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Sample records for vibration response characteristics

  1. Significant characteristics of social response to noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishinomiya, G.

    1979-01-01

    Several surveys made since 1971 to investigate annoyance resulting from noise and vibration, from various sources were studied in order to quantify the relation between annoyance response to noise or vibration and properties of the respondent including factors such as noise exposure, etc. Samples collected by the social surveys and physical measurements were analyzed by multi-dimensional analysis.

  2. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn Lynne; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien; Carpenter, Mark Gregory; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-02-16

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine proprioceptive reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults (n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied two-minutes of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii were significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed a) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with <60 s of low-level (RMS=10 m/s(2)) vibration, b) responses did not habituate over two-minutes of exposure, and importantly c) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize proprioceptive reflexes.

  3. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  4. Vibration-Response Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of structures analyzed interactively. Interactive steadystate vibration-response program, VIBRA, developed. Frequency-response analyses commonly used in evaluating dynamic behaviors of structures subjected to cyclic external forces. VIBRA calculates frequency response using modalsuperposition approach. Method applicable to single or multiple forces applied to linear, proportionally damped structure in which damping is viscous or structural. VIBRA written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution.

  5. Estimating the ride quality characteristics of vehicles with random decrement analysis of on-the-road vibration response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainalis, Daniel; Rouillard, Vincent; Sek, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the application of a practical analytical technique based on the random decrement method to estimate the rigid sprung mass dynamic characteristics (frequency response function) of road vehicles using only vibration response data during constant-speed operation. A brief history and development of the random decrement technique is presented, along with a summary of work undertaken on optimal parameter selection to establish the random decrement signature. Two approaches to estimate the dynamic characteristics from the random decrement signature are described and evaluated. A custom, single-wheeled vehicle (physical quarter car) was commissioned to undertake a series of on-the-road experiments at various nominally constant operating speeds. The vehicle, also instrumented as an inertial profilometer, simultaneously measured the longitudinal pavement profile to establish the vehicle's actual dynamic characteristics during operation. The main outcome of the paper is that the random decrement technique can be used to provide accurate estimates of the sprung mass mode of the vehicle's dynamic characteristics for both linear and nonlinear suspension systems of an idealised vehicle.

  6. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  7. Nonlinear characteristics of an autoparametric vibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Taha, Haithem E.; Tan, Ting

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear characteristics of an autoparametric vibration system are investigated. This system consists of a base structure and a cantilever beam with a tip mass. The dynamic equations for the system are derived using the extended Hamilton's principle. The method of multiple scales (MMS) is used to determine an approximate analytical solution of the nonlinear governing equations and, hence, analyze the stability and bifurcation of the system. Compared with the numerical simulation, the first-order MMS is not sufficient. A Lagrangian-based approach is proposed to perform a second-order analysis, which is applicable to a large class of nonlinear systems. The effects of the amplitude and frequency of the external force, damping and frequency of the attached cantilever beam, and the tip mass on the nonlinear responses of the autoparametric vibration system are determined. The results show that this system exhibits many interesting nonlinear phenomena including saturation, jumps, hysteresis and different kinds of bifurcations, such as saddle-node, supercritical pitchfork and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations. Power spectra, phase portraits and Poincare maps are employed to analyze the unstable behavior and the associated Hopf bifurcation and chaos. Depending on the application of such a system, its dynamical behaviors could be exploited or avoided.

  8. Effect of Vibration on Retention Characteristics of Screen Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Park, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the effect of vibration on the retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems was performed. The functioning of surface tension devices using fine-mesh screens requires that the pressure differential acting on the screen be less than its pressure retention capability. When exceeded, screen breakdown will occur and gas-free expulsion of propellant will no longer be possible. An analytical approach to predicting the effect of vibration was developed. This approach considers the transmission of the vibration to the screens of the device and the coupling of the liquid and the screen in establishing the screen response. A method of evaluating the transient response of the gas/liquid interface within the screen was also developed.

  9. Human response to vibration in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Waddington, David C; Woodcock, James; Peris, Eulalia; Condie, Jenna; Sica, Gennaro; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Steele, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main findings of a field survey conducted in the United Kingdom into the human response to vibration in residential environments. The main aim of this study was to derive exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to vibration from environmental sources. The sources of vibration considered in this paper are railway and construction activity. Annoyance data were collected using questionnaires conducted face-to-face with residents in their own homes. Questionnaires were completed with residents exposed to railway induced vibration (N = 931) and vibration from the construction of a light rail system (N = 350). Measurements of vibration were conducted at internal and external positions from which estimates of 24-h vibration exposure were derived for 1073 of the case studies. Sixty different vibration exposure descriptors along with 6 different frequency weightings were assessed as potential predictors of annoyance. Of the exposure descriptors considered, none were found to be a better predictor of annoyance than any other. However, use of relevant frequency weightings was found to improve correlation between vibration exposure and annoyance. A unified exposure-response relationship could not be derived due to differences in response to the two sources so separate relationships are presented for each source.

  10. On the undamped vibration absorber with cubic stiffness characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, G.

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of a vibration absorber, a nonlinear spring can be used on purpose. This paper presents an analytical insight on the characteristics of an undamped nonlinear vibration absorber when it is attached to a linear spring-mass-damper oscillator. In particular, the nonlinear attachment is modelled as a Duffing's oscillator with a spring characteristics having a linear positive stiffness term plus a cubic stiffness term. The effects of the nonlinearity, mass ratio and frequency ratio are investigated based on an approximate analytical formulation of the amplitude-frequency equation. Comparisons to the linear case are shown in terms of the frequency response curves. The nonlinear absorber seems to show an improved robustness to mistuning respect to the corresponding linear device. However, such a better robustness may be limited by some instability of the expected harmonic response.

  11. A new method that indicates the peak stress of random vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Xie, Peng; Xu, Zhen; Jin, Guang

    2012-09-01

    It is an important assessment targets that make a quantitative study of the peak stress of random vibration response during the mechanical properties design process of the space payload. Based on the equivalent of the destructive effect of the random vibration peak response and sine vibration response, the paper established the link between the two, obtained the sine vibration input function that equivalent to the destructive effect of the random vibration peak response. Considering the characteristic of the quantitative research that stress of sine vibration can be, the paper analyzed the stress of the sine vibration by the finite element method and indirectly accessed to the random vibration response peak stress which equivalent to the sine vibration destructive effect. This method worked very well to indicate the peak stress of random vibration response during the ground random vibration tests. The paper provided an effective means of predictive and validation method for the mechanical properties design and test during the ground random vibration test evaluation. The developments costs of the engineering can be significant saving and greatly shorten the development cycle by the method of the peak stress of random vibration response indicated during the ground tests. It is also helpful to improve the safety and reliability of the space load structure in order to avoid the failure or fatigue of the ground random vibration tests.

  12. Vibration Characteristics of a Suspension Footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, J. M. W.

    1997-04-01

    A suspension footbridge located in a tourist attraction in Singapore has a suspended span of 35 m and was designed for static pedestrian and wind loads. In common with other bridges of this type, it is a light, efficient structure and has a lively dynamic performance.Distributed parameter and finite element models were used to understand the vertical plane behaviour of the bridge and a prototype dynamic test using impact excitation was conducted to check the models and investigate the dynamic response.The first two vertical vibration modes were found to occur at the same frequency, 2 Hz, as the average pedestrian footfall. Response to pedestrians was simulated using linear and non-linear models of a moving excitation source.

  13. Vibration response and harmonic wave propagation of ultrasonic arc drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; DeHaven, J. G.; Higuchi, K.; Tzou, H. S.

    2007-02-01

    A piezoelectric curvilinear arc driver designed for an ultrasonic curvilinear motor is evaluated in this study. A design of piezoelectric curvilinear arc driver is proposed and its governing equations, vibration behaviour and wave propagation are investigated. Then, analysis of forced vibration response or driving characteristics to harmonic excitations in the modal domain is conducted. Finite element modelling and analysis of the arc driver are also discussed. Analytical results of free vibration characteristics are compared favourably with the finite element results. Harmonic analyses of the three finite element models reveal changes of dynamic behaviours of three models and also imply operating frequencies with a significant travelling wave component. Parametric study of mathematical and finite element simulation results suggests that stable travelling waves can be generated to drive a rotor on the proposed curvilinear arc motor system.

  14. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  15. Aircraft noise-induced building vibrations. [human annoyance responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Mayes, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The outdoor/indoor noise levels and associated vibration levels resulting from aircraft and nonaircraft events are recorded at 11 homesites, a historic building, and a school. In addition, limited subjective tests are conducted to examine the human detection/annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Results include relationships between aircraft noise and building vibration and between vibration and human response. Comparisons of building vibration data with existing criteria for building damage and human response are also considered.

  16. Understanding the effect of hammering process on the vibration characteristics of cymbals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, F.; Yoshida, T.; Koide, T.; Mizuta, T.; Osamura, K.

    2016-09-01

    Cymbals are thin domed plates used as percussion instruments. When cymbals are struck, they vibrate and radiate sound. Cymbals are made through spin forming, hammering, and lathing. The spin forming creates the basic shape of the cymbal, which determines its basic vibration characteristics. The hammering and lathing produce specific sound adjustments by changing the cymbal's vibration characteristics. In this study, we study how hammering cymbals affects their vibration characteristics. The hammering produces plastic deformation (small, shallow dents) on the cymbal's surface, generating residual stresses throughout it. These residual stresses change the vibration characteristics. We perform finite element analysis of a cymbal to obtain its stress distribution and the resulting change in vibration characteristics. To reproduce the stress distribution, we use thermal stress analysis, and then with this stress distribution we perform vibration analysis. These results show that each of the cymbal's modes has a different sensitivity to the thermal load (i.e., hammering). This difference causes changes in the frequency response and the deflection shape that significantly improves the sound radiation efficiency. In addition, we explain the changes in natural frequencies by the stress and modal strain energy distributions.

  17. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  18. Thermal weights for semiclassical vibrational response functions

    SciTech Connect

    Moberg, Daniel R.; Alemi, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2015-08-28

    Semiclassical approximations to response functions can allow the calculation of linear and nonlinear spectroscopic observables from classical dynamics. Evaluating a canonical response function requires the related tasks of determining thermal weights for initial states and computing the dynamics of these states. A class of approximations for vibrational response functions employs classical trajectories at quantized values of action variables and represents the effects of the radiation-matter interaction by discontinuous transitions. Here, we evaluate choices for a thermal weight function which are consistent with this dynamical approximation. Weight functions associated with different semiclassical approximations are compared, and two forms are constructed which yield the correct linear response function for a harmonic potential at any temperature and are also correct for anharmonic potentials in the classical mechanical limit of high temperature. Approximations to the vibrational linear response function with quantized classical trajectories and proposed thermal weight functions are assessed for ensembles of one-dimensional anharmonic oscillators. This approach is shown to perform well for an anharmonic potential that is not locally harmonic over a temperature range encompassing the quantum limit of a two-level system and the limit of classical dynamics.

  19. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. Using a perturbation expansion technique the free vibration solution is obtained in a closed-form, and the effects of system parameters on beam response are explored. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  20. Vibration characteristics analysis of rotating shrouded blades with impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Xie, Fangtao; Nai, Haiqiang; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    A dynamic model of rotating shrouded blades with impacts among adjacent shrouded blades is established considering the effects of the centrifugal stiffening, spin softening and Coriolis force, and the model is validated using finite element method. In the proposed model, the shrouded blade is simplified as a cantilever Euler-Bernoulli beam with a mass point at the free end, and the flexural dynamic stiffness of shrouded blade is selected as contact stiffness during collision. Based on the developed model, the effects of symmetric and asymmetric shroud gaps, rotational speeds, and aerodynamic force amplitudes on the dynamic characteristics of shrouded blades are analyzed through Newmark-β numerical method. The results indicate that (1) the vibro-impact responses of shrouded blades under some asymmetric gaps are more complicated than that under symmetric gap. (2) With the increase of rotational speed from 6000 to 10,000 rev/min, the system vibration experiences from period-three motion, through chaotic motion, finally to period-one motion during collision process because the increasing rotational speed changes the flexural dynamic stiffness of rotating blade. (3) The vibration displacements of shrouded blades increase linearly, and impact force increases linearly with the increase of aerodynamic force amplitude.

  1. Characteristics of laterally vibrating resonant microcantilevers in viscous liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Russell; Josse, Fabien; Heinrich, Stephen M.; Brand, Oliver; Dufour, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of microcantilevers vibrating laterally in viscous liquid media are investigated and compared to those of similar microcantilevers vibrating in the out-of-plane direction. The hydrodynamic loading on the vibrating beam is first determined using a numerical model. A semi-analytical expression for the hydrodynamic forces in terms of the Reynolds number and the aspect ratio (beam thickness over beam width) is obtained by introducing a correction factor to Stokes' solution for a vibrating plate of infinite area to account for the effects of the thickness. The results enable the effects of fluid damping and effective fluid mass on the resonant frequency and the quality factor (Q) to be investigated as a function of both the beam's geometry and liquid medium's properties and compared to experimentally determined values given in the literature. The resonant frequency and Q are found to be higher for laterally vibrating microcantilevers compared to those of similar geometry experiencing transverse (out-of-plane) vibration. Compared to transversely vibrating beams, the resonant frequency of laterally vibrating beams is shown to decrease at a slower rate (with respect to changes in viscosity) in media having higher viscosities than water. The theoretical results are compared to experimental data obtained for cantilevers completely immersed in solutions of varying aqueous percent glycerol. The increases in resonant frequency and Q are expected to yield much lower limits of detection in liquid-phase chemical sensing applications.

  2. Substrate-borne vibrations induce behavioral responses in the leaf-dwelling cerambycid, Paraglenea fortunei.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Remi; Hosoda, Naoe; Kitajima, Hiroshi; Takanashi, Takuma

    2014-12-01

    Many insects utilize substrate-borne vibrations as a source of information for recognizing mates or predators. Among various substrates, plant leaves are commonly used for transmitting and receiving vibrational information. However, little is known about the utilization of vibrations by leaf-dwelling insects, especially coleopteran beetles. We conducted two experiments to examine the response of the leaf-dwelling cerambycid beetle, Paraglenea fortunei, to substrate-borne vibrations. We recorded and analyzed vibrations of host plant leaves from four different sources: wind (0.5 m/s), a beetle during landing, a walking beetle, and a beetle walking in the wind (0.5 m/s). We then measured the behavioral thresholds, the lowest amplitudes that induce behavioral responses, from beetles walking and resting on horizontal and vertical substrates with pulsed vibrations ranging from 20 Hz to 1 kHz. The vibrational characteristics of biotic and abiotic stimuli clearly differed. Beetle-generated vibrations (landing, walking, and walking in the wind) were broadly high in the low-frequency components above ∼30 Hz, while wind-generated vibrations showed a dominant peak at ∼30 Hz and a steep decrease thereafter. Among four situations, beetles walking on horizontal substrates showed lowest thresholds to vibrations of 75-500 Hz, which are characteristic of beetle-generated vibrations. Given that P. fortunei beetles are found on horizontal leaf surfaces of the host plant, vibrations transmitted though horizontal substrates may induce a strong freeze response in walking beetles to detect conspecifics or heterospecifics. Our findings provide evidence that leaf-dwelling beetles can discriminate among biotic and abiotic factors via differences in vibrational characteristics.

  3. Mounting method improves electrical and vibrational characteristics of screen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of the mesh or screen electrodes used in electron tubes are improved by decreasing the shunt capacitance of the tube while retaining the close spacing needed for the required resolution. Vibrational characteristics are enhanced by raising the natural resonant frequency.

  4. Prediction of vibration characteristics in beam structure using sub-scale modeling with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zai, Behzad Ahmed; Sami, Saad; Khan, M. Amir; Ahmad, Furqan; Park, Myung Kyun

    2015-09-01

    Geometric or sub-scale modeling techniques are used for the evaluation of large and complex dynamic structures to ensure accurate reproduction of load path and thus leading to true dynamic characteristics of such structures. The sub-scale modeling technique is very effective in the prediction of vibration characteristics of original large structure when the experimental testing is not feasible due to the absence of a large testing facility. Previous researches were more focused on free and harmonic vibration case with little or no consideration for readily encountered random vibration. A sub-scale modeling technique is proposed for estimating the vibration characteristics of any large scale structure such as Launch vehicles, Mega structures, etc., under various vibration load cases by utilizing precise scaled-down model of that dynamic structure. In order to establish an analytical correlation between the original structure and its scaled models, different scale models of isotropic cantilever beam are selected and analyzed under various vibration conditions( i.e. free, harmonic and random) using finite element package ANSYS. The developed correlations are also validated through experimental testing. The prediction made from the vibratory response of the scaled-down beam through the established sets of correlation are found similar to the response measured from the testing of original beam structure. The established correlations are equally applicable in the prediction of dynamic characteristics of any complex structure through its scaled-down models. This paper presents modified sub-scale modeling technique that enables accurate prediction of vibration characteristics of large and complex structure under not only sinusoidal but also for random vibrations.

  5. Vibration characteristics of a steadily rotating slender ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived to describe the structural vibrations of a uniform homogeneous ring which is very flexible because the radius is very large compared with the cross sectional dimensions. Elementary beam theory is used and small deflections are assumed in the derivation. Four sets of structural modes are examined: bending and compression modes in the plane of the ring; bending modes perpendicular to the plane of the ring; and twisting modes about the centroid of the ring cross section. Spatial and temporal characteristics of these modes, presented in terms of vibration frequencies and ratios between vibration amplitudes, are demonstrated in several figures. Given a sufficiently high rotational rate, the dynamics of the ring approach those of a vibrating string. In this case, the velocity of traveling wave in the material of the ring approaches in velocity of the material relative to inertial space, resulting in structural modes which are almost stationary in space.

  6. Effects of Frequency and Acceleration Amplitude on Osteoblast Mechanical Vibration Responses: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Bone cells are deformed according to mechanical stimulation they receive and their mechanical characteristics. However, how osteoblasts are affected by mechanical vibration frequency and acceleration amplitude remains unclear. By developing 3D osteoblast finite element (FE) models, this study investigated the effect of cell shapes on vibration characteristics and effect of acceleration (vibration intensity) on vibrational responses of cultured osteoblasts. Firstly, the developed FE models predicted natural frequencies of osteoblasts within 6.85–48.69 Hz. Then, three different levels of acceleration of base excitation were selected (0.5, 1, and 2 g) to simulate vibrational responses, and acceleration of base excitation was found to have no influence on natural frequencies of osteoblasts. However, vibration response values of displacement, stress, and strain increased with the increase of acceleration. Finally, stress and stress distributions of osteoblast models under 0.5 g acceleration in Z-direction were investigated further. It was revealed that resonance frequencies can be a monotonic function of cell height or bottom area when cell volumes and material properties were assumed as constants. These findings will be useful in understanding how forces are transferred and influence osteoblast mechanical responses during vibrations and in providing guidance for cell culture and external vibration loading in experimental and clinical osteogenesis studies. PMID:28074178

  7. Longitudinal Vibration Characteristics Required to Cut a Circle by Ultrasonic Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2010-07-01

    Currently, lasers and water jets are used to cut circles in brittle materials such as ceramics. However, a disadvantage of these methods is that the conventional equipment is large and complex. To resolve this issue, a method using the ultrasonic vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn for cutting is developed. We consider that this equipment can be simplified and miniaturized. The shape of the hollow-type stepped horn and the characteristics of the longitudinal vibration required to obtain excellent cutting properties were examined. As a result, the most appropriate depth of the hollow part is one-quarter of the wavelength for a hollow-type stepped horn that vibrates longitudinally. The amplification factor is proportional to the cross-sectional ratio providing the cross-sectional ratio does not exceed 4.6. The characteristics of the longitudinal vibration of the hollow-type stepped horn when the static pressing force at the tip of the horn is varied were also examined. It was clarified that the ultrasonic vibration of a hollow-type stepped horn can be used to cut brittle materials.

  8. Characteristics of Vibration that Alter Cardiovascular Parameters in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Rabey, Karyne N; Schmitt, Daniel; Norton, John N; Reynolds, Randall P

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that short-term exposure of mice to vibration within a frequency range thought to be near the resonant frequency range of mouse tissue and at an acceleration of 0 to 1 m/s(2) would alter heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). We used radiotelemetry to evaluate the cardiovascular response to vibration in C57BL/6 and CD1 male mice exposed to vertical vibration of various frequencies and accelerations. MAP was consistently increased above baseline values at an acceleration near 1 m/s(2) and a frequency of 90 Hz in both strains, and HR was increased also in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, MAP increased at 80 Hz in individual mice of both strains. When both strains were analyzed together, mean MAP and HR were increased at 90 Hz at 1 m/s(2), and HR was increased at 80 Hz at 1 m/s(2). No consistent change in MAP or HR occurred when mice were exposed to frequencies below 80 Hz or above 90 Hz. The increase in MAP and HR occurred only when the mice had conscious awareness of the vibration, given that these changes did not occur when anesthetized mice were exposed to vibration. Tested vibration acceleration levels lower than 0.75 m/s(2) did not increase MAP or HR at 80 or 90 Hz, suggesting that a relatively high level of vibration is necessary to increase these parameters. These data are important to establish the harmful frequencies and accelerations of environmental vibration that should be minimized or avoided in mouse facilities.

  9. Vibration characteristics of a piezoelectric open-shell transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeseung; Kim, Jin O.; Il Jung, Soon

    2012-04-01

    This paper deals with the vibration characteristics of a piezoelectric open-shell transducer which was made by dividing a cylindrical piezoelectric transducer longitudinally into two segments. Two-dimensional governing equations were derived by using the cylindrical membrane theory. Applying mechanical and electrical boundary conditions yielded a characteristic equation for the resonance frequencies of the piezoelectric open-shell transducer. The fundamental frequency and the electromechanical coupling factor were calculated and compared with the results of the finite element analysis and experiment. The fundamental mode shape obtained theoretically was compared with the result of the finite element analysis. The theoretical analysis was verified to provide the vibration characteristics of an open-shell transducer.

  10. Vibration and noise characteristics of flap type olive harvesters.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Bülent; Saraçoğlu, Türker; Alayunt, Fazilet N; Ozarslan, Cengiz

    2011-03-01

    The object of this study was to measure and evaluate the vibration and noise characteristics of five flap type portable harvesters using for olive harvesting and their effect on operator health during harvesting time. The vibration and sound pressure levels of different harvesters were measured at both idling and full load conditions. The vibration values of harvesters were measured and analyzed for both right and left hands and the sound pressure level was measured at ear level of the operator. The vibration total value was expressed as the root-mean-squares (rms) of three component values. The results indicated that in 10% of the exposed population traumatic vasospastic disease (TVD) appeared after 0.7-7.1 years for the left hand, 1.0-4.7 years for the right hand of the operator in continuous use of these harvesters, under usual working conditions. The sound pressure values at operator's ear level of harvesters were found below risk levels when compared with ILO standards.

  11. Human discomfort response to noise combined with vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted (1) to determine the effects of combined environmental noise and vertical vibration upon human subjective discomfort response, (2) to develop a model for the prediction of passenger discomfort response to the combined environment, and (3) to develop a set of noise-vibration curves for use as criteria in ride quality design. Subjects were exposed to parametric combinations of noise and vibrations through the use of a realistic laboratory simulator. Results indicated that accurate prediction of passenger ride comfort requires knowledge of both the level and frequency content of the noise and vibration components of a ride environment as well as knowledge of the interactive effects of combined noise and vibration. A design tool in the form of an empirical model of passenger discomfort response to combined noise and vertical vibration was developed and illustrated by several computational examples. Finally, a set of noise-vibration criteria curves were generated to illustrate the fundamental design trade-off possible between passenger discomfort and the noise-vibration levels that produce the discomfort.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. The effects of system parameters on beam response are explored with a perturbation expansion technique. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  13. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: biodynamic responses to sinusoidal and random vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of biodynamic responses of the seated human body on the frequency, magnitude and waveform of vertical vibration has been studied in 20 males and 20 females. With sinusoidal vibration (13 frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.1-1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s.) and with random vibration (1-16 Hz) at the same magnitudes, the apparent mass of the body was similar with random and sinusoidal vibration of the same overall magnitude. With increasing magnitude of vibration, the stiffness and damping of a model fitted to the apparent mass reduced and the resonance frequency decreased (from 6.5 to 4.5 Hz). Male and female subjects had similar apparent mass (after adjusting for subject weight) and a similar principal resonance frequency with both random and sinusoidal vibration. The change in biodynamic response with increasing vibration magnitude depends on the frequency of the vibration excitation, but is similar with sinusoidal and random excitation.

  14. Finite element method-based study for effect of adult degenerative scoliosis on the spinal vibration characteristics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Yang, James; Lieberman, Isador; Haddas, Ram

    2017-03-22

    Finite element analysis was used to investigate the responses of five healthy subjects and five adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) subjects to cyclic vibration. The dynamic responses of the healthy and scoliotic spines to the sinusoidal cyclic vibrations have been investigated in previous studies by simulation or experimental approaches. However, no simulation or experimental results were available for the ADS subjects. The effect of the ADS on the vibrational characteristics of spines remained unknown. The objective of this study was to compare differences of the dynamic responses to the cyclic vibration input between the healthy subjects and subjects with ADS. Based on the simulations results in this study, the scoliotic spines are more sensitive to the cyclic vibrations than the healthy spines. More resonant frequencies were predicted in the scoliotic spines than the healthy spines. The scoliotic deformity in the spine was to make the vibrational response of the spine significantly more complex at the apical scoliotic region. This study suggested that ADS could severely increase spinal response to the cyclic vibrations, which could potentially lead to further scoliotic deformity in the spine.

  15. Thermoregulatory responses to heat and vibration in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaul, W. A.; Spear, R. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vibration on thermoregulatory responses was studied in heat-acclimated men exposed suddenly to simultaneous heat and whole body vibrations (WBVs) at two intensity levels, each at graded frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz. The mean rectal temperature (Tre) became elevated more quickly in the WBV exposures than in the controls (heat exposure alone). Both intensity- and frequency-dependent WBV relationships were recorded in localized blood flows and in sweat rates. Thus, vibration appears to reduce the efficiency of the cooling mechanisms during a heat exposure.

  16. Vibration Damping Response of Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    to predict the vibration damping of these coposites. L lein Irauu, .. rii. se i-s foi tesi specimel gC-miLtrics oSl0y, so that - material...manner that the strain in the x direction was determined. This development results in the transverse strain given as av (x,y,z) avO (x,y)ei~ t a 2wO(xy) ei

  17. Vibration characteristics of an ultrasonic transducer of two piezoelectric discs.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chunguang; Kim, Jin Oh

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of the different thickness of the piezoelectric discs used in assembly of an ultrasonic sandwich transducer. The transducer consists of two piezoelectric discs with different thickness between 0 and 2.0mm and with same diameter 28mm. Its vibration characteristics of the radial and axial motions were investigated theoretically and experimentally in axisymmetric vibration modes. Theoretically, the differential equations of piezoelectric motions were solved to produce characteristic equations that provided natural frequencies and mode shapes. The range of the fundamental frequency of radial in-plane mode is 80-360kHz and that of the axial out-of-plane mode is 600-1200kHz. Experimentally, the natural frequencies and the radial in-plane motion were measured using an impedance analyzer and an in-plane laser interferometer, respectively. The results of the theoretical analysis were compared with those of a finite-element analysis and experiments, and the theoretical analysis was verified on the basis of this comparison. It was concluded that the natural frequencies of the radial modes of the transducer were not affected by the stack and thickness of piezoelectric discs; however, those of the thickness modes were affected by the stack and thickness of the piezoelectric discs.

  18. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  19. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-28

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  20. Damage Identification of Piles Based on Vibration Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Yao, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    A method of damage identification of piles was established by using vibration characteristics. The approach focused on the application of the element strain energy and sensitive modals. A damage identification equation of piles was deduced using the structural vibration equation. The equation contained three major factors: change rate of element modal strain energy, damage factor of pile, and sensitivity factor of modal damage. The sensitive modals of damage identification were selected by using sensitivity factor of modal damage firstly. Subsequently, the indexes for early-warning of pile damage were established by applying the change rate of strain energy. Then the technology of computational analysis of wavelet transform was used to damage identification for pile. The identification of small damage of pile was completely achieved, including the location of damage and the extent of damage. In the process of identifying the extent of damage of pile, the equation of damage identification was used in many times. Finally, a stadium project was used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method of damage identification for piles. The correctness and practicability of the proposed method were verified by comparing the results of damage identification with that of low strain test. The research provided a new way for damage identification of piles. PMID:25506062

  1. Vibration and wave propagation characteristics of multisegmented elastic beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Adnan H.; Hawwa, Muhammad A.

    1990-01-01

    Closed form analytical solutions are derived for the vibration and wave propagation of multisegmented elastic beams. Each segment is modeled as a Timoshenko beam with possible inclusion of material viscosity, elastic foundation and axial forces. Solutions are obtained by using transfer matrix methods. According to these methods formal solutions are first constructed which relate the deflection, slope, moment and shear force of one end of the individual segment to those of the other. By satisfying appropriate continuity conditions at segment junctions, a global 4x4 matrix results which relates the deflection, slope, moment and shear force of one end of the beam to those of the other. If any boundary conditions are subsequently invoked on the ends of the beam one gets the appropriate characteristic equation for the natural frequencies. Furthermore, by invoking appropriate periodicity conditions the dispersion relation for a periodic system is obtained. A variety of numerical examples are included.

  2. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  3. Vibration characteristics of bone conducted sound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, S; Håkansson, B; Tjellström, A

    2000-01-01

    A dry skull added with damping material was used to investigate the vibratory pattern of bone conducted sound. Three orthogonal vibration responses of the cochleae were measured, by means of miniature accelerometers, in the frequency range 0.1-10 kHz. The exciter was attached to the temporal, parietal, and frontal bones, one at the time. In the transmission response to the ipsilateral cochlea, a profound low frequency antiresonance (attenuation) was found, verified psycho-acoustically, and shown to yield a distinct lateralization effect. It was also shown that, for the ipsilateral side, the direction of excitation coincides with that of maximum response. At the contralateral cochlea, no such dominating response direction was found for frequencies above the first skull resonance. An overall higher response level was achieved, for the total energy transmission in general and specifically for the direction of excitation, at the ipsilateral cochlea when the transducer was attached to the excitation point closest to the cochlea. The transranial attenuation was found to be frequency dependent, with values from -5 to 10 dB for the energy transmission and -30 to 40 dB for measurements in a single direction, with a tendency toward higher attenuation at the higher frequencies.

  4. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  5. Rocket Launch-Induced Vibration and Ignition Overpressure Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul; Margasahayam, Ravi; Nayfeh, Jamal; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rocket-induced vibration and ignition overpressure response environments are predicted in the low-frequency (5 to 200 hertz) range. The predictions are necessary to evaluate their impact on critical components, structures, and facilities in the immediate vicinity of the rocket launch pad.

  6. Techniques for obtaining subjective response to vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. J.; Oborne, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to validate the techniques used for obtaining ratings in the field surveys carried out by the University College of Swansea. In addition, attempts were made to evaluate the basic form of the human response to vibration. Some of the results obtained by different methods are described.

  7. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  8. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  9. Vibration characteristics of OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental vibration tests covering a range of torque and speed conditions were performed on the OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Signals from accelerometers located on the transmission housing were analyzed by using Fourier spectra, power spectral density functions, and averaging techniques. Most peaks of the Fourier spectra occurred at the spiral bevel and planetary gear mesh harmonics. The highest level of vibration occurred at the spiral bevel meshing frequency. Transmission speed and vibration measurement location had a significant effect on measured vibration; transmission torque and measurement direction had a small effect.

  10. Vibration characteristics of an APS lab facility in Building 401

    SciTech Connect

    Royston, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The vibratory behavior of a lab facility located in Building 401 of the Advanced Photon Source site at Argonne National Laboratory is summarized. Measurements of ambient vibration indicate that acceptable displacement levels are usually maintained (rms value below 0.1 microns) for the measured frequency range, above 0.2 Hz. An exception occurs when strong wind conditions excite a horizontal building resonance near 1.85 Hz to rms levels as high as 0.3 microns. Measurements of the laboratory floor`s dynamic response to directly applied force excitation agree with theoretical predictions. The primary component of the floor construction is a reinforced concrete slab. The slab has a transverse fundamental resonant frequency of 18.5 Hz and an associated damping level of roughly 8.5% of critical. It is also shown via experimental measurements that the linoleum surface adhered to the concrete slab is far more compliant than the slab itself and can significantly influence the floor`s dynamic response to local excitations.

  11. Vibration characteristic analysis method for the quartz microgyroscope based on the admittance circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoxu; Dong, Peitao; Xie, Liqiang; Wu, Xuezhong

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristic analysis method for a quartz microgyroscope based on the admittance circle is reported in this paper. Admittance theory is introduced and the admittance circle principle is analysed to study the vibration characteristics of the quartz microgyroscope. The prototype gyroscope was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The admittance and phase diagram of the work mode were obtained by vibration mode test systems. Then the admittance circle of the work mode was drawn, and the parameter identification of the transfer function between the voltage and current was completed to analyse the vibration characteristics. Therefore, the vibration characteristic analysis method based on the admittance circle can be used to build the transfer function of the quartz microgyroscope, which is helpful for the design of a high performance quartz microgyroscope.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of an inclined flexible cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinghua; Ma, Yexuan; Xu, Wanhai; Lu, Yan; Cheng, Ankang

    2017-04-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted on vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible inclined cylinder with a yaw angle equals 45° for investigating the response characteristics in a towing tank. The flexible cylinder model was 5.6 m in length and 16 mm in diameter with an aspect ratio of 350 and a mass ratio of 1.9. The Reynolds numbers ranged from about 800 to 16,000.The strain responses were measured directly in both cross-flow (CF) and in-line (IL) directions and corresponding displacements were obtained using a modal approach. The dynamic response characteristics of the inclined flexible cylinder excited by vortex shedding was examined from the aspect of strain response, displacement amplitudes, dominant modes, response frequencies and drag force coefficients. The experimental results indicated that the CF response amplitude could be up to a value of 3.0D and the IL one more than 1.1D. The dominant modes were from 1 to 3 in CF direction and 1 to 5 in IL direction. And it was found that dominant frequencies increased linearly with the reduced velocity. The multi-modal response of the flexible inclined cylinder model excited by VIV was observed and analyzed. Moreover, the values of drag coefficients were in the range of 0.9-2.6.

  13. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 2: vibration response, fretting-wear, guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Part 2 of this paper covers forced vibration excitation mechanisms, vibration response prediction, resulting damage assessment, and acceptance criteria.

  14. Vibration characteristics and damage detection in a suspension bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Wasanthi R.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Nguyen, Theanh

    2016-08-01

    Suspension bridges are flexible and vibration sensitive structures that exhibit complex and multi-modal vibration. Due to this, the usual vibration based methods could face a challenge when used for damage detection in these structures. This paper develops and applies a mode shape component specific damage index (DI) to detect and locate damage in a suspension bridge with pre-tensioned cables. This is important as suspension bridges are large structures and damage in them during their long service lives could easily go un-noticed. The capability of the proposed vibration based DI is demonstrated through its application to detect and locate single and multiple damages with varied locations and severity in the cables of the suspension bridge. The outcome of this research will enhance the safety and performance of these bridges which play an important role in the transport network.

  15. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness.

  16. Three-body abrasive wear characteristics under reciprocating motion of CFRP in vibrating environment

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Sadakazu; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Nakagawa, Tatsuo

    1996-12-31

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in industry because of their attractive mechanical characteristics. Such CFRP parts are invariably subjected to three-body wear due to small indentations and machine vibrations. In this study, the wear characteristics under the three-body condition and the abrasive wear of CFRP were investigated by using a vibrating environment and silicon carbide abrasive grains.

  17. Response of the seated human body to whole-body vertical vibration: discomfort caused by sinusoidal vibration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Frequency weightings for predicting vibration discomfort assume the same frequency-dependence at all magnitudes of vibration, whereas biodynamic studies show that the frequency-dependence of the human body depends on the magnitude of vibration. This study investigated how the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort depends on the acceleration and the force at the subject-seat interface. Using magnitude estimation, 20 males and 20 females judged their discomfort caused by sinusoidal vertical acceleration at 13 frequencies (1-16 Hz) at magnitudes from 0.1 to 4.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The frequency-dependence of their equivalent comfort contours depended on the magnitude of vibration, but was less dependent on the magnitude of dynamic force than the magnitude of acceleration, consistent with the biodynamic non-linearity of the body causing some of the magnitude-dependence of equivalent comfort contours. There were significant associations between the biodynamic responses and subjective responses at all frequencies in the range 1-16 Hz. Practitioner Summary: Vertical seat vibration causes discomfort in many forms of transport. This study provides the frequency-dependence of vibration discomfort over a range of vibration magnitudes and shows how the frequency weightings in the current standards can be improved.

  18. Seated Occupant Apparent Mass Characteristics Under Automotive Postures and Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAKHEJA, S.; HARU, I.; BOILEAU, P.-É.

    2002-05-01

    The biodynamic apparent mass response characteristics of 24 human subjects (12 males and 12 females) seated under representative automotive postures with hands-in-lap (passengers) and hands-on-steering wheel (drivers) are reported. The measurements were carried out under white noise vertical excitations of 0·25, 0·5 and 1·0m/s2r.m.s. acceleration magnitudes in the 0·5-40Hz frequency range and a track measured input (1·07m/s2). The measured data have been analyzed to study the effects of hands position, body mass, magnitude and type of vibration excitation, and feet position, on the biodynamic response expressed in terms of apparent mass. A comparison of the measured response of subjects assuming typical automotive postures involving inclined cushion, inclined backrest and full use of backrest support with data determined under different postural conditions and excitation levels revealed considerable differences. The biodynamic response of automobile occupants seated with hands in lap, peaks in the 6·5-8·6Hz frequency range, which is considerably higher than the reported range of fundamental frequencies (4·5-5Hz) in most other studies involving different experimental conditions. The peak magnitude tends to decrease considerably for the driving posture with hands-on-steering wheel, while a second peak in the 8-12 Hz range becomes more apparent for this posture. The results suggest that biodynamic response of occupants seated in automotive seats and subject to vertical vibration need to be characterized, as a minimum, by two distinct functions for passenger and driving postures. A higher body mass, in general, yields higher peak magnitude response and lower corresponding frequency for both postures. The strong dependence of the response on the body mass is further demonstrated by grouping the measured data into four different mass ranges: less than 60 kg, between 60·5 and 70 kg, between 70·5 and 80 kg, and above 80 kg. From the results, it is concluded that

  19. Modal characteristics of in-plane vibration of circular plates clamped at the outer edge.

    PubMed

    Farag, N H; Pan, J

    2003-04-01

    The equations of in-plane vibration in thin flat plates are solved for free vibration in circular plates clamped at the outer edge. The mode shapes are represented by trigonometric functions in the circumferential direction and by series summation of Bessel functions in the radial direction. Accuracy of the predictions of natural frequencies and mode shapes is assessed by comparisons with finite-element predictions and with previously reported results. The present solution gives very accurate predictions. The work also highlights the nature of coupling between the different circumferential and radial modes and the response of different vibrational modes at the center of the plate. It is shown that the center point of the plate vibrates only for modes with unity circumferential wave number (number of nodal diameters). Nondimensional frequency parameters are listed and the radial mode shapes of natural vibration are depicted to illustrate the free-vibration behavior in the frequency range of practical interest.

  20. Study of the bending vibration characteristic of phononic crystals beam-foundation structures by Timoshenko beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ni, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Han, Lin; Kang, Xue-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Vibration problems wildly exist in beam-foundation structures. In this paper, finite periodic composites inspired by the concept of ideal phononic crystals (PCs), as well as Timoshenko beam theory (TBT), are proposed to the beam anchored on Winkler foundation. The bending vibration band structure of the PCs Timoshenko beam-foundation structure is derived from the modified transfer matrix method (MTMM) and Bloch's theorem. Then, the frequency response of the finite periodic composite Timoshenko beam-foundation structure by the finite element method (FEM) is performed to verify the above theoretical deduction. Study shows that the Timoshenko beam-foundation structure with periodic composites has wider attenuation zones compared with homogeneous ones. It is concluded that TBT is more available than Euler beam theory (EBT) in the study of the bending vibration characteristic of PCs beam-foundation structures with different length-to-height ratios.

  1. Optimal Design of Spring Characteristics of Damper for Subharmonic Vibration in Automatic Transmission Powertrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, T.; Ryu, T.; Matsuzaki, K.; Rosbi, S.; Sueoka, A.; Takikawa, Y.; Ooi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In the torque converter, the damper of the lock-up clutch is used to effectively absorb the torsional vibration. The damper is designed using a piecewise-linear spring with three stiffness stages. However, a nonlinear vibration, referred to as a subharmonic vibration of order 1/2, occurred around the switching point in the piecewise-linear restoring torque characteristics because of the nonlinearity. In the present study, we analyze vibration reduction for subharmonic vibration. The model used herein includes the torque converter, the gear train, and the differential gear. The damper is modeled by a nonlinear rotational spring of the piecewise-linear spring. We focus on the optimum design of the spring characteristics of the damper in order to suppress the subharmonic vibration. A piecewise-linear spring with five stiffness stages is proposed, and the effect of the distance between switching points on the subharmonic vibration is investigated. The results of our analysis indicate that the subharmonic vibration can be suppressed by designing a damper with five stiffness stages to have a small spring constant ratio between the neighboring springs. The distances between switching points must be designed to be large enough that the amplitude of the main frequency component of the systems does not reach the neighboring switching point.

  2. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  3. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-07

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  4. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  5. Estimate of the changes in the characteristics of a PZT vibrator under a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Moojoon

    2015-03-01

    To utilize lead zirconate titanate (PZT) vibrators in the aerospace industry, we formulate the changes in the characteristics of the vibrator for the transverse mode and the thickness mode as functions of the temperature. For practical use, we adopted a few linear functions and a square function as regression functions in order to estimate the characteristics of the commercialized PZT-5 series of ceramics. The input admittance characteristics were calculated using the characteristic functions suggested in this study, and the results showed good agreement with the measured ones.

  6. Analysis of proposed criteria for human response to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janeway, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development of criteria for human vibration response is reviewed, including the evolution of the ISO standard 2631. The document is analyzed to show why its application to vehicle ride evaluation is strongly opposed. Alternative vertical horizontal limits for comfort are recommended in the ground vehicle ride frequency range above 1 Hz. These values are derived by correlating the absorbed power findings of Pradko and Lee with other established criteria. Special emphasis is placed on working limits in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz since this is the most significant area in ground vehicle ride evaluation.

  7. Vibration characteristics in a smart bridge model using shape-memory alloy fiber reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, A.; Zhao, H.; Abe, H.

    2005-05-01

    A smart bridge model was proposed for active control on strength and vibration by changing material properties of shape memory alloy embedded in the bridge structure using TiNi/acrylic composite. A systemic experimental study was carried out to investigate the self-strengthening effect by shape recovery of pre-strained TiNi wires as well as vibration control by stiffness changing with direct electric heating method. The deflection and vibration responses are measured by electric strain gages affixed on the bridge floor on which the model train goes through. From these results, we know the smart bridge model of composite material beam has not only been able to reduce the vibration response, but also change the frequency of the structure. The damping and vibration control for the bridge model is confirmed by the measurement.

  8. Characteristics of Dry Chin-Tuck Swallowing Vibrations and Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Dudik, Joshua M; Jestrović, Iva; Luan, Bo; Coyle, James L.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effects of the chin-tuck maneuver, a technique commonly employed to compensate for dysphagia, on cervical auscultation are not fully understood. Characterizing a technique that is known to affect swallowing function is an important step on the way to developing a new instrumentation-based swallowing screening tool. Methods In this study, we recorded data from 55 adult participants who each completed five saliva swallows in a chin-tuck position. The resulting data was processed using previously designed filtering and segmentation algorithms. We then calculated 9 time, frequency, and time-frequency domain features for each independent signal. Results We found that multiple frequency and time domain features varied significantly between male and female subjects as well as between swallowing sounds and vibrations. However, our analysis showed that participant age did not play a significant role on the values of the extracted features. Finally, we found that various frequency features corresponding to swallowing vibrations did demonstrate statistically significant variation between the neutral and chin-tuck positions but sounds showed no changes between these two positions. Conclusion The chin-tuck maneuver affects many facets of swallowing vibrations and sounds and its effects can be monitored via cervical auscultation. Significance These results suggest that a subject’s swallowing technique does need to be accounted for when monitoring their performance with cervical auscultation based instrumentation. PMID:25974926

  9. New algorithm for controlling electric arc furnaces using their vibrational and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Serikov, V. A.; Rechkalov, A. V.; Cherednichenko, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The processes occurring in arc discharges are analyzed as the sources of acoustic radiation in an electric arc furnace (EAF). Acoustic vibrations are shown to transform into mechanical vibrations in the furnace laboratory. The shielding of the acoustic energy fluxes onto water-cooled wall panels by a charge is experimentally studied. It is shown that the rate of charge melting and the depth of submergence of arc discharges in the slag and metal melt can be monitored by measuring the vibrational characteristics of furnaces and using them in a universal industrial process-control system, which was developed for EAFs.

  10. Dose-response relation between exposure to two types of hand-arm vibration and sensorineural perception of vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Virokannas, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--31 railway workers and 32 lumberjacks were examined to compare the dose-response relation between the exposure to two types of hand-arm vibration and the sensory disturbances in peripheral nerves as evaluated by the vibration perception thresholds (VPTs). METHODS--Clinical examinations were carried out that included measurements of the VPTs, and electroneuromyography (ENMG), and an inquiry to confirm the use of vibrating tools. Diseases of the central nervous system and neuropathies were checked by inquiry and a clinical examination, diabetes was excluded by a blood sample analysis, and the subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome confirmed with ENMG were excluded from the study. RESULTS--Lifetime use of hand held tamping machines (railway workers) and chain saws (lumberjacks) had a significant correlation with the VPTs at frequencies from 32 to 500 Hz. The increase of the VPTs (250 Hz) in relation to use of vibrating tools was 1.8-fold higher on average in the whole group and 2.3-fold higher in the young (< 45) railway workers who had used hand held tamping machines, than in the corresponding groups of lumberjacks, who had used chain saws, whereas the frequency weighted acceleration of vibration in tamping machines was fourfold. CONCLUSION--There was a significant dose-response relation between the exposure to hand-arm vibration and the VPTs. The VPTs as a function of the frequency weighted acceleration of vibration and the exposure to vibration gave promising results for assessment of the risk of damage to sensory nerves induced by vibration. PMID:7795756

  11. Optimization of Training Sets for Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns from Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been used for a number of years to process holography-generated characteristic patterns of vibrating structures. This technology depends critically on the selection and the conditioning of the training sets. A scaling operation called folding is discussed for conditioning training sets optimally for training feed-forward neural networks to process characteristic fringe patterns. Folding allows feed-forward nets to be trained easily to detect damage-induced vibration-displacement-distribution changes as small as 10 nm. A specific application to aerospace of neural-net processing of characteristic patterns is presented to motivate the conditioning and optimization effort.

  12. Description of the traction characteristics of the neodymium compensators of the automatic vibration isolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.; Gurov, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the method of calculation of neodymium magnets was presented. The calculation of the neodymium magnets characteristics and stiffness correctors of the vibration isolator according to the requirements for vibration isolation devices with stiffness compensators was performed. This research has been performed with the support of the President scholarship for young scientists, order No. 184 of Ministry of education and science of the Russian Federation of the 10th of March 2015.

  13. Training Data Optimized and Conditioned to Learn Characteristic Patterns of Vibrating Blisks and Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have been training artificial neural networks to interpret the characteristic patterns (see the leftmost image) generated from electronic holograms of vibrating structures. These patterns not only visualize the vibration properties of structures, but small changes in the patterns can indicate structural changes, cracking, or damage. Neural networks detect these small changes well. Our objective has been to adapt the neural-network, electronic-holography combination for inspecting components in Glenn's Spin Rig.

  14. Vibration and Noise Characteristics of Elliptical Gears due to Non-Uniform Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Nagamura, Kazuteru; Ikejo, Kiyotaka

    Elliptical gear is a typical non-circular gear, which transmits a variable-ratio rotation and power simultaneously. Due to the non-uniform rotation, the vibration and noise of elliptical gears demonstrate particular characteristics which should be paid attention to in practical application. In this paper, two elliptical gears, which are a single elliptical gear and a double elliptical gear, have been investigated to analyze the vibration and noise characteristics of elliptical gears. The corresponding circular gears for comparison are also investigated. General factors including the torque, the rotation speed, the gear vibration acceleration and the gear noise of the four test gears are measured by running test. The root mean square of the Circumferential Vibration Acceleration (CVA) and the sound pressure level of the noise of elliptical gears are obtained from the measured results and compared with those of circular gears to clarify the vibration and noise characteristics of elliptical gears. Furthermore, the frequency analysis of the CVA of elliptical gears is conducted by Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm (FFT) and compared with that of circular gears. The main vibration component of elliptical gear is uncovered according to the obtained frequency spectra. In addition, the Critical Rotation Speeds of Tooth Separation (CRSTS) of elliptical gear is obtained and its relation with load torque is unveiled.

  15. Evaluation of human response to structural vibrations induced by sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Louis C.; Czech, J.

    1992-01-01

    The topic is addressed of building vibration response to sonic boom and the evaluation of the associated human response to this vibration. An attempt is made to reexamine some of the issues addressed previously and to offer fresh insight that may assist in reassessing the potential impact of sonic boom over populated areas. Human response to vibration is reviewed first and a new human vibration response criterion curve is developed as a function of frequency. The difference between response to steady state versus impulsive vibration is addressed and a 'vibration exposure' or 'vibration energy' descriptor is suggested as one possible way to evaluate duration effects on response to transient vibration from sonic booms. New data on the acoustic signature of rattling objects are presented along with a review of existing data on the occurrence of rattle. Structural response to sonic boom is reviewed and a new descriptor, 'Acceleration Exposure Level' is suggested which can be easily determined from the Fourier Spectrum of a sonic boom. A preliminary assessment of potential impact from sonic booms is provided in terms of human response to vibration and detection of rattle based on a synthesis of the preceding material.

  16. Thermal vibration characteristics of armchair boron-nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Anirban; Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-12-21

    A nanomechanical resonator based sensor works by detecting small changes in the natural frequency of the device in presence of external agents. In this study, we address the length and the temperature-dependent sensitivity of precompressed armchair Boron-Nitride nanotubes towards their use as sensors. The vibrational data, obtained using molecular dynamics simulations, are analyzed for frequency content through the fast Fourier transformation. As the temperature of the system rises, the vibrational spectrum becomes noisy, and the modal frequencies show a red-shift irrespective of the length of the nanotube, suggesting that the nanotube based sensors calibrated at a particular temperature may not function desirably at other temperatures. Temperature-induced noise becomes increasingly pronounced with the decrease in the length of the nanotube. For the shorter nanotube at higher temperatures, we observe multiple closely spaced peaks near the natural frequency, that create a masking effect and reduce the sensitivity of detection. However, longer nanotubes do not show these spurious frequencies, and are considerably more sensitive than the shorter ones.

  17. Large-voltage behavior of charge transport characteristics in nanosystems with weak electron–vibration coupling

    PubMed Central

    Belzig, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study analytically the Full Counting Statistics of the charge transport through a nanosystem consisting of a few electronic levels weakly coupled to a discrete vibrational mode. In the limit of large transport voltage bias the cumulant generating function can be evaluated explicitly based solely on the intuitive physical arguments and classical master equation description of the vibration mode. We find that for the undamped vibrational modes mutual dynamical interplay between electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom leads to strongly nonlinear (in voltage) transport characteristics of the nanosystem. In particular, we find that for large voltages the k-th cumulant of the current grows as V 2k to be contrasted with the linear dependence in case of more strongly externally damped and thus thermalized vibrational modes. PMID:26425436

  18. Research on vibration response of a multi-faulted rotor system using LMD-based time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Weidong; Qian, Suxiang; Chang, Yongping; Yang, Shixi

    2012-12-01

    Unbalance, fatigue crack and rotor-stator rub are the three common and important faults in a rotor-bearing system. They are originally interconnected each other, and their vibration behaviors do often show strong nonlinear and transient characteristic, especially when more than one of them coexist in the system. This article is aimed to study the vibration response of the rotor system in presence of multiple rotor faults such as unbalance, crack, and rotor-stator rub, using local mean decomposition-based time-frequency representation. Equations of motion of the multi-faulted Jeffcott rotor, including unbalance, crack, and rub, are presented. By solving the motion equations, steady-state vibration response is obtained in presence of multiple rotor faults. As a comparison, Hilbert-Huang transformation, based on empirical mode decomposition, is also applied to analyze the multi-faults data. By the study some diagnostic recommendations are derived.

  19. Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper reviews experimental studies of the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration, equivalent comfort contours, temporary changes in sensation caused by vibration, and reductions in finger blood flow caused by hand-transmitted vibration. Absolute thresholds depend on the contact conditions but for a typical hand grip the thresholds show greatest sensitivity to acceleration around 125 Hz. The frequency-dependence of discomfort caused by hand-transmitted vibration depends on vibration magnitude: similar to absolute thresholds at low magnitudes, but the discomfort at higher magnitudes is similar when the vibration velocity is similar (at frequencies between about 16 and 400 Hz). Hand-transmitted vibration induces temporary elevations in vibrotactile thresholds that reflect the sensory mechanisms excited by the vibration and are therefore highly dependent on the frequency of vibration. Hand-transmitted vibration reduces finger blood flow during and after exposure; when the vibration velocity is similar at all frequencies there is more vasoconstriction at frequencies greater than 63 Hz than at lower frequencies. A single frequency weighting cannot provide a good indication of how all effects of hand-transmitted vibration depend on vibration frequency. Furthermore, a single frequency weighting provides only an approximate indication of any single response, because many factors influence the frequency-dependence of responses to hand-transmitted vibration, including the magnitude of vibration, contact conditions, and individual differences. Although the frequency weighting in current standards extends from 8 to 1,000 Hz, frequencies greater than 400 Hz rarely increase the weighted value on tools and there is currently little psychophysical or physiological evidence of their effects.

  20. Nailfold capillary morphological characteristics of hand-arm vibration syndrome: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, QingSong; Chen, GuiPing; Xiao, Bin; Lin, HanSheng; Qu, HongYing; Zhang, DanYing; Shi, MaoGong; Lang, Li; Yang, Bei; Yan, MaoSheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of nailfold capillaroscopy associated with hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Methods In total, 113 male gold miners were recruited: 35 workers who were chronically exposed to vibration and developed vibration-induced white finger were defined as the HAVS group, 39 workers who were exposed to vibration but did not have HAVS were classified as the vibration-exposed controls (VEC) group, and 39 workers without vibration exposure were categorised as the non-VEC (NVEC) group. Video capillaroscopy was used to capture images of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers of both hands. The following nailfold capillary characteristics were included: number of capillaries/mm, avascular areas, haemorrhages and enlarged capillaries. The experiments were carried out in the same winter. All characteristics were evaluated under blinded conditions. Results Significant differences in all morphological characteristics existed between the groups (p<0.05). Avascular areas in the HAVS, VEC and NVEC groups appeared in 74.3%, 43.6% and 25.0% of participants, respectively. A higher percentage of participants had haemorrhages in the HAVS group (65.7%) compared with the other groups (VEC: 7.7% and NVEC: 7.5%). The number of capillaries/mm, input limb width, output limb width, apical width, and ratio of output limb and input limb all had more than 70% sensitivity or specificity of their cut-off value. Conclusions Nailfold capillary characteristics, especially the number of capillaries/mm, avascular areas, haemorrhages, output limb width, input limb width and apical width alterations, revealed significant associations with HAVS. PMID:27888176

  1. Vibration characteristics and optimization for panel elastically supported in mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Y.; Honda, S.; Narita, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, usage of smartphones and tablet terminals have spread around the world. These devices using touchscreen as a user interface are currently mainstream. Also, in order to let information of input or output surely know to users, there are some types of equipment having vibrational function in touchscreen. Here, the material of touchscreen consists of glass and the glass panel is fixed to a mobile phone's body by adhesive tapes along the edge of the panel. However, due to the difficulty of design of vibration, it needs investigation with a vast number of manufacturing prototypes. Moreover, the vibration characteristic of panels is not enough regarding intensity and a tactile impression. Therefore, in this study, the authors consider the vibration characteristic of glass panel elastically fixed by adhesive tapes along edges. First, they show modeling of adhesive tapes along edges of panel by using translational and rotational springs. Second, they show formulating vibration characteristic by using an energy method. Third, they optimize spring constants of translational and rotational springs by using Genetic Algorithm(GA) from the obtained expression. Finally, they consider natural frequencies and eigenmodes which were acquired from experiments and simulations.

  2. Acceleration response spectrum for predicting floor vibration due to occupant walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Ruotian; Zhang, Mengshi

    2014-07-01

    Annoying vibrations caused by occupant walking is an important serviceability problem for long-span floors. At the design stage the floor's structural arrangement may frequently change to cater for the owner's varying requirements. An efficient and accurate approach for predicting a floor's acceleration response is thus of great significance. This paper presents a design-oriented acceleration response spectrum for calculating a floor's response given the floor's modal characteristics and a specified confidence level. 2204 measured footfall traces from 61 test subjects were used to generate 10 s peak root-mean-square acceleration response spectra, on which a piecewise mathematical representation is based. The proposed response spectrum consists of three main parts: the first harmonic plateau ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 Hz, the second harmonic plateau ranging from 3.0 to 5.0 Hz and the descending part going with frequencies from 5.0 to 10.0 Hz. The representative value of each plateau and the mathematical representation for the descending curve were determined statistically for different confidence levels. Furthermore, the effects of factors, such as floor span, occupant stride length, higher modes of vibration, boundary conditions and peak acceleration response, on the proposed spectrum have been investigated and a modification measure for each factor is suggested. A detailed application procedure for the proposed spectrum approach is presented and has been applied to four existing floors to predict their acceleration responses. Comparison between predicted and field measured responses shows that the measured accelerations of the four floors are generally close to or slightly higher than the predicted values for the 75 percent confidence level, but are all lower than the predicted values for the 95 percent confidence level. Therefore the suggested spectrum-based approach can be used for predicting a floor's response subject to a single person walking.

  3. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  4. [Short-term memory characteristics of vibration intensity tactile perception on human wrist].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fei; Chen, Li-Juan; Lu, Wei; Song, Ai-Guo

    2014-12-25

    In this study, a recall experiment and a recognition experiment were designed to assess the human wrist's short-term memory characteristics of tactile perception on vibration intensity, by using a novel homemade vibrotactile display device based on the spatiotemporal combination vibration of multiple micro vibration motors as a test device. Based on the obtained experimental data, the short-term memory span, recognition accuracy and reaction time of vibration intensity were analyzed. From the experimental results, some important conclusions can be made: (1) The average short-term memory span of tactile perception on vibration intensity is 3 ± 1 items; (2) The greater difference between two adjacent discrete intensities of vibrotactile stimulation is defined, the better average short-term memory span human wrist gets; (3) There is an obvious difference of the average short-term memory span on vibration intensity between the male and female; (4) The mechanism of information extraction in short-term memory of vibrotactile display is to traverse the scanning process by comparison; (5) The recognition accuracy and reaction time performance of vibrotactile display compares unfavourably with that of visual and auditory. The results from this study are important for designing vibrotactile display coding scheme.

  5. Physicochemical vs. Vibrational Descriptors for Prediction of Odor Receptor Responses.

    PubMed

    Gabler, Stephan; Soelter, Jan; Hussain, Taufia; Sachse, Silke; Schmuker, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Responses of olfactory receptors (ORs) can be predicted by applying machine learning methods on a multivariate encoding of an odorant's chemical structure. Physicochemical descriptors that encode features of the molecular graph are a popular choice for such an encoding. Here, we explore the EVA descriptor set, which encodes features derived from the vibrational spectrum of a molecule. We assessed the performance of Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Random Forest Regression (RFR) to predict the gradual response of Drosophila ORs. We compared a 27-dimensional variant of the EVA descriptor against a set of 1467 descriptors provided by the eDragon software package, and against a 32-dimensional subset thereof that has been proposed as the basis for an odor metric consisting of 32 descriptors (HADDAD). The best prediction performance was reproducibly achieved using SVR on the highest-dimensional feature set. The low-dimensional EVA and HADDAD feature sets predicted odor-OR interactions with similar accuracy. Adding charge and polarizability information to the EVA descriptor did not improve the results but rather decreased predictive power. Post-hoc in vivo measurements confirmed these results. Our findings indicate that EVA provides a meaningful low-dimensional representation of odor space, although EVA hardly outperformed "classical" descriptor sets.

  6. Optimization of Training Sets For Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Vibrating Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An artificial neural network is disclosed that processes holography generated characteristic pattern of vibrating structures along with finite-element models. The present invention provides for a folding operation for conditioning training sets for optimally training forward-neural networks to process characteristic fringe pattern. The folding pattern increases the sensitivity of the feed-forward network for detecting changes in the characteristic pattern The folding routine manipulates input pixels so as to be scaled according to the location in an intensity range rather than the position in the characteristic pattern.

  7. Neural-Net Processing of Characteristic Patterns From Electronic Holograms of Vibrating Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks can be used to process efficiently the characteristic patterns or mode shapes from electronic holograms of vibrating blades. The models used for routine design may not yet be sufficiently accurate for this application. This document discusses the creation of characteristic patterns; compares model generated and experimental characteristic patterns; and discusses the neural networks that transform the characteristic patterns into strain or damage information. The current potential to adapt electronic holography to spin rigs, wind tunnels and engines provides an incentive to have accurate finite element models lor training neural networks.

  8. Piezoelectric Instruments of High Natural Frequency Vibration Characteristics and Protection Against Interference by Mass Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohlka, Werner

    1943-01-01

    The exploration of the processes accompanying engine combustion demands quick-responding pressure-recording instruments, among which the piezoelectric type has found widespread use because of its especially propitious properties as vibration-recording instruments for high frequencies. Lacking appropriate test methods, the potential errors of piezoelectric recorders in dynamic measurements could only be estimated up to now. In the present report a test method is described by means of which the resonance curves of the piezoelectric pickup can be determined; hence an instrumental appraisal of the vibration characteristics of piezoelectric recorders is obtainable.

  9. A study of hand vibration on chipping and grinding operators, part II: Four-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model of the vibration response of the human hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. D.; Falkenberg, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    The results of the development of a four-degree-of-freedom, lumped parameter model of the vibration response characteristics of the human hand are presented. For this study dynamic compliance measurements were made on 75 foundry workers. Curve fitting techniques were then employed to identify the values of the model parameters that yielded empirically generated dynamic compliance curves that correlated well with the measured dynamic compliance values. The agreement was good between 20 Hz and 1000 Hz in the X- and Y-directions. The agreement was good between 20 Hz and 1000 Hz in the Z-direction.

  10. Nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of gear pair system with time-varying characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Jin-Jin; Liu, Jin-Jie; Li, Ya-Qian

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we investigate the nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of a gear pair system involving backlash, time-varying meshing stiffness and static transmission error. Firstly, a gear pair model is established in a strongly nonlinear form, and its nonlinear vibration characteristics are systematically investigated through different approaches. Several complicated phenomena such as period doubling bifurcation, anti period doubling bifurcation and chaos can be observed under the internal parametric excitation. Then, an active compensation controller is designed to suppress the vibration, including the chaos. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified numerically. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  11. Basic Characteristics of Ground Vibration Sensors for the Detection of Debris Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Y.; Fujii, N.; Sawada, T.

    2000-09-01

    An acoustic sensor has been designed and built to sense ground vibration with a microphone installed underground inside a steel pipe. The sensor has detected debris flows in torrents in Japan. Other sensors have been used to sense ground vibrations similarly and they also have been tested in the field individually. Basic characteristics of three different ground vibration sensors, an acoustic, a piezoelectric, and a moving-coil sensor are compared in the same test field. Two of them, a microphone sensor and a piezoelectric sensor, have higher signal-to-noise ratios (S/N ratios) than the moving-coil sensor. The microphone sensor has the maximum S/N ratio at our experimental field and is the most useful one.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  13. Insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations in the mining industry. [elastodynamic response of rubber insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeveleanu, C.

    1974-01-01

    The insulation of nonlinear and random vibrations is considered for some ore preparing and sorting implements: rotary crushers, resonance screens, hammer mills, etc. The appearance of subharmonic vibrations is analyzed, and the conditions for their appearance are determined. A method is given for calculating the insulation of these vibrations by means of elastic elements made of rubber. The insulation of the random vibrations produced by Symons crushers is calculated by determining the transmissability and deformation of the insulation system for a narrow band random response.

  14. The transmission of vertical vibration through seats: Influence of the characteristics of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on the impedance of the seat and the apparent mass of the seat occupant. This study was designed to determine how factors affecting the apparent mass of the body (age, gender, physical characteristics, backrest contact, and magnitude of vibration) affect seat transmissibility. The transmission of vertical vibration through a car seat was measured with 80 adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with two backrest conditions (no backrest and backrest), and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Linear regression models were used to study the effects of subject physical characteristics (age, gender, and anthropometry) and features of their apparent mass (resonance frequency, apparent mass at resonance and at 12 Hz) on the measured seat transmissibility. The strongest predictor of both the frequency of the principal resonance in seat transmissibility and the seat transmissibility at resonance was subject age, with other factors having only marginal effects. The transmissibility of the seat at 12 Hz depended on subject age, body mass index, and gender. Although subject weight was strongly associated with apparent mass, weight was not strongly associated with seat transmissibility. The resonance frequency of the seat decreased with increases in the magnitude of the vibration excitation and increased when subjects made contact with the backrest. Inter-subject variability in the resonance frequency and transmissibility at resonance was less with greater vibration excitation, but was largely unaffected by backrest contact. A lumped parameter seat-person model showed that changes in seat transmissibility with age can be predicted from changes in apparent mass with age, and that the dynamic stiffness of the seat appeared to increase with increased loading so as to compensate for increases in subject apparent mass associated with increased sitting

  15. Experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a model of an asymmetric multielement space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, U. J.

    1977-01-01

    Vibration investigations of a model of the asymmetric multielement space shuttle were made. The influence on overall motions of local deformation in the vicinity of element interfaces, high modal density, low structural damping, and high responsiveness in the crew cabin are included in the findings. Mode frequencies generally increase with decreasing propellant masses and staging of elements.

  16. Neuromuscular response of the trunk to inertial based sudden perturbations following whole body vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Danielle; Cort, Joel A

    2014-12-01

    The effects of whole body vibration exposure on the neuromuscular responses following inertial-based trunk perturbations were examined. Kinematic and surface EMG (sEMG) data were collected while subjects were securely seated on a robotic platform. Participants were either exposed to 10 min of vibration or not, which was followed by sudden inertial trunk perturbations with and without timing and direction knowledge. Amplitude of sEMG was analyzed for data collected during the vibration protocol, whereas the onset of sEMG activity and lumbar spine angle were analyzed for the perturbation protocol. Data from the vibration protocol did not show a difference in amplitude of sEMG for participants exposed to vibration and those not. The perturbation protocol data showed that those not exposed to vibration had a 14% faster muscle onset, despite data showing no difference in fatigue level.

  17. Vibration characteristics of Ni-Ti pseudo-elastic wire inter-weaved fabric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Qiuhong; Dong, Li

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a study on the vibration characteristics of Ni-Ti wire inter-weaved glass fabric/epoxy composites. The Ni-Ti pseudo-elastic wires were used as warp yarns and embedded in the fabric preforms with various weaving methods. Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and vibration test technique were used to reveal the dynamical behaviors of specimens in different frequencies of vibration. The storage modulus E', the loss tanδ, the natural frequency f and damping ratio η were examined. The energy dissipation behaviors of the Ni-Ti pseudo-elastic wire, the geometry of textile fabric was also studied. The effect of weaving method on the vibration behavior in Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based textile composites was considered. The results showed that: (I) the energy dissipation capacity of the wire could be significantly improved by increasing the tensile strain and speed, but slightly affected by loading frequency; (II) the woven of few Ni-Ti warps caused the increase of the storage modulus and the change of the loss tanδ. In the buckling vibration, the damping effects of Ni-Ti pseudo-elastic wires vary with the woven structures. The compact woven structure with proper Ni-Ti warp architectures would receive a small amplitude and good damping.

  18. Dynamic characteristics and performance evaluation for the part strut failure of the vibration isolation platform on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Sheng, Chao; Guo, Zixi; Wang, Youyi; Li, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    The dynamic characteristics and performance evaluation for the part strut failure of the vibration isolation platform are presented in this paper. The first step provides and mathematically describes two types of strut failure: fractured and stuck. Secondly, the dynamic model of the vibration isolation platform, which considers the part strut failure, is established using the Newton-Euler method and a constraint equation to evaluate its dynamic characteristics and performance. Then, with reasonable assumptions, the dynamic model of the satellite, which has a vibration isolation platform and vibration sources (such as control moment gyros) of three working situations (without and with two types of strut failure), is simplified to analyse the frequency domain characteristic and coupling characteristic with the attitude control system. Finally, a numerical simulation is used to study the effect of the vibration isolation platform with part strut failure on the attitude control and stabilization, and the attitude control performance is evaluated.

  19. City Dweller Responses to Multiple Stressors Intruding into Their Homes: Noise, Light, Odour, and Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eja

    2015-01-01

    Urban densification increases exposure to noise, light, odour, and vibration in urban dwellings. Exposure from combined environmental stressors intruding into the home could increase the risk of adverse effects on wellbeing, even when the exposure is at a relatively low level. This study assesses the prevalence of annoyance with a combination of potential environmental stressors common in urban areas and the association with wellbeing. A questionnaire was sent by mail to residents in five areas in Halmstad (Sweden) with similar socioeconomic and housing characteristics but different exposure (response rate 56%; n = 385). Of the respondents, 50% were annoyed to some degree by at least one of the suggested stressors, most commonly by noise and vibration from local traffic. Structural equation modelling showed that annoyance led to lowered quality of life via the mediating construct residential satisfaction, which in turn was influenced by place attachment and perceived restoration possibilities in the dwelling. Stress had a negative impact on quality of life, but was not directly correlated to annoyance. Stress was however correlated with sensitivity. The findings suggest that dose-response relationships for environmental stressors should be studied in a broader context of environmental and individual factors. Also relatively low levels of exposure should be mitigated, especially if several stressors are present. PMID:25794188

  20. The bio-response of osteocytes and its regulation on osteoblasts under vibration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Tong; Sun, Lian-Wen; Qi, Hong-Yu; Shi, Hao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Vibration, especially at low magnitude and high frequency (LMHF), was demonstrated to be anabolic for bone, but how the LMHF vibration signal is perceived by osteocytes is not fully studied. On the other hand, the mechanotransduction of osteocytes under shear stress has been scientists' primary focus for years. Due to the small strain caused by low-magnitude vibration, whether the previous explanation for shear stress will still work for LMHF vibration is unknown. In this study, a finite element method (FEM) model based on the real geometrical shape of an osteocyte was built to compare the mechanical behaviors of osteocytes under LMHF vibration and shear stress. The bio-response of osteocytes to vibration under different frequencies, including the secretion of soluble factors and the concentration of intracellular calcium, were studied. The regulating effect of the conditioned medium (CM) from vibrated osteocytes on osteoblasts was also studied. The FEM analysis result showed the cell membrane deformation under LMHF vibration was very small (with a peak value of 1.09%) as compared to the deformation caused by shear stress (with a peak value of 6.65%). The F-actin stress fibers of osteocytes were reorganized, especially on the nucleus periphery after LMHF vibration. The vibration at 30 Hz has a promoting effect on osteocytes and the osteogenesis of osteoblasts, whereas vibration at 90 Hz was suppressive. These results lead to a conclusion that the bio-response of osteocytes to LMHF vibration is frequency-dependent and is more related to the cytoskeleton on nuclear periphery rather than the membrane deformation.

  1. Vibrational energy harvesting by exploring structural benefits and nonlinear characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chongfeng; Jing, Xingjian

    2017-07-01

    Traditional energy harvesters are often of low efficiency due to very limited energy harvesting bandwidth, which should also be enough close to the ambient excitation frequency. To overcome this difficulty, some attempts can be seen in the literature typically with the purposes of either increasing the energy harvesting bandwidth with a harvester array, or enhancing the energy harvesting bandwidth and peak with nonlinear coupling effect etc. This paper presents an alternative way which can achieve tuneable resonant frequency (from high frequency to ultralow frequency) and improved energy harvesting bandwidth and peak simultaneously by employing special structural benefits and advantageous displacement-dependent nonlinear damping property. The proposed energy harvesting system employs a lever systems combined with an X-shape supporting structure and demonstrates very adjustable stiffness and unique nonlinear damping characteristics which are very beneficial for energy harvesting. It is shown that the energy harvesting performance of the proposed system is directly determined by several easy-to-tune structural parameters and also by the relative displacement in a special nonlinear manner, which provides a great flexibility and/or a unique tool for tuning and improving energy harvesting efficiency via matching excitation frequencies and covering a broader frequency band. This study potentially provides a new insight into the design of energy harvesting systems by employing structural benefits and geometrical nonlinearities.

  2. Characteristic of torsional vibration of mill main drive excited by electromechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yifang; Yan, Xiaoqiang; Lin, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    In the study of electromechanical coupling vibration of mill main drive system, the influence of electrical system on the mechanical transmission is considered generally, however the research for the mechanism of electromechanical interaction is lacked. In order to research the electromechanical coupling resonance of main drive system on the F3 mill in a plant, the cycloconverter and synchronous motor are modeled and simulated by the MTLAB/SIMULINK firstly, simulation result show that the current harmonic of the cycloconverter can lead to the pulsating torque of motor output. Then the natural characteristics of the mechanical drive system are calculated by ANSYS, the result show that the modal frequency contains the component which is close to the coupling vibration frequency of 42Hz. According to the simulation result of the mechanical and electrical system, the closed loop feedback model including the two systems are built, and the mechanism analysis of electromechanical coupling presents that there is the interaction between the current harmonic of electrical system and the speed of the mechanical drive system. At last, by building and computing the equivalent nonlinear dynamics model of the mechanical drive system, the dynamic characteristics of system changing with the stiffness, damping coefficient and the electromagnetic torque are obtained. Such electromechanical interaction process is suggested to consider in research of mill vibration, which can induce strong coupling vibration behavior in the rolling mill drive system.

  3. Dynamic characteristics of two new vibration modes of the disk-shell shaped gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Litang; Qiu, Shijung; Gao, Xiangqung

    1992-10-01

    Two new vibration modes of the disk-shell-shaped big medium gears placed on three separate medium shafts of a turboprop engine have been found. They have the same nodal diameters as the conventional ones, but their frequencies are higher. The tooth ring vibrates both radially and axially and has greater deflection than the gear hub. The resonance of these two new nodal diameter modes is much more dangerous than that of the conventional nodal diameter modes. Moreover, they occur nearly at the upper and the lower bounds of the gear operating speed range. A special detuning method is developed for removing the resonance of these two new modes out of the upper and the lower bounds, respectively, and the effectiveness of the damping rings in this case has been researched. The vibration responses measured on the reductor casing have been then reduced to a quite low level after the damping rings were applied to the three big medium gears.

  4. Optimisation of the vibrational response of ultrasonic cutting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, M. P.; Lim, F. C. N.; Cardoni, A.; Lucas, M.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides an account of an investigation into possible dynamic interactions between two coupled non-linear sub-systems, each possessing opposing non-linear overhang characteristics in the frequency domain in terms of positive and negative cubic stiffnesses. This system is a two-degree-of-freedom Duffing oscillator in which certain non-linear effects can be advantageously neutralised under specific conditions. This theoretical vehicle has been used as a preliminary methodology for understanding the interactive behaviour within typical industrial ultrasonic cutting components. Ultrasonic energy is generated within a piezoelectric exciter, which is inherently non-linear, and which is coupled to a bar- or block-horn, and to one or more material cutting blades, for example. The horn/blade configurations are also non-linear, and within the whole system there are response features which are strongly reminiscent of positive and negative cubic stiffness effects. The two-degree-of-freedom model is analysed and it is shown that a practically useful mitigating effect on the overall non-linear response of the system can be created under certain conditions when one of the cubic stiffnesses is varied. It has also been shown experimentally that coupling of ultrasonic components with different non-linear characteristics can strongly influence the performance of the system and that the general behaviour of the hypothetical theoretical model is indeed borne out in practice. Further experiments have shown that a multiple horn/blade configuration can, under certain circumstances, display autoparametric responses based on the forced response of the desired longitudinal mode parametrically exciting an undesired lateral mode. Typical autoparametric response phenomena have been observed and are presented at the end of the paper.

  5. Influence of resistance load on neuromuscular response to vibration training.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin; Clarke, Michael; McNamara, Brian; Moran, Kieran

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of resistance load on the acute and acute residual effects of vibration training, with vibration applied directly to the bicep tendon in a maximal-effort dynamic resistance exercise (3 sets of maximal-effort bicep curls). Eleven participants were exposed to 4 training conditions in random order: exercise with 1 of 2 different loads (40% 1-repetition maximum [RM] or 70% 1RM load) combined with 1 of 2 vibration conditions (vibration [1.2 mm, 65 Hz] or sham vibration). Five minutes before and after the exercise, a set of maximal-effort bicep curls with a load of either 40 or 70% 1RM was performed as the pre- and posttraining test. Concentric elbow joint angular velocity, moment and power, and bicep root mean square electromyography (EMGrms) were measured during training and in the pre- and posttraining tests. The results show that during training (acute effect) and at 5 minutes after training (acute residual effect), vibration did not induce a significant change in EMGrms, mean and peak angular velocities, moment and power, time to peak power, and initial power at 100 milliseconds after the start of the concentric phase for either resistance load. Therefore, in aiming to train neuromuscular output using maximal-effort dynamic contractions (40 and 70% 1RM), there is no benefit in employing direct vibration, at least with a 1.2-mm amplitude and 65-Hz frequency. However, the amplitude of 1.2 mm may be too high to effectively stimulate neuromuscular output in maximal-effort dynamic contractions per se.

  6. Vibration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C.

    1971-01-01

    Guidelines of the methods and applications used in vibration technology at the MSFC are presented. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide a practical tool for coordination and understanding between industry and government groups concerned with vibration of systems and equipments. Topics covered include measuring, reducing, analyzing, and methods for obtaining simulated environments and formulating vibration specifications. Methods for vibration and shock testing, theoretical aspects of data processing, vibration response analysis, and techniques of designing for vibration are also presented.

  7. Establishment of one-axis vibration test system for measurement of biodynamic response of human hand-arm system.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Nobuyuki; Hosoya, Naoki; Maeda, Setsuo

    2008-12-01

    Prolonged exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) due to use of hand-held power tools leads to an increased occurrence of symptoms of disorders in the vascular, neurological, and osteo-articular systems of the upper limbs called hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Biodynamic responses of the hand-arm system to vibration can be suggestive parameters that give us better assessment of exposure to HAV and fundamental data for design of low-vibration-exposure power tools. Recently, a single axis hand-arm vibration system has been installed in the Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The aims of this study were to obtain the fundamental dynamic characteristics of an instrumented handle and to validate the performance and measurement accuracy of the system applied to dynamic response measurement. A pseudo-random vibration signal with a frequency range of 5-1,250 Hz and a power spectrum density of 1.0 (m/s2)2/Hz was used in this study. First the dynamic response of the instrumented handle without any weight was measured. After this measurement, the dynamic response measurement of the handle with weights mounted on the handle was performed. The apparent mass of a weight itself was obtained by using the mass cancellation method. The mass of the measuring cap on the instrumented handle was well compensated by using the mass cancellation method. Based on the 10% error tolerance, this handle can reliably measure the dynamic response represented by an apparent mass with a minimum weight of 2.0 g in a frequency range of 10.0 to 1,000 Hz. A marked increase in the AM magnitude of the weights of 15 g and 20 g in frequency ranges greater than 800 Hz is attributed not to the fundamental resonance frequency of the handle with weights, but to the fixation of the weight to the measuring cap. In this aspect, the peak of the AM magnitude can be reduced and hence should not be an obstacle to the biodynamic response measurement of the human hand-arm system. On the

  8. Simplified formulae to investigate flexural vibration characteristics of piezoelectric tubes in ultrasonic micro-actuators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Fan, Li

    2010-03-01

    Based on the Rayleigh energy theory combining with Timoshenko beam model, the flexural vibration characteristics of piezoelectric tubes in ultrasonic micro-actuators are investigated. Additionally, the simplified formulae are derived to study the fundamental flexural resonance frequencies of the piezoelectric tubes with free-free ends and cantilevers. By changing the sizes of the tubes and the mass loads at the free ends, the variations of the flexural resonance frequencies of the piezoelectric tubes and cantilevers are calculated theoretically. To verify accuracy of the simplified formulae, by changing the lengths of the tubes and the mass loads the flexural resonance frequencies of the piezoelectric tube with free-free ends are measured experimentally. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental measurements, which demonstrate that the simplified formulae are accurate and effective for analyzing the flexural vibration characteristics of the piezoelectric tubes in the ultrasonic micro-actuators.

  9. Flight and Analytical Methods for Determining the Coupled Vibration Response of Tandem Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeates, John E , Jr; Brooks, George W; Houbolt, John C

    1957-01-01

    Chapter one presents a discussion of flight-test and analysis methods for some selected helicopter vibration studies. The use of a mechanical shaker in flight to determine the structural response is reported. A method for the analytical determination of the natural coupled frequencies and mode shapes of vibrations in the vertical plane of tandem helicopters is presented in Chapter two. The coupled mode shapes and frequencies are then used to calculate the response of the helicopter to applied oscillating forces.

  10. Response of the skeletal system to helicopter-unique vibration.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, J R

    1978-01-01

    An 18-month prospective skeletal system study was conducted on flying and nonflying personnel relative to chronic low-frequency vibration as experienced in helicopter flight. The aviators were initial entry students in rotary-wing training while the non-flying participants were beginning basic military training. Comparisons were made on the basis of anthropometric measurements, radiological studies, and bone mineral density changes as measured by photon absorption. The bone mineral densitometry showed no significant variation in the aviator group. A short-term 10% demineralization of the distal ulna in the non-flying group was noted immediately following the physical training. The final bone mineral density of basic training subjects returned to the initial level 18 months after the physical training. It was concluded that the helicopter aircrew members under study were exposed to levels of vibration below the threshold of vibration required to produce a measurable change in the skeletal system.

  11. Nonlinear subjective and dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Nawayseh, N.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the magnitude of fore-and-aft and lateral vibration on the subjective and mechanical responses of seated subjects has been investigated experimentally using simultaneous measurements of relative discomfort and apparent mass. Twelve male subjects were exposed to sinusoidal vibration at nine frequencies (between 1.6 and 10 Hz) at four magnitudes (in the range 0.125-1.0 m s -2 r.m.s.) in both horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral). The method of magnitude estimation was used to estimate discomfort relative to that caused by a 4 Hz reference vibration in the same axis. The apparent mass was calculated from the acceleration and the applied force so as to quantify the mechanical response of the body. With each direction of excitation, the apparent mass was normalised by dividing it by the apparent mass obtained at 4 Hz, so that the mechanical responses could be compared with the subjective responses. The relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass were similarly affected by the frequency and magnitude of vibration, with significant correlations between the relative discomfort and the normalised apparent mass. The results indicate that the discomfort caused by horizontal whole-body vibration is associated with the apparent mass in a frequency range where motion of the whole body is dominant. In this frequency range, the nonlinear subjective responses may be attributed, at least in part, to the nonlinear dynamic responses to horizontal whole-body vibration.

  12. Responses of the frog primary vestibular afferents to direct vibration of the semicircular canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Responses of primary afferents (PA) of lateral semicircular canal to sinusoidal vibration of the canal wall within the range 0.05-200 Hz (mean amplitudes 5-15 microns) in immobilized frogs were studied. Dynamic characteristics (gain, phase) of relative linear velocity of the vibrator (micron X/s) were examined. At 0.2 Hz, the gain was 5.35 + or - 3.19 imp X/s /micron X/s (mean; S.D.; n=14) and linearly decreased if the frequency rose. Phase lag of relative velocity at 0.05 Hz was 49.8 deg + or - 16.5 deg (n=13) and at 1 Hz 97 deg + or - 9.4 deg (n=22). At 100 Hz phase lag was about 240 deg. Three groups of PA are described: wide range PA reacting in the range from 0.05 up to 60-180 Hz; high frequency PA responding in the range from 20-40 up to 100-150 Hz; and low frequency PA responding in the range from 0.05 up to 2-20 Hz.

  13. Vibration characteristics measurement of beam-like structures using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talai, S. M.; Desai, D. A.; Heyns, P. S.

    2016-11-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) has matured and is now widely accepted as a condition monitoring tool where temperature is measured in a non-contact way. Since the late 1970s, it has been extensively used in vibrothermography (Sonic IR) non-destructive technique for the evaluation of surface cracks through the observation of thermal imaging of the vibration-induced crack heat generation. However, it has not received research attention on prediction of structural vibration behaviour, hence; the concept to date is not understood. Therefore, this paper explores its ability to fill the existing knowledge gap. To achieve this, two cantilever beam-like structures couple with a friction rod subjected to a forced excitations while infrared cameras capturing the thermal images on the friction interfaces. The analysed frictional temperature evolution using the Matlab Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm and the use of the heat conduction equation in conjunction with a finite difference approach successfully identifies the structural vibration characteristics; with maximum error of 0.28% and 20.71% for frequencies and displacements, respectively. These findings are particularly useful in overcoming many limitations inherent in some of the current vibration measuring techniques applied in structural integrity management such as strain gauge failures due to fatigue.

  14. Vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2013-12-07

    Based on density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory calculations, we systematically investigate the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strains. It is found that under hole doping, the phonon frequencies of the ZO and TO branches at different wave vector q shift linearly with different slopes. Under electron doping, although the phonon frequencies shift irregularly, the shifting values are different at different phonon wave vectors. Interestingly, we find that external strain can restrain the irregular vibration responses of h-BN sheet to electron doping. The critical factor is revealed to be the relative position of the nearly free electron and boron p{sub z} states of h-BN sheet. Under external strains, the vibration responses of h-BN sheet are also found to be highly dependent on the phonon branches. Different vibration modes at different q points are revealed to be responsible for the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain. Our results point out a new way to detect the doping or strain status of h-BN sheet by measuring the vibration frequencies at different wave vector.

  15. Vibration testing based on impulse response excited by pulsed-laser ablation: Measurement of frequency response function with detection-free input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosokawa, Takahiko

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a non-contact vibration-measurement system that is based on impulse excitation by laser ablation (i.e. laser excitation) to measure the high-frequency-vibration characteristics of objects. The proposed method makes it possible to analyse the frequency response function just by measuring the output (acceleration response) of a test object excited by pulsed-laser ablation. This technique does not require detection of the input force. Firstly, using a rigid block, the pulsed-laser-ablation force is calibrated via Newton's second law. Secondly, an experiment is conducted in which an object whose natural frequency lies in the high-frequency domain is excited by pulsed-laser ablation. The complex frequency spectrum obtained by Fourier transform of the measured response is then divided by the estimated pulsed-laser-ablation force. Finally, because of the error involved in the trigger position of the response with respect to the impulse arrival time, the phase of the complex Fourier transform is modified by accounting for the response dead time. The result is the frequency response function of the object. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by a vibration test of an aluminium block.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of free vibration characteristics of an in situ railway concrete sleeper to variations of rail pad parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Remennikov, Alex M.

    2006-11-01

    The vibration of in situ concrete sleepers in a railway track structure is a major factor causing cracking of prestressed concrete sleepers and excessive railway track maintenance cost. Not only does the ballast interact with the sleepers, but the rail pads also take part in affecting their free vibration characteristics. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of free vibration behaviors of an in situ railway concrete sleeper (standard gauge sleeper), incorporating sleeper/ballast interaction, subjected to the variations of rail pad properties. Through finite element analysis, Timoshenko-beam and spring elements were used in the in situ railway concrete sleeper modeling. This model highlights the influence of rail pad parameters on the free vibration characteristics of in situ sleepers. In addition, information on the first five flexural vibration modes indicates the dynamic performance of railway track when using different types of rail pads, as it plays a vital role in the cracking deterioration of concrete sleepers.

  17. Torsional vibration characteristic study of the grid-connected DFIG wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Songtao; Xie, Da; Wu, Wangping; Gu, Chenghong; Li, Furong

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the torsional vibration characteristics of the grid-connected doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbine by small signal analysis method. Firstly a detailed small-signal stability union model of the grid-connected DFIG wind turbine is developed, including the mechanical system and electrical system. To study the dynamic characteristic of the blade, gearbox, low speed and high speed shafts, a three mass shaft model for the mechanical system is adopted. At the same time, small signal models of DFIG, the voltage source converter (VSC) and the transmission line of the electrical system are developed respectively. Then, through calculating the eigenvalues of the state matrix A and the corresponding participation factors, the modal analysis is conducted in the shaft torsional vibration issues. And the impact of the system parameters including the series compensation capacitor, the flat-wave reactor, the PI parameters, especially the speed controller of generator rotor on shaft torsional vibration are discussed. The results show that the speed controller strengthens association between the mechanical system and the electrical system, and also produces a low-frequency oscillation mode.

  18. Transfer matrix method for determination of the natural vibration characteristics of elastically coupled launch vehicle boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Laith K.; Zhou, Qinbo; Hendy, Hossam; Rui, Xiaoting

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of natural vibration characteristics has become one of important steps of the manufacture and dynamic design in the aerospace industry. This paper presents a new scenario called virtual cutting in the context of the transfer matrix method of linear multibody systems closed-loop topology for computing the free vibration characteristics of elastically coupled flexible launch vehicle boosters. In this approach, the coupled system is idealized as a triple-beam system-like structure coupled by linear translational springs, where a non-uniform free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam is used. A large thrust-to-weight ratio leads to large axial accelerations that result in an axial inertia load distribution from nose to tail. Consequently, it causes the development of significant compressive forces along the length of the launch vehicle. Therefore, it is important to take into account this effect in the transverse vibration model. This scenario does not need the global dynamics equations of a system, and it has high computational efficiency and low memory requirements. The validity of the presented scenario is achieved through comparison to other approaches published in the literature.

  19. Teacher Characteristics for Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychly, Laura; Graves, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive pedagogy, as defined by one of the most prominent authors in the field, Geneva Gay (2002), is "using the cultural characteristics, experiences, and perspectives of ethnically diverse students as conduits for teaching them more effectively". Culturally responsive pedagogy can be thought of, then, as teaching practices that…

  20. A Lanczos-chain driven approach for calculating damped vibrational configuration interaction response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Győrffy, Werner; Christiansen, Ove

    2010-09-01

    We present an approach based on the Lanczos method for calculating the vibrational configuration interaction response functions necessary for evaluating the pure vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of molecules. The method iteratively builds a tridiagonal representation of the central response matrix, which is subsequently used for solving the response equations. From the same chain, the response functions can be evaluated approximately for any frequency as well as using any complex damping factor. Applications to formaldehyde, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the concepts presented.

  1. Operating Characteristics of a Same-Phase Drive-Type Ultrasonic Motor Using a Flexural Disk Vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Takehiro; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Kusakabe, Chiharu

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we describe an ultrasonic motor using a flexural disk vibrating in two degeneration modes driven by a same-phase input signal. Its operating characteristics depend considerably on the pressing force between the stator and the rotor. We report some experimental studies of this effect. Measurements of the vibration mode showed that the change in the rotational direction of the motor was caused by a shift in the vibration axis of the mode synthesized from two degeneration modes. It is also shown that the motor's operating characteristics can be adjusted via an electrical element connected to the control terminal.

  2. Dynamic Response of the Standing Human Body Exposed to Vertical Vibration: Influence of Posture and Vibration Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of the posture of the legs and the vibration magnitude on the dynamic response of the standing human body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration has been investigated. Motions were measured on the body surface at the first and eighth thoracic and fourth lumbar vertebrae (T1, T8 and L4), at the right and left iliac crests and at the knee. Twelve subjects took part in the experiment with three leg postures (normal, legs bent and one leg), and five magnitudes of random vibration (0·125-2·0 ms-2r.m.s.) in the frequency range from 0[msde]5-30 Hz. The main resonance frequencies of the apparent masses at 1·0 ms-2r.m.s. differed between postures: 5·5 Hz in the normal posture, 2·75 Hz in the legs bent posture and 3·75 Hz in the one leg posture. In the normal posture, the transmissibilities to L4 and the iliac crests showed a similar trend to the apparent mass at low frequencies. With the legs straight, no resonance was observed in the legs at frequencies below 15 Hz. In the legs bent posture, a bending motion of the legs at the knee and a pitching or bending motion of the upper-body appeared to contribute to the resonance of the whole body as observed in the apparent mass, with attenuation of vibration transmission to the upper body at high frequencies. In the one leg posture, coupled rotational motion of the whole upper-body about the hip joint may have contributed to the resonance observed in the apparent mass at low frequencies and the attenuation of vertical vibration transmission at high frequencies. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass in the normal posture decreased from 6·75-5·25 Hz with increasing vibration magnitude from 0·125 to 2·0 ms-2r.m.s. This “softening” effect was also found in the transmissibilities to many parts of the body that showed resonances.

  3. Influence of tyre-road contact model on vehicle vibration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, Peter; Gagnon, Louis

    2015-09-01

    The influence of the tyre-road contact model on the simulated vertical vibration response was analysed. Three contact models were compared: tyre-road point contact model, moving averaged profile and tyre-enveloping model. In total, 1600 real asphalt concrete and Portland cement concrete longitudinal road profiles were processed. The linear planar model of automobile with 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) was used. Five vibration responses as the measures of ride comfort, ride safety and dynamic load of cargo were investigated. The results were calculated as a function of vibration response, vehicle velocity, road quality and road surface type. The marked differences in the dynamic tyre forces and the negligible differences in the ride comfort quantities were observed among the tyre-road contact models. The seat acceleration response for three contact models and 331 DOF multibody model of the truck semi-trailer was compared with the measured response for a known profile of test section.

  4. Neurocognitive responses to a single session of static squats with whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Amonette, William E; Boyle, Mandy; Psarakis, Maria B; Barker, Jennifer; Dupler, Terry L; Ott, Summer D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the head accelerations using a common whole body vibration (WBV) exercise protocol acutely reduced neurocognition in healthy subjects. Second, we investigated differential responses to WBV plates with 2 different delivery mechanisms: vertical and rotational vibrations. Twelve healthy subjects (N = 12) volunteered and completed a baseline (BASE) neurocognitive assessment: the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Subjects then participated in 3 randomized exercise sessions separated by no more than 2 weeks. The exercise sessions consisted of five 2-minute sets of static hip-width stance squats, with the knees positioned at a 45° angle of flexion. The squats were performed with no vibration (control [CON]), with a vertically vibrating plate (vertical vibration [VV]), and with a rotational vibrating plate (rotational vibration [RV]) set to 30 Hz with 4 mm of peak-to-peak displacement. The ImPACT assessments were completed immediately after each exercise session and the composite score for 5 cognitive domains was analyzed: verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, and impulse control. Verbal memory scores were unaffected by exercise with or without vibration (p = 0.40). Likewise, visual memory was not different (p = 0.14) after CON, VV, or RV. Significant differences were detected for visual motor speed (p = 0.006); VV was elevated compared with BASE (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences (p = 0.26) in reaction time or impulse control (p = 0.16) after exercise with or without vibration. In healthy individuals, 10 minutes of 30 Hz, 4-mm peak-to-peak displacement vibration exposure with a 45° angle of knee flexion did not negatively affect neurocognition.

  5. Vibrational characteristics of diethyltoluenediamines (DETDA) functionalized carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajori, S.; Ansari, R.

    2015-02-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be viewed as an important process by which the dispersion and solubility of CNTs in the matrices of nanocomposites are improved. Covalent functionalization can affect the mechanical behavior of CNTs. In this paper, the vibrational behavior of diethyltoluenediamines (DETDA) functionalized CNTs is investigated utilizing molecular dynamics simulations in canonical ensemble at room temperature. The models of simulations are divided into two categories of functionalized CNTs with regular and random distributions of DETDA polymers. The results demonstrate that natural frequency of functionalized CNTs is lower than that of pristine ones. Also, it is observed that buckling phenomenon occurs during vibration for functionalized CNTs with regular distribution of polymers. It is further observed that polymer mass and van der Waals (vdW) forces are responsible for frequency changes in functionalized CNTs with random and regular distribution patterns of CNTs, respectively.

  6. Response of a flexible filament in a flowing soap film subject to a forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Laibing; Xiao, Qing; Wu, Haijun; Wu, Yanfeng; Yin, Xiezhen

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between flexible plates and fluids are important physical phenomena. A flag in wind is one of the most simplified and classical models for studying the problem. In this paper, we investigated the response of a flag in flow with an externally forced vibration by using flexible filaments and soap film. Experiments show that for a filament that is either in oscillation or stationary, the external forced vibration leads to its oscillation. A synchronization phenomenon occurs in the experiments. A small perturbation leads to a large response of flapping amplitude in response. The insight provided here is helpful to the applications in the flow control, energy harvesting, and bionic propulsion areas.

  7. Forced response approach of a parametric vibration with a trigonometric series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dishan

    2015-02-01

    A forced vibration problem with parametric stiffness is modeled by feedback structure in this manuscript, and the forced response is expressed as a special trigonometric series. The forced response of this problem is determined by algebraic equation. By applying harmonic balance and limitation operation, all coefficients of the harmonic components in the forced response solution are fully approached. The investigation result shows that the new approach has an advantage in the computational time and accuracy, and it is very significant for the theoretical research and engineering application in dealing with the problem of forced parametric vibration.

  8. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  9. Study on vibration characteristics of the shaft system for a dredging pump based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. M.; Qin, L.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, X.; He, L. Y.; He, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the shaft system for a dredging pump were studied with the Finite Element Method (FEM) by SAMCEF ROTOR. At first, the influence of the fluid-solid coupling interaction of mud water and impeller, water sealing and pump shaft on the lateral critical speeds were analyzed. The results indicated that the mud water must be taken into consideration, while the water sealing need not to. Then the effects of radial and thrust rolling bearings on the lateral critical speeds were discussed, which shows that the radial bearing close to the impeller has greatest impact on the 1st order critical speed. At last, the upper and lower limits of the critical speeds of lateral, axial and torsional vibration were calculated. The rated speed of the dredging pump was far less than the predicted critical speed, which can ensure the safe operation of the unit. Each vibration mode is also shown in this paper. This dynamic analysis method offers some reference value on the research of vibration and stability of the shaft system in dredging pump.

  10. The use of statistical characteristics of reducer vibrations as diagnostic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balitskiy, F. Y.; Genkin, M. D.; Ivanova, M. A.; Sokolova, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a statistical analysis of the vibrations of the experimental RS-1 reducer stand, with a spiral-gear transmission, operating on a closed circuit, are presented. The analysis was carried out on the Minsk-2 and Minsk-32 digital computers, with two-channel analog-digital converter, built in the Institute of the Science of Mechanics. Two-dimensional distribution patterns, conditional dispersions and dispersion ratios were calculated. The octave-band-filtered first harmonics of the tooth frequency f sub z of the vibrations at two different measurement points were considered as the components of the vibration process to be analyzed. The regression lines, corresponding to different values of the loading torque, are presented. Since it was not the gear drive parameters which were determined by diagnostic methods, but the characteristics most sensitive to change in state of the object of the investigation, the loading torque, which is the simplest and most accessible for measurement, was chosen as the condition parameter.

  11. A numerical method for determining the natural vibration characteristics of rotating nonuniform cantilever blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.; Malatino, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the free vibration characteristics of a rotating blade having nonuniform spanwise properties and cantilever boundary conditions. The equations which govern the coupled flapwise, chordwise, and torsional motion of such a blade are solved using an integrating matrix method. By expressing the equations of motion and matrix notation, utilizing the integrating matrix as an operator, and applying the boundary conditions, the equations are formulated into an eigenvalue problem whose solutions may be determined by conventional methods. Computer results are compared with experimental data.

  12. Measurements of an ARS DE204S Cryocooler's Thermal and Vibration Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Haid, B

    2004-08-24

    This document describes measurements that characterize an Advanced Research Systems DE204S cryocooler system. The data is relevant to the thermal performance and vibration characteristics of the cold-head. The thermal measurements include heat load mapping of the 1st and 2nd stage, and temperature fluctuation measurement of the 2nd stage heat station. A comparison of fluctuation measurements by four different sensors is also included to support the 2nd stage fluctuation results. Finally, optical measurement of the cyclic 2nd stage heat station deflection is described.

  13. Vibration characteristics of a large wind turbine tower on non-rigid foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, S. T.; Cang, T. Y. P.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Timmerman, D. H.; Fenton, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of the Mod-OA wind turbine supported by nonrigid foundations were investigated for a range of soil rigidities. The study shows that the influence of foundation rotation on the fundamental frequency of the wind turbine is quite significant for cohesive soils or loose sand. The reduction in natural frequency can be greater than 20 percent. However, for a foundation resting on well graded, dense granular materials or bedrock, such effect is small and the foundation can be treated as a fixed base.

  14. Visual Stimulation Facilitates Penile Responses to Vibration in Men with and without Erectile Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Erick; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared reflexogenic and psychogenic penile responses in men with and without erectile disorder. Hypothesized that men with psychogenic dysfunction respond minimally to vibrotactile stimulation. As predicted, responses were different in the vibration condition. Interpretations are provided in terms of attention and appraisal. (BF)

  15. Response measurement by laser Doppler vibrometry in vibration qualification tests with non-Gaussian random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the field of vibration qualification testing, random excitations are typically imposed on the tested system in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) profile. This is the one of the most popular ways to control the shaker or slip table for durability tests. However, these excitations (and the corresponding system responses) exhibit a Gaussian probability distribution, whereas not all real-life excitations are Gaussian, causing the response to be also non-Gaussian. In order to introduce non-Gaussian peaks, a further parameter, i.e., kurtosis, has to be controlled in addition to the PSD. However, depending on the specimen behaviour and input signal characteristics, the use of non-Gaussian excitations with high kurtosis and a given PSD does not automatically imply a non-Gaussian stress response. For an experimental investigation of these coupled features, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations and consequently evaluate the input signals most representative for real-life, non-Gaussian excitations. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and burst non-Gaussian excitation signals. The laser Doppler vibrometry technique was used in this type of test for the first time, in order to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response as proportional to the differential displacement measured at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of measurements using accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal dropouts occurring during the experiment is described. The results demonstrate the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal features and therefore to select the most appropriate input signal for the fatigue test.

  16. Response measurement by laser Doppler vibrometry in vibration qualification tests with non-Gaussian random excitation.

    PubMed

    Troncossi, M; Di Sante, R; Rivola, A

    2016-10-01

    In the field of vibration qualification testing, random excitations are typically imposed on the tested system in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) profile. This is the one of the most popular ways to control the shaker or slip table for durability tests. However, these excitations (and the corresponding system responses) exhibit a Gaussian probability distribution, whereas not all real-life excitations are Gaussian, causing the response to be also non-Gaussian. In order to introduce non-Gaussian peaks, a further parameter, i.e., kurtosis, has to be controlled in addition to the PSD. However, depending on the specimen behaviour and input signal characteristics, the use of non-Gaussian excitations with high kurtosis and a given PSD does not automatically imply a non-Gaussian stress response. For an experimental investigation of these coupled features, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations and consequently evaluate the input signals most representative for real-life, non-Gaussian excitations. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and burst non-Gaussian excitation signals. The laser Doppler vibrometry technique was used in this type of test for the first time, in order to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response as proportional to the differential displacement measured at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of measurements using accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal dropouts occurring during the experiment is described. The results demonstrate the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal features and therefore to select the most appropriate input signal for the fatigue test.

  17. Postural stability and responses to vibrations in patients after anterior cruciate ligament surgical reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hirjaková, Z; Šingliarová, H; Bzdúšková, D; Kimijanová, J; Bučková, K; Valkovič, P; Hlavačka, F

    2016-10-24

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of surgical reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on postural stability and responses to lower limb (LL) muscles vibrations. Centre of pressure (CoP) was measured in 17 subjects during stance on firm/foam surface with eyes open/closed and during unilateral vibrations of LL muscles (m. triceps surae - TS, m. quadriceps femoris - Q, m. quadriceps femoris and hamstrings simultaneously - QH). The measurements were performed: 1) preoperatively, 2) six weeks and 3) three months after the reconstruction. Decreased postural stability was documented six weeks after the reconstruction compared to preoperative measurement. Three months after the reconstruction significant improvement was observed during stance on foam surface with eyes closed. Preoperatively, altered reactions of LL with ACL lesion compared to intact LL were manifested by slower response in first 3 s of TS vibration and by increased CoP shift in last 5 s of QH vibration. After the reconstruction, we observed slower CoP reaction and decreased CoP shift during TS vibration of LL with ACL lesion compared to preoperative level. Posturography during quiet stance and during TS vibration reliably detect postural changes due to ACL reconstruction and can be potentially useful in clinical practice.

  18. Subjective response to combined noise and vibration during flight of a large twin-jet airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA twin-jet airplane was used to obtain controlled noise and vibration environments during flight while obtaining subjective responses from 13 passenger-subjects (6 females and 7 males). Subjective ratings of overall comfort, comfort when considering only vibration, and comfort when considering only noise were obtained during times of different vibration and noise environments. Passenger-subjects were able to distinguish and rate noise better than vibration. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in ratings of ride comfort due to both sex type and flight experience. Males rated flying discomfort much more severely than females when rating the overall ride and the ride when considering only the noise environment. Experienced passengers also rated the overall ride to be more uncomfortable than inexperienced passengers.

  19. Effect of cold ambient temperature on palmar sweating response to vibration stress.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hideo; Noguchi, Ryo; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Matoba, Tsunetaka

    2002-08-01

    We investigated the effect of cold ambient temperature on the palmar sweating response to vibration stress. Ten healthy, male subjects were exposed to eight ambient temperatures (5, 7, 10, 14, 18, 22, 24 and 28 degrees C). At each ambient temperature, each subject gripped the handle of a vibration generator with his left hand with a grasp strength of 49 N. This hand was then exposed to a 125-Hz sinusoidal vibration with an acceleration of 50 m/s(2) (rms) for 3 min at each ambient temperature. Palmar sweating and skin temperature were measured simultaneously on the palm and the fourth finger, respectively, of the subjects' right palm. The palmar sweating response showed a significant change among eight ambient temperatures. The palmar sweating measured at an ambient temperature of 5 degrees C was found to be significantly larger than those measured at 10, 14, 18, 22, 24 and 28 degrees C. Vibration exposure caused a significant increase in the palmar sweating response. Our results suggest that a cold environment plays a significant role in the palmar sweating response to vibration stress.

  20. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm.

  1. Quantitative EOH and FEM hybrid study of vibration characteristics of avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leak, Chris E.; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1995-06-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of avionics is the requirement to assure their reliable functionality while subjected to the actual operating conditions which are static and dynamic in nature. Of particular interest to the developments presented in this paper are the dynamic loading conditions. Because the avionics have certain mass and elasticity, they respond to the loads encountered during operation with a specific vibration behavior. Therefore, development of reliable avionics packages depends upon our ability to determine the dynamic characteristics which define and control their vibration behavior, particularly as it relates to the dynamic environment within an aircraft which is a major contributor to the failure of airborne avionic systems. In this paper, computational and experimental hybrid methodolgy is used to quantitatively study the vibration characteristics of avionics. The computational methodology is based on the finite element method. The experimental methodology is based on the electro-optic holography method, which allows direct electro- optic recording, processing, and display of the laser holograms at the rate of 30 holograms per second, making it capable of producing quantitative data in nearly real-time. Using the electro- optic holography method, displacement magnitudes in the submicron range are measured noninvasively over the full field of view, as a function of the resonance frequencies. Although some of the experimentally observed mode shapes were not predicted using the computational model employed in this study, the correlation between the results obtained using the finite element and the electro-optic holography methods was otherwise good and the agreement between the corresponding resonance frequencies was within 2%.

  2. Quantification of the effects of audible rattle and source type on the human response to environmental vibration.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, J; Sica, G; Peris, E; Sharp, C; Moorhouse, A T; Waddington, D C

    2016-03-01

    The present research quantifies the influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance caused by vibration in residential environments. The sources of vibration considered are railway and the construction of a light rail system. Data were measured in the United Kingdom using a socio-vibration survey (N = 1281). These data are analyzed using ordinal logit models to produce exposure-response relationships describing community annoyance as a function of vibration exposure. The influence of source type and the presence of audible vibration-induced rattle on annoyance are investigated using dummy variable analysis, and quantified using odds-ratios and community tolerance levels. It is concluded that the sample population is more likely to express higher levels of annoyance if the vibration source is construction compared to railway, and if vibration-induced rattle is audible.

  3. Mechanical Vibration Characteristics for the Driving Part in Array of Microelectromechanical Systems Vibratory Gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yoshinori; Hirata, Masaki; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2012-09-01

    Over the past ten years, much effort to develop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes with the “tactical” and “inertial” grade has been made. Although several techniques are proposed to increase the sensitivity, each of them has serious tradeoffs with other characteristics. We propose a new approach to accomplish the increase in sensitivity. The overall gyroscope consists of gyroscope elements arrayed in an X-Y matrix. Each gyroscope element is connected with two types of beams, coupling and connecting beams, and is excited in the antiphase vibration mode. First, this array configuration takes the advantage of the large scale factor of N2, the square of the number of elements, for the sensitivity over a simply large chip (the sensitivity is proportional to N). Second, the vibrational characteristics are not changed from those for a single element irrespective of the number of elements. Therefore, much effort in design can be saved. 1×2 and 2×2 arrays with the resonant frequency of approximately 5 kHz were fabricated and evaluated in terms of the resonant frequency and amplitude for each element. They agreed well with those of a single gyroscope. This indicates that the proposed array helps to reduce the task of frequency tuning, which is needed for conventional 1×2 gyroscope arrays. It is also useful to fabricate a highly resonant gyroscope, which is immune to environmental noise.

  4. Vibration characteristics of piezoelectric fiber composites under thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, vibration characteristics of piezoelectric fiber composite beams are presented. An asymptotic method based on virtual work principle is introduced first. The primary variables in thermo-electro-mechanical problems are asymptotically expanded in terms of the small parameter, which is done by taking the geometric slenderness of the beams. This subsequently renders a set of recursive virtual works at each order, in which the virtual works are separated into two parts: 2D microscopic problems and 1D macroscopic problems. These microscopic and macroscopic problems are systematically associated with each other, and thus the boundary conditions are affected by both of them. Cantilever beams under multiphysics environment are taken as a test-bed in order to illustrate the significance of edge effects and asymptotical correctness to the vibration characteristics of the beams. For the displacement prescribed boundary such as the clamped boundary, the stress weighted average conditions are applied to obtain the accurate prediction, which are known to be a good approximation (possibly the best candidate up to date).

  5. Vibration characteristics of piezoelectric fiber composites under thermo-electro-mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, vibration characteristics of piezoelectric fiber composite beams are presented. An asymptotic method based on virtual work principle is introduced first. The primary variables in thermo-electro-mechanical problems are asymptotically expanded in terms of the small parameter, which is done by taking the geometric slenderness of the beams. This subsequently renders a set of recursive virtual works at each order, in which the virtual works are separated into two parts: 2D microscopic problems and 1D macroscopic problems. These microscopic and macroscopic problems are systematically associated with each other, and thus the boundary conditions are affected by both of them. Cantilever beams under multiphysics environment are taken as a test-bed in order to illustrate the significance of edge effects and asymptotical correctness to the vibration characteristics of the beams. For the displacement prescribed boundary such as the clamped boundary, the stress weighted average conditions are applied to obtain the accurate prediction, which are known to be a good approximation (possibly the best candidate up to date).

  6. Deducing Electronic Unit Internal Response During a Vibration Test Using a Lumped Parameter Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    During random vibration testing of electronic boxes there is often a desire to know the dynamic response of certain internal printed wiring boards (PWBs) for the purpose of monitoring the response of sensitive hardware or for post-test forensic analysis in support of anomaly investigation. Due to restrictions on internally mounted accelerometers for most flight hardware there is usually no means to empirically observe the internal dynamics of the unit, so one must resort to crude and highly uncertain approximations. One common practice is to apply Miles Equation, which does not account for the coupled response of the board in the chassis, resulting in significant over- or under-prediction. This paper explores the application of simple multiple-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter modeling to predict the coupled random vibration response of the PWBs in their fundamental modes of vibration. A simple tool using this approach could be used during or following a random vibration test to interpret vibration test data from a single external chassis measurement to deduce internal board dynamics by means of a rapid correlation analysis. Such a tool might also be useful in early design stages as a supplemental analysis to a more detailed finite element analysis to quickly prototype and analyze the dynamics of various design iterations. After developing the theoretical basis, a lumped parameter modeling approach is applied to an electronic unit for which both external and internal test vibration response measurements are available for direct comparison. Reasonable correlation of the results demonstrates the potential viability of such an approach. Further development of the preliminary approach presented in this paper will involve correlation with detailed finite element models and additional relevant test data.

  7. Acute bone response to whole body vibration in healthy pre-pubertal boys

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, R.; Ward, K.; Lee, E.; Razaghi, H.; Horne, C.; Bishop, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    The skeleton responds to mechanical stimulation. We wished to ascertain the magnitude and speed of the growing skeleton’s response to a standardised form of mechanical stimulation, vibration. 36 prepubertal boys stood for 10 minutes in total on one of two vibrating platforms (high (>2 g) or low (<1 g) magnitude vibration) on either 1, 3 or 5 successive days (n=12 for each duration); 15 control subjects stood on an inactive platform. Blood samples were taken at intervals before and after vibration to measure bone formation (P1NP, osteocalcin) and resorption (CTx) markers as well as osteoprotegerin and sclerostin. There were no significant differences between platform and control groups in bone turnover markers immediately after vibration on days 1, 3 and 5. Combining platform groups, at day 8 P1NP increased by 25.1% (CI 12.3 to 38.0; paired t-test p=0.005) and bone resorption increased by 10.9% (CI 3.6 to 18.2; paired t-test p=0.009) compared to baseline. Osteocalcin, osteoprotogerin and sclerostin did not change significantly. The growing skeleton can respond quickly to vibration of either high or low magnitude. Further work is needed to determine the utility of such “stimulation-testing” in clinical practice. PMID:26032203

  8. Whole-body vibration induces pain and lumbar spinal inflammation responses in the rat that vary with the vibration profile.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Martha E; Kartha, Sonia; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is linked epidemiologically to neck and back pain in humans, and to forepaw mechanical allodynia and cervical neuroinflammation in a rodent model of WBV, but the response of the low back and lumbar spine to WBV is unknown. A rat model of WBV was used to determine the effect of different WBV exposures on hind paw behavioral sensitivity and neuroinflammation in the lumbar spinal cord. Rats were exposed to 30 min of WBV at either 8 or 15 Hz on days 0 and 7, with the lumbar spinal cord assayed using immunohistochemistry at day 14. Behavioral sensitivity was measured using mechanical stimulation of the hind paws to determine the onset, persistence, and/or recovery of allodynia. Both WBV exposures induce mechanical allodynia 1 day following WBV, but only the 8 Hz WBV induces a sustained decrease in the withdrawal threshold through day 14. Similarly, increased activation of microglia, macrophages, and astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord is only evident after the painful 8 Hz WBV. Moreover, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-phosphorylation is most robust in neurons and astrocytes of the dorsal horn, with the most ERK phosphorylation occurring in the 8 Hz group. These findings indicate that a WBV exposure that induces persistent pain also induces a host of neuroimmune cellular activation responses that are also sustained. This work indicates there is an injury-dependent response that is based on the vibration parameters, providing a potentially useful platform for studying mechanisms of painful spinal injuries. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1439-1446, 2016.

  9. Vibrational response of a moving suspension-slider loading system exciting a rotating flexible disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong-Chen; Tan, Qing-Chang; Yang, Xin; Chatwin, Chris

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the vibrational response of the magnetic read/write head in hard disk drives this paper models a rotating flexible disk excited by a moving suspension-slider system which is considered to be a mass-dashpot-spring loading system, with the initial unstressed transverse runout integrated into the rotating disk dynamic model. The slider motion on the disk surface is driven by the suspension rotating at a constant speed. By subtracting the steady-state deflection component from the instantaneous deflection response of the rotating disk system, the relative vibration transverse deflection of the slider caused by the motion of the suspension-slider loading system is obtained. The effects of the slider initial and final positions, speed of movement, the disk rotational speed, and the disk mode of the initial transverse runout on the maximum amplitude of the relative vibration deflection are analyzed.

  10. Machinery vibration: Origins, impressions and cures

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, I. )

    1995-01-01

    The current trend toward high performance (speed, power, flow, etc.) and low eight are causing new machinery dynamics problems. Vibration diagnostics engineering of rotor-bearing-casing systems must consider both internal and external influences to effectively predict and diagnose these problems. It is assumed that machinery vibration data are free from ambiguity, error, conform to a standard and clearly identify the physical cause(s) responsible for vibration. Rotor vibration due to internal forces are described: unbalance force characteristics; response characteristics; and rules of rotor fundamental response. Rotor vibration due to external forces include: rotating aerodynamic stall; oil whirl; oil whip; structural resonance; vane/blade passing vibration; misalignment; rotor rubbing; gear mesh vibrations; and shaft crack. These are also discussed.

  11. Biodynamic response of the human body in the sitting position when subjected to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P. M.; Bonthoux, C.

    1983-10-01

    Previous studies of the location of those areas in which the sensation of vibration is perceived under whole body vertical vibration have underlined the predominance of the relative movement between thorax and pelvis. Experiments were designed to explore systematically the transmissibility between the pelvis and thorax. These were supplemented by measurements of mechanical impedance of the body and absorbed power. To determine the body impedance, a procedure was developed to remove the effect of the load platform itself. Fifteen subjects were presented first with a swept sinusoidal vibration, and then with a broad band random vibration, to see how the wave form of the motion might affect the mechanical response of the body. The results obtained for the seat to thorax transmissibility suggest that within the range of vertical vibration investigated (1-10 Hz, 1·6 m/s 2 r.m.s.) the human body in the sitting position can be modelled by a linear system with one or two degrees of freedom according to the subject. Data from the impedance function, which is a more complete description of the response of the body as a mechanical system, lead to systems with one further degree of freedom.

  12. Scanning LDV for vibration measurement of filiform hairs in crickets in response to induced airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santulli, C.; Finn, T. J.; Seidel, R.; Jeronimidis, G.

    2006-06-01

    Cercal hairs represent in cricket a wind sensitive escape system, able to detect the airflow generated from predating species. These sensors have been studied as a biomimetic concept to allow the development of MEMS for biomedical use. In particular, the behaviour of the hairs, including airflow response, resonant frequency and damping, has been investigated up to a frequency of 20 kHz. The microscopic nature of the hairs, the complex vibrations of excited hairs and the high damping of the system suggested that the use of Laser Doppler vibrometry could possibly improve the test performance. Two types of tests were performed: in the first case the hairs were indirectly excited using the signal obtained from a vibrating aluminium plate, whilst in the second case the hairs were directly excited using a white noise chirp. The results from the first experiment indicated that the hairs move in-phase with the exciting signal up to frequencies in the order of 10 kHz, responding to the vibration modes of the plate with a signal attenuation of 12 to 20 dB. The chirp experiment revealed the presence of rotational resonant modes at 6850 and 11300 Hz. No clear effect of hair length was perceivable on the vibration response of the filiform sensors. The obtained results proved promising to support the mechanical and vibration characterisation of the hairs and suggest that scanning Laser vibrometry can be used extensively on highly dampened biological materials.

  13. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  14. On the dimension of complex responses in nonlinear structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to accurately model engineering systems under extreme dynamic loads would prove a major breakthrough in many aspects of aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering. Extreme loads frequently induce both nonlinearities and coupling which increase the complexity of the response and the computational cost of finite element models. Dimension reduction has recently gained traction and promises the ability to distill dynamic responses down to a minimal dimension without sacrificing accuracy. In this context, the dimensionality of a response is related to the number of modes needed in a reduced order model to accurately simulate the response. Thus, an important step is characterizing the dimensionality of complex nonlinear responses of structures. In this work, the dimensionality of the nonlinear response of a post-buckled beam is investigated. Significant detail is dedicated to carefully introducing the experiment, the verification of a finite element model, and the dimensionality estimation algorithm as it is hoped that this system may help serve as a benchmark test case. It is shown that with minor modifications, the method of false nearest neighbors can quantitatively distinguish between the response dimension of various snap-through, non-snap-through, random, and deterministic loads. The state-space dimension of the nonlinear system in question increased from 2-to-10 as the system response moved from simple, low-level harmonic to chaotic snap-through. Beyond the problem studied herein, the techniques developed will serve as a prescriptive guide in developing fast and accurate dimensionally reduced models of nonlinear systems, and eventually as a tool for adaptive dimension-reduction in numerical modeling. The results are especially relevant in the aerospace industry for the design of thin structures such as beams, panels, and shells, which are all capable of spatio-temporally complex dynamic responses that are difficult and computationally expensive to

  15. [Possibility of using vibration response imaging in resuscitation and intensive care].

    PubMed

    Vinshtok, Iu L; Zelenin, G B; Gulitskiĭ, K E

    2010-01-01

    Lung monitoring and visualization in intensive care unit (ICU) patients is a difficult task. Chest X-ray and auscultation are the most commonly used methods today. The new technique vibration response imaging (VRI) based on the vibration that is generated by airflow in the lung and that is its surrogate manifestation allows visualization of lung function. This method provides clinicians with an easy-to-use, non-radiation, non-invasive acoustic-based imaging technique of visual and quantitative evaluation of the lung. VRI objective dynamic image is a clinical addition to the existing static visual modalities used in the ICU.

  16. Acute Cardiovascular Response during Resistance Exercise with Whole-body Vibration in Sedentary Subjects: A Randomized Cross-over Trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, Thaisa; Polito, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the acute cardiovascular responses during and after resistance exercise with and without whole-body vibration. Nineteen sedentary adults randomly performed one session of isometric squats without vibration and the same exercise with vibration. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were measured. SBP, DBP and HR were also measured for 20 min after the sessions. The exercise with vibration demonstrated significant values ​​(P < 0.05) for SBP (second to sixth sets), DBP (third to sixth sets) and SVR (second to sixth sets) compared with the exercise without vibration. After the sessions, the values ​​of SBP for both exercises were significantly lower than the respective resting values; with no difference between the sessions. In conclusion, exercise with vibration caused increases in SBP, DBP and SVR compared with exercise with no vibration in sedentary adults.

  17. Measurement of flexoelectric response in polyvinylidene fluoride films for piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2017-02-01

    This study presents an investigation on the measurement of flexoelectric response in β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films attached on cantilever beam-based flexible piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters (PVEHs). The flexoelectric response associated with negative strain gradients was simulated through harmonic response analysis by using the finite element method (FEM). The polarization frequency response functions (FRFs) modified by direct flexoelectric effect of PVDF films was experimentally validated by multi-mode FRFs. From quantitative comparisons between experimental observations and simulated estimation of FRFs, it is demonstrated that the direct flexoelectric response can be observed in PVDF films attached on PVEHs.

  18. Study of T53 engine vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Vibration characteristics for overhauled T53 engines, including rejection rate, principal sources of vibration, and normal procedures taken by the overhaul center to reduce engine vibration are summarized. Analytical and experimental data were compared to determine the engine's dynamic response to unbalance forces with results showing that the engine operates through bending critical speeds. Present rigid rotor balancing techniques are incapable of compensating for the flexible rotor unbalance. A comparison of typical test cell and aircraft vibration levels disclosed significant differences in the engine's dynamic response. A probable spline shift phenomenon was uncovered and investigated. Action items to control costs and reduce vibration levels were identified from analytical and experimental studies.

  19. Free-vibration characteristics and correlation of a space station split-blanket solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Shaker, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a zero-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The zero-g configuration corrresponds to an on-orbit configuration of the Space Station solar array. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the natural frequencies of the array; the second uses the finite element method program, MSC/NASTRAN. The stiffness matrix from the NASTRAN solution was found to be erroneously grounded. The results from the two methods are compared. It is concluded that the grounding does not seriously compromise the solution to the elastic modes of the solar array. However, the correct rigid body modes need to be included to obtain the correct dynamic model.

  20. Free-vibration characteristics and correlation of a Space Station split-blanket solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Shaker, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a zero-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The zero-g configuration corresponds to an on-orbit configuration of the Space Station solar array. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the natural frequencies of the array; the second uses the finite element method program, MSC/NASTRAN. The stiffness matrix from the NASTRAN solution was found to be erroneously grounded. The results from the two methods are compared. It is concluded that the grounding does not seriously compromise the solution to the elastic modes of the solar array. However, the correct rigid body modes need to be icluded to obtain the correct dynamic model.

  1. Effects of blood in veins of dragonfly wing on the vibration characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dan; Yin, Yajun; Zhao, Hongxiao; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    How the blood in veins of dragonfly wing affects its vibration characteristics is investigated. Based on the experimental results of the wing's morphology and microstructures, including the veins, the membranes and the pterostigma, accurate three-dimensional finite element models of the dragonfly forewing are developed. Considering the blood in veins, the total mass, mass distribution and the moments of inertia of the wing are studied. The natural frequencies/modal shapes are analyzed when the veins are filled with and without blood, respectively. The based natural frequency of the model with blood (189 Hz) is much closer to the experimental result. Relative to bending modal shapes, the torsional ones are affected more significantly by the blood. The results in this article reveal the multi-functions of the blood in dragonfly wings and have important implications for the bionic design of flapping-wing micro air vehicles.

  2. Theoretical analysis based on fundamental functions of thin plate and experimental measurement for vibration characteristics of a plate coupled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chan-Yi; Wu, Yi-Chuang; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2017-04-01

    This study combined theoretical, experimental, and numerical analysis to investigate the vibration characteristics of a thin rectangular plate positioned horizontally at the bottom of a rectangular container filled with liquid. Flow field pressure was derived using an equation governing the behavior of incompressible fluids. Analytic solutions to vibrations in a thin plate in air served as the fundamental function of the thin plate coupled with liquid. We then used liquid pressure, and the out-of-plane deflection of the thin plate for the construction of frequency response functions for the analysis of vibration characteristics in the liquid-plate coupling system. Two experimental methods were employed to measure the vibration characteristics of the thin plate immersed in water. The first involved using sensors of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) to measure transient signals of fluid-plate system subjected an impact at the thin plate. These were then converted to the frequency domain in order to obtain the resonant frequencies of the fluid-plate coupling system. The second method was amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI), which was used to measure the dynamic characteristics of the thin plate in the flow field. This method was paired with the image processing techniques, temporal speckle pattern interferometry (TSPI) and temporal standard deviation (TSTD), to obtain clear mode shapes of the thin plate and resonant frequencies. Comparison of the results from theoretical analysis, finite element method, and experimental measurements confirmed the accuracy of our theoretical analysis, which was superior to the conventional approach based on beam mode shape functions. The experimental methods proposed in this study can be used to measure the resonant frequencies of underwater thin plates, and clear mode shapes can be obtained using AF-ESPI. Our results indicate that the resonant frequencies of thin plates underwater are lower than

  3. Experimental studies for determining human discomfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate several problems related to methodology and design of experiments to obtain human comfort response to vertical sinusoidal vibration. Specifically, the studies were directed to the determination of (1) the adequacy of frequency averaging of vibration data to obtain discomfort predictors, (2) the effect of practice on subject ratings, (3) the effect of the demographic factors of age, sex, and weight, and (4) the relative importance of seat and floor vibrations in the determination of measurement and criteria specification location. Results indicate that accurate prediction of discomfort requires knowledge of both the acceleration level and frequency content of the vibration stimuli. More importantly, the prediction of discomfort was shown to be equally good based upon either floor accelerations or seat accelerations. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the discomfort levels in different seats resulting from similar vibratory imputs were equal. Therefore, it was recommended that criteria specifications and acceleration measurements be made at the floor location. The results also indicated that practice did not systematically influence discomfort responses nor did the demographic factors of age, weight, and sex contribute to the discomfort response variation.

  4. Effects of gear crack propagation paths on vibration responses of the perforated gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Qibin; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviors of a perforated gear system considering effects of the gear crack propagation paths and this study focuses on the effects of a crack propagating through the rim on the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) and vibration responses. Considering the effects of the extended tooth contact, a finite element (FE) model of a gear pair is established based on ANSYS software. TVMS of the perforated gear with crack propagating through tooth and rim are calculated by using the FE model. Furthermore, a lumped mass model is adopted to investigate the vibration responses of the perforated gear system. The results show that there exist three periods related to slots of the gear body in a rotating period of the perforated gear. Gear cracks propagating through tooth and rim both reduce the gear body stiffness and lead to reduction of TVMS besides the crack tooth contact moment, and the TVMS weakening for the former is less than that for the latter. Moreover, the results also show that the gear crack propagating through the rim (CPR) has a greater effect on vibration responses than the gear crack propagating through the tooth (CPT) under the same crack level. Vibration level increases with the increasing crack depth, especially for the gear with CPR.

  5. Vibration-transit theory of self-dynamic response in a monatomic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.; Wallace, Duane C.

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model for self-dynamic response is developed using vibration-transit theory, and is applied to liquid sodium at all wave vectors q from the hydrodynamic regime to the free particle limit. In this theory the zeroth-order Hamiltonian describes the vibrational motion in a single random valley harmonically extended to infinity. This Hamiltonian is tractable, is evaluated a priori for monatomic liquids, and the same Hamiltonian (the same set of eigenvalues and eigenvectors) is used for equilibrium and nonequilibrium theory. Here, for the self-intermediate scattering function Fs(q,t) , we find the vibrational contribution is in near perfect agreement with molecular dynamics (MD) through short and intermediate times, at all q . This is direct confirmation that normal mode vibrational correlations are present in the motion of the liquid state. The primary transit effect is the diffusive motion of the vibrational equilibrium positions, as the liquid transits rapidly among random valleys. This motion is modeled as a standard random walk, and the resulting theoretical Fs(q,t) is in excellent agreement with MD results at all q and t . In the limit q→∞ , the theory automatically exhibits the correct approach to the free-particle limit. Also, in the limit q→0 , the hydrodynamic limit emerges as well. In contrast to the benchmark theories of generalized hydrodynamics and mode coupling, the present theory is near a priori, while achieving modestly better accuracy. Therefore, in our view, it constitutes an improvement over the traditional theories.

  6. Theoretical relationship between vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions of the human body.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2013-11-25

    The relationship between the vibration transmissibility and driving-point response functions (DPRFs) of the human body is important for understanding vibration exposures of the system and for developing valid models. This study identified their theoretical relationship and demonstrated that the sum of the DPRFs can be expressed as a linear combination of the transmissibility functions of the individual mass elements distributed throughout the system. The relationship is verified using several human vibration models. This study also clarified the requirements for reliably quantifying transmissibility values used as references for calibrating the system models. As an example application, this study used the developed theory to perform a preliminary analysis of the method for calibrating models using both vibration transmissibility and DPRFs. The results of the analysis show that the combined method can theoretically result in a unique and valid solution of the model parameters, at least for linear systems. However, the validation of the method itself does not guarantee the validation of the calibrated model, because the validation of the calibration also depends on the model structure and the reliability and appropriate representation of the reference functions. The basic theory developed in this study is also applicable to the vibration analyses of other structures.

  7. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  8. Exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to freight and passenger railway vibration exposure in residential environments.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Calum; Woodcock, James; Sica, Gennaro; Peris, Eulalia; Moorhouse, Andrew T; Waddington, David C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, exposure-response relationships for annoyance due to freight and passenger railway vibration exposure in residential environments are developed, so as to better understand the differences in human response to these two sources of environmental vibration. Data for this research come from a field study comprising interviews with respondents and measurements of their vibration exposure (N = 752). A logistic regression model is able to accurately classify 96% of these measured railway vibration signals as freight or passenger based on two signal properties that quantify the duration and low frequency content of each signal. Exposure-response relationships are then determined using ordinal probit modeling with fixed thresholds. The results indicate that people are able to distinguish between freight and passenger railway vibration, and that the annoyance response due to freight railway vibration is significantly higher than that due to passenger railway vibration, even for equal levels of exposure. In terms of a community tolerance level, the population studied is 15 dB (re 10(-6) m s(-2)) more tolerant to passenger railway vibration than freight railway vibration. These results have implications for the expansion of freight traffic on rail, or for policies to promote passenger railway.

  9. Analysis of vibrational response in graphite oxide nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prias Barragan, Jhon Jairo; Gross, Katherine; Lajaunie, Luc; Arenal, Raul; Ariza Calderon, Hernando; Prieto, Pedro

    In this work, we present a new low-cost fabrication process to obtain graphite oxide nanoplatelets from bamboo pyroligneous acid (GO-BPA) by thermal decomposition method using a pyrolysis system for different carbonization temperatures from 673 to 973 K. The GO-BPA samples were characterized by using Raman, FTIR, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques, whose results suggest that increased carbonization temperature increases graphite conversion, boundary defects, desorption of some organic compounds and phonon response, respectively. We discuss potential applications of the GO-BPA samples involving phonon response that would benefit from a fully scaled technology, advanced electronic sensors and devices.

  10. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Stretching the soleus (Sol) muscle during sudden toe-up rotations of the supporting platform in a standing subject evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR). The aim of the present investigation was to further explore the afferent and spinal pathways mediating the SLR and MLR in lower limb muscles by means of tendon vibration. In seven subjects, toe-up or toe-down rotations were performed under: (1) control, (2) continuous bilateral vibration at 90 Hz of Achilles' tendon or tibialis anterior (TA) tendon, and (3) post-vibration conditions. Sol and TA background EMG activity and reflex responses were bilaterally recorded and analysed. Toe-up rotations induced SLRs and MLRs in Sol at average latencies of 40 and 66 ms, respectively. During vibration, the latency of both responses increased by about 2 ms. The area of the SLR significantly decreased during vibration, regardless of the underlying background activity, and almost returned to control value post-vibration. The area of Sol MLR was less influenced by vibration than SLR, the reduction being negligible with relatively high background activity. However, contrary to SLR, MLR was even more reduced post-vibration. Toe-down rotations induced no SLR in the TA, while a MLR was evoked at about 81 ms. The area of TA MLR decreased slightly during vibration but much more post-vibration. SLRs and MLRs were differently affected by changing the vibration frequency to 30 Hz: vibration had a negligible effect on the SLR, but still produced a significant effect on the MLR. The independence from the background EMG of the inhibitory effect of vibration upon the SLR suggests that vibration removes a constant amount of the Ia afferent input. This can be accounted for by either presynaptic inhibition of group Ia fibres or a ‘busy-line' phenomenon. The differential effect of vibration on SLRs and MLRs is compatible with the notions that spindle primaries have a higher sensitivity to vibration than

  11. Eccentric Exercise: Physiological Characteristics and Acute Responses.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jamie; Pearson, Simon; Ross, Angus; McGuigan, Mike

    2017-04-01

    An eccentric contraction involves the active lengthening of muscle under an external load. The molecular and neural mechanisms underpinning eccentric contractions differ from those of concentric and isometric contractions and remain less understood. A number of molecular theories have been put forth to explain the unexplained observations during eccentric contractions that deviate from the predictions of the established theories of muscle contraction. Postulated mechanisms include a strain-induced modulation of actin-myosin interactions at the level of the cross-bridge, the activation of the structural protein titin, and the winding of titin on actin. Accordingly, neural strategies controlling eccentric contractions also differ with a greater, and possibly distinct, cortical activation observed despite an apparently lower activation at the level of the motor unit. The characteristics of eccentric contractions are associated with several acute physiological responses to eccentrically-emphasised exercise. Differences in neuromuscular, metabolic, hormonal and anabolic signalling responses during, and following, an eccentric exercise bout have frequently been observed in comparison to concentric exercise. Subsequently, the high levels of muscular strain with such exercise can induce muscle damage which is rarely observed with other contraction types. The net result of these eccentric contraction characteristics and responses appears to be a novel adaptive signal within the neuromuscular system.

  12. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  13. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  14. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  15. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Louise R; Baker, Andrew T; Elias, Damian O; Dammann, John F; Zielinski, Mark C; Polashock, Vicky S; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-01-01

    Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  16. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0, are obtained. It is shown that at rvibrations frequencies, is negative. As a result, while the quasi-continuous spectrum band shifts to lower frequencies, the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity shifts to lower temperatures. The distance within only one pair of atoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  17. Influence of Defects on Vibrational Characteristics of Linear Chains of Inert Gases Atoms Adsorbed on Carbon Nanobundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhelii, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    The study of vibrational characteristics of chains of rare gas atoms adsorbed in the grooves between nanotubes in nanobundles is reduced to the analyses of the phonon spectrum and the vibrational characteristics of linear chains of atoms in an external field. Atoms in the chain have three degrees of freedom. The analytical expressions for the vibrational characteristics of the atoms in the chain, depending on the ratio between the interatomic distance in the chain r and the equilibrium distance between atoms in the chain r_0 , are obtained. It is shown that at rvibrations frequencies, is negative. As a result, while the quasi-continuous spectrum band shifts to lower frequencies, the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity shifts to lower temperatures. The distance within only one pair of atoms is modified. It is the defect that can entail discrete states split off from the quasi-continuous spectrum band. The discrete levels with frequencies below the quasi-continuous spectrum band shift the linear part of the temperature dependence of the heat capacity to lower temperatures. The conditions for appearing of discrete frequency levels are obtained, and their characteristics are found.

  18. Vibration characteristics of walls and a plate glass window representative of those of a wood-frame house

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanical excitation was used, and measurements of acceleration response, natural frequencies, and nodal patterns were performed. Results indicate that the wall sections and the complete wall did not act as a unit in responding to sinusoidal vibration inputs. Calculated frequencies of the components that account for this independent behavior of the studs and face sheets agreed resonably well with experimental frequencies. Experimental vibrations of the plate glass window agreed with the calculated behavior, and responses of the window exposed to airplane flyover noise were readily correlated with the test results.

  19. Synchronous and non-synchronous responses of systems with multiple identical nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Jimmy S.; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we investigate the nonlinear dynamic response of systems composed of a primary inertia to which multiple identical vibration absorbers are attached. This problem is motivated by observations of systems of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers that are designed to reduce engine order torsional vibrations in rotating systems, but the results are relevant to translational systems as well. In these systems the total absorber mass is split into multiple equal masses for purposes of distribution and/or balance, and it is generally expected that the absorbers will act in unison, corresponding to a synchronous response. In order to capture nonlinear effects of the responses of the absorbers, specifically, their amplitude-dependent frequency, we consider them to possess nonlinear stiffness. The equations of motion for the system are derived and it is shown how one can uncouple the equations for the absorbers from that for the primary inertia, resulting in a system of identical resonators that are globally coupled. These symmetric equations are scaled for weak nonlinear effects, near resonant forcing, and small damping. The method of averaging is applied, from which steady-state responses and their stability are investigated. The response of systems with two, three, and four absorbers are considered in detail, demonstrating a rich variety of bifurcations of the synchronous response, resulting in responses with various levels of symmetry in which sub-groups of absorbers are mutually synchronous. It is also shown that undamped models with more than two absorbers possess a degenerate response, which is made robust by the addition of damping to the model. Design guidelines are proposed based on the nature of the system response, with the aim of minimizing the acceleration of the primary system. It is shown that the desired absorber parameters are selected so that the system achieves a stable synchronous response which does not undergo jumps via saddle

  20. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  1. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  2. Mathematical Description of THE Traction Characteristics of the Driving Devices at Spatial Stiffness Compensators of the Vibration Isolation Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.

    2016-08-01

    During the researches the mathematical description of the traction characteristics of the stiffness compensators of the vibration isolation devices, relatively of the each axis, has been done. Representation of the compensators properties considers the variable load, thereby provide the wide enough spectrum of the action of the suggested vibration isolators. The derived expressions are valid for all three axes of space at the different stiffnesses, i.e. basic basic and two compensating. The research was supported by the scholarships of Russian Federation President for young scientists №184 from 10th of March 2015.

  3. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  4. Vibration Response Testing of the CEBAF 12GeV Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. Kirk; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Powers, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. These cryomodules were tested during production to characterize their microphonic response in situ. For several early cryomodules, detailed (vibration) modal studies of the cryomodule string were performed during the assembly process to identify the structural contributors to the measured cryomodule microphonic response. Structural modifications were then modelled, implemented, and verified by subsequent modal testing and in-situ microphonic response testing. Interim and latest results from this multi-stage process will be reviewed.

  5. Multipulse polarisation selective spectroscopy of rotational and vibrational responses of molecules in a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, V G

    2013-02-28

    The amplitude control of time-resolved optical responses in a liquid is theoretically analysed under nonresonant irradiation of the system by a train of femtosecond pulses with parallel and orthogonal polarisations. The control parameters, specifying the excitation scenarios, are the duration of pulses, their relative intensities, polarisation, and the delays between the pulses. It is shown that the choice of specific excitation scenarios transfers the system into a state in which only one response is detected from a set of responses of coherent intramolecular Raman active vibrational modes, coherent molecular librations and orientational rotations. (laser spectroscopy)

  6. Evaluating Attenuation of Vibration Response using Particle Impact Damping for a Range of Equipment Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Parsons, David; Smith, Andrew; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert; Craigmyle, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Particle dampers provide a mechanism for diverting energy away from resonant structural vibrations. This experimental study provides data from a series of acoustically excited tests to determine the effectiveness of these dampers for equipment mounted to a curved orthogrid panel for a launch vehicle application. Vibration attenuation trends are examined for variations in particle damper fill level, component mass, and excitation energy. A significant response reduction at the component level was achieved, suggesting that comparatively small, strategically placed, particle damper devices might be advantageously used in launch vehicle design. These test results were compared to baseline acoustic response tests without particle damping devices, over a range of isolation and damping parameters. Instrumentation consisting of accelerometers, microphones, and still photography data will be collected to correlate with the analytical results.

  7. Determination of Dynamic Characteristics of the Frame Bearing Structures of the Vibrating Separating Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piven, V. V.; Umanskaya, O. L.

    2016-08-01

    Within the vibrating separating machines the vibration displacement of the members is transferred to a frame bearing structure, and over it the movement is transferred again to the suspension brackets of the sieve separating surfaces and to the foundation, on which the machine is fixed. The forced oscillations of the sieve separating surfaces ensure the separation process, and the vibration, transferred from the frame structure, disturbs this process. It is necessary to ensure the vibration displacement of the separating surfaces within the fixed limitations by means of optimal design of the frame bearing surfaces. The aim of the work is to decrease adverse vibrations towards the technological separation process. The calculated and graphical relations, acquired according to the presented methods, enable to estimate the influence of various structure solutions on vibration displacements of the structure elements at the stage of design.

  8. Postural responses to various frequencies of vibration of the triceps surae and forefoot sole during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Naka, Masami; Fujiwara, Katsuo; Kiyota, Naoe

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of somatosensory input to the sensory reference system in quiet standing. We applied vibration (0.5 mm amplitude, 1-60 Hz) to the triceps surae and the forefoot sole to stimulate the muscle spindles and the mechanoreceptors, respectively, and evaluated postural responses. Thirteen young healthy adults who showed backward-lean and forward-lean responses to vibration at high and low frequencies, respectively, participated in the full experiment. The lowest vibration frequencies inducing backward-lean responses (B-LF) were 15-55 Hz for the triceps surae and 16-60 Hz for the forefoot sole. The highest frequencies inducing forward-lean responses (F-HF) were 3-18 Hz for the triceps surae and 1-20 Hz for the forefoot sole. When vibration was simultaneously applied to the triceps surae and forefoot sole at F-HF, no response was induced in 70% of trials. A forward-lean response was induced in the remaining 30% of trials. Simultaneous vibration of the triceps surae and forefoot sole at B-LF induced backward-lean responses in all trials. All postural responses occurred 0.5-4.3 s after vibration onset. Postural responses to high-frequency vibration conceivably occur as a compensatory movement to the illusionary perception that standing position is deviating forward from quiet standing, which must be a reference position. Postural responses to low-frequency vibration possibly occur to equalize the positional information that is received from the triceps surae and the forefoot sole. Both postural responses are likely to involve the sensory reference system, which is located in the supraspinal nervous system.

  9. Psychophysical relationships characterizing human response to whole-body sinusoidal vertical vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation determined that the psychophysical relationships between subjective discomfort evaluations to vibratory stimuli and subjective evaluations of the intensity of vibratory stimuli can be expressed in a linear fashion. Furthermore, significant differences were found to exist between discomfort and intensity subjective response for several but not all discrete frequencies investigated. The implication of these results is that ride quality criteria based upon subjective evaluation of vibration intensity should be applied cautiously in the development of criteria for human comfort.

  10. Analytical and experimental evaluations of Space Shuttle TPS tile vibration response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Pope, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies and laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the vibration response of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) tiles due to the intense rocket generated acoustic noise during lift-off. The TPS tiles are mounted over the exterior of the Space Shuttle Orbiter structure through Strain Isolation Pads (SIP) which protect the tiles from thermal induced shear loads at their interface. The analytical predictions indicate that the response of a typical tile is governed by the structural vibration inputs through the SIP under the tile at frequencies below 250 Hz, and by the direct acoustic excitation over the exterior surface of the tile at frequencies above 250 Hz. An evaluation of the laboratory test data for this same tile, in which conditioned (partial) coherent output spectral analysis procedures were used, leads to exactly the same conclusion. The results demonstrate the power of conditioned spectral analysis procedures in identifying vibration response mechanisms when two or more of the inputs are highly correlated.

  11. Spectral response characteristics of photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanselman, Daniel L.

    The most efficient solar modules use multiple materials of slightly varying composition and electronic characteristics to convert different bandwidths of the solar spectrum into usable electricity. Cells made in this fashion generally require very expensive, high precision equipment leading to a high cost of the modules. It has been suggested that an optical system be used to disperse the sunlight into its constituent wavelengths (see Conte et. al. (1989)[22]) with different materials strategically placed under the appropriate bandwidth of light to produce higher efficiency, low cost modules. The proper selection and placement of materials requires detailed knowledge of the response of various materials to different wavelengths of light. Solid State Theory calculates this response through complicated mathematical models describing the band structure of the materials and the density of states for charge carriers. The research described herein defines this response through experiment. The experiment designed for this research examines the response of commercially available photovoltaic cells of various materials. Concentrated sunlight is passed through filters with known transmittance to illuminate a photovoltaic cell. The incident irradiance, and thereby the incident power, on the cell is recorded as well as the power output by the cell. These two powers are compared for each filter, and the results are plotted as efficiency vs. wavelength providing an experimental check for theoretical calculations. This experiment can be performed on any photovoltaic material of interest to determine optimal material selection and placement under the dispersed sunlight for a solar module. The combination of the methods developed in this research and the optics described in the paper by Conte et. al. can be used to produce an inexpensive, high efficiency solar module.

  12. SA1 and RA afferent responses to static and vibrating gratings.

    PubMed

    Bensmaïa, S J; Craig, J C; Yoshioka, T; Johnson, K O

    2006-03-01

    SA1 and RA afferent fibers differ both in their ability to convey information about the fine spatial structure of tactile stimuli and in their frequency sensitivity profiles. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which the spatial resolution of the signal conveyed by SA1 and RA fibers depends on the temporal properties of the stimulus. To that end, we recorded the responses evoked in SA1 and RA fibers of macaques by static and vibrating gratings that varied in spatial period, vibratory frequency, and amplitude. Gratings were oriented either parallel to the long axis of the finger (vertical) or perpendicular to it (horizontal). We examined the degree to which afferent responses were dependent on the spatial period, vibratory frequency, amplitude, and orientation of the gratings. We found that the spatial modulation of the afferent responses increased as the spatial period of the gratings increased; the spatial modulation was the same for static and vibrating gratings, despite large differences in evoked spike rates; the spatial modulation in SA1 responses was independent of stimulus amplitude over the range of amplitudes tested, whereas RA modulation decreased slightly as the stimulus amplitude increased; vertical gratings evoked stronger and more highly modulated responses than horizontal gratings; the modulation in SA1 responses was higher than that in RA responses at all frequencies and amplitudes. The behavioral consequences of these neurophysiological findings are examined in a companion paper.

  13. Reactive oxygen species regulatory mechanisms associated with rapid response of MC3T3-E1 cells for vibration stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Gan, Xueqi; Zhu, Zhuoli; Yang, Yang; He, Yuting; Yu, Haiyang

    2016-02-12

    Although many previous studies have shown that refractory period-dependent memory effect of vibration stress is anabolic for skeletal homeostasis, little is known about the rapid response of osteoblasts simply derived from vibration itself. In view of the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating differentiated activity of osteoblasts, whether and how ROS regulates the rapid effect of vibration deserve to be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that MC3T3-E1 cells underwent decreased gene expression of Runx2, Col-I and ALP and impaired ALP activity accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission immediately after vibration loading. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of ERK-Drp1 signal transduction in ROS regulatory mechanisms responsible for the rapid effect of vibration stress.

  14. Dynamic characteristics of a cable-stayed bridge measured from traffic-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Chen, Chern-Hwa

    2012-09-01

    This paper studies the dynamic characteristics of the Kao-Ping-Hsi cable-stayed bridge under daily traffic conditions. Experimental data were measured from a structural monitoring system, and system-identification techniques, such as the random decrement (RD) technique and Ibrahim time-domain (ITD) method, were adopted. The first five modes of the bridge were identified for their natural frequencies and damping ratios under different traffic loading conditions, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) deck velocities. The magnitude of the torsion mode of the Kao-Ping-Hsi cable-stayed bridge is found to be one order-of-magnitude less than the transfer mode, and two orders-of-magnitude less than the vertical modes. Out results indicated that vibrations induced by traffic flow can be used as an indicator to monitor the health of the bridge due to their insensitivity to the natural frequencies of the cable-stayed bridge. Furthermore, the damping ratios may be used as a more sensitive indicator to describe the condition of the bridge.

  15. Universal response spectrum procedure for predicting walking-induced floor vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James; Racic, Vitomir; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Floor vibrations caused by people walking are an important serviceability problem both for human occupants and vibration-sensitive equipment. Present design methodologies available for prediction of vibration response due to footfall loading are complex and suffer from division between low and high frequency floors. In order to simplify the design process and to avoid the problem of floor classification, this paper presents a methodology for predicting vibration response metrics due to pedestrian footfalls for any floor type having natural frequency in the range 1-20 Hz. Using a response spectrum approach, a database of 852 weight-normalised vertical ground reaction force (GRF) time histories recorded for more than 60 individuals walking on an instrumented treadmill was used to calculate response metrics. Chosen metrics were peak values of 1 s peak root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration and peak envelope one-third octave velocities. These were evaluated by weight-normalising the GRFs and applying to unit-mass single degree of freedom oscillators having natural frequencies in the range 1-20 Hz and damping ratios in the range 0.5-5%. Moreover, to account for effect of mode shape and duration of crossing (i.e. duration of dynamic loading), the recorded GRFs were applied for three most typical mode shapes and floor spans from 5 m to 40 m. The resulting peak values as functions of frequency i.e. spectra are condensed to statistical representations for chosen probability of being exceeded over a wide range of applications. RMS (acceleration) spectra show strong peaks corresponding to the first harmonic of pacing rate followed by clear minima at approximately 3.5 Hz, a second much smaller peak corresponding to the second harmonic and a steady decline with increasing frequency beginning around 5 Hz. One-third octave spectra show asymptotic trends with frequency, span and damping. A comprehensive validation exercise focusing on the acceleration RMS spectra was based on a

  16. [The characteristics of the development of gallbladder and biliary tract pathology under the influence of vibration].

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskiĭ, V N; Merkulov, V M; Vasil'ev, A Iu; Ermakova, T I; Borisov, B P

    1995-01-01

    The examination of 86 helicopter pilots has shown that their exposure to vibration leads to biliary and gallbladder damage which aggravates with longer service. As indicated by spectroscopy and gas-liquid chromatography, vibration affects colloid-osmotic properties of bile: molecules grow in size, bile acids retention becomes longer.

  17. Nonlinear Vibration Characteristics of Fluid-Filled Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Wang, W. Q.; Zhang, L. X.

    Nonlinear vibration behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with fluid inside the inner tube are investigated based on Donnell's cylindrical shell model and the more refined van der Waals (vdW) interaction formula. The Galerkin method and harmonic balance method are used to study the issue. The results obtained show that the radial vibrational modes of simply supported DWCNTs have twice the dynamical mode transitions as the frequency increases. The transitions correspond to twice the noncoaxial vibrations which play a critical role in electronic and transport properties of CNTs. Moreover, comparisons of the dynamical behaviors of fluid-filled DWCNTs with different wave numbers, radii and aspect ratios demonstrate that the amplitude-frequency curve topological forms are identical. Meanwhile, it is also concluded that the existence of fluid is significant for the value of amplitude ratio corresponding to noncoaxial vibration whereas it does not change the nonlinear vibrating topological pattern of amplitude-frequency curves.

  18. Vibration and Operational Characteristics of a Composite-Steel (Hybrid) Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; DeLuca, Samuel; Pelagalli, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid gears have been tested consisting of metallic gear teeth and shafting connected by composite web. Both free vibration and dynamic operation tests were completed at the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Test Facility, comparing these hybrid gears to their steel counterparts. The free vibration tests indicated that the natural frequency of the hybrid gear was approximately 800 Hz lower than the steel test gear. The dynamic vibration tests were conducted at five different rotational speeds and three levels of torque in a four square test configuration. The hybrid gears were tested both as fabricated (machined, composite layup, then composite cure) and after regrinding the gear teeth to the required aerospace tolerance. The dynamic vibration tests indicated that the level of vibration for either type of gearing was sensitive to the level of load and rotational speed.

  19. Elastic response of the atomic nucleus in gauge space: Giant Pairing Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortignon, P. F.; Broglia, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Due to quantal fluctuations, the ground state of a closed shell system A0 can become virtually excited in a state made out of the ground state of the neighbour nucleus \\vert gs(A_0+2) rangle ( \\vert gs(A_0-2) rangle ) and of two uncorrelated holes (particles) below (above) the Fermi surface. These J^{π} = 0+ pairing vibrational states have been extensively studied with two-nucleon transfer reactions. Away from closed shells, these modes eventually condense, leading to nuclear superfluidity and thus to pairing rotational bands with excitation energies much smaller than hbarω0, the energy separation between major shells. Pairing vibrations are the plastic response of the nucleus in gauge space, in a similar way in which low-lying quadrupole vibrations, i.e. surface vibrations with energies much smaller than hbarω0 whose eventual condensation leads to quadrupole deformed nuclei, provide an example of the plastic nuclear response in 3D space. While much is known, in particular concerning its damping, regarding the counterpart of quadrupole plastic modes, i.e. regarding the giant quadrupole resonances (GQR), J^{π} = 2+ elastic response of the nucleus with energies of the order of hbarω0, little is known regarding this subject concerning pairing modes (giant pairing vibrations, GPV). Consequently, the recently reported observation of L = 0 resonances, populated in the reactions 12C(18O,16O)14C and 13C(18O,16O)15C and lying at an excitation energy of the order of hbarω0, likely constitutes the starting point of a new field of research, that of the study of the elastic response of nuclei in gauge space. Not only that, but also the fact that the GPV have likely been serendipitously observed in these light nuclei when it has failed to show up in more propitious nuclei like Pb, provides unexpected and fundamental insight into the relation existing between basic mechanisms -Landau, doorway, compound damping- through which giant resonances acquire a finite lifetime, let

  20. Analyses of biodynamic responses of seated occupants to uncorrelated fore-aft and vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandapuram, Santosh; Rakheja, Subhash; Marcotte, Pierre; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2011-08-01

    The apparent mass and seat-to-head-transmissibility response functions of the seated human body were investigated under exposures to fore-aft ( x), vertical ( z), and combined fore-aft and vertical ( x and z) axis whole-body vibration. The coupling effects of dual-axis vibration were investigated using two different frequency response function estimators based upon the cross- and auto-spectral densities of the response and excitation signals, denoted as H1 and Hv estimators, respectively. The experiments were performed to measure the biodynamic responses to single and uncorrelated dual-axis vibration, and to study the effects of hands support, back support and vibration magnitude on the body interactions with the seatpan and the backrest, characterized in terms of apparent masses and the vibration transmitted to the head. The data were acquired with 9 subjects exposed to two different magnitudes of vibration applied along the individual x- and z-axis (0.25 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms), and along both the axis (0.28 and 0.4 m/s 2 rms along each axis) in the 0.5-20 Hz frequency range. The two methods resulted in identical single-axis responses but considerably different dual-axis responses. The dual-axis responses derived from the Hv estimator revealed notable effects of dual-axis vibration, as they comprised both the direct and cross-axis responses observed under single axis vibration. Such effect, termed as the coupling effect, was not evident in the dual-axis responses derived using the commonly used H1 estimator. The results also revealed significant effects of hands and back support conditions on the coupling effects and the measured responses. The back support constrained the upper body movements and thus showed relatively weaker coupling compared to that observed in the responses without the back support. The effect of hand support was also pronounced under the fore-aft vibration. The results suggest that a better understanding of the seated human body responses to

  1. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    Nonlinear biodynamic responses are evident in many studies of the apparent masses of sitting and standing subjects in static postures that require muscle activity for postural control. In the present study, 12 male subjects adopted a relaxed semi-supine posture assumed to involve less muscle activity than during static sitting and standing. The supine subjects were exposed to two types of vertical vibration (in the x-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 m s -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 10.35 to 7.32 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 m s -2 rms. This nonlinear response was apparent in both the vertical ( x-axis) apparent mass and in the horizontal ( z-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. As the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 m s -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass with intermittent random vibration decreased from 9.28 to 8.06 Hz whereas, over the same range of magnitudes with continuous random vibration, the resonance frequency decreased from 9.62 to 7.81 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 m s -2 rms) was 1.37 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 1.71 with the continuous random vibration. With the intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration of the same magnitudes. The response was typical of thixotropy that may be a primary cause of the nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration.

  2. Experimental study on seismic responses of piping systems with friction. Part 1: Large-scale shaking table vibration test

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Watanabe, T.; Mitsumori, T.; Shimizu, N.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogawa, N.

    1995-08-01

    This report deals with the experimental study of seismic response behavior of piping systems in industrial facilities such as petrochemical, oil refinery, and nuclear plants. Special attention is focused on the nonlinear dynamic response of piping systems due to frictional vibration appearing in piping and supporting devices. A three-dimensional mock-up piping and supporting structure model wherein piping is of 30-m length and 200-mm diameter is excited by a large-scale (15 m x 15 m) shaking table belong to the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention in Tsukuba, Ibaraki. Power spectra of the response vibration and the loading-response relationship in the form of a hysteresis loop under several loading conditions are obtained. The response reduction effect caused by frictional vibration is evaluated and demonstrated in terms of response reduction factor.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the torsional vibration characteristics of boron-nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) has led to extensive studies on their exceptional properties. In this study, the torsional vibration behavior of boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is explored on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the torsional frequency is sensitive to geometrical parameters such as length and boundary conditions. The axial vibration is found to be induced by torsional vibration of nanotubes which can cause instability in the nanostructure. It is also observed that the torsional frequency of BNNTs is higher than that of their carbon counterpart. Moreover, the shear modulus is predicted by incorporating MD simulation numerical results into torsional vibration frequency obtained through continuum-based model of tubes. Finally, it is seen that the torsional frequency of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes (DWBNNTs) is between the frequencies of their constituent inner and outer tubes.

  4. Theoretical foundation, methods, and criteria for calibrating human vibration models using frequency response functions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    While simulations of the measured biodynamic responses of the whole human body or body segments to vibration are conventionally interpreted as summaries of biodynamic measurements, and the resulting models are considered quantitative, this study looked at these simulations from a different angle: model calibration. The specific aims of this study are to review and clarify the theoretical basis for model calibration, to help formulate the criteria for calibration validation, and to help appropriately select and apply calibration methods. In addition to established vibration theory, a novel theorem of mechanical vibration is also used to enhance the understanding of the mathematical and physical principles of the calibration. Based on this enhanced understanding, a set of criteria was proposed and used to systematically examine the calibration methods. Besides theoretical analyses, a numerical testing method is also used in the examination. This study identified the basic requirements for each calibration method to obtain a unique calibration solution. This study also confirmed that the solution becomes more robust if more than sufficient calibration references are provided. Practically, however, as more references are used, more inconsistencies can arise among the measured data for representing the biodynamic properties. To help account for the relative reliabilities of the references, a baseline weighting scheme is proposed. The analyses suggest that the best choice of calibration method depends on the modeling purpose, the model structure, and the availability and reliability of representative reference data. PMID:26740726

  5. Nonlinear dual-axis biodynamic response of the semi-supine human body during longitudinal horizontal whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    The resonance frequencies in frequency response functions of the human body (e.g. apparent mass and transmissibility) decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear biodynamic response is found with various sitting and standing postures requiring postural control. The present study measured the apparent mass of the body in a relaxed semi-supine posture with two types of longitudinal horizontal vibration (in the z-axis of the semi-supine body): (i) continuous random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) at five magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ms -2 rms); (ii) intermittent random excitation (0.25-20 Hz) alternately at 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms. With continuous random vibration, the dominant primary resonance frequency in the median normalised apparent mass decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 Hz as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. A nonlinear response was apparent in both the horizontal ( z-axis) apparent mass and the vertical ( x-axis) cross-axis apparent mass. With intermittent random vibration, as the vibration magnitude increased from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms, the median resonance frequency of the apparent mass decreased from 3.2 to 2.5 Hz whereas, with continuous random vibration over the same range of magnitudes, the resonance frequency decreased from 3.4 to 2.4 Hz. The median change in the resonance frequency (between 0.25 and 1.0 ms -2 rms) was 0.6 Hz with the intermittent random vibration and 0.9 Hz with the continuous random vibration. With intermittent vibration, the resonance frequency was higher at the high magnitude and lower at the low magnitude than with continuous vibration at the same magnitudes. The responses were consistent with passive thixotropy being a primary cause of nonlinear biodynamic responses to whole-body vibration, although reflex activity of the muscles may also have an influence.

  6. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  7. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  8. Temporal response of biological cells to high-frequency optical jumping and vibrating tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyao; Sheng, Yunlong

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed the temporal responses of biological cells in the jumping and vibrating optical tweezers for tugging, wiggling and stretching the cells with the finite element method. Some new concepts were established, which might be investigated in the future experiments, such as the jumping of local stress and local strain, independently on the recovery time of the viscoelastic material and on the jumping frequency, the energy dissipation in the hysteresis cycles, the cytoplasm fluid field and its interaction with the cell membrane. The cell was modeled with full 3D structure and viscoelastic continuum materials.

  9. Myoelectric Response of Back Muscles to Vertical Random Whole-Body Vibration with Different Magnitudes at Different Postures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BLÜTHNER, R.; SEIDEL, H.; HINZ, B.

    2002-05-01

    Back muscle forces contribute essentially to the whole-body vibration-induced spinal load. The electromyogram (EMG) can help to estimate these forces during whole-body vibration (WBV). Thirty-eight subjects were exposed to identical random low-frequency WBV (0·7, 1·0 and 1·4 m/s-2 r.m.s. weighted acceleration) at a relaxed, erect and bent forward postures. The acceleration of the seat and the force between the seat and the buttocks were measured. Six EMGs were derived from the right side of the m. trapezius pars descendens, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars thoracis, m. ileocostalis lumborum pars lumborum; m. longissimus thoracis pars thoracis, m. longissimus thoracis pars lumborum, and lumbar multifidus muscle. All data were filtered for anti-aliasing and sampled with 1000 Hz. Artefacts caused by the ECG in the EMG were identified and eliminated in the time domain using wavelets. The individually rectified and normalized EMGs were averaged across subjects. The EMGs without WBV exhibited characteristic patterns for the three postures examined. The coherence and transfer functions indicated characteristic myoelectric responses to random WBV with several effects of posture and WBV magnitude. A comprehensive set of transfer functions from the seat acceleration or the mean normalized input force to the mean processed EMG was presented.The results can be used for the development of more sophisticated models with a separate control of various back muscle groups. However, the EMG-force relationship under dynamic conditions needs to be examined in more detail before the results can be implemented. Since different reflex mechanisms depending on the frequency of WBV are linked with different types of active muscle fibres, various time delays between the EMG and muscle force may be necessary.

  10. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  11. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  12. Analytical and experimental comparisons of electromechanical vibration response of a piezoelectric bimorph beam for power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumentut, M. F.; Howard, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Power harvesters that extract energy from vibrating systems via piezoelectric transduction show strong potential for powering smart wireless sensor devices in applications of health condition monitoring of rotating machinery and structures. This paper presents an analytical method for modelling an electromechanical piezoelectric bimorph beam with tip mass under two input base transverse and longitudinal excitations. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equations were used to model the piezoelectric bimorph beam. The polarity-electric field of the piezoelectric element is excited by the strain field caused by base input excitation, resulting in electrical charge. The governing electromechanical dynamic equations were derived analytically using the weak form of the Hamiltonian principle to obtain the constitutive equations. Three constitutive electromechanical dynamic equations based on independent coefficients of virtual displacement vectors were formulated and then further modelled using the normalised Ritz eigenfunction series. The electromechanical formulations include both the series and parallel connections of the piezoelectric bimorph. The multi-mode frequency response functions (FRFs) under varying electrical load resistance were formulated using Laplace transformation for the multi-input mechanical vibrations to provide the multi-output dynamic displacement, velocity, voltage, current and power. The experimental and theoretical validations reduced for the single mode system were shown to provide reasonable predictions. The model results from polar base excitation for off-axis input motions were validated with experimental results showing the change to the electrical power frequency response amplitude as a function of excitation angle, with relevance for practical implementation.

  13. Phase coherence in vibration-induced responses of tactile fibres associated with Pacinian corpuscle receptors in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, J; Kavanagh, P; Rowe, M J

    1987-01-01

    1. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats, responses were recorded in peripheral nerves or cervical dorsal columns from sensory fibres associated with Pacinian corpuscle (P.c.) receptors in the forelimb footpads. Factors affecting the phase of response to cutaneous vibration in individual P.c. fibres, and the extent of phase coherence in the responses of different P.c. fibres were examined when sinusoidal vibratory stimuli at 100-400 Hz were delivered using a 1 mm diameter probe. 2. Increases in vibration amplitude from the absolute to the 1:1 threshold for the P.c. fibre led to phase advances in the response, often of about 60 deg, in over 85% of fibres tested at 200 and 300 Hz, but further increases had little effect. 3. Variations in stimulus position within the receptive field led to unpredictable changes in the response phase that ranged from minimal change to shifts of 180 deg. As the response phase was unrelated to the distance from the point of peak sensitivity it is likely that at high vibration frequencies (greater than or equal to 100 Hz) the recruited population of P.c. fibres will respond over the whole range of phase angles. 4. The calculated phase of spike initiation in different pairs of P.c. fibres that shared coincident points of best sensitivity on the skin ranged from near synchrony to maximum asynchrony indicating that there is little phase coherence even in the subpopulation of somatotopically related P.c. fibres recruited by high-frequency cutaneous vibration. 5. Paired recordings from P.c. fibres within the cervical dorsal columns revealed a broad range of phase discrepancies in the responses of P.c. fibres to vibration at 200 and 300 Hz. 6. Several hypotheses are considered to explain the known presence of phase-locked responses to high-frequency (greater than or equal to 100 Hz) vibration in the central neurones of dorsal column nuclei. PMID:3681709

  14. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  15. Energy Expenditure and Substrate Oxidation in Response to Side-Alternating Whole Body Vibration across Three Commonly-Used Vibration Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Elie-Jacques; Charrière, Nathalie; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim There is increasing recognition about the importance of enhancing energy expenditure (EE) for weight control through increases in low-intensity physical activities comparable with daily life (1.5–4 METS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) increases EE modestly and could present both a useful adjuvant for obesity management and tool for metabolic phenotyping. However, it is unclear whether a “dose-response” exists between commonly-used vibration frequencies (VF) and EE, nor if WBV influences respiratory quotient (RQ), and hence substrate oxidation. We aimed to investigate the EE-VF and RQ-VF relationships across three different frequencies (30, 40, and 50Hz). Methods EE and RQ were measured in 8 healthy young adults by indirect calorimetry at rest, and subsequently during side-alternating WBV at one of 3 VFs (30, 40, and 50 Hz). Each frequency was assessed over 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest), separated by 5 min seated rest. During the WBV participants stood on the platform with knees flexed sufficiently to maintain comfort, prevent transmission of vibration to the upper body, and minimise voluntary physical exertion. Repeatability was assessed across 3 separate days in a subset of 4 individuals. In order to assess any sequence/habituation effect, an additional group of 6 men underwent 5 cycles of intermittent WBV (30s vibration/30s rest) at 40 Hz, separated by 5 min seated rest. Results Side-alternating WBV increased EE relative to standing, non-vibration levels (+36%, p<0.001). However, no differences in EE were observed across VFs. Similarly, no effect of VF on RQ was found, nor did WBV alter RQ relative to standing without vibration. Conclusion No relationship could be demonstrated between EE and VF in the range of 30-50Hz, and substrate oxidation did not change in response to WBV. Furthermore, the thermogenic effect of intermittent WBV, whilst robust, was quantitatively small (<2 METS). PMID:26974147

  16. Frequency Response of the Sample Vibration Mode in Scanning Probe Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Qian; Qian, Meng-Lu

    2010-05-01

    Based on the interaction mechanism between tip and sample in the contact mode of a scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM), an active mass of the sample is introduced in the mass-spring model. The tip motion and frequency response of the sample vibration mode in the SPAM are calculated by the Lagrange equation with dissipation function. For the silicon tip and glass assemblage in the SPAM the frequency response is simulated and it is in agreement with the experimental result. The living myoblast cells on the glass slide are imaged at resonance frequencies of the SPAM system, which are 20kHz, 30kHz and 120kHz. It is shown that good contrast of SPAM images could be obtained when the system is operated at the resonance frequencies of the system in high and low-frequency regions.

  17. Theoretical study of the changes in the vibrational characteristics arising from the hydrogen bonding between Vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid) and H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Yordanka

    2006-02-01

    The vibrational characteristics (vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities) for the hydrogen-bonded system of Vitamin C ( L-ascorbic acid) with five water molecules have been predicted using ab initio SCF/6-31G(d, p) calculations and DFT (BLYP) calculations with 6-31G(d, p) and 6-31++G(d, p) basis sets. The changes in the vibrational characteristics from free monomers to a complex have been calculated. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show that the complexation between Vitamin C and five water molecules leads to large red shifts of the stretching vibrations for the monomer bonds involved in the hydrogen bonding and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The predicted frequency shifts for the stretching vibrations from Vitamin C taking part in the hydrogen bonding are up to -508 cm -1. The magnitude of the wavenumber shifts is indicative of relatively strong OH···H hydrogen-bonded interactions. In the same time the IR intensity and Raman activity of these vibrations increase upon complexation. The IR intensity increases dramatically (up to 12 times) and Raman activity increases up to three times. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show, that the symmetric OH vibrations of water molecules are more sensitive to the complexation. The hydrogen bonding leads to very large red shifts of these vibrations and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The asymmetric OH stretching vibrations of water, free from hydrogen bonding are less sensitive to the complexation than the hydrogen-bonded symmetric O sbnd H stretching vibrations. The increases of the IR intensities for these vibrations are lower and red shifts are negligible.

  18. Theoretical study of the changes in the vibrational characteristics arising from the hydrogen bonding between Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) and H2O.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Yordanka

    2006-02-01

    The vibrational characteristics (vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities) for the hydrogen-bonded system of Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) with five water molecules have been predicted using ab initio SCF/6-31G(d,p) calculations and DFT (BLYP) calculations with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The changes in the vibrational characteristics from free monomers to a complex have been calculated. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show that the complexation between Vitamin C and five water molecules leads to large red shifts of the stretching vibrations for the monomer bonds involved in the hydrogen bonding and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The predicted frequency shifts for the stretching vibrations from Vitamin C taking part in the hydrogen bonding are up to -508 cm(-1). The magnitude of the wavenumber shifts is indicative of relatively strong OH...H hydrogen-bonded interactions. In the same time the IR intensity and Raman activity of these vibrations increase upon complexation. The IR intensity increases dramatically (up to 12 times) and Raman activity increases up to three times. The ab initio and BLYP calculations show, that the symmetric OH vibrations of water molecules are more sensitive to the complexation. The hydrogen bonding leads to very large red shifts of these vibrations and very strong increase in their IR intensity. The asymmetric OH stretching vibrations of water, free from hydrogen bonding are less sensitive to the complexation than the hydrogen-bonded symmetric OH stretching vibrations. The increases of the IR intensities for these vibrations are lower and red shifts are negligible.

  19. Effect of experimentally reduced distal sensation on postural response to hip abductor/ankle evertor muscle vibration.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S; Collings, R; Paton, J; Marsden, J

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether postural responses induced by vibratory perturbations of the hip abductors and ankle evertors, were modified when distal tactile sensation was experimentally reduced through cooling. Sixteen healthy subjects were investigated pre and post cooling. Subjects stood with their eyes closed with a stance width of 4 cm. A 2s vibratory stimulus was applied to the left or right hip abductor or ankle evertor muscle. The order of the site and side of the stimulation was randomised. The postural response to hip abductor and ankle evertor vibration was recorded using 3D motion analysis (Codamotion, Leicestershire). Medio-lateral centre of pressure motion was simultaneously recorded during quiet standing via a force plate (Kistler, UK). Pre-cooling people responded to unilateral ankle vibration with an ipsilateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. People responded to unilateral hip vibration with a contralateral translation and tilt of the pelvis, and an ipsilateral tilt of the trunk. Following an experimental reduction in distal tactile sensation there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to ankle vibration (F(6.2)=P<0.05) and a significant increase in amplitude of pelvic tilt in response to hip vibration (F(5.2)=P<0.05). This suggests that the sensitivity to artificial stimulation of hip proprioception increases with distal cooling, possibly indicating a change in the gain/weighting placed upon sensory information from the hips.

  20. Method for vibration response simulation and sensor placement optimization of a machine tool spindle system with a bearing defect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response.

  1. Method for Vibration Response Simulation and Sensor Placement Optimization of a Machine Tool Spindle System with a Bearing Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response. PMID:23012514

  2. School Board Member Characteristics and Fiscal Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, William S.; Bernardo, Charles M.

    1967-01-01

    An attempt is made to judge characteristics affecting a school district's fiscal performance by conducting a factor analysis on 74 variables having factor loadings of .30 or greater. The 16 factors studied (containing the 74 variables) include many facets of school board fiscal policy and information on the kinds of people who make the policies.…

  3. Frequency weighting for vibration-induced white finger compatible with exposure-response models.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Pitts, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to derive a frequency weighting for the development of vibration-induced white finger (VWF). It employs a model to compare health risks for pairs of population groups that are selected to have similar health outcomes from operating power tools or machines with markedly different acceleration spectra (rock drills, chain saws, pavement breakers and motorcycles). The model defines the Relative Risk, RR(f(trial)), which is constructed from the ratio of daily exposures and includes a trial frequency weighting that is applied to the acceleration spectra. The trial frequency weighting consists of a frequency-independent primary frequency range, and subordinate frequency ranges in which the response to vibration diminishes, with cut-off frequencies that are changed to influence the magnitude of RR(f(trial)). The frequency weighting so derived when RR(f(trial)) = 1 is similar to those obtained by other methods (W(hf), W(hT)). It consists of a frequency independent range from about 25 Hz to 500 Hz (-3 dB frequencies), with an amplitude cut-off rate of 12 dB/octave below 25 Hz and above 500 Hz. The range is compatible with studies of vasoconstriction in persons with VWF. The results provide further evidence that the ISO frequency weighting may be inappropriate for assessing the risk of developing VWF.

  4. Vibrational response prediction of a pneumatic tyre using an orthotropic two-plate wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Mace, B. R.; Brennan, M. J.

    2003-07-01

    A wave model to predict the vibrational response of a pneumatic tyre subject to line force excitation is presented. The tread and sidewalls are each modelled as thin, flat orthotropic plates with in-plane tension, which are joined together by a translational stiffness, and to a rigid rim. The dynamic response of the tyre to harmonic excitation is decomposed into spatial harmonics around the circumference, and waves in the meridional direction. At low frequencies (<100 Hz), the response is stiffness-like, and is controlled by the sidewall properties and tension effects resulting from the tyre pressure. In the mid-frequency range (100-500 Hz), a resonant response is observed, associated with modes both across and around the tyre. At high frequencies (>500 Hz), the response tends towards that of an infinite orthotropic plate. Experiments have been conducted on an inflated tyre fitted to a wheel rim to confirm the theoretical findings. The results show reasonable agreement with the predictions, the model accurately reflecting the phenomenological behaviour.

  5. DFT study of conformational and vibrational characteristics of 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Urmila; Srivastava, Mayuri; Singh, R. P.; Yadav, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    The conformational and IR and Raman spectral studies of 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole have been carried out by using the DFT method at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The detailed vibrational assignments have been done on the basis of calculated potential energy distributions. Comparative studies of molecular geometries, atomic charges and vibrational fundamentals of all the conformers have been made. There are four possible conformers for this molecule. The optimized geometrical parameters obtained by B3LYP/6-311++G** method showed good agreement with the experimental X-ray data. The atomic polar tensor (APT) charges, Mulliken atomic charges, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of HBT and its conformers were also computed.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contract all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimental quantities.

  7. Dynamic characteristics of heat exchanger tubes vibrating in a tube support plate inactive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tubes in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including nuclear plant steam generators, derive their support from longitudinally positioned tube support plates (TSPs). Typically there is a clearance between the tube and TSP hole. Depending on design and fabrication tolerances, the tube may or may not contact all of the TSPs. Noncontact results in an inactive TSP which can lead to detrimental flow induced tube vibrations under certain conditions dependent on the resulting tube-TSP interaction dynamics and the fluid excitation forces. The purpose of this study is to investigate the tube-TSP interaction dynamics. Results of an experimental study of damping and natural frequency as functions of tube-TSP diametral clearance and TSP thickness are reported. Calculated values of damping ratio and frequency of a tube vibrating within an inactive TSP are also presented together with a comparison of calculated and experimetnal quantities.

  8. Effects of tension on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) responses of a long tensioned cylinder in uniform flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ling; Ge, Fei; Wu, Xiaodong; Hong, Youshi

    2017-02-01

    The effects of tension on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) responses for a tension-dominated long cylinder with an aspect ratio of 550 in uniform flows are experimentally investigated in this paper. The results show that elevated tension suppresses fluctuations of maximum displacement with respect to flow velocity and makes chaotic VIV more likely to appear. With respect to periodic VIV, if elevated tension is applied, the dominant vibration frequency in the in-line (IL) direction will switch from a fundamental vibration frequency to twice the value of the fundamental vibration frequency, which results in a ratio of the dominant vibration frequency in the IL direction to that in the cross-flow direction of 2.0. The suppression of the elevated tension in the fluctuation of the maximum displacement causes the axial tension to become an active control parameter for the VIV maximum displacement of a tension-dominated long riser or tether of an engineering structure in deep oceans. However, the axial tension must be optimized before being used since the high dominant vibration frequency due to the elevated tension may unfavorably affect the fatigue life of the riser or tether.

  9. Separating Fluid Shear Stress from Acceleration during Vibrations in Vitro: Identification of Mechanical Signals Modulating the Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Manske, Sarah L; Chan, M Ete; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Rubin, Clinton T; Frame, Mary D; Judex, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the physical mechanism(s) by which cells can sense vibrations requires the determination of the cellular mechanical environment. Here, we quantified vibration-induced fluid shear stresses in vitro and tested whether this system allows for the separation of two mechanical parameters previously proposed to drive the cellular response to vibration – fluid shear and peak accelerations. When peak accelerations of the oscillatory horizontal motions were set at 1g and 60Hz, peak fluid shear stresses acting on the cell layer reached 0.5Pa. A 3.5-fold increase in fluid viscosity increased peak fluid shear stresses 2.6-fold while doubling fluid volume in the well caused a 2-fold decrease in fluid shear. Fluid shear was positively related to peak acceleration magnitude and inversely related to vibration frequency. These data demonstrated that peak shear stress can be effectively separated from peak acceleration by controlling specific levels of vibration frequency, acceleration, and/or fluid viscosity. As an example for exploiting these relations, we tested the relevance of shear stress in promoting COX-2 expression in osteoblast like cells. Across different vibration frequencies and fluid viscosities, neither the level of generated fluid shear nor the frequency of the signal were able to consistently account for differences in the relative increase in COX-2 expression between groups, emphasizing that the eventual identification of the physical mechanism(s) requires a detailed quantification of the cellular mechanical environment. PMID:23074384

  10. Parametric reduced order models for predicting the nonlinear vibration response of cracked structures with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Kwon; Castanier, Matthew P.; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2009-03-01

    Modeling and re-analysis techniques are proposed for predicting the dynamic response of complex structures that have suffered damage in one or more of their components. When such damages are present, the model of the healthy structure may no longer capture the system-level response or the loading from the rest of the structure on the damaged components. Hence, novel models that allow for an accurate re-analysis of the response of damaged structures are needed in important applications, including damage detection. Herein, such models are obtained by using a reduced order modeling approach based on component mode synthesis. Because the resonant response of a complex structure is often sensitive to component uncertainties (in geometric parameters such as thickness, material properties such as Young's modulus, etc.), novel parametric reduced order models (PROMs) are developed. In previous work, PROMs have been applied for handling uncertainties in a single substructure. Herein, PROMs are extended to the general case of multiple substructures with uncertain parameters or damage. Two damage cases are considered: severe structural deformation (dents), and cracks. For the first damage case, an approximate method based on static mode compensation (SMC) is used to perform fast re-analysis of the vibration response of the damaged structure. The re-analysis is performed through a range of locations and severity levels of the damage. For selected damage locations and levels, the SMC approximation is compared to full finite element analysis to demonstrate the accuracy and computational time savings for the new method. For the second damage case (cracks), the vibration problem becomes nonlinear due to the intermittent contact of the crack faces. Therefore, to estimate the resonant frequencies for a cracked structure, the bi-linear frequency approximation (BFA) is used for cracks of various lengths. Since BFA is based on linear analyses, it is fast and particularly well suited for

  11. A hybrid analytical model for the transverse vibration response of a micro-end mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, K. B.; Zhong, Z. W.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of its detrimental effect on tool life and product quality, vibration analyses are crucial if the full potential of micro-milling operation is to be attained. In this paper, a hybrid analytical model (HAM) developed for estimating the transverse response of a micro-end mill is presented. The HAM is a combination of discrete and distributed structural elements. The discrete elements account for the stiffness and damping coefficients of the machining system, while the distributed elements idealize the geometrical representation of the micro-end mill with a novel model of the micro-flute. A number of slot micro-end milling operations, carefully designed with the Taguchi method of design of experiments, are carried out to examine the accuracy of the HAM. The comparison of the response profile from the experiment and the developed model shows reasonably close similarity. The influence of the helix angle is found to be far greater on the response of the micro-end mill than the other geometric variables. By making use of the root mean square of the response, it is further observed that the representation of the micro-flute of the micro-end mill with a less accurate model deteriorates the prediction of the HAM.

  12. Modal identification using the frequency-scale domain decomposition technique of ambient vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thien-Phu; Argoul, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a new modal identification method of ambient vibration responses. The application of the singular value decomposition to continuous wavelet transform of power spectral density matrix gives singular values and singular vectors in frequency-scale domain. Analytical development shows a direct relation between local maxima in frequency-scale representation of singular values and modal parameters. This relation is then carried on for the identification of modal parameters via a complete practical procedure. The main novelties of this work involve the new formulation in frequency-scale domain and the capacity for the identification of modal parameters without the step of ridges extraction in comparison with previous wavelet-based modal identification methods.

  13. The response of a plate bonded to a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The response of an infinite Bernoulli-Euler plate placed on the surface of a randomly vibrating viscoelastic half-space is calculated, allowing for the presence of shear stresses between the plate and the half-space. The shear stresses arise from the condition that the relative motion between the plate and the half-space vanishes at the interface. The three components of displacement of the free surface of the half-space before the plate is added are assumed to be stationary homogeneous random functions of position and time. From the wavenumber-frequency spectra of these displacements the frequency spectra of the three components of displacement of the plate half-space interface are calculated. As an example, the frequency spectrum of the vertical interface displacement is calculated for two assumed forms of the wavenumber spectra of the free-surface displacements.

  14. Study of seismic response and vibration control of High voltage electrical equipment damper based on TMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuncheng; Wang, Chongyang; Mao, Long; Zha, Chuanming

    2016-11-01

    Substation high voltage electrical equipment such as mutual inductor, circuit interrupter, disconnecting switch, etc., has played a key role in maintaining the normal operation of the power system. When the earthquake disaster, the electrical equipment of the porcelain in the transformer substation is the most easily to damage, causing great economic losses. In this paper, using the method of numerical analysis, the establishment of a typical high voltage electrical equipment of three dimensional finite element model, to study the seismic response of a typical SF6 circuit breaker, at the same time, analysis and contrast the installation ring tuned mass damper (TMD damper for short), by changing the damper damping coefficient and the mass block, install annular TMD vibration control effect is studied. The results of the study for guiding the seismic design of high voltage electrical equipment to provide valuable reference.

  15. Biodynamic response of the seated human body to single-axis and dual-axis vibration: effect of backrest and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The biodynamic responses to the human body give an understanding of why human responses to vibration (changes in health, comfort, and performance) vary with the frequency and direction of vibration. Studies have shown that biodynamic responses also vary with the magnitude of vibration and that the backrests of seats influence the transmission of vibration to the seated human body. There has been little study of the nonlinearity in the biodynamic responses of the body to dual-axis excitation and no study of the influence of backrests during dual-axis excitation. This study investigated the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of the human body exposed to random vibration (0.2 to 20 Hz) in all 15 possible combinations of four magnitudes (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.) of fore-and-aft vibration and the same four magnitudes of vertical vibration. Nonlinearity was evident, with the body softening with increasing magnitude of vibration when using a fixed magnitude of vibration in one direction and varying the magnitude of vibration in the other direction. The fore-and-aft apparent mass on the seat was greater without a backrest at the lower frequencies but greater with a backrest at the higher frequencies. The vertical apparent mass on the seat was decreased by the backrest at low frequencies. Cross-axis coupling was evident, with excitation in one axis producing a response in the other axis. It is concluded that the nonlinearity of the body evident during single-axis and multi-axis vibration, and the influence of backrests, should be taken into account when determining frequency weightings for predicting human responses to vibration and when optimising the dynamics of seating to minimise exposure to vibration.

  16. A comparison of energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of protonated and sodiated high mannose N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  17. A Comparison of Energy-Resolved Vibrational Activation/Dissociation Characteristics of Protonated and Sodiated High Mannose N-Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D.

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  18. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  19. Analysis of lateral and torsional vibration characteristics of beams and shafts with end located rotational masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Partial differential equations are derived for free lateral and torsional vibration of a uniform free-free beam with a rotational mass attached to each extremity. For appropriate boundary conditions, nonlinear algebraic equations are obtained using a symbolic manipulation computer program, the solutions of which enable the computation of the neutral frequencies and mode-shapes. The mode-shapes are linear combinations of trigonometric and hyperbolic sine and cosine functions. A computer program is written for the numerical solution of the algebraic equations mentioned above, which can compute the natural frequencies, mode-shapes, and node points for any given set of parameters, for any given number of modes.

  20. Calibration characteristics of IRAD GAGE vibrating wire stressmeter at normal and high temperature. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P. K.; Hatfield, R. W.; Runstadler, Jr., P. W.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes calibration studies of the IRAD GAGE Vibrating Wire Stressmeter. The work has been performed for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, to understand and interpret the behavior and performance of the stressmeter in Climax granite. To help interpret the results obtained in Climax granite, the study also included calibration tests of the gage in other materials: Barre granite, aluminum, and Lucite. Stressmeter calibrations were carried out in thin rock slabs by determining the relation between the stressmeter readings and uniaxial plane stresses. Calibrations were also conducted under biaxial and triaxial stress fields.

  1. Effect of Phase on Human Responses to Vertical Whole-Body Vibration and SHOCK—ANALYTICAL Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MATSUMOTO, Y.; GRIFFIN, M. J.

    2002-03-01

    The effect of the “phase” on human responses to vertical whole-body vibration and shock has been investigated analytically using alternative methods of predicting subjective responses (using r.m.s., VDV and various frequency weightings). Two types of phase have been investigated: the effect of the relative phase between two frequency components in the input stimulus, and the phase response of the human body. Continuous vibrations and shocks, based on half-sine and one-and-a-half-sine accelerations, each of which had two frequency components, were used as input stimuli. For the continuous vibrations, an effect of relative phase was found for the vibration dose value (VDV) when the ratio between two frequency components was three: about 12% variation in the VDV of the unweighted acceleration was possible by changing the relative phase. The effect of the phase response of the body represented by frequency weightings was most significant when the frequencies of two sinusoidal components were about 3 and 9 Hz. With shocks, the effect of relative phase was observed for all stimuli used. The variation in the r.m.s. acceleration and in the VDV caused by variations in the relative phase varied between 3 and 100%, depending on the nature of stimulus and the frequency weighting. The phase of the frequency weightings had a different effect on the r.m.s. and the VDV.

  2. Crack identification through scan-tuning of vibration characteristics using piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shengjie; Wu, Nan; Wang, Quan

    2017-02-01

    This research develops a frequency-based methodology with a scan vibration tuning process for crack identification in beam-type structures coupled with piezoelectric materials. Piezoelectric sensor and actuator patches are mounted on the surface of the host beam synchronously to generate feedback excitations for a tuning process by applying a feedback voltage output from the piezoelectric sensors. The feedback excitations can adjust the stiffness at local section of the beam covered by piezoelectric patches so as to tune its natural vibration mode shapes to amplify the natural frequency change due to the existence of the crack. Piezoelectric patches located at different positions of the beam are activated one by one to realize the scan-tuning process. The crack is identified since the natural frequency change is magnified by the piezoelectric sensor and actuator located at the crack position. Theoretical and finite element models of the scan-tuned beam structures coupled with piezoelectric materials are established. From simulation results, the crack existence and location can be effectively detected through the scan-tuning process with 25% natural frequency change due to a crack located at the middle of the beam. Further parameter studies are conducted to study the effects of the crack location and size on the detection sensitivity.

  3. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  4. Vibration Response of an Elastically Point-Supported Plate With Attached Masses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-02

    studied the vibration of a simply supported rectangular plate carrying a concentrated mass and presents a closed-form solution for the frequencies and...used in the analysis. Lee and Lee [4] incorporated a new class of admissible functions to study the vibration of elasticallyn elastically point...Rayleigh–Ritz method to study the vibration of point-supported plates with a combination of simply supported and clamped-edge conditions. The orthronormal

  5. An on-road shock and vibration response test series utilizing worst case and statistical analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1997-11-01

    Defining the maximum expected shock and vibration responses for an on-road truck transportation environment is strongly dependent on the amount of response data that can be obtained. One common test scheme consists of measuring response data over a relatively short prescribed road course and then reviewing that data to obtain the maximum response levels. The more mathematically rigorous alternative is to collect an unbiased ensemble of response data during a long road trip. This paper compares data gathered both ways during a recent on-road certification test for a tractor trailer van being designed by Sandia.

  6. Travelling wave and non-stationary response in nonlinear vibrations of water-filled circular cylindrical shells: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Marco; Balasubramanian, Prabakaran; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear vibrations of a water-filled circular cylindrical shell subjected to radial harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest resonances are investigated experimentally and numerically by using a seamless aluminium sample. The experimental boundary conditions are close to simply supported edges. The presence of exact one-to-one internal resonance, giving rise to a travelling wave response around the shell circumference and non-stationary vibrations, is experimentally observed and the nonlinear response is numerically reproduced. The travelling wave is measured by means of state-of-the-art laser Doppler vibrometers applied to multiple points on the structure simultaneously. Chaos is detected in the frequency region where the travelling wave response is present. The reduced-order model is based on the Novozhilov nonlinear shell theory retaining in-plane inertia and the nonlinear equations of motion are numerically studied (i) by using a code based on arclength continuation method that allows bifurcation analysis in case of stationary vibrations, (ii) by a continuation code based on direct integration and Poincaré maps that evaluates also the maximum Lyapunov exponent in case of non-stationary vibrations. The comparison of experimental and numerical results is particularly satisfactory.

  7. Using frequency response functions to manage image degradation from equipment vibration in the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, William R.; McBride, Daniel R.

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, providing a significant increase in the resolution of solar data available to the scientific community. Vibration mitigation is critical in long focal-length telescopes such as the Inouye Solar Telescope, especially when adaptive optics are employed to correct for atmospheric seeing. For this reason, a vibration error budget has been implemented. Initially, the FRFs for the various mounting points of ancillary equipment were estimated using the finite element analysis (FEA) of the telescope structures. FEA analysis is well documented and understood; the focus of this paper is on the methods involved in estimating a set of experimental (measured) transfer functions of the as-built telescope structure for the purpose of vibration management. Techniques to measure low-frequency single-input-single-output (SISO) frequency response functions (FRF) between vibration source locations and image motion on the focal plane are described. The measurement equipment includes an instrumented inertial-mass shaker capable of operation down to 4 Hz along with seismic accelerometers. The measurement of vibration at frequencies below 10 Hz with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires several noise reduction techniques including high-performance windows, noise-averaging, tracking filters, and spectral estimation. These signal-processing techniques are described in detail.

  8. Radar Interferometry for Monitoring the Vibration Characteristics of Buildings and Civil Structures: Recent Case Studies in Spain.

