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Sample records for vims wavelength scale

  1. Carbon dioxide on the satellites of Saturn: Results from the Cassini VIMS investigation and revisions to the VIMS wavelength scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Meyer, A.W.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Sandford, S.A.; Mastrapa, R.M.E.; Filacchione, G.; Ore, C.M.D.; Nicholson, P.D.; Buratti, B.J.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Dalton, J.B.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Several of the icy satellites of Saturn show the spectroscopic signature of the asymmetric stretching mode of C-O in carbon dioxide (CO2) at or near the nominal solid-phase laboratory wavelength of 4.2675 ??m (2343.3 cm-1), discovered with the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft. We report here on an analysis of the variation in wavelength and width of the CO2 absorption band in the spectra of Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione. Comparisons are made to laboratory spectra of pure CO2, CO2 clathrates, ternary mixtures of CO2 with other volatiles, implanted and adsorbed CO2 in non-volatile materials, and ab initio theoretical calculations of CO2 * nH2O. At the wavelength resolution of VIMS, the CO2 on Phoebe is indistinguishable from pure CO2 ice (each molecule's nearby neighbors are also CO2) or type II clathrate of CO2 in H2O. In contrast, the CO2 band on Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione is shifted to shorter wavelengths (typically ???4.255 ??m (???2350.2 cm-1)) and broadened. These wavelengths are characteristic of complexes of CO2 with different near-neighbor molecules that are encountered in other volatile mixtures such as with H2O and CH3OH, and non-volatile host materials like silicates, some clays, and zeolites. We suggest that Phoebe's CO2 is native to the body as part of the initial inventory of condensates and now exposed on the surface, while CO2 on the other three satellites results at least in part from particle or UV irradiation of native H2O plus a source of C, implantation or accretion from external sources, or redistribution of native CO2 from the interior. The analysis presented here depends on an accurate VIMS wavelength scale. In preparation for this work, the baseline wavelength calibration for the Cassini VIMS was found to be distorted around 4.3 ??m, apparently as a consequence of telluric CO2 gas absorption in the pre-launch calibration. The effect can be reproduced by convolving a sequence of model detector

  2. Global-scale surface spectral variations on Titan seen from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present global-scale maps of Titan from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on Cassini. We map at 64 near-infrared wavelengths simultaneously, covering the atmospheric windows at 0.94, 1.08, 1.28, 1.6, 2.0, 2.8, and 5 ??m with a typical resolution of 50 km/pixel or a typical total integration time of 1 s. Our maps have five to ten times the resolution of ground-based maps, better spectral resolution across most windows, coverage in multiple atmospheric windows, and represent the first spatially resolved maps of Titan at 5 ??m. The VIMS maps provide context and surface spectral information in support of other Cassini instruments. We note a strong latitudinal dependence in the spectral character of Titan's surface, and partition the surface into 9 spectral units that we describe in terms of spectral and spatial characteristics. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Poster 13: Large-scale simultaneous mapping of Titan's aerosol opacity and surface albedo by a new massive inversion method of Cassini/VIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Appere, Thomas; Cornet, Thomas; Le Mouelic, Stephane%F. Aa(Aim Cea Saclay; Lesia Observatoire de Paris), Ab(Aim Cea Saclay; Universite Paris 7), Ac(Jpl; Lpg Nantes), Ad(Gsma Reims), Ae(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Af(Jpl), Ag(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Ah(Aim Cea Saclay), Ai(Esac/Esa), Aj(Lpg Nantes)

    2016-06-01

    We have still limited information on Titan's surface albedo in the near-infrared. Only few spectral windows exist in between the intense methane bands, and even those windows are strongly affected by atmospheric contributions (absorption, scattering). Yet, this part of the spectrum is important to determine the surface composition thanks to the wealth of absorption bands by minerals and ices present there. A radiative transfer model is an effective tool to take the atmospheric effects into consideration in the analysis (e.g. Rannou et al. 2010, Griffith et al 2012, Solomonidou et al. 2016,...), but it is too time-consuming to process the whole VIMS hyperspectral dataset (millions of spectra) and create large-scale maps of the surface albedo. To overcome this problem, we developed an inversion method of VIMS data that employs lookup tables of synthetic spectra produced by a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (described in its original form in Hirtzig et al. 2013). The heavy computational part (calling the radiative transfer model) is thus done only once for all during the creation of the modeled spectra. We updated the model with new methane spectroscopy and the new aerosol parameters we found in our analysis of the VIMS Emission Phase Function (see the other Maltagliati et al. abstract in this workshop). We analyzed in detail the behavior of the spectra as a function of the free parameters of the model (three inputs, the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles; and two products: the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo) in order to create an optimized grid for the lookup table. The lookup tables were then grafted onto an ad-hoc inversion model. Our method can process a whole 64x64 VIMS datacube in few minutes, with a gain in computational time of a factor of more than one thousand with respect to the standard method. This will consent for the first time a truly massive inversion of VIMS data and large-scale acquisition of Titan's surface albedo, paving the

  4. Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R.; Textor, G.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) are summarized. The general objectives of the VIM are to investigate the interplanetary and interstellar media and to continue the Voyager program of ultraviolet astronomy. The VIM will utilize both Voyager spacecraft for the period from January 1990 through December 2019. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, control and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  5. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples.

  6. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  7. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  8. Mapping and interpretation of Sinlap crater on Titan using Cassini VIMS and RADAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Mouelic S.; Paillou, P.; Janssen, M.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Crapeau, M.; Encrenaz, P.J.; Jaumann, R.; Geudtner, D.; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L.; Tobie, G.; Wall, S.

    2008-01-01

    Only a few impact craters have been unambiguously detected on Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission. Among these, Sinlap is the only one that has been observed both by the RADAR and VIMS instruments. This paper describes observations at centimeter and infrared wavelengths which provide complementary information about the composition, topography, and surface roughness. Several units appear in VIMS false color composites of band ratios in the Sinlap area, suggesting compositional heterogeneities. A bright pixel possibly related to a central peak does not show significant spectral variations, indicating either that the impact site was vertically homogeneous, or that this area has been recovered by homogeneous deposits. Both VIMS ratio images and dielectric constant measurements suggest the presence of an area enriched in water ice around the main ejecta blanket. Since the Ku-band SAR may see subsurface structures at the meter scale, the difference between infrared and SAR observations can be explained by the presence of a thin layer transparent to the radar. An analogy with terrestrial craters in Libya supports this interpretation. Finally, a tentative model describes the geological history of this area prior, during, and after the impact. It involves mainly the creation of ballistic ejecta and an expanding plume of vapor triggered by the impact, followed by the redeposition of icy spherules recondensed from this vapor plume blown downwind. Subsequent evolution is then driven by erosional processes and aeolian deposition. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. A close look at Saturn's rings with Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, P.D.; Hedman, M.M.; Clark, R.N.; Showalter, M.R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Hansen, G.B.; Sicardy, B.; Drossart, P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Coradini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Soon after the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft entered orbit about Saturn on 1 July 2004, its Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtained two continuous spectral scans across the rings, covering the wavelength range 0.35-5.1 ??m, at a spatial resolution of 15-25 km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings, while the second covers the Cassini Division and the entire A ring. Comparisons of the VIMS radial reflectance profile at 1.08 ??m with similar profiles at a wavelength of 0.45 ??m assembled from Voyager images show very little change in ring structure over the intervening 24 years, with the exception of a few features already known to be noncircular. A model for single-scattering by a classical, many-particle-thick slab of material with normal optical depths derived from the Voyager photopolarimeter stellar occultation is found to provide an excellent fit to the observed VIMS reflectance profiles for the C ring and Cassini Division, and an acceptable fit for the inner B ring. The A ring deviates significantly from such a model, consistent with previous suggestions that this region may be closer to a monolayer. An additional complication here is the azimuthally-variable average optical depth associated with "self-gravity wakes" in this region and the fact that much of the A ring may be a mixture of almost opaque wakes and relatively transparent interwake zones. Consistently with previous studies, we find that the near-infrared spectra of all main ring regions are dominated by water ice, with a typical regolith grain radius of 5-20 ??m, while the steep decrease in visual reflectance shortward of 0.6 ??m is suggestive of an organic contaminant, perhaps tholin-like. Although no materials other than H2O ice have been identified with any certainty in the VIMS spectra of the rings, significant radial variations are seen in the strength of the water-ice absorption bands. Across the boundary between the C and B rings, over a radial range of ???7000 km, the

  10. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. IV. Daytime temperature maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Ciarniello, Mauro; Cerroni, Priscilla; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Jaumann, Ralf; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe; Stephan, Katrin; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.

    2016-06-01

    The spectral position of the 3.6 μm continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS I/F spectra is used as a marker to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. This feature is characterizing the crystalline water ice spectrum which is the dominant compositional endmember of the satellites' surfaces. Laboratory measurements indicate that the position of the 3.6 μm peak of pure water ice is temperature-dependent, shifting towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, from about 3.65 μm at T=123 K to about 3.55 μm at T=88 K. A similar method was already applied to VIMS Saturn's rings mosaics to retrieve ring particles temperature (Filacchione, G., Ciarniello, M., Capaccioni, F., et al., 2014. Icarus, 241, 45-65). We report here about the daytime temperature variations observed on the icy satellites as derived from three different VIMS observation types: (a) a sample of 240 disk-integrated I/F observations of Saturn's regular satellites collected by VIMS during years 2004-2011 with solar phase in the 20°-40° range, corresponding to late morning-early afternoon local times. This dataset is suitable to exploit the temperature variations at hemispherical scale, resulting in average temperature T <88 K for Mimas, T ≪88 K for Enceladus, T <88 K for Tethys, T=98-118 K for Dione, T=108-128 K for Rhea, T=118-128 K for Hyperion, T=128-148 and T > 168 K for Iapetus' trailing and leading hemispheres, respectively. A typical ±5 K uncertainty is associated to the temperature retrieval. On Tethys and Dione, for which observations on both leading and trailing hemispheres are available, in average daytime temperatures higher of about 10 K on the trailing than on the leading hemisphere are inferred. (b) Satellites disk-resolved observations taken at 20-40 km pixel-1 resolution are suitable to map daytime temperature variations across surfaces' features, such as Enceladus' tiger stripes and Tethys' equatorial dark lens

  11. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Thermal Emission from Hot Spots Along Enceladus South Pole Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2016-10-01

    Most of the south pole fissure region has not been directly illuminated by sunlight since the sub-solar point moved into the northern hemisphere in 2009, thereby eliminating the background of reflected sunlight at VIMS wavelengths and making the fissure thermal emission readily measureable. Since then, VIMS has measured spectra of at least 11 hot spots along the fissures. Most of these measurements were acquired in ride-along mode with CIRS as the prime instrument. During at least 2 encounters, VIMS and CIRS acquired simultaneous or near-simultaneous spectra of the same fissure location. VIMS spectra include multiple hot spots along Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, and a likely hot spot on Alexandria.All of the VIMS spectra examined to date are consistent with this scenario of a self-regulating fissure maximum T~200 K with brighter VIMS emissions corresponding to fissures up to ~20 m wide. Emission from the warm fissure interior walls dominate the VIMS spectra with <15% contributed by conductive heating of the adjacent terrain at VIMS wavelengths.CIRS spectra report slightly cooler T's due to CIRS increased sensitivity to lower T emission at longer wavelengths and averaging over contributions from both the hottest and cooler areas. Combined analysis of the CIRS and VIMS spectra spanning 3 to 500 micron wavelengths promises to reveal the distribution of [T, area] near the fissures that cannot be spatially resolved. This [T, area] distribution holds the key to understanding how heat is transferred to the surface within a few 100 m of the fissures.The VIMS-detected emission is concentrated in localized hot spots along the fissures and does not seem to be distributed continuously along them. CIRS spectra suggest a more continuous distribution of the emission along the fissure length. Jets locations also are distributed along the fissure length and it appears that the VIMS-detected hot spots in general correlate with jet locations, but not all of the jet locations have been

  12. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  13. Europa's Opposition Surge in the Near-Infrared: Interpreting Disk-Integrated Observations by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, D. P.; Buratti, B. J.

    2003-05-01

    Observations of Europa's opposition surge by Cassini VIMS, presented at last year's DPS, have now been modeled with the commonly used Hapke photometric function. The VIMS dataset emphasizes observations at 16 phase angles from 0.4 to 0.6 deg---the first time the < 1 deg phase ``heart" of Europa's opposition surge has been observed in the near-IR. This dataset also provides a unique opportunity to examine how the surge is affected by changes in wavelength and albedo: at VIMS wavelengths of 0.91, 1.73, and 2.25 microns, the geometric albedo of Europa is 0.81, 0.33, and 0.18 respectively. Despite this factor-of-four albedo range, however, the slope of Europa's phase curve at < 1 deg phase is similar at all three wavelengths (to within error bars) and this common slope is similar to the phase coefficient seen in visible observations of Europa. Two competing models for the opposition surge's physical cause are the Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE) and Coherent Backscatter Effect (COBE). Because of sparse VIMS phase coverage, it's not possible to constrain all the surge parameters at once in a Hapke function that has both SHOE and COBE; accordingly, we performed separate Hapke fits for SHOE-only and COBE-only surges. At 2.25 microns, where VIMS data are somewhat noisy, both types of surges can mimic the slope of the VIMS phase curve at < 1 deg phase. At 0.91 and 1.73 microns, however---where VIMS data are ``cleaner"---COBE does a noticeably poorer job than SHOE of matching the VIMS phase coefficient at < 1 deg phase; in particular, the best COBE fit insists on having a steeper phase-curve slope than the data. This suggests---without being conclusive---that COBE is less likely than SHOE to be the cause of Europa's near-IR opposition surge.

  14. A Scaling Theory of the MJO Horizontal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Yang and Ingersoll (2013, Triggered Convection, Gravity Waves, and the MJO: A Shallow-Water Model. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 2476-2486.) use a shallow water model to simulate the MJO. In this model, we parameterize radiation as a large-scale mass sink, and parameterize convection as a small-scale mass source that is only triggered when the layer thickness is lower than a certain threshold. Over a wide parameter range, the model gives a strong MJO-like signal - a large-scale pattern that drifts slowly to the east, together with wind and pressure fields similar to those observed. Based on the simulation results, we propose that the MJO is an interference pattern of the westward and eastward inertia-gravity (WIG and EIG) waves. The MJO propagation speed is determined by the difference in the phase speeds of the EIG and WIG waves. In this study, we try to quantitatively understand what controls the MJO horizontal scale using the same shallow water model. There are four parameters in the model - the Kelvin wave speed (c), the convective timescale (t_c), the size of the convection (r_c), and the number density (s_c) of convection. We perform numerical simulations to examine the sensitivity of the MJO zonal wavenumber (k) to these parameters: k increases when s_c and r_c increase and when c decreases; k does not depend on the convective timescale. The scaling between k and the model parameters obeys a power law within an inertial range. A scaling argument will be presented based on the equatorial beta-plane scaling. This scaling argument helps to understand the climate dynamics of the MJO, e.g., how the MJO responds to global warming. The fidelity of this scaling argument can be examined by performing systematic global warming simulations using super-parameterized 3D climate models that reproduce the MJO signal in the current climate.

  15. Wavelength scaling of terahertz radiation in plasma gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Huang, Suxia; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Liangliang

    2016-11-01

    In our experiments, terahertz radiation via two-color generated laser plasma gas targets is studied using nitrogen and the noble gases (helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon) as the generation media. Carried out at the infrared beam of the advanced laser light source, we studied the effects of different pump wavelengths (between 1200 nm and 1600 nm) on THz generation. Terahertz pulse energy is measured as functions of input pulse energy, gas species, gas pressure. The experimental results show that the terahertz pulse energy approach a maximum value of 0.0578 μJ per pulse in xenon gas when the input 1600 nm pulse energy is 0.4 mJ per pulse.

  16. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  17. A Limited International Intercomparison of Responsivity Scales at Fiber Optic Wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Gallawa, R. L.; Gardner, J. L.; Nettleton, D. H.; Stock, K. D.; Ward, T. H.; Li, Xiaoyu

    1991-01-01

    We report here on a recent limited international intercomparison of responsivity scales at wavelengths of interest to the optical communications community. Participants in the comparison were the national laboratories in the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia. The wavelengths tested were 1300 and 1550 nm. Data taken at 850 nm are only briefly discussed. The disagreement between the national laboratories’ responsivity scale is comfortably within the uncertainty claimed by each laboratory. PMID:28184112

  18. Composition of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; D'Aversa, E.; Griffith, C.A.; Baines, E.K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Dalle, Ore C.M.; Filacchione, G.; Formisano, V.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Jaumann, R.; Lunine, J.I.; Nelson, R.M.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Titan's bulk density along with Solar System formation models indicates considerable water as well as silicates as its major constituents. This satellite's dense atmosphere of nitrogen with methane is unique. Deposits or even oceans of organic compounds have been suggested to exist on Titan's solid surface due to UV-induced photochemistry in the atmosphere. Thus, the composition of the surface is a major piece of evidence needed to determine Titan's history. However, studies of the surface are hindered by the thick, absorbing, hazy and in some places cloudy atmosphere. Ground-based telescope investigations of the integral disk of Titan attempted to observe the surface albedo in spectral windows between methane absorptions by calculating and removing the haze effects. Their results were reported to be consistent with water ice on the surface that is contaminated with a small amount of dark material, perhaps organic material like tholin. We analyze here the recent Cassini Mission's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) observations that resolve regions on Titan. VIMS is able to see surface features and shows that there are spectral and therefore likely compositional units. By several methods, spectral albedo estimates within methane absorption windows between 0.75 and 5 ??m were obtained for different surface units using VIMS image cubes from the Cassini-Huygens Titan Ta encounter. Of the spots studied, there appears to be two compositional classes present that are associated with the lower albedo and the higher albedo materials, with some variety among the brighter regions. These were compared with spectra of several different candidate materials. Our results show that the spectrum of water ice contaminated with a darker material matches the reflectance of the lower albedo Titan regions if the spectral slope from 2.71 to 2.79 ??m in the poorly understood 2.8-??m methane window is ignored. The spectra for brighter regions are not matched by the spectrum of

  19. Scale-factor variations due to wavelength-dependent optical losses in fiber optic gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, James A.

    1996-11-01

    Most sources of optical loss in a fiber optic gyro (FOG) depend on wavelength. Because of the broadband sources used in interferometric FOGs, these losses result in an effective shift of mean wavelength of the light producing the interference signal. For some signal processing methods, these wavelength variations produce proportional changes in the IFOG scale factor. Using well documented approximations, losses are calculated and plotted versus wavelength. A discussion of the qualitative effects on scale factor is presented and expected mean wavelength variations are computed using a representative approximation of the spectrum of a FOG source. The types of losses considered include: fiber-fiber or fiber-wave guide misalignments; microbend losses, bending losses and mode diameter mismatches. Preliminary results indicate that scale factor variations caused by such losses will contribute significantly to the total scale factor thermal sensitivity for some FOG designs. While closed loop operation results in a scale factor with fundamentally low sensitivity to variations in optical losses, most implementations are sensitive to changes in mean wavelength, thus the effects discussed here should be considered when designing high performance IFOGs and their electronics.

  20. Universal instability for wavelengths below the ion Larmor scale.

    PubMed

    Landreman, Matt; Antonsen, Thomas M; Dorland, William

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrate that the universal mode driven by the density gradient in a plasma slab can be absolutely unstable even in the presence of reasonable magnetic shear. Previous studies from the 1970s that reached the opposite conclusion used an eigenmode equation limited to L_{x}≫ρ_{i}, where L_{x} is the scale length of the mode in the radial direction, and ρ_{i} is the ion Larmor radius. Here we instead use a gyrokinetic approach which does not have this same limitation. Instability is found for perpendicular wave numbers k_{y} in the range 0.7≲k_{y}ρ_{i}≲100, and for sufficiently weak magnetic shear: L_{s}/L_{n}≳17, where L_{s} and L_{n} are the scale lengths of magnetic shear and density. Thus, the plasma drift wave in a sheared magnetic field may be unstable even with no temperature gradients, no trapped particles, and no magnetic curvature.

  1. VIMS Observations of Titan's South Polar Haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. K.; Griffith, C. A.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2005-12-01

    Titan's stratospheric haze significantly affects the thermal budget of the atmosphere, thereby providing important dynamical forcing. The aerosols act as atmospheric coolants by enhancing radiation to space in the thermal infrared. In addition, they heat the atmosphere by absorbing solar UV radiation. Atmospheric models which couple the haze to the dynamics suggest that the aerosols accumulate at the poles during the winter, creating permanent polar caps, and augment the latitudinal temperature gradients. In turn, this reinforces meridional circulation which transports more haze to the pole and results in a positive feedback between dynamics and cooling. Ground-based observations in the near-IR (1 to 2 μm) of Titan's south pole indicate the existence of a polar hood of haze between 30 and 50 km altitude. Yet, the altitude of these particulates, which coincides with that of the tropopause at 44 km, raises the question of whether the particles are methane cloud particles associated with local convection or haze associated with global circulation. We propose to investigate further the nature of the polar hood with an analysis of Cassini observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), which provides a higher spatial resolution and greater wavelength coverage than do the ground-based observations. Preliminary analysis of the VIMS data corroborates the existence of a southern polar hood of atmospheric particulates. Through a radiative transfer analysis, we will determine the optical depth, altitude, effective particle size and latitudinal extent of the observed particulate hood. The optical depth will provide a measure of the thermal forcing due to the particles, while the effective size will distinguish between submicron-sized haze particles and the larger methane particles, diagnostic of the hood's origin.

  2. Novel VIM metallo-beta-lactamase variant, VIM-24, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Correa, Adriana; Briceño, David F; Rosas, Natalia C; De La Cadena, Elsa; Ruiz, Sory J; Mojica, Maria F; Camargo, Ruben Dario; Zuluaga, Ivan; Marin, Adriana; Quinn, John P; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2011-05-01

    We report the emergence of a novel VIM variant (VIM-24) in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate in Colombia. The isolate displays MICs for carbapenems below the resistance breakpoints, posing a real challenge for its detection. The blaVIM-24 gene was located within a class 1 integron carried on a large plasmid. Further studies are needed to clarify its epidemiological and clinical impact.

  3. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Close to the Multiphoton Ionization Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chien-Jen; Cirmi, Giovanni; Hong, Kyung-Han; Moses, Jeffrey; Huang, Shu-Wei; Granados, Eduardo; Keathley, Phillip; Bhardwaj, Siddharth; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2013-08-01

    We study the wavelength scaling of high harmonic generation efficiency with visible driver wavelengths in the transition between the tunneling and the multiphoton ionization regimes where the Keldysh parameter is around unity. Our experiment shows a less dramatic wavelength scaling of efficiency than the conventional case for near- and mid-IR driver wavelengths, and it is well explained by a generalized three-step model for increased Keldysh parameters that employs complex ionization times in addition to the nonadiabatic ionization. The complex ionization time is critical to avoid the divergence when replacing the quasistatic ionization model by the more general nonadiabatic ionization model. Together, the two modifications present a consistent description of the influence of the atomic potential on the rescattering process in the intermediate Keldysh regime.

  4. A multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction method: getsources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shchikov, A.; André, Ph.; Didelon, P.; Motte, F.; Hennemann, M.; Schneider, N.

    2012-06-01

    We present a multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm called getsources. Although it has been designed primarily for use in the far-infrared surveys of Galactic star-forming regions with Herschel, the method can be applied to many other astronomical images. Instead of the traditional approach of extracting sources in the observed images, the new method analyzes fine spatial decompositions of original images across a wide range of scales and across all wavebands. It cleans those single-scale images of noise and background, and constructs wavelength-independent single-scale detection images that preserve information in both spatial and wavelength dimensions. Sources are detected in the combined detection images by following the evolution of their segmentation masks across all spatial scales. Measurements of the source properties are done in the original background-subtracted images at each wavelength; the background is estimated by interpolation under the source footprints and overlapping sources are deblended in an iterative procedure. In addition to the main catalog of sources, various catalogs and images are produced that aid scientific exploitation of the extraction results. We illustrate the performance of getsources on Herschel images by extracting sources in sub-fields of the Aquila and Rosette star-forming regions. The source extraction code and validation images with a reference extraction catalog are freely available.

  5. Verbal Instruction Model (VIM) in voice therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Ann-Christine

    2016-01-01

    The stumbling-block in voice therapy is the patient's generalization of the new voice behavior in everyday life. Traditionally voice therapy is based on demonstration, i.e. during the therapy session the speech therapist uses her own voice and body to demonstrate for the patient how to produce voice in different training tasks. During the last decade a new voice therapy strategy, the Verbal Instruction Model (VIM), has been developed by the author. In VIM the speech therapist uses verbal instructions instead of demonstration when conveying the training tasks to the patient. Our clinical experience has shown that VIM seems to help getting over the stumbling-block of generalization. However, evidence for VIM voice therapy outcome remains to be scientifically studied and confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to describe VIM voice therapy and to discuss therapy strategies in the light of motor learning principles.

  6. Space switching enabled tunable wavelength converter and its application in large scale optical interconnect architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaowen; Zhou, Luying; Cheng, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a large scale Clos structure based optical interconnect by employing cyclic arrayed waveguide grating routers (AWGRs) and novel space switching enabled tunable wavelength converters (SS-TWCs). The 1:2 or 1:4 SS-TWCs expand the scale of the optical interconnect up to 8 times of standard Clos structure while using the same AWGR modules. Experimental results are given to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed optical interconnect.

  7. Europa's opposition surge in the near-infrared: interpreting disk-integrated observations by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2004-11-01

    Near-infrared observations of Europa's disk-integrated opposition surge by Cassini VIMS, first published in Fig. 4 of Brown et al. (2003, Icarus, 164, 461), have now been modeled with the commonly used Hapke photometric function. The VIMS data set emphasizes observations at 16 solar phase angles from 0.4° to 0.6°—the first time the <1° phase "heart" of Europa's opposition surge has been observed this well in the near-IR. This data set also provides a unique opportunity to examine how the surge is affected by changes in wavelength and albedo: at VIMS wavelengths of 0.91, 1.73, and 2.25 μm, the geometric albedo of Europa is 0.81, 0.33, and 0.18, respectively. Despite this factor-of-four albedo range, however, the slope of Europa's phase curve at <1° phase is similar at all three wavelengths (to within the error bars) and this common slope is similar to the phase coefficient seen in visible-light observations of Europa. The two components of the opposition surge—involving different models of the physical cause of the surge—are the Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE) and the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE). Because of sparse VIMS phase coverage, it is not possible to constrain all the surge parameters at once in a Hapke function that has both SHOE and CBOE; accordingly, we performed separate Hapke fits for SHOE-only and CBOE-only surges. At 2.25 μm, where VIMS data are somewhat noisy, both types of surges can mimic the slope of the VIMS phase curve at <1° phase. At 0.91 and 1.73 μm, however—where VIMS data are "cleaner"—CBOE does a noticeably poorer job than SHOE of matching the VIMS phase coefficient at <1° phase; in particular, the best CBOE fit insists on having a steeper phase-curve slope than the data. This discrepancy suggests that Europa's near-IR opposition surge cannot be explained by CBOE alone and must have a significant SHOE component, even at wavelengths where Europa is bright.

  8. Small particles and self-gravity wakes in Saturn's rings from UVIS and VIMS stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard G.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of particle sizes in Saturn's rings roughly follows a truncated inverse power-law. Though it is well known that differential optical depths provide a way to probe the parameters of size distribution (i.e. Zebker et al. [1985] Icarus, 64, 531-548), the technique is complicated by the presence of self-gravity wakes which introduce a geometric dependence to the observed optical depth. Here we present a method of extracting information about the size distribution of the particles in the gaps between the self-gravity wakes. The Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) occultations measure starlight at an effective wavelength of 2.9 μm falling onto a single pixel with angular dimensions 0.25 mrad × 0.5 mrad while Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultations measure starlight at a much smaller effective wavelength of 0.15 μm and over a field of view with larger angular dimensions of 6.0 mrad × 6.4 mrad. Starlight diffracted out of the VIMS pixel by particles smaller than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ∼8.86 mm, is not replaced by neighboring particles, while the UVIS instrument, with its larger field of view and smaller effective wavelength, collects all of the light diffracted by particles larger than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ∼0.025 mm. Consequently, measurements by VIMS overstate the optical depth in regions where sub-centimeter-sized particles are present. Using the rectangular cross section wake model of (Colwell et al. [2006], Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07201) and (Colwell et al. [2007] Icarus, 190, 127-144) with a new parameter to represent the excess VIMS optical depth not seen by UVIS, we combine VIMS and UVIS occultations for the first time for particle size analysis. We find a significant fraction of sub-cm particles only in the outermost portion of the A ring, and in the B1 region of the B ring. In the Trans-Encke region, we find a trend of increasing abundance of sub-cm particles as the outer edge of the A Ring is approached

  9. Novel VIM Metallo-β-Lactamase Variant, VIM-24, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Correa, Adriana; Briceño, David F.; Rosas, Natalia C.; De La Cadena, Elsa; Ruiz, Sory J.; Mojica, Maria F.; Camargo, Ruben Dario; Zuluaga, Ivan; Marin, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2011-01-01

    We report the emergence of a novel VIM variant (VIM-24) in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate in Colombia. The isolate displays MICs for carbapenems below the resistance breakpoints, posing a real challenge for its detection. The blaVIM-24 gene was located within a class 1 integron carried on a large plasmid. Further studies are needed to clarify its epidemiological and clinical impact. PMID:21282438

  10. Metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling to nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Dongwon; Koo, Sukmo; Yu, Sunkyu; Park, Namkyoo

    2009-10-12

    We propose a novel metal slit array Fresnel lens for wavelength-scale optical coupling into a nanophotonic waveguide. Using the plasmonic waveguide structure in Fresnel lens form, a much wider beam acceptance angle and wavelength-scale working distance of the lens was realized compared to a conventional dielectric Fresnel lens. By applying the plasmon waveguide dispersion relation to a phased antenna array model, we also develop and analyze design rules and parameters for the suggested metal slit Fresnel lens. Numerical assessment of the suggested structure shows excellent coupling efficiency (up to 59%) of the 10 mum free-space Gaussian beam to the 0.36 mum Si waveguide within a working distance of a few mum.

  11. Reduction of CCD observations made with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. III. Wavelength scale refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the recent modifications to the data reduction technique for observations acquired with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) mounted on the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory that allow the wavelength scale to be correctly computed in the case of large mutual offsets of studied objects in interferograms.We examine the parameters of the scanning FPIs used in the SCORPIO-2 multimode focal reducer.

  12. Stability study of standards used for calibration of the spectrophotometer wavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debossan, L. F.; Carvalho, E. M. S.; Souza, M. A.; Gomes, J. F. S.

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of spectrophotometers is a procedure recommended by international standards to provide quality assurance of results and traceability. Due to its intrinsic properties, holmium oxide filters are indicated as reference standards for calibrating the wavelength scale of such equipment. This paper presents a study aiming to assess the repeatability and drift of holmium oxide standard filters calibrated in the Radiometry and Photometry Laboratory (Laraf) of Inmetro in order to verify their stability.

  13. About the Portuguese VIM3 version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, O.; Cruz, A.; Oliveira, J. C.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    For the first time, a unique Portuguese version of the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM) was organized and published by the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) of Portugal and Brazil. This challenge could be met thanks to the experiences of the respective translations of the previous editions of the VIM and to the new Orthographic Agreement (AO) of the Portuguese speaking countries. After a brief historical review of the VIMs and their Portuguese versions, this communication aims to display the main steps that led to the final joint translation. Advantage was taken of this 3rd edition and of the AO to update the Portuguese multiplicative prefix writing "kilo" in coherence with the respective symbol "k". By way of answer to the questions raised by the recent edition of the VIM (VIM3) that stresses on the concepts associated to the terms, some suggestions are proposed and inconsistencies are identified, in order to facilitate the understanding and the dissemination of the document. These few suggestions for the next edition of the VIM also intended to standardize the terminology found in normative texts of different scientific fields which unfortunately does not necessarily tend to be consistent between them.

  14. Titan's haze as seen by VIMS during solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Ken; Xu, Fang; West, Robert; Brown, Robert; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger; Micholson, Phil

    2016-06-01

    This study describe solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. These observations include two recent observations made in the last few months. The solar occultation observations have been made at different latitudes and seasons, which allows us to investigate the variability of the density profile of aerosols. We present the line curves in the different atmospheric windows, and the data processing and the inversion method to retrieve vertical density profile. This unique data set provides information on Titan's opacity in the atmospheric windows, which is important to retrieve the surface properties. It also provides information on the cross-subsection of the aerosols as a function of wavelength in the wavelength range 1 to 5 micron.

  15. Hapke modeling of Rhea surface properties through Cassini-VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.

    2011-01-01

    The surface properties of the icy bodies in the saturnian system have been investigated by means of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) hyperspectral imager which operates in the 0.35-5.1. ??m wavelength range. In particular, we have analyzed 111 full disk hyperspectral images of Rhea ranging in solar phase between 0.08?? and 109.8??. These data have been previously analyzed by Filacchione et al. (Filacchione, G. et al. [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290; Filacchione, G. et al. [2010]. Icarus 206, 507-523) to study, adopting various "spectral indicators" (such as spectral slopes, band depth, and continuum level), the relations among various saturnian satellites. As a further step we proceed in this paper to a quantitative evaluation of the physical parameters determining the spectrophotometric properties of Rhea's surface. To do this we have applied Hapke (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Topics in Remote Sensing: 3 Springer, Berlin) IMSA model (Isotropic Multiple Scattering Approximation) which allow us to model the phase function at VIS-IR (visible-infrared) wavelengths as well as the spectra taking into account various types of mixtures of surface materials. Thanks to this method we have been able to constrain the size of water ice particles covering the surface, the amount of organic contaminants, the large scale surface roughness and the opposition effect surge. From our analysis it appears that wavelength dependent parameters, e.g. opposition surge width (h) and single-particle phase function parameters (b,. v), are strongly correlated to the estimated single-scattering albedo of particles. For Rhea the best fit solution is obtained by assuming: (1) an intraparticle mixture of crystalline water ice and a small amount (0.4%) of Triton tholin; (2) a monodisperse grain size distribution having a particle diameter am= 38. ??m; and (3) a surface roughness parameter value of 33??. The study of phase function shows

  16. Hapke modeling of Rhea surface properties through Cassini-VIMS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.

    2011-08-01

    The surface properties of the icy bodies in the saturnian system have been investigated by means of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) hyperspectral imager which operates in the 0.35-5.1 μm wavelength range. In particular, we have analyzed 111 full disk hyperspectral images of Rhea ranging in solar phase between 0.08° and 109.8°. These data have been previously analyzed by Filacchione et al. (Filacchione, G. et al. [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290; Filacchione, G. et al. [2010]. Icarus 206, 507-523) to study, adopting various "spectral indicators" (such as spectral slopes, band depth, and continuum level), the relations among various saturnian satellites. As a further step we proceed in this paper to a quantitative evaluation of the physical parameters determining the spectrophotometric properties of Rhea's surface. To do this we have applied Hapke (Hapke, B. [1993]. Theory of Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy, Topics in Remote Sensing: 3. Springer, Berlin) IMSA model (Isotropic Multiple Scattering Approximation) which allow us to model the phase function at VIS-IR (visible-infrared) wavelengths as well as the spectra taking into account various types of mixtures of surface materials. Thanks to this method we have been able to constrain the size of water ice particles covering the surface, the amount of organic contaminants, the large scale surface roughness and the opposition effect surge. From our analysis it appears that wavelength dependent parameters, e.g. opposition surge width ( h) and single-particle phase function parameters ( b, v), are strongly correlated to the estimated single-scattering albedo of particles. For Rhea the best fit solution is obtained by assuming: (1) an intraparticle mixture of crystalline water ice and a small amount (0.4%) of Triton tholin; (2) a monodisperse grain size distribution having a particle diameter a m = 38 μm; and (3) a surface roughness parameter value of 33°. The study of phase function shows

  17. Wavelength-scale imaging of trapped ions using a phase Fresnel lens.

    PubMed

    Jechow, A; Streed, E W; Norton, B G; Petrasiunas, M J; Kielpinski, D

    2011-04-15

    A microfabricated phase Fresnel lens was used to image ytterbium ions trapped in a radio frequency Paul trap. The ions were laser cooled close to the Doppler limit on the 369.5 nm transition, reducing the ion motion so that each ion formed a near point source. By detecting the ion fluorescence on the same transition, near-diffraction-limited imaging with spot sizes of below 440 nm (FWHM) was achieved. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of wavelength-scale imaging of trapped ions and the highest imaging resolution ever achieved with atoms in free space.

  18. Wavelength Scaling of High-Harmonic Yield: Threshold Phenomena and Bound State Symmetry Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anthony F.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.

    2008-05-01

    Using our recent description of harmonic generation (HG) in terms of a system's complex quasienergy [1], we analyze the harmonic power PδE(λ) (over a fixed interval, δE, of harmonic energies) as a function of wavelength and show that it reproduces the wavelength scaling predicted recently by two groups of authors [2, 3] based on solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation: PδE(λ)˜&-xcirc;, where x 5-6. Furthermore, the oscillations of PδE(λ) on a fine λ scale found in Ref. [3] are then shown to have a quantum origin, involving threshold phenomena within a system of interacting ionization and HG channels. Our results are also shown to be sensitive to the bound state wave function's symmetry. [1] M.V. Frolov, A.V. Flegel, N.L. Manakov, and A.F. Starace, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063407 (2007). [2] J. Tate, T. Auguste, H.G. Muller, P. Salières, P. Agostini, and L.F. DiMauro, Phys. Rev. Lett.98, 013901 (2007). [3] K. Schiessl, K.L. Ishikava, E. Persson, and J. Burgd"orfer, Phys. Rev. Lett.99, 253903 (2007).

  19. VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC{sup 2}-2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format.

  20. Cassini VIMS observations of the Galilean satellites including the VIMS calibration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Capaccioni, F.; Hansen, G.B.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R.N.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Bussoletti, E.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed the Galilean satellites during the Cassini spacecraft's 2000/2001 flyby of Jupiter, providing compositional and thermal information about their surfaces. The Cassini spacecraft approached the jovian system no closer than about 126 Jupiter radii, about 9 million kilometers, at a phase angle of < 90 ??, resulting in only sub-pixel observations by VIMS of the Galilean satellites. Nevertheless, most of the spectral features discovered by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) aboard the Galileo spacecraft during more than four years of observations have been identified in the VIMS data analyzed so far, including a possible 13C absorption. In addition, VIMS made observations in the visible part of the spectrum and at several new phase angles for all the Galilean satellites and the calculated phase functions are presented. In the process of analyzing these data, the VIMS radiometric and spectral calibrations were better determined in preparation for entry into the Saturn system. Treatment of these data is presented as an example of the VIMS data reduction, calibration and analysis process and a detailed explanation is given of the calibration process applied to the Jupiter data. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Organized chromophoric assemblies for nonlinear optical materials: towards (sub)wavelength scale architectures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialiang; Semin, Sergey; Rasing, Theo; Rowan, Alan E

    2015-03-01

    Photonic circuits are expected to greatly contribute to the next generation of integrated chips, as electronic integrated circuits become confronted with bottlenecks such as heat generation and bandwidth limitations. One of the main challenges for the state-of-the-art photonic circuits lies in the development of optical materials with high nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities, in particular in the wavelength and subwavelength dimensions which are compatible with on-chip technologies. In this review, the varied approaches to micro-/nanosized NLO materials based on building blocks of bio- and biomimetic molecules, as well as synthetic D-π-A chromophores, have been categorized as supramolecular self-assemblies, molecular scaffolds, and external force directed assemblies. Such molecular and supramolecular NLO materials have intrinsic advantages, such as structural diversities, high NLO susceptibilities, and clear structure-property relationships. These "bottom-up" fabrication approaches are proposed to be combined with the "top-down" techniques such as lithography, etc., to generate multifunctionality by coupling light and matter on the (sub)wavelength scale.

  2. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  3. Cassini-VIMS temperature maps of Saturn's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, M. C.; Scipioni, F.; Cerroni, P.

    The spectral position of the 3.6 mu m continuum peak measured on Cassini-VIMS reflectance spectra is used to infer the temperature of the regolith particles covering the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. Laboratory measurements by \\cite{Clark2012} have shown that 3.6 mu m peak for pure crystalline water ice particles shifts towards shorter wavelengths when the sample is cooled, moving from about 3.65 mu m at T=123 K to about 3.55 mu m at T=88 K. A similar trend is observed also in the imaginary part (k) of the refractive index of water ice when the sample is cooled from T=140 K to 20 K \\citep{Mastrapa2009}. Since water ice is the dominant endmember on Saturn's satellites surfaces \\citep{Filacchione2012}, the measurement of the wavelength at which the 3.6 mu m reflectance peak occurs can be considered as a temperature indicator. We report about temperature maps of Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Rhea derived by applying this method to Cassini-VIMS data taken at spatial resolution of 20-40 km/pixel. These maps allow us to correlate the temperature distribution with solar illumination conditions and with geological features. On average Enceladus' midlatitudes regions appear at T<100 K while the south pole tiger-stripes active area shows a thermal emission at T>115 K. Tethys' and Mimas' equatorial lenses show significant thermal anomalies: despite these features have low visible albedo they appear more cold than the surrounding mid-latitude regions as a consequence of a much higher thermal inertia. On Mimas, Hershel crater's floor appears warmer (T>115 K) than the adjacent equatorial lens area (T<110 K). Finally, Dione's analysis evidences lower temperature across the bright wispy terrains than the nearby low albedo areas.

  4. Method of single expression: an exact solution for wavelength scale 1D photonic structure computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik V.; Knyazyan, Tamara M.

    2003-12-01

    The principles of the method of single expression (MSE) for boundary problems solution in classical electrodynamics are presented. In the MSE the solution of the Helmholtz's equation is presented in the special form of a single expression describing resultant amplitude and phase distributions in the medium. This form of solution presenation permits to pass over the restrictions of the superposition principle and to solve both linear and nonlinear problems with ths same ease. In the MSE the Helmholtz's equation is reformulated to the set of first order differential equations and the boundary problem is solved numerically. No approximations are implied either in Helmholtz's equation or in boundary conditions. Using the MSE steady-state boundary problems are modeled for wavelength scale multilayer and modulated 1D photonic structures including amplification and nonuniformity evoked by intense electromagnetic field.

  5. Probing the parsec-scale accretion flow of 3C 84 with millimeter wavelength polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Plambeck, R. L.; Bower, G. C.; Rao, Ramprasad; Marrone, D. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Johnson, M. D.

    2014-12-10

    We report the discovery of Faraday rotation toward radio source 3C 84, the active galactic nucleus in NGC 1275 at the core of the Perseus Cluster. The rotation measure (RM), determined from polarization observations at wavelengths of 1.3 and 0.9 mm, is (8.7 ± 2.3)× 10{sup 5} rad m{sup –2}, among the largest ever measured. The RM remained relatively constant over a 2 yr period even as the intrinsic polarization position angle wrapped through a span of 300°. The Faraday rotation is likely to originate either in the boundary layer of the radio jet from the nucleus or in the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The accretion flow probably is disk-like rather than spherical on scales of less than a parsec, otherwise the RM would be even larger.

  6. Computing Global Mosaics of Titan With the VIMS Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouelic, S.; Cornet, T.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini observes the surface of Titan in seven narrow atmospheric windows in the infrared at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns. We have produced a global hyperspectral mosaic of the complete VIMS data set of Titan between T0 (July 2004) and T112 flyby (July 2015), by merging all the data cubes sorted by increasing spatial resolution, with the high resolution images on top of the mosaic and the low resolution images used as background. We filtered out the observing geometry in order to remove the pixels acquired in too extreme illuminating and viewing conditions, which systematically produce atmospheric artifacts. We used thresholds of 80° both on the incidence and emission angles, 100° on the phase angle, and 7 on the airmass. These thresholds corresponds to a trade-off between surface coverage and data quality. The viewing geometry is normalized at first order using a surface photometric function derived from the observation at 5 μm, where the atmospheric scattering is almost negligible. We also use the wings of the atmospheric windows as a proxy to correct for the amount of additive scattering present in the center of these windows, where the surface is seen by VIMS. Various color composites can then be produced using combinations of different wavelengths to emphasize surface heterogeneities. Among these, a RGB composite with red controlled by the 5 μm image, the green by the 2 μm image and the blue by the 1.27 μm, reveals the extent of equatorial dune fields appearing in brownish tones. Bluish areas corresponds to regions possibly enriched in water ice or other organic compounds. Composite of band ratios such as 1.59/1.27 μm, 2.03/1.27 μm and 1.27/1.08 also prove to be more useful to better emphasize surface variations, even if they are also more sensitive to residual artefacts due to atmospheric and geometric effects or calibration residuals.

  7. Surface of Titan : model and VIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannou, P.; Toledo, D.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Lemouélic, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this presentation we will describe how we explain the surface reflectivity observed by DISR and how we retrieved the surface albedo of Titan from VIMS observation, showing where are the main uncertainties. We show that the reflectivity at the Huygens Landing Site may be explained a layer of liquid methane at the surface. We also show that other zones on Titan may have the same type of surface reflectivity than the HLS.

  8. Mimas: Preliminary Evidence For Amorphous Water Ice from VIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Marzo, G. A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Roush, T. L.; Mastrapa, R. M.; DalleOre, C. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a statistical clustering analysis (1,2) on a mosaic of VIMS data cubes obtained on February 13, 2010, for Saturn s satellite Mimas. Seven VIMS cubes were geometrically projected and re-sampled to a common spatial resolution. The clustering technique consists of a partitioning algorithm coupled to a criterion that prevents sub-optimal solutions and tests for the influence of random noise in the measurements. The clustering technique is agnostic about the meaning of the clusters, and scientific interpretation requires their a posteriori evaluation. The preliminary results yielded five clusters, demonstrating that spectral variability across Mimas surface is statistically significant. The ratios of the means calculated for each of the clusters show structure within the 1.6- micron water ice band, as well as the shape and the central wavelength of the strong ice band at 2 micron, that map spatially in patterns apparently related to the topography of Mimas, in particular certain regions in and around Herschel crater. The mean spectra of the five clusters, show similarities with laboratory spectra of amorphous and crystalline H2O ice (3) that are suggestive of the presence of an amorphous ice component in certain regions of Mimas, notably on the central peak of Herschel, on the crater floor, and in faults surrounding the crater. This may represent a mixture of both ice phases, or perhaps a layer of amorphous ice on a base of crystalline ice. Another possible occurrence of amorphous ice appears southwest of Herschel, close to the south pole.

  9. VIM3.0. Continuous Energy MC Neutron/Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1991-08-01

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron or photon (VIM3.0) transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments. In VIM3.0, the photon interactions i.e., pair production, coherent and incoherent scattering, and photoelectric events, and photon heating are tallied by group, region, and isotope.

  10. VIM3.0. Continuous Energy MC Neutron/Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1991-10-10

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron or photon (VIM3.0) transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments. In VIM3.0, the photon interactions i.e., pair production, coherent and incoherent scattering, and photoelectric events, and photon heating are tallied by group, region, and isotope.

  11. A nano/micro `meso' scale self-calibrating integrated optical wavelength and intensity meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.; Zavalin, A.

    2006-07-01

    Wavelength-division multiplexing has become the dominant approach to utilizing the massive bandwidth of optical fibers and integrated optics, including those based on a photonic crystal approach and recent nanotechnology achievements. For tunable sources and tunable receivers, it is desirable to measure the wavelength accurately and quickly. Unfortunately, current wavelength-measurement devices are not integrated and not fast enough to support 1 Gbit/s and higher requirements of the modern communication lines. We show here how to make an integrated optical system that results in an intensity-independent wavelength determination and a wavelength-independent intensity determination at ultra-short pulse duration or higher than ˜1-GHz bandwidth. The two output beams from a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, tuned to 3 dB at each output at the beginning of the wavelength-measurement range, provide all of the needed information. We show how a simple fast wavelength meter can be built into a silicon - or other - optical chip. It employs fuzzy metrology using both outputs of an integrated interferometer.

  12. Multi-wavelength, Multi-scale Observations of Outflows in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele Laurie Dennis

    During the early stages of star formation, an embedded protostar accretes mass and simultaneously expels mass and angular momentum in the form of a bipolar outflow. In the common case of clustered star formation, outflows likely impact their surrounding environment and influence subsequent star formation. Numerical simulations have shown that outflows can sustain turbulence and maintain a cluster in quasi-equilibrium; alternatively, it was proposed that outflows may trigger rather than regulate or inhibit star formation. Observations of outflows and their impact on clusters are challenging because they must probe spatial scales over several orders of magnitude --- from the size of a core (a few hundred AU, or N ~ 10-3 pc) to a cluster (a few pc) --- and previous works generally focused on one scale or the other. This thesis incorporates high-resolution, high-sensitivity interferometry observations (with millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelengths) complemented by observations obtained using single dish telescopes in order to assess molecular outflow properties and their cumulative impact in two young protostellar clusters: Serpens South and NGC 1333. Based on these case studies, I develop an evolutionary scenario for clustered star formation spanning the ages of the two clusters, about 0.1 - 1 Myr. Within this scenario, outflows in both Serpens South and NGC 1333 provide sufficient energy to sustain turbulence early in the protocluster formation process. In neither cluster do outflows provide enough energy to counter the gravitational potential energy and disrupt the entire cluster. However, most of the mass in outflows in both clusters have velocities greater than the escape velocity, and therefore the relative importance of outflow-driven turbulence compared with gravitational potential likely changes with time as ambient gas escapes. We estimate that enough gas mass will escape via outflows in Serpens South so that it will come to resemble NGC 1333 in terms of its

  13. Titan's aerosol optical properties with VIMS observations at the limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannou, Pascal; Seignovert, Benoit; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The study of Titan properties with remote sensing relies on a good knowledge of the atmosphere properties. The in-situ observations made by Huygens combined with recent advances in the definition of methane properties enable to model and interpret observations with a very good accuracy. Thanks to these progresses, we can analyze in this work the observations made at the limb of Titan in order to retrieve information on the haze properties as its vertical profiles but also the spectral behaviour between 0.88 and 5.2 µm. To study the haze layer and more generally the source of opacities in the stratosphere, we use some observation made at the limb of Titan by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We used a model in spherical geometry and in single scattering, and we accounted for the multiple scattering with a parallel plane model that evaluate the multiple scattering source function at the plane of the limb. Our scope is to retrieve informations about the vertical distribution of the haze, its spectral properties, but also to obtain details about the shape of the methane windows to desantangle the role of the methane and of the aerosols. We started our study at the latitude of 55°N, with a image taken in 2006 with a relatively high spatial resolution (for VIMS). Our preliminary results shows the spectral properties of the aerosols are the same whatever the altitude. This is a consequence of the large scale mixing. From limb profile between 0.9 and 5.2 µm, we can probe the haze layer from about 500 km (at 0.9 µm) to the ground (at 5.2 µm). We find that the vertical profile of the haze layer shows three distinct scale heights with transitions around 250 km and 350 km. We also clearly a transition around 70-90 km that may be due to the top of a condensation layer.

  14. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  15. Titan's surface composition and atmospheric transmission with solar occultation measurements by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Solar occultation measurements by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reveal the near-infrared transmission of Titan's atmosphere down to an altitude of ∼40 km. By combining these observations with VIMS reflectance measurements of Titan's surface and knowledge of haze and gas opacity profiles from the Huygens probe, we constrain a simple model for the transfer of radiation in Titan's atmosphere in order to derive surface reflectance in the methane windows used for compositional analysis. The advantages of this model are twofold: (1) it is accurate enough to yield useful results, yet simple enough to be implemented in just a few lines of code, and (2) the model parameters are directly constrained by the VIMS occultation and on-planet measurements. We focus on the 2.0, 2.7, 2.8 and 5.0 μm windows, where haze opacity is minimized, and diagnostic vibrational bands exist for water ice and other candidate surface species. A particularly important result is the strong atmospheric attenuation at 2.7 μm compared to 2.8 μm, resulting in a reversal of apparent spectral slope in a compositionally diagnostic wavelength range. These results show that Titan's surface reflectance is much "bluer" and more closely matched by water ice than the uncorrected spectra would indicate, although the majority of Titan's surface has a spectrum consistent with mixtures (either intimate or areal) of water ice and haze particles precipitated from the atmosphere. Compositions of geologic units can be accurately modeled as mixtures ranging from predominantly water ice (Sinlap crater ejecta and margins of dark equatorial terrain) to predominantly organic-rich (Tui Regio and Hotei Regio), with particles in the size range ∼10-20 μm. In distinguishing between hypothesized formation mechanisms for Tui and Hotei Regio, their organic-rich composition favors a process that concentrates precipitated haze particles, such as playa lake evaporite deposition (Barnes, J.W., Bow

  16. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the

  17. Coherent constructive interference in Saturn's rings reported by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Brown, R. H.; Spilker, L. J.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Leader, F.; Matson, D. L.; Edgington, S.; Nicholson, P. D.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R. N.; Bibring, J.-P.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B.; Bellucci, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; McCord, T. B.; Mennella, V.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2007-08-01

    On several occasions during its orbital tour the Cassini spacecraft has flown between the sun and Saturn in such fashion that the zero phase point passed through the rings. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) recorded spectral image cubes (0.4< ? <5.2μm) that showed the opposition effect (OE) at zero phase. The OE is a spike in the reflected light observed near 0o phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle. This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings. Previous work has shown that the OE arises from two distinct processes, shadow hiding (SHOE) and coherent backscattering (CBOE). The SHOE process causes an OE by the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases. The CBOE process causes an OE by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium. SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant. CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering. We have made spectral scans the VIMS images that traverse the zero phase point. We selected narrow spectral bands that reflected a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels. In this way, phase curves of the ringlet were obtained for each band. We have compared these data to data we acquired in the laboratory using the JPL long arm goniometer where we measured the phase curve of particulate materials that simulate the surface of Saturn's ring particles. We argue here that the OE is due to coherent backscattering because: 1) The theoretical CBOE function fit to the data is excellent. 2) The OE width is extremely narrow 3) The angular width of the peak increases with wavelength. CBOE theory also predicts that the width depends on the transport mean free path (TMFP) in the medium. We find that the OE is caused by

  18. Cassini/VIMS observations of the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belluci, G.; Brown, R.H.; Formisano, V.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Miller, E.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary scientific results obtained from the analysis of VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) lunar images and spectra. These data were obtained during the Cassini Earth flyby in August 1999. Spectral ratios have been produced in order to derive lunar mineralogical maps. Some spectra observed at the north-east lunar limb, show few unusual absorption features located at 0.357, 0.430 and 0.452 ??m, the origin of which is presently unknown. ?? 2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Subclass B1 Metallo-β-Lactamase VIM-4 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lassaux, Patricia; Traoré, Daouda A. K.; Loisel, Elodie; Favier, Adrien; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Sohier, Jean Sébastien; Laurent, Clémentine; Bebrone, Carine; Frère, Jean-Marie; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Galleni, Moreno

    2011-01-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase VIM-4, mainly found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii, was produced in Escherichia coli and characterized by biochemical and X-ray techniques. A detailed kinetic study performed in the presence of Zn2+ at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 100 μM showed that VIM-4 exhibits a kinetic profile similar to the profiles of VIM-2 and VIM-1. However, VIM-4 is more active than VIM-1 against benzylpenicillin, cephalothin, nitrocefin, and imipenem and is less active than VIM-2 against ampicillin and meropenem. The crystal structure of the dizinc form of VIM-4 was solved at 1.9 Å. The sole difference between VIM-4 and VIM-1 is found at residue 228, which is Ser in VIM-1 and Arg in VIM-4. This substitution has a major impact on the VIM-4 catalytic efficiency compared to that of VIM-1. In contrast, the differences between VIM-2 and VIM-4 seem to be due to a different position of the flapping loop and two substitutions in loop 2. Study of the thermal stability and the activity of the holo- and apo-VIM-4 enzymes revealed that Zn2+ ions have a pronounced stabilizing effect on the enzyme and are necessary for preserving the structure. PMID:21149620

  20. Characterization of the Titan's VIMS - units: Using Spectral Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Jérémy F.; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Brown, Robert H.

    2016-04-01

    Since the equatorial regions of Titan have been fully observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [1], the analysis of false-color composites enables distinguishing four main spectral units: the equatorial bright, brown, blue, and 5 μm-bright spectral units [2-4]. More precisely, the equatorial bright plateaus and inselbergs correspond to water-ice substrate coated by a layer of organic sediments. Moreover, the blue materials are more likely enriched in water-ice, which consist of icy particles exposition derived from the high standing plateaus and deposited into the lowlands after fluvial/pluvial processes [5] and/or impact cratering [6]. These blue materials are mainly located at the frontier of the large bright plateaus, and hence considered as transition zones to the brown areas corresponding to the radar dunes [7]. Whereas these brown dunes consist on atmospheric aerosols (i.e. tholins) [4] contaminated with particles of water-ice. Here we try to better characterize these spectral units, through VIMS observations at high resolution from TA (Oct. 2004) to T114 (Nov. 2015). Regions of interest show local transition zones between the equatorial bright areas, the blue materials, and the brown dunes, suggesting weathering and erosional processes (e.g. the Huygens landing site; areas at the east of Xanadu province; and Bohai Sinus at the south of Quivira plateau) [5,8], and impact cratering (e.g. Sinlap, Selk, Menrva, and Paxsi craters) [6,9]. Areas exposing large (i.e. Tui and Hotei Regiones) and small (e.g. Yalaing Terra, NW Belet, and NW Fensal) 5 μm-bright units - presumed evaporitic deposits - are also included in this study [9-11]. Subtle differences in the spectral behavior of these four units can be enhanced by using ratios of VIMS channels. At short wavelengths (i.e. below 2 μm), brown and blue materials seem to correspond to a granular mixture of organic sediments - similar to the atmospheric aerosols - and water-ice particles [7

  1. Global mapping of the surface of Titan through the haze with VIMS onboard Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Cornet, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Lasue, Jérémie; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini observes the surface of Titan through the atmosphere in seven narrow spectral windows in the infrared at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns. We have produced a global hyperspectral mosaic at 32 pixels per degrees of the complete VIMS data set of Titan between T0 (July 2004) and T120 (June 2016) flybys. We merged all the data cubes sorted by increasing spatial resolution, with the high resolution images on top of the mosaic and the low resolution images used as background. One of the main challenge in producing global spectral composition maps is to remove the seams between individual frames taken throughout the entire mission. These seams are mainly due to the widely varying viewing angles between data acquired during the different Titan flybys. These angles induce significant surface photometric effects and a strongly varying atmospheric (absorption and scattering) contribution, the scattering of the atmosphere being all the more present than the wavelength is short. We have implemented a series of empirical corrections to homogenize the maps, by correcting at first order for photometric and atmospheric scattering effects. Recently, the VIMS' IR wavelength calibration has been observed to be drifting from a total of a few nm toward longer wavelengths, the drift being almost continuously present over the course of the mission. Whereas minor at first order, this drift has implications on the homogeneity of the maps when trying to fit images taken at the beginning of the mission with images taken near the end, in particular when using channels in the narrowest atmospheric spectral windows. A correction scheme has been implemented to account for this subtle effect.

  2. Physical Properties of the Saturnian Ring System Inferred from Cassini VIMS Opposition Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, B.; Nelson, R. M.; Brown, R. H.; Spilker, L. J.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Leader, F.; Matson, D. L.; Edgington, S.; Nicholson, P. D.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R. N.; Bibring, J.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Bellucci, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; McCord, T.; Menella, V.; Sicardy, B.

    2005-12-01

    Much can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by studying the wavelength dependence of their reflectance as a function of phase angle. At small phase angles the reflectance of the rings exhibits the opposition effect (OE) a significant increase in reflectance as phase angle approaches zero degrees. The wavelength dependence of the width and the peak of the OE are indicators of important physical properties of the regoliths of the ring particles such as particle size, particle shape, packing density and albedo. The Cassini VIMS multi spectral imaging spectrometer obtained low phase observations of the Saturnian ring system from 0.4-5.2 microns during 2005. These data clearly show a pronounced (OE). Cassini VIMS opposition surge data indicate a wavelength dependence of the OE that relates to the size and separation of the scattering centers on the surface of the ring particles. Laboratory studies and theoretical models of the OE relate the size and shape of the reflectance increase to physical properties of the medium (Nelson et al, 2002; Spilker et al. 1995; Hapke et al., 1993)). The OE arises from two processes, shadow hiding (SH) and coherent backscattering (CB). The SHOE is observed because shadows cast by the particulate grains on one another are eliminated as phase angle approaches zero degrees. The CBOE is due to constructive interference between light rays traveling in opposite paths through the medium as the path length decreases with decreasing phase angle. The VIMS data at 1.9 microns, where the rings are highly reflective, indicate a strong CBOE effect, however, at 2.1 microns, where the rings are very absorbing, the shape of the phase curve is consistent with SHOE. Hapke et al. 1993,Science, 260, 509-511 Nelson, R. M. et al., 2002. Planetary and Space Science, 50, 849-856 Spilker aka Horn, L.J et al., 1995. IAU Colloquium #150 This work done at JPL under contract with NASA

  3. Detection and Characterization of VIM-31, a New Variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg Mutations, in a Clinical Isolate of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Bebrone, Carine; Huang, Te-Din; Bouchahrouf, Warda; DeGheldre, Yves; Deplano, Ariane; Hoffmann, Kurt; Glupczynski, Youri

    2012-01-01

    We report the first description of the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-31, a new variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg mutations, in Enterobacter cloacae 11236, which was isolated from blood specimens of a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma in Belgium. blaVIM-31 was found on a class 1 integron located on a self-transferable but not typeable 42-kb plasmid. Compared to values published elsewhere for VIM-2, the purified VIM-31 enzyme showed weaker catalytic efficiency against all the tested beta-lactam agents (except for ertapenem), resulting from lower kcat (except for ertapenem) and higher Km values for VIM-31. PMID:22391550

  4. Multigroup calculations using VIM: A user's guide to ISOVIM

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1992-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have long been used to benchmark more a mate approximate solution methods for reactor physics problems. The power of VIM (ref 1) lies partly in the detailed geometrical representations incorporating the (generally) curved surfaces of combinatorial geometry, and partly in the fine energy detail of pointwise cross sections which are independent of the neutron spectrum. When differences arise between Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations, the question arises, is the error in the multigroup cross sections, in the treatment of transport effects, or in the mesh-based treatment of space in the deterministic calculation The answers may not be obvious, but may be identified by combining the exact geometry capability of VIM with the multigroup formalism. We can now run VIM in a multigroup mode by producing special VIM Material files which contain point-wise data describing multigroup data with histograms. This forces VIM to solve the multigroup problem with only three small code modifications. P[sub N] scattering is simulated with the usual tabulated angular distributions with 20 equally-sized scattering angle cosine meshes. This document describes the VIM multigroup capability, the procedures for generating multigroup cross sections for VIM, and their use. The multigroup cross section generating code, ISOVIM, is described, and benchmark testing is documented.

  5. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C.

  6. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of α-amylase on poly(DVB-VIM)-Cu(+2) magnetic metal-chelate affinity sorbent.

    PubMed

    Osman, Bilgen; Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Kök, Senay; Beşirli, Necati

    2012-09-01

    Designing an immobilised metal ion affinity process on large-scale demands that a thorough understanding be developed regarding the adsorption behaviour of proteins on metal-loaded gels and the characteristic adsorption parameters to be evaluated. In view of this requirement, interaction of α-amylase as a model protein with newly synthesised magnetic-poly(divinylbenzene-1-vinylimidazole) [m-poly(DVB-VIM)] microbeads (average diameter, 53-212 μm) was investigated. The m-poly(DVB-VIM) microbeads were prepared by copolymerising of divinylbenzene (DVB) with 1-vinylimidazole (VIM). The m-poly(DVB-VIM) microbeads were characterised by N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope and swelling studies. Cu(2+) ions were chelated on the m-poly(DVB-VIM) beads and used in adsorption of α-amylase in a batch system. The maximum α-amylase adsorption capacity of the m-poly(DVB-VIM)-Cu(2+) beads was determined as 10.84 mg/g at pH 6.0, 25 °C. The adsorption data were analyzed using three isotherm models, which are the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, modified Ritchie's-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to test dynamic experimental data. The study of temperature effect was quantified by calculating various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes.

  7. Coherence solution for bidirectional reflectance distributions of surfaces with wavelength-scale statistics.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Brian G; Gamiz, Victor L

    2006-02-01

    The scalar bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) due to a perfectly conducting surface with roughness and autocorrelation width comparable with the illumination wavelength is derived from coherence theory on the assumption of a random reflective phase screen and an expansion valid for large effective roughness. A general quadratic expansion of the two-dimensional isotropic surface autocorrelation function near the origin yields representative Cauchy and Gaussian BRDF solutions and an intermediate general solution as the sum of an incoherent component and a nonspecular coherent component proportional to an integral of the plasma dispersion function in the complex plane. Plots illustrate agreement of the derived general solution with original bistatic BRDF data due to a machined aluminum surface, and comparisons are drawn with previously published data in the examination of variations with incident angle, roughness, illumination wavelength, and autocorrelation coefficients in the bistatic and monostatic geometries. The general quadratic autocorrelation expansion provides a BRDF solution that smoothly interpolates between the well-known results of the linear and parabolic approximations.

  8. Multi-wavelength Monitoring of Lensed Quasars: Deciphering Quasar Structure at Micro-arcseconds Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ana; Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Chen, Bin; MacLeod, Chelsea Louise; Chartas, George

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing in multiply imaged gravitationally lensed quasars provides us with a unique tool to zoom in on the structure of AGN and explore their physics in more detail. Microlensing magnification, caused primarily by stars and white dwarfs close to the line of sight towards the lensed quasar images, is seen as uncorrelated flux variations due to the relative motions of the quasar, the lens, its stars, and the observer, and it depends on the structural and dynamical properties of the source and the lens. Since the magnification depends upon the size of the source, we can use microlensing to measure the size of quasar emission regions. In essence, the amplitude of the microlensing variability encodes the source size, with smaller sources showing larger variability amplitudes. Using state of the art microlensing techniques, our team has performed pioneering research in the field based on multi-wavelength space and ground-based observations. Among the most remarkable results, using Chandra observations we have set the first quantitative constraints on the sizes of the X-ray emission regions of quasars. In this work l briefly describe the methodology, the results from our previous multi-wavelength monitoring programs, and the next frontier of exploring the dependence of the structure of the X-ray emission regions on black hole mass and X-ray energy.

  9. VIM2/13. Continuous Energy MC Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments.

  10. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

    1995-05-17

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the plate lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigorous`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work. This involves such areas as uncovering problems in deterministic methods and models, pitfalls in using Monte Carlo codes, and improving predictions. The numerical illustrations included here were taken from the extensive documentation cited as references.

  11. VIMS Observations of Titan During the First Two Close Flybys by the Cassini-Huygens Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, S.; LeMouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.

    2005-01-01

    The joint NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission reached the saturnian system on July 1st 2004. It started the observations of Saturn s environment including its atmosphere, rings, and satellites (Phoebe, Iapetus and Titan). Titan, one of the primary scientific interests of the mission, is veiled by an ubiquitous thick haze. Its surface cannot be seen in the visible but as the haze effects decrease with increasing wavelength, there is signal in the infrared atmospheric windows if no clouds are present. Onboard the Cassini spacecraft, the VIMS instrument (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) is expected to pierce the veil of the hazy moon and successfully image its surface in the infrared wavelengths, taking hyperspectral images in the range 0.4 to 5.2 micron. On 26 October (TA) and 13 December 2004 (TB), the Cassini-Huygens mission flew over Titan at an altitude lower than 1200 km at closest approach. VIMS acquired several tens of image cubes with spatial resolution ranging from a few tens of kilometers down to 1.5 kilometer per pixel, demonstrating its capability for studying Titan s geology.

  12. Cassini/VIMS observation of an Io post-eclipse brightening event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellucci, G.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Cruikshank, D.; Nelson, R.M.; Clark, R.N.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.; Brown, R.H.; McCord, T.B.; Buratti, B.J.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    During the Cassini-Jupiter flyby, VIMS observed Io at different phase angles, both in full sunlight and in eclipse. By using the sunlight measurements, we were able to produce phase curves in the visual through all the near infrared wavelengths covered by the VIMS instrument (0.85-5.1 ??m). The phase angle spanned from ???2?? to ???120??. The measurements, done just after Io emerged from Jupiter's shadow, show an increase of about 15% in Io's reflectance with respect to what would be predicted by the phase curve. This behavior is observed at wavelengths >1.2 ??m. Moreover, just after emergence from eclipse an increase of about 25% is observed in the depth of SO2 frost bands at 4.07 and 4.35 ??m. At 0.879

  13. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  14. Sub-cm Particles in Saturn's Rings from VIMS, UVIS, and RSS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard Gregory; Colwell, Josh E.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Marouf, Essam A.; Esposito, Larry W.; Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.

    2016-10-01

    Particles sizes in Saturn's rings roughly follow a truncated power law. One way to determine the governing parameters of the size distribution is through the analysis of differential optical depths (Zebker et al. 1983). Non-axisymmetric self-gravity wakes complicate this approach when optical depth measurements at different wavelengths are not made at same viewing geometry. Using occultations spanning a wide range of viewing angles and from multiple instruments onboard Cassini (the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Radio Science Subsystem (RSS)), we forward-model the properties of the self-gravity wakes in Saturn's A and B rings while simultaneously constraining the parameters of the cm - sub-cm particle size distribution. In the absence of wakes, and in regions where particles smaller than ~ 8.86 mm are present, VIMS stellar occultations measure larger optical depths than UVIS stellar occultations due to the diffraction of 2.9 μm light out of the small (0.25 × 0.5 mrad) VIMS field of view compared with UVIS which measures shorter wavelength (0.15 μm) light over a much larger (6.4 × 6.0 mrad) field of view. This excess optical depth combined with RSS X-band (λ = 3.6 cm) optical depths provides a way to probe both the power law slope and the minimum particle size. In the A and B rings where self-gravity wakes are prevalent, we use the wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, 2007) with an additional free parameter representing the excess optical depth which would be measured through the gaps between opaque wakes, by VIMS compared to UVIS. In the B ring and inner A ring we find and absence of sub-cm particles and power law slopes of q ~ 2.8. In the trans-Encke region, where there are a multitude of satellite driven resonances, we find an increasing abundance of sub-cm particles as the outer edge of the A ring is approached. In the C Ring and the Cassini Division, where self-gravity wakes are absent

  15. 1.3 mm WAVELENGTH VLBI OF SAGITTARIUS A*: DETECTION OF TIME-VARIABLE EMISSION ON EVENT HORIZON SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bolin, David E.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Blundell, Ray; Gurwell, Mark A.; Moran, James M.; Primiani, Rurik; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Plambeck, Richard; Chamberlin, Richard; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Honma, Mareki; Oyama, Tomoaki; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Lamb, James; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2011-02-01

    Sagittarius A*, the {approx}4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole candidate at the Galactic center, can be studied on Schwarzschild radius scales with (sub)millimeter wavelength very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). We report on 1.3 mm wavelength observations of Sgr A* using a VLBI array consisting of the JCMT on Mauna Kea, the Arizona Radio Observatory's Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in Arizona, and two telescopes of the CARMA array at Cedar Flat in California. Both Sgr A* and the quasar calibrator 1924-292 were observed over three consecutive nights, and both sources were clearly detected on all baselines. For the first time, we are able to extract 1.3 mm VLBI interferometer phase information on Sgr A* through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of baselines. On the third night of observing, the correlated flux density of Sgr A* on all VLBI baselines increased relative to the first two nights, providing strong evidence for time-variable change on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii. These results suggest that future VLBI observations with greater sensitivity and additional baselines will play a valuable role in determining the structure of emission near the event horizon of Sgr A*.

  16. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Moughames, J; Jradi, S; Chan, T M; Akil, S; Battie, Y; Naciri, A En; Herro, Z; Guenneau, S; Enoch, S; Joly, L; Cousin, J; Bruyant, A

    2016-10-04

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ(3), slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications.

  17. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications. PMID:27698476

  18. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications.

  19. Cassini VIMS Observes the Opposition Effect in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Brown, R. H.; Spilker, L. J.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Leader, F.; Matson, D. L.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cassini Vims Rings Team

    On May 20 2005 the Cassini spacecraft flew between the sun and Saturn on a trajectory such that the zero phase point passed through the rings The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer VIMS recorded a number of spectral image cubes 0 4 lambda 5 2 mu m that showed the opposition effect OE at zero phase The OE is a spike in the reflected intensity observed near 0 o phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings Previous work has shown that the OE arises from two distinct processes shadow hiding SHOE and coherent backscattering CBOE The SHOE process causes an OE by the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases The CBOE process causes an OE by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering Using the individual image cubes a total of 32 areas containing 4 pixels each were selected that lay along the same ringlet as the opposition point and bracketed it in phase angle Because water ice is a major component of the rings the spectra are predominantly that of water Within each spectrum 9 narrow spectral bands were chosen to reflect a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels In this

  20. Physical Properties of Saturn's Ring Particles from Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Vims Team

    On several occasions in 2005 the Cassini spacecraft flew between the sun and Saturn on a trajectory such that the zero phase point passed through the rings. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) recorded a number of spectral image cubes (0.4< λ <5.2µm) that showed the opposition effect (OE) at zero phase. The OE is a surge in the reflected intensity observed near 0o phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle. This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings. Using the individual image cubes, a total of 32 areas containing several pixels each were selected in each cube that lay along the same ringlet as the opposition point and bracketed it in phase angle. Because water ice is a major component of the rings, the spectra are predominantly that of water. Within each spectrum spectral bands were chosen to reflect a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels. In this way phase curves of the ringlets were obtained for each band. .Previous work interpreted the OE as a consequence of two distinct processes, shadow hiding (SHOE) and coherent backscattering (CBOE). The SHOE process argues that OE is due to the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases. The CBOE process argues that an OE is caused by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium. SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant. CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering. 1 The OE of Saturn's rings has traditionally been interpreted as a SHOE. We suggest instead that it is a CBOE because the angular width of the peak increases with wavelength and the OE width is extremely narrow, consistent with CBOE. In addition, the theoretical CBOE function fit to the data is excellent. CBOE theory also

  1. Density Wave Signatures In VIMS Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, M. M.; Cassini VIMS Team

    2012-10-01

    Spectral scans of Saturn's rings by the Cassini VIMS instrument have revealed both regional and local variations in the depths of the water ice bands at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, which have been interpreted in terms of variations in regolith grain size and the amount of non-icy "contaminants" (Filacchione et al. 2012; Hedman et al. 2012). Noteworthy among the local variations are distinctive patterns associated with the four strong density waves in the A ring. Within each wavetrain there is a peak in band strength relative to the surrounding material, while extending on both sides of the wave is a "halo" of reduced band strength. The typical width of these haloes is 400-500 km, about 2-3 times the visible extent of the density waves. The origin of these features is unknown, but may involve enhanced collisional erosion in the wave zones and transport of the smaller debris into nearby regions. A similar pattern of band depth variations is also seen at several locations in the more opaque B ring in association with the strong 3:2 ILRs of Janus, Pandora and Prometheus. The former shows a pattern just like its siblings in the A ring, while the latter two resonances show haloes, but without central peaks. In each case, the radial widths of the halo approaches 1000 km, but stellar occultation profiles show no detectable density wavetrain. We suggest that this spectral signature may be a useful diagnostic for the presence of strong density waves in regions where the rings are too opaque for occultations to reveal a typical wave profile. More speculatively, the displacement of the haloes' central radii from the calculated ILR locations of 600-700 km could imply a surface density in the central B ring in excess of 500 g/cm^2. This research was supported by the Cassini/Huygens project.

  2. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  3. Near ultraviolet visible infrared mapping spectrometer (NU-VIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Francis M.

    1994-09-01

    The NU-VIMS is a new instrument concept for high resolution spectral imaging within the spectral band of 0.25 to 5.0 micrometers . The concept utilizes state-of-the-art detector and grating technologies to extend the capabilities of the Cassini/VIMS-V prototype while maintaining its compact and lightweight format. The NU-VIMS optical design achieves remarkable performance while relying only on spherical surfaces in a single optical channel with only one grating and either one or two detector arrays. Though the concept was developed in anticipation of the MORO, Rosetta, and Pluto-Charon deep space missions, the instrument could also be mounted on a lightweight satellite for low cost remote sensing of the earth.

  4. Characterizing the Effects of Washing by Different Detergents on the Wavelength-Scale Microstructures of Silk Samples Using Mueller Matrix Polarimetry

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yang; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Zhou, Jialing; Zeng, Nan; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Silk fibers suffer from microstructural changes due to various external environmental conditions including daily washings. In this paper, we take the backscattering Mueller matrix images of silk samples for non-destructive and real-time quantitative characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructure and examination of the effects of washing by different detergents. The 2D images of the 16 Mueller matrix elements are reduced to the frequency distribution histograms (FDHs) whose central moments reveal the dominant structural features of the silk fibers. A group of new parameters are also proposed to characterize the wavelength-scale microstructural changes of the silk samples during the washing processes. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are carried out to better understand how the Mueller matrix parameters are related to the wavelength-scale microstructure of silk fibers. The good agreement between experiments and simulations indicates that the Mueller matrix polarimetry and FDH based parameters can be used to quantitatively detect the wavelength-scale microstructural features of silk fibers. Mueller matrix polarimetry may be used as a powerful tool for non-destructive and in situ characterization of the wavelength-scale microstructures of silk based materials. PMID:27517919

  5. Mapping the Atmospheric and Surface Properties of Titan by the Massive Inversion of Cassini/VIMS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Appéré, Thomas; Vincendon, Mathieu; Douté, Sylvain; LeMouelic, Stéphane; Rannou, Pascal; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Coustenis, Athena; Brown, Robert H.

    2014-11-01

    Since the beginning of the Cassini mission, the imaging spectrometer VIMS has acquired ~40000 hyperspectral images of Titan containing several millions of spectra. Such a huge amount of data cannot be analyzed with a radiative transfer solver like SHDOM because of computational limits. Nevertheless, such a solver is the most suited tool to extract simultaneous information of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan from VIMS datacubes. We have developed a method of analyzing VIMS data that consents to use the power of a RT model without the inconvenience of long computational times, by the creation of look-up tables for different values of the RT model's parameters (geometry of the observation, surface albedo, aerosols opacity). We employ up-to-date information on gaseous spectral coefficients, aerosols’ optical properties and Titan’s climatology. These look-up tables, appropriately interpolated, are then used to minimize the observations and create simultaneous maps of aerosols opacity and of surface albedo (at the wavelengths of Titan’s spectral windows). This method lowers the computational time by a factor of several thousands and thus, for the first time, a truly massive treatment of VIMS data. In this paper we present the results of our method applied to the area of the Huygens landing site and their comparison with the results of other Cassini instruments. We also show the retrieved maps of a region observed multiple times at different Cassini flybys with different observational conditions, as the T13/T17 mosaic of the Atzlan area. The perspectives for atmospheric and surface seasonal monitoring are highlighted.

  6. Titan’s surface and atmosphere from Cassini/VIMS data with updated methane opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtzig, M.; Bézard, B.; Lellouch, E.; Coustenis, A.; de Bergh, C.; Drossart, P.; Campargue, A.; Boudon, V.; Tyuterev, V.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Kassi, S.; Nikitin, A.; Mondelain, D.; Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, S.

    2013-09-01

    We present an analysis of Titan data acquired by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), making use of recent improvements in methane spectroscopic parameters in the region 1.3-5.2 μm. We first analyzed VIMS spectra covering a 8 × 10-km2 area near the Huygens landing site in order to constrain the single scattering albedo (ω0) of the aerosols over all of the VIMS spectral range. Our aerosol model agrees with that derived from Huygens Probe Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in situ measurements below 1.6 μm. At longer wavelengths, ω0 steadily decreases from 0.92 at 1.6 μm to about 0.70 at 2.5 μm and abruptly drops to about 0.50 near 2.6 μm, a spectral variation that differs from that of Khare et al.’s (Khare, B.N., Sagan, C., Arakawa, E.T., Suits, F., Callcott, T.A., Williams, M.W. [1984]. Icarus 60, 127-137) laboratory tholins. Our analysis shows that the far wings of the strong methane bands on both sides of the transparency windows provide a significant source of opacity in these windows, and that their unknown sub-Lorentzian behavior limits our ability to determine precisely the surface albedos. Below 1.6 μm, the retrieved surface albedos agree with those derived from Huygens/DISR. The VIMS spectrum at 2.0 μm indicates a surface albedo of 0.11 ± 0.01, larger than derived in previous studies, and inconsistent with the signature of water ice. A series of VIMS data taken from 2004 to 2010 between 40°S and 40°N were then analyzed to monitor the latitudinal and temporal evolution of the atmospheric aerosol content. In the 2004-2008 period, the haze extinction is larger at Northern mid-latitudes by ∼20% with respect to the Huygens site, whereas Southern mid-latitudes are depleted by ∼15-20%. In 2009-2010, a progressive decline of the haze content in the Northern hemisphere is observed but no reversal of the North-to-South asymmetry is seen till mid-2010. Finally, data from five regions in Tui Regio and Fensal that show

  7. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bézard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008).Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 μm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°.We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  8. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008). Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 µm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°. We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  9. Metallo-β-Lactamases in Clinical Pseudomonas Isolates in Taiwan and Identification of VIM-3, a Novel Variant of the VIM-2 Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2001-01-01

    A total of 209 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas (193 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 P. putida, 4 P. stutzeri, and 2 P. fluorescens isolates) with reduced susceptibilities to imipenem and/or ceftazidime were subjected to PCR assays with primers specific for blaIMP-1, blaIMP-2, blaVIM-1, and blaVIM-2 and sequence analysis to identify the metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) prevalent among these organisms in Taiwan; and 21 isolates gave positive results. Five isolates including two P. putida and three P. stutzeri isolates were found to carry blaIMP-1, and six isolates including five P. putida and one P. stutzeri isolates harbored blaVIM-2. The remaining 10 isolates were P. aeruginosa, and all were found to carry a novel variant of blaVIM-2, designated blaVIM-3. There are only two nucleotide differences between blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-3, leading to two amino acid alterations. Our findings indicate that VIM-2 and its variant have become the most prevalent metalloenzymes in Pseudomonas in Taiwan. Southern hybridization with the blaVIM-2-, blaVIM-3-, and blaIMP-1 -specific probes revealed that only two VIM-2-producing P. putida isolates appeared to carry the MBL gene on plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that six VIM-3-producing P. aeruginosa isolates and two IMP-1-producing P. stutzeri isolates were genetically related, suggesting that the spread of these MBL genes in Taiwan could be due to clonal dissemination as well as genetic exchange between different clones. PMID:11451678

  10. Temporal variations of Titan's surface with Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Stephan, K.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Drossart, P.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lawrence, K.; Bratsolis, E.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze Cassini VIMS data of several areas on Titan's surface looking for variations with time. Three of these locations are near the equator (10-30°S), namely Hotei Regio, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera; in some cases changes in brightness and/or in appearance were reported therein. We also investigate a portion of the undifferentiated plains, areas relatively homogeneous and dark in radar observations, located near 20-25°N. This is a follow-up on a previous paper in which we had inferred surface albedos for some distinct regions of interest (RoIs) identified within the Hotei, Tui and Sotra areas through a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and radiative transfer (RT) modeling (Solomonidou [2014]. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 1729-1747). We apply the same methods here to a larger dataset looking for variations of the surface albedo with time and using the Huygens landing site as the 'ground truth' for calibration purposes. As expected, the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged from January 2010 to June 2012. Our analysis of Hotei Regio data from March 2005 to March 2009 also does not show any significant surface albedo variations within uncertainties. We note however that our RT retrievals are not optimal in this case because of the use of a plane-parallel code and the unfavorable geometry of the associated datasets. Conversely, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera show surface albedo fluctuations with time with pronounced trends for darkening and for brightening respectively. The Tui Regio spectrum exhibits a surface albedo decrease from March 2005 to February 2009, at 0.94, 1.08, 2.03, and 5 μm wavelengths, while the spectrum shape remains the same over that time. On the contrary, the Sotra Patera area became at least two times brighter within a year (April 2005-February 2006), at 1.58 μm, 2.03 μm, and 5 μm. We also retrieved surface albedo spectra for three reference regions surrounding Hotei, Tui and Sotra and for three additional regions we use as 'test cases' that

  11. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Flamini, E.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lopes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR medium resolution data on Titan’s surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. Such units in fact reveal compositional trends in the surface, that are likely related to different abundances of simple ices and/or hydrocarbons. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This classification can be expanded and refined as new

  12. Helium Abundance of Saturn from Cassini VIMS and CIRS Combined Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.; Gierasch, P. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini VIMS instrument has obtained about 11 stellar occultations of sufficient quality that they can be used to infer the atmospheric structure where the stellar light cuts through Saturn's atmosphere on its way to thespacecraft. For 5 of these stellar occultations, the Cassini CIRS instrument obtained spectra of Saturn's limb at nearly the same time and place. By combining these observations, we have previously demonstrated that we can produce an estimate of the Helium abundance on Saturn (e.g., Banfield et al., DPS BAAS, 2011). The Helium abundance of Saturn is of great interest due to its leverage on our understanding of the formation and internal evolution processes of the giant planets in our Solar System, as well as giant exoplanets in other solar systems. The Helium abundance is also of significant interest due to a long-standing discrepancy between estimates obtained using a combined IR Spectra/Radio Science Occultation technique (He/H2~0.03, Conrath et al., '84) and those obtained using IR spectra alone (He/H2~0.13, Conrath & Gautier, '00). We will present our results from the Cassini VIMS/CIRS analysis of this problem. The technique uses the Cassini CIRS limb spectra to produce an estimate of the temperature profile between about 0.01 mbar and 5 mbar. The VIMS stellar occultations are used to produce a scale height profile over a similar vertical region, but with much better information content (and thus tighter constraints) between about 1 mbar and 5 mbar. By comparing these two results and demanding consistency we can infer the mean molecular mass of the atmosphere (and thus the Helium abundance) in the region of overlap (~1mbar to 5 mbar). Realistically, both sets of observations are quite challenging to perform. The signal levels are relatively low for the CIRS limb spectra (compared to nadir spectra), making calibration especially challenging. Not all VIMS occultations are successful with variable stellar baselines or stray light corrupting the

  13. Clouds and hazes vertical structure of a Saturn's giant vortex from Cassini/VIMS-V data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Filacchione, G.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the evolution of a giant tropospheric vortex formed in the wake of the storm that encircled Saturn from December 2010 to July 2011 (Fletcher et al. [2011a] Science, 332, 1413-1417; Fletcher et al. [2012] Icarus, 221, 560-586; Sánchez-Lavega et al. [2011] Nature, 475, 71-74; Sánchez-Lavega et al. [2012] Icarus, 220, 561-576; Sayanagi et al. [2013] Icarus, 223, 460-478; Fischer et al. [2011] Nature, 475, 75-77) taking advantage of the observations acquired by the instruments on board the Cassini spacecraft. In particular, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) imaged the vortex several times. In this work we analyzed two observations registered by the visual channel of VIMS (VIMS-V) on 08/24/2011 and 01/04/2012, both after the active phase of the storm, and characterized quantitatively the vertical structure of the clouds and hazes above the vortex. Until now, VIMS-V dataset has been scarcely exploited to perform such an analysis. The IR channel of VIMS has always been preferred since it covers wavelengths containing spectral information on a wider range of altitudes in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, in our analysis we investigate the information content of VIMS-V observations and demonstrate that the covered spectral range contains valuable information that are helpful to improve our knowledge on the properties of Saturn's upper atmosphere. We developed a forward radiative transfer model to describe Saturn's atmosphere and simulate VIMS-V spectra in the 0.35-1.05 μm wavelength range. The analysis has then been performed by means of an inverse model that we built on the basis of the Bayesian approach. Spatial distributions of effective radii, column number densities and top pressures of the cloud decks have been mapped and as a by-product of our analysis we also suggest a modified spectral shape for the imaginary part of the refractive index of the tropospheric haze, with respect to the shape described in the study of Karkoschka and Tomasko

  14. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of VIM-12, a novel hybrid VIM-1/VIM-2 metallo-beta-lactamase from a Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate, reveal atypical substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Maria; Pournaras, Spyros; Kristo, Ioulia; Ikonomidis, Alexandros; Maniatis, Antonios N; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2007-11-13

    Metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) are considered an emerging family of Zn2+-dependent enzymes that significantly contribute to the resistance of many nosocomial pathogens against beta-lactam antimicrobials. Since these plasmid-encoded enzymes constitute specific molecular targets for beta-lactams, their exact mode of action is greatly important in deploying efficient anti-infective treatments and for the control of severe multi-resistant nosocomial infections, which becomes a global problem. A novel hybrid VIM-1/VIM-2-type beta-lactamase (named VIM-12) has recently been identified in a clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Greece. The sequence of this enzyme is highly similar with that of VIM-1 at its N-terminal region and with that of VIM-2 at its C-terminal region, raising the question of whether this sequence similarity reflects also a similar functional role. Moreover, the possible contribution of this novel beta-lactamase to the overall antibiotic resistance of this specific clinical isolate was investigated. The gene encoding VIM-12 was cloned and expressed, and the recombinant enzyme was used for detailed kinetic analysis, using a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. VIM-12 was found to exhibit narrow substrate specificity, compared to other known beta-lactamases, limited mainly to penicillin and to a much lesser extent to imipenen. Interestingly, meropenem was found to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor of the enzyme, although the active site of VIM-12 exhibited complete conservation of residues among VIM enzymes. We conclude that VIM-12 represents a novel and unique member of the family of known metallo-beta-lactamases, exhibiting atypical substrate specificity.

  15. Saturn B and C ring studies at multiple wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-04-01

    We can learn a great deal about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize higher optical depth regions in faint rings such as the outer C ring, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as

  16. Multi-wavelength View of Kiloparsec-scale Clumps in Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ferguson, Henry C.; Cassata, Paolo; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z ~ 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually ~10% and together ~50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and ~20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which seems qualitatively consistent with

  17. MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF KILOPARSEC-SCALE CLUMPS IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z {approx} 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually {approx}10% and together {approx}50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and {approx}20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which

  18. Distribution of radiation from organic light-emitting diode structures with wavelength-scale gratings as a function of azimuth and polar angles.

    PubMed

    Tutt, Lee; Revelli, Joseph F

    2008-03-01

    The angular distribution of radiation emitted from organic electroluminescent diodes fabricated on substrates with wavelength-scale gratings was measured using an optical Fourier transform instrument. A simple geometrical model is derived that specifies the polar angle of the exiting photon as a function of the azimuth angle, the grating pitch, the wavelength of light, and the effective index of the refraction of the light emitted by the fluorescing excitons. The radiation pattern of the extracted light is shown to fit that predicted by the model if one assumes that it comes from surface plasmon polaritons and bound TE waveguide modes.

  19. VIMS Observations of the Moon: a Recalibration in the Search for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C.; Hansen, G. B.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the possibility that small amounts of adsorbed water may be stable on illuminated portions of the lunar surface, possibly as OH- , (e.g. Starukhina and Shkuratov, 2000; Hibbitts et al., 2009; Dyar et al., 2009; McCord et al., 2009) and to confirm not yet released observations by other spacecraft, we have reanalyzed the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) observations of the Moon for absorption features near 3 microns - a very strong absorption band due to the presence of OH- or H2O. The VIMS instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft measures reflected solar and thermally emitted radiation from ~ 0.35 to 5.1 microns in 352 channels. On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew between the Earth and the Moon, within 380,000 km of the lunar surface at a phase angle of 90deg and a subsolar point of 0.33N, 257E (Brown et al., 2000), obtaining 12 observations fully within its field of view at a sub-spacecraft spatial resolution of about 190 km/pixel. Designed for operation at 10 a.u., the instrument offers the potential for very high SNR measurements of solar reflectance and thermal emission from of the lunar surface to investigate the presence and abundance of water and other trace materials, provided that significant calibration issues are appropriately addressed. Due to a combination of operating at higher temperatures than designed for and due to high thermal flux from the parts of the Moon’s surface that are warm, the VIMS instrument saturates in the infrared shortward of 1.65 microns and longward of ~ 3.5 - 4 microns, with longer wavelengths remaining useful for colder areas of the surface. In this preliminary effort, we have recalibrated each of the 12 observations relative to the equatorial limb by fitting the spectrum of the limb to a polynomial curve, resulting in an arbitrarily smooth spectrum, but deriving an empirical adjustment to the radiometric calibration that allows us to compare other areas of the Moon to the limb. This

  20. Cassini-VIMS Observations of Saturn's Rings at SOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Showalter, M. R.; Sicardy, B.; Cassini VIMS

    2004-11-01

    Following the Cassini spacecraft's Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) burn on 1 July 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtained near-infrared spectra from 0.9 to 5.1 μ m in two continuous radial scans across the unlit side of the rings, at ranges of ˜30,000 km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings at a phase angle, α = 82o and an emission angle, e = 47o, while the second covers the Cassini Division and entire A ring at α = 59o and e = 63o. The solar incidence angle was 114o and the radial resolution of both scans is 15-20 km, with sampling intervals of 2-3 km. Structurally, the rings appear to have changed little, if at all, since the Voyager observations in 1980/81 and the 28 Sgr occultations in 1989. This similarity extends even to the quasi-irregular structure which characterizes the inner B ring on scales of ˜100 km. Spectrally, all regions of the rings scanned are dominated by water ice, with prominent absorption bands at 1.55, 2.0 and 3.0 μ m, as well as weaker bands at 1.04 and 1.25 μ m seen primarily in the A and B rings. The ice bands are strongest in the middle A ring, somewhat weaker in the B ring, and much weaker in the C ring and Cassini Division. Locally, however, the fractional band depths appear to be independent of optical depth, suggesting that the light diffusely transmitted through the rings at moderate phase angles is dominated by single scattering. Regionally, the transitions between the C and B rings and between the Cassini Division and A ring are marked by gradual changes in band depth over radial distances of a few thousand km, perhaps indicative of ballistic redistribution of material. A broad reflectance maximum at 3.6 μ m, characteristic of ice grain sizes less than 100 μ m, is prominent everywhere but particularly strong in the outermost parts of the A ring, exterior to the Encke Gap. Besides water ice, the most noteworthy spectral feature is a broad, shallow absorption in the 0.9-1.8 μ m

  1. Cassini-VIMS Observations of Saturn's Rings at SOI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Brown, R. H.; Clark., R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Showalter, M. R.; Sicardy, B.

    2004-12-01

    Following the Cassini spacecraft's Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) burn on 1 July 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtained near-infrared spectra from 0.9 to 5.1~μ m in two continuous radial scans across the unlit side of the rings, at ranges of ˜30,000~km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings at a phase angle, α = 82o and an emission angle, e = 47o, while the second covers the Cassini Division and entire A ring at α = 59o and e = 63o. The solar incidence angle was 114o and the radial resolution of both scans is 15-20~km, with sampling intervals of 2-3~km. Structurally, the rings appear to have changed little, if at all, since the Voyager observations in 1980/81 and the 28~Sgr occultations in 1989. This similarity extends even to the quasi-irregular structure which characterizes the inner B ring on scales of ˜100~km. Spectrally, all regions of the rings scanned are dominated by water ice, with prominent absorption bands at 1.55, 2.0 and 3.0~μ m, as well as weaker bands at 1.04 and 1.25~μ m seen primarily in the A and B rings. The ice bands are strongest in the middle A ring, somewhat weaker in the B ring, and much weaker in the C ring and Cassini Division. However, the transitions between the C and B rings and between the Cassini Division and A ring are marked by gradual changes in band depth over radial distances of a few thousand km, perhaps indicative of ballistic redistribution of material. Besides water ice, the most noteworthy spectral feature is a broad, shallow absorption in the 0.9-1.8~μ m region which we tentatively attribute to Fe-bearing minerals, most likely silicates. This feature is seen primarily in the outer C ring and the Cassini Division, but like the ice band depths it pays scant attention to structural boundaries. This work was supported by NASA and ESA under contracts with the Cassini-Huygens Project.

  2. Characteristics of Titan's Clouds from VIMS T0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R. N.; Drossart, P.; Owen, T. C.; Nelson, R. M.; Cassini VIMS

    2004-11-01

    Over the past 4 years, ground-based images have shown that Titan sports a high cloud systems on a daily basis, which have been observed exclusively in Titan's south polar region. These clouds are composed of methane ice and may be a component of a liquid cycle similar to Earth's hydrologic cycle, with clouds, rain and seas. In July, Cassini gave us the first direct view of Titan's high clouds as the spacecraft passed below Titan's south pole. Observations by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) illuminate the altitudes, thicknesses and extents of Titan's clouds, which were dramatically imaged in detail by the ISS instrument. We find, consistent with ground-based observations, that the clouds reside in the high troposphere. In addition, the clouds are optically thick over a region of at least 100 km. Here I will discuss the characteristics of Titan's clouds as measured by VIMS, and implications of these results in terms of the formation of Titan's clouds. This work is supported by Cassini VIMS funds and the NASA planetary astronomy program

  3. Multi-wavelength observations of galaxy clusters: Population evolution and scaling relations for intermediate-redshift clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas Patrick

    Galaxy clusters are key signatures of the formation of structure in the Universe due to their positions at the nodes of the cosmic web. However, these privileged positions feature significant amounts of activity as a consequence of frequent accretion and collisions with other galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Thus, a rigorous understanding of cluster evolution constrains not only cosmological structure formation but also galaxy dynamics in the most extreme environments. Here, we examine the evolution of clusters in two situations: how the properties of the hot intracluster gas changes with the total masses of the clusters at the observational frontiers of mass and redshift; and how cluster galaxies evolve with redshift in some of the most massive clusters in the Universe. In Chapter 2 we examine a population of moderate-luminosity clusters at intermediate redshifts using the XMM-Newton telescope with well-determined masses from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. We find that these systems do not deviate from scaling relations between mass, luminosity, and temperature derived from more massive clusters, implying that, even at the redshifts and masses probed here, gravitational energetics still dominate over supernovae. In Chapter 3 we utilize new techniques to maximize a multi-wavelength dataset from HST of 25 massive galaxy clusters. We present new methods for detection and photometry of galaxies in the presence of inconsistent, diffuse background. Using these techniques, we construct a photometric catalog down to M* + 4-5 for clusters at redshift z 0:2 to z 0:9, which we validate with comparisons to spectral observations and a similar catalog. We also consider the luminosity function for these clusters; we find a drop-off in the faint-end slope when only selecting red sequence galaxies. Finally, in Chapter 4, we exploit our new photometric catalogs to study the evolution of the red galaxies, the "red sequence of galaxies," in these massive clusters of

  4. Global Distribution of Dunes on Titan With VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, L.; Le Mouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Jaumann, R.; Soderblom, J.; Soderblom, L. A.; Clark, R.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2008-12-01

    The carbon cycle on Titan involves several processes in the deep interior, in the sub-surface and in the atmosphere. The dunes, which were first seen by the Cassini/SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) [Lorenz et al., 2006], are thought to be composed of hydrocarbon grains deposited onto the surface after they formed in the atmosphere. Although their composition has not been determined during the nominal mission, pure water ice grains can be ruled out by the IR spectra obtained by the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer). This study compares RADAR and VIMS images of dune fields to determine the spectral characteristics of these areas and uses the global VIMS spectral maps in order to provide a global map of the dune fields on Titan. Most of the Aeolian sand deposits are found in sand seas. In addition, isolated groups of "cat scratches", very sinuous short dunes [Radebaugh et al., 2008] and sand sheets [Lunine et al., 2008] are recognized. Their emplacement is most probably related to the available sand supply. In VIMS infrared dataset, the detailed study of dune fields by Barnes et al. [2008] shows that dune patterns are found mainly in brown units, which cover 18% of the whole Titan's surface and are found in equatorial regions. Dark blue units cover roughly 2% of Titan's surface. They are systematically associated with bright terrains and are never found isolated within brown units. The dune fields in SAR images generally end at the limit between infrared brown and bright units. Dunes can also be found on dark blue terrains as seen by Barnes et al. [2007] and Soderblom et al. [2007]. 82% of SAR dunes are located in brown units and 4.5% in dark blue units. The remnant dunes, corresponding to "cat scratches" or not well defined dune fields, appear in infrared bright units as isolated patches. These dunes may form with a low sand supply. They account for about 13.5% RADAR dunes. From the global mapping, we inferred that dunes in the RADAR data are highly

  5. Simultaneous Mapping of Titan's Atmospheric and Surface Properties Through the Massive Inversion of Cassini/VIMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Appéré, T.; Vincendon, M.; Douté, S.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer solver (i.e. SHDOM) is the most powerful tool to extract simultaneous information of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan from the hyperspectral data of the VIMS imaging spectrometer onboard Cassini. However, the sheer amount of data (~40000 VIMS cubes containing several millions of spectra since the beginning of the mission) makes this approach too demanding in computational time. In our analysis we use a radiative transfer model to create look-up tables for different values of the model's parameters (geometry of the observation, surface albedo, aerosols opacity). We employ up-to-date information on gaseous spectral coefficients, aerosols' optical properties and Titan's climatology. These look-up tables, appropriately interpolated, are then used to minimize the observations and create simultaneous maps of surface albedo at the wavelengths of Titan's spectral windows and of aerosols opacity. This approach allows the gain of a factor of several thousands in computational time and thus, for the first time, a truly massive treatment of VIMS data. This capacity of processing full mapping quickly will consent to monitor closely the global and local seasonal evolution of the atmosphere and the surface. We will present the results of our method applied to some cases of interest. We will analyze several hyperspectral images of the Huygens landing site and show the comparison of our results with observations of other Cassini instruments. We will also investigate regions that have been observed multiple times at different Cassini flybys with different observational conditions, as the T13/T17 mosaic of the Atzlan area. The perspectives for atmospheric and surface seasonal monitoring will be highlighted.

  6. Titan's Surface Composition from Cassini VIMS Solar Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Thomas; Hayne, Paul; Sotin, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Titan's surface is obscured by a thick absorbing and scattering atmosphere, allowing direct observation of the surface within only a few spectral win-dows in the near-infrared, complicating efforts to identify and map geologi-cally important materials using remote sensing IR spectroscopy. We there-fore investigate the atmosphere's infrared transmission with direct measure-ments using Titan's occultation of the Sun as well as Titan's reflectance measured at differing illumination and observation angles observed by Cas-sini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We use two im-portant spectral windows: the 2.7-2.8-mm "double window" and the broad 5-mm window. By estimating atmospheric attenuation within these windows, we seek an empirical correction factor that can be applied to VIMS meas-urements to estimate the true surface reflectance and map inferred composi-tional variations. Applying the empirical corrections, we correct the VIMS data for the viewing geometry-dependent atmospheric effects to derive the 5-µm reflectance and 2.8/2.7-µm reflectance ratio. We then compare the cor-rected reflectances to compounds proposed to exist on Titan's surface. We propose a simple correction to VIMS Titan data to account for atmospheric attenuation and diffuse scattering in the 5-mm and 2.7-2.8 mm windows, generally applicable for airmass < 3.0. We propose a simple correction to VIMS Titan data to account for atmospheric attenuation and diffuse scatter-ing in the 5-mm and 2.7-2.8 mm windows, generally applicable for airmass < 3.0. The narrow 2.75-mm absorption feature, dividing the window into two sub-windows, present in all on-planet measurements is not present in the occultation data, and its strength is reduced at the cloud tops, suggesting the responsible molecule is concentrated in the lower troposphere or on the sur-face. Our empirical correction to Titan's surface reflectance yields properties shifted closer to water ice for the majority of the low

  7. The Saturnian satellite Rhea as seen by Cassini VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Wagner, R.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Giese, B.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Brown, R.H.; Filacchione, G.; Cappacioni, F.; Scholten, F.; Buratti, B.J.; Hansen, G.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Nelson, R.M.; Matson, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in June 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer has obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn in the spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m. Numerous flybys were performed at Saturn's second largest satellite Rhea, providing a nearly complete coverage with pixel-ground resolutions sufficient to analyze variations of spectral properties across Rhea's surface in detail. We present an overview of the VIMS observations obtained so far, as well as the analysis of the spectral properties identified in the VIMS spectra and their variations across its surface compared with spatially highly resolved Cassini ISS images and digital elevation models. Spectral variations measured across Rhea's surface are similar to the variations observed in the VIMS observations of its neighbor Dione, implying similar processes causing or at least inducing their occurrence. Thus, magnetospheric particles and dust impacting onto the trailing hemisphere appear to be responsible for the concentration of dark rocky/organic material and minor amounts of CO 2 in the cratered terrain on the trailing hemisphere. Despite the prominent spectral signatures of Rhea's fresh impact crater Inktomi, radiation effects were identified that also affect the H 2O ice-rich cratered terrain of the leading hemisphere. The concentration of H 2O ice in the vicinity of steep tectonic scarps near 270??W and geologically fresh impact craters implies that Rhea exhibits an icy crust at least in the upper few kilometers. Despite the evidence for past tectonic events, no indications of recent endogenically powered processes could be identified in the Cassini data. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laboratory Investigations Relevant to Cassini VIMS Reports of Coherent Constructive Interference in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert

    The Cassini spacecraft has flown between the sun and Saturn on several occasions during its orbital tour creating circumstances in which the zero phase point passed through the rings. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) recorded spectral image cubes (0.4 to 5.2 microns that showed the opposition effect (OE) at zero phase. The OE is a spike in the intensity of reflected light observed near zero phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle. This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings. Laboratory investigations of angular scattering properties of particulate materials show that the OE arises from two distinct processes, shadow hiding (SHOE) and coherent backscattering (CBOE). The SHOE process causes an OE by the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases. The CBOE process causes an OE by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium. SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant. CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering. We have made spectral dimension scans of the VIMS images that traverse the zero phase point. We selected narrow spectral bands that represent a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels. In this way, phase curves of the ringlet were obtained for each band. We have compared these data to data we acquired in the laboratory using the JPL long arm goniometer where we measured the phase curve of particulate materials that simulate the surface of Saturn's ring particles. We argue here that the OE is due to coherent backscattering because: 1) The theoretical CBOE function fit to the data is excellent. 2) The OE width is extremely narrow 3) The angular width of the peak increases with wavelength. CBOE theory also predicts that the

  9. Optical properties of Titan's aerosols: comparison between DISR/Huygens observations and VIMS/Cassini solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmuse, Florian; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, the only satellite with a dense atmosphere, presents a hydrocarbon cycle that includes the formation and sedimentation of organic aerosols. The optical properties of Titan's haze inferred from measurement of the Huygens probe were recently revisited by Doose et al. (Icarus, 2016). The present study uses the solar occultation observations in equatorial regions of Titan that have been acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft to infer similar information in a broader wavelength range. Preliminary studies have proven the interest of those solar occultation data in the seven atmospheric windows to constrain the aerosol number density, but could not directly compare with the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data because models predict that the density profile vary with latitude. The present study compares the DISR measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and the solar occultation data acquired by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. These sets of data differ in their acquisition method and time, spectral range, and altitude: the DISR measurements have been taken in 2005, along a vertical line of sight, in the visible spectral range (490-950nm) and under 140km of altitude. The relevant solar occultation data at equator have been acquired in 2009, along a horizontal line of sight, in the IR range (0.9-5.1µm), with sun light scanning all altitudes for a long enough wavelength, namely in the five-micron atmospheric window. These sets of data have been analyzed previously, separately and using different models. Here, we present a cross analysis of these sets of data, that allows us to test the different models describing the density profile of aerosols. In addition to providing wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient, the comparison allows us to assess the impact of refraction in Titan's atmosphere. It also provides optical depth and scattering properties that are crucial information

  10. Titan's Surface Properties: Correlations Among DISR, RADAR And VIMS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Laurence A.; DISR, Cassini-Huygens; RADAR; VIMS Teams

    2006-09-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of longitudinal dunes seen in radar images (Lorenz et al. 2006) correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as “ brown” and "blue” in color composites (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 μm) of near-IR spectral cubes. Earth-based spectroscopy (Griffith et al. 2003) shows a surface consistent with dirty H2O ice; VIMS data show more evidence of H2O ice in darker than brighter units (McCord et al. 2006). Our work shows that relative to the VIMS dark blue unit, the albedo of the dark brown unit is lower at 1.3 μm, higher at 2.0 μm, shows less evidence of water ice, and correlates with the radar-dark dunes. This suggests that the dunes are dryer, higher in hydrocarbon or nitrile composition. VIMS bright units show even less evidence of H2O, inferred to consist of very fine tholin dust. If the rate of deposition of hydrocarbons is 0.1 μm/yr (Yung et al. 1984), the surface would be coated (optically) in a few years unless cleansing processes are active. The dunes must be mobile on this timescale to prevent accumulation of bright coatings. Likewise fluvial/pluvial processes every few decades must be cleaning the dark floors of the incised channels and dark scoured plains at the Huygens landing site. In this model Xanadu is a large inactive region where eolian, fluvial, pluvial activity is currently at a low ebb. Huygens landing in a region of the dark blue materials a few kilometers south of bright highlands and about 30 km south of the nearest occurrence of the VIMS-dark-brown Radar-dunes unit. References: Lorenz, R. D., et al., Science, 312, 2006; Griffith, C. A., et al., Science 300, 2003; McCord, T. B., et al., Pl. Sp. Sci. in press, 2006; Yung, Y. L., et al., Ap. J. Supp, 55, 1984.

  11. Remote sensing applications in marine science programs at VIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, H. H.; Penney, M. E.; Byrne, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Scientists at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) utilized remote sensing in three programs: (1) tonal variations in imagery of wetlands; (2) use of the thermal infrared to delineate the discharge cooling water at the Virginia Electric and Power Company (VEPCO) nuclear power station on the James River; and (3) the use of aerial photography to determine the volume storage function for water in the marsh-bay complex fed by Wachapreague Inlet on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Details of the investigations are given, along with significant results.

  12. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments, summary

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

    1995-05-17

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the place lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigomus`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work.

  13. Saturn's north polar cyclone and hexagon at depth revealed by Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Fletcher, L.N.; Showman, A.P.; Roos-Serote, M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed cyclonic vortex centered on the north pole of Saturn has been revealed by the visual-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter, thus showing that the tropospheres of both poles of Saturn are occupied by cyclonic vortices with winds exceeding 135 m/s. High-spatial-resolution (~200 km per pixel) images acquired predominantly under night-time conditions during Saturn's polar winter-using a thermal wavelength of 5.1 ??m to obtain time-lapsed imagery of discrete, deep-seated (>2.1-bar) cloud features viewed in silhouette against Saturn's internally generated thermal glow-show a classic cyclonic structure, with prograde winds exceeding 135 m/s at its maximum near 88.3?? (planetocentric) latitude, and decreasing to <30 m/s at 89.7?? near the vortex center and<20 m/s at 80.5??. High-speed winds, exceeding 125 m/s, were also measured for cloud features at depth near 76?? (planetocentric) latitude within the polar hexagon consistent with the idea that the hexagon itself, which remains nearly stationary, is a westward (retrograde) propagating Rossby wave - as proposed by Allison (1990, Science 247, 1061-1063) - with a maximum wave speed near 2-bars pressure of ~125 m/s. Winds are ~25 m/s stronger than observed by Voyager, suggesting temporal variability. Images acquired of one side of the hexagon in dawn conditions as the polar winter wanes shows the hexagon is still visible in reflected sunlight nearly 28 years since its discovery, that a similar 3-lane structure is observed in reflected and thermal light, and that the cloudtops may be typically lower in the hexagon than in nearby discrete cloud features outside of it. Clouds are well-correlated in visible and 5.1 ??m images, indicating little windshear above the ~2-bar level. The polar cyclone is similar in size and shape to its counterpart at the south pole; a primary difference is the presence of a small (<600 km in diameter) nearly pole-centered cloud, perhaps indicative of

  14. Are scaling laws of sub-optical wavelength electric field confinement in arrays of metal nanoparticles related to plasmonics or to geometry?

    PubMed

    Mezeme, M Essone; Brosseau, C

    2012-07-30

    In this work, we describe finite element simulations of the plasmonic resonance (PLR) properties of a self-similar chain of plasmonic nanostructures. Using a broad range of conditions, we find strong numerical evidence that the electric field confinement behaves as (Ξ/λ)(PLR)[proporationality] EFE(-γ), where EFE is the electric field enhancement, Ξis the linear size of the focusing length, and λ is the wavelength of the resonant excitation. We find that the exponent γ is close to 1, i.e. significantly lower than the 1.5 found for two-dimensional nanodisks. This scaling law provides support for the hypothesis of a universal regime in which the sub-optical wavelength electric field confinement is controlled by the Euclidean dimensionality and is independent of nanoparticle size, metal nature, or embedding medium permittivity.

  15. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2013-09-20

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D{sub 2}), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v{sub max}) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)∝L {sup –3}, N(A)∝A {sup –2}, N(V)∝V {sup –5/3}, N(T)∝T {sup –2}, and D{sub 2} = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κ∝L {sup 0.94±0.01} and the three-parameter scaling law L∝κ T {sup 0.1}, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs)

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Spatio-temporal Evolution of Solar Flares with AIA/SDO. I. Universal Scaling Laws of Space and Time Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai

    2013-09-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D 2), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v max) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)vpropL -3, N(A)vpropA -2, N(V)vpropV -5/3, N(T)vpropT -2, and D 2 = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κvpropL 0.94 ± 0.01 and the three-parameter scaling law Lvpropκ T 0.1, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs).

  17. Spectral changes associated with rain on Titan: observations by VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Dalba, P. A.; Barnes, J.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.

    2012-04-01

    Titan has an erosional cycle similar to that on the Earth, with solid, liquid, and gaseous methane taking the place of the Earth’s water. Lakes and ponds, drainage and fluvial features, and clouds all suggest that rain is falling on Titan. A darkening event near clouds covering the Huygens landing site, followed by a return to the previous state, strongly suggested rainfall followed by evaporation (Turtle et al., 2011). The Cassini Visual infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) obtains medium resolution spectra in the 0.35-5.1 μm spectral region, which includes several atmospheric “windows” that offer glimpses of Titan’s surface. The albedo of the surface can be measured in these windows, and some compositional information, including changes through time, can be derived. VIMS observed an area near 15º south latitude and 330º longitude at two separate times: in August 2009 during T61 and in May 2011 during T76. A spectral analysis of this region, including compensation for varying atmospheric path lengths, shows substantial spectral changes in the two and five micron atmospheric windows. A comparison of the changes with that expected from the deposition and later evaporation of liquid methane or another hydrocarbon shows them to be consistent with rain on Titan. Ackowledgements: This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012 all rights reserved. References: Turtle, E. P. et al. (2011) Science 331, 1414.

  18. Characteristics Of Titan's Clouds from VIMS T0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, C. A.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.; Drossart, P.; Owen, T.; Nelson, R.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past 4 years, ground-based images have shown that Titan sports high cloud systems on a daily basis, which have been observed exclusively in Titan's south polar region. These clouds are composed of methane ice and may be a component of a liquid cycle similar to Earth's hydrologic cycle, with clouds, rain and seas. This past July, Cassini gave us the first direct view of Titan's high clouds as the spacecraft passed below Titan's south pole. Observations by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) illuminate the altitudes, thicknesses and extents of Titan's clouds, which were dramatically imaged in detail by the ISS instrument. We find, consistent with ground-based observations, that the clouds reside in the high troposphere. In addition, at times the clouds are optically thick over a region of at least 100 km. Here I will discuss the characteristics of Titan's clouds as measured by VIMS, and implications of these results in terms of the formation of Titan's clouds.

  19. From the Icy Satellites to Small Moons and Rings: Spectral Indicators by Cassini-VIMS Unveil Compositional Trends in the Saturnian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. B.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    flat reflectance in the visible, making them remarkably different with respect to the other small moons. Moreover, we have observed that the two Tethys' lagrangian moons appear spectrally different, with Calypso characterized by more intense water ice bands than Telesto. Conversely, at visible wavelengths Polydeuces, Telesto and Methone are in absolute the more blue objects in the Saturn's system. The red slopes measured in the visible range on disk-integrated spectral data, showing varying degrees on all of the satellites, could be caused more by exogenic processes than by geologic and endogenic events which are operating on more localized scales. The principal exogenic processes active in the Saturn's system [11] which alter the satellites and rings surfaces are the E ring particles bombardment, the interaction with corotating plasma and energetic particles, the bombardment of exogenic dark material [12] and the water ice photolysis. A discussion about the correlations between these processes and the o bserved spectral classes is given. With the approaching of the Cassini "Gran Finale" orbits, VIMS will unveil with unprecedented spatial resolution the spectral properties of many small moons and rings. These data will be extremely valuable to improve our classification of the Saturn's satellites and rings.

  20. Scaling single-wavelength optical interconnects to 180 Gb/s with PAM-M and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Stefanos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Argyris, Nikolaos; Spatharakis, Christos; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2016-03-01

    Faced with surging datacenter traffic demand, system designers are turning to multi-level optical modulation with direct detection as the means of reaching 100 Gb/s in a single optical lane; a further upgrade to 400 Gb/s is envisaged through wavelength-multiplexing of multiple 100 Gb/s strands. In terms of modulation formats, PAM-4 and PAM-8 are considered the front-runners, striking a good balance between bandwidth-efficiency and implementation complexity. In addition, the emergence of energy-efficient, high-speed CMOS digital-to-analog converters (DACs) opens up new possibilities: Spectral shaping through digital filtering will allow squeezing even more data through low-cost, low-bandwidth electro-optic components. In this work we demonstrate an optical interconnect based on an EAM that is driven directly with sub-volt electrical swing by a 65 GSa/s arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). Low-voltage drive is particularly attractive since it allows direct interfacing with the switch/server ASIC, eliminating the need for dedicated, power-hungry and expensive electrical drivers. Single-wavelength throughputs of 180 and 120 Gb/s are experimentally demonstrated with 60 Gbaud optical PAM-8 and PAM-4 respectively. Successful transmission over 1250 m SMF is achieved with direct-detection, using linear equalization via offline digital signal processing in order to overcome the strong bandwidth limitation of the overall link (~20 GHz). The suitability of Nyquist pulse shaping for optical interconnects is also investigated experimentally with PAM-4 and PAM-8, at a lower symbol rate of 40 Gbaud (limited by the sampling rate of the AWG). To the best of our knowledge, the rates achieved are the highest ever using optical PAM-M formats.

  1. VIS-NIR Spectrophotometric Study of the Saturnian icy Satellites by Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; McCord, T. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Brown, R. H.; Bibring, J.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y. G.; Matson, D. L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2007-12-01

    After the first three years of the nominal mission aboard the Cassini probe the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment has collected more than one thousand useful full-disk observations of both regular (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe) and minor (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) icy moons of Saturn. These data, acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage, are analyzed by using several spectroscopic indicators (I/F continuum level, slopes, bands strengths) in order to identify analogies and differences in the compositional units of satellites and derive the phase curves at different longitudes; many observations acquired close to zero phase angle allow us to measure the opposition surge effect on several satellites. Concerning the composition we have derived the distribution of the water ice abundance and grain size from the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. We report about the differences observed in the CO2 band position which is shifted at shorter wavelengths on Hyperion respect to Phoebe and Iapetus; this effect is probably related to a different distribution of clathrates on these icy surfaces. This research was completed thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  2. The three-dimensional structure of VIM-31--a metallo-β-lactamase from Enterobacter cloacae in its native and oxidized form.

    PubMed

    Kupper, Michaël B; Herzog, Konrad; Bennink, Sandra; Schlömer, Philipp; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Fischer, Rainer; Bebrone, Carine; Hoffmann, Kurt M

    2015-06-01

    The metallo-β-lactamase VIM-31 differs from VIM-2 by only two Tyr224His and His252Arg substitutions. Located close to the active site, the Tyr224His substitution is also present in VIM-1, VIM-4, VIM-7 and VIM-12. The VIM-31 variant was reported in 2012 from Enterobacter cloacae and kinetically characterized. It exhibits globally lower catalytic efficiencies than VIM-2. In the present study, we report the three-dimensional structures of VIM-31 in its native (reduced) and oxidized forms. The so-called 'flapping-loop' (loop 1) and loop 3 of VIM-31 were not positioned as in VIM-2 but instead were closer to the active site as in VIM-4, resulting in a narrower active site in VIM-31. Also, the presence of His224 in VIM-31 disrupts hydrogen-bonding networks close to the active site. Moreover, a third zinc-binding site, which also exists in VIM-2 structures, could be identified as a structural explanation for the decreased activity of VIM-MBLs at high zinc concentrations.

  3. VimA mediates multiple functions that control virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Robles, A.; Fletcher, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Porphyromonas gingivalis, a black-pigmented, gram-negative anaerobe, is an important etiological agent of periodontal disease. Its ability to survive in the periodontal pocket and orchestrate the microbial/host activities that can lead to disease suggest that P. gingivalis possesses a complex regulatory network involving transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. The vimA (virulence modulating) gene is part of the 6.15-kb bcp-recA-vimA-vimE-vimF-aroG locus and plays a role in oxidative stress resistance. In addition to the glycosylation and anchorage of several surface proteins including the gingipains, VimA can also modulate sialylation, acetyl coenzyme A transfer, lipid A and its associated proteins and may be involved in protein sorting and transport. In this review, we examine the multifunctional role of VimA and discuss its possible involvement in a major regulatory network important for survival and virulence regulation in P. gingivalis. It is postulated that the multifunction of VimA is modulated via a post-translational mechanism involving acetylation. PMID:23279905

  4. Multigroup calculations using VIM: A user`s guide to ISOVIM

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1992-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have long been used to benchmark more a mate approximate solution methods for reactor physics problems. The power of VIM (ref 1) lies partly in the detailed geometrical representations incorporating the (generally) curved surfaces of combinatorial geometry, and partly in the fine energy detail of pointwise cross sections which are independent of the neutron spectrum. When differences arise between Monte Carlo and deterministic calculations, the question arises, is the error in the multigroup cross sections, in the treatment of transport effects, or in the mesh-based treatment of space in the deterministic calculation? The answers may not be obvious, but may be identified by combining the exact geometry capability of VIM with the multigroup formalism. We can now run VIM in a multigroup mode by producing special VIM Material files which contain point-wise data describing multigroup data with histograms. This forces VIM to solve the multigroup problem with only three small code modifications. P{sub N} scattering is simulated with the usual tabulated angular distributions with 20 equally-sized scattering angle cosine meshes. This document describes the VIM multigroup capability, the procedures for generating multigroup cross sections for VIM, and their use. The multigroup cross section generating code, ISOVIM, is described, and benchmark testing is documented.

  5. Latitudinal variations in Titan's methane and haze from Cassini VIMS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penteado, P.F.; Griffith, C.A.; Tomasko, M.G.; Engel, S.; See, C.; Doose, L.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Sotin, C.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze observations taken with Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), to determine the current methane and haze latitudinal distribution between 60??S and 40??N. The methane variation was measured primarily from its absorption band at 0.61 ??m, which is optically thin enough to be sensitive to the methane abundance at 20-50 km altitude. Haze characteristics were determined from Titan's 0.4-1.6 ??m spectra, which sample Titan's atmosphere from the surface to 200 km altitude. Radiative transfer models based on the haze properties and methane absorption profiles at the Huygens site reproduced the observed VIMS spectra and allowed us to retrieve latitude variations in the methane abundance and haze. We find the haze variations can be reproduced by varying only the density and single scattering albedo above 80 km altitude. There is an ambiguity between methane abundance and haze optical depth, because higher haze optical depth causes shallower methane bands; thus a family of solutions is allowed by the data. We find that haze variations alone, with a constant methane abundance, can reproduce the spatial variation in the methane bands if the haze density increases by 60% between 20??S and 10??S (roughly the sub-solar latitude) and single scattering absorption increases by 20% between 60??S and 40??N. On the other hand, a higher abundance of methane between 20 and 50 km in the summer hemisphere, as much as two times that of the winter hemisphere, is also possible, if the haze variations are minimized. The range of possible methane variations between 27??S and 19??N is consistent with condensation as a result of temperature variations of 0-1.5 K at 20-30 km. Our analysis indicates that the latitudinal variations in Titan's visible to near-IR albedo, the north/south asymmetry (NSA), result primarily from variations in the thickness of the darker haze layer, detected by Huygens DISR, above 80 km altitude. If we assume little to no latitudinal methane

  6. Uplift of the South African Plateau: mantle-scale deformation, long wavelength relief growth and offshore sediment budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillocheau, François; Dauteuil, Olivier; Baby, Guillaume; Robin, Cécile

    2013-04-01

    The South African Plateau is one of the largest very long wavelength relief (x1000 km) of the world that could be related to mantle dynamics and the effect of the African superplume. Unfortunately, the timing of the uplift and the different steps of the relief growth are still debated with a Late Cretaceous uplift scenario and an Oligocene one. Whatever model, few attentions were paid to the evolution of the overall geomorphic system, from the upstream erosional system to the downstream depositional system. This study is based, onshore, on the mapping and chronology of all the macroforms (weathering surfaces and associated alterites, pediments and pediplains, incised rivers, wave-cut platforms) dated by intersection with the few preserved sediments and the volcanics (mainly kimberlites pipes) and, offshore, on a more classical dataset of seismic lines and petroleum wells (characterization and dating of forced regression, sediment volume measurement, etc..). The main result of this study is that the South African Plateau is an old Late Cretaceous Plateau reactivated during Paleogene times and fossilized since the Middle Miocene. • During Late Cretaceous, in a semiarid climatic setting, the main uplift occurred from the east (around 95 Ma) to the west (around 75 Ma) and could result from the migration of the African plate over the African superplume: This is the paroxysm of the erosion with the growth of a large delta offshore present-day Orange River mouth (sedimentation rate around 100 000 km3/Ma). • During Paleocene - Mid Eocene times, in more humid conditions and in response to a more subtle long wavelength deformation, pedimentation occurred mainly localised along Cape Fold Belt feeding a large delta offshore western Cape Peninsula. During Mid Eocene times, all those landscapes are fossilized and weathered by laterites. • Late Eocene and Oligocene is the second period of uplift of the Plateau, localised along its Indian Ocean side (Drackensberg Moutains

  7. VIMS spectral mapping observations of Titan during the Cassini prime mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Griffