated energy. Furthermore, due to a kind of resonance between particles and oscillating clouds, the probability density function of particles is strongly modified, thus generating beams of accelerated particles rather than a translation of the whole distribution function to higher energy. This simple mechanism could account for the presence of beamlets in some space plasma physics situations.

  13. Acute unilateral loss of vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Fetter, M

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function is the most severe condition that can occur in the vestibular system. The clinical syndrome is caused by the physiologic properties of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) arc. In the normal situation, the two peripheral vestibular end organs are connected to a functional unit in coplanar pairs of semicircular canals working in a push-pull mode. "Push-pull" mode means that, when one side is excited, the other side is inhibited, and vice versa due to two mechanisms. First, first-order vestibular afferents are bipolar cells. They have a tonic firing rate that is modulated up or down depending on the direction of rotation. Second, via inhibitory neural connections of second-order vestibular neurons between the vestibular nuclei (vestibular commissural system), the excited side inhibits further the contralateral side. The neural signals are encoded as the difference of the change in firing rate of the vestibular neurons modulating the tonic firing rate on both sides in opposite directions (one side up, the contralateral side down). When the head is not moving, the two peripheral vestibular end organs generate a resting firing rate, which is exactly equal on both sides. When the head is rotated, for example, to the right, the right-sided first-order vestibular afferents increase their discharge rate and the left-sided ones decrease their firing rate. This leads to increase in firing rate of also the type I second-order vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei, which synapse with inhibitory type II neurons on the contralateral side, further decreasing the firing rate in the second-order vestibular neurons in the contralateral vestibular nucleus. When the direction of head rotation is reversed, the behavior of the type I neurons on the two sides of the head is reversed. The same relation exists between the coplanar vertical canal afferents on the two sides of the head. When there is unilateral damage to the end organ or the

  14. Primal Terror: A Perspective of Vestibular Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The effects of "primal terror", the emotional experience of one's inability to naturally maintain balance in opposition to gravity and to integrate vestibular input, are discussed for children with learning and perceptual problems. (CL)

  15. The three faces of vestibular ganglionitis.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Richard R; Gacek, Mark R

    2002-02-01

    We present temporal bone and clinical evidence that common syndromes of recurrent vertigo are caused by a viral infection of the vestibular ganglion. In the present series, histopathologic and radiologic changes in the vestibular ganglion and meatal ganglion were consistent with a viral inflammation of ganglion cells in cases of Meniere's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and vestibular neuronitis. Clinical observations of multiple neuropathies involving cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII on the same side in patients with recurrent vertigo are best explained by a cranial polyganglionitis caused by a neurotrophic virus, which is reactivated by a stressful event later in life. The reactivation of the latent virus may manifest as one of the above vertigo syndromes, depending on the part of the vestibular ganglion that is inflamed, the type and strain of the virus, and host resistance.

  16. Basic Concepts in Understanding Recovery of Function in Vestibular Reflex Networks during Vestibular Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Peusner, Kenna D.; Shao, Mei; Reddaway, Rebecca; Hirsch, June C.

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input–output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation. PMID:22363316

  17. Outcome analysis of individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Angel, C. R.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Gianna, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of vestibular rehabilitation protocols in subjects with peripheral vestibular disorders compared with normal and abnormal control subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study using repeated measure, matched control design. Subjects were solicited consecutively according to these criteria: vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) sensory organization tests (SOTs) 5 and 6 and underwent rehabilitation; vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of SOTs 5 and 6 and did not undergo rehabilitation; and normal subjects (normal SOTs). SETTING: Tertiary neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Men and women over age 18 with chronic vestibular disorders and chief complaints of unsteadiness, imbalance, and/or motion intolerance, and normal subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Pre- and post-rehabilitation assessment included CDP, vestibular disability, and activities of daily living questionnaires. Individualized rehabilitation plans were designed and implemented to address the subject's specific complaints and functional deficits. Supervised sessions were held at weekly intervals, and self-administered programs were devised for daily home use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CDP composite and SOT scores, number of falls on CDP, and self-assessment questionnaire results. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent rehabilitation (Group A) showed statistically significant improvements in SOTs, overall composite score, and reduction in falls compared with abnormal (Group B) control groups. Group A's performances after rehabilitation were not significantly different from those of normal subjects (Group C) in SOTs 3 through 6, and close to normal on SOTs 1 and 2. Subjects in Group A also reported statistically significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome measures of vestibular protocol physical therapy confirmed objective and subjective improvement in subjects with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders. These

  18. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage.

  19. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  20. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  1. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-04-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  2. Vestibular Impairment in Frontotemporal Dementia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Kadono, Kotarou; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Takiguchi, Mao; Terada, Makoto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Moriyama, Tetsuya; Yanagiha, Kumi; Nohara, Seitaro; Tozaka, Naoki; Miyake, Zenshi; Aizawa, Satoshi; Furusho, Kentaro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background No studies to date have attempted to evaluate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from the perspective of the vestibular system. Objective The present study examined vestibular function in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) clinical syndrome and evaluated whether vestibular disorders are involved in the clinical symptoms due to FTD. Methods Fourteen patients with FTD syndrome, as well as healthy elderly controls without dementia, were included in the present study. All subjects underwent vestibular function tests using electronystagmography, such as caloric tests and visual suppression (VS) tests, in which the induced caloric nystagmus was suppressed by visual stimuli. The association between clinical symptoms and vestibular function in the FTD syndrome group was further examined. Results In the FTD syndrome group, caloric nystagmus was not necessarily suppressed during VS tests. Furthermore, VS was observed to be significantly impaired in FTD syndrome patients with gait disturbance as compared to those without such disturbance. Conclusion The present study revealed that impairment of VS in patients with FTD results in an inability to regulate vestibular function by means of visual perception, regardless of multiple presumed neuropathological backgrounds. This could also be associated with gait disturbance in patients with FTD syndrome. PMID:27350780

  3. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  4. Unilateral vestibular loss impairs external space representation.

    PubMed

    Borel, Liliane; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Cauvin, Pierre; Dumitrescu, Michel; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Péruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal) and far (extrapersonal) spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation), and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss.

  5. Unilateral Vestibular Loss Impairs External Space Representation

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Liliane; Redon-Zouiteni, Christine; Cauvin, Pierre; Dumitrescu, Michel; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Péruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for a wide range of postural and oculomotor functions and maintains an internal, updated representation of the position and movement of the head in space. In this study, we assessed whether unilateral vestibular loss affects external space representation. Patients with Menière's disease and healthy participants were instructed to point to memorized targets in near (peripersonal) and far (extrapersonal) spaces in the absence or presence of a visual background. These individuals were also required to estimate their body pointing direction. Menière's disease patients were tested before unilateral vestibular neurotomy and during the recovery period (one week and one month after the operation), and healthy participants were tested at similar times. Unilateral vestibular loss impaired the representation of both the external space and the body pointing direction: in the dark, the configuration of perceived targets was shifted toward the lesioned side and compressed toward the contralesioned hemifield, with higher pointing error in the near space. Performance varied according to the time elapsed after neurotomy: deficits were stronger during the early stages, while gradual compensation occurred subsequently. These findings provide the first demonstration of the critical role of vestibular signals in the representation of external space and of body pointing direction in the early stages after unilateral vestibular loss. PMID:24523916

  6. On the recall of vestibular sensations.

    PubMed

    zu Eulenburg, Peter; Müller-Forell, W; Dieterich, M

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies on the recall or imagination of a distinctive task in the motor network or of sensations in sensory systems (visual, acoustic, nociceptive, gustatory, and olfactory) demonstrated that the respective primary cortex is often involved in the mental imagery process. Our aim was to examine this phenomenon in the vestibular system using fMRI. Sixteen healthy subjects were asked to remember the feeling of a rotatory chair procedure in contrast to an identical situation at rest. Shortly afterwards they were asked to recall the vestibular experience in a 1.5-T scanner. The resulting activations were then compared with the responses of a galvanic vestibular control experiment and a rest condition. The vestibular recall showed significant bihemispheric activations in the inferior frontal gyri, the anterior operculum, the middle cingulate, the putamen, the globus pallidus, the premotor motor cortex, and the anterior insula. We found activations in regions known to play a role in spatial referencing, motor programs, and attention in the recall of vestibular sensations. But important known relay stations for the cortical processing of vestibular information showed neither relevant activations nor deactivations.

  7. Vestibular stimulation affects optic-flow sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark; O'Mahony, Simon; Ibbotson, Michael R; Kohlhagen, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Typically, multiple cues can be used to generate a particular percept. Our area of interest is the extent to which humans are able to synergistically combine cues that are generated when moving through an environment. For example, movement through the environment leads to both visual (optic-flow) and vestibular stimulation, and studies have shown that non-human primates are able to combine these cues to generate a more accurate perception of heading than can be obtained with either cue in isolation. Here we investigate whether humans show a similar ability to synergistically combine optic-flow and vestibular cues. This was achieved by determining the sensitivity to optic-flow stimuli while physically moving the observer, and hence producing a vestibular signal, that was either consistent with the optic-flow signal, eg a radially expanding pattern coupled with forward motion, or inconsistent with it, eg a radially expanding pattern with backward motion. Results indicate that humans are more sensitive to motion-in-depth optic-flow stimuli when they are combined with complementary vestibular signals than when they are combined with conflicting vestibular signals. These results indicate that in humans, like in nonhuman primates, there is perceptual integration of visual and vestibular signals. PMID:21180352

  8. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation.

    PubMed

    Osler, Callum J; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-11-01

    The same pattern of vestibular afferent feedback may signify a loss of balance or a change in body orientation, depending upon the initial head posture. To resolve this ambiguity and generate an appropriate motor response, the CNS must transform vestibular information from a head-centred reference frame into relevant motor coordinates. But what if the reference frame is continuously moving? Here, we ask if this neural transformation process is continuously updated during a voluntary change in head posture. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to induce a sensation of head roll motion in blindfolded subjects marching on the spot. When head orientation was fixed, this caused unconscious turning behaviour that was maximal during neck flexion, minimal with the head level and reversed direction with neck extension. Subjects were then asked to produce a continuous voluntary change in head pitch, while GVS was applied. As the neck moved from full flexion into extension, turn velocity was continuously modulated and even reversed direction, reflecting the pattern observed during the head-fixed condition. Hence, an identical vestibular input resulted in motor output which was dynamically modulated by changes in head pitch. However, response magnitude was significantly reduced, suggesting possible suppression of vestibular input during voluntary head movement. Nevertheless, these results show that the CNS continuously reinterprets vestibular exafference to account for ongoing voluntary changes in head posture. This may explain why the head can be moved freely without losing the sense of balance and orientation.

  9. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  10. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  11. The Components of Vestibular Cognition--Motion Versus Spatial Perception.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular cognition can be divided into two main functions--a primary vestibular sensation of self-motion and a derived sensation of spatial orientation. Although the vestibular system requires calibration from other senses for optimal functioning, both vestibular spatial and vestibular motion perception are typically employed when navigating without vision. A recent important finding is the cerebellar mediation of the uncoupling of reflex (i.e., the vestibular-ocular reflex) from vestibular motion perception (Perceptuo-Reflex Uncoupling). The brain regions that mediate vestibular motion and vestibular spatial perception is an area of on-going research activity. However, there is data to support the notion that vestibular motion perception is mediated by multiple brain regions. In contrast, vestibular spatial perception appears to be mediated by posterior brain areas although currently the exact locus is unclear. I will discuss the experimental evidence that support this functional dichotomy in vestibular cognition (i.e., motion processing vs. spatial orientation). Along the way I will highlight relevant practical technical tips in testing vestibular cognition. PMID:26595954

  12. Stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    'Stochastic thermodynamics as a conceptual framework combines the stochastic energetics approach introduced a decade ago by Sekimoto [1] with the idea that entropy can consistently be assigned to a single fluctuating trajectory [2]'. This quote, taken from Udo Seifert's [3] 2008 review, nicely summarizes the basic ideas behind stochastic thermodynamics: for small systems, driven by external forces and in contact with a heat bath at a well-defined temperature, stochastic energetics [4] defines the exchanged work and heat along a single fluctuating trajectory and connects them to changes in the internal (system) energy by an energy balance analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. Additionally, providing a consistent definition of trajectory-wise entropy production gives rise to second-law-like relations and forms the basis for a 'stochastic thermodynamics' along individual fluctuating trajectories. In order to construct meaningful concepts of work, heat and entropy production for single trajectories, their definitions are based on the stochastic equations of motion modeling the physical system of interest. Because of this, they are valid even for systems that are prevented from equilibrating with the thermal environment by external driving forces (or other sources of non-equilibrium). In that way, the central notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as heat, work and entropy, are consistently extended to the non-equilibrium realm. In the (non-equilibrium) ensemble, the trajectory-wise quantities acquire distributions. General statements derived within stochastic thermodynamics typically refer to properties of these distributions, and are valid in the non-equilibrium regime even beyond the linear response. The extension of statistical mechanics and of exact thermodynamic statements to the non-equilibrium realm has been discussed from the early days of statistical mechanics more than 100 years ago. This debate culminated in the development of linear response

  13. Multiple Unilateral Vestibular Schwannomas: Segmental NF2 or Sporadic Occurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Matthew L.; Gompel, Jamie J. Van

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report a case of a patient presenting with two separate unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs) without other stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Study Design This article discusses a case report and review of the literature. Setting Tertiary academic referral center. Participants A 41-year-old female was referred for evaluation of a left-sided 1.8-cm cerebellopontine angle tumor centered on the porus acusticus and a separate ipsilateral 3-mm intracanalicular tumor appearing to arise from the superior vestibular nerve. The patient denied a family history of NF2. Neurotologic examination was unremarkable and close review of magnetic resonance imaging did not find any other stigmata of NF2. Results The patient underwent left-sided retrosigmoid craniotomy with gross total resection of both tumors. Final pathology confirmed benign schwannoma. The INI1/SMARCB1 staining pattern did not suggest NF2 or schwannomatosis. Conclusions This is only the third report of a case with multiple unilateral VSs occurring in a patient without other features of NF2. Herein, the authors review the two other reports and discuss potential mechanisms for this rare phenomenon. PMID:27354931

  14. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  15. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  16. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  17. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, Susan J.; Whitney, Susan L.; Cass, Stephen P.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Fife, Terry D.; Furman, Joseph M.; Getchius, Thomas S. D.; Goebel, Joel A.; Shepard, Neil T.; Woodhouse, Sheelah N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncompensated vestibular hypofunction results in postural instability, visual blurring with head movement, and subjective complaints of dizziness and/or imbalance. We sought to answer the question, “Is vestibular exercise effective at enhancing recovery of function in people with peripheral (unilateral or bilateral) vestibular hypofunction?” Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed in 5 databases published after 1985 and 5 additional sources for relevant publications were searched. Article types included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case control series, and case series for human subjects, published in English. One hundred thirty-five articles were identified as relevant to this clinical practice guideline. Results/Discussion: Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of benefit over harm, clinicians should offer vestibular rehabilitation to persons with unilateral and bilateral vestibular hypofunction with impairments and functional limitations related to the vestibular deficit. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of harm over benefit, clinicians should not include voluntary saccadic or smooth-pursuit eye movements in isolation (ie, without head movement) as specific exercises for gaze stability. Based on moderate evidence, clinicians may offer specific exercise techniques to target identified impairments or functional limitations. Based on moderate evidence and in consideration of patient preference, clinicians may provide supervised vestibular rehabilitation. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence, clinicians may prescribe a minimum of 3 times per day for the performance of gaze stability exercises as 1 component of a home exercise program. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence (range of supervised visits: 2-38 weeks, mean = 10 weeks), clinicians may consider providing adequate supervised vestibular rehabilitation sessions for the

  18. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  19. Caloric vestibular stimulation modulates nociceptive evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick; Bottini, Gabriella; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Vestibular stimulation has been reported to alleviate central pain. Clinical and physiological studies confirm pervasive interactions between vestibular signals and somatosensory circuits, including nociception. However, the neural mechanisms underlying vestibular-induced analgesia remain unclear, and previous clinical studies cannot rule out explanations based on alternative, non-specific effects such as distraction or placebo. To investigate how vestibular inputs influence nociception, we combined caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) with psychophysical and electrocortical responses elicited by nociceptive-specific laser stimulation in humans (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs). Cold water CVS applied to the left ear resulted in significantly lower subjective pain intensity for experimental laser pain to the left hand immediately after CVS, relative both to before CVS and to 1 h after CVS. This transient reduction in pain perception was associated with reduced amplitude of all LEP components, including the early N1 wave reflecting the first arrival of nociceptive input to primary somatosensory cortex. We conclude that cold left ear CVS elicits a modulation of both nociceptive processing and pain perception. The analgesic effect induced by CVS could be mediated either by subcortical gating of the ascending nociceptive input, or by direct modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  20. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  1. Longitudinal performance of an implantable vestibular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Ling, Leo; Oxford, Trey; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Rubinstein, Jay T.; Phillips, James O.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of vestibular function may be treatable with an implantable vestibular prosthesis that stimulates semicircular canal afferents with biphasic pulse trains. Several studies have demonstrated short-term activation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with electrical stimulation. Fewer long-term studies have been restricted to small numbers of animals and stimulation designed to produce adaptive changes in the electrically elicited response. This study is the first large consecutive series of implanted rhesus macaque to be studied longitudinally using brief stimuli designed to limit adaptive changes in response, so that the efficacy of electrical activation can be studied over time, across surgeries, canals and animals. The implantation of a vestibular prosthesis in animals with intact vestibular end organs produces variable responses to electrical stimulation across canals and animals, which change in threshold for electrical activation of eye movements and in elicited slow phase velocities over time. These thresholds are consistently lower, and the slow phase velocities higher, than those obtained in human subjects. The changes do not appear to be correlated with changes in electrode impedance. The variability in response suggests that empirically derived transfer functions may be required to optimize the response of individual canals to a vestibular prosthesis, and that this function may need to be remapped over time. PMID:25245586

  2. [Is the sense of verticality vestibular?].

    PubMed

    Barra, J; Pérennou, D

    2013-06-01

    The vestibular system constitutes an inertial sensor, which detects linear (otoliths) and angular (semicircular canals) accelerations of the head in the three dimensions. The otoliths are specialized in the detection of linear accelerations and can be used by the brain as a "plumb line" coding earth gravity acceleration (direction). This property of otolithic system suggested that the sense of verticality is supported by the vestibular system. The preeminence of vestibular involvement in the sense of verticality stated in the 1900s was progressively supplanted by the notion of internal models of verticality. The internal models of verticality involve rules and properties of integration of vestibular graviception, somaesthesic graviception, and vision. The construction of a mental representation of verticality was mainly modeled as a bottom-up organization integrating visual, somatosensory and vestibular information without any cognitive modulations. Recent studies reported that the construction of internal models of verticality is not an automatic multi-sensory integration process but corresponds to more complex mechanisms including top-down influences such as awareness of body orientation or spatial representations. PMID:23856176

  3. [Is the sense of verticality vestibular?].

    PubMed

    Barra, J; Pérennou, D

    2013-06-01

    The vestibular system constitutes an inertial sensor, which detects linear (otoliths) and angular (semicircular canals) accelerations of the head in the three dimensions. The otoliths are specialized in the detection of linear accelerations and can be used by the brain as a "plumb line" coding earth gravity acceleration (direction). This property of otolithic system suggested that the sense of verticality is supported by the vestibular system. The preeminence of vestibular involvement in the sense of verticality stated in the 1900s was progressively supplanted by the notion of internal models of verticality. The internal models of verticality involve rules and properties of integration of vestibular graviception, somaesthesic graviception, and vision. The construction of a mental representation of verticality was mainly modeled as a bottom-up organization integrating visual, somatosensory and vestibular information without any cognitive modulations. Recent studies reported that the construction of internal models of verticality is not an automatic multi-sensory integration process but corresponds to more complex mechanisms including top-down influences such as awareness of body orientation or spatial representations.

  4. Spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Rossana; Pollock, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Watch, wait, and rescan” (WWR) has an established place as a successful management option for a significant proportion of vestibular schwannomas (VS) as an alternative to microsurgical removal or stereotactic radiotherapy. VS may grow slowly and continuously, followed by stagnation or even shrinkage. We present two case reports of spontaneous shrinkage of VS along with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 29-year-old female presented with a progressive history of visual blurring and intermittent diplopia over 2 months. A 29 mm of maximum intracranial diameter (ICD) VS with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The patient underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt with resolution of her symptoms and opted for initial WWR management. Interval scanning between 2007 and 2014 showed progressive reduction in the maximum ICD together with reduction in the degree of central tumor enhancement. Maximum ICD at most recent follow up was 22 mm. A 28-year-old female was referred with right sensorineural deafness. A right VS of maximum ICD of 27 mm was diagnosed. Initial WWR management was planned after discussion. Serial imaging showed an initial increase in the size of the tumor followed by progressive reduction in size. The most recent follow up showed a maximum ICD of 20 mm. Conclusion: Early WWR management can be associated with spontaneous shrinkage of VS over time. Prospective clinical study of larger numbers of such cases using the UK VS database may help to identify predictive factors for the spontaneous regression of VS. PMID:27280055

  5. Internal models of self-motion: computations that suppress vestibular reafference in early vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Brooks, Jessica X; Jamali, Mohsen; Carriot, Jerome; Massot, Corentin

    2011-05-01

    In everyday life, vestibular sensors are activated by both self-generated and externally applied head movements. The ability to distinguish inputs that are a consequence of our own actions (i.e., active motion) from those that result from changes in the external world (i.e., passive or unexpected motion) is essential for perceptual stability and accurate motor control. Recent work has made progress toward understanding how the brain distinguishes between these two kinds of sensory inputs. We have performed a series of experiments in which single-unit recordings were made from vestibular afferents and central neurons in alert macaque monkeys during rotation and translation. Vestibular afferents showed no differences in firing variability or sensitivity during active movements when compared to passive movements. In contrast, the analyses of neuronal firing rates revealed that neurons at the first central stage of vestibular processing (i.e., in the vestibular nuclei) were effectively less sensitive to active motion. Notably, however, this ability to distinguish between active and passive motion was not a general feature of early central processing, but rather was a characteristic of a distinct group of neurons known to contribute to postural control and spatial orientation. Our most recent studies have addressed how vestibular and proprioceptive inputs are integrated in the vestibular cerebellum, a region likely to be involved in generating an internal model of self-motion. We propose that this multimodal integration within the vestibular cerebellum is required for eliminating self-generated vestibular information from the subsequent computation of orientation and posture control at the first central stage of processing.

  6. Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting as Oral Dysgeusia: An Easily Missed Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma; Staines, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a fifty-year-old male patient who was referred to the Oral Medicine Department with a complaint of a salty taste. History taking subsequently revealed that the patient was also experiencing intermittent numbness of his left lower lip, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the left ear. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed which revealed a large vestibular schwannoma affecting the left vestibulocochlear nerve, which was treated surgically. This case shows the importance of taking a detailed history in a patient presenting with an initial complaint of oral dysgeusia. It also highlights the possibility of significant underlying pathology, presenting with initial low level, nonspecific complaints such as an altered taste, and the rationale for imaging patients who report unilateral facial hypoesthesia. PMID:27022490

  7. Calcification of vestibular schwannoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Jinlu; Qu, Limei; Li, Yunqian

    2012-10-02

    Calcification rarely occurs in vestibular schwannoma (VS), and only seven cases of calcified VS have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 48-year-old man with VS, who had a history of progressive left-sided hearing loss for 3 years. Neurological examination revealed that he had left-sided hearing loss and left cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography angiography showed a mass with calcification in the left cerebellopontine angle (CPA). The tumor was successfully removed via suboccipital craniotomy, and postoperative histopathology showed that the tumor was a schwannoma. We reviewed seven cases of calcified VS that were previously reported in the literature, and we analyzed and summarized the characteristics of these tumors, including the calcification, texture, and blood supply. We conclude that calcification in VS is associated with its texture and blood supply, and these characteristics affect the surgical removal of the tumor.

  8. Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting as Oral Dysgeusia: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a fifty-year-old male patient who was referred to the Oral Medicine Department with a complaint of a salty taste. History taking subsequently revealed that the patient was also experiencing intermittent numbness of his left lower lip, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the left ear. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed which revealed a large vestibular schwannoma affecting the left vestibulocochlear nerve, which was treated surgically. This case shows the importance of taking a detailed history in a patient presenting with an initial complaint of oral dysgeusia. It also highlights the possibility of significant underlying pathology, presenting with initial low level, nonspecific complaints such as an altered taste, and the rationale for imaging patients who report unilateral facial hypoesthesia. PMID:27022490

  9. Vestibular failure in children with congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Shinjo, Yukiko; Jin, Yulian; Takegoshi, Hideki

    2008-09-01

    Congenitally deaf infants and children commonly suffer vestibular failure in both ears, and impairment of postural control, locomotion, and gait. The development of gross motor functions, such as head control, sitting, and walking is likely to be delayed, but fine motor function is usually preserved unless disorders of the central nervous system are present. These children can eventually catch up with their normal peers in terms of development and growth as a result of central vestibular compensation. The visual and somatosensory systems, pyramidal and extrapyramidal motor system (cerebellum, basal ganglia, cerebrum) and intellectual development, compensate for vestibular failure in infants and children with congenitally hypoactive or absent function of the semicircular canals and otolith organs. PMID:18821229

  10. Optical nerve stimulation for a vestibular prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Bierer, Steven M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Phillips, James O.

    2009-02-01

    Infrared Nerve Stimulation (INS) offers several advantages over electrical stimulation, including more precise spatial selectivity and improved surgical access. In this study, INS and electrical stimulation were compared in their ability to activate the vestibular branch of the VIIIth nerve, as a potential way to treat balance disorders. The superior and lateral canals of the vestibular system of Guinea pigs were identified and approached with the aid of precise 3-D reconstructions. A monopolar platinum stimulating electrode was positioned near the ampullae of the canals, and biphasic current pulses were used to stimulate vestibular evoked potentials and eye movements. Thresholds and input/output functions were measured for various stimulus conditions. A short pulsed diode laser (Capella, Lockheed Martin-Aculight, Inc., Bothell WA) was placed in the same anatomical position and various stimulus conditions were evaluated in their ability to evoke similar potentials and eye movements.

  11. Vestibular failure in children with congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Shinjo, Yukiko; Jin, Yulian; Takegoshi, Hideki

    2008-09-01

    Congenitally deaf infants and children commonly suffer vestibular failure in both ears, and impairment of postural control, locomotion, and gait. The development of gross motor functions, such as head control, sitting, and walking is likely to be delayed, but fine motor function is usually preserved unless disorders of the central nervous system are present. These children can eventually catch up with their normal peers in terms of development and growth as a result of central vestibular compensation. The visual and somatosensory systems, pyramidal and extrapyramidal motor system (cerebellum, basal ganglia, cerebrum) and intellectual development, compensate for vestibular failure in infants and children with congenitally hypoactive or absent function of the semicircular canals and otolith organs.

  12. Estimation of Optical Stimulus Amplitude for Balance Training Using Electrical Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts following gravitational transitions. By training astronauts preflight with supra-threshold noisy stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS), the central nervous system can be trained to reweight sensory information by utilizing veridical information from other sensory inputs, such as vision and proprioception, for postural and gait control. This, in turn, can enhance functional performance in novel gravitational environments. The optimal maximum amplitude of stimulation to simulate the effect of deterioration in vestibular inputs for preflight training or for evaluating vestibular contribution in functional tests in general, however, has not yet been identified. Most studies have used arbitrary but fixed maximum current amplitudes from 3 to 5 mA in the medio-lateral (ML) direction to disrupt balance function in both ML and anterior-posterior directions in healthy adults. The goal of this study was to determine the minimum SVS level that yields an equivalently degraded balance performance. Fourteen subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in the ML direction. Objective perceptual motion thresholds, were estimated ahead of time by having subjects sit on a chair with their eyes closed and giving 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimulation at various current amplitudes. Results from the balance task suggest that using stimulation amplitudes of 280% of motion-perceptual threshold (2.2 mA on average) significantly degraded balance performance and increasing the stimulation amplitude did not lead to further degradation. We anticipate that preflight training using supra-threshold SVS stimulation will be a component of preflight sensorimotor adaptability training designed to improve adaptability to novel

  13. Electrical vestibular stimuli to enhance vestibulo-motor output and improve subject comfort.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Geers, Anoek M; Vlaar, Martijn P; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Electrical vestibular stimulation is often used to assess vestibulo-motor and postural responses in both clinical and research settings. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) is a recently established technique with many advantages over its square-wave counterpart; however, the evoked muscle responses remain relatively small. Although the vestibular-evoked responses can be enhanced by increasing the stimulus amplitude, subjects often perceive these higher intensity electrical stimuli as noxious or painful. Here, we developed multisine vestibular stimulation (MVS) signals that include precise frequency contributions to increase signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of stimulus-evoked muscle and motor responses. Subjects were exposed to three different MVS stimuli to establish that: 1) MVS signals evoke equivalent vestibulo-motor responses compared to SVS while improving subject comfort and reducing experimentation time, 2) stimulus-evoked vestibulo-motor responses are reliably estimated as a linear system and 3) specific components of the cumulant density time domain vestibulo-motor responses can be targeted by controlling the frequency content of the input stimulus. Our results revealed that in comparison to SVS, MVS signals increased the SNR 3-6 times, reduced the minimum experimentation time by 85% and improved subjective measures of comfort by 20-80%. Vestibulo-motor responses measured using both EMG and force were not substantially affected by nonlinear distortions. In addition, by limiting the contribution of high frequencies within the MVS input stimulus, the magnitude of the medium latency time domain motor output response was increased by 58%. These results demonstrate that MVS stimuli can be designed to target and enhance vestibulo-motor output responses while simultaneously improving subject comfort, which should prove beneficial for both research and clinical applications. PMID:24392130

  14. Electrical vestibular stimuli to enhance vestibulo-motor output and improve subject comfort.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Geers, Anoek M; Vlaar, Martijn P; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Electrical vestibular stimulation is often used to assess vestibulo-motor and postural responses in both clinical and research settings. Stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) is a recently established technique with many advantages over its square-wave counterpart; however, the evoked muscle responses remain relatively small. Although the vestibular-evoked responses can be enhanced by increasing the stimulus amplitude, subjects often perceive these higher intensity electrical stimuli as noxious or painful. Here, we developed multisine vestibular stimulation (MVS) signals that include precise frequency contributions to increase signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of stimulus-evoked muscle and motor responses. Subjects were exposed to three different MVS stimuli to establish that: 1) MVS signals evoke equivalent vestibulo-motor responses compared to SVS while improving subject comfort and reducing experimentation time, 2) stimulus-evoked vestibulo-motor responses are reliably estimated as a linear system and 3) specific components of the cumulant density time domain vestibulo-motor responses can be targeted by controlling the frequency content of the input stimulus. Our results revealed that in comparison to SVS, MVS signals increased the SNR 3-6 times, reduced the minimum experimentation time by 85% and improved subjective measures of comfort by 20-80%. Vestibulo-motor responses measured using both EMG and force were not substantially affected by nonlinear distortions. In addition, by limiting the contribution of high frequencies within the MVS input stimulus, the magnitude of the medium latency time domain motor output response was increased by 58%. These results demonstrate that MVS stimuli can be designed to target and enhance vestibulo-motor output responses while simultaneously improving subject comfort, which should prove beneficial for both research and clinical applications.

  15. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  16. Obliteration of vestibular and cochlear aqueducts in animals.

    PubMed

    Suh, K W; Cody, D T

    1977-01-01

    The right vestibular aqueduct was obliterated in guinea pigs, chinchillas, and monkeys, and the right cochlear aqueduct and both the right vestibular and right cochlear aqueducts were obliterated in guinea pigs and chinchilas. Changes in auditory acuity were monitored by determining averaged temporal-response thresholds, and temporal-bone histologic studies were performed. Obliteration of the vestibular aqueduct or both the vestibular and cochlear aqueducts consistently produced endolymphatic hydrops in guinea pigs. In these animals, the auditory acuity gradually deteriorated. The low tones consistently were depressed more than the high tones. The auditory changes corresponded to the severity of endolymphatic hydrops. On the other hand, no significant histologic or audiometric changes were demonstrated in monkeys after obliteration of the vestibular aqueduct or in chinchillas after obliteration of the vestibular aqueduct or of both the vestibular and cochlear aqueducts. No significant histologic or audiometric changes were demonstrated in guinea pigs and chinchillas after obliteration of the cochlear aqueduct. PMID:408954

  17. From ear to uncertainty: vestibular contributions to cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Zheng, Yiwen

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and neocortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarize the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), can modulate cognitive function. PMID:24324413

  18. Vestibular convergence patterns in vestibular nuclei neurons of alert primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory signal convergence is a fundamental and important aspect of brain function. Such convergence may often involve complex multidimensional interactions as those proposed for the processing of otolith and semicircular canal (SCC) information for the detection of translational head movements and the effective discrimination from physically congruent gravity signals. In the present study, we have examined the responses of primate rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) neurons that do not exhibit any eye movement-related activity using 0.5-Hz translational and three-dimensional (3D) rotational motion. Three distinct neural populations were identified. Approximately one-fourth of the cells exclusively encoded rotational movements (canal-only neurons) and were unresponsive to translation. The canal-only central neurons encoded head rotation in SCC coordinates, exhibited little orthogonal canal convergence, and were characterized with significantly higher sensitivities to rotation as compared to primary SCC afferents. Another fourth of the neurons modulated their firing rates during translation (otolith-only cells). During rotations, these neurons only responded when the axis of rotation was earth-horizontal and the head was changing orientation relative to gravity. The remaining one-half of VN neurons were sensitive to both rotations and translations (otolith + canal neurons). Unlike primary otolith afferents, however, central neurons often exhibited significant spatiotemporal (noncosine) tuning properties and a wide variety of response dynamics to translation. To characterize the pattern of SCC inputs to otolith + canal neurons, their rotational maximum sensitivity vectors were computed using exclusively responses during earth-vertical axis rotations (EVA). Maximum sensitivity vectors were distributed throughout the 3D space, suggesting strong convergence from multiple SCCs. These neurons were also tested with earth-horizontal axis rotations (EHA), which would activate

  19. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  20. Loss of Afferent Vestibular Input Produces Central Adaptation and Increased Gain of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Shepherd, Sarah J; Nowack, Amy; Nie, Kaibao; Kaneko, Chris R S; Rubinstein, Jay T; Ling, Leo; Phillips, James O

    2016-02-01

    Implanted vestibular neurostimulators are effective in driving slow phase eye movements in monkeys and humans. Furthermore, increases in slow phase velocity and electrically evoked compound action potential (vECAP) amplitudes occur with increasing current amplitude of electrical stimulation. In intact monkeys, protracted intermittent stimulation continues to produce robust behavioral responses and preserved vECAPs. In lesioned monkeys, shorter duration studies show preserved but with somewhat lower or higher velocity behavioral responses. It has been proposed that such changes are due to central adaptive changes in the electrically elicited vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). It is equally possible that these differences are due to changes in the vestibular periphery in response to activation of the vestibular efferent system. In order to investigate the site of adaptive change in response to electrical stimulation, we performed transtympanic gentamicin perfusions to induce rapid changes in vestibular input in monkeys with long-standing stably functioning vestibular neurostimulators, disambiguating the effects of implantation from the effects of ototoxic lesion. Gentamicin injection was effective in producing a large reduction in natural VOR only when it was performed in the non-implanted ear, suggesting that the implanted ear contributed little to the natural rotational response before injection. Injection of the implanted ear produced a reduction in the vECAP responses in that ear, suggesting that the intact hair cells in the non-functional ipsilateral ear were successfully lesioned by gentamicin, reducing the efficacy of stimulation in that ear. Despite this, injection of both ears produced central plastic changes that resulted in a dramatically increased slow phase velocity nystagmus elicited by electrical stimulation. These results suggest that loss of vestibular afferent activity, and a concurrent loss of electrically elicited vestibular input, produces an

  1. Responses of primary vestibular neurons to galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in the anaesthetised guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juno; Curthoys, Ian S

    2004-09-30

    Previous studies in humans and animals which have shown that DC galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) induces horizontal and torsional eye movements have been interpreted as being due to a preferential activation of primary vestibular afferents innervating the horizontal semicircular canals and otoliths by GVS. The present study sought to determine in guinea pigs whether GVS does indeed selectively activate primary horizontal canal and otolith afferents. Constant-current GVS was passed between electrodes implanted in the tensor-tympani muscle of each middle ear or between electrodes on the skin over the mastoid. During this stimulation, responses from single primary vestibular neurons were recorded extracellularly by glass microelectrodes in Scarpa's ganglion. Afferents from all vestibular sensory regions were activated by both surface and tensor-tympani galvanic stimulation. Tensor tympani GVS was approximately 10 times more effective than surface GVS. At larger current intensities irregularly discharging afferents showed an asymmetrical response: cathodal stimulation resulted in a larger change in firing (increase) than anodal stimulation (decrease), whereas regularly discharging afferents responded symmetrically to the two polarities of GVS. Across all afferents tuned for different types of natural vestibular stimulation, neuronal sensitivity for GVS was found to increase with discharge variability (as indexed by CV*). Anterior canal afferents showed a slightly higher sensitivity than afferents from other vestibular sensory regions. Hence, the present study concluded that GVS activates primary vestibular afferents innervating all sensory regions in a uniform fashion. Therefore, the specific pattern of GVS-induced eye movements reported in previous studies are not due to differential sensitivity between different vestibular sensory regions, but are likely to reflect an involvement of central processing.

  2. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or “à la carte” VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  3. Immunological Influences on the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this project were to examine the influence of immune signaling molecules on the survival and replacement of sensory hair cells in the vestibular organs. We have made considerable progress toward that goal, particularly in the characterization of mechanisms that underlie hair cell death.

  4. Perspectives in vestibular diagnostics and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Arneborg

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular diagnostics and therapy ist the mirror of technological, scientific and socio-economics trends as are other fields of clinical medicine. These trends have led to a substantial diversification of the field of neurotology. The improvements in diagnostics have been characterized by the introduction of new receptor testing tools (e.g., VEMPs), progress in imaging (e.g., the endolymphatic hydrops) and in the description of central-vestibular neuroplasticity. The etiopathology of vestibular disorders has been updated by geneticists (e.g., the description of the COCH gene mutations), the detection of structural abnormalities (e.g., dehiscence syndromes) and related disorders (e.g. migraine-associated vertigo). The therapeutic options were extended by re-evaluation of techniques known a long time ago (e.g., saccus exposure), the development of new approaches (e.g., dehiscence repair) and the introduction of new drug therapy concepts (e.g., local drug delivery). Implantable, neuroprosthetic solutions have not yet reached experimental safety and validity and are still far away. However, externally worn neuroprosthetic solution were introduced in the rehab of vestibular disorders (e.g., VertiGuard system). These and related trends point into a medical future which is characterized by presbyvertigo as classical sign of the demographic changes ahead, by shortage of financial resources and a medico-legally over-regulated, even hostile environment for physicians in clinical medicine. PMID:22558055

  5. The geriatric auditory and vestibular systems.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R; Clemis, J D

    1990-12-01

    Age-related declines in auditory and vestibular function are becoming more prevalent and better understood. The personal and societal impact of these disorders is impressive, and present techniques of amplification or balance training can be of great benefit. However, many issues await investigation, and continued integration of ever-increasing technologies promises many new answers, and questions, in the future. PMID:2074981

  6. Response to Vestibular Sensory Events in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Carmody, Thomas; Andrews, Alonzo A.; Mehta, Jyutika A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the response to vestibular sensory events in persons with autism. The data for this study was collected as part of a cross-sectional study that examined sensory processing (using the Sensory Profile) in 103 persons with autism, 3-43 years of age, compared to age- and gender-matched community controls. The…

  7. Vesibulotoxicity and Management of Vestibular Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics for vestibular hair cells has been used to special advantage in the treatment of Meniere's disease. Intratympanic (middle ear) injections of these drugs are being increasingly used to control vertigo in this disorder when it has not responded to medical therapy. The mechanisms by which these drugs…

  8. Widespread vestibular activation of the rodent cortex.

    PubMed

    Rancz, Ede A; Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M; Canals, Santiago; Margrie, Troy W

    2015-04-15

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  9. Cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the vestibular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, R A

    1991-10-01

    Receptor binding studies specific for nicotinic cholinergic receptors have been carried out on isolated vestibular epithelia of the frogs Rana catesbiana and Rana temporaria. Evidence is presented for the presence of nicotinic-like cholinergic receptors specifically associated with the sensory areas. PMID:1797345

  10. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  11. What does galvanic vestibular stimulation stimulate?

    PubMed

    Wardman, Daniel L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    The technique of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has been used for a long time. The stimulus produces stereotyped automatic postural and ocular responses. The mechanisms underlying these responses are not understood although they are commonly attributed to altered otolith output. Based on animal studies, it seems reasonable to assume that vestibular afferents from the otoliths and semicircular canals are affected similarly by GVS. With this assumption, and anatomical knowledge of the vestibular apparatus, a model is developed to describe the expected responses of vestibular afferents to percutaneous GVS and the physiological implications of this altered sensory signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS, the most commonly used technique, should produce a canal signal consistent with a strong ear-down roll towards the cathodal side, a smaller nose-to-cathode yaw, but no pitch signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS should also produce an otolith signal consistent with tilt towards the cathodal side or a translational acceleration towards the anodal side. The expected responses for other configurations of GVS are also described. The model appears consistent with published data on the ocular and postural responses to GVS, and suggests other testable hypotheses concerning postural, ocular and perceptual responses to GVS.

  12. Perspectives in vestibular diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Arneborg

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular diagnostics and therapy ist the mirror of technological, scientific and socio-economics trends as are other fields of clinical medicine. These trends have led to a substantial diversification of the field of neurotology.The improvements in diagnostics have been characterized by the introduction of new receptor testing tools (e.g., VEMPs), progress in imaging (e.g., the endolymphatic hydrops) and in the description of central-vestibular neuroplasticity. The etiopathology of vestibular disorders has been updated by geneticists (e.g., the description of the COCH gene mutations), the detection of structural abnormalities (e.g., dehiscence syndromes) and related disorders (e.g. migraine-associated vertigo). The therapeutic options were extended by re-evaluation of techniques known a long time ago (e.g., saccus exposure), the development of new approaches (e.g., dehiscence repair) and the introduction of new drug therapy concepts (e.g., local drug delivery). Implantable, neuroprosthetic solutions have not yet reached experimental safety and validity and are still far away. However, externally worn neuroprosthetic solution were introduced in the rehab of vestibular disorders (e.g., VertiGuard system).These and related trends point into a medical future which is characterized by presbyvertigo as classical sign of the demographic changes ahead, by shortage of financial resources and a medico-legally over-regulated, even hostile environment for physicians in clinical medicine.

  13. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  14. Neuronal loss in human medial vestibular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J C; Díaz, C; Suárez, C; Fernández, J A; González del Rey, C; Navarro, A; Tolivia, J

    1998-08-01

    The data concerning the effects of age on the brainstem are inconsistent, and few works are devoted to the human vestibular nuclear complex. The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) is the largest nucleus of the vestibular nuclear complex, and it seems to be related mainly to vestibular compensation and vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Eight human brainstems have been used in this work. The specimens were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and stained by the formaldehyde-thionin technique. Neuron profiles were drawn with a camera lucida at x330. Abercrombie's method was used to estimate the total number of neurons. We used the test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov with the correction of Lilliefors to evaluate the fit of our data to a normal distribution, and a regression analysis was performed to determine if the variation of our data with age was statistically significant. The present study clearly shows that neuronal loss occurs with aging. The total number of neurons decreases with age, from 122,241 +/- 651 cells in a 35-year-old individual to 75,915 +/- 453 cells in an 89-year-old individual. Neuron loss was significant in the caudal and intermediate thirds of the nucleus, whereas the changes in the rostral third were not significant. The nuclear diameter of surviving neurons decreased significantly with age. There is a neuron loss in the MVN that seems to be age-related. It could help explain why elderly people find it hard to compensate for unilateral vestibular deficits. The preservation of neurons in the rostral third could be related to the fact that this area primarily innervates the oculolmotor nuclei; these latter neurons do not decrease in number in other species studied.

  15. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  16. The vestibular contribution to the head direction signal and navigation

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction (HD) cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on HD cells. We also examine the vestibular system’s role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers. PMID:24795578

  17. Diverse spatial reference frames of vestibular signals in parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reference frames are important for understanding how sensory cues from different modalities are coordinated to guide behavior, and the parietal cortex is critical to these functions. We compare reference frames of vestibular self-motion signals in the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), and dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd). Vestibular heading tuning in VIP is invariant to changes in both eye and head positions, indicating a body (or world)-centered reference frame. Vestibular signals in PIVC have reference frames that are intermediate between head- and body-centered. In contrast, MSTd neurons show reference frames between head- and eye-centered, but not body-centered. Eye and head position gain fields were strongest in MSTd and weakest in PIVC. Our findings reveal distinct spatial reference frames for representing vestibular signals, and pose new challenges for understanding the respective roles of these areas in potentially diverse vestibular functions. PMID:24239126

  18. Effect of noise on the vestibular system - Vestibular evoked potential studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Sohmer, H.; Elidan, J.; Plotnik, M.; Freeman, S.; Sockalingam, R.; Berkowitz, Z.; Mager, M.

    1999-01-01

    Studies have shown that in order for sound to affect the vestibular end organs in the inner ear, very high intensities are required. Furthermore, in patients with noise induced hearing loss, vestibular signs, if present, are subclinical. In order to study possible auditory-vestibular interactions in a more controlled fashion, using physiological sound intensities, the present study used short latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) to impulses of angular (15,000 degrees /sec(2), risetime 1.5 msec) and linear (3-5 g, risetime 1.5 msec) acceleration were used to study the possible effects of sound on peripheral vestibular function in rats. Four different paradigms were used: a - an intense (135 dB pe SPL) click stimulus was presented 5 msec before the linear acceleration impulse and the VsEP to 128 stimuli were recorded with and without this click stimulus. There was no effect of the preceding intense click on the first wave (reflecting end organ activity) of the linear VsEP. b - 113 dB SPL white noise "masking" was presented while the VsEPs were elicited. A 10-20% reduction in the amplitude of the first VsEP wave was seen during the noise exposure, but 5 minutes after this exposure, there was almost complete recovery to pre-exposure amplitude. c - 113 dB SPL noise was presented for one hour and VsEPs were recorded within 15 minutes of cessation of the noise. The auditory nerve-brainstem-evoked response showed a temporary threshold shift while there was no effect on the VsEP. d - 113 dB SPL white noise was presented for 12 hours per day for 21 consecutive days. Auditory nerve-brainstem-evoked responses and vestibular (VsEPs) function were studied one week after the conclusion of the noise exposure. Auditory function was severely permanently depressed (40 dB threshold elevation and clear histological damage) while the amplitude of wave 1 of the VsEP was not affected. It seems therefore that even though intense noise clearly affects the cochlea and may have a

  19. BDNF signaling in the rat cerebello-vestibular pathway during vestibular compensation: BDNF signaling in vestibular compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liuqing; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Sulin; Liu, Bo; Liang, Pei; Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Kun; Leng, Yangming; Kong, Weijia

    2015-09-01

    Vestibular compensation, which is the behavioral recovery from lesions to the peripheral vestibular system, is attributed to plasticity of the central vestibular system. It has been reported that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed and released in an activity-dependent manner. Upon binding to the tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), BDNF can acutely modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity in the central nervous system. To assess the possible contribution of BDNF to this recovery process, we studied the expression of BDNF, TrkB.FL, TrkB.T1 and KCC2 (K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2) in the bilateral medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and the flocculus of rats at 4 h, 8 h, 1, 3 and 7 days following unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. Our results have shown that, compared with the sham controls and the contra-lesional side, (a) the expression of BDNF and TrkB.FL increased at 4 h in the ipsi-lesional flocculus after UL; (b) the expression of TrkB.T1 decreased at 4 h and KCC2 decreased at 8 h and 1 day in the ipsi-lesional flocculus after UL; and (c) BDNF and TrkB.FL expression was enhanced and KCC2 expression was reduced in the ipsi-lesional MVN at 8 h after UL. Our data supported the hypothesis that BDNF upregulation may reduce the inhibitory effects of the flocculus and commissural inhibition system by regulating inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission in floccular Purkinje cells and Purkinje cell terminals in the MVN. Additionally, KCC2 may be a switch in this process. PMID:26111610

  20. New methods for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Dizziness and vertigo are common complaints, with a lifetime prevalence of over 30%. This review provides a brief summary of the recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances in the field of neuro-otology. A special focus is placed on the clinical usefulness of vestibular tests. While these have markedly improved over the years, treatment options for vestibular disorders still remain limited. Available therapies for selected vestibular diseases are discussed. PMID:21173877

  1. Ernst Mach on the vestibular organ 100 years ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews the contributions of Ernst Mach to vestibular research. His experiments, mainly psychophysical in nature, included measurements of threshold and investigation of the vestibular-visual interaction. Among his conclusions are that the adequate stimulus for the semicircular canals must be pressure, and that the sustained endolymph flow theory of Breuer (1874) and Crum Brown (1874) is erroneous. Excerpts are given of Mach's publications on vestibular functions.-

  2. Influence of temperature on the sound-evoked vestibular potential.

    PubMed

    Wit, H P; Dijkgraaf, E

    1985-01-01

    The sound-evoked vestibular potential, measured with gross electrodes after fenestration of a lateral semicircular canal in pigeons, is delayed with respect to the acoustic stimulus. The influence of temperature of the vestibular system on this delay can most easily be explained by assuming chemically mediated transmission to take place between vestibular hair cells and their primary afferents. The possibility of electrotonic transmission, however, cannot be excluded. PMID:3878654

  3. Direction specific biases in human visual and vestibular heading perception.

    PubMed

    Crane, Benjamin T

    2012-01-01

    Heading direction is determined from visual and vestibular cues. Both sensory modalities have been shown to have better direction discrimination for headings near straight ahead. Previous studies of visual heading estimation have not used the full range of stimuli, and vestibular heading estimation has not previously been reported. The current experiments measure human heading estimation in the horizontal plane to vestibular, visual, and spoken stimuli. The vestibular and visual tasks involved 16 cm of platform or visual motion. The spoken stimulus was a voice command speaking a heading angle. All conditions demonstrated direction dependent biases in perceived headings such that biases increased with headings further from the fore-aft axis. The bias was larger with the visual stimulus when compared with the vestibular stimulus in all 10 subjects. For the visual and vestibular tasks precision was best for headings near fore-aft. The spoken headings had the least bias, and the variation in precision was less dependent on direction. In a separate experiment when headings were limited to ± 45°, the biases were much less, demonstrating the range of headings influences perception. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between the bias curves for visual and spoken stimuli in every subject. The correlation between visual-vestibular and vestibular-spoken biases were weaker but remained significant. The observed biases in both visual and vestibular heading perception qualitatively resembled predictions of a recent population vector decoder model (Gu et al., 2010) based on the known distribution of neuronal sensitivities.

  4. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shubham; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, Rahul; Srivastava, Pratima; Soni, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF). This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth. PMID:26788377

  5. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  6. Direction Specific Biases in Human Visual and Vestibular Heading Perception

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    Heading direction is determined from visual and vestibular cues. Both sensory modalities have been shown to have better direction discrimination for headings near straight ahead. Previous studies of visual heading estimation have not used the full range of stimuli, and vestibular heading estimation has not previously been reported. The current experiments measure human heading estimation in the horizontal plane to vestibular, visual, and spoken stimuli. The vestibular and visual tasks involved 16 cm of platform or visual motion. The spoken stimulus was a voice command speaking a heading angle. All conditions demonstrated direction dependent biases in perceived headings such that biases increased with headings further from the fore-aft axis. The bias was larger with the visual stimulus when compared with the vestibular stimulus in all 10 subjects. For the visual and vestibular tasks precision was best for headings near fore-aft. The spoken headings had the least bias, and the variation in precision was less dependent on direction. In a separate experiment when headings were limited to ±45°, the biases were much less, demonstrating the range of headings influences perception. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between the bias curves for visual and spoken stimuli in every subject. The correlation between visual-vestibular and vestibular-spoken biases were weaker but remained significant. The observed biases in both visual and vestibular heading perception qualitatively resembled predictions of a recent population vector decoder model (Gu et al., 2010) based on the known distribution of neuronal sensitivities. PMID:23236490

  7. What is the minimal vestibular function required for compensation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Wade, S. W.; Nashner, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Living with an uncompensated, abnormal vestibular system requires oppressive modification of life style and often prevents return to work and activities of daily living. Patients with vestibular abnormalities were studied to determine the minimal residual vestibular function required to achieve compensation. Three groups of patients with (a) complete unilateral loss of vestibular function with normal horizontal canal-vestibulo-ocular (HCVOR) function in the opposite ear, (b) complete unilateral loss with abnormal HCVOR function in the opposite ear, and (c) bilateral reduction of vestibular function from aminoglycoside toxicity underwent vestibuloocular (VOR), optokinetic (OKN), visual-VOR (VVOR), and computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) tests before and after therapeutic procedures. Results suggest that a minimal VOR response amplitude must be present for compensation of VVOR function to occur. The roles of VOR and OKN phase shifts in vestibular compensation are more complicated and require further study. Compensation of vestibulospinal function does not necessarily accompany VOR or VVOR compensation. Ascending and descending vestibular compensatory mechanisms may involve different spatial sensory inputs. Results of these studies have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with vestibular disorders, including selection and monitoring of patients for therapeutic regimens such as vestibular nerve section and streptomycin therapy.

  8. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system's contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  9. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  10. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  11. The vestibular system of the owl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  12. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  13. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  14. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir.

  15. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir.

  16. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir. PMID:27419553

  17. Galvanic vestibular stimulation: a novel modulatory countermeasure for vestibular-associated movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V; Gonzalez-Castaño, Alexander; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2014-01-01

    Motion sickness or kinetosis is the result of the abnormal neural output originated by visual, proprioceptive and vestibular mismatch, which reverses once the dysfunctional sensory information becomes coherent. The space adaptation syndrome or space sickness relates to motion sickness; it is considered to be due to yaw, pith, and roll coordinates mismatch. Several behavioural and pharmacological measures have been proposed to control these vestibular-associated movement disorders with no success. Galvanic vestibular stimulation has the potential of up-regulating disturbed sensory-motor mismatch originated by kinetosis and space sickness by modulating the GABA-related ion channels neural transmission in the inner ear. It improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent proprioceptive volleys, which would ultimately modulate the motor output restoring the disordered gait, balance and human locomotion due to kinetosis, as well as the spatial disorientation generated by gravity transition. PMID:24637984

  18. Audiovestibular Function Deficits in Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are benign tumours of the vestibular nerve and can lead to hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, facial palsy, and brainstem compression. Audiovestibular diagnostic tests are essential for detection and treatment planning. Methods. Medline was used to perform a systematic literature review with regard to how audiovestibular test parameters correlate with symptoms, tumour size, and tumour location. Results. The auditory brainstem response can be used to diagnose retrocochlear lesions caused by VS. Since hearing loss correlates poorly with tumour size, a retrocochlear lesion is probably not the only cause for hearing loss. Also cochlear mechanisms seem to play a role. This can be revealed by abnormal otoacoustic emissions, despite normal ABR and new MRI techniques which have demonstrated endolymphatic hydrops of the inner ear. Caloric and head impulse tests show frequency specific dynamics and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may help to identify the location of the tumour regarding the involved nerve parts. Conclusion. In order to preserve audiovestibular function in VS, it is important to stop the growth of the tumour and to avoid degenerative changes in the inner ear. A detailed neurotological workup helps to diagnose VS of all sizes and can also provide useful prognostic information. PMID:27747231

  19. Vestibular compensation and orientation during locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphan, T.; Imai, T.; Moore, S. T.; Cohen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Body, head, and eye movements were studied in three dimensions while walking and turning to determine the role of the vestibular system in directing gaze and maintaining spatial orientation. The body, head, and eyes were represented as three-dimensional coordinate frames, and the movement of these frames was related to a trajectory frame that described the motion of the body on a terrestrial plane. The axis-angle of the body, head, and eye rotation were then compared to the axis-angle of the rotation of the gravitoinertial acceleration (GIA). We inferred the role of the vestibular system during locomotion and the contributions of the VCR and VOR by examining the interrelationship between these coordinate frames. Straight walking induced head and eye rotations in a compensatory manner to the linear accelerations, maintaining head pointing and gaze along the direction of forward motion. Turning generated a combination of compensation and orientation responses. The head leads and steers the turn while the eyes compensate to maintain stable horizontal gaze in space. Saccades shift horizontal gaze as the turn is executed. The head pitches, as during straight walking. It also rolls so that the head tends to align with the orientation of the GIA. Head orientation changes anticipate orientation changes of the GIA. Eye orientation follows the changes in GIA orientation so that the net orientation gaze is closer to the orientation of the GIA. The study indicates that the vestibular system utilizes compensatory and orienting mechanisms to stabilize spatial orientation and gaze during walking and turning.

  20. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  1. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important

  2. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  3. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  4. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Pireddu, Giorgio; Galati, Gaspare; Sulpizio, Valentina; Paolucci, Stefano; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  5. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  6. A study of whirlin isoforms in the mouse vestibular system suggests potential vestibular dysfunction in DFNB31-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Pranav Dinesh; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Vashist, Deepti; Jones, Sherri M; Jones, Timothy A; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-15

    The DFNB31 gene plays an indispensable role in the cochlea and retina. Mutations in this gene disrupt its various isoforms and lead to non-syndromic deafness, blindness and deaf-blindness. However, the known expression of Dfnb31, the mouse ortholog of DFNB31, in vestibular organs and the potential vestibular-deficient phenotype observed in one Dfnb31 mutant mouse (Dfnb31(wi/wi)) suggest that DFNB31 may also be important for vestibular function. In this study, we find that full-length (FL-) and C-terminal (C-) whirlin isoforms are expressed in the vestibular organs, where their stereociliary localizations are similar to those of developing cochlear inner hair cells. No whirlin is detected in Dfnb31(wi/wi) vestibular organs, while only C-whirlin is expressed in Dfnb31(neo/neo) vestibular organs. Both FL- and C-whirlin isoforms are required for normal vestibular stereociliary growth, although they may play slightly different roles in the central and peripheral zones of the crista ampullaris. Vestibular sensory-evoked potentials demonstrate severe to profound vestibular deficits in Dfnb31(neo/neo) and Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice. Swimming and rotarod tests demonstrate that the two Dfnb31 mutants have balance problems, with Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice being more affected than Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice. Because Dfnb31(wi/wi) and Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice faithfully recapitulate hearing and vision symptoms in patients, our findings of vestibular dysfunction in these Dfnb31 mutants raise the question of whether DFNB31-deficient patients may acquire vestibular as well as hearing and vision loss.

  7. A study of whirlin isoforms in the mouse vestibular system suggests potential vestibular dysfunction in DFNB31-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Pranav Dinesh; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Vashist, Deepti; Jones, Sherri M; Jones, Timothy A; Yang, Jun

    2015-12-15

    The DFNB31 gene plays an indispensable role in the cochlea and retina. Mutations in this gene disrupt its various isoforms and lead to non-syndromic deafness, blindness and deaf-blindness. However, the known expression of Dfnb31, the mouse ortholog of DFNB31, in vestibular organs and the potential vestibular-deficient phenotype observed in one Dfnb31 mutant mouse (Dfnb31(wi/wi)) suggest that DFNB31 may also be important for vestibular function. In this study, we find that full-length (FL-) and C-terminal (C-) whirlin isoforms are expressed in the vestibular organs, where their stereociliary localizations are similar to those of developing cochlear inner hair cells. No whirlin is detected in Dfnb31(wi/wi) vestibular organs, while only C-whirlin is expressed in Dfnb31(neo/neo) vestibular organs. Both FL- and C-whirlin isoforms are required for normal vestibular stereociliary growth, although they may play slightly different roles in the central and peripheral zones of the crista ampullaris. Vestibular sensory-evoked potentials demonstrate severe to profound vestibular deficits in Dfnb31(neo/neo) and Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice. Swimming and rotarod tests demonstrate that the two Dfnb31 mutants have balance problems, with Dfnb31(wi/wi) mice being more affected than Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice. Because Dfnb31(wi/wi) and Dfnb31(neo/neo) mice faithfully recapitulate hearing and vision symptoms in patients, our findings of vestibular dysfunction in these Dfnb31 mutants raise the question of whether DFNB31-deficient patients may acquire vestibular as well as hearing and vision loss. PMID:26420843

  8. Vestibular and optokinetic responses of the white cat.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, R A; Polsinelli, D J; Knister, J R; Kohut, R I

    1977-01-01

    The vestibular and optokinetic responses of a group of white cats were evaluated and compared with the responses from a control group of pigmented animals. The results indicate that in all cases the white cats exhibited varying degrees of vestibular and/or optokinetic dysfunction, which in some animals varied from test session to test session.

  9. Sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei during active head movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; Boyle, R.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Many secondary vestibular neurons are sensitive to head on trunk rotation during reflex-induced and voluntary head movements. During passive whole body rotation the interaction of head on trunk signals related to the vestibulo-collic reflex with vestibular signals increases the rotational gain of many secondary vestibular neurons, including many that project to the spinal cord. In some units, the sensitivity to head on trunk and vestibular input is matched and the resulting interaction produces an output that is related to the trunk velocity in space. In other units the head on trunk inputs are stronger and the resulting interaction produces an output that is larger during the reflex. During voluntary head movements, inputs related to head on trunk movement combine destructively with vestibular signals, and often cancel the sensory reafferent consequences of self-generated movements. Cancellation of sensory vestibular signals was observed in all of the antidromically identified secondary vestibulospinal units, even though many of these units were not significantly affected by reflexive head on trunk movements. The results imply that the inputs to vestibular neurons related to head on trunk rotation during reflexive and voluntary movements arise from different sources. We suggest that the relative strength of reflexive head on trunk input to different vestibular neurons might reflect the different functional roles they have in controlling the posture of the neck and body.

  10. Effect of meprobamate on the vestibulosensory and vestibular somatic reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of meprobamate on the vestibular illusion of counter-rotation, movement coordination and vertical writing was investigated by a double blind trial method and placebo. The results confirm the possibility of the meprobamate application for prophylaxis and correction of vestibular disturbances.

  11. Vestibular influences on autonomic cardiovascular control in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Costa, F.; Kaufmann, H.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that anatomical connections exist between vestibular and autonomic nuclei. Animal studies have shown functional interactions between the vestibular and autonomic systems. The nature of these interactions, however, is complex and has not been fully defined. Vestibular stimulation has been consistently found to reduce blood pressure in animals. Given the potential interaction between vestibular and autonomic pathways this finding could be explained by a reduction in sympathetic activity. However, rather than sympathetic inhibition, vestibular stimulation has consistently been shown to increase sympathetic outflow in cardiac and splanchnic vascular beds in most experimental models. Several clinical observations suggest that a link between vestibular and autonomic systems may also exist in humans. However, direct evidence for vestibular/autonomic interactions in humans is sparse. Motion sickness has been found to induce forearm vasodilation and reduce baroreflex gain, and head down neck flexion induces transient forearm and calf vasoconstriction. On the other hand, studies using optokinetic stimulation have found either very small, variable, or inconsistent changes in heart rate and blood pressure, despite substantial symptoms of motion sickness. Furthermore, caloric stimulation severe enough to produce nystagmus, dizziness, and nausea had no effect on sympathetic nerve activity measured directly with microneurography. No effect was observed on heart rate, blood pressure, or plasma norepinephrine. Several factors may explain the apparent discordance of these results, but more research is needed before we can define the potential importance of vestibular input to cardiovascular regulation and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  12. Body ownership and embodiment: vestibular and multisensory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Halje, P; Blanke, O

    2008-06-01

    Body ownership and embodiment are two fundamental mechanisms of self-consciousness. The present article reviews neurological data about paroxysmal illusions during which body ownership and embodiment are affected differentially: autoscopic phenomena (out-of-body experience, heautoscopy, autoscopic hallucination, feeling-of-a-presence) and the room tilt illusion. We suggest that autoscopic phenomena and room tilt illusion are related to different types of failures to integrate body-related information (vestibular, proprioceptive and tactile cues) in addition to a mismatch between vestibular and visual references. In these patients, altered body ownership and embodiment has been shown to occur due to pathological activity at the temporoparietal junction and other vestibular-related areas arguing for a key importance of vestibular processing. We also review the possibilities of manipulating body ownership and embodiment in healthy subjects through exposition to weightlessness as well as caloric and galvanic stimulation of the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In healthy subjects, disturbed self-processing might be related to interference of vestibular stimulation with vestibular cortex leading to disintegration of bodily information and altered body ownership and embodiment. We finally propose a differential contribution of the vestibular cortical areas to the different forms of altered body ownership and embodiment.

  13. A Computational Framework for Electrical Stimulation of Vestibular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Prisca; Capogrosso, Marco; Bassi Luciani, Lorenzo; Panarese, Alessandro; Micera, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    The vestibular organs are very important to generate reflexes critical for stabilizing gaze and body posture. Vestibular diseases significantly reduce the quality of life of people who are affected by them. Some research groups have recently started developing vestibular neuroprostheses to mitigate these symptoms. However, many scientific and technological issues need to be addressed to optimise their use in clinical trials. We developed a computational model able to mimic the response of human vestibular nerves and which can be exploited for "in-silico" testing of new strategies to design implantable vestibular prostheses. First, a digital model of the vestibular system was reconstructed from anatomical data. Monopolar stimulation was delivered at different positions and distances from ampullary nerves. The electrical potential induced by the injected current was computed through finite-element methods and drove extra-cellular stimulation of fibers in the vestibular, facial, and cochlear nerves. The electrical activity of vestibular nerves and the resulting eye movements elicited by different stimulation protocols were investigated. A set of electrode configurations was analyzed in terms of selectivity at increasing injected current. Electrode position along the nerve plays a major role in producing undesired activity in other nontargeted nerves, whereas distance from the fiber does not significantly affect selectivity. Indications are provided to minimize misalignment in nonoptimal electrode locations. Eye movements elicited by the different stimulation protocols are calculated and compared to experimental values, for the purpose of model validation. PMID:25751868

  14. Vestibular papillomatosis: An important differential diagnosis of vulvar papillomas.

    PubMed

    Ozkur, Ezgi; Falay, Tugba; Turgut Erdemir, Asli Vefa; Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Leblebici, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Most authors believe that vestibular papillomatosis (VP) is an anatomical variant of the vestibular mucosa. But VP is sometimes misdiagnosed as genital warts and this can lead to aggressive investigations, therapy, and anxiety in patients. We present a patient with VP. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) were performed to differentiate VP from other papilomatous diseases of the vulva. PMID:27136629

  15. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  16. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  17. Vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Sergeeva, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the published literature on vestibular disorders following different types of head and neck trauma. Current knowledge of the different causes and underlying mechanisms of vestibular disorders, as well as the sites of organic damage, is presented. Non-organic mechanisms are also surveyed. The frequency of occurrence of vestibular symptoms, and of other accompanying subjective complaints, associated with different types of trauma is presented and related to the specific causes. Hypotheses about the pathogenesis of traumatic vestibular disorders are presented, and the knowledge derived from animal experiments is also discussed. We believe this to be a very important topic, since vestibular complaints in traumatic patients often remain undiagnosed or underestimated in clinical practice. This review article aims to suggest directions for additional research and to provide guidance to both the scientific and clinical practice communities. PMID:27358219

  18. Congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction in childhood: an overlooked entity.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Avery H; Phillips, James O

    2006-07-01

    We report five children with previously unrecognized vestibular dysfunction detected by clinical examination and confirmed by quantitative vestibular testing. Patient 1 presented with fluctuating visual acuity and intermittent nystagmus. Patient 2 had congenital hearing loss associated with imbalance, delayed motor development, and cyclic vomiting. Patient 3 had neurotrophic keratitis with an intermittent head tilt, imbalance, and motor delays. Patient 4 showed ataxia and eye movement abnormalities following traumatic brain injury and had reading difficulties. Patient 5 had episodic vertigo and eye movement abnormalities from infancy. Clinical vestibular testing emphasized spontaneous nystagmus, rapid head thrust, and assessment of post-rotatory nystagmus. Quantitative vestibular testing included the sinusoidal chair rotation and velocity step tests, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, post-head-shake nystagmus, and computerized platform posturography. Pediatric neurologists encounter children with congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction, which can be recognized on the basis of relevant history and clinical abnormalities of the ocular-ocular reflex.

  19. Anatomical and Physiological Considerations in Vestibular Dysfunction and Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.; Mills, Kristal N.; Gaines, G. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Sensory information from the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory/proprioceptive systems are integrated in the brain in complex ways to produce a final motor output to muscle groups for maintaining gaze, head and body posture, and controlling static and dynamic balance. The balance system is complex, which can make differential diagnosis of dizziness quite challenging. On the other hand, this complex system is organized anatomically in a variety of pathways and some of these pathways have been well studied. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is one such pathway. Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the VOR facilitates our understanding of normal and abnormal eye movements and research is advancing our understanding of the plasticity of the vestibular system. This review highlights anatomical and physiological features of the normal vestibular system, applies these concepts to explain some clinical findings in some common peripheral vestibular disorders, and discusses some of the research investigating the anatomical and physiological basis for vestibular compensation. PMID:21072129

  20. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T. A. K.; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of “optimal” stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high

  1. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T A K; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of "optimal" stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline

  2. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T A K; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of "optimal" stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline

  3. The role of the vestibular system in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.; Mueller, S. Alyssa

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances during spaceflight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of Earth. During spaceflight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system so that astronauts can produce appropriate body movements in microgravity. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. One set of internal cues that may assist in the manual localization of objects is information from the vestibular system. This system contributes to our sense of the body's position in space by providing information on head position and movement and the orientation of the body with respect to gravity. Research on the vestibular system has concentrated on its role in oculo-motor control. Little is known about the role that vestibular information plays in manual motor control, such as reaching and pointing movements. Since central interpretation of vestibular information is altered in microgravity, it is important to determine its role in this process. This summer, we determined the importance of vestibular information in a subject's ability to point accurately toward a target in extrapersonal space. Subjects were passively rotated across the earth-vertical axis and then asked to point back to a previously-seen target. In the first paradigm, the subjects used both visual and vestibular cues for the pointing response, while, in the second paradigm, subjects used only vestibular information. Subjects were able to point with 85 percent accuracy to a target using vestibular information alone. We infer from this result that vestibular input plays a role in the spatial programming of

  4. Stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations. It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshore structures.

  5. Vestibular schwannoma in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-03-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL.

  6. Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm after Gamma Knife Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Mamoru; KAWARABUKI, Kentaro; INOUE, Yasuo; OHTA, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysms of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) after radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma (VS) are rare, and no definite treatment has been established for distal AICA pseudoaneurysms. We describe a 61-year-old man who underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for left VS. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial regression of the tumor. Twelve years after GKS, he suffered from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initial angiogram showed no vascular lesions; second left vertebral angiogram, 10 days after admission, demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lateral pontine segment of the left AICA. The proximal portion of the AICA was occluded by a coil. Postoperative MRI revealed an infarction on the left side of the pons and brachium pontis. Although the patient suffered from mild postoperative cerebellar ataxia and facial and abducens nerve palsy, he was discharged 1 month postoperatively requiring no assistance with activities of daily living. Twelve months later, he recovered satisfactorily with a modified Rankin Scale grade of 1, and no recanalization of the aneurysm was found on MR angiography. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for ruptured aneurysms at distal AICA carries the risk of brain stem infarction, but should be considered when no other option is available such as after radiotherapy for VS. PMID:26667081

  7. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  8. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  9. Vestibular function in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Harth, O.; Thuemler, R.; Baldrighi, G.; Shillinger, G. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents new results about the interdependence of optical illusory sensations and eye movements in man. To establish to what degree certain illusions previously obtained during centrifugation and parabolic flight can be explained by eye movements and by neuronal integration in the brain, real eye movements were measured as they occurred in the dark without optical fixation, during rectilinear accelerations on the ground, and during weightlessness in parabolic flight. Results provide valuable insight into normal vestibular function as well as resolution of within-the-eye and behind-the-eye contributions to the above illusions.

  10. In the presence of others: Self-location, balance control and vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Falconer, C J; Deroualle, D; Mast, F W

    2015-11-01

    The degree to which others in our environment influence sensorimotor processing has been a particular focus of cognitive neuroscience for the past two decades. This process of self-other resonance, or shared body representation, has only recently been extended to more global bodily processes such as self-location, self-motion perception, balance and perspective taking. In this review, we outline these previously overlooked areas of research to bridge the distinct field of social neuroscience with global self-perception, vestibular processing and postural control. Firstly, we outline research showing that the presence and movement of others can modulate two fundamental experiences of the self: self-location (the experience of where the self is located in space) and self-motion perception (the experience that oneself has moved or has been moved in space). Secondly, we outline recent research that has shown perturbations in balance control as a result of instability in others in our environment. Conversely to this, we also highlight studies in virtual reality demonstrating the potential benefits of the presence of others in our environment for those undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Thirdly, we outline studies of first- and third-person perspective taking, which is the ability to have or take a visuo-spatial perspective within and out-with the confines of our own body. These studies demonstrate a contamination of perspective taking processes (i.e. automatic, implicit, third-person perspective taking) in the presence of others. This collection of research highlights the importance of social cues in the more global processing of the self and its accompanying sensory inputs, particularly vestibular signals. Future research will need to better determine the mechanisms of self-other resonance within these processes, including the role of individual differences in the susceptibility to the influence of another.

  11. In the presence of others: Self-location, balance control and vestibular processing.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Falconer, C J; Deroualle, D; Mast, F W

    2015-11-01

    The degree to which others in our environment influence sensorimotor processing has been a particular focus of cognitive neuroscience for the past two decades. This process of self-other resonance, or shared body representation, has only recently been extended to more global bodily processes such as self-location, self-motion perception, balance and perspective taking. In this review, we outline these previously overlooked areas of research to bridge the distinct field of social neuroscience with global self-perception, vestibular processing and postural control. Firstly, we outline research showing that the presence and movement of others can modulate two fundamental experiences of the self: self-location (the experience of where the self is located in space) and self-motion perception (the experience that oneself has moved or has been moved in space). Secondly, we outline recent research that has shown perturbations in balance control as a result of instability in others in our environment. Conversely to this, we also highlight studies in virtual reality demonstrating the potential benefits of the presence of others in our environment for those undergoing vestibular rehabilitation. Thirdly, we outline studies of first- and third-person perspective taking, which is the ability to have or take a visuo-spatial perspective within and out-with the confines of our own body. These studies demonstrate a contamination of perspective taking processes (i.e. automatic, implicit, third-person perspective taking) in the presence of others. This collection of research highlights the importance of social cues in the more global processing of the self and its accompanying sensory inputs, particularly vestibular signals. Future research will need to better determine the mechanisms of self-other resonance within these processes, including the role of individual differences in the susceptibility to the influence of another. PMID:26602955

  12. The effect of voluntary sway control on the early and late components of the vestibular-evoked postural response.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Raymond Francis

    2010-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the human vestibular nerve evokes a postural response which, unlike visually evoked sway, is unaffected by stimulus predictability. However, responses can be modified by changes in the level of background sway. Here, the effect of voluntary changes in sway magnitude upon the response to vestibular stimulation is investigated. Subjects were asked to stand either relaxed or still while stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) was applied to the mastoid processes (1 mA root-mean-square; 0.05-5 Hz). Calf muscle activity, ground-reaction force and sway responses were characterised in the frequency and time domains using cross-spectra and cross-correlations (CC), respectively. SVS induced coherent EMG, lateral force and sway responses. Differences in response gain between still and relaxed conditions largely reflected differences in signal power across frequencies, and peak EMG CC responses correlated strongly with background EMG changes. However, when data were normalised to account for changes in signal power, early EMG responses were almost identical between conditions, but after 232 ms, they diverged. Standing still caused heavy attenuation of the late component of the EMG response, reducing response duration by 825 ms. Similar effects were observed in force and sway, and all postural signals showed less phase lag with SVS below 2 Hz when standing still. These results demonstrate that the vestibular-evoked postural response consists of two parts: an early high-frequency component, which scales with background activity but is otherwise inflexible, and a late low-frequency component, which can be heavily attenuated by voluntary control resulting in earlier termination of the sway response.

  13. Altered vestibular function in fetal and newborn rats gestated in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers evaluated vestibular development and function in rat pups flown during gestation on the NASA-NIH R1 and R2 missions. Fetal and postnatal vestibular function were examined. Altered vestibular-mediated responses in the experimental fetal pups are attributed to either direct effect of gravity on the vestibular system or indirect effects of microgravity transduced through the mother. The postnatal tests confirmed the hypothesis that the vestibular system continually adapts and responds to tonic stimulation.

  14. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  15. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Dougherty, William

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Study Design Case-controlled cohort study Setting Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Main Outcome Measure Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. Results We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p=0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. Conclusions There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty. PMID:25700790

  16. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C Y; Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  17. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  18. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  19. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Dougherty, William

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Case-controlled cohort study. Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p = 0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty. PMID:25700790

  20. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E; Law, Tammy C. Y.; Fitzpatrick, Richard C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8) stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion) was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance. PMID:25894558

  1. Nystagmus in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith; Krakovitz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is one of the commonly identified congenital temporal bone abnormalities associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be unilateral or bilateral, and typically presents at birth or in early childhood. Vestibular symptoms have been reported in up to 50% of affected individuals, and may be delayed in onset until adulthood. The details of nystagmus in patients with EVA have not been previously reported. The objectives were to describe the clinical history, vestibular test findings and nystagmus seen in a case series of patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct anomaly. Chart review, included computed tomography temporal bones, infrared nystagmography with positional and positioning testing, caloric testing, rotary chair and vibration testing. Clinical history and nystagmus varied among the five patients in this series. All patients were initially presumed to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, but repositioning treatments were not effective, prompting referral, further testing and evaluation. In three patients with longstanding vestibular complaints, positional nystagmus was consistently present. One patient had distinct recurrent severe episodes of positional nystagmus. Nystagmus was unidirectional and horizontal. In one case horizontal nystagmus was consistently reproducible with seated head turn to the affected side, and reached 48 d/s. Nystagmus associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct is often positional, and can be confused with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Unexplained vestibular symptoms in patients with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss should prompt diagnostic consideration of EVA. PMID:26557362

  2. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  3. Vestibular compensation: the neuro-otologist's best friend.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel; Helmchen, Christoph; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Why vestibular compensation (VC) after an acute unilateral vestibular loss is the neuro-otologist's best friend is the question at the heart of this paper. The different plasticity mechanisms underlying VC are first reviewed, and the authors present thereafter the dual concept of vestibulo-centric versus distributed learning processes to explain the compensation of deficits resulting from the static versus dynamic vestibular imbalance. The main challenges for the plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) during a post-lesion critical period are neural protection, structural reorganization and rebalance of VN activity on both sides. Data from animal models show that modulation of the ipsilesional VN activity by the contralateral drive substitutes for the normal push-pull mechanism. On the other hand, sensory and behavioural substitutions are the main mechanisms implicated in the recovery of the dynamic functions. These newly elaborated sensorimotor reorganizations are vicarious idiosyncratic strategies implicating the VN and multisensory brain regions. Imaging studies in unilateral vestibular loss patients show the implication of a large neuronal network (VN, commissural pathways, vestibulo-cerebellum, thalamus, temporoparietal cortex, hippocampus, somatosensory and visual cortical areas). Changes in gray matter volume in these multisensory brain regions are structural changes supporting the sensory substitution mechanisms of VC. Finally, the authors summarize the two ways to improve VC in humans (neuropharmacology and vestibular rehabilitation therapy), and they conclude that VC would follow a "top-down" strategy in patients with acute vestibular lesions. Future challenges to understand VC are proposed. PMID:27083885

  4. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  5. Vestibular compensation: the neuro-otologist's best friend.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Michel; Helmchen, Christoph; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Why vestibular compensation (VC) after an acute unilateral vestibular loss is the neuro-otologist's best friend is the question at the heart of this paper. The different plasticity mechanisms underlying VC are first reviewed, and the authors present thereafter the dual concept of vestibulo-centric versus distributed learning processes to explain the compensation of deficits resulting from the static versus dynamic vestibular imbalance. The main challenges for the plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) during a post-lesion critical period are neural protection, structural reorganization and rebalance of VN activity on both sides. Data from animal models show that modulation of the ipsilesional VN activity by the contralateral drive substitutes for the normal push-pull mechanism. On the other hand, sensory and behavioural substitutions are the main mechanisms implicated in the recovery of the dynamic functions. These newly elaborated sensorimotor reorganizations are vicarious idiosyncratic strategies implicating the VN and multisensory brain regions. Imaging studies in unilateral vestibular loss patients show the implication of a large neuronal network (VN, commissural pathways, vestibulo-cerebellum, thalamus, temporoparietal cortex, hippocampus, somatosensory and visual cortical areas). Changes in gray matter volume in these multisensory brain regions are structural changes supporting the sensory substitution mechanisms of VC. Finally, the authors summarize the two ways to improve VC in humans (neuropharmacology and vestibular rehabilitation therapy), and they conclude that VC would follow a "top-down" strategy in patients with acute vestibular lesions. Future challenges to understand VC are proposed.

  6. The Development of the Vestibular Apparatus Under Conditions of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinnikov, Y. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Lychakov, D. V.; Palmbakh, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on the effect of space flight conditions on morphogenesis and the structure of the vestibular apparatus in amphibian and fish larvae. Larval development proceeded in weightlessness without serious morphological defects. The vestibular apparatus developed; its organization in the experimental animals did not differ qualitatively from that in the controls. The specific external stimulus (gravitation) appears not to be a necessary condition for the development of a gravitation receptor in ontogenesis although the appearance of the vestibular apparatus in phylogenesis was apparently related to this stimulus.

  7. Long-term follow-up of vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Nuti, Daniele

    2009-05-01

    The long-term outcome of vestibular neuritis was evaluated in 35 patients using 4 bedside tests (head impulse, head heave, head shake, vibration), the caloric test and two surveys that explored the degree of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory [DHI]) and the anxiety and depression levels (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]). Sixty-six percent of patients showed a positive bedside clinical test or calorics abnormalities. DHI scores were significantly higher in the patients group, while HADS scores were comparable between patients and controls. Disability from vestibular neuritis is primarily due to the vestibular disturbance itself, rather than purely psychological factors.

  8. Chronic vestibulo-ocular reflexes evoked by a vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, Daniel M; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lewis, Richard F

    2007-06-01

    We are developing prosthetics for patients suffering from peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We tested a sensory-replacement prosthesis that stimulates neurons innervating the vestibular system by providing chronic pulsatile stimulation to electrodes placed in monkeys' lateral semicircular canals, which were plugged bilaterally, and used head angular velocity to modulate the current pulse rate. As an encouraging finding, we observed vestibulo-ocular reflexes that continued to be evoked by the motion-modulated stimulation months after the nystagmus evoked by the constant-rate baseline stimulation had dissipated. This suggests that long-term functional replacement of absent vestibular function is feasible.

  9. Vestibular contributions to a right-hemisphere network for bodily awareness: combining galvanic vestibular stimulation and the "Rubber Hand Illusion".

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Berlot, Eva; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    An altered sense of one's own body is a common consequence of vestibular damage, and also of damage to vestibular networks in the right hemisphere. However, few experimental studies have investigated whether vestibular signals contribute to bodily awareness. We addressed this issue by combining an established experimental model of bodily awareness (Rubber Hand Illusion -RHI) with galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) in healthy participants. Brief left anodal and right cathodal GVS (which predominantly activates vestibular networks in the right hemisphere), or right anodal and left cathodal GVS, or sham stimulation were delivered at random, while participants experienced either synchronous or asynchronous visuo-tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and their own hand. The drift in the perceived position of the participant's hand towards the rubber hand was used as a proxy measure of the resulting multisensory illusion of body ownership. GVS induced strong polarity-dependent effects on this measure of RHI: left anodal and right cathodal GVS produced significantly lower proprioceptive drift than right anodal and left cathodal GVS. We suggest that vestibular inputs influence the multisensory weighting functions that underlie bodily awareness: the right hemisphere vestibular projections activated by the left anodal and right cathodal GVS increased the weight of intrinsic proprioceptive signals about hand position, and decreased the weight of visual information responsible for visual capture during the RHI.

  10. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients. PMID:27746761

  11. Optokinetic and Vestibular Responsiveness in the Macaque Rostral Vestibular and Fastigial Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ayanna S.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2009-01-01

    We recorded from rostral vestibular (VN) and rostral fastigial nuclei (FN) neurons that did not respond to eye movements during three-dimensional (3D) vestibular and optokinetic stimulation (OKS). The majority of neurons in both areas (76 and 69% in VN and FN, respectively) responded during both rotational and translational motion. Preferred directions scattered throughout 3D space for translation but showed some preference for pitch/roll over yaw for rotation. VN/FN neurons were also tested during OKS while monkeys suppressed their optokinetic nystagmus by fixating a head-fixed target. Only a handful of cells (VN: 17%, FN: 6%) modulated during 0.5-Hz OKS suppression, but the number of responsive cells increased (VN: 40%, FN: 48%) during 0.02-Hz OKS. Preferred directions for rotation and OKS were not matched on individual neurons, and OKS gains were smaller than the respective gains during rotation. These results were generally similar for VN and FN neurons. We conclude that optokinetic-vestibular convergence might not be as prevalent as earlier studies have suggested. PMID:19073813

  12. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  13. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  14. Multisensory effects on somatosensation: a trimodal visuo-vestibular-tactile interaction.

    PubMed

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular information about self-motion is combined with other sensory signals. Previous research described both visuo-vestibular and vestibular-tactile bilateral interactions, but the simultaneous interaction between all three sensory modalities has not been explored. Here we exploit a previously reported visuo-vestibular integration to investigate multisensory effects on tactile sensitivity in humans. Tactile sensitivity was measured during passive whole body rotations alone or in conjunction with optic flow, creating either purely vestibular or visuo-vestibular sensations of self-motion. Our results demonstrate that tactile sensitivity is modulated by perceived self-motion, as provided by a combined visuo-vestibular percept, and not by the visual and vestibular cues independently. We propose a hierarchical multisensory interaction that underpins somatosensory modulation: visual and vestibular cues are first combined to produce a multisensory self-motion percept. Somatosensory processing is then enhanced according to the degree of perceived self-motion. PMID:27198907

  15. Multisensory effects on somatosensation: a trimodal visuo-vestibular-tactile interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular information about self-motion is combined with other sensory signals. Previous research described both visuo-vestibular and vestibular-tactile bilateral interactions, but the simultaneous interaction between all three sensory modalities has not been explored. Here we exploit a previously reported visuo-vestibular integration to investigate multisensory effects on tactile sensitivity in humans. Tactile sensitivity was measured during passive whole body rotations alone or in conjunction with optic flow, creating either purely vestibular or visuo-vestibular sensations of self-motion. Our results demonstrate that tactile sensitivity is modulated by perceived self-motion, as provided by a combined visuo-vestibular percept, and not by the visual and vestibular cues independently. We propose a hierarchical multisensory interaction that underpins somatosensory modulation: visual and vestibular cues are first combined to produce a multisensory self-motion percept. Somatosensory processing is then enhanced according to the degree of perceived self-motion. PMID:27198907

  16. Balancing awareness: Vestibular signals modulate visual consciousness in the absence of awareness.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Roy; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The processing of visual and vestibular information is crucial for perceiving self-motion. Visual cues, such as optic flow, have been shown to induce and alter vestibular percepts, yet the role of vestibular information in shaping visual awareness remains unclear. Here we investigated if vestibular signals influence the access to awareness of invisible visual signals. Using natural vestibular stimulation (passive yaw rotations) on a vestibular self-motion platform, and optic flow masked through continuous flash suppression (CFS) we tested if congruent visual-vestibular information would break interocular suppression more rapidly than incongruent information. We found that when the unseen optic flow was congruent with the vestibular signals perceptual suppression as quantified with the CFS paradigm was broken more rapidly than when it was incongruent. We argue that vestibular signals impact the formation of visual awareness through enhanced access to awareness for congruent multisensory stimulation.

  17. [Childhood peripheral vestibular disorders: a report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Akdoğan, Mehmet Volkan; Tarhan, Erkan; Ozgirgin, Osman Nuri; Ozlüoğlu, Levent Naci

    2006-01-01

    Vertigo is uncommon in childhood. Its etiology is different from that of adults. Both central and peripheral disorders may give rise to vertigo symptoms in pediatric patients. The evaluation of vertigo in children requires a detailed history taking, clinical examination, audiometric assessment, and vestibular function tests. We present three pediatric patients with vertigo symptoms, together with treatment methods and results of treatment. Their ages ranged from 10 to 14 years. The diagnoses were vestibular neuritis in one patient, and benign paroxismal positional vertigo in two patients. Treatment was comprised of vestibular rehabilitation for vestibular neuritis, and canalith repositioning maneuver for benign paroxismal positional vertigo. All the patients benefited well from the procedures applied. PMID:17124444

  18. Vestibular function and temporal bone imaging in DFNB1.

    PubMed

    Oonk, A M M; Beynon, A J; Peters, T A; Kunst, H P M; Admiraal, R J C; Kremer, H; Verbist, B; Pennings, R J E

    2015-09-01

    DFNB1 is the most prevalent type of hereditary hearing impairment known nowadays and the audiometric phenotype is very heterogeneous. There is, however, no consensus in literature on vestibular and imaging characteristics. Vestibular function and imaging results of 44 DFNB1 patients were evaluated in this retrospective study. All patients displayed a response during rotational velocity step testing. In 65% of the cases, the caloric results were within normal range bilaterally. The video head impulse test was normal in all patients. In 34.4% of the CT scans one or more temporal bone anomalies were found. The various anomalies found, were present in small numbers and none seemed convincingly linked to a specific DFNB1genotype. The group of DFNB1 patients presented here is the largest thus far evaluated for their vestibular function. From this study, it can be assumed that DFNB1 is not associated with vestibular dysfunction or specific temporal bone anomalies. PMID:26188104

  19. [Presbyastasis and application of vestibular rehabilitation in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Costa de Araujo, P; Demanez, L; Lechien, J; Bauvir, P; Petermans, J

    2011-03-01

    Balance disorders can have a major functional impact among the elderly. The main risk is falling. Three elements are implicated in the loss of balance: vision, proprioception and the vestibular system. This article will discuss mainly vestibular damage and its implications. The assessment of balance disorders, particularly in geriatric patients, is based on validated scales composed of several items. These provide scores and are based on the results of chronometric measurements. They can be useful for the application of Vestibular Rehabilitation (VR), a technique improving the adaptation and autonomy of these patients. Vestibular rehabilitation is therefore part of an overall support, the goal of therapy being to improve daily life and to reduce the risk of falls. PMID:21560428

  20. Certain aspects of the vestibular problem in space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Vestibulovegetative disorders on manned space flights are discussed. A study relating to the vestibular stimuli in respiration, diaphoresis cardiac rhythm and a broad complex of hemodynamic indices was conducted. Certain tests for astronaut candidates are discussed.

  1. Anatomy, physiology, and physics of the peripheral vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Kingma, H; van de Berg, R

    2016-01-01

    Many medical doctors consider vertigo and dizziness as the major, almost obligatory complaints in patients with vestibular disorders. In this chapter, we will explain that vestibular disorders result in much more diverse and complex complaints. Many of these other complaints are unfortunately often misinterpreted and incorrectly classified as psychogenic. When we really understand the function of the vestibular system, it becomes quite obvious why patients with vestibular disorders complain about a loss of visual acuity, imbalance, fear of falling, cognitive and attentional problems, fatigue that persists even when the vertigo attacks and dizziness decreases or even disappears. Another interesting new aspect in this chapter is that we explain why the function of the otolith system is so important, and that it is a mistake to focus on the function of the semicircular canals only, especially when we want to understand why some patients seem to suffer more than others from the loss of canal function as objectified by reduced caloric responses. PMID:27638059

  2. What are the Symptoms of a Vestibular Disorder?

    MedlinePlus

    ... distance Increased night blindness; difficulty walking in the dark Poor depth perception Visit the Neuro-Optometric Association's ... vestibular disorders can be. Your support of VEDA matters. Please help us continue this important work by ...

  3. Surgical access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radkevich, L. A.; Ayzikov, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A posteroventral approach for access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve is presented which permits simultaneous surgical access to the ampullary and otolithic nerves. Surgical procedures are discussed.

  4. Behavioral Assessment of the Aging Mouse Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Dababneh, Edward; Quail, Stephanie L.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related decline in balance performance is associated with deteriorating muscle strength, motor coordination and vestibular function. While a number of studies show changes in balance phenotype with age in rodents, very few isolate the vestibular contribution to balance under either normal conditions or during senescence. We use two standard behavioral tests to characterize the balance performance of mice at defined age points over the lifespan: the rotarod test and the inclined balance beam test. Importantly though, a custom built rotator is also used to stimulate the vestibular system of mice (without inducing overt signs of motion sickness). These two tests have been used to show that changes in vestibular mediated-balance performance are present over the murine lifespan. Preliminary results show that both the rotarod test and the modified balance beam test can be used to identify changes in balance performance during aging as an alternative to more difficult and invasive techniques such as vestibulo-ocular (VOR) measurements. PMID:25045963

  5. The European vestibular experiments in spacelab-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, J.; von Baumgarten, R.; Vogel, H.; Wetzig, J.; Benson, A.; Berthoz, A.; Vieville, Th.; Brandt, Th.; Probst, Th.; Brand, U.; Bruzek, W.; Dichgans, J.; Scherer, H.

    A series of experiments /1/ were performed in the Spacelab-1 mission on November/December, 1983, pre-, in-, and postflight. These experiments covered various aspects of the functions of the vestibular system, the inflight tests comprising threshold measurements for linear movements in three orthogonal axes, optokinetic stimulation, vestibulo-ocular reflexes under linear and angular accelerations, caloric stimulation with and without linear accelerations; pre- and postflight tests repeated the inflight protocol with the addition of subjective vertical and eye counter-rotation measurements using a tilt table. One of the most surprising and significant results was the caloric test: strong caloric nystagmus on the two subjects tested was recorded inflight; this was contrary to what was expected from Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric nystagmus.

  6. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Vestibular response in denatured rape oil intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, C; Gavilán, J; Abril, A

    1985-10-01

    During the spring of 1981 a massive intoxication broke out in Spain, which is presently attributed to the ingestion of denatured rape oil, and which has been called 'Toxic Syndrome' (TS). We studied 51 patients affected by the TS one year after the onset of their disease, analyzing their vestibular responses in the caloric test with the help of an analog-digital computer. A significant decrease in the number of nystagmic beats of the affected patients can be observed, while the rest of the parameters studied show similar values to those found simultaneously in 30 normal subjects. It is suggested that these differences are yet another manifestation of the polyneuropathy found in intoxication by denatured rape oil. PMID:3877134

  8. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  9. Timing of neuron development in the rodent vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The timing of cell generation (onset and duration) in the developing rat vestibular and proprioceptive systems is investigated. The results clearly indicate a defined time-span for generation of all neurons in the central nervous system nuclei studied. This cytogenetic period in both vestibular and proprioceptive sensory nuclei is determined to occur during and immediately after placentation, a potentially critical period for spaceflight exposure due to alterations in maternal physiology.

  10. Early and Phasic Cortical Metabolic Changes in Vestibular Neuritis Onset

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients’ cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients’ subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  11. [Membrane model of the cupula of the vestibular semicircular canals].

    PubMed

    Kondrachuk, A V; Shipov, A A; Sirenko, S P

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-course variations of the cupula of the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus is presented. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data which suggests that the cupular matter has viscosity-elasticity properties. Their role in the functioning of the vestibular apparatus is discussed in qualitative terms. The applicability of the membrane model to the description of the time-course variations of the cupula is considered.

  12. Vestibular and oculomotor influences on visual dependency

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva Melo, Mariane; Siddiqui, Aazim A.; Arshad, Qadeer; Patel, Mitesh

    2016-01-01

    The degree to which a person relies on visual stimuli for spatial orientation is termed visual dependency (VD). VD is considered a perceptual trait or cognitive style influenced by psychological factors and mediated by central reweighting of the sensory inputs involved in spatial orientation. VD is often measured with the rod-and-disk test, in which participants align a central rod to the subjective visual vertical (SVV) in the presence of a background that is either stationary or rotating around the line of sight—dynamic SVV. Although this task has been employed to assess VD in health and vestibular disease, what effect torsional nystagmic eye movements may have on individual performance is unknown. Using caloric ear irrigation, 3D video-oculography, and the rod-and-disk test, we show that caloric torsional nystagmus modulates measures of VD and demonstrate that increases in tilt after irrigation are positively correlated with changes in ocular torsional eye movements. When the direction of the slow phase of the torsional eye movement induced by the caloric is congruent with that induced by the rotating visual stimulus, there is a significant increase in tilt. When these two torsional components are in opposition, there is a decrease. These findings show that measures of VD can be influenced by oculomotor responses induced by caloric stimulation. The findings are of significance for clinical studies, as they indicate that VD, which often increases in vestibular disorders, is modulated not only by changes in cognitive style but also by eye movements, in particular nystagmus. PMID:27358321

  13. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  14. [Vestibular evoked potentials in "Gallus Domesticus"].

    PubMed

    Weisleder, P; Jones, T A; Rubel, E W

    1989-01-01

    Electrophysiological activity in response to linear acceleration stimuli was recorded from Gallus Domesticus by means of subcutaneous electrodes. This investigation had two purposes: 1) to obtain normative data for our laboratory, and 2) to rule out auditory and somatosensory contributions to the Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEP). The stimulus consisted of a sigmoid-shaped voltage function generated by a digital-to-analog converter. This signal was amplified, attenuated, and directed to a shaker (selenoid-based, linear mechanical vibrator). The animal's head was firmly attached to a small platform which in turn was coupled to the transducer. The recorded electrophysiological activity was filtered, amplified, and averaged over 256 stimulus presentations. The VsEP are composed of a positive wave, a prominent negativity, and three to five additional positive waves which occur within the first 10 milliseconds following the stimulus. The first three elements are the most robust components of the response. Latency/acceleration and amplitude/acceleration functions were constructed for each of these three waves. Clear and replicable responses were obtained at an acceleration of 2.00 g. At this level the amplitude of the components ranged between 3 and 5 microvolts. On the average, threshold responses were recorded at 0.0935 g. VsEP were not affected by high intensity white noise. However, bilateral intralabyrinthine injection of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, abolished the responses. These results suggest that the activity recorded in response to linear acceleration stimuli is of vestibular origin. PMID:2635851

  15. Aging and the human vestibular nuclei: morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J C; Díaz, C; Suárez, C; Fernández, J A; González del Rey, C; Navarro, A; Tolivia, J

    2000-04-14

    The data concerning the effects of age on the brainstem are scarce and few works are devoted to the human vestibular nuclear complex. The study of the effects of aging in the vestibular nuclei could have clinical interest due to the high prevalence of balance control and gait problems in the elderly. We have used in this work eight human brainstems of different ages sectioned and stained by the formaldehyde-thionin technique. The neuron's profiles were drawn with a camera lucida and Abercrombie's method was used to estimate the total number of neurons. The test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov with the correction of Lilliefors was used to evaluate the fit of our data to a normal distribution and a regression analysis was done to determine if the variation of our data with age was statistically significant. Aging does not affect the volume or length of the vestibular nuclear complex. Our results clearly show that neuronal loss occurs with aging in the descending (DVN), medial (MVN), and lateral (LVN) vestibular nuclei, but not in the superior (SVN). There are changes in the proportions of neurons of different sizes but they are not statistically significant. The neuronal loss could be related with the problems that elderly people have to compensate unilateral vestibular lesions and the alterations of the vestibulospinal reflexes. The preservation of SVN neurons can explain why vestibulo-ocular reflexes are compensated after unilateral vestibular injuries.

  16. Visuo-vestibular contributions to anxiety and fear.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carlos M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-01-01

    The interactive roles of the visual and vestibular systems allow for postural control within boundaries of perceived safety. In specific circumstances, visual vestibular and postural interactions act as a cue that trigger fear, similarly to what occurs in motion sickness. Unusual patterns of visuo-vestibular interaction that emerge without warning can elicit fear, which can then become associated to a certain stimuli or situation, creating a CS-US association, (i.e., phobia), or can emerge without warning but also without becoming associated to a particular concomitant event (i.e., panic). Depending on the individual sensitivity to visuo-vestibular unusual patterns and its impact in postural control, individuals will be more or less vulnerable to develop these disorders. As such, the mechanism we here propose is also sufficient to explain the lack of certain fears albeit exposure. Following this rationale, a new subcategory of anxiety disorders, named visuo-vestibular fears can be considered. This model brings important implications for developmental and evolutionary psychological science, and invites to place visuo-vestibular fears in a particular subtype or specification within the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

  17. Oculomotor disturbances during visual-vestibular interaction in Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waespe, W; Wichmann, W

    1990-06-01

    Transient and lasting oculomotor disturbances during visual-vestibular interaction are described in 9 patients with Wallenberg's lateral medullary syndrome. In all patients magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a single focal area of pathological signal intensity in the (dorso)-lateral medulla suggesting infarction. In 2 of these 9 patients and in 3 further patients with no medullary signs, the infarction involved the cerebellar territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Acutely, all patients with Wallenberg's syndrome (except 1) had saccadic lateropulsion and spontaneous nystagmus in light with the horizontal fast component beating to the contralateral normal side. The velocity of the slow drift to the side of the lesion was dependent on eye position and induced a characteristic asymmetry of the visually and vestibularly elicited slow eye movements. In most patients smooth pursuit, optokinetic nystagmus and visual suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex were still impaired when this spontaneous drift was minimal or absent. The oculomotor disturbances in patients with and without cerebellar infarction are compared. The following conclusions are made. (1) The spontaneous drift that is dependent on eye position is mostly created by 'ocular lateropulsion', that is, a tonic bias within the oculomotor system which may have several sources. (2) The abnormalities and asymmetries of oculomotor responses during visual-vestibular stimulation cannot solely be explained by this spontaneous drift and its interaction with otherwise normal eye movements. Instead, structures and pathways are damaged in Wallenberg's syndrome which mediate visual and/or motor signals important for the cerebellar control of visually-guided slow eye movements. (3) Damage to these pathways occurs in the lateral medulla, as the MRI findings show that in most patients the cerebellum is rarely involved, but no definite conclusion can be made as to which of the fibres

  18. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  19. A Stochastic Employment Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Teng

    2013-01-01

    The Stochastic Employment Problem(SEP) is a variation of the Stochastic Assignment Problem which analyzes the scenario that one assigns balls into boxes. Balls arrive sequentially with each one having a binary vector X = (X[subscript 1], X[subscript 2],...,X[subscript n]) attached, with the interpretation being that if X[subscript i] = 1 the ball…

  20. Role of vestibular information in initiation of rapid postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have difficulty maintaining balance without stepping when standing in tandem, on compliant surfaces, across narrow beams, or on one foot, especially with eyes closed. Normal individuals (with no sensory impairment) maintain balance in these tasks by employing quick, active hip rotation (a "hip strategy"). The absence of a hip strategy in vestibular patients responding to translations of a short support surface has previously been taken as evidence that the use of hip strategy requires an intact vestibular system. However, many tasks requiring hip strategy alter one or a combination of important system characteristics, such as initial state of the body (tandem stance), dynamics (compliant surfaces), or biomechanical limits of stability (narrow beams). Therefore, the balance deficit in these tasks may result from a failure to account for these support surface alterations when planning and executing sensorimotor responses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular information is critical to trigger a hip strategy even on an unaltered support surface, which imposes no changes on the system characteristics. We recorded the postural responses of vestibular patients and control subjects with eyes closed to rearward support surface translations of varying velocity, in erect stance on a firm, flat surface. Subjects were instructed to maintain balance without stepping, if possible. Faster translation velocities (25 cm/s or more) produced a consistent pattern of early hip torque (first 400 ms) in control subjects (i.e., a hip strategy). Most of the patients with bilateral vestibular loss responded to the same translation velocities with similar torques. Contrary to our hypothesis, we conclude that vestibular function is not necessary to trigger a hip strategy. We postulate, therefore, that the balance deficit previously observed in vestibular patients during postural tasks that elicit a hip strategy may have been due to

  1. Sensitivity of human visual and vestibular cortical regions to egomotion-compatible visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Velia; Smith, Andrew T

    2010-08-01

    The analysis and representation of visual cues to self-motion (egomotion) is primarily associated with cortical areas MST, VIP, and (recently) cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv). Various other areas, including visual areas V6 and V6A, and vestibular areas parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), putative area 2v (p2v), and 3aNv, are also potentially suited to processing egomotion (in some cases based on multisensory cues), but it is not known whether they are in fact involved in this process. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, we presented human participants with 2 types of random dot kinematograms. Both contained coherent motion but one simulated egomotion while the other did not. An area in the parieto-occipital sulcus that may correspond to V6, PIVC, and p2v were all differentially responsive to egomotion-compatible visual stimuli, suggesting that they may be involved in encoding egomotion. More generally, we show that the use of such stimuli provides a simple and reliable fMRI localizer for human PIVC and p2v, which hitherto required galvanic or caloric stimulation to be identified.

  2. Sensitivity of Human Visual and Vestibular Cortical Regions to Egomotion-Compatible Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2010-01-01

    The analysis and representation of visual cues to self-motion (egomotion) is primarily associated with cortical areas MST, VIP, and (recently) cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv). Various other areas, including visual areas V6 and V6A, and vestibular areas parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), putative area 2v (p2v), and 3aNv, are also potentially suited to processing egomotion (in some cases based on multisensory cues), but it is not known whether they are in fact involved in this process. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, we presented human participants with 2 types of random dot kinematograms. Both contained coherent motion but one simulated egomotion while the other did not. An area in the parieto-occipital sulcus that may correspond to V6, PIVC, and p2v were all differentially responsive to egomotion-compatible visual stimuli, suggesting that they may be involved in encoding egomotion. More generally, we show that the use of such stimuli provides a simple and reliable fMRI localizer for human PIVC and p2v, which hitherto required galvanic or caloric stimulation to be identified. PMID:20034998

  3. Older adults demonstrate superior vestibular perception for virtual rotations.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ryan M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Dalton, Brian H; Inglis, J Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Adult ageing results in a progressive loss of vestibular hair cell receptors and afferent fibres. Given the robustness of vestibulo-ocular and vestibular-evoked whole-body responses to age-related deterioration, it was proposed that the vestibular system compensates centrally. Here we examine the potential for central compensation in vestibular sensitivity with adult ageing by using a combination of real and virtual rotation-based psychophysical testing at two stimulus frequencies (0.1 & 1Hz). Real rotations activate semi-circular canal hair cell receptors naturally via mechanotransduction, while electrical current used to evoke virtual rotations does not rely on mechanical deformation of hair cell receptors to activate vestibular afferents. This two-pronged approach allows us to determine the independent effects of age-related peripheral afferent receptor loss and potential compensatory mechanisms. Older adults had thresholds for discriminating real rotations that were significantly greater than young adults at 0.1Hz (7.2 vs. 3°/s), but the effect of age was weaker (non-significant) at 1Hz (2.4 vs. 1.3°/s). For virtual rotations, older adults had greater thresholds than young adults at 0.1Hz (1.2 vs. 0.5mA), however, older adults outperformed young adults at 1Hz (0.6 vs. 1.1mA). Based on these thresholds, we argue that central vestibular processing gain is enhanced in older adults for 1Hz real and virtual rotations, partially offsetting the negative impact of normal age-related hair cell receptor and primary afferent loss. We propose that the frequency dependence of this compensation reflects the physiological importance of the 1-5Hz range in natural vestibular input.

  4. Assessing vestibular dysfunction. Exploring treatments of a complex condition.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lisa A

    2010-07-01

    In summary, patients with BPPV can be treated with the canalith repositioning maneuver. Patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction can be treated using adaptation, substitution, and/or habituation exercises. Patients with motion sensitivity can demonstrate improved tolerance to motion after performing habituation exercises. Patients with bilateral vestibular loss will benefit from substitution and adaptation exercises. Each patient requires a treatment regime that is individualized and appropriate to address their impairments. Often the treatment is determined through the evaluation process. The task that causes the patient's complaints, whether it be dizziness, imbalance, and/or issues with eye-head coordination, often becomes the treatment of choice, gradually increasing difficulty as appropriate and safe. Patients with TBI who have concomitant vestibular dysfunction are a challenging population to treat. One has to be cognizant of cognitive deficits that may interfere with or prolong treatment as well as the many other neurological deficits that may be present because of the brain injury. For example, attempting to perform the canalith repositioning maneuver on a patient status post TBI when they are not able to comprehend the reasoning behind the treatment can lead to agitation or behavioral issues. Communication with the patient's primary doctor is a necessity so that the team is always on the same page about the approach to treatment. Vestibular evaluation and rehabilitation are a necessity for patients who have experienced a TBI. The sooner the problems are identified, the sooner treatment can be initiated with the goal of helping patients recover their maximal functional level of independence and safety. Also, treating patients with TBI and vestibular impairments can require increased treatment time in comparison to treatment of a patient with only vestibular dysfunction, so the sooner the treatment for vestibular dysfunction can be started, the

  5. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Allan T.; Menant, Jasmine C.; Hübner, Patrick P.; Lord, Stephen R.; Migliaccio, Americo A.

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51–92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1–2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s2 to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5–1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  6. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness.

    PubMed

    Chau, Allan T; Menant, Jasmine C; Hübner, Patrick P; Lord, Stephen R; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51-92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1-2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s(2) to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5-1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  7. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  8. Altered cupular mechanics: a cause of peripheral vestibular disorders?

    PubMed

    Helling, Kai; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Jijiwa, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Yoshio; Watanabe, Satoru; Scherer, Hans

    2002-06-01

    It has taken many decades to arrive at today's concept of cupula mechanics in the stimulation of endolymphatic flows on the hair cells in the ampullae of the semicircular canal. While Steinhausen assumed free swing-door movement of the cupula in the 1930s, Hillman was the first to demonstrate firm cupula attachment to the ampulla wall as a physiological necessity in the 1970s. In contrast to the present clinical concepts of acute peripheral vestibular functional disorders (circulatory disturbances, viral or bacterial infection, altered electrolytes in the endolymph), this study examines the extent to which an impaired attachment mechanism can trigger peripheral vestibular disorders. For this purpose, we used a pigeon model (n = 8), in which mechanical detachment of the cupula from the ampulla wall was achieved by means of a targeted pressure increase in the ampulla of the lateral semicircular canal. In two additional animals the labyrinth was completely destroyed on one side in order to directly compare partial and complete vestibular disorders. In this way partial damage to the lateral semicircular canal ampulla presents a clinical picture whose symptoms are very similar to those of an idiopathic vestibular disorder in humans. Their intensity and course of compensation differ markedly from the symptoms of complete vestibular destruction. Subsequent histological examination revealed that the hair cells remained intact during the experimental detachment of the cupula. Our results thus show that only altered cupula mechanics seem to trigger the clinical picture of a peripheral vestibular disorder. This may result in completely new approaches to differential diagnosis and the therapy of vestibular neuronitis.

  9. Fifth Symposium on the Role of the Vestibular Organs in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Vestibular problems of manned space flight are investigated for weightlessness and reduced gravity conditions with emphasis on space station development. Intensive morphological studies on the vestibular system and its central nervous system connections are included.

  10. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a.Migraine Associated Vertigo or [MAV])

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a Top Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a. Migraine Associated Vertigo or ... Wackym on his You Tube Channel. Migraine and vestibular dysfunction Approximately 40% of migraine patients have some ...

  11. Effects of microgravity on vestibular ontogeny: direct physiological and anatomical measurements following space flight (STS-29)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Fermin, C.; Hester, P. Y.; Vellinger, J.

    1993-01-01

    Does space flight change gravity receptor development? The present study measured vestibular form and function in birds flown as embryos for 5 days in earth orbit (STS-29). No major changes in vestibular gross morphology were found. Vestibular response mean amplitudes and latencies were unaffected by space flight. However, the results of measuring vestibular thresholds were mixed and abnormal responses in 3 of the 8 flight animals raise important questions.

  12. [The specific features of the vestibular function in the patients presenting with sensorineural hearing loss of vascular genesis].

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, I M; Popadyuk, V I; Tuzhilina, K V

    2016-01-01

    The authors consider the specific features of the vestibular function in the patients with sensorineural hearing loss of vascular genesis. The study included 60 patients at the age from 28 to 75 years presenting with sensorineural impairment of hearing of vascular genesis. All of them were examined with the use of the extended otoneurological method. The data obtained were compared with the structural changes and hemodynamic characteristics of vertebral arteries (VA) and internal carotid arteries (ICA) and with the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain.

  13. A Critical Look at Vestibular Dysfunction in Learning-Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polatajko, Helene J.

    1985-01-01

    The vestibular function was examined in 40 learning disabled and 40 non LD children. Data indicated no significant difference between normal and LD Ss, no significant correlation between vestibular function and academic achievement, and no significant educational relevance in categorizing LD Ss according to vestibular dimensions. (CL)

  14. Screening people in the waiting room for vestibular impairments

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Helen S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Pavlik, Valory N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Primary care physicians need good screening tests of the vestibular system to help them determine whether patients who complain of dizziness should be evaluated for vestibular disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if current, widely-used screening tests of the vestibular system predict subsequent performance on objective diagnostic tests of the vestibular system (ENG). Setting and subjects Of 300 subjects who were recruited from the waiting room of a primary care clinic and were screened there 69 subjects subsequently volunteered for ENGs in the otolaryngology department. The screening study included age, history of vertigo, head impulse tests, Dix-Hallpike maneuvers, and Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance (CTSIB) with head still and head pitching at 0.33 Hz. The ENG included Dix-Hallpike tests, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, bi-thermal water caloric tests, and low frequency sinusoids in the rotatory chair in darkness. Results The scores on the screening were related to the total ENG but odds ratios were not significant for some variables probably due to the small sample size. Conclusions A larger sample may have yielded stronger results but in general the high odds ratios suggest a relationship between the ENG score and Dix-Hallpike responses and between the ENG scores and some CTSIB responses. PMID:25188617

  15. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  16. Gray-matter atrophy after chronic complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Stephan, Thomas; Hamilton, Derek A; Kalla, Roger; Glasauer, Stefan; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    It has been shown in blind patients that the abolition of sensory input can lead to changes in white- and cortical gray-matter volumes. Here the white- and gray-matter changes found with whole brain voxel-based morphometry in 16 patients with complete chronic unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) due to vestibular schwannoma removal several years prior are reported on. Subtle deficits in spatial memory and navigation were previously shown in patients with right UVD. Images of the brains of right-UVD patients were flipped, standard preprocessing steps were performed, and the data were modulated. Patients showed a gray-matter volume reduction in the cerebellum due to schwannoma removal, in the supramarginal gyrus ipsilateral to the lesion, as well as in the postcentral and superior temporal gyrus, areas involved in the vestibular cortical network, and in the motion-sensitive area MT/V5. There was no correlation with behavioral navigational abilities. No gray-matter atrophy was found in the insular cortical vestibular region or the hippocampus, both of which receive bilateral vestibular projections. The thalamus and tegmentum of the mesencephalon showed gray-matter reduction on the opposite side; this was possibly due to reduced auditory input, which is known to cross at this level. In comparison to healthy controls, no regional increases in gray-matter volume were seen. No white-matter changes were detected at the selected threshold.

  17. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs.

  18. Binding body and self in visuo-vestibular conflicts.

    PubMed

    Macauda, Gianluca; Bertolini, Giovanni; Palla, Antonella; Straumann, Dominik; Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2015-03-01

    Maintenance of the bodily self relies on the accurate integration of multisensory inputs in which visuo-vestibular cue integration is thought to play an essential role. Here, we tested in healthy volunteers how conflicting visuo-vestibular bodily input might impact on body self-coherence in a full body illusion set-up. Natural passive vestibular stimulation was provided on a motion platform, while visual input was manipulated using virtual reality equipment. Explicit (questionnaire) and implicit (skin temperature) measures were employed to assess illusory self-identification with either a mannequin or a control object. Questionnaire results pointed to a relatively small illusion, but hand skin temperature, plausibly an index of illusory body ownership, showed the predicted drop specifically in the condition when participants saw the mannequin moving in congruence with them. We argue that this implicit measure was accessible to visuo-vestibular modulation of the sense of self, possibly mediated by shared neural processes in the insula involved in vestibular and interoceptive signalling, thermoregulation and multisensory integration.

  19. Oscillatory neural responses evoked by natural vestibular stimuli in humans.

    PubMed

    Gale, Steven; Prsa, Mario; Schurger, Aaron; Gay, Annietta; Paillard, Aurore; Herbelin, Bruno; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-03-01

    While there have been numerous studies of the vestibular system in mammals, less is known about the brain mechanisms of vestibular processing in humans. In particular, of the studies that have been carried out in humans over the last 30 years, none has investigated how vestibular stimulation (VS) affects cortical oscillations. Here we recorded high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in healthy human subjects and a group of bilateral vestibular loss patients (BVPs) undergoing transient and constant-velocity passive whole body yaw rotations, focusing our analyses on the modulation of cortical oscillations in response to natural VS. The present approach overcame significant technical challenges associated with combining natural VS with human electrophysiology and reveals that both transient and constant-velocity VS are associated with a prominent suppression of alpha power (8-13 Hz). Alpha band suppression was localized over bilateral temporo-parietal scalp regions, and these alpha modulations were significantly smaller in BVPs. We propose that suppression of oscillations in the alpha band over temporo-parietal scalp regions reflects cortical vestibular processing, potentially comparable with alpha and mu oscillations in the visual and sensorimotor systems, respectively, opening the door to the investigation of human cortical processing under various experimental conditions during natural VS. PMID:26683063

  20. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p < 0.001). There was no correlation between the clinical and laboratory findings and VEMP findings in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.