    PubMed

    Luzi, Guido; Crosetto, Michele; Fernández, Enric

    2017-03-24

    The potential of a coherent microwave sensor to monitor the vibration characteristics of civil structures has been investigated in the past decade, and successful case studies have been published by different research teams. This remote sensing technique is based on the interferometric processing of real aperture radar acquisitions. Its capability to estimate, simultaneously and remotely, the displacement of different parts of the investigated structures, with high accuracy and repeatability, is its main advantage with respect to conventional sensors. A considerable amount of literature on this technique is available, including various case studies aimed at testing the ambient vibration of bridges, buildings, and towers. In the last years, this technique has been used in Spain for civil structures monitoring. In this paper, three examples of such case studies are described: the monitoring of the suspended bridge crossing the Ebro River at Amposta, the communications tower of Collserola in Barcelona, and an urban building located in Vilafranca del Penedès, a small town close to Barcelona. This paper summarizes the main outcomes of these case studies, underlining the advantages and limitations of the sensors currently available, and concluding with the possible improvements expected from the next generation of sensors.

  9. Optical fiber grating vibration sensor for vibration monitoring of hydraulic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Liu, Chuntong; Li, Hongcai; He, Zhenxin; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    In view of the existing electrical vibration monitoring traditional hydraulic pump vibration sensor, the high false alarm rate is susceptible to electromagnetic interference and is not easy to achieve long-term reliable monitoring, based on the design of a beam of the uniform strength structure of the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibration sensor. In this paper, based on the analysis of the vibration theory of the equal strength beam, the principle of FBG vibration tuning based on the equal intensity beam is derived. According to the practical application of the project, the structural dimensions of the equal strength beam are determined, and the optimization design of the vibrator is carried out. The finite element analysis of the sensor is carried out by ANSYS, and the first order resonant frequency is 94.739 Hz. The vibration test of the sensor is carried out by using the vibration frequency of 35 Hz and the vibration source of 50 Hz. The time domain and frequency domain analysis results of test data show that the sensor has good dynamic response characteristics, which can realize the accurate monitoring of the vibration frequency and meet the special requirements of vibration monitoring of hydraulic pump under specific environment.

  10. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta(2) = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key

  11. Professional Soccer Player Neuromuscular Responses and Perceptions to Acute Whole Body Vibration Differ from Amateur Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Cloak, Ross; Lane, Andrew; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Acute whole body vibration (WBV) is an increasingly popular training technique amongst athletes immediately prior to performance and during scheduled breaks in play. Despite its growing popularity, evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness on acute neuromuscular responses is unclear, and suggestions that athlete ability impacts effectiveness warrant further investigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the neuromuscular effects of acute WBV and perceptions of whether WBV is an effective intervention between amateur and professional soccer players. Participants were 44 male soccer players (22 professional and 22 amateur; age: 23.1 ± 3.7 years, body mass: 75.6 ± 8.8 kg and height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m). Participants in each group were randomly assigned to either an intervention of 3 x 60 s of WBV at 40 Hz (8mm peak-to-peak displacement) or control group. Peak knee isometric force, muscle activation and post activation potentiation (PAP) of the knee extensors along with self-report questionnaire of the perceived benefits of using the intervention were collected. A three-way ANOVA with repeated measures revealed professional players demonstrated a significant 10.6% increase (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.22) in peak knee isometric force following acute WBV with no significant differences among amateur players. A significant difference (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.16) in PAP amongst professional players following acute WBVT was also reported. No significant differences amongst amateur players were reported across measurements. Results also indicated professional players reported significantly stronger positive beliefs in the effectiveness of the WBV intervention (p < 0.01, Partial Eta2 = 0.27) compared to amateur players. Acute WBV elicited a positive neuromuscular response amongst professional players identified by PAP and improvements in knee isometric peak force as well as perceived benefits of the intervention, benefits not found among amateur players. Key points

  12. Free-vibration characteristics of a large split-blanket solar array in a 1-g field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods for studying the free vibration characteristics of a large split blanket solar array in both a 0-g and a 1-g cantilevered configuration are presented. The 0-g configuration corresponds to an in-orbit configuration of the array; the 1-g configuration is a typical ground test configuration. The first method applies the equations of continuum mechanics to determine the mode shapes and frequencies of the array; the second method uses the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. In the Rayleigh-Ritz method the array displacements are represented by string modes and cantilevered beam modes. The results of this investigation are summarized by a series of graphs illustrating the effects of various array parameters on the mode shapes and frequencies of the system. The results of the two methods are also compared in tabular form.

  13. A density functional theory-based finite element method to study the vibrational characteristics of zigzag phosphorene nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnazari, A.; Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the vibrational characteristics of zigzag phosphorene nanotubes are investigated by using a three-dimensional finite element model. The beam elements are used to simulate the P-P bonds in the structure of the phosphorene nanotubes. The elastic properties of the beam elements are computed from the similarity of energy terms in the molecular and structural mechanics. Besides, mass elements are located at the place of the atoms. Considering the zigzag phosphorene nanotubes with different diameters, it is shown that the effect of the diameter on the first natural frequencies of the nanotubes can be neglected. However, this effect increases for higher modes. Besides, at the same diameter, the zigzag phosphorene nanotubes with larger aspect ratios (length/diameter) have smaller frequencies.

  14. Spectral Characteristics of CN Radical (B → X) and Its Application in Determination of Rotational and Vibrational Temperatures of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhi-Min; Ding, Yan-Jun; Zhai, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Qian-Suo; Jiang, Zong-Lin

    2011-04-01

    The aim is to resolve the difficulties of measurement of temperature at several thousands of Celsius degrees for some unstable non-equilibrium gas flows. Based on the molecular spectroscopy theory and inherent molecular structure characteristics of the CN radical, the dependence of the spectral profile on the rotational temperature (RT), vibrational temperature (VT) and optical apparatus function are numerically explored within some certain ranges. Meanwhile, by comparing the numerically calculated spectra with the experimental spectra of the CN radical, the corresponding RT and VT of the plasma induced by the interaction of the laser pulse from an oscillated Nd:YAG laser with the coal target are determined, respectively. In addition, a short discussion on the thermodynamic state and the energy transfer process of the CN radical is also given.

  15. Probabilistic analysis of mean-response along-wind induced vibrations on wind turbine towers using wireless network data sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Antonio; Swartz, Raymond A.

    2011-04-01

    Wind turbine systems are attracting considerable attention due to concerns regarding global energy consumption as well as sustainability. Advances in wind turbine technology promote the tendency to improve efficiency in the structure that support and produce this renewable power source, tending toward more slender and larger towers, larger gear boxes, and larger, lighter blades. The structural design optimization process must account for uncertainties and nonlinear effects (such as wind-induced vibrations, unmeasured disturbances, and material and geometric variabilities). In this study, a probabilistic monitoring approach is developed that measures the response of the turbine tower to stochastic loading, estimates peak demand, and structural resistance (in terms of serviceability). The proposed monitoring system can provide a real-time estimate of the probability of exceedance of design serviceability conditions based on data collected in-situ. Special attention is paid to wind and aerodynamic characteristics that are intrinsically present (although sometimes neglected in health monitoring analysis) and derived from observations or experiments. In particular, little attention has been devoted to buffeting, usually non-catastrophic but directly impacting the serviceability of the operating wind turbine. As a result, modal-based analysis methods for the study and derivation of flutter instability, and buffeting response, have been successfully applied to the assessment of the susceptibility of high-rise slender structures, including wind turbine towers. A detailed finite element model has been developed to generate data (calibrated to published experimental and analytical results). Risk assessment is performed for the effects of along wind forces in a framework of quantitative risk analysis. Both structural resistance and wind load demands were considered probabilistic with the latter assessed by dynamic analyses.

  16. Effects of an elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of an ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Woo Seok; No, Kwangsoo

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an optimized method to improve the sound quality of ultra-thin piezoelectric micro-acoustic actuators. To achieve flat and smooth frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuators, we have proposed an elastic mass attached to the acoustic diaphragm. The effects of the elastic mass on frequency response characteristics of the piezoelectric acoustic actuator were investigated by finite element analysis simulation and laser scanning vibrometer measurement. Based on the modal and vibrational characteristics, it was found that the fabricated piezoelectric acoustic actuator has a significant dip of 1.32 kHz and peak of 2.24 kHz, which correspond respectively to the (1,3) and (3,1) resonant modes of the acoustic diaphragm. However, by attaching an elastic mass to the acoustic diaphragm with a shape similar to the (3,1) mode, the resonant frequencies corresponding to the (1,3) and (3,1) modes shifted to higher frequencies and the vibrational displacements at each mode were dramatically reduced by about 40%. As a result, the dip at (1,3) mode was greatly improved by 13 dB and total harmonic distortion was dramatically reduced from 80.83% to 8.71%. This paper shows that the optimized elastic mass can allow flat and smooth frequency response characteristics by improving the significant peak and dip.

  17. Vibration suppression of structures with densely spaced modes using maximally robust minimum delay digital finite impulse response filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glossiotis, G. N.; Antoniadis, I. A.

    2007-03-01

    Due to the inherent flexibility of engineering structures, transient and residual vibrations occur when a motion command is applied, thus raising several practical restrictions concerning their fast, accurate and safe motion. Although various command-preconditioning techniques have been proposed for the effective suppression of the excited vibrations, their application has been limited only to structures with a few distinct and well-separated modes. This paper further considers the applicability of motion preconditioning methods for a large class of lightweight flexible structures, which present multiple densely spaced natural modes, existing even at relatively low frequencies. Properly designed finite impulse response (FIR) filters can lead to an effective motion preconditioning method, suppressing drastically the excited vibrations over the entire excited frequency band. Compared to other alternative preconditioning methods, such as input shapers or infinite impulse response (IIR) filters, FIR filters present the most efficient behavior in terms of vibration suppression efficiency, or in terms of the delay introduced in the motion command, as verified by numerical simulations and experimental results involving multibay trusses, with tenths of densely spaced modes in a range from 0.4 Hz up to 75 Hz.

  18. Effect of size polydispersity on the structural and vibrational characteristics of two-dimensional granular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Hua; Sun, Qi-Cheng; Shi, Zhi-Ping; Feng, Xu; Gu, Qiang; Jin, Feng

    2014-07-01

    Two-dimensional disordered granular assemblies composed of 2048 polydispersed frictionless disks are simulated using the discrete element method. The height of the first peak of the pair correlation function, g1, the local and global bond orientational parameters ψ6l and ψ6g, and the fluctuations of these parameters decrease with increasing polydispersity s, implying the transition from a polycrystalline state to an amorphous state in the system. As s increases, the peak position of the boson peak ωBP shifts towards a lower frequency and the intensity of the boson peak D(ωBP)/ωBP increases, indicating that the position and the strength of the boson peak are controlled by the polydispersity of the system. Moreover, the inverse of the boson peak intensity ωBP/D(ωBP), the shear modulus G, and the basin curvature SIS all have a similar dependence on s, implying that the s dependence of the vibrational density of states at low frequencies likely originates from the s dependence of the basin curvature.

  19. Study of passenger subjective response to ideal and real-vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, R. H.; Mikulka, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stimulus received by subjects tested on the passenger ride quality apparatus (PRQA) is defined. Additional analyses on the data collected from field tests using buses, were conducted to assess the relation between subjective ratings of ride quality and vibrations measured on the buses, and to better define the vibration stimulus measured in the field. The relation of subjective evaluation of simulations of bus rides produced by the DRQA to subjective evaluations of the actual bus rides is discussed. The relative contribution of the seat and floor vibration to human comfort in a simulated aircraft ride environment is discussed along with the determination of equal comfort curves through magnitude estimation.

  20. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  1. Density response of a trapped Fermi gas: A crossover from the pair vibration mode to the Goldstone mode

    SciTech Connect

    Korolyuk, A.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.

    2011-09-15

    We consider the density response of a trapped two-component Fermi gas. Combining the Bogoliubov-deGennes method with the random phase approximation allows the study of both collective and single-particle excitations. Calculating the density response across a wide range of interactions, we observe a crossover from a weakly interacting pair vibration mode to a strongly interacting Goldstone mode. The crossover is associated with a depressed collective mode frequency and an increased damping rate, in agreement with density response experiments performed in strongly interacting atomic gases.

  2. A coatable, light-weight, fast-response nanocomposite sensor for the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance: from structural vibration to ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Xu, Hao; Liu, Weijian; Liao, Yaozhong; Jin, Hao; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by an innovative sensing philosophy, a light-weight nanocomposite sensor made of a hybrid of carbon black (CB)/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has been developed. The nanoscalar architecture and percolation characteristics of the hybrid were optimized in order to fulfil the in situ acquisition of dynamic elastic disturbance from low-frequency vibration to high-frequency ultrasonic waves. Dynamic particulate motion induced by elastic disturbance modulates the infrastructure of the CB conductive network in the sensor, with the introduction of the tunneling effect, leading to dynamic alteration in the piezoresistivity measured by the sensor. Electrical analysis, morphological characterization, and static/dynamic electromechanical response interrogation were implemented to advance our insight into the sensing mechanism of the sensor, and meanwhile facilitate understanding of the optimal percolation threshold. At the optimal threshold (˜6.5 wt%), the sensor exhibits high fidelity, a fast response, and high sensitivity to ultrafast elastic disturbance (in an ultrasonic regime up to 400 kHz), yet with an ultralow magnitude (on the order of micrometers). The performance of the sensor was evaluated against a conventional strain gauge and piezoelectric transducer, showing excellent coincidence, yet a much greater gauge factor and frequency-independent piezoresistive behavior. Coatable on a structure and deployable in a large quantity to form a dense sensor network, this nanocomposite sensor has blazed a trail for implementing in situ sensing for vibration- or ultrasonic-wave-based structural health monitoring, by striking a compromise between ‘sensing cost’ and ‘sensing effectiveness’.

  3. The effect of ultrasonic vibration on the compaction characteristics of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Levina, Marina; Rubinstein, Michael H

    2002-05-01

    An ultrasonic (US) compaction rig has been developed, capable of providing compaction pressure together with high-power ultrasonic vibrations of 20 kHz to a powder or granular material in a die. The rig has been used to investigate the effect of ultrasound on the compaction properties of ibuprofen, a drug with poor compaction properties which produces tablets that are weak and frequently exhibit capping. It was found that coherent ibuprofen tablets could be prepared by ultrasound-assisted compaction at pressures as low as 20-30 MPa. Application of ultrasound before and after compaction was found not to be as effective as ultrasound applied during compaction. The breaking forces of the tablets produced with ultrasound applied during compaction were found to be consistently significantly higher than when compaction was performed conventionally, or with ultrasound applied before or after compaction. Application of ultrasound during compaction made it possible to increase tablet mechanical strength, typically by a factor of 2-5. It was concluded that pressure should be applied together with ultrasound in order to achieve a better acoustical contact, which is required to transmit vibrations from the horn to the material, and also to bond the surfaces of the particles. Ultrasound application during ibuprofen compaction also resulted in an increase in the apparent density, in relation to the apparent density of conventionally prepared tablets, of up to 14.4%. Ultrasound appears to improve particle rearrangement and provides energy for partial melting of particle asperities and subsequent fusion of particle surfaces, so as to increase interparticulate bonding. Solid bridge formation was thought to result in a reduction of void space, which in turn reduced the rate of water penetration into the compacts and consequently increased disintegration and dissolution times. It was found that the results of ultrasound-assisted compaction are influenced by formulation and US time

  4. Active Inertial Vibration Isolators And Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren; Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Report describes development of active inertial vibration isolators and dampers in which actuators electromagnet coils moving linearly within permanent magnetic fields in housings, somewhat as though massive, low-frequency voice coils in loudspeakers. Discusses principle of operation, electrical and mechanical considerations in design of actuators, characteristics of accelerometers, and frequency responses of control systems. Describes design and performance of one- and three-degree-of-freedom vibration-suppressing system based on concept.

  5. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  6. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S. Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  7. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, Ivan S.; Konovalenko, Igor S.; Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A.

    2015-10-01

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of Composite Wing Sections for Improved Aeroelastic and Vibration Characteristics Using Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop analysis procedures to investigate the coupling of composite and smart materials to improve aeroelastic and vibratory response of aerospace structures. The structural modeling must account for arbitrarily thick geometries, embedded and surface bonded sensors and actuators and imperfections, such as delamination. Changes in the dynamic response due to the presence of smart materials and delaminations is investigated. Experiments are to be performed to validate the proposed mathematical model.

  9. Dynamic response characteristics of the high-temperature superconducting maglev system under lateral eccentric distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zheng, Jun; Si, Shuaishuai; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    Off-centre operation of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev systems caused by inevitable conditions such as the misregistration of vehicle, crosswind and curve negotiation, may change the distribution of the trapped flux in the HTS bulks and the magnetic interaction between HTS bulks and the PMG. It impacts on the performance of HTS maglev, and more seriously makes the maglev vehicle overturned. Therefore, understanding the performance of the HTS maglev in off-center operation is very important. In this paper, the dynamic response characteristics of a cryostat with twenty-four onboard YBaCuO superconductor bulks were experimentally investigated at different eccentric distances under loads before the initial FC process. Parameters such as vibration accelerations, displacement, natural frequency and dynamic stiffness were acquired and analyzed via the B&K vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. Results suggest that the natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the maglev vehicle would be obviously reduced with the eccentric distance, posing negative effects on the stability of HTS maglev.

  10. Influence of resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, A. V.; Moskvichev, D. Yu.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of acoustic resonators on the acoustic and propulsion performance characteristics of a ramjet ejector chamber under conditions with vibration hydrogen combustion was experimentally examined. In the study, resonators having identical throats and different cavity diameters were used. For fixed-volume resonators the best propulsion performance characteristics were achieved in the case in which the cavity diameter differed little from the resonator throat diameter.

  11. Frequency response characteristics and response spectra of base-isolated and un-isolated structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Namba, H.

    1995-07-06

    The transmissibility of seismic loads through a linear base-isolation system is analyzed using an impedance method. The results show that the system acts like a {open_quotes}low-pass{close_quotes} filter. It attenuates high-frequency loads but passes through low-frequency ones. The filtering effect depends on the vibration frequencies and damping of the isolated structure and the isolation system. This paper demonstrates the benefits and design principles of base isolation by comparing the transmissibilities and response spectra of isolated and un-isolated structures. Parameters of typical isolated buildings and ground motions of the 1994 Northridge earthquake are used for the demonstration.

  12. Preliminary Calibration Report of an Apparatus to Measure Vibration Characteristics of Low Frequency Disturbance Source Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James W.; Marshall, Robert A.; Finley, Tom D.; Lawrence, George F.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a description of the test apparatus and the method of testing the low frequency disturbance source characteristics of small pumps, fans, camera motors, and recorders that are typical of those used in microgravity science facilities. The test apparatus will allow both force and acceleration spectra of these disturbance devices to be obtained from acceleration measurements over the frequency range from 2 to 300 Hz. Some preliminary calibration results are presented.

  13. Poststimulus Response Characteristics of the Human Cone Flicker Electroretinogram

    PubMed Central

    Gowrisankaran, Sowjanya; McAnany, J. Jason; Alexander, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    At certain temporal frequencies, the human cone flicker electroretinogram (ERG) contains multiple additional responses following the termination of a flicker train. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these poststimulus responses are a continuing response to the terminated flicker train or represent the oscillation of a resonant system. ERGs were recorded from 10 visually normal adults in response to full-field sinusoidally modulated flicker trains presented against a short-wavelength rod-saturating adapting field. The amplitude and timing properties of the poststimulus responses were evaluated within the context of a model of a second-order resonant system. At stimulus frequencies between 41.7 and 71.4 Hz, the majority of subjects showed at least three additional ERG responses following the termination of the flicker train. The interval between the poststimulus responses was approximately constant across stimulus frequency, with a mean of 14.4 ms, corresponding to a frequency of 69.4 Hz. The amplitude and timing characteristics of the poststimulus ERG responses were well described by an underdamped second-order system with a resonance frequency of 70.3 Hz. The observed poststimulus ERG responses may represent resonant oscillations of retinal ON bipolar cells, as has been proposed for electrophysiological recordings of poststimulus responses from retinal ganglion cells. However, further investigation is required to determine the types of retinal neurons involved in the generation of the poststimulus responses of the human flicker ERG. PMID:24016531

  14. Cardiopulmonary response during whole-body vibration training in patients with severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Gloeckl, Rainer; Richter, Petra; Winterkamp, Sandra; Pfeifer, Michael; Nell, Christoph; Christle, Jeffrey W; Kenn, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Several studies in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown that whole-body vibration training (WBVT) has beneficial effects on exercise capacity. However, the acute cardiopulmonary demand during WBVT remains unknown and was therefore investigated in this study. Ten patients with severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 38±8% predicted) were examined on two consecutive days. On day one, symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed on a cycle ergometer. The next day, six bouts of repeated squat exercises were performed in random order for one, two or three minutes either with or without WBVT while metabolic demands were simultaneously measured. Squat exercises with or without WBVT induced comparable ventilatory efficiency (minute ventilation (VE)/carbon dioxide production (V'CO2 ): 38.0±4.4 with WBVT versus 37.4±4.1 without, p=0.236). Oxygen uptake after 3 min of squat exercises increased from 339±40 mL·min(-1) to 1060±160 mL·min(-1) with WBVT and 988±124 mL min(-1) without WBV (p=0.093). However, there were no significant differences between squat exercises with and without WBVT in oxygen saturation (90±4% versus 90±4%, p=0.068), heart rate (109±13 bpm versus 110±15 bpm, p=0.513) or dyspnoea (Borg scale 5±2 versus 5±2, p=0.279). Combining squat exercises with WBVT induced a similar cardiopulmonary response in patients with severe COPD compared to squat exercises without WBVT. Bearing in mind the small sample size, WBVT might be a feasible and safe exercise modality even in patients with severe COPD.

  15. Cardiopulmonary response during whole-body vibration training in patients with severe COPD

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Petra; Winterkamp, Sandra; Pfeifer, Michael; Nell, Christoph; Christle, Jeffrey W.; Kenn, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Several studies in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown that whole-body vibration training (WBVT) has beneficial effects on exercise capacity. However, the acute cardiopulmonary demand during WBVT remains unknown and was therefore investigated in this study. Ten patients with severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 38±8% predicted) were examined on two consecutive days. On day one, symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed on a cycle ergometer. The next day, six bouts of repeated squat exercises were performed in random order for one, two or three minutes either with or without WBVT while metabolic demands were simultaneously measured. Squat exercises with or without WBVT induced comparable ventilatory efficiency (minute ventilation (VE)/carbon dioxide production (V′CO2): 38.0±4.4 with WBVT versus 37.4±4.1 without, p=0.236). Oxygen uptake after 3 min of squat exercises increased from 339±40 mL·min−1 to 1060±160 mL·min−1 with WBVT and 988±124 mL min−1 without WBV (p=0.093). However, there were no significant differences between squat exercises with and without WBVT in oxygen saturation (90±4% versus 90±4%, p=0.068), heart rate (109±13 bpm versus 110±15 bpm, p=0.513) or dyspnoea (Borg scale 5±2 versus 5±2, p=0.279). Combining squat exercises with WBVT induced a similar cardiopulmonary response in patients with severe COPD compared to squat exercises without WBVT. Bearing in mind the small sample size, WBVT might be a feasible and safe exercise modality even in patients with severe COPD. PMID:28326310

  16. The experimental investigation of bounce characteristics of ACV responsive skirt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. L.; Ma, T.

    This paper presents some experimental results on the bounce characteristics of the bag-finger responsive skirt and on skirt frequency response under cushion pressure excitation obtained in a large-scale box facility. The influence of some parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the skirt bounce motion and the amplitude of the cushion pressure oscillation were explored, and the corresponding bounce boundary curves are given. Some interesting nonlinear phenomena related to the skirt instability in the time domain response are presented. The mechanism for skirt bounce and the important parameters affecting skirt dynamic stability are examined, and some means for eliminating skirt bounce are introduced.

  17. A hybrid single-end-access MZI and Φ-OTDR vibration sensing system with high frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Xia, Lan; Cao, Chunqi; Sun, Zhenhong; Li, Yanting; Zhang, Xuping

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid single-end-access Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and phase sensitive OTDR (Φ-OTDR) vibration sensing system is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. In our system, the narrow optical pulses and the continuous wave are injected into the fiber through the front end of the fiber at the same time. And at the rear end of the fiber, a frequency-shift-mirror (FSM) is designed to back propagate the continuous wave modulated by the external vibration. Thus the Rayleigh backscattering signals (RBS) and the back propagated continuous wave interfere with the reference light at the same end of the sensing fiber and a single-end-access configuration is achieved. The RBS can be successfully separated from the interference signal (IS) through digital signal process due to their different intermediate frequency based on frequency division multiplexing technique. There is no influence between these two schemes. The experimental results show 10 m spatial resolution and up to 1.2 MHz frequency response along a 6.35 km long fiber. This newly designed single-end-access setup can achieve vibration events locating and high frequency events response, which can be widely used in health monitoring for civil infrastructures and transportation.

  18. Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.; Prime, M.B.; Shevitz, D.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains a review of the technical literature concerning the detection, location, and characterization of structural damage via techniques that examine changes in measured structural vibration response. The report first categorizes the methods according to required measured data and analysis technique. The analysis categories include changes in modal frequencies, changes in measured mode shapes (and their derivatives), and changes in measured flexibility coefficients. Methods that use property (stiffness, mass, damping) matrix updating, detection of nonlinear response, and damage detection via neural networks are also summarized. The applications of the various methods to different types of engineering problems are categorized by type of structure and are summarized. The types of structures include beams, trusses, plates, shells, bridges, offshore platforms, other large civil structures, aerospace structures, and composite structures. The report describes the development of the damage-identification methods and applications and summarizes the current state-of-the-art of the technology. The critical issues for future research in the area of damage identification are also discussed.

  19. Energy conservation in the transient response of nonlinear beam vibration problems subjected to pulse loading - A numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of a double cantilevered beam subjected to pulse loading over a central sector is studied. The initial response is generated in detail to ascertain the energetics of the response. The total energy is used as a gauge of the stability and accuracy of the solution. It is shown that to obtain accurate and stable initial solutions an extremely high spatial and time resolution is required. This requirement was only evident through an examination of the energy of the system. It is proposed, therefore, to use the total energy of the system as a necessary stability and accuracy criterion for the nonlinear response of conservative systems. The results also demonstrate that even for moderate nonlinearities, the effects of membrane forces have a significant influence on the system. It is also shown that while the fundamental response is contained in a first mode envelope, the fluctuations caused by the higher order modes must be resolved.

  20. Three-Dimensional Vibration Isolator for Suppressing High-Frequency Responses for Sage III Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Cutright, S.; Dyke, R.; Templeton, J.; Gasbarre, J.; Novak, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III - International Space Station (ISS) instrument will be used to study ozone, providing global, long-term measurements of key components of the Earth's atmosphere for the continued health of Earth and its inhabitants. SAGE III is launched into orbit in an inverted configuration on SpaceX;s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. As one of its four supporting elements, a Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP) mounted to the top panel of the Interface Adapter Module (IAM) box experiences high-frequency response due to structural coupling between the two structures during the SpaceX launch. These vibrations, which were initially observed in the IAM Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test and later verified through finite element analysis (FEA) for the SpaceX launch loads, may damage the internal electronic cards and the Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) sensors mounted on the CMP. Three-dimensional (3D) vibration isolators were required to be inserted between the CMP and IAM interface in order to attenuate the high frequency vibrations without resulting in any major changes to the existing system. Wire rope isolators were proposed as the isolation system between the CMP and IAM due to the low impact to design. Most 3D isolation systems are designed for compression and roll, therefore little dynamic data was available for using wire rope isolators in an inverted or tension configuration. From the isolator FEA and test results, it is shown that by using the 3D wire rope isolators, the CMP high-frequency responses have been suppressed by several orders of magnitude over a wide excitation frequency range. Consequently, the TQCM sensor responses are well below their qualification environments. It is indicated that these high-frequency responses due to the typical instrument structural coupling can be significantly suppressed by a vibration passive control using the 3D vibration isolator. Thermal and contamination

  1. Vibration characteristics of Z-ring-stiffened 60 deg conical shell models of a planetary entry spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, E. C.; Mixon, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a 60 deg conical shell model of a planetary entry vehicle is described and the results presented. Model configurations include the shell with or without one or two Z-ring stiffeners and with or without a simulated payload. Tests were conducted with the model clamped at the small diameter and with the model suspended at the simulated payload. Additionally, calculated results obtained from application of several analytical procedures reported in the literature are presented together with comparisons between experimental and calculated frequencies and meridional mode shapes. Generally, very good frequency agreement between experimental and calculated results was obtained for all model configurations. For small values of circumferential mode number, however, the frequency agreement decreased as the number of ring stiffeners increased. Overall agreement between experimental and calculated mode shapes was generally good. The calculated modes usually showed much larger curvatures in the vicinity of the rings than were observed in the experimentally measured mode shapes. Dual resonances associated with modal preference were noted for the shell without Z-ring stiffeners, whereas the addition of stiffeners produced resonances for which the model responded in two or more modes over different sections of the shell length.

  2. Active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Valery P.; Bazinenkov, Alexey M.

    2017-06-01

    The article describes the active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers. An active damper based on the MR elastomers can be used as an actuator of micro- or nanopositioning for a vibroinsulated object. The MR elastomers give such advantages for active control of vibration as large range of displacements (up to 1 mm), more efficient absorption of the vibration energy, possibility of active control of amplitude-frequency characteristics and positioning with millisecond response speed and nanometer running accuracy. The article presents the results of experimental studies of the most important active damper parameters. Those are starting current, transient time for stepping, transmission coefficient of the vibration displacement amplitude.

  3. Characteristics of 10 mm Multilayer L1-F2 Mode Vibrator and Application to a Linear Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Tomoki; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2003-05-01

    In the present paper we discuss a small-sized multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator and its application to an ultrasonic linear motor. In an attempt to reduce both the size and the driving voltage of an L1-F2 mode vibrator, we constructed a multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator whose inner electrodes are simply divided into two. Test results clarified that the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits two resonance modes; namely, a first longitudinal mode and a second flexural mode, and that an amplitude of vibration velocity is sufficiently large for application to a linear motor. Specific merits of our multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator are that the driving voltage is low (5 Vrms), owing to multilayer construction, and that the vibrator is small (10 × 2.5 × 2 mm: W×H×D), owing to the simple construction of the inner electrodes. Additionally, the present study revealed that an ultrasonic linear motor using the multilayer L1-F2 mode vibrator exhibits superior performance in practical application.

  4. Investigation of Dynamic Force/Vibration Transmission Characteristics of Four-Square Type Gear Durability Test Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    In this study, design requirements for a dynamically viable, four-square type gear test machine are investigated. Variations of four-square type gear test machines have been in use for durability and dynamics testing of both parallel- and cross-axis gear set. The basic layout of these machines is illustrated. The test rig is formed by two gear pairs, of the same reduction ratio, a test gear pair and a reaction gear pair, connected to each other through shafts of certain torsional flexibility to form an efficient, closed-loop system. A desired level of constant torque is input to the circuit through mechanical (a split coupling with a torque arm) or hydraulic (a hydraulic actuator) means. The system is then driven at any desired speed by a small DC motor. The main task in hand is the isolation of the test gear pair from the reaction gear pair under dynamic conditions. Any disturbances originated at the reaction gear mesh might potentially travel to the test gearbox, altering the dynamic loading conditions of the test gear mesh, and hence, influencing the outcome of the durability or dynamics test. Therefore, a proper design of connecting structures becomes a major priority. Also, equally important is the issue of how close the operating speed of the machine is to the resonant frequencies of the gear meshes. This study focuses on a detailed analysis of the current NASA Glenn Research Center gear pitting test machine for evaluation of its resonance and vibration isolation characteristics. A number of these machines as the one illustrated has been used over last 30 years to establish an extensive database regarding the influence of the gear materials, processes surface treatments and lubricants on gear durability. This study is intended to guide an optimum design of next generation test machines for the most desirable dynamic characteristics.

  5. Theoretical-Experimental Method for Evaluating the Elastic and Damping Characteristics of Soft Materials Based on Studying the Resonance Flexural Vibrations of Test Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.; Gyunal, I.; Shishkin, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    A hardware and software system for studying the damping and elastic properties of soft materials in a low-frequency range of deformation up to 100 Hz, which most fully corresponds to the range of dynamic actions in actual service conditions of structures, is proposed. A novel identification method for evaluating the elastic and damping properties of soft materials in shear is developed. It employs the frequency and amplitude characteristics of the resonance flexural vibrations of three-layer test specimens with a soft inner layer. Identification of the elastic shear properties is based on a comparison of calculated and experimental frequencies of resonance vibrations of test specimens. To evaluate the shear damping properties of soft materials, the condition of minimum of an objective function containing experimental and calculated amplitudes of vibrations of the free end of a test specimen is used. The possibility of evaluating the properties mentioned from the experimental and calculated internal damping parameters of test specimens, which significantly reduces the laboriousness of the problem considered, is shown. Numerical calculations are carried out for identifying the elastic and damping characteristics of a technical rubber in shear based on an analysis of resonance flexural vibrations of seven test specimens with outer layers made of a D16AT aluminum alloy.

  6. The Effect of Vibration on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Regiane Luz; Almeida, Gil Lucio

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of proprioception in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effect of vibration on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle, knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group-CG) and eight individuals with Down syndrome (DS) while balancing on…

  7. Responses of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) to conspecific vibrational signals and synthetic mimics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mate-seeking in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, a vector of the economically damaging huanglongbing citrus disease, typically includes male-female duetting behaviors. First, the male calls by beating its wings at ca. 170-250 Hz, producing vibrations that are transmitted along the host tree branches to th...

  8. Sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for low-mid frequencies vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardonio, P.; Zilletti, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation study concerning the low-mid frequencies control of flexural vibration in a lightly damped thin plate, which is equipped with three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers and is excited by a rain on the roof broad frequency band stationary disturbance. The sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are semi-active mass-spring-dashpot systems whose stiffness and damping properties can be varied uniformly within given ranges. They are operated in such a way as their characteristic natural frequencies are continuously varied to control the response of flexural modes that resonate within given frequency bands. More specifically, in this study the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are operated asynchronously, each within one of three sequential frequency bands comprised between 20 and 120, 120 and 220, 220 and 320 Hz. The flexural vibration control effects produced by the three sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are compared to those produced by three classical tuneable vibration absorbers, each set to control the response of a specific flexural mode of the plate resonating in one of these three frequency bands. The study shows that the proposed sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers outperform the classical tuneable vibration absorbers and produce about 6, 5, 4 dB reduction of the plate overall flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation. Also, the study indicates that the sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers are robust to variations in the plate flexural response. For instance they still produce about 5.1, 5.3, 4.6 dB reductions of the flexural response in the three frequency bands of operation when the plate is tensioned such that the flexural natural frequencies are shifted up from about 40 percent, for the first resonance, to 7 percent, for the tenth resonance.

  9. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  10. A self-powered vibration sensor based on electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofibres with enhanced piezoelectric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xumin; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Zilan; Zhang, Shenqiu; He, Yahua; Zhang, Youdong; Chen, Kansong; Hu, Yongming; Gu, Haoshuang

    2016-10-01

    The development of self-powered vibration sensors using polymeric piezoelectric nanomaterials has attracted great attention owing to their outstanding flexibility and energy harvesting behaviours. In this study, ultra-long poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibres with optimised β-phase content were synthesised through electrospinning method with different DC voltages. The increase in the β-phase content of the PVDF nanofibres greatly enhanced their piezoelectric response with nearly tripled output voltage and current under the same strain condition. Moreover, the output voltage exhibited linear correlations with both the amplitude and frequency of the strain. Under a fixed frequency of 1.54 Hz, the output voltage exhibited a linear correlation to the strain amplitude with strain sensitivity up to 0.92 V rad-1 and 0.61 V mm-1. The frequency-dependent strain sensing behaviour also confirmed the necessity for frequency calibration to the measured results of vibration. Accordingly, the sensor can be used for self-powered monitoring of the vibration state of a metal foil and measuring the intrinsic resonance frequency of the objects without any powering source.

  11. Experimental research on the response characteristics of PLZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. J.; Huang, J. H.; Wang, J.

    2015-07-01

    PLZT ceramics have exhibited promising applications as wireless photo-driven micro actuators for their direct conversion from optical energy to mechanical energy. However, the slow response of photodeformation and the residual photovoltage and deformation prevent PLZT ceramics from being employed as micro actuators, especially in the high frequency dynamic field. The primary purposes of this article are to analyze the response characteristics of PLZT ceramics and look for some measures to improve the response performance of the photo-induced deformation. To this end, this study observed the slow response, the residual photovoltage and deformation through photostrictive static experiments. Some measures proposed to accelerate the response speed and eliminate the residual photovoltage and deformation in this paper were experimentally confirmed. From these experiments, the hysteresis phenomenon caused by temperature rising, the residual photovoltage and photo-induced deformation after turning off the ultraviolet light are considered to be the main reasons for the slow response of photo-induced deformation. The experimental results indicate that reducing the effect of temperature elevation, ground connection and using another PLZT ceramic to eliminate the residual photovoltage and deformation are proven ways to improve the response performance of photo-induced deformation. On that basis, two optical driving mechanisms were proposed.

  12. The negative and positive electrorheological behavior and vibration damping characteristics of colemanite and polyindene/colemanite conducting composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, B.; Unal, H. I.; Erol, O.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the electrorheological (ER) properties of colemanite and polyindene (94.8% PIn)/colemanite (5.2%) conducting composite were investigated by dispersion in silicone oil (SO). The zeta (ζ)-potentials and antisedimentation ratios of the materials were determined. Some parameters which affect the ER properties of all the dispersions such as the volume fraction, electric field strength (E), shear rate, frequency and temperature were investigated. The rather unusual behavior known as the negative ER effect was observed for colemanite/SO above E = 1.5 kV mm-1 and for PIn/colemanite/SO under all values of the electric field strength even at high volume fraction. This negative ER response was converted to a positive one by the addition of non-ionic surfactant. Furthermore, glycerol was used as a polar promoter and observed to enhance the ER activity of the colemanite/SO system. Creep-recovery tests were applied to all the dispersions studied to investigate their behavior under sustained shear stress. Finally, 28% and 30% vibration damping capacities were achieved using an automobile shock absorber for the glycerol/colemanite/SO and non-ionic surfactant/PIn/colemanite/SO systems under the E = 0.17 kV mm-1 condition, respectively.

  13. A preliminary investigation into optimising the response of vibrating systems used for ultrasonic cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, F. C. N.; Cartmell, M. P.; Cardoni, A.; Lucas, M.

    2004-05-01

    The coupling of two non-linear oscillators is investigated, each with opposing non-linear overhang characteristics in the frequency domain as a result of positive and negative cubic stiffness. This leads to the definition of a two-degree-of-freedom Duffing oscillator in which such non-linear effects can be neutralised under certain dynamic conditions. The physical motivation for this system stems from applications in ultrasonic cutting in which an exciter drives a tuned blade. The exciter and the blade are both strongly non-linear, with features strongly reminiscent of positive and negative cubic effects. It is shown by means of approximate analysis that in the case of simple idealised coupled oscillator models a practically useful mitigating effect on the overall non-linear response of the system is observed when one of the cubic stiffnesses is varied. Experimentally, it has also been demonstrated that coupling of ultrasonic components with different non-linear characteristics can strongly influence the performance of the system and that the general behaviour of the hypothetical theoretical model is indeed borne out in practice.

  14. Unusual lattice vibration characteristics in whiskers of the pseudo-one-dimensional titanium trisulfide TiS3

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kedi; Torun, Engin; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Fan, Xi; Pant, Anupum; Parsons Wright, David; Aoki, Toshihiro; Peeters, Francois M.; Soignard, Emmanuel; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal trichalcogenides form a class of layered materials with strong in-plane anisotropy. For example, titanium trisulfide (TiS3) whiskers are made out of weakly interacting TiS3 layers, where each layer is made of weakly interacting quasi-one-dimensional chains extending along the b axis. Here we establish the unusual vibrational properties of TiS3 both experimentally and theoretically. Unlike other two-dimensional systems, the Raman active peaks of TiS3 have only out-of-plane vibrational modes, and interestingly some of these vibrations involve unique rigid-chain vibrations and S–S molecular oscillations. High-pressure Raman studies further reveal that the AgS–S S-S molecular mode has an unconventional negative pressure dependence, whereas other peaks stiffen as anticipated. Various vibrational modes are doubly degenerate at ambient pressure, but the degeneracy is lifted at high pressures. These results establish the unusual vibrational properties of TiS3 with strong in-plane anisotropy, and may have relevance to understanding of vibrational properties in other anisotropic two-dimensional material systems. PMID:27653671

  15. Validation of Intra-Subject Variation in Biodynamic Responses of Seated Human Exposed to Whole-Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Soo; Yoshimura, Takuya; Tamaoki, Gen

    Many studies have been conducted to investigate the change in human response under various experimental conditions. Usually, these experiments were conducted using many subjects and the inter-subject variation was evaluated. However, the intra-subject variation in human response is also necessary for understanding the change in an individual's physical response to whole-body vibration (WBV). The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses (both apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility) of a seated human exposed to vertical whole-body vibration over time. In the experiments, nine male subjects were exposed to vertical random vibration (0.2-0.3 m/s2 in r.m.s.) in the 0-30Hz frequency range. The measurement variation was also evaluated, wherein the measurements were repeated five times without any change to form the “baseline” for each subject, and the intra-subject variations were evaluated by comparing their responses with these “baseline.” The intra-subject variation was examined from two different viewpoints: variation “within a day” and that “over several days.” To determine the intra-subject variation “within a day”, the five measurements were obtained at two-hour intervals on the same day. In the intra-subject variation “over several days”, the five measurements were obtained again, but at the same time of the day on five consecutive days. The results show that the intra-subject variations (both “within a day” and “over several days”) in biodynamic responses are larger than the “baseline.” However, when the variation “within a day” in biodynamic responses is compared to that “over several days,” no common trend is observed among subjects. Although the magnitude of intra-subject variation in biodynamic responses depends on each subject, both variations “within a day” and that “over several days” have a similar range of variation.

  16. Characterization of the frequency and muscle responses of the lumbar and thoracic spines of seated volunteers during sinusoidal whole body vibration.

    PubMed

    Baig, Hassam A; Dorman, Daniel B; Bulka, Ben A; Shivers, Bethany L; Chancey, Valeta C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2014-10-01

    Whole body vibration has been postulated to contribute to the onset of back pain. However, little is known about the relationship between vibration exposure, the biomechanical response, and the physiological responses of the seated human. The aim of this study was to measure the frequency and corresponding muscle responses of seated male volunteers during whole body vibration exposures along the vertical and anteroposterior directions to define the transmissibility and associated muscle activation responses for relevant whole body vibration exposures. Seated human male volunteers underwent separate whole body vibration exposures in the vertical (Z-direction) and anteroposterior (X-direction) directions using sinusoidal sweeps ranging from 2 to 18 Hz, with a constant amplitude of 0.4 g. For each vibration exposure, the accelerations and displacements of the seat and lumbar and thoracic spines were recorded. In addition, muscle activity in the lumbar and thoracic spines was recorded using electromyography (EMG) and surface electrodes in the lumbar and thoracic region. Transmissibility was determined, and peak transmissibility, displacement, and muscle activity were compared in each of the lumbar and thoracic regions. The peak transmissibility for vertical vibrations occurred at 4 Hz for both the lumbar (1.55 ± 0.34) and thoracic (1.49 ± 0.21) regions. For X-directed seat vibrations, the transmissibility ratio in both spinal regions was highest at 2 Hz but never exceeded a value of 1. The peak muscle response in both spinal regions occurred at frequencies corresponding to the peak transmissibility, regardless of the direction of imposed seat vibration: 4 Hz for the Z-direction and 2-3 Hz for the X-direction. In both vibration directions, spinal displacements occurred primarily in the direction of seat vibration, with little off-axis motion. The occurrence of peak muscle responses at frequencies of peak transmissibility suggests that such

  17. Calculated strain response of vibrational modes for H-containing point defects in diamond.

    PubMed

    Goss, Jonathan P; Briddon, Patrick R

    2011-06-28

    The low mass of hydrogen leads to highly localised, high-frequency vibrational modes associated with H-containing defects in crystalline materials. In addition to vibrational spectroscopy, the presence of hydrogen in diamond has been identified from several experimental techniques. In particular, paramagnetic resonance shows that H is often associated with lattice vacancies, but in many cases the microscopic structure of the defects remains to be determined. We present the results of first-principles density-functional modelling of selected H-containing point defects, reporting both the calculated frequencies and the change in frequencies with applied strain. We show that more constrained environments lead to significantly larger strain-related shifts in frequency than more open environments, such as where the H is associated with lattice vacancies.

  18. The forced vibrational response of a rectangular parallelepiped with rigid-lubricated boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, E. v. K.; Egle, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Green function for a rectangular parallelepiped with rigid-lubricated boundaries is developed by a normal mode approach, the free vibration solutions being used. Explicit solutions are presented for a concentrated impulse, which serves as a model for an acoustic emission stress wave, and for a concentrated step force. Numerical results for short times show good agreement with the infinite space solution. Analogous solutions are developed for the inverse boundary conditions.

  19. Exaggerated haemodynamic and neural responses to involuntary contractions induced by whole-body vibration in normotensive obese versus lean women.

    PubMed

    Dipla, Konstantina; Kousoula, Dimitra; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Kyparos, Antonios; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? In obesity, the exaggerated blood pressure response to voluntary exercise is linked to hypertension, yet the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. We examined whether involuntary contractions elicit greater haemodynamic responses and altered neural control of blood pressure in normotensive obese versus lean women. What is the main finding and its importance? During involuntary contractions induced by whole-body vibration, there were augmented blood pressure and spontaneous baroreflex responses in obese compared with lean women. This finding is suggestive of an overactive mechanoreflex in the exercise-induced hypertensive response in obesity. Passive contractions did not elicit differential heart rate responses in obese compared with lean women, implying other mechanisms for the blunted heart rate response reported during voluntary exercise in obesity. In obesity, the exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is linked to hypertension, yet the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether involuntary mechanical oscillations, induced by whole-body vibration (WBV), elicit greater haemodynamic responses and altered neural control of BP in obese versus lean women. Twenty-two normotensive, premenopausal women (12 lean and 10 obese) randomly underwent a passive WBV (25 Hz) and a control protocol (similar posture without WVB). Beat-by-beat BP, heart rate, stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, parasympathetic output (evaluated by heart rate variability) and spontaneous baroreceptor sensitivity (sBRS) were assessed. We found that during WBV, obese women exhibited an augmented systolic BP response compared with lean women that was correlated with body fat percentage (r = 0.77; P < 0.05). The exaggerated BP rise was driven mainly by the greater increase in cardiac output index in obese versus lean women, associated with a greater stroke volume index in obese women

  20. The effects of isomerism on the vibrational spectra and thermodynamic characteristics of biuret in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolevich, M. V.; Lastochkina, V. A.; Frenkel, M. L.; Kabo, G. Ya.; Zhbankov, R. G.

    1991-03-01

    A theoretical study of the IR spectra of cis- and trans-isomers of biuret, based on coupled calculations of vibrational frequencies as a valence force field approximation and of absorption band intensities by the CNDO/2 method, is reported. Calculated thermodynamic functions for biuret agreed with experimental thermochemical data. For calculating the vibrations of an isolated biuret molecule, the experimental vapour-phase IR absorption spectra were used.

  1. Acceptance and control of aircraft interior noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Leatherwood, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Ride quality criteria for noise, vibration, and their combination in the helicopter cabin environment are discussed. Results are presented of laboratory and field studies of passenger responses to interior noise and vibration during the performance of a listening task and during reverie, as well as to the interaction of noise with multi-frequency and multi-axis vibration. A study of means for reducing helicopter interior noise based on analytical, experimental and flight studies of the near-field noise source characteristics of the aircraft, the transmission of noise through aircraft structures and the attenuation of noise by various noise control treatments is then presented which has resulted in a reduction of 3 dB in helicopter cabin noise. Finally, a model under development to evaluate passenger acceptance of a helicopter noise and vibration environment is indicated which incorporates the observed noise and vibration effects on comfort and is expected to provide insights for more effective noise and vibration control.

  2. Response attenuation in a large-scale structure subjected to blast excitation utilizing a system of essentially nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, Nicholas E.; Hubbard, Sean A.; Luo, Jie; Fahnestock, Larry A.; Spencer, Billie F.; McFarland, D. Michael; Quinn, D. Dane; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Bergman, Lawrence A.

    2017-02-01

    Limiting peak stresses and strains in a structure subjected to high-energy, short-duration transient loadings, such as blasts, is a challenging problem, largely due to the well-known insensitivity of the first few cycles of the structural response to damping. Linear isolation, while a potential solution, requires a very low fundamental natural frequency to be effective, resulting in large nearly-rigid body displacement of the structure, while linear vibration absorbers have little or no effect on the early-time response where relative motions, and thus stresses and strains, are at their highest levels. The problem has become increasingly important in recent years with the expectation of blast-resistance as a design requirement in new construction. In this paper, the problem is examined experimentally and computationally in the context of offset-blast loading applied to a custom-built nine story steel frame structure. A fully-passive response mitigation system consisting of six lightweight, essentially nonlinear vibration absorbers (termed nonlinear energy sinks - NESs) is optimized and deployed on the upper two floors of this structure. Two NESs have vibro-impact nonlinearities and the other four possess smooth but essentially nonlinear stiffnesses. Results of the computational and experimental study demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed passive nonlinear mitigation system to rapidly and efficiently attenuate the global structural response, even at early time (i.e., starting at the first response cycle), thus minimizing the peak demand on the structure. This is achieved by nonlinear redistribution of the blast energy within the modal space through low-to-high energy scattering due to the action of the NESs. The experimental results validate the theoretical predictions.

  3. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Response Characteristics of F-4 Bias-Ply and Radial-Belted Main Gear Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics of F-4 military fighter 30x11.5-14.5/26PR bias-ply and radial-belted main gear tires. Tire properties were measured by the application of vertical, lateral, and fore-and-aft loads. Mass moment-of-inertia data were also obtained. The results of the study include quasi-static load-deflection curves, free-vibration time-history plots, energy loss associated with hysteresis, stiffness and damping characteristics, footprint geometry, and inertia properties of each type of tire. The difference between bias-ply and radial-belted tire construction is given, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each tire design. Three simple damping models representing viscous, structural, and Coulomb friction are presented and compared with the experimental data. The conclusions discussed contain a summary of test observations.

  4. Dynamic Responses and Vibration Control of the Transmission Tower-Line System: A State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers. PMID:25105161

  5. Dynamic responses and vibration control of the transmission tower-line system: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Guo, Wei-hua; Li, Peng-yun; Xie, Wen-ping

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an overview on the dynamic analysis and control of the transmission tower-line system in the past forty years. The challenges and future developing trends in the dynamic analysis and mitigation of the transmission tower-line system under dynamic excitations are also put forward. It also reviews the analytical models and approaches of the transmission tower, transmission lines, and transmission tower-line systems, respectively, which contain the theoretical model, finite element (FE) model and the equivalent model; shows the advances in wind responses of the transmission tower-line system, which contains the dynamic effects under common wind loading, tornado, downburst, and typhoon; and discusses the dynamic responses under earthquake and ice loads, respectively. The vibration control of the transmission tower-line system is also reviewed, which includes the magnetorheological dampers, friction dampers, tuned mass dampers, and pounding tuned mass dampers.

  6. Identification of the elastic and damping characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic based on a study of damping flexural vibrations of test specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.; Gyunal, I.; Shishkin, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical and experimental method for determining the elastic and damping characteristics of materials is proposed based on analysis of vibrograms of damping flexural vibrations of test specimens with different structures. It is shown that during tension-compression and shear of a carbon fiber-reinforced plastic made of Porcher 3692 carbon fabric and EDT-69NM polymer binder, its dynamic elastic modulus decreases considerably with increasing frequency of deformation in the range of 0-120 Hz. The amplitude dependences of the logarithmic vibration decrements of the carbon fiber-reinforced plastic are determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the experimental and calculated internal-damping parameters of the test specimens in tension-compression and shear.

  7. Correlation of finite-element structural dynamic analysis with measured free vibration characteristics for a full-scale helicopter fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenigsberg, I. J.; Dean, M. W.; Malatino, R.

    1974-01-01

    The correlation achieved with each program provides the material for a discussion of modeling techniques developed for general application to finite-element dynamic analyses of helicopter airframes. Included are the selection of static and dynamic degrees of freedom, cockpit structural modeling, and the extent of flexible-frame modeling in the transmission support region and in the vicinity of large cut-outs. The sensitivity of predicted results to these modeling assumptions are discussed. Both the Sikorsky Finite-Element Airframe Vibration analysis Program (FRAN/Vibration Analysis) and the NASA Structural Analysis Program (NASTRAN) have been correlated with data taken in full-scale vibration tests of a modified CH-53A helicopter.

  8. The Influence of Road Bumps Characteristics on the Chaotic Vibration of a Nonlinear Full-Vehicle Model with Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, J.; Khanlo, H. M.; Ghayour, M.; Faramarzi, Kh.

    In this paper, the chaotic behavior of a ground vehicle system with driver subjected to road disturbances is studied and the relationship between the nonlinear vibration of the vehicle and ride comfort is evaluated. The vehicle system is modeled as fully nonlinear with seven degrees of freedom and an additional degree of freedom for driver (8-DOF). The excitation force is the road irregularities that are assumed as road speed control bumps. The sinusoidal, consecutive half-sine and dented-rectangular waveforms are considered to simulate the road speed control bumps. The nonlinearities of the system are due to the nonlinear springs and dampers that are used in the suspension system and tires. The governing differential equations are extracted under Newton-Euler laws and solved via numerical methods. The chaotic behaviors were studied in more detail with special techniques such as bifurcation diagrams, phase plane portrait, Poincaré map and Lyapunov exponents. The ride comfort was evaluated as the RMS value of the vertical displacement of the vehicle body and driver. Firstly, the effect of amplitude (height) and frequency (vehicle’s speed) of these speed control bumps on chaotic vibrations of vehicle are studied. The obtained results show that various forms of vibrations, such as periodic, subharmonic and chaotic vibrations, can be detected in the system behavior with the change of the height and frequency of speed control bumps and present different types of strange attractors in the vehicle with and without driver. Then, the influence of nonlinear vibration on ride comfort and the relationship between chaotic vibrations of the vehicle and driving comfort are investigated. The results of analyzing the RMS diagrams reveal that the chaotic behaviors can directly affect the driving comfort and lead to the driver’s comfort being reduced. The obtained results can be used in the design of vehicle and road bumps pavement.

  9. Characteristics of Late Negative ERG Responses Elicited By Sawtooth Flicker

    PubMed Central

    Gowrisankaran, Sowjanya; Genead, Mohamed A.; Anastasakis, Anastasios; Alexander, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine whether the properties of the late negative responses (LNRs) of the electroretinogram (ERG) elicited by sawtooth flicker are consistent with the characteristics of the photopic negative response generated by a light pulse (PhNRpulse). Methods ERG recordings were obtained from 10 visually normal individuals and from 6 patients with optic atrophy (OA) in response to 8-Hz rapid-on and rapid-off sawtooth flicker and to brief (4 ms) light pulses. All stimuli were either long-wavelength (R), middle-wavelength (G), or a combination of equal luminances of long and middle-wavelengths (Y) presented on a short-wavelength, rod-saturating adapting field. Amplitudes of LNRs were obtained in response to rapid-on (LNRon) and rapid-off (LNRoff) sawtooth flicker, and were also derived from the sum of the ERG waveforms to the two sawtooth phases (LNRadd). Results For the control subjects, PhNRpulse amplitude varied with stimulus wavelength, being largest in response to a long-wavelength pulse, as expected. However, the amplitudes of LNRon, LNRoff, and LNRadd were not significantly different for R, Y, and G sawtooth flicker. Despite the absence of a chromatic effect, LNRoff and LNRadd amplitudes were significantly smaller in the OA patients than in the controls, similar to the results for the PhNRpulse, implying an inner retinal origin for the LNRoff and LNRadd. However, LNRon amplitudes did not differ significantly between the OA patients and controls, although there was a significant correlation between the LNRon and PhNRpulse for R stimuli. Conclusion We conclude that LNRoff and LNRadd but not LNRon can be useful measures to assess the integrity of the inner retina that can complement the PhNRpulse. PMID:23054159

  10. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  11. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  12. Seasonal variations in vibrational spectra of the sea surface nanolayer and their relation to characteristic parameters for phytoplankton activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laß, Kristian; Bange, Hermann W.; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    The sea surface nanolayer is a very thin organic substance layer, down to monomolecular thickness. It is found on top of the sea surface microlayer, which in turn comprises roughly the uppermost millimeter of the water column. The nanolayer constitutes the actual interface between ocean and atmosphere and plays an important role in all exchange processes of matter and energy between ocean and atmosphere. Nevertheless, knowledge about formation and development of the sea surface nanolayer in the course of the year is very limited. In this study we present surface-specific observations of the sea surface nanolayer development over a period of three and a half years. Samples of the sea surface have been taken monthly at Boknis Eck Time Series Station (Eckernförde Bay, southwestern Baltic Sea) by screen sampling. From surface-sensitive vibrational spectra obtained by nonlinear sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), information on amount, structure and composition of the organic nanolayer material was extracted. SFG has been introduced by us as a new method to study the ocean nanolayer quite recently [1,2]. The abundance of nanolayer material was found to follow a pronounced yearly periodicity, with larger amounts of material present from mid to end of summer. A substantial time lag of about 2.5 months between spring algal bloom maxima and abundance maxima of nanolayer material has been observed. In contrast to common perception, this shows that high phytoplankton abundance and pronounced nanolayers are not directly related to each other. Variations in the appearance of the spectra serve as indicators for changes in structure and chemical composition of the nanolayer. The accumulation of carbohydrate-rich material in late summer provides a possible explanation for the observed spectral changes. We propose that sloppy feeding of zooplankton as well as photochemical and/or microbial processing of organic material present in the microlayer is responsible for the

  13. The response characteristics of tetrazolium violet solutions to gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emi-Reynolds, G.; Kovács, András; Fletcher, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The dosimetry characteristics of various solutions of tetrazolium violet, TV, (2,5-diphenyl-3-(1-naphthyl)-2H-tetrazolium chloride) to gamma irradiation are reported. The optical absorption spectra of these solutions show peaks between 400 and 600 nm with a shoulder at around 550 nm. The dose response of the optical absorbance values of aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic solutions containing different concentrations of TV was measured in the 250 Gy up to 75 kGy dose range. The formation of formazan product was observed due to radiolytic reduction in both solutions. Its formation was found more pronounced in N 2-saturated as well as in alkaline solutions. The results indicate that the 1 mM TV solution can be used for food irradiation and medical sterilization dosimetry at gamma irradiation facilities.

  14. Spectral characteristics of ventricular response to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hayano, J; Yamasaki, F; Sakata, S; Okada, A; Mukai, S; Fujinami, T

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the spectral characteristics of the fluctuation in ventricular response during atrial fibrillation (AF), R-R interval time series obtained from ambulatory electrocardiograms were analyzed in 45 patients with chronic AF and in 30 age-matched healthy subjects with normal sinus rhythm (SR). Although the 24-h R-R interval spectrum during SR showed a 1/f noise-like downsloping linear pattern when plotted as log power against log frequency, the spectrum during AF showed an angular shape with a breakpoint at a frequency of 0.005 +/- 0.002 Hz, by which the spectrum was separated into long-term and short-term components with different spectral characteristics. The short-term component showed a white noise-like flat spectrum with a spectral exponent (absolute value of the regression slope) of 0.05 +/- 0.08 and an intercept at 10(-2) Hz of 4.9 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz). The long-term component had a 1/f noise-like spectrum with a spectral exponent of 1.26 +/- 0.40 and an intercept at 10(-4) Hz of 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz), which did not differ significantly from those for the spectrum during SR in the same frequency range [spectral exponent, 1.36 +/- 0.06; intercept at 10(-4) Hz, 7.1 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz)]. The R-R intervals during AF may be a sequence of uncorrelated values over the short term (within several minutes). Over the longer term, however, the R-R interval fluctuation shows the long-range negative correlation suggestive of underlying regulatory processes, and spectral characteristics indistinguishable from those for SR suggest that the long-term fluctuations during AF and SR may originate from similar dynamics of the cardiovascular regulatory systems.

  15. Maternal characteristics influence response to DHA during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gould, J F; Anderson, A J; Yelland, L N; Gibson, R A; Makrides, M

    2016-05-01

    We explored the degree to which maternal and offspring outcomes resulting from consuming prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 800mg/day) in a clinical trial were influenced by maternal characteristics. Among non-smokers, women who received DHA had heavier babies (adjusted mean difference (MD)=99g 95% CI 45-153, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01) and fewer low birth weight babies than control women (adjusted relative risk=0.43 95% CI 0.25-0.74, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01). From women who had not completed further education, children in the DHA group had higher cognitive scores at 18 months compared with control children (adjusted MD=3.15 95% CI 0.93-5.37, p=0.01; interaction p<0.01). Conversely, the children of women who completed further education in the DHA group had lower language scores than control children (adjusted MD -2.82 95% CI -4.90 to -0.73, p=0.01; interaction p=0.04). Our results support the notion that responsiveness to prenatal DHA may depend on the characteristics of specific population subgroups.

  16. Psycho-vibratory evaluation of timber floors - Towards the determination of design indicators of vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreira, J.; Trollé, A.; Jarnerö, K.; Sjökvist, L.-G.; Bard, D.

    2015-03-01

    In timber housing constructions, vibrations can be a nuisance for inhabitants. Notably, the vibrational response of wooden floor systems is an issue in need of being dealt with more adequately in the designing of such buildings. Studies addressing human response to vibrations are needed in order to be able to better estimate what level of vibrations in dwellings can be seen as acceptable. In the present study, measurements on five different wooden floors were performed in a laboratory environment at two locations in Sweden (SP in Växjö and LU in Lund). Acceleration measurements were carried out while a person either was walking on a particular floor or was seated in a chair placed there as the test leader was walking on the floor. These participants filled out a questionnaire regarding their perception and experiencing of the vibrations in question. Independently of the subjective tests, several static and dynamic characteristics of the floors were determined through measurements. The ultimate aim was to develop indicators of human response to floor vibrations, specifically those regarding vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance, their being drawn based on relationships between the questionnaire responses obtained and the parameter values determined on the basis of the measurements carried out. To that end, use was made of multilevel regression. Although the sample of floors tested was small, certain clear trends could be noted. The first eigenfrequency (calculated in accordance with Eurocode 5) and Hu and Chui's criterion (calculated from measured quantities) proved to be the best indicators of vibration annoyance, and the Maximum Transient Vibration Value (computed on the basis of the accelerations experienced by the test subjects) to be the best indicator of vibration acceptability.

  17. Modal interactions due to friction in the nonlinear vibration response of the "Harmony" test structure: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of an assembly with friction joints - named "Harmony" - is studied both experimentally and numerically. The experimental results exhibit a softening effect and an increase of dissipation with excitation level. Modal interactions due to friction are also evidenced. The numerical methodology proposed groups together well-known structural dynamic methods, including finite elements, substructuring, Harmonic Balance and continuation methods. On the one hand, the application of this methodology proves its capacity to treat a complex system where several friction movements occur at the same time. On the other hand, the main contribution of this paper is the experimental and numerical study of evidence of modal interactions due to friction. The simulation methodology succeeds in reproducing complex form of dynamic behavior such as these modal interactions.

  18. Experimental IR and Raman spectra and quantum chemical studies of molecular structures, conformers and vibrational characteristics of L-ascorbic acid and its anion and cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. A.; Rani, P.; Kumar, M.; Singh, R.; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, N. P.

    2011-12-01

    IR and spectra of the L-ascorbic acid ( L-AA) also known as vitamin C have been recorded in the region 4000-50 cm -1. In order to make vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands computations were carried out by employing the RHF and DFT methods to calculate the molecular geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies along with other related parameters for the neutral L-AA and its singly charged anionic ( L-AA -) and cationic ( L-AA +) species. Significant changes have been found for different characteristics of a number of vibrational modes. The four ν(O-H) modes of the L-AA molecule are found in the order ν(O 9-H 10) > ν(O 19-H 20) > ν(O 7-H 8) > ν(O 14-H 15) which could be due to complexity of hydrogen bonding in the lactone ring and the side chain. The C dbnd O stretching wavenumber ( ν46) decreases by 151 cm -1 in going from the neutral to the anionic species whereas it increases by 151 cm -1 in going from the anionic to the cationic species. The anionic radicals have less kinetic stabilities and high chemical reactivity as compared to the neutral molecule. It is found that the cationic radical of L-AA is kinetically least stable and chemically most reactive as compared to its neutral and anionic species.

  19. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Influence of the profile of the spectral line of vibrations of a medium on the time characteristics of stimulated scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'dyugin, Igor'M.; Zolotarev, M. V.; Sviridov, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is made of the problem of the time taken to establish steady-state lasing as a result of various types of stimulated scattering (Raman, Brillouin, and excited by heat evolution in a medium) and of the law governing amplification of Stokes waves after times much shorter than the relaxation time of vibrations of the medium for an arbitrary spectral line profile. It is shown that the characteristic times for the establishment of steady-state lasing in the case of stimulated scattering near the maximum of the gain profile are of the same type for different spectral lines profiles and have similar values.

  20. Experimental investigation of the vibrational and thermal response of a laser spark plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Gregory S.

    A study was conducted in order to evaluate the external thermal and vibrational effects on the operation of a laser ignition system for internal combustion (IC) engine applications. West Virginia University (WVU) in conjunction with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have constructed a prototype laser spark plug which has been designed to mount directly onto the head of a natural gas engine for the purpose of igniting an air/fuel (A/F) mixture in the engine's combustion chamber. To be considered as a viable replacement for the conventional electrode-based ignition system, integrity, durability and reliability must be justified. Thermal and oscillatory perturbations induced upon the ignition system are major influences that affect laser spark plug (LSP) operation and, therefore, quantifying these effects is necessary to further the advancement and development of this technology. The passively q-switched Nd:YAG laser was mounted on Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) Vibration Exciter Type 4808 Shaker in conjunction with at B&K Power Amplifier Type 2719, which was oscillated in 10 Hz intervals from 0 to 60 Hz using a sine wave to mimic natural gas engine operation. The input signal simulated the rotational velocity of the engine operating from 0 to 3600 RPM with the laser mounted in three different axial orientations. The laser assembly was wrapped with medium-temperature heat tape, outfitted with thermocouples and heated from room temperature to 140 ºF to simulate the temperatures that the LSP may experience when installed on an engine. The acceleration of the payload was varied between 50% and 100% of the oscillator's maximum allowable acceleration in each mounting orientation resulting in a total of 294 total setpoints. For each setpoint, pulse width, pulse width variation, q-switch delay, jitter and output energy were measured and recorded. Each of these dependent variables plays a critical role in multi photon ionization and precise control is necessary to limit

  1. A band Lanczos approach for calculation of vibrational coupled cluster response functions: simultaneous calculation of IR and Raman anharmonic spectra for the complex of pyridine and a silver cation.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2013-07-07

    We describe new methods for the calculation of IR and Raman spectra using vibrational response theory. Using damped linear response functions that incorporate a Lorentzian line-shape function from the outset, it is shown how the calculation of Raman spectra can be carried out through the calculation of a set of vibrational response functions in the same manner as described previously for IR spectra. The necessary set of response functions can be calculated for both vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) anharmonic vibrational wave-functions. For the efficient and simultaneous calculation of the full set of necessary response functions, a non-hermitian band Lanczos algorithm is implemented for VCC, and a hermitian band Lanczos algorithm is implemented for VCI. It is shown that the simultaneous calculation of several response functions is often advantageous. Sample calculations are presented for pyridine and the complex between pyridine and the silver cation.

  2. NIST torsion oscillator viscometer response: Performance on the LeRC active vibration isolation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1992-01-01

    Critical point viscosity measurements are limited to their reduced temperature approach to T(sub c) in an Earth bound system, because of density gradients imposed by gravity. Therefore, these classes of experiments have been proposed as good candidates for 'microgravity' science experiments where this limitation is not present. The nature of these viscosity measurements dictate hardware that is sensitive to low frequency excitations. Because of the vibratory acceleration sensitivity of a torsion oscillator viscometer, used to acquire such measurements, a vibration isolation sensitivity test was performed on candidate 'microgravity' hardware to study the possibility of meeting the stringent oscillatory sensitivity requirements of a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) torsion oscillator viscometer. A prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation system, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used as the isolation system. The ambient acceleration levels of the platform were reduced to the noise floor levels of its control sensors, about one microgravity in the 0.1 to 10 Hz bandwidth.

  3. Finite element parametric study of the influence of friction pad material and morphological characteristics on disc brake vibration phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, P.; Frendo, F.; Rodrigues, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    Since nowadays the NVH performance of vehicles has become an important priority, the noise radiating from brakes is considered a source of considerable passenger discomfort and dissatisfaction. Creep groan and squeal that show up with annoying vibrations and noise in specific frequency ranges are typical examples of self-excited brake vibrations caused by the stick-slip effect, the former, by the mode coupling of brake disc and friction pads or calliper, the latter. In both cases, the friction coefficient, which depends, among other factors, on the morphology of the mating surfaces and on the operating conditions, is a fundamental parameter but not the only one for the occurrence of the vibratory phenomena. Finite element complex eigenvalue parametric analyses were performed on a disc brake assembly to evaluate propensity to dynamic instability of brakes with multiple pads, as in railway brakes, as a function of the number of pads, pad shape and size, and material parameters.

  4. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  5. Vibration and structureborne noise in space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical models and computer programs for structural response calculations under action of mechanical point loads were developed for single wall shells (composite or aluminum), double wall shells (composite or aluminum), and single wall or double wall circular plates (aluminum). The design configuration of the habitability modules of the space station concept are expected to be discretely stiffened cylindrical shells with truncated cone type end caps or flat but stiffened circular end plates. Analytical formulations and response calculations were performed for the case where the stiffened shell is represented by an orthotropic shell model. The natural frequencies can be calculated. For application to low frequency (below 1000Hz) vibrations and noise generation, such a model might be adequate to evaluate vibration and noise transmission characteristics of space station habitability modules. Parametric studies are now being performed to assess interior noise environment inside a habitability module to mechanically induced vibrations.

  6. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  7. Effect of hygrothermal environment on the nonlinear free vibration responses of laminated composite plates: A nonlinear Unite element micromechanical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Trupti R.; Panda, Subrata K.; Dash, Sushmita

    2016-09-01

    The present research deals with the nonlinear free vibration responses of laminated composite flat panel under hygrothermal environment, by considering the corrugated material properties of the composite lamina through a micromechanical model. The plate has been modeled in the framework of the higher-order shear deformation theory and Green-Lagrange strain displacement relations have been used to account for the geometric nonlinearity. Moreover, the present formulation incorporates all the nonlinear higher order terms arising in the model to capture the exact flexure of the panel. Hamilton's principle has been adopted to derive the system governing equations and suitable nonlinear finite element steps have been employed for discretization. The responses are computed using direct iterative method and compared with those available published results for validation purpose. Numerical illustrations are presented to investigate the effect of various parameters (thickness ratio, support conditions and lamination scheme) on the nonlinear frequency responses of laminated composite plate under hygrothermal environment using the present model and discussed in details.

  8. Efficient Nonparametric Approaches for Estimating the Operating Characteristics of Discrete Item Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    1998-01-01

    Introduces and discusses the rationale and procedures of two nonparametric approaches to estimating the operating characteristic of a discrete item response, or the conditional probability, given the latent trait, that the examinee's response be that specific response. (SLD)

  9. Passenger ride quality within a noise and vibration environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Drezek, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The subjective response to noise and vibration stimuli was studied in a ride quality simulator to determine their importance in the prediction of passenger ride quality. Subjects used category scales to rate noise discomfort, vibration discomfort, both noise and vibration discomfort, and overall discomfort in an effort to evaluate parametric arrangements of noise and vibration. The noise stimuli were composed of octave frequency bands centered at 125, 250, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, each presented at 70, 75, 80, and 85 dB(A). The vertical vibration stimuli were 5 Hz bandwidth random vibrations centered at 3, 5, 7, and 9 Hz, each presented at 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, and 0.12 grms. Analyses were directed at (1) a determination of the subject's ability to separate noise and vibration as contributors to discomfort, (2) an assessment of the physical characteristics of noise and vibration that are needed for prediction of ride quality in this type of multifactor environment, and (3) an evaluation of the relative contribution of noise and vibration to passenger ride quality.

  10. Inspection of Tooth Surface Geometry by Means of Vibration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanasumawong, Chanat; Matsumura, Shigeki; Houjoh, Haruo

    Tooth surface undulation is one of the important sources of gear noise and vibration. The vibration caused by this source is observed as the occurrence of non-meshing vibration component or ghost noise on a vibration spectrum. Frequently ghost noise occurs at the same frequency with natural frequency of a gear pair, consequently its amplitude is amplified to the considerable level and lead to unexpected and severe noise and vibration problems. In this paper a method for inspecting tooth surface undulation is proposed and applied to a helical gear pair. Vibration characteristics of individual gear are extracted from the vibration signal of a gear by synchronous averaging technique, then a frequency response function that can be determined experimentally is applied to the individual averaged signal to assess the tooth surface undulation. The undulations are evaluated by applying this method to the measured vibration signals of the gear pair operated at various speeds and various torques, and show good agreement with each other regardless of operating conditions and also with the expectation by precise tooth surface measurement, even though the undulation is very small in the level of 0.1µm. These results suggest the ability of this method to assess the tooth surface geometry relevant to vibration.

  11. Vibration Prediction Method of Electric Machines by using Experimental Transfer Function and Magnetostatic Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Kuroishi, M.; Nakai, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the noise and structural vibration caused by rotating electric machines. Special attention is given to the magnetic-force induced vibration response of interior-permanent magnet machines. In general, to accurately predict and control the vibration response caused by the electric machines, it is inevitable to model not only the magnetic force induced by the fluctuation of magnetic fields, but also the structural dynamic characteristics of the electric machines and surrounding structural components. However, due to complicated boundary conditions and material properties of the components, such as laminated magnetic cores and varnished windings, it has been a challenge to compute accurate vibration response caused by the electric machines even after their physical models are available. In this paper, we propose a highly-accurate vibration prediction method that couples experimentally-obtained discrete structural transfer functions and numerically-obtained distributed magnetic-forces. The proposed vibration synthesis methodology has been applied to predict vibration responses of an interior permanent magnet machine. The results show that the predicted vibration response of the electric machine agrees very well with the measured vibration response for several load conditions, for wide frequency ranges.

  12. Vibration characteristics of pipe organ reed tongues and the effect of the shallot, resonator, and reed curvature.

    PubMed

    Plitnik, G R

    2000-06-01

    Pipe organ reed pipes sound when a fixed-free curved brass reed mounted on a shallot connected to a resonator is forced to vibrate by an impressed static air pressure. Five sets of experiments were performed in order to investigate the influence of the most important parameters which could affect the tone of a reed pipe. First, the phase difference between the pressure variation in the shallot and the boot, and its relationship to the motion of the reed tongue were analyzed to compare their phases and their spectra. Next, the frequency dependence of the reed on three basic parameters (reed thickness, its vibrating length, and the imposed static air pressure) was investigated in an attempt to determine an empirical equation for the frequency. For each trial, two of the variables were kept constant while the third was altered in order to construct an equation giving frequency as a function of the three variables. Third, experiments were conducted using three different types of shallots: the American (or English) style, the French style, and the German style. The results show that for each shallot, the frequency increases linearly with thickness and linearly with air pressure (over the normal operating range of the reed). For each of the shallots, frequency varies inversely with length when the other variables are held constant. The effect on the reed spectrum of using the three different types of shallot was also investigated, as was the effect of reducing the interior volume of each type. Progressively filling the shallot interior generally decreases the frequency of the vibrating reed. The effect of the resonators on frequency and spectrum was studied because the resonator is an integral part of the resulting tone; virtually every reed stop has some type of resonator. The resonator tends to raise the Q of the impedance peaks and reduce the fundamental frequency. Finally, the influence of the type and degree of curvature on reed vibration was briefly examined

  13. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  14. Analytical and experimental study of vibrations in a gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Ruan, Y. F.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the dynamics of a gear transmission system is presented and compared to experimental results from a gear noise test rig at NASA Lewis. The analytical procedure developed couples the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing-gear system with the response of the gearbox structure. Transient and steady-state vibrations of the gearbox system are presented in the time and frequency domains. The vibration characteristics of a simple single-mesh-gear noise test rig are modeled. The numerical simulations are compared to experimental data measured under typical operating conditions. The system natural frequencies, peak vibration amplitudes, and gear mesh frequencies are generally in good agreement.

  15. Incorporating piezoelectric energy harvester in tunable vibration absorber for application in multi-modal vibration reduction of a platform structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Tunable vibration absorber is an effective device to reduce the vibration of structure subjected to harmonic excitation. The vibration energy is transferred mostly to the absorber when the natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to the excitation frequency. In this study, a piezoelectric (PZT) transducer was incorporated into the absorber in order to harvest the vibration energy and still alleviate the vibration of a platform structure. The tuning in dynamic characteristics of the absorber was facilitated by controlling its tip mass. The design formulation of the absorber was presented with a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) model having the equivalent parameters. In the meantime, an optimal electric load resistor was determined to maximize the power output from the PZT transducer. The experimental measurement validated the SDOF model with good accuracy both in the vibration response and the output electric voltage. Finally, the absorber was installed on a platform structure to investigate its vibration reduction and energy harvesting capability for the external disturbance frequency covering certain frequency span. With three resonance modes of the platform studied, the absorber was able to reduce more than 80% of its original vibration and harvest several folds of electric power comparing with the untuned absorber. Although the performance in vibration reduction was slightly influenced (<6%), the great increase in the electric energy harvested revealed the absorber design a good potential toward self-powered sensor or actuator applications.

  16. Dose response characteristics of special opti-chromic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humprerys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    In 1981 Kronenberg, McLaughlin, and Siebentritt proposed measurement of radiation dosage using optical waveguides with leuco dye solutions. Based on this work, an opti-chromic system was proposed at the Fourth International Meeting on Radiation Processing. This opti-chromic system has been evaluated by McLaughlin and Radak. The opti-chromic waveguide system may be even more valuable for other applications which involve measurements with special requirements and configurations. The linearity of the radiation response can be enhanced by proper selection of leuco dye concentration, waveguide materials, organic activator solvents, and trace chemical additives. This paper presents experimental data resulting from an examination of the organic solvents TEP, DMSO, and n-propyl alcohol in relationship to stability, temperature characteristics, and radiation chemistry. The experimental data indicates that by varying the types and combinations of organic solvents, special opti-chromic waveguides can be fabricated to measure various radiation ranges under a variety of temperature ranges which have stability over time.

  17. Selective effects of vibration on monosynaptic and late EMG responses in human soleus muscle after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve or a tendon tap.

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, A

    1979-01-01

    In normal subjects it was possible to evoke tendon and Hoffman reflexes which were followed by late EMG responses with a latency of 150-250 ms after the reflex stimuli. Analysis of the covariations of reflexes and late responses revealed that muscle spindle sensitivity and strength of the preceding twitch are not essential factors in determining the occurrence of the late responses as opposed to excitability changes within the spinal cord. Inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes and facilitation of late EMG responses to vibration indicate a difference in central pathways. A polysynaptic pathway may be involved in the late responses. PMID:159346

  18. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  19. Exploring Modeling Options and Conversion of Average Response to Appropriate Vibration Envelopes for a Typical Cylindrical Vehicle Panel with Rib-stiffened Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Phil; LaVerde, Bruce; Teague, David

    2009-01-01

    Although applications for Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) techniques are more widely used in the aerospace industry today, opportunities to anchor the response predictions using measured data from a flight-like launch vehicle structure are still quite valuable. Response and excitation data from a ground acoustic test at the Marshall Space Flight Center permitted the authors to compare and evaluate several modeling techniques available in the SEA module of the commercial code VA One. This paper provides an example of vibration response estimates developed using different modeling approaches to both approximate and bound the response of a flight-like vehicle panel. Since both vibration response and acoustic levels near the panel were available from the ground test, the evaluation provided an opportunity to learn how well the different modeling options can match band-averaged spectra developed from the test data. Additional work was performed to understand the spatial averaging of the measurements across the panel from measured data. Finally an evaluation/comparison of two conversion approaches from the statistical average response results that are output from an SEA analysis to a more useful envelope of response spectra appropriate to specify design and test vibration levels for a new vehicle.

  20. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  1. 14 CFR 33.83 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vibration test. 33.83 Section 33.83... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.83 Vibration test. (a) Each engine must undergo vibration surveys to establish that the vibration characteristics of those components...

  2. Crowd-induced random vibration of footbridge and vibration control using multiple tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fan, Jiansheng; Nie, Jianguo; Li, Quanwang; Chen, Yu

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates vibration characteristics of footbridge induced by crowd random walking, and presents the application of multiple tuned mass dampers (MTMD) in suppressing crowd-induced vibration. A single foot force model for the vertical component of walking-induced force is developed, avoiding the phase angle inaccessibility of the continuous walking force. Based on the single foot force model, the crowd-footbridge random vibration model, in which pedestrians are modeled as a crowd flow characterized with the average time headway, is developed to consider the worst vibration state of footbridge. In this random vibration model, an analytic formulation is developed to calculate the acceleration power spectral density in arbitrary position of footbridge with arbitrary span layout. Resonant effect is observed as the footbridge natural frequencies fall within the frequency bandwidth of crowd excitation. To suppress the excessive acceleration for human normal walking comfort, a MTMD system is used to improve the footbridge dynamic characteristics. According to the random vibration model, an optimization procedure, based on the minimization of maximum root-mean-square (rms) acceleration of footbridge, is introduced to determine the optimal design parameters of MTMD system. Numerical analysis shows that the proposed MTMD designed by random optimization procedure, is more effective than traditional MTMD design methodology in reducing dynamic response during crowd-footbridge resonance, and that the proper frequency spacing enlargement will effectively reduce the off-tuning effect of MTMD.

  3. Crack modelling and detection in Timoshenko FGM beam under transverse vibration using frequency contour and response surface model with GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Panigrahi, Brajesh; Pohit, G.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, dynamic response of cracked Timoshenko beam with functionally graded material properties are obtained by a numerical technique using Ritz approximation. In order to verify the applicability and performance of the formulation, comparisons of the present numerical method with three-dimensional FEM models are made. Crack is assumed to be transverse and open throughout the vibration cycle. Two different crack detection techniques have been proposed. Results obtained by the numerical technique are used in both of the crack detection techniques. In the first technique, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours of different modes helps in the prediction of crack location and size. In the second technique, crack is modelled using response surface methodology (RSM). The sum of the squared errors between the numerical and RSM regression model natural frequencies is used as the objective function. This objective function is minimised using genetic algorithm optimisation technique. Both the crack detection techniques and the numerical analysis have shown good agreement with each other.

  4. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  5. Analyzing the vibrational response of an AFM cantilever in liquid with the consideration of tip mass by comparing the hydrodynamic and contact repulsive force models in higher modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Nahavandi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the vibration of a tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever covered with two whole piezoelectric layers in a liquid medium. The authors of this article have already modeled the vibration of a cantilever immersed in liquid over rough surfaces. Five new ideas have been considered for improving the results of the previous work. Mass and damping of a cantilever probe tip have been considered. Since the probe tip of an AFM cantilever has a mass, which can itself affect the natural frequency of vibration, the significance of this mass has been explored. Also, two hydrodynamic force models for analyzing the mass and damping added to a cantilever in liquid medium have been evaluated. In modeling the vibration of a cantilever in liquid, simplifications are made to the theoretical equations used in the modeling, which may make the obtained results different from those in the real case. So, two hydrodynamic force models are introduced and compared with each other. In addition to the already introduced DMT model, the JKR model has been proposed. The forces acting on a probe tip have attractive and repulsive effects. The attractive Van der Waals force can vary depending on the surface smoothness or roughness, and the repulsive contact force, which is independent of the type of surface roughness and usually varies with the hardness or softness of a surface. When the first mode is used in the vibration of an AFM cantilever, the changes of the existing physical parameters in the simulation do not usually produce a significant difference in the response. Thus, three cantilever vibration modes have been investigated. Finally, an analytical approach for obtaining the response of equations is presented which solves the resulting motion equation by the Laplace method and, thus, a time function is obtained for cantilever deflection is determined. Also, using the COMSOL software to model a cantilever in a liquid medium, the computed natural

  6. Research on relation between bending stress and characteristic frequency of H-shaped beam by free vibration deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-05-27

    In order to investigate a relation between a bending stress and a characteristic frequency of a beam, 4-point loading which had constant moment region was conducted to a beam with H shape configuration experimentally and numerically. H-shaped beam has many characteristic deformation modes. Axial tensile stress in the beam made its characteristic frequency higher, and compressive stress lower. In the experiment, some characteristic frequencies got higher by a bending stress, and the others stayed in a small frequency fluctuation. The distinction is anticipated as a capability to measure a bending stress of a beam by its characteristic frequencies.

  7. Electrical, optical and vibrational characteristics of nano structured yttrium barium stannous oxide synthesized through a modified combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Vidya, S.; Rejith, P.P.; John, Annamma; Solomon, Sam; Deepa, A.S.; Thomas, J.K.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Synthesis of YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} nano particles through a novel single step auto igniting combustion process. {yields} Phase purity, thermal stability, vibrational analysis, UV-vis absorption and photo luminescent studies were carried out. {yields} Chemical non-reactivity of YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} with high T{sub c} superconductor YBCO was studied. -- Abstract: A single step combustion process for the preparation of nanoparticles of yttrium barium stannous oxide is reported in this paper. The structure, phase purity and particulate properties of the as prepared nano YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} powder were examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as prepared powder obtained itself is phase pure and possess cubic structure with lattice constant 8.240 A. The particle size of the as prepared sample from Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis is in the range of {approx}15 nm. Vibrational studies carried out on the as prepared powder also confirm the cubic structure of the as prepared sample. The thermal stability of the nano particle is analyzed by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The material is a semiconductor with excellent luminescent properties. Chemical compatibility of the sample with YBCO is analyzed. The YBCO-YBa{sub 2}SnO{sub 5.5} composite showed T{sub c}(0) at 92 K.

  8. Individual Differences in Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesh, Anoop; Mauermann, Manfred; Ernst, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how outer hair cell loss interacts with noise-induced and age-related auditory nerve degradation (i.e., cochlear synaptopathy) to affect auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave characteristics. Given that listeners with impaired audiograms likely suffer from mixtures of these hearing deficits and that ABR amplitudes have successfully been used to isolate synaptopathy in listeners with normal audiograms, an improved understanding of how different hearing pathologies affect the ABR source generators will improve their sensitivity in hearing diagnostics. We employed a functional model for human ABRs in which different combinations of hearing deficits were simulated and show that high-frequency cochlear gain loss steepens the slope of the ABR Wave-V latency versus intensity and amplitude versus intensity curves. We propose that grouping listeners according to a ratio of these slope metrics (i.e., the ABR growth ratio) might offer a way to factor out the outer hair cell loss deficit and maximally relate individual differences for constant ratios to other peripheral hearing deficits such as cochlear synaptopathy. We compared the model predictions to recorded click-ABRs from 30 participants with normal or high-frequency sloping audiograms and confirm the predicted relationship between the ABR latency growth curve and audiogram slope. Experimental ABR amplitude growth showed large individual differences and was compared with the Wave-I amplitude, Wave-V/I ratio, or the interwaveI–W latency in the same listeners. The model simulations along with the ABR recordings suggest that a hearing loss profile depicting the ABR growth ratio versus the Wave-I amplitude or Wave-V/I ratio might be able to differentiate outer hair cell deficits from cochlear synaptopathy in listeners with mixed pathologies. PMID:27837052

  9. Effects of vibrational anharmonicity on molecular electronic conduction and thermoelectric efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Hava Meira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2017-03-01

    We study inelastic vibration-assisted charge transfer effects in two-site molecular junctions, focusing on signatures of vibrational anharmonicity on the electrical characteristics and the thermoelectric response of the junction. We consider three types of oscillators: harmonic, anharmonic-Morse allowing bond dissociation, and harmonic-quartic, mimicking a confinement potential. Using a quantum master equation method which is perturbative in the electron-vibration interaction, we find that the (inelastic) electrical and thermal conductances can be largely affected by the nature of the vibrational potential. In contrast, the Seebeck coefficient, the thermoelectric figure-of-merit, and the thermoelectric efficiency beyond linear response conceal this information, showing a rather weak sensitivity to vibrational anharmonicity. Our work illustrates that anharmonic (many-body) effects, consequential to the current-voltage characteristics, are of little effect for the thermoelectric performance in the present model.

  10. Power-Generation Characteristics After Vibration and Thermal Stresses of Thermoelectric Unicouples with CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kwang Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok; Kim, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Lee, Soonil; Hwang, Hae Jin

    2015-06-01

    Reliability tests for thermoelectric unicouples were carried out to investigate the adhesion properties of CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces. The n-type In0.25 Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 and p-type In0.25Co3FeSb12 bulks were prepared for fabricating a thermoelectric unicouple (one p- n couple) by an induction melting and a spark plasma sintering process. Mo-Cu alloy was selected as an electrode for the unicouples due to its high melting temperature and proper work function value. Many thermoelectric unicouples with the CoSb3/Ti/Mo(Cu) interfaces were fabricated with the proper brazing materials by means of a repeated firing process. Reliability of the unicouples with the interfaces was evaluated by a vibration test and a thermal cycling test. After the thermal cycling and vibration tests, the power-generation characteristics of the unicouples were compared with the unicouples before the tests. Even after the vibration test, electrical power with a power density of 0.5 W/cm2 was generated. The Ti-interlayer is considered as a possible candidate for making a reliable unicouple with high adhesion strength. With the thermal cycling test, the resistance of the unicouple increased and the electrical power from the unicouple decreased. A failure mode by the thermal cycling test was ascribed to a complex effect of micro-cracks originated from the thermal stress and oxidation problem of the thermoelectric materials; that is, a thick oxide layer more than 300 μm was detected after a high-temperature durability test of n-type In0.25Co3.95Ni0.05Sb12 material at 773 K in air for 7 days.

  11. The vibration of a box-type structure. II - Response to a travelling pressure wave.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popplewell, N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite element method is formulated for determining the transient response of a box-type structure to a traveling, arbitrarily shaped pressure wave. The method is illustrated by considering an example of practical concern - the sonic boom. The acceleration-time histories of a closed box are compared with those obtained experimentally from a simulated boom. Satisfactory agreement is obtained with only four rectangular elements per individual face and a simplified loading of the box.

  12. Free Vibration Response Comparison of Composite Beams with Fluid Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    responses of the composites when subjected to these types of input forces including an array of FSI conditions surrounding marine composite structures...close to the density of water. Studies [6–9] of composites under low velocity impact have also shown that there is an increase in impact force with...Background The three dimensional (3-D) DIC technique is a noncontact , optical technique for obtaining full field deformation [12]. It utilizes a

  13. Whole-body vibration decreases the proliferative response of TCD4+ cells in elderly individuals with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, R.; Avelar, N.C.P.; Simão, A.P.; Neves, C.D.C.; Brito-Melo, G.E.A.; Coimbra, C.C.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Lacerda, A.C.R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding whole-body vibration (WBV; frequency = 35 to 40 Hz; amplitude = 4 mm) to squat training on the T-cell proliferative response of elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study was a randomized controlled trial in which the selected variables were assessed before and after 12 weeks of training. Twenty-six subjects (72 ± 5 years of age) were divided into three groups: 1) squat training with WBV (WBV, N = 8); 2) squat training without WBV (N = 10), and 3) a control group (N = 8). Women who were ≥60 years of age and had been diagnosed with OA in at least one knee were eligible. The intervention consisted of 12 uninterrupted weeks of squatting exercise training performed 3 times/week. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from peripheral blood collected before and after training. The proliferation of TCD4+ and TCD8+ cells was evaluated by flow cytometry measuring the carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester fluorescence decay before and after the intervention (Δ). The proliferative response of TCD4+ cells (P = 0.02, effect size = 1.0) showed a significant decrease (23%) in the WBV group compared to the control group, while there was no difference between groups regarding the proliferative response of TCD8+ cells (P = 0.12, effect size = 2.23). The data suggest that the addition of WBV to squat exercise training might modulate T-cell-mediated immunity, minimizing or slowing disease progression in elderly patients with OA of the knee. PMID:22948377

  14. The influence of higher harmonic flow forces on the response of a curved circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Budz, Collin; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a curved circular cylinder (a quarter of a ring, with no extension added to either end) free to oscillate in the crossflow direction was studied experimentally. Both the concave and the convex orientations (with respect to the oncoming flow direction) were considered. As expected, the amplitude of oscillations in both configurations was decreased compared to a vertical cylinder with the same mass ratio. Flow visualizations showed that the vortices were shed in parallel to the curved cylinder, when the cylinder was free to oscillate. The sudden jump in the phase difference between the flow forces and the cylinder displacement observed in the VIV of vertical cylinders was not observed in the curved cylinders. Higher harmonic force components at frequencies twice and three times the frequency of oscillations were observed in flow forces acting on the vertical cylinder, as well as the curved cylinder. Asymmetry in the wake was responsible for the 2nd harmonic force component and the relative velocity of the structure with respect to the oncoming flow was responsible for the 3rd harmonic force component. The lock-in occurred over the same range of reduced velocities for the curved cylinder in the convex orientation as for a vertical cylinder, but it was extended to higher reduced velocities for a curved cylinder in the concave orientation. Higher harmonic force components were found to be responsible for the extended lock-in range in the concave orientation. Within this range, the higher harmonic forces were even larger than the first harmonic force and the structure was being excited mainly by these higher harmonic forces.

  15. Measuring Fluctuating Pressure Levels and Vibration Response in a Jet Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterholt, Douglas J.; Knox, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of loads due to solid rocket motor plume impingement allows for moreaccurate analyses of components subjected to such an environment. Typically, test verification of predicted loads due to these conditions is widely overlooked or unsuccessful. ATA Engineering, Inc., performed testing during a solid rocket motor firing to obtain acceleration and pressure responses in the hydrodynamic field surrounding the jet plume. The test environment necessitated a robust design to facilitate measurements being made in close proximity to the jet plume. This paper presents the process of designing a test fixture and an instrumentation package that could withstand the solid rocket plume environment and protect the required instrumentation.

  16. A magnetically sprung vibration harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Mellor, P. H.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-04-01

    The use of energy harvesting systems is becoming a more prominent research topic in supplying energy to wireless sensor nodes. The paper will present an analytical 'toolbox' for designing and modeling a vibration energy harvester where the moving mass is suspended magnetically. Calculations from the presented model and measurements from a prototype are compared, and the presence of system non-linearities is shown and discussed. The use of the magnetic suspension and its equivalent hardening spring suspension leads to the system's non-linearity, demonstrating a broad band response and 'jump' phenomenon characteristic. The benefits of these are discussed and the system's performance is compared with those from literature, showing similarity.

  17. Vibration isolation of automotive vehicle engine using periodic mounting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, S.

    2005-05-01

    Customer awareness and sensitivity to noise and vibration levels have been raised through increasing television advertisement, in which the vehicle noise and vibration performance is used as the main market differentiation. This awareness has caused the transportation industry to regard noise and vibration as important criteria for improving market shares. One industry that tends to be in the forefront of the technology to reduce the levels of noise and vibration is the automobile industry. Hence, it is of practical interest to reduce the vibrations induced structural responses. The automotive vehicle engine is the main source of mechanical vibrations of automobiles. The engine is vulnerable to the dynamic action caused by engine disturbance force in various speed ranges. The vibrations of the automotive vehicle engines may cause structural failure, malfunction of other parts, or discomfort to passengers because of high level noise and vibrations. The mounts of the engines act as the transmission paths of the vibrations transmitted from the excitation sources to the body of the vehicle and passengers. Therefore, proper design and control of these mounts are essential to the attenuation of the vibration of platform structures. To improve vibration resistant capacities of engine mounting systems, vibration control techniques may be used. For instance, some passive and semi-active dissipation devices may be installed at mounts to enhance vibration energy absorbing capacity. In the proposed study, a radically different concept is presented whereby periodic mounts are considered because these mounts exhibit unique dynamic characteristics that make them act as mechanical filters for wave propagation. As a result, waves can propagate along the periodic mounts only within specific frequency bands called the "Pass Bands" and wave propagation is completely blocked within other frequency bands called the "Stop Bands". The experimental arrangements, including the design of

  18. Studying the buckling and vibration characteristics of single-walled zinc oxide nanotubes using a nanoscale finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.; Mirnezhad, M.; Sadeghiyeh, F.

    2013-09-01

    The free vibration and axial buckling of achiral zinc oxide nanotubes (ZnONTs) are studied in this paper based on a three-dimensional finite-element model in which bonds are modeled using beam elements and mass elements are placed at the joints of beams instead of atoms. To determine the mechanical properties of the nanotubes, a linkage is established between molecular mechanics and density functional theory. The fundamental frequency and critical buckling load of ZnONTs with different geometries, chiralities and boundary conditions are calculated. It is shown that zigzag nanotubes are more stable than armchair ones. Investigating the effect of aspect ratio on the critical force shows that longer nanotubes are less stable. Also, it is indicated that increasing the length of the nanotubes will result in decreasing the frequency. Moreover, as the aspect ratio increases, the effect of end conditions diminishes.

  19. Effect of granular media on the vibrational response of a resonant structure: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Valenza, John J; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David Linton

    2010-11-01

    The acoustic response of a structure that contains a cavity filled with a loose granular material is analyzed. The inputs to the theory are the effective masses of each subsystem: that of the empty-cavity resonating structure and that of the granular medium within the cavity. This theory accurately predicts the frequencies, widths, and relative amplitudes of the various flexural mode resonances observed with rectangular bars, each having a cavity filled with loose tungsten granules. Inasmuch as the dominant mechanism for damping is due to adsorbed water at the grain-grain contacts, the significant effects of humidity on both the effective mass of the granular medium as well as on the response of the grain-loaded bars are monitored. Here, depending upon the humidity and the preparation protocol, it is possible to observe one, two, or three distinct resonances in a wide frequency range (1-5 kHz) over which the empty bar has but one resonance. These effects are understood in terms of the theoretical framework, which may simplify in terms of perturbation theories.

  20. Experimental Analysis of a Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting System for Harmonic, Random, and Sine on Random Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, Jackson W.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Silvers, Kurt L.

    2013-07-01

    Formal journal article Experimental analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvesting system for harmonic, random, and sine on random vibration Abstract: Harvesting power with a piezoelectric vibration powered generator using a full-wave rectifier conditioning circuit is experimentally compared for varying sinusoidal, random and sine on random (SOR) input vibration scenarios. Additionally, the implications of source vibration characteristics on harvester design are discussed. Studies in vibration harvesting have yielded numerous alternatives for harvesting electrical energy from vibrations but piezoceramics arose as the most compact, energy dense means of energy transduction. The rise in popularity of harvesting energy from ambient vibrations has made piezoelectric generators commercially available. Much of the available literature focuses on maximizing harvested power through nonlinear processing circuits that require accurate knowledge of generator internal mechanical and electrical characteristics and idealization of the input vibration source, which cannot be assumed in general application. In this manuscript, variations in source vibration and load resistance are explored for a commercially available piezoelectric generator. We characterize the source vibration by its acceleration response for repeatability and transcription to general application. The results agree with numerical and theoretical predictions for in previous literature that load optimal resistance varies with transducer natural frequency and source type, and the findings demonstrate that significant gains are seen with lower tuned transducer natural frequencies for similar source amplitudes. Going beyond idealized steady state sinusoidal and simplified random vibration input, SOR testing allows for more accurate representation of real world ambient vibration. It is shown that characteristic interactions from more complex vibrational sources significantly alter power generation and power processing

  1. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  2. Vibration Response Models of a Stiffened Aluminum Plate Excited by a Shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical models of structural-acoustic interactions are of interest to aircraft designers and the space program. This paper describes a comparison between two energy finite element codes, a statistical energy analysis code, a structural finite element code, and the experimentally measured response of a stiffened aluminum plate excited by a shaker. Different methods for modeling the stiffeners and the power input from the shaker are discussed. The results show that the energy codes (energy finite element and statistical energy analysis) accurately predicted the measured mean square velocity of the plate. In addition, predictions from an energy finite element code had the best spatial correlation with measured velocities. However, predictions from a considerably simpler, single subsystem, statistical energy analysis model also correlated well with the spatial velocity distribution. The results highlight a need for further work to understand the relationship between modeling assumptions and the prediction results.

  3. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  4. Demonstrating the Effect of Particle Impact Dampers on the Random Vibration Response and Fatigue Life of Printed Wiring Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Brent; Montgomery, Randall; Geist, David; Hunt, Ron; LaVerde, Bruce; Towner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In a recent experimental study, small Particle Impact Dampers (PID) were bonded directly to the surface of printed circuit board (PCB) or printed wiring assemblies (PWA), reducing the random vibration response and increasing the fatigue life. This study provides data verifying practicality of this approach. The measured peak strain and acceleration response of the fundamental out of plane bending mode was significantly attenuated by adding a PID device. Attenuation of this mode is most relevant to the fatigue life of a PWA because the local relative displacements between the board and the supported components, which ultimately cause fatigue failures of the electrical leads of the board-mounted components are dominated by this mode. Applying PID damping at the board-level of assembly provides mitigation with a very small mass impact, especially as compared to isolation at an avionics box or shelf level of assembly. When compared with other mitigation techniques at the PWA level (board thickness, stiffeners, constrained layer damping), a compact PID device has the additional advantage of not needing to be an integral part of the design. A PID can simply be bonded to heritage or commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware to facilitate its use in environments beyond which it was originally qualified. Finite element analysis and test results show that the beneficial effect is not localized and that the attenuation is not due to the simple addition of mass. No significant, detrimental reduction in frequency was observed. Side-by-side life testing of damped and un-damped boards at two different thicknesses (0.070" and 0.090") has shown that the addition of a PID was much more significant to the fatigue life than increasing the thickness. High speed video, accelerometer, and strain measurements have been collected to correlate with analytical results.

  5. The dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison between measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin, J.; Capron, A.; Jongmans, D.; Baillet, L.; Bottelin, P.; Donze, F.; Larose, E.; Mangeney, A.

    2016-11-01

    Seismic noise measurements (ambient vibrations) have been increasingly used in rock slope stability assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. Recent studies made on gravitational hazard revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequencies and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum rock slope displacement. Different properties (resonance frequencies, polarization, and spectral ratio amplitudes) can be derived from the spectral analysis of the seismic noise to characterize unstable rock masses. The objective here is to identify the dynamic parameters that could be used to gain information on prone-to-fall rock columns geometry. To do so, the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to seismic noise has been studied on two different sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry. Dynamic parameters (main resonance frequency and spectral ratio amplitudes) that could characterize the column decoupling were extracted from seismic noise and their variations were studied taking into account the external environmental parameter fluctuations. Based on this analysis, a two-dimensional numerical model has been set up to assess the influence of the rear vertical fractures identified on both sites on the rock column motion response. Although a simple relation was found between spectral ratio amplitudes and the rock column slenderness, it turned out that the resonance frequency is more stable than the spectral ratio amplitudes to characterize this column decoupling, provided that the elastic properties of the column can be estimated. The study also revealed the effect of additional remote fractures on the dynamic parameters, which in turn could be used for detecting the presence of such discontinuities.

  6. The dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to ambient vibrations: comparison between measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin, J.; Capron, A.; Jongmans, D.; Baillet, L.; Bottelin, P.; Donze, F.; Larose, E.; Mangeney, A.

    2017-02-01

    Seismic noise measurements (ambient vibrations) have been increasingly used in rock slope stability assessment for both investigation and monitoring purposes. Recent studies made on gravitational hazard revealed significant spectral amplification at given frequencies and polarization of the wave-field in the direction of maximum rock slope displacement. Different properties (resonance frequencies, polarization and spectral ratio amplitudes) can be derived from the spectral analysis of the seismic noise to characterize unstable rock masses. The objective here is to identify the dynamic parameters that could be used to gain information on prone-to-fall rock columns' geometry. To do so, the dynamic response of prone-to-fall columns to seismic noise has been studied on two different sites exhibiting cliff-like geometry. Dynamic parameters (main resonance frequency and spectral ratio amplitudes) that could characterize the column decoupling were extracted from seismic noise and their variations were studied taking into account the external environmental parameter fluctuations. Based on this analysis, a two-dimensional numerical model has been set up to assess the influence of the rear vertical fractures identified on both sites on the rock column motion response. Although a simple relation was found between spectral ratio amplitudes and the rock column slenderness, it turned out that the resonance frequency is more stable than the spectral ratio amplitudes to characterize this column decoupling, provided that the elastic properties of the column can be estimated. The study also revealed the effect of additional remote fractures on the dynamic parameters, which in turn could be used for detecting the presence of such discontinuities.

  7. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  8. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties Using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Kiratli, B. J; Steele, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical response tissue analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(sub MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(sup 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between EI(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(sup 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(sup 2) = 0.645). EI(sub MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(sup 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(sup 2) = 0.915 and R(sup 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non- invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  9. Noninvasive Determination of Bone Mechanical Properties using Vibration Response: A Refined Model and Validation in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, S. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Steele, C. R.; Kiratli, B. J.; Martin, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Accurate non-invasive mechanical measurement of long bones is made difficult by the masking effect of surrounding soft tissues. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) offers a method for separating the effects of the soft tissue and bone; however, a direct validation has been lacking. A theoretical analysis of wave propagation through the compressed tissue revealed a strong mass effect dependent on the relative accelerations of the probe and bone. The previous mathematical model of the bone and overlying tissue system was reconfigured to incorporate the theoretical finding. This newer model (six-parameter) was used to interpret results using MRTA to determine bone cross-sectional bending stiffness, EI(sub MRTA). The relationship between EI(MRTA) and theoretical EI values for padded aluminum rods was R(exp 2) = 0.999. A biological validation followed using monkey tibias. Each bone was tested in vivo with the MRTA instrument. Postmortem, the same tibias were excised and tested to failure in three-point bending to determine EI(sub 3-PT) and maximum load. Diaphyseal Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements were also made. The relationship between E(sub 3-PT) and in vivo EI(sub MRTA) using the six-parameter model is strong (R(exp 2) = 0.947) and better than that using the older model (R(exp 2) = 0.645). EI(MRTA) and BMD are also highly correlated (R(exp 2) = 0.853). MRTA measurements in vivo and BMD ex vivo are both good predictors of scaled maximum strength (R(exp 2) = 0.915 and R(exp 2) = 0.894, respectively). This is the first biological validation of a non-invasive mechanical measurement of bone by comparison to actual values. The MRTA technique has potential clinical value for assessing long-bone mechanical properties.

  10. Analysis of muscle activation in each body segment in response to the stimulation intensity of whole-body vibration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a whole-body vibration exercise, as well as to discuss the scientific basis to establish optimal intensity by analyzing differences between muscle activations in each body part, according to the stimulation intensity of the whole-body vibration. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects included 10 healthy men in their 20s without orthopedic disease. Representative muscles from the subjects’ primary body segments were selected while the subjects were in upright positions on exercise machines; electromyography electrodes were attached to the selected muscles. Following that, the muscle activities of each part were measured at different intensities. No vibration, 50/80 in volume, and 10/25/40 Hz were mixed and applied when the subjects were on the whole-vibration exercise machines in upright positions. After that, electromyographic signals were collected and analyzed with the root mean square of muscular activation. [Results] As a result of the analysis, it was found that the muscle activation effects had statistically meaningful differences according to changes in exercise intensity in all 8 muscles. When the no-vibration status was standardized and analyzed as 1, the muscle effect became lower at higher frequencies, but became higher at larger volumes. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it was shown that the whole-body vibration stimulation promoted muscle activation across the entire body part, and the exercise effects in each muscle varied depending on the exercise intensities. PMID:28265155

  11. State Space Formulation of Nonlinear Vibration Responses Collected from a Dynamic Rotor-Bearing System: An Extension of Bearing Diagnostics to Bearing Prognostics

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Peter W.; Wang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Bearings are widely used in various industries to support rotating shafts. Their failures accelerate failures of other adjacent components and may cause unexpected machine breakdowns. In recent years, nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system have been widely analyzed for bearing diagnostics. Numerous methods have been proposed to identify different bearing faults. However, these methods are unable to predict the future health conditions of bearings. To extend bearing diagnostics to bearing prognostics, this paper reports the design of a state space formulation of nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system in order to intelligently predict bearing remaining useful life (RUL). Firstly, analyses of nonlinear vibration responses were conducted to construct a bearing health indicator (BHI) so as to assess the current bearing health condition. Secondly, a state space model of the BHI was developed to mathematically track the health evolution of the BHI. Thirdly, unscented particle filtering was used to predict bearing RUL. Lastly, a new bearing acceleration life testing setup was designed to collect natural bearing degradation data, which were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed bearing prognostic method. Results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed bearing prognostic method is promising and the proposed bearing prognostic method is able to reflect future bearing health conditions. PMID:28216586

  12. State Space Formulation of Nonlinear Vibration Responses Collected from a Dynamic Rotor-Bearing System: An Extension of Bearing Diagnostics to Bearing Prognostics.

    PubMed

    Tse, Peter W; Wang, Dong

    2017-02-14

    Bearings are widely used in various industries to support rotating shafts. Their failures accelerate failures of other adjacent components and may cause unexpected machine breakdowns. In recent years, nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system have been widely analyzed for bearing diagnostics. Numerous methods have been proposed to identify different bearing faults. However, these methods are unable to predict the future health conditions of bearings. To extend bearing diagnostics to bearing prognostics, this paper reports the design of a state space formulation of nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system in order to intelligently predict bearing remaining useful life (RUL). Firstly, analyses of nonlinear vibration responses were conducted to construct a bearing health indicator (BHI) so as to assess the current bearing health condition. Secondly, a state space model of the BHI was developed to mathematically track the health evolution of the BHI. Thirdly, unscented particle filtering was used to predict bearing RUL. Lastly, a new bearing acceleration life testing setup was designed to collect natural bearing degradation data, which were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed bearing prognostic method. Results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed bearing prognostic method is promising and the proposed bearing prognostic method is able to reflect future bearing health conditions.

  13. Vibration isolation via a scissor-like structured platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiuting; Jing, Xingjian; Xu, Jian; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    More and more attentions are attracted to the analysis and design of nonlinear vibration control/isolation systems for better isolation performance. In this study, an isolation platform with n-layer scissor-like truss structure is investigated to explore novel design of passive/semi-active/active vibration control/isolation systems and to exploit potential nonlinear benefits in vibration suppression. Due to the special scissor-like structure, the dynamic response of the platform has inherent nonlinearities both in equivalent damping and stiffness characteristics (although only linear components are applied), and demonstrates good loading capacity and excellent equilibrium stability. With the mathematical modeling and analysis of the equivalent stiffness and damping of the system, it is shown that: (a) the structural nonlinearity in the system is very helpful in vibration isolation, (b) both equivalent stiffness and damping characteristics are nonlinear and could be designed/adjusted to a desired nonlinearity by tuning structural parameters, and (c) superior vibration isolation performances (e.g., quasi-zero stiffness characteristics etc.) can be achieved with different structural parameters. This scissor-like truss structure can potentially be employed in different engineering practices for much better vibration isolation or control.

  14. Transient response characteristics in a biomolecular integral controller.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2016-04-01

    The cellular behaviour of perfect adaptation is achieved through the use of an integral control element in the underlying biomolecular circuit. It is generally unclear how integral action affects the important aspect of transient response in these biomolecular systems, especially in light of the fact that it typically deteriorates the transient response in engineering contexts. To address this issue, the authors investigated the transient response in a computational model of a simple biomolecular integral control system involved in bacterial signalling. They find that the transient response can actually speed up as the integral gain parameter increases. On further analysis, they find that the underlying dynamics are composed of slow and fast modes and the speed-up of the transient response is because of the speed-up of the slow-mode dynamics. Finally, they note how an increase in the integral gain parameter also leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the transient response, consistent with the overall improvement in the transient response. These results should be useful in understanding the overall effect of integral action on system dynamics, particularly for biomolecular systems.

  15. Vibration control in piping system by dual dynamic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeyama, H.; Ikahata, N.; Sunakoda, K.; Seto, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the applicability of a seismic response reduction method with a dual dynamic absorber for equipment, piping system, etc. in a nuclear power plant. The dual dynamic absorber which utilizes a magnetic damping effect was developed and the investigation was done to the characteristics of vibration controllability through excitation tests. As the primary stage of this study, a simple vertical straight pipe with a diameter of 60.8 mm and a length of 2,000 mm was excited by random vibration input, and amplitude of vibration level was reduced by the dual dynamic absorber mounted on the pipe. The mass ratio of the dual dynamic absorber to the straight pipe was 0.05. The result of this test was that the response reduction effect of the dual dynamic absorber for random excitations was verified. Also, the damping characteristic with fine linearity for the input level was obtained.

  16. Characteristics, Responsibilities, and Qualities of Urban School Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, Edith; Hidalgo, Francisco

    1995-01-01

    Teacher mentors in urban schools need particular characteristics to promote development in beginning teachers because the urban school is a unique environment. Urban mentor teachers need to be able to articulate their beliefs and practices, and they need well-developed coaching skills. (SLD)

  17. Angle dependence of response characteristics of neutron survey instruments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N J; Bartlett, D T; Hager, L G; Jones, L N; Molinos, C; Tanner, R J; Taylor, G C; Thomas, D J

    2004-01-01

    Neutron area survey instruments are designed to have an approximately isotropic response. In practice, the response cannot be perfectly isotropic for instruments that do not have spherical symmetry, and for all instruments it is modified by the inclusion of batteries, electronics, handles, etc. This affects the ability of the survey instrument to measure accurately an isotropic dose equivalent quantity. Measurements of the angle dependence of response for four of the most commonly used designs of survey instrument (Harwell 0949, Mark 7 NRM, NM2 and Studsvik 2202D) have been performed in a low-scatter room using radionuclide and monoenergetic neutron sources. The Monte Carlo code MCNP has been used to model the responses and to investigate their sensitivity to the polyethylene density, counting gas pressure and other manufacturing tolerances. Preliminary modelling results are presented here.

  18. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  19. The Role of a Vibration Response Imaging Device in the Selection of Patients for Lung Resection Surgery.

    PubMed

    Comce, Fatma; Bingol, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Tanju, Serhan; Toker, Alper; Cagatay, Pembe; Ece, Turhan

    2011-06-17

    BACKGROUND: Simpler and radiation free alternatives have been researched to estimate postoperative lung functions. Objective of the study is to investigate the reliability of predicted postoperative (ppo) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁) and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) calculated by vibration response imaging (VRI) to guide the selection of patients for lung resection surgery in comparison with quantitative perfusion scintigraphy (Q scan). METHODS: 35 candidates for lung resection were enrolled in the study for preoperative and postoperative evaluation of FEV₁ and DLCO. RESULTS: Totally 25 patients had preoperative tests. VRI measurements showed strong correlation with Q scan measurements of predicted postoperative (ppo) FEV₁% (r= .87, p<.001), ppo FEV₁(L) (r=.90, p<.001) and ppo DLCO% (r=.90, p<.001). There was a correlation between ppo FEV₁ (% and L) calculated by Q scan and postoperative actual FEV₁ (% and L) (r=.47, p<.05; r=.73, p<.001). There was no difference between VRI measurements of ppo FEV₁(% and L) and postoperative actual FEV₁ values. There was a correlation between ppo FEV₁ (% and L) calculated by VRI and postoperative actual FEV₁(% and L) (r= .52, p<.05; r= .79, p<.001). The mean differences between ppo and postoperative actual FEV₁ values was 49ml for VRI versus 230ml for Q scan. Both VRI and Q scan ppo DLCO% did not show agreement with postoperative actual DLCO%. CONCLUSIONS: VRI, which is a non-invasive, radiation free and simple test, may be valuable in the preoperative evaluation of lung resection surgery. It may be a good alternative to Q scan.

  20. Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Nam V. H.; Sussitz, Hermann F.; Lieberzeit, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance—QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity. PMID:25587416

  1. Human response to vibration stress in Japanese workers: lessons from our 35-year studies A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Tsunetaka

    2015-01-01

    The occupational uses with vibratory tools or vehicles provoked health disorders of users. We reviewed narratively our articles of 35 yr studies and their related literatures, and considered the pathophysiology of the hand-arm vibration disorders. Concerning the risk factors of health impairments in workers with vibratory tools, there are two conflicting schools of the researchers: The peripheral school emphasizes that vibration only makes predominant impairments on hands and arms, showing typically Raynaud's phenomenon in the fingers. In the systemic school, the health disorders are produced by combination with vibration, noise and working environment, namely vibratory work itself, leading to diversified symptoms and signs in relation to systemic impairments. Our 35 yr studies have evidently supported the systemic school, including disorders of the central and autonomic nervous systems. The genesis is vibratory work itself, including vibration, noise, cold working environment, ergonomic and biodynamic conditions, and emotional stress in work. Because the health disorders yield in the whole body, the following measures would contribute to the prevention of health impairments: the attenuation of vibration and noise generated form vibratory machines and the regulations on operating tool hours. In conclusion, this occupational disease results from systemic impairments due to long-term occupational work with vibratory tools.

  2. Human response to vibration stress in Japanese workers: lessons from our 35-year studies A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    MATOBA, Tsunetaka

    2015-01-01

    The occupational uses with vibratory tools or vehicles provoked health disorders of users. We reviewed narratively our articles of 35 yr studies and their related literatures, and considered the pathophysiology of the hand-arm vibration disorders. Concerning the risk factors of health impairments in workers with vibratory tools, there are two conflicting schools of the researchers: The peripheral school emphasizes that vibration only makes predominant impairments on hands and arms, showing typically Raynaud’s phenomenon in the fingers. In the systemic school, the health disorders are produced by combination with vibration, noise and working environment, namely vibratory work itself, leading to diversified symptoms and signs in relation to systemic impairments. Our 35 yr studies have evidently supported the systemic school, including disorders of the central and autonomic nervous systems. The genesis is vibratory work itself, including vibration, noise, cold working environment, ergonomic and biodynamic conditions, and emotional stress in work. Because the health disorders yield in the whole body, the following measures would contribute to the prevention of health impairments: the attenuation of vibration and noise generated form vibratory machines and the regulations on operating tool hours. In conclusion, this occupational disease results from systemic impairments due to long-term occupational work with vibratory tools. PMID:26460379

  3. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  4. Analysis of Frequency Response Characteristics of Polymer Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohigashi, Hiroji; Itoh, Toru; Kimura, Kuniko; Nakanishi, Toshiharu; Suzuki, Miyo

    1988-03-01

    Piezoelectric polymers have large dielectric and mechanical internal losses. In this study, we introduced internal losses into Mason’s equivalent circuit, and analyzed the effects of these losses on the transducer response, mainly in the frequency domain. To prove the validity of the theoretical analysis, we fabricated polymer transducers of several backing load types which are effective for practical use, using vinylidene fluoride and trifluoroethylene copolymer films, and evaluated their frequency and impulse responses. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We conclude that a consideration of the internal losses is essential for the proper design and correct evaluation of polymer transducers.

  5. Tactile Responses to Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrillo, Ronald T.; Bolanowski, Stanley J.

    The skin is by far the largest organ of the human body having an area of approximately 1.85 m2 in the adult male and 1.65 m2 in the adult female with an average weight of about 9 lb., comprising about 6% of the total body weight. In thickness it ranges from an average of 4.4 mm in non-hairy skin to 2.1 mm in hairy skin. It is thin over the eyelids and thick at the soles of the feet. The human body contains four types of skin.

  6. Vibration detection and discrimination in the masked birch caterpillar (Drepana arcuata).

    PubMed

    Guedes, R N C; Matheson, S M; Frei, B; Smith, M L; Yack, J E

    2012-05-01

    Leaf-borne vibrations are potentially important to caterpillars for communication and risk assessment. Yet, little is known about the vibratory environment of caterpillars, or how they detect and discriminate between vibrations from relevant and non-relevant sources. We measured the vibratory ‘landscape’ of the territorial masked birch caterpillar Drepana arcuata (Drepanidae), and assessed its ability to detect and respond to vibrations generated by conspecific and predatory intruders, wind and rain. Residents of leaf shelters were shown to respond to low amplitude vibrations generated by a crawling conspecific intruder, since removal of the vibrations through leaf incision prevented the resident’s response. Residents did not respond to large amplitude, low frequency disturbances caused by wind and rain alone, but did respond to approaching conspecifics under windy conditions, indicating an ability to discriminate between these sources. Residents also responded differently in the presence of vibrations generated by approaching predators (Podisus) and conspecifics. An analysis of vibration characteristics suggests that despite significant overlap between vibrations from different sources, there are differences in frequency and amplitude characteristics that caterpillars may use to discriminate between sources. Caterpillars live in a vibration-rich environment that we argue forms a prominent part of the sensory world of substrate bound holometabolous larvae.

  7. School Refusal Behavior: Prevalence, Characteristics, and the Schools' Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickney, Marcella I.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 288 elementary and secondary North Dakota schools found 75% had a school refusal behavior (SRB) identification system in place, 57% had a school psychologist available, principals were most frequently responsible for identifying school refusers, 2.3% of students were identified as school refusers of which 49% falsely claimed illness,…

  8. Inductor flyback characteristic gives voltage regulator fast response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. D.

    1965-01-01

    Voltage regulator alternately connects an inductor in parallel and in series with the input voltage source. This flyback voltage regulator provides a regulated dc voltage to varying loads from a varying dc supply and gives fast response to load and supply changes.

  9. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  10. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  11. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  12. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  13. Review of bubble detector response characteristics and results from space.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B J; Smith, M B; Ing, H; Andrews, H R; Machrafi, R; Tomi, L; Matthews, T J; Veloce, L; Shurshakov, V; Tchernykh, I; Khoshooniy, N

    2012-06-01

    A passive neutron-bubble dosemeter (BD), developed by Bubble Technology Industries, has been used for space applications. Both the bubble detector-personal neutron dosemeter and bubble detector spectrometer have been studied at ground-based facilities in order to characterise their response due to neutrons, heavy ion particles and protons. This technology was first used during the Canadian-Russian collaboration aboard the Russian satellite BION-9, and subsequently on other space missions, including later BION satellites, the space transportation system, Russian MIR space station and International Space Station. This paper provides an overview of the experiments that have been performed for both ground-based and space studies in an effort to characterise the response of these detectors to various particle types in low earth orbit and presents results from the various space investigations.

  14. Wind response characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Holley, W. E.; Jafarey, N.

    1981-01-01

    It was the objective of the work reported here, and in the companion paper 1 . A broader examination of wind turbine dynamic response to turbulence, and attempts to ascertain the features of turbulence that wind turbines are most sensitive to were made. A statistical description of the wind input including all three wind components and allowing linear wind gradients across the rotor disk, was used together with quasi-static aerodynamic theory and an elementary structural model involving only a few degrees of freedom. The idea was to keep the turbine model simple and show the benefits of this type of statistical wind representation before attempting to use a more complex turbine model. As far as possible, the analysis was kept in the simplest form, while still preserving key physical responses.

  15. Postural response to vibration of triceps surae, but not quadriceps muscles, differs between people with and without knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Although proprioceptive impairments are reported in knee osteoarthritis (OA), there has been little investigation of the underlying causes. Muscle spindles make an important contribution to proprioception. This study investigated whether function of quadriceps, triceps surae, and tibialis anterior muscle spindles is altered in individuals with knee OA. Thirty individuals with knee OA (17 females, 66 ± 7 [mean ± SD] years) and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls (17 females, 65 ± 8 years) stood comfortably and blindfolded on a force plate. Mechanical vibration (60 Hz) was applied bilaterally over the quadriceps, triceps surae, or tibialis anterior muscles for the middle 15 s (Vibration) of a 45 s trial (preceded and followed by 15 s Baseline and Recovery periods). Two trials were recorded for each muscle site. Mean anterior-posterior displacement of centre of pressure was analysed. Although there were no differences between groups for trials with vibration applied to the quandriceps or tibialis anterior, participants with knee OA were initially perturbed more by triceps surae vibration and accommodated less to repeated exposure than controls. This indicates that people with knee OA have less potential to detect or compensate for disturbed input to triceps surae, possibly due to an inability to compensate using muscles spindles in the quadriceps muscle.

  16. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  17. Roman Catholic beliefs produce characteristic neural responses to moral dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Flexas, Albert; de Miguel, Pedro; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; Munar, Enric

    2014-01-01

    This study provides exploratory evidence about how behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief. Eleven Catholics and 13 Atheists (all female) judged 48 moral dilemmas. Differential neural activity between the two groups was found in precuneus and in prefrontal, frontal and temporal regions. Furthermore, a double dissociation showed that Catholics recruited different areas for deontological (precuneus; temporoparietal junction) and utilitarian moral judgments [dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); temporal poles], whereas Atheists did not (superior parietal gyrus for both types of judgment). Finally, we tested how both groups responded to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas: Catholics showed enhanced activity in DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex during utilitarian moral judgments to impersonal moral dilemmas and enhanced responses in anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus during deontological moral judgments to personal moral dilemmas. Our results indicate that moral judgment can be influenced by an acquired set of norms and conventions transmitted through religious indoctrination and practice. Catholic individuals may hold enhanced awareness of the incommensurability between two unequivocal doctrines of the Catholic belief set, triggered explicitly in a moral dilemma: help and care in all circumstances—but thou shalt not kill. PMID:23160812

  18. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Fluid structural interaction problems that estimate panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. Even when the analyst elects to use a fitted function for the spatial correlation an error may be introduced if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Both qualitative and quantitative illustrations evaluating the adequacy of different patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are provided. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system is then evaluated in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same finite element model. The convergence study results are presented illustrating the impact resulting from a poor choice of patch density. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a Diffuse Acoustic Field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  19. Characteristics of antibody responses in Pigeon Fanciers' Lung.

    PubMed

    Nademi, Zohreh; Todryk, Stephen; Baldwin, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The aetiology of Pigeon Fanciers' Lung (PFL) is believed to include immune complex formation between inhaled pigeon antigens and antibodies generated against them. However it is unclear why some fanciers are asymptomatic despite the presence of high levels of anti-avian antigen antibodies in their serum. In this study we investigated whether qualitative differences in specific antibodies might contribute to disease. IgG responses among pigeon fanciers were determined by ELISA and the functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against a range of pigeon antigens was determined by inhibition ELISA and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). The median titres of IgG1 and IgG2 against all the pigeon antigens tested was higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic fanciers and these differences were significant for anti-pigeon serum IgG1 (P=0.04), anti-fresh pigeon droppings (PDF) IgG2 (P=0.028), anti-old pigeon droppings (PDO) IgG2 (P=0.04) and anti-pigeon intestinal scrapings IgG2 (P=0.03). The functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against PDO was higher in symptomatic individuals (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively) whilst the functional affinity of anti-PDF IgG2 was also significantly higher in these patients (P≤0.001). Symptomatic fanciers were also significantly more likely to have a high reaction enthalphy (ΔH) as measured by ITC and thus had higher affinity antibodies against PDO (P=0.044). This data confirms previous studies showing that the magnitude alone of the antibody response to pigeon antigens cannot determine the presence of PFL, but that antibody affinity may be important. ITC is a rapid method of measuring antibody affinity and has diagnostic potential in PFL, and may be of use in other situations where antibody affinity is important.

  20. Plant characteristic estimation using sonar, multispectral reflectance, and electromagnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Carol L.

    Scope and method of study. The goal of this study was to design, test and validate three methods of remotely estimating plant physical and physiological characteristics. A free-space parallel plate electrostatic sensing system operating at medium radio frequency range was used to estimate water content and plant dry biomass. An ultrasound distance sensing system and a multispectral imaging system was used to directly estimate plant height and top view surface area and indirectly estimate plant biomass. NDVI was calculated from the multispectral imaging system data. Combining NDVI with the plant height and top view surface area estimates, a correlation was observed between plant biomass, chlorophyll content and chlorophyll concentration. Findings and conclusions. Plant water content and dry biomass of greenhouse grown spinach were estimated using a free-space electrostatic sensing system (r2 = 0.95). Ultrasonic sensor-based height estimates and top view surface area multispectral image data provided plant biomass estimates in corn and spinach (r 2 = 0.85 and 0.88). Estimates for snap beans were not as convincing (r2 = 0.52). Combining biomass estimates from the height and surface area data obtained by the ultrasonic distance sensor and the multispectral imaging system with NDVI670 calculated from reflectance data from the imaging system provided strong correlations with chlorophyll content in spinach (r 2 = 0.91). This was an improvement from the chlorophyll content estimates using only NDVI670. Correlations with chlorophyll concentration were weak. The strongest correlation was found using the reflectance ratio, NIR/Green (r2 = 0.30).

  1. Investigation of frequency-response characteristics of engine speed for a typical turbine-propeller engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Burt L , III; Oppenheimer, Frank L

    1951-01-01

    Experimental frequency-response characteristics of engine speed for a typical turbine-propeller engine are presented. These data were obtained by subjecting the engine to sinusoidal variations of fuel flow and propeller-blade-angle inputs. Correlation is made between these experimental data and analytical frequency-response characteristics obtained from a linear differential equation derived from steady-state torque-speed relations.

  2. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  3. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  4. Facile Fabrication of Composite Membranes with Dual Thermo- and pH-Responsive Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Luo, Feng; Liu, Yu-Qiong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2017-04-11

    Facile fabrication of novel functional membranes with excellent dual thermo- and pH-responsive characteristics has been achieved by simply designing dual-layer composite membranes. pH-Responsive poly(styrene)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymers and polystyrene blended with thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogels are respectively used to construct the top layer and bottom layer of composite membranes. The stretching/coiling conformation changes of the P4VP chains around the pKa (~3.5-4.5) provide the composite membranes with extraordinary pH-responsive characteristics, and the volume phase transitions of PNIPAM nanogels at the pore/matrix interfaces in the bottom layer around the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT, ~33 oC) provide the composite membranes with great thermo-responsive characteristics. The microstructures, permeability performances and dual stimuli-responsive characteristics can be well tuned by adjusting the content of PNIPAM nanogels and the thickness of the PS-b-P4VP top layer. The water fluxes of the composite membranes can be changed in order of magnitude by changing the environment temperature and pH, and the dual thermo- and pH-responsive permeation performances of the composite membranes are satisfactorily reversible and reproducible. The membrane fabrication strategy in this work provides valuable guidance for further development of dual stimuli-responsive membranes or even multi stimuli-responsive membranes.

  5. [A method of obtaining vibrational dephasing time of molecular multi-vibrational modes simultaneously].

    PubMed

    Wan, Hui; Yin, Jun; Yu, Ling-Yao; Liu, Xing; Qu, Jun-Le; Lin, Zi-Yang; Niu, Han-Ben

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors used the time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy based on supercontinuum developed by ourselves to acquire simultaneously the molecular vibration spectrum and vibrational dephasing time of the molecular various vibrational modes. Using benzonitrile as the sample, the authors measured its vibrational relaxation processes at its five typical vibrational modes and obtained their vibrational dephasing time respectively. In the experiment, the authors also found the phenomenon that oscillations appear in the vibrational dephasing of plane bending vibration mode of benzene ring in benzonitrile, which was caused by superposition of the two adjacent normal vibrational modes excited simultaneously. After mixing benzonitrile with anhydrous ethanol, the authors also measured their vibrational dephasing time. This method is capable of monitoring the changes of the molecular characteristics and its micro-environment, therefore it will find widespread applications in biology, chemistry and materials science.

  6. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current

  7. Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions is discussed. Descriptions of experimental results concerning root acclimation to temperature, root and shoot acclimation to nitrogen stress, and growth response to NH4(+) and NO3(-) nutrition are included. A preliminary model validation to changing temperatures is presented.

  8. The Influence of Learning Characteristics on Evaluation of Audience Response Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGeorge, Erina L.; Homan, Scott R.; Dunning, John B.; Elmore, David; Bodie, Graham D.; Evans, Ed; Khichadia, Sangeetha; Lichti, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Audience Response Technology (ART) has been widely adopted on college campuses, and prior research indicates that, on average, it receives positive evaluations from students. However, research has not yet examined how characteristics of students as learners influence their responses to ART. The current study examined aptitude for learning,…

  9. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  10. Influence of immobilization strategies on biosensing response characteristics: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Saha, Shibu; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization technique plays an important role in fabrication of a biosensor. NiO based cholesterol biosensor has been used to study the effect of various immobilization techniques on the biosensing response characteristics. The biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing cholesterol oxidase on NiO thin films by three different immobilization techniques viz. physisorption, cross-linking and covalent binding. The study reveals a strong dependence of biosensing response on corresponding immobilization technique. The biosensor based on immobilization by covalent bonding shows superior response characteristics as compared to others owing to its zero length. The results highlight the significance of immobilization technique for biosensor fabrication.

  11. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  12. Damping phenomena in a wire rope vibration isolation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.; Cutchins, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A study is presented of the dynamic characteristics of a wire rope vibration isolation system constructed with helical isolators, with emphasis placed on the analytical modeling of damping mechanisms in the system. An experimental investigation is described in which the static stiffness curve, hysteresis curves, phase plane trajectories, and frequency response curves are obtained. A semiempirical model having nonlinear stiffness, nth-power velocity damping, and variable Coulomb friction damping is developed, and the results are compared to experimental data. Several observations and conclusions are made about the dynamic phenomena in a typical wire rope vibration isolation system based on the experimental and semiempirical results.

  13. Growth and physiological characteristics of E. coli in response to the exposure of sound field.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Bin; Wu, Ying; Li, Shi-Chang; Liu, Wen; Duan, Xiao-Fei; Li, Meng-Wei

    2013-09-15

    It is undeniable that environmental sonic vibration can affect our emotions and mood, but so far the study of physical stimuli provoked by audible wave on single cells has been rarely concerned. To investigate the response of E. coli to audible wave exposure, the growth status and alterations in antioxidant enzyme activity were studied in liquid culture. The data showed that the growth of E. coli was promoted in the treatments of different frequencies sound wave. The most significant effect on growth promotion appeared when sound wave was maintained at 100 dB and 5000 Hz. Simultaneously, sonic vibration evoked significantly increases the level of total protein content contents. And the changes of activities of Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed obviously. The results suggested that the growth promotion effect of audible sound may be non-linear and shows obvious frequency and intensity peculiarities. Moreover, the increase in activity of antioxidant enzymes implied that a number of active oxygen species generated in bacterial cell under the exposure of audible sound. We speculate that the audible sound may cause a secondary oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of active oxygen species generation induced by audible sound.

  14. Experimental implementation of switching and sweeping tuneable vibration absorbers for broadband vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilletti, Michele; Gardonio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the laboratory implementation of two semi-active tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs): a switching TVA and a sweeping TVA. The two absorbers are designed to control the low frequency total flexural response of a cylindrical duct excited by a stationary broadband random force. The two TVAs are composed by a seismic mass mounted on a axial spring. Both TVAs are equipped with a relative displacement and relative velocity feedback control system, which is used to vary the characteristic stiffness and damping, that is the characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio, of the TVA. The switching TVA cyclically tunes its characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio to iteratively control the resonant responses due to three targeted flexural natural modes of the duct. Alternatively the sweeping TVA continuously varies its characteristic natural frequency and damping ratio within given ranges to blindly control the resonant responses due to the same three flexural natural modes of the duct. The paper presents both simulation and experimental results regarding the feedback loop used to iteratively or continuously tune the TVAs and about the reduction of vibration produced by the two semi-active TVAs. The simulation and the experimental results show that both TVAs effectively control the flexural response of the duct in the low frequency band, which is characterised by the resonances of the three targeted flexural natural modes of the duct.

  15. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  16. Fourier Analysis Of Vibrations Of Round Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-series representation developed for analysis of vibrations in complicated, round structures like turbopump impellers. Method eliminates guesswork involved in characterization of shapes of vibrational modes. Easy way to characterize complicated modes, leading to determination of responsiveness of given mode to various forcing functions. Used in conjunction with finite-element numerical simulation of vibrational modes of structure.

  17. Compact Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A vibration damper includes a rigid base with a mass coupled thereto for linear movement thereon. Springs coupled to the mass compress in response to the linear movement along either of two opposing directions. A converter coupled to the mass converts the linear movement to a corresponding rotational movement. A rotary damper coupled to the converter damps the rotational movement.

  18. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  19. A numerical analysis of the influence of tram characteristics and rail profile on railway traffic ground-borne noise and vibration in the Brussels Region.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, G; Pauwels, N; Brux, P; Conti, C; Verlinden, O

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, damage potentially caused by passing train in dense cities is of increasing concern and restricts improvement to the interconnection of various public transport offers. Although experimental studies are common to quantify the effects of noise and vibration on buildings and on people, their reach is limited since the causes of vibrations can rarely be deduced from data records. This paper presents the numerical calculations that allow evaluating the main contributions of railway-induced ground vibrations in the vicinity of buildings. The reference case is the Brussels Region and, more particularly, the T2000 tram circulating in Brussels city. Based on a pertinent selection of the vibration assessment indicators and a numerical prediction approach, various results are presented and show that the free-field analysis is often improperly used in this kind of analysis as the interaction of soil and structure is required. Calculated high ground vibrations stem from singular rail surface defects. The use of resilient wheels is recommended in order to reduce the ground-borne noise and vibration to permissible values.

  20. Energy harvesting from an autoparametric vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-01

    The combined control and energy harvesting characteristics of an autoparametric vibration absorber consisting of a base structure subjected to the external force and a cantilever beam with a tip mass are investigated. The piezoelectric sheets are attached to the cantilever beam to convert the vibrations of the base structure into electrical energy. The coupled nonlinear representative model is developed by using the extended Hamiton’s principle. The effects of the electrical load resistance on the frequency and damping ratio of the cantilever beam are analyzed. The impacts of the external force and load resistance on the structural displacements of the base structure and the beam and on the level of harvested energy are determined. The results show that the initial conditions have a significant impact on the system’s response. The relatively high level of energy harvesting is not necessarily accompanied with the minimum displacements of the base structure.

  1. Discomfort criteria for single-axis vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations were conducted to determine the fundamental relationships governing human subjective discomfort response to single-axis vibrations. The axes investigated were vertical, lateral, longitudinal, roll, and pitch, and the vibrations used were both sinusoidal and random in nature. Results of these investigations provided the basis for: (1) development of a scale of passenger discomfort that is common to all axes of vibration; and (2) generation of discomfort criteria for each axis of each axis and for both types of vibration. Furthermore, empirical equations describing discomfort responses within each axis of vibration are included.

  2. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  3. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  4. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  5. Toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences: how task characteristics influence responses

    PubMed Central

    Hafenbrädl, Sebastian; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In research on Bayesian inferences, the specific tasks, with their narratives and characteristics, are typically seen as exchangeable vehicles that merely transport the structure of the problem to research participants. In the present paper, we explore whether, and possibly how, task characteristics that are usually ignored influence participants’ responses in these tasks. We focus on both quantitative dimensions of the tasks, such as their base rates, hit rates, and false-alarm rates, as well as qualitative characteristics, such as whether the task involves a norm violation or not, whether the stakes are high or low, and whether the focus is on the individual case or on the numbers. Using a data set of 19 different tasks presented to 500 different participants who provided a total of 1,773 responses, we analyze these responses in two ways: first, on the level of the numerical estimates themselves, and second, on the level of various response strategies, Bayesian and non-Bayesian, that might have produced the estimates. We identified various contingencies, and most of the task characteristics had an influence on participants’ responses. Typically, this influence has been stronger when the numerical information in the tasks was presented in terms of probabilities or percentages, compared to natural frequencies – and this effect cannot be fully explained by a higher proportion of Bayesian responses when natural frequencies were used. One characteristic that did not seem to influence participants’ response strategy was the numerical value of the Bayesian solution itself. Our exploratory study is a first step toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences, and highlights new avenues for future research. PMID:26300791

  6. Dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy of the SiCN A ˜ 2 Δ - X ˜ 2 Π system: Observation of some vibrational levels with chaotic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaru; Ishiwata, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of the A ˜ 2Δ - X ˜ 2Π transition was obtained for SiCN generated by laser ablation under supersonic free jet expansion. The vibrational structures of the dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra from single vibronic levels (SVL's) were analyzed with consideration of the Renner-Teller (R-T) interaction. Analysis of the pure bending (ν2) structure by a perturbation approach including R-T, anharmonicity, spin-orbit (SO), and Herzberg-Teller (H-T) interactions indicated considerably different spin splitting for the μ and κ levels of the X ˜ 2Π state of SiCN, in contrast to identical spin splitting for general species derived from the perturbation approach, where μ and κ specify the lower and upper levels, respectively, separated by R-T. Further analysis of the vibrational structure including R-T, anharmonicity, SO, H-T, Fermi, and Sears interactions was carried out via a direct diagonalization procedure, where Sears resonance is a second-order interaction combined from SO and H-T interactions with Δ K = ± 1, ΔΣ = ∓1, and Δ P = 0, and where P is a quantum number, P = K + Σ. The later numerical analysis reproduced the observed structure, not only the pure ν2 structure but also the combination structure of the ν2 and the Si-CN stretching (ν3) modes. As an example, the analysis demonstrates Sears resonance between vibronic levels, (0110) κ Σ(+) and ( 0 2 0 0 ) μ Π /1 2 , with Δ K = ± 1 and Δ P = 0. On the basis of coefficients of their eigen vectors derived from the numerical analysis, it is interpreted as an almost one-to-one mixing between the two levels. The mixing coefficients of the two vibronic levels agree with those obtained from computational studies. The numerical analysis also indicates that some of the vibronic levels show chaotic characteristics in view of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator (2D-HO) basis which is used as the basis function in the present numerical analysis; i.e., the

  7. Small scale effect on vibrational response of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different boundary conditions based on nonlocal beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Sahmani, S.

    2012-04-01

    The free vibration response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is investigated in this work using various nonlocal beam theories. To this end, the nonlocal elasticity equations of Eringen are incorporated into the various classical beam theories namely as Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBT), Timoshenko beam theory (TBT), and Reddy beam theory (RBT) to consider the size-effects on the vibration analysis of SWCNTs. The generalized differential quadrature (GDQ) method is employed to discretize the governing differential equations of each nonlocal beam theory corresponding to four commonly used boundary conditions. Then molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is implemented to obtain fundamental frequencies of nanotubes with different chiralities and values of aspect ratio to compare them with the results obtained by the nonlocal beam models. Through the fitting of the two series of numerical results, appropriate values of nonlocal parameter are derived relevant to each type of chirality, nonlocal beam model, and boundary conditions. It is found that in contrast to the chirality, the type of nonlocal beam model and boundary conditions make difference between the calibrated values of nonlocal parameter corresponding to each one.

  8. Evidence for active, nonlinear, negative feedback in the vibration response of the apical region of the in-vivo guinea-pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Zinn, C; Maier, H; Zenner, H; Gummer, A W

    2000-04-01

    The transverse vibration response of the organ of Corti near the apical end of the guinea-pig cochlea was measured in vivo. For cochleae in good physiological condition, as ascertained with threshold compound action potentials and the endocochlear potential, increasing amounts of attenuation and phase lag were found as the intensity was decreased below 80 dB SPL. These nonlinear phenomena disappeared post mortem. The data suggest that an active, nonlinear damping mechanism exists at low intensities at the apex of the cochlea. The phase nonlinearity, evident at all frequencies except at the best frequency (BF), was limited to a total phase change of 0.25 cycles, implying negative feedback of electromechanical force from the outer hair cells into a compliant organ of Corti. The amplitude nonlinearity was largest above BF, possibly due to interaction with a second vibration mode. The high-frequency flank of the amplitude response curve was shifted to lower frequencies by as much as 0.6 octave (oct) for a 50-dB reduction of sound intensity; the reduction of BF was 0.3 oct, but there was no change of relative bandwidth (Q(10 dB)). Detailed frequency responses measured at 60 dB SPL were consistent with non-dispersive, travelling-wave motion: travel time to the place of BF (400 Hz at 60 dB SPL) was 2.9 ms, Q(10 dB) was 1.0; standing-wave motion occurred above 600 Hz. Based on comparison with neural and mechanical data from the base of the cochlea, amplitudes at the apex appear to be sufficient to yield behavioural thresholds. It is concluded that active negative feedback may be a hallmark of the entire cochlea at low stimulus frequencies and that, in contrast to the base, the apex does not require active amplification.

  9. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  10. The effects of vibration on explosive and reactive strength when applying individualized vibration frequencies.

    PubMed

    Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Tihanyi, Jozsef; Safar, Sandor; Scrimaglio, Renato

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 8 weeks of whole-body vibrations on explosive and reactive leg strength. Thirty-three physically active students took part in the study and were randomly assigned to an individualized-vibration group, a fixed-vibration group or a control group. The frequency of vibration was set to 30 Hz for the fixed-vibration group, whereas the frequency for the individualized-vibration group was determined by monitoring the participants' EMGrms activity. The participants in the two vibration groups were exposed three times a week for 8 weeks to a series of 10 x 1-min whole-body vibrations with a 1-min pause between series of vibrations and a 4-min pause after the first five series of vibrations. Jump height in the squat jump increased significantly in all three groups (by 11% for the individualized-vibration group, p=0.001; by 3% for the fixed-vibration group, p=0.011; and by 2% for the control group, p=0.006), but countermovement jump height was not affected. In continuous rebound jumps by the individualized-vibration group, jumping height increased by 22% (p=0.006) and power increased by 18% (p=0.002). The results of this study suggest that the use of an individualized vibration frequency produces a greater response from the neuromuscular system and is more beneficial than vibrations at a fixed pre-selected frequency.

  11. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  12. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-09-03

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments.

  13. Vibration evaluation and parameter optimization of hydraulic thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Zhang, Haokun

    2017-01-01

    Two difficult problems which are drilling string vibration and drilling pressure control exist in the process of drilling large displacement horizontal well. Using hydraulic thruster can not only improve the mechanical drilling speed and increase the horizontal section of footage displacement but also obtain better drill string dynamic characteristics and reduce vibration of drilling tool and prolong the life of the bottom hole assembly. By using the spring-damping model of drill string, the dynamic response of the different excitation of the drill bit is analyzed, so as to evaluate the effect of vibration reduction of hydraulic thruster. Use the three factors four levels orthogonal test method to optimize the key design parameters of hydraulic thruster. The analysis shows that the different drilling mud density should be used in the hydraulic thruster with different key parameters, in order to display its superiority.

  14. On the influence of the local vibration on spectral and laser characteristics of F{sub 2}{sup -} colour centres in LiF crystals at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Papashvili, A G; Smetanin, S N; Doroshenko, M E

    2015-12-31

    A study of spectral and laser properties of the LiF : F{sub 2}{sup -} crystal at low temperatures has revealed an electronic – vibrational interaction of electrons of the F{sub 2}{sup -} centre with the local vibration of the centre, which occurs against the background of coupling between electrons of F{sub 2}{sup -} centres and lattice phonons. The interaction of electrons with the local vibration manifests itself in spectra in the form of narrow lines superimposed on wide electron – phonon lines that are due to the electron – lattice interaction. An anomalous behaviour of spectral LiF : F{sub 2}{sup -} laser lines is also found at liquid nitrogen temperature upon selective excitation; this behaviour is explained by the difference in the probabilities of the lattice and local interactions. (active media)

  15. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Barth, Amy E.; Trahan, Lisa H.; Reddy, Radhika R.; Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, "What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?" Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from…

  16. Preference for Anonymous Classroom Participation: Linking Student Characteristics and Reactions to Electronic Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Alyson; Hill, N. Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Electronic response systems (ERS) are a means to foster class participation by students who are reluctant to participate in class. In this study, we identify individual characteristics that relate to students' preference for anonymous classroom participation, and we also examine the extent to which preference for anonymity is related to their…

  17. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  18. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    STUEBING, KARLA K.; BARTH, AMY E.; TRAHAN, LISA H.; REDDY, RADHIKA R.; MICIAK, JEREMY; FLETCHER, JACK M.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, “What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?” Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from the National Reading Panel Report. Eligible participant populations included at-risk elementary school children enrolled in the third grade or below. Effects were analyzed using a shifting unit of analysis approach within three statistical models: cognitive characteristics predicting growth curve slope (Model 1, mean r = .31), gain (Model 2, mean r = .21), or postintervention reading controlling for preintervention reading (Model 3, mean r = .15). Effects were homogeneous within each model when effects were aggregated within study. The small size of the effects calls into question the practical significance and utility of using cognitive characteristics for prediction of response when baseline reading is available. PMID:26535015

  19. Investigation of P300 response characteristics through human color vision-based visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilaiprasitporn, Theerawit; Yagi, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we propose visual stimulation based on the primary colors (red, green, and blue) in order to investigate the characteristics of the P300 response. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in our experiment, and their brain signals were recorded by electroencephalography (EEG). Using two basic measures referred to as `on-peak' and `off-peak' for comparison of the P300 response among the participants, we found that the P300 response varies depending on the color of the stimulus. The results of this investigation are expected to contribute to various existing and future EEG-based applications.

  20. Response surface methodology for predicting quality characteristics of beef patties added with flaxseed and tomato paste.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Melendres, M; Camou, J P; Torrentera Olivera, N G; Alvarez Almora, E; González Mendoza, D; Avendaño Reyes, L; González Ríos, H

    2014-05-01

    Response surface methodology was used to study the effect of flaxseed flour (FS) and tomato paste (TP) addition, from 0 to 10% and 0 to 20% respectively, on beef patty quality characteristics. The assessed quality characteristics were color (L, a, and b), pH and texture profile analysis (TPA). Also, sensory analysis was performed for the assessment of color, juiciness, firmness, and general acceptance. FS addition reduced L and a values and decreased weight loss of cooked products (P<0.05). An opposite effect was observed when TP was added (P<0.05). All TPA parameters decreased when percentages of FS and TP were increased in the formulation of beef patties. Furthermore, FS and TP addition adversely affected the sensory characteristics of the cooked product (P<0.05); nevertheless, all sensory characteristics evaluated had an acceptable score (>5.6). Thus FS and TP are ingredients that can be used in beef patty preparation.

  1. Apparatus and method of preloading vibration-damping bellows

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    An improved vibration damping bellows mount or interconnection is disclosed. In one aspect, the bellows is compressively prestressed along its length to offset vacuum-generated tensile loads and thereby improve vibration damping characteristics.

  2. Dynamic response characteristics analysis of the doubly-fed wind power system under grid voltage drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, L.; Chen, W.; Xu, Y. T.

    2016-08-01

    Double-fed induction generator (DFIG) is sensitive to the disturbances of grid, so the security and stability of the grid and the DFIG itself are under threat with the rapid increase of DFIG. Therefore, it is important to study dynamic response of the DFIG when voltage drop failure is happened in power system. In this paper, firstly, mathematical models and the control strategy about mechanical and electrical response processes is respectively introduced. Then through the analysis of response process, it is concluded that the dynamic response characteristics are related to voltage drop level, operating status of DFIG and control strategy adapted to rotor side. Last, the correctness of conclusion is validated by the simulation about mechanical and electrical response processes in different voltage levels drop and different DFIG output levels under DIgSILENT/PowerFactory software platform.

  3. Multiscale Mechanical Model of the Pacinian Corpuscle Shows Depth and Anisotropy Contribute to the Receptor's Characteristic Response to Indentation.

    PubMed

    Quindlen, Julia C; Lai, Victor K; Barocas, Victor H

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous mechanoreceptors transduce different tactile stimuli into neural signals that produce distinct sensations of touch. The Pacinian corpuscle (PC), a cutaneous mechanoreceptor located deep within the dermis of the skin, detects high frequency vibrations that occur within its large receptive field. The PC is comprised of lamellae that surround the nerve fiber at its core. We hypothesized that a layered, anisotropic structure, embedded deep within the skin, would produce the nonlinear strain transmission and low spatial sensitivity characteristic of the PC. A multiscale finite-element model was used to model the equilibrium response of the PC to indentation. The first simulation considered an isolated PC with fiber networks aligned with the PC's surface. The PC was subjected to a 10 μm indentation by a 250 μm diameter indenter. The multiscale model captured the nonlinear strain transmission through the PC, predicting decreased compressive strain with proximity to the receptor's core, as seen experimentally by others. The second set of simulations considered a single PC embedded epidermally (shallow) or dermally (deep) to model the PC's location within the skin. The embedded models were subjected to 10 μm indentations at a series of locations on the surface of the skin. Strain along the long axis of the PC was calculated after indentation to simulate stretch along the nerve fiber at the center of the PC. Receptive fields for the epidermis and dermis models were constructed by mapping the long-axis strain after indentation at each point on the surface of the skin mesh. The dermis model resulted in a larger receptive field, as the calculated strain showed less indenter location dependence than in the epidermis model.

  4. The Effects of Impact Vibration on Peripheral Blood Vessels and Nerves

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine M.; WAUGH, Stacey; JOHNSON, Claud; MILLER, G. Roger; XU, Xueyan; WARREN, Christopher; DONG, Ren G.

    2013-01-01

    Research regarding the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome after exposure to impact vibration has produced conflicting results. This study used an established animal model of vibration-induced dysfunction to determine how exposure to impact vibration affects peripheral blood vessels and nerves. The tails of male rats were exposed to a single bout of impact vibration (15 min exposure, at a dominant frequency of 30 Hz and an unweighted acceleration of approximately 345 m/s2) generated by a riveting hammer. Responsiveness of the ventral tail artery to adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction and acetylcholine-mediated re-dilation was measured ex vivo. Ventral tail nerves and nerve endings in the skin were assessed using morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Impact vibration did not alter vascular responsiveness to any factors or affect trunk nerves. However, 4 days following exposure there was an increase in protein-gene product (PGP) 9.5 staining around hair follicles. A single exposure to impact vibration, with the exposure characteristics described above, affects peripheral nerves but not blood vessels. PMID:24077447

  5. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  6. Optimization of a hybrid vibration absorber for vibration control of structures under random force excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. L.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2013-02-01

    A recently reported design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) which is optimized to suppress resonant vibration of a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system is re-optimized for suppressing wide frequency band vibration of the SDOF system under stationary random force excitation. The proposed HVA makes use of the feedback signals from the displacement and velocity of the absorber mass for minimizing the vibration response of the dynamic structure based on the H2 optimization criterion. The objective of the optimal design is to minimize the mean square vibration amplitude of a dynamic structure under a wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the vibration response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure and it can provide significant vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square vibration amplitude of the primary system. The proposed HVA are tested on a SDOF system and continuous vibrating structures with comparisons to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  7. Postprandial glycaemic response: how is it influenced by characteristics of cereal products?

    PubMed

    Meynier, Alexandra; Goux, Aurélie; Atkinson, Fiona; Brack, Olivier; Vinoy, Sophie

    2015-06-28

    Cereal products exhibit a wide range of glycaemic indexes (GI), but the interaction of their different nutrients and starch digestibility on blood glucose response is not well known. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate how cereal product characteristics can contribute to GI and insulinaemic index and to the parameters describing glycaemic or insulinaemic responses (incremental AUC, maximum concentration and Δpeak). Moreover, interactions between the different cereal products characteristics and glycaemic response parameters were assessed for the first time. Relationships between the cereal products characteristics and the glycaemic response were analysed by partial least square regressions, followed by modelling. A database including 190 cereal products tested by the usual GI methodology was used. The model on glycaemic responses showed that slowly digestible starch (SDS), rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and fat and fibres, and several interactions involving them, significantly explain GI by 53 % and Δpeak of glycaemia by 60 %. Fat and fibres had important contributions to glycaemic response at low and medium SDS contents in cereal products, but this effect disappears at high SDS levels. We showed also for the first time that glycaemic response parameters are dependent on interactions between starch digestibility (interaction between SDS and RDS) and nutritional composition (interaction between fat and fibres) of the cereal products. We also demonstrated the non-linear effect of fat and fibres (significant effect of their quadratic terms). Hence, optimising both the formula and the manufacturing process of cereal products can improve glucose metabolism, which is recognised as strongly influential on human health.

  8. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  9. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  10. Site responses based on ambient vibrations and earthquake data: a case study from the meizoseismal area of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Thulasiraman; Rajendran, Kusala

    2016-08-01

    The 2001 Mw 7.6 earthquake sourced in the Kachchh rift of northwest India led to extensive damage in the city of Bhuj, located ~70 km southwest of its epicenter. The building stock of this densely populated city was a mix of modern, single, and multistoried structures as well as traditional and non-engineered abodes, most of which were not designed to withstand severe shaking effects. Although there was extensive liquefaction and ground failure in the meizoseismal area, they were not observed in Bhuj, but the damage was severe here. In this study, we apply horizontal to vertical spectral ratio method to ambient vibrations (HVSR-AV) to obtain fundamental resonance frequency (f0) and H/V peak amplitude (A0) to examine if site response had any significant role in the observed damage. The patterns of H/V curves as well as spatial distributions of f0 (0.6-1.4 Hz) and A0 (1.5-4.4) suggest absence of any strong impedance contrast within the subsurface. Similar results obtained for ambient vibrations and earthquake signals suggest the efficacy of the HVSR-AV method as most useful for regions of low-level seismicity. The weathered sandstone that is generally exposed in the city represents the resonating layer whose thickness is approximately estimated as ~66-155 m, based on 1D assumption. The current set of available data precludes any quantitative modeling, but our preliminary inference is that site effects were not significant during the 2001 earthquake damage observed in Bhuj.

  11. A torsion quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Daolin; Bishop, Steven

    2015-03-01

    A torsion vibration isolator with quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) is proposed to attenuate the transmission of torsional vibration along a shaft system, which also plays a role of coupling between shafts. A pre-compressed cam-roller mechanism is designed to provide torsional negative stiffness that counteracts with the positive torsion stiffness of the vulcanized rubber between shafts. With the design parameters are set to satisfy a unique condition, the stiffness of the isolator delivers a QZS property about the equilibrium position. A nonlinear mathematical model is developed and its dynamic characteristics are further analyzed by using the Harmonic Balance method. A typical folded resonance curve occurs when the vibration amplitude is plotted as the excitation frequency is varied, illustrating a jump phenomenon in the response. The efficiency of vibration attenuation is estimated under a designed torque load, showing that the torsion QZS vibration isolator outperforms the corresponding linear counterpart, especial in low frequency ranges. Furthermore, the torque transmissibility of the QZS isolator is also studied to demonstrate the performance of the QZS isolator when the actual torque deviates from the design load.

  12. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  13. Optimal design of linear and non-linear dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, I. N.; Cheshankov, B. I.

    1988-05-01

    An efficient numerical method is applied to obtain optimal parameters for both linear and non-linear damped dynamic vibration absorbers. The minimization of the vibration response has been carried out for damped as well as undamped force excited primary systems with linear and non-linear spring characteristics. Comparison is made with the optimum absorber parameters that are determined by using Den Hartog's classical results in the linear case. Six optimization criteria by which the response is minimized over narrow and broad frequency bands are examined. Pareto optimal solutions of the multi-objective decision making problem are obtained.

  14. Food vibrations: Asian spice sets lips trembling

    PubMed Central

    Hagura, Nobuhiro; Barber, Harry; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Szechuan pepper, a widely used ingredient in the cuisine of many Asian countries, is known for the tingling sensation it induces on the tongue and lips. While the molecular mechanism by which Szechuan pepper activates tactile afferent fibres has been clarified, the tingling sensation itself has been less studied, and it remains unclear which fibres are responsible. We investigated the somatosensory perception of tingling in humans to identify the characteristic temporal frequency and compare this to the established selectivity of tactile afferents. Szechuan pepper was applied to the lower lip of participants. Participants judged the frequency of the tingling sensation on the lips by comparing this with the frequencies of mechanical vibrations applied to their right index finger. The perceived frequency of the tingling was consistently at around 50 Hz, corresponding to the range of tactile RA1 afferent fibres. Furthermore, adaptation of the RA1 channel by prolonged mechanical vibration reliably reduced the tingling frequency induced by Szechuan pepper, confirming that the frequency-specific tactile channel is shared between Szechuan pepper and mechanical vibration. Combining information about molecular reactions at peripheral receptors with quantitative psychophysical measurement may provide a unique method for characterizing unusual experiences by decomposing them into identifiable minimal units of sensation. PMID:24026819

  15. Study of the vibrational characteristics of the homonuclear diatomic nuclear schrödinger equation with a numerov method using a number of empirical potential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Alireza; Anwar Bég, O.; Ghorbani, Mohammadali

    2013-02-01

    Many empirical potential energy functions have been modeled to represent the potential energy function of a diatomic molecule along whole range of internuclear distance coordinate, whereby one can determine certain molecular constants. Here we employ various potential functions such as Morse, Rydberg, Varshni(II), Varshni(III), Varshni(VI), Pöschl-Teller, Hulburt-Hirschfelder, Lippincott, Frost-Musulin, Linnet, and Rosen-Morse, and the Numerov method to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation for F2, as an example of a homonuclear diatomic molecule. Herewith, the vibrational and vibration-rotation energy levels are obtained and excellent accuracy is achieved. The potential of employing the Numerov method in engineering physics computations is emphasized.

  16. Meta-analysis of digital game and study characteristics eliciting physiological stress responses.

    PubMed

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert-Jan; Van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Digital games have been used as stressors in a range of disciplines for decades. Nonetheless, the underlying characteristics of these stressors and the study in which the stressor was applied are generally not recognized for their moderating effect on the measured physiological stress responses. We have therefore conducted a meta-analysis that analyzes the effects of characteristics of digital game stressors and study design on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in studies carried out from 1976 to 2012. In order to assess the differing quality between study designs, a new scale is developed and presented, coined reliability of effect size. The results show specific and consistent moderating functions of both game and study characteristics, on average accounting for around 43%, and in certain cases up to 57% of the variance found in physiological stress responses. Possible cognitive and physiological processes underlying these moderating functions are discussed, and a new model integrating these processes with the moderating functions is presented. These findings indicate that a digital game stressor does not act as a stressor by virtue of being a game, but rather derives its stressor function from its characteristics and the methodology in which it is used. This finding, together with the size of the associated moderations, indicates the need for a standardization of digital game stressors.

  17. Towards identifying the dynamics of sliding by acoustic emission and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The results of experiments with high load and sliding speed sliding conditions on tribologically mated pairs such as steel 1045/steel 1045 (test 1), steel 1045/basalt (test 2) and Hadfield steel/basalt (test 3) have been carried out in order to identify their response in terms of the acoustic emission and vibration signals. The steel to rock and rock to steel transfer has been revealed by examining the worn surfaces of both steel and rock samples with the use of laser scanning microscopy. The AE signal characteristics have been determined for the tribological pairs studied. The dynamics of sliding has been evaluated by measuring the vibration accelerations. Relationship between wear mode and either acoustic emission signal or vibration signal has been established. The minimal vibration oscillations amplitude and acoustic emission signal energy have been found out in sliding Hadfield steel/basalt pair.

  18. Using cross correlations of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2007-04-01

    It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's function) between two receivers can be obtained from the cross correlation of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise cross-correlation function computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz.

  19. Vibration suppression of a flywheel system using a novel nonlinear vibration absorber with an Euler buckled beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiping, Liu; Wenhua, Shi

    2016-09-01

    The micro-vibration from flywheel system, as one of the main disturbances, has restricted the effective use of high sensitive payloads in satellites. In order to suppress the low- frequency line spectrum from the flywheel, a novel nonlinear vibration absorber (NVA) using Euler buckled beam is developed. The proposed NVA is attached on the supporting structure of the flywheel assembly, aiming to attenuate the line spectrum introduced by the flywheel in operation. A discrete multi-degree-of-freedom dynamic model, which includes the NVA, the flywheel and the supporting structure by taking into account of the gyroscopic effect of the flywheel, is built. The NVA is represented by a linear positive stiffness spring and parallel Euler buckled beams. The systematic dynamic equations with and without the NVA under the micro-vibration from the flywheel, respectively, are solved by using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method in time-domain. In addition, the effects of initial imperfection, oblique angle and damping coefficient of the Euler buckled beam on the vibration suppression performance are studied. The calculating results reveal that a typical nonlinear dynamic absorber for controlling the micro-vibration from the flywheel is constructed successfully based on the provided designing parameters of the Euler buckled beam. Compared with the vibration responses of the combined system with and without the NVA, it can be concluded that the NVA has better attenuation performance. The initial imperfection and damping coefficient of the Euler buckled beam exist optimum values, and with the increase of the oblique angle, the vibration controlling characteristics of the NVA have been improved.

  20. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-20

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  1. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil

    2011-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper. A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  2. VIBRA--An Interactive Computer Program for Steady-State Vibration Response Analysis of Linear Damped Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    LOCATION. RESPONSE NODE 10 i DIRECTION 0.7S R / A LERA A 0 C 92 C L E RI A T -4.5S ... 10 a10 2O 230 240 FREQUENCY, HER TZ Figure 8.- Expanded plot of...APPENDIX C - COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS ........................................ 30 Memory Allocation and Auxiliary Storage Files...APPENDIX C - TABLES.................................................................. 34 REFE ENC S

  3. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  4. Using Surface Electromyography To Assess Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Response Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J.; Perrin, David H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the continuum of muscular responses that typically occur with joint perturbation. The applications and limitations of surface electromyography (sEMG) in evaluating these responses are also addressed. Research applications assessing sex differences in these neuromuscular response characteristics are discussed along with suggestions for future research. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched from 1969 through 1998. Sport DISCUS was searched from 1975 through 1998. Terms searched included “anterior cruciate ligament,” “epidemiology,” “neuromuscular control,” “neuromuscular performance,” “electromyography,” “latency,” “reflex,” “electromechanical delay,” “dynamic stability,” “intrinsic stiffness,” “short-range stiffness,” “muscle,” “mechanoreceptors,” and “reaction time.” Data Synthesis: It is widely accepted that efficient neuromuscular control is essential to dynamic joint stability and protection. Many studies have established the significant role of the muscles, and particularly the hamstrings, in providing knee stability. By observing the timing, phasing, and recruitment of reflexive muscular activation after a loading stress to the knee, we can better understand the coordinative mechanisms necessary to protect the joint and prevent ligament injury. A number of research models have employed the use of sEMG to evaluate neuromuscular responses at the knee after joint loading or perturbation. However, very few studies have specifically addressed potential sex differences in these response characteristics. Conclusions/Recommendations: From the limited research available, it appears that a sex difference may exist in some aspects of neuromuscular responses. However, further research is needed to explore these differences at the knee and their potential role as predisposing factors to the higher incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Future studies should

  5. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  6. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  7. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  8. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  9. Responses of the Acutely Injured Spinal Cord to Vibration that Simulates Transport in Helicopters or Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Manouchehri, Neda; Melnyk, Angela D; Chak, Jason; Tigchelaar, Seth; So, Kitty; Okon, Elena B; Jiang, Shudong; Kinsler, Rachel; Barazanji, Khalid; Cripton, Peter A; Kwon, Brian K

    2016-12-15

    In the military environment, injured soldiers undergoing medical evacuation via helicopter or mine-resistant ambush-protected vehicle (MRAP) are subjected to vibration and shock inherent to the transport vehicle. We conducted the present study to assess the consequences of such vibration on the acutely injured spinal cord. We used a porcine model of spinal cord injury (SCI). After a T10 contusion-compression injury, animals were subjected to 1) no vibration (n = 7-8), 2) whole body vibration at frequencies and amplitudes simulating helicopter transport (n = 8), or 3) whole body vibration simulating ground transportation in an MRAP ambulance (n = 7). Hindlimb locomotor function (using Porcine Thoracic Injury Behavior Scale [PTIBS]), Eriochrome Cyanine histochemistry and biochemical analysis of inflammatory and neural damage markers were analyzed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) expression levels for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were similar between the helicopter or MRAP group and the unvibrated controls. Spared white/gray matter tended to be lower in the MRAP-vibrated animals than in the unvibrated controls, especially rostral to the epicenter. However, spared white/gray matter in the helicopter-vibrated group appeared normal. Although there was a relationship between the extent of sparing and the extent of locomotor recovery, no significant differences were found in PTIBS scores between the groups. In summary, exposures to vibration in the context of ground (MRAP) or aeromedical (helicopter) transportation did not significantly impair functional outcome in our large animal model of SCI. However, MRAP vibration was associated with increased tissue damage around the injury site, warranting caution around exposure to vehicle vibration acutely after SCI.

  10. Stress analysis of vibrating pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachwieja, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    The pipelines are subject to various constraints variable in time. Those vibrations, if not monitored for amplitude and frequency, may result in both the fatigue damage in the pipeline profile at high stress concentration and the damage to the pipeline supports. If the constraint forces are known, the system response may be determined with high accuracy using analytical or numerical methods. In most cases, it may be difficult to determine the constraint parameters, since the industrial pipeline vibrations occur due to the dynamic effects of the medium in the pipeline. In that case, a vibration analysis is a suitable alternative method to determine the stress strain state in the pipeline profile. Monitoring the pipeline vibration levels involves a comparison between the measured vibration parameters and the permissible values as depicted in the graphs for a specific pipeline type. Unfortunately, in most cases, the studies relate to the petrochemical industry and thus large diameter, long and straight pipelines. For a pipeline section supported on both ends, the response in any profile at the entire section length can be determined by measuring the vibration parameters at two different profiles between the pipeline supports. For a straight pipeline section, the bending moments, variable in time, at the ends of the analysed section are a source of the pipe excitation. If a straight pipe section supported on both ends is excited by the bending moments in the support profile, the starting point for the stress analysis are the strains, determined from the Euler-Bernoulli equation. In practice, it is easier to determine the displacement using the experimental methods, since the factors causing vibrations are unknown. The industrial system pipelines, unlike the transfer pipelines, are straight sections at some points only, which makes it more difficult to formulate the equation of motion. In those cases, numerical methods can be used to determine stresses using the

  11. Vibration of a rolling wheel— preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, B.

    1983-03-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the axial vibration of a railway wheel on a vehicle travelling at speeds of up to 100 miles/h. Frequency analysis shows that the wheel response is resonant, at modes of vibration which have been identified from static tests. Further developments of measurement and analysis techniques will be necessary before a more complete picture of the importance of wheel vibration on wheel/rail noise radiation can be determined.

  12. Neuronal uptake affects dynamic characteristics of heart rate response to sympathetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, T; Kawada, T; Sugimachi, M; Miyano, H; Sato, T; Shishido, T; Yoshimura, R; Miyashita, H; Inagaki, M; Alexander, J; Sunagawa, K

    1999-07-01

    Recently, studies in our laboratory involving the use of a Gaussian white noise technique demonstrated that the transfer function from sympathetic stimulation frequency to heart rate (HR) response showed dynamic characteristics of a second-order low-pass filter. However, determinants for the characteristics remain to be established. We examined the effect of an increase in mean sympathetic stimulation frequency and that of a blockade of the neuronal uptake mechanism on the transfer function in anesthetized rabbits. We found that increasing mean sympathetic stimulation frequency from 1 to 4 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the dynamic gain of the transfer function without affecting other parameters, such as the natural frequency, lag time, or damping coefficient. In contrast, the administration of desipramine (0.3 mg/kg iv), a neuronal uptake blocking agent, significantly (P < 0.01) decreased both the dynamic gain and the natural frequency and prolonged the lag time. These results suggest that the removal rate of norepinephrine at the neuroeffector junction, rather than the amount of available norepinephrine, plays an important role in determining the low-pass filter characteristics of the HR response to sympathetic stimulation.

  13. Differential Responses to Food Price Changes by Personal Characteristic: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mizdrak, Anja; Scarborough, Peter; Waterlander, Wilma E.; Rayner, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Fiscal interventions to improve population diet have been recommended for consideration by many organisations including the World Health Organisation and the United Nations and policies such as sugar-sweetened beverage taxes have been implemented at national and sub-national levels. However, concerns have been raised with respect to the differential impact of fiscal interventions on population sub-groups and this remains a barrier to implementation. Objective To examine how personal characteristics (such as socioeconomic status, sex, impulsivity, and income) moderate changes in purchases of targeted foods in response to food and beverage price changes in experimental settings. Design Systematic review Data Sources Online databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, EconLit and PsycInfo), reference lists of previous reviews, and additional data from study authors. Study Selection We included randomised controlled trials where food and beverage prices were manipulated and reported differential effects of the intervention on participant sub-groups defined according to personal characteristics. Data Analysis Where possible, we extracted data to enable the calculation of price elasticities for the target foods by personal characteristic. Results 8 studies were included in the review. Across studies, the difference in price elasticity varied from 0.02 to 2.43 between groups within the same study. 11 out of the total of 18 comparisons of own-price elasticity estimates by personal characteristic differed by more than 0.2 between groups. Income related factors were the most commonly considered and there was an indication that own-price elasticity estimates do vary by income but the direction of this effect was not clear. Conclusion Experimental studies provide an opportunity to examine the differential effects of fiscal measures to improve population diets. Patterns in price sensitivity by personal characteristics are complex. General conclusions pertaining to the

  14. Vibration-mediated interactions in a host–parasitoid system

    PubMed Central

    Meyhöfer, R.; Casas, J.; Dorn, S.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain behavioral evidence of vibration mediated interactions between the apple tentiform leafminer Phyllonorycter malella (Ger.) (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) and its parasitoid Sympiesis sericeicornis Nees (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae). The experimental set-up allowed the simultaneous recording on video film of both the parasitoids and the hosts behavior, thus enabling us to contrast their respective responses to the leaf vibrations produced by the other party. We analysed the one step transition probabilties from one behavioral state to the following. Active larval movements had a marked influence on the parasitoid's behavior, while feeding and still had no detectable effect. We found no evidence for vibrotaxis on the part of the parasitoid. While parasitoid searching behavior on the leaf surface did not seem to alter the leafminers behavior, ovipositor insertions triggered a characteristic avoidance response. The described interactions are discussed in the context of the 'princess and monster' model developed in search and game theory.

  15. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  16. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Charles C.; Pytanowski, Gregory P.; Vendituoli, Jonathan S.

    1997-07-08

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  17. Effects of vibration excitation methodology and configuration of an acoustic needle on its tip vibration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Hu, Junhui

    2013-04-01

    One of design purposes of an acoustic needle is to obtain a big vibration displacement at its tip. In this paper, vibration characteristics of the tip of the acoustic needle driven by a sandwich type ultrasonic transducer, is investigated to obtain the guidelines for increasing the tip vibration. It is found that the tip vibration can be increased by employing acoustic needles with proper vibration excitation structure and configuration. The effective measures include using a sandwich type piezoelectric transducer with flexurally vibrating end plates and an acoustic needle with conical tip section, decreasing the length of vibration excitation section at the needle root, bonding the needle root at a proper location of the transducer end plate, and tuning the length ratio of the conical tip section to the whole needle.

  18. Dynamic response characteristics of dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Joseph A.; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Scott-Emuakpor, Onome E.; Cross, Charles J.; Slater, Joseph C.

    2015-02-01

    New turbine engine designs requiring secondary flow compression often look to dual flow-path integrally bladed rotors (DFIBRs) since these stages have the ability to perform work on the secondary, or bypassed, flow-field. While analogous to traditional integrally bladed rotor stages, DFIBR designs have many differences that result in unique dynamic response characteristics that must be understood to avoid fatigue. This work investigates these characteristics using reduced-order models (ROMs) that incorporate mistuning through perturbations to blade frequencies. This work provides an alternative to computationally intensive geometric-mistuning approaches for DFIBRs by utilizing tuned blade mode reductions and substructure coupling in cyclic coordinates. Free and forced response results are compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions to determine if any errors are related to the reduced-order model formulation reduction methods. It is shown that DFIBRs have many more frequency veering regions than their single flow-path integrally blade rotor (IBR) counterparts. Modal families are shown to transition between system, inner-blade, and outer-blade motion. Furthermore, findings illustrate that while mode localization of traditional IBRs is limited to a single or small subset of blades, DFIBRs can have modal energy localized to either an inner- or outer-blade set resulting in many blades responding above tuned levels. Lastly, ROM forced response predictions compare well to full FEM predictions for the two test cases shown.

  19. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex. PMID:27563414

  20. Hysteretic memory and end plate effects on the response of a flexible cylinder undergoing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedikli, Ersegun Deniz; Dahl, Jason M.

    2015-11-01

    The response of rigid cylinders undergoing VIV has been observed to be hysteretic with respect to the nominal reduced velocity, as transition of the wake is delayed dependent on whether the flow has been slowed down or sped up. In the present study, a similar behavior is observed for a flexible, tension-dominated cylinder, however the hysteretic behavior is shown to affect the transition between excited modes. The test cylinder has diameter of 6.35 mm, aspect ratio of 40 and mass ratio of 3.76. The dynamic response of the cylinder is measured visually, by tracking 26 dots along the span of the cylinder using two high-speed cameras between the Reynolds number of 1080 and 4660. It is observed that a clear memory effect exists, where the speed at which transition between the first mode and second mode excitation in the cross-flow direction changes dependent on whether the flow is increasing or decreasing in speed. A second series of experiments is conducted to investigate end plate effects on the flexible cylinder. Experiments are conducted with and without an end plate located at the end pivot point on the cylinder. Clear differences are observed between each condition illustrating the strong three-dimensional behavior of vortex shedding behind the flexible cylinder.

  1. Acute effects of Dry Immersion on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayenko, D. G.; Miller, T. F.; Melnik, K. A.; Netreba, A. I.; Khusnutdinova, D. R.; Kitov, V. V.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Gerasimenko, Y. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-04-01

    Impairments in balance control are inevitable following exposure to microgravity. However, the role of particular sensory system in postural disorders at different stages of the exposure to microgravity still remains unknown. We used a method called Dry Immersion (DI), as a ground-based model of microgravity, to elucidate the effects of 6-h of load-related afferent inputs on kinematic characteristics of postural corrective responses evoked by pushes to the chest of different intensities during upright standing. The structure of postural corrective responses was altered following exposure to DI, which was manifested by: (1) an increase of the ankle and knee flexion during perturbations of medium intensity, (2) the lack of the compensatory hip extension, as well as diminished knee and ankle flexion with a further increase of the perturbation intensity to submaximal level. We suggest that the lack of weight-bearing increases the reactivity of the balance control system, whereas the ability to scale the responses proportionally to the perturbation intensity decreases. Disrupted neuromuscular coordination of postural corrective responses following DI can be attributed to adaptive neural modifications on the spinal and cortical levels. The present study provides evidence that even a short-term lack of load-related afferent inputs alters kinematic patterns of postural corrective responses, and can result in decreased balance control. Because vestibular input is not primarily affected during the DI exposure, our results indicate that activity and the state of the load-related afferents play critical roles in balance control following real or simulated microgravity.

  2. Parametric Optimization of Ares I Propellant Slosh Characteristics Using Frequency Response Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique for developing propellant slosh damping requirements with respect to the stability characteristics of large flexible launch vehicles is presented. A numerical algorithm is devised which allows an automated software program to rapidly converge to pseudo-optimal solutions that minimize required propellant slosh damping for multiple tanks while maintaining constraints on the frequency response characteristics of a particular open-loop plant transfer function. An implementation of the algorithm using a high-order linear model of the Ares I plant dynamics considers all relevant dynamic interactions of flexible body modes, propellant slosh, and nozzle inertia effects. A high-resolution propellant damping requirements table is produced that can be used for baffle design. The method is demonstrated to provide exceptional speed and accuracy when compared with the alternative human-in-the-loop approach.

  3. Polarimetric fiber vibration sensor based on polarization-diversity loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Kim, Young Suk; Jo, Songhyun; Lee, Yong Wook

    2015-07-01

    Here, we demonstrated a polarimetric fiber vibration sensor based on a polarization-diversity loop structure (PDLS) by using polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF). The PDLS is composed of a polarization beam splitter, PM-PCF, and polarization controllers, forming a Sagnac birefringence interferometer (SBI) that has periodic interference spectra. When static strain is applied to PM-PCF used as a sensor head, spectral shift is observed in the output interference spectrum of the SBI of the sensor. If a monochromatic light source such as a laser diode is introduced into the SBI, the output optical power of the SBI is determined by its wavelength-dependent transmittance. If the wavelength of the light source is properly located at a spectral region where the transmittance of the SBI linearly varies, therefore, the magnitude of strain applied to PM-PCF can be found by observing the output voltage variation of a photodetector connected to the output port of the SBI. To investigate the vibration response of the proposed sensor with respect to various types of vibration, vibration diverse in the amplitude and frequency was applied to 8-cm-long PM-PCF by using a cylindrical piezoelectric transducer or a metal cantilever. First, vibration characteristics were examined for single frequency vibration in a range of 1-3000 Hz. Then, the sensor response to naturally damped vibration was explored. It was experimentally observed that the cut-off frequency was ~1900 Hz in the frequency response, and the peak value of the sensor output signal increased with the amount of impulse for naturally damped vibration.

  4. Vibrations transmitted to human subjects through passenger seats and considerations of passenger comfort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the vertical and lateral vibration-transmission characteristics of several types of transport vehicle seats (two aircraft and one bus) to obtain preliminary estimates and comparisons of the ride acceptability of the various seat types. Results of this investigation indicate that from the standpoint of human comfort the seats exhibit undesirable dynamic response characteristics. Amplification of floor vibrations occurred at the frequencies known to be most critical for human comfort in both vertical and lateral axes. An average transmissibility function for aircraft seats was tabulated together with the associated variability for use by designers who incorporate similar types of seats in their vehicles. The acceptability of vibrations resulting from floor inputs of 0.10g and 0.15g was low over a broad range of frequencies for both axes and all seat types, and was especially low at frequencies where the input was being amplified.

  5. Vibrational stability of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2013-05-01

    The mechanical stability of graphene as temperature rises is analyzed based on three different self-consistent phonon (SCP) models. Compared with three-dimensional (3-D) materials, the critical temperature Ti at which instability occurs for graphene is much closer to its melting temperature Tm obtained from Monte Carlo simulation (Ti ≃ 2Tm, K. V. Zakharchenko, A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 23, 202202). This suggests that thermal vibration plays a significant role in melting of graphene while melting for 3-D materials is often dominated by topologic defects. This peculiar property of graphene derives from its high structural anisotropy, which is characterized by the vibrational anisotropic coefficient (VAC), defined upon its Lindermann ratios in different directions. For any carbon based material with a graphene-like structure, the VAC value must be smaller than 5.4 to maintain its stability. It is also found that the high VAC value of graphene is responsible for its negative thermal expansion coefficient at low temperature range. We believe that the VAC can be regarded as a new criterion concerning the vibrational stability of any low-dimensional (low-D) materials.

  6. Dynamic vibration absorber using magnetic spring and damper

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Niwa, H.; Miyano, H.; Ozaki, O.; Kitada, Y.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a dynamic vibration absorber based on a magnetic spring and damper system. A pair of double cylindrical magnets face each other across a gap, with one magnet fixed to the target structure and the other to the moving mass of the dynamic vibration absorber. The magnetic restoring force characteristics of the proposed system are examined through static loading tests and analysis. The dynamic characteristics are also tested in vibration tests. Furthermore, application of the proposed dynamic vibration absorber to a rotating machinery model demonstrates that the system gives effective two-dimensional vibration control.

  7. Paradoxical response to an emotional task: trait characteristics and heart-rate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, Rita; Varanini, Maurizio; Paoletti, Giulia; Mecacci, Giulio; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the heart-rate dynamics of subjects reporting decreased (responders) or paradoxically increased relaxation (nonresponders) at the end of a threatening movie. Heart-rate dynamics were characterized by indices extracted through recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). These indices were studied as a function of a few individual characteristics: hypnotizability, gender, absorption, anxiety, and the activity of the behavioral inhibition and activation systems (BIS/BAS). Results showed that (a) the subjective experience of responsiveness is associated with the activity of the behavioral inhibition system and (b) a few RQA and DFA indices are able to capture the influence of cognitive-emotional traits, including hypnotizability, on the responsiveness to the threatening task.

  8. Interpretation of DNA vibrational spectra by normal coordinate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghomi, M; Letellier, R; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1990-01-01

    1. In the following article we undertake a brief review of the most prominent DNA vibrational markers as observed experimentally by Raman and i.r. spectroscopies on polynucleotides and explain how a simplified valence force field can account for the evolution of the DNA vibrational spectra. 2. Our discussion made as a review of our previous investigations on the interpretation of DNA vibration modes, is based on some of the most characteristic and structure dependent DNA vibrational markers.

  9. Using Monte Carlo Ray tracing to Understand the Vibrational Response of UN as Measured by Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Aczel, A. A.; Abernathy, D. L.; Nagler, S. E.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Granroth, G. E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently neutron spectroscopy measurements, using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of-flight chopper spectrometers, observed an extended series of equally spaced modes in UN that are well described by quantum harmonic oscillator behavior of the N atoms. Additional contributions to the scattering are also observed. Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations with various sample kernels have allowed us to distinguish between the response from the N oscillator scattering, contributions that arise from the U partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and all forms of multiple scattering. These simulations confirm that multiple scattering contributes an ~ Q -independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. All three of the aforementioned contributions are necessary to accurately model the experimental data. These simulations were also used to compare the T dependence of the oscillator modes in SEQUOIA data to that predicted by the binary solid model. This work was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Analysis on pseudo excitation of random vibration for structure of time flight counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Dapeng

    2015-03-01

    Traditional computing method is inefficient for getting key dynamical parameters of complicated structure. Pseudo Excitation Method(PEM) is an effective method for calculation of random vibration. Due to complicated and coupling random vibration in rocket or shuttle launching, the new staging white noise mathematical model is deduced according to the practical launch environment. This deduced model is applied for PEM to calculate the specific structure of Time of Flight Counter(ToFC). The responses of power spectral density and the relevant dynamic characteristic parameters of ToFC are obtained in terms of the flight acceptance test level. Considering stiffness of fixture structure, the random vibration experiments are conducted in three directions to compare with the revised PEM. The experimental results show the structure can bear the random vibration caused by launch without any damage and key dynamical parameters of ToFC are obtained. The revised PEM is similar with random vibration experiment in dynamical parameters and responses are proved by comparative results. The maximum error is within 9%. The reasons of errors are analyzed to improve reliability of calculation. This research provides an effective method for solutions of computing dynamical characteristic parameters of complicated structure in the process of rocket or shuttle launching.

  11. Inertia-Wheel Vibration-Damping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromechanical system would damp vibrations in large, flexible structure. In active vibration-damping system motors and reaction wheels at tips of appendages apply reaction torques in response to signals from accelerometers. Velocity signal for vibrations about one axis processes into control signal to oppose each of n vibrational modes. Various modes suppressed one at a time. Intended primarily for use in spacecraft that has large, flexible solar panels and science-instrument truss assembly, embodies principle of control interesting in its own right and adaptable to terrestrial structures, vehicles, and instrument platforms.

  12. Automated Characterization Of Vibrations Of A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Yam, Yeung; Mettler, Edward; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Automated method of characterizing dynamical properties of large flexible structure yields estimates of modal parameters used by robust control system to stabilize structure and minimize undesired motions. Based on extraction of desired modal and control-design data from responses of structure to known vibrational excitations. Applicable to terrestrial structures where vibrations are important - aircraft, buildings, bridges, cranes, and drill strings.

  13. Numerical Simulation on the Response Characteristics of a Pneumatic Microactuator for Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuling; Li, Songjing; Bao, Gang

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a multiphysical system modeling and simulation of a pneumatic microactuator, which significantly influences the performance of a particular pneumatic microfluidic device. First, the multiphysical system modeling is performed by developing a physical model for each of its three integrated components: microchannel with a microvalve, a gas chamber, and an elastomer membrane. This is done for each step of operation for the whole system. The whole system is then considered a throttle blind capacitor model, and it is used to predict the response time of the pneumatic microactuator by correlating its characteristics such as gas pressurizing, hydraulic resistance, and membrane deformation. For this microactuator, when the maximum membrane deformation is 100 µm, the required actuated air pressure is 80 kPa, and the response time is 1.67 ms when the valve-opening degree is 0.8. The response time is 1.61 ms under fully open conditions. These simulated results are validated by the experimental results of the current and previous work. A correlation between the simulated and experimental results confirms that the multiphysical modeling presented in this work is applicable in developing a proper design of a pneumatic microactuator. Finally, the influencing factors of the response time are discussed and analyzed.

  14. Nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized composite cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, R. L.; Johnson, E. R.; Starnes, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical study of the nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized 4- to 16-ply-thick graphite-epoxy cylindrical panels are presented. Specimens with clamped boundaries simulating the skin between two frames and two stringers of a typical transport fuselage were tested to failure. Failure results of aluminum specimens are compared with the graphite-epoxy test results. The specimens failed at their edges where the local bending gradients and interlaminar stresses are maximum. STAGS nonlinear two-dimensional shell analysis computer code results are used to identify regions of the panels where the response is independent of the axial coordinate. A geometrically nonlinear one-dimensional cylindrical panel analysis was derived and used to determine panel response and interlaminar stresses. Inclusion of the geometric nonlinearity was essential for accurate prediction of panel response. The maximum stress failure criterion applied to the predicted tensile stress in the fiber direction agreed best with the experimentally determined first damage pressures.

  15. Comparison of aortic and carotid baroreflex stimulus-response characteristics in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Querry, R. G.; Fadel, P. J.; Weiss, M. W.; Olivencia-Yurvati, A.; Shi, X.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    In order to characterize the stimulus-response relationships of the arterial, aortic, and carotid baroreflexes in mediating cardiac chronotropic function, we measured heart rate (HR) responses elicited by acute changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and carotid sinus pressure (CSP) in 11 healthy individuals. Arterial (aortic + carotid) baroreflex control of HR was quantified using ramped changes in MAP induced by bolus injection of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SN). To assess aortic-cardiac responses, neck pressure (NP) and suction (NS) were applied during PE and SN administration, respectively, to counter alterations in CSP thereby isolating the aortic baroreflex. Graded levels of NP and NS were delivered to the carotid sinus using a customized neck collar device to assess the carotid-cardiac baroreflex, independent of drug infusion. The operating characteristics of each reflex were determined from the logistic function of the elicited HR response to the induced change in MAP. The arterial pressures at which the threshold was located on the stimulus-response curves determined for the arterial, aortic and carotid baroreflexes were not significantly different (72+/-4, 67+/-3, and 72+/-4 mm Hg, respectively, P > 0.05). Similarly, the MAP at which the saturation of the reflex responses were elicited did not differ among the baroreflex arcs examined (98+/-3, 99+/-2, and 102+/-3 mm Hg, respectively). These data suggest that the baroreceptor populations studied operate over the same range of arterial pressures. This finding indicates each baroreflex functions as both an important anti-hypotensive and anti-hypertensive mechanism. In addition, this investigation describes a model of aortic baroreflex function in normal healthy humans, which may prove useful in identifying the origin of baroreflex dysfunction in disease- and training-induced conditions.

  16. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  17. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  18. Vibration analysis of a large underwater shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzawa, Y.; Kagawa, K.; Takahashi, H.

    1995-12-31

    This is the 2nd report on structural feasibility study of an underwater half drop shaped shell , the 1st one was reported in ISOPE`93. Dynamic characteristics of a large underwater shell of revolution are studied in the paper. Large rotational shell having optimum shape with respect to the hydrostatic pressure can be used for a storage of LNG or vessel of super conducting coil for power storage in the future. In this study, which is one of many structural feasibility studies for the shell, vibration characteristics of the shell are examined using numerical analysis, in which finite elements for the structure and boundary elements for surrounding water are used. Natural frequencies and modes of an underwater drop shaped shell are examined using a developed numerical code DASOR. The code was justified by comparison with other results of vibration analysis of a submerged cylindrical shell for various water levels. The added mass effect of the underwater drop shaped shell in each vibration mode is discussed and the ratio of modal mass of structure in water and in air in the lowest mode proved to be very large specially for axisymmetrical mode and horizontal lowest mode. A seismic response analysis of the underwater shell of revolution with the excitation coming from a horizontally moving seabed is performed numerically and statistically. The analysis using power spectrum density function provide with the responses of distribution of displacements, membrane stresses, and bending moments.

  19. Vibrational characteristics and structure of the six- and eight-coordinate praseodymium(III) complexes with 2,6-lutidine N-oxide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban-Oganowska, H.; Godlewska, P.; Macalik, L.; Hanuza, J.; Oganowski, W.; van der Maas, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    New praseodymium complexes of 2,6-lutidine, 4-methoxy-2,6-lutidine and 3-halo-2,6-lutidine N-oxides (LuO) have been synthesised and chemically characterised. The Fourier transform IR and Raman spectra have been measured in the range 50-4000 and 80-4000 cm -1, respectively, and discussed in terms of possible structure and composition of compounds studied. The frequencies of the stretching N-O, Pr-O and Pr-Cl vibrations have been assigned and related to the possible molecular structures of the Pr(LuO) 8, Pr(LuO) 7O', Pr(LuO) 5O' 2O″, Pr(LuO) 6, PrCl 3(LuO) 3 and PrCl 3(LuO) 2O' complexes (O' and O″ denotes the H 2O and C 2H 5OH ligands).

  20. Response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade using latex and nonlatex materials

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J; Lalande, Sophie; Hyatt, Robert E; Johnson, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of esophageal pressure allows for the calculation of several important and clinically useful parameters of respiratory mechanics. Esophageal pressure is often measured with balloon-tipped catheters. These catheters may be handmade from natural latex condoms and polyethylene tubing. Given the potential of natural latex to cause allergic reaction, it is important to determine whether esophageal catheter balloons can be fabricated, by hand, using nonlatex condoms as construction materials. To determine the static and dynamic response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade from latex and nonlatex materials, six esophageal catheter balloons were constructed from each of the following condom materials: natural latex, synthetic polyisoprene, and polyurethane (18 total). Static compliance and working volume range of each balloon catheter was obtained from their pressure-volume characteristics in water. The dynamic response of balloon catheters were measured via a pressure “step” test, from which a third-order underdamped transfer function was modeled. The dynamic ranges of balloon catheters were characterized by the frequencies corresponding to ±5% amplitude- and phase-distortion (fA5% and fφ5%). Balloon catheters handmade from polyurethane condoms displayed the smallest working volume range and lowest static balloon compliance. Despite this lower compliance, fA5% and fφ5% were remarkably similar between all balloon materials. Our findings suggest that polyisoprene condoms are an ideal nonlatex construction material to use when fabricating esophageal catheter balloons by hand. PMID:26077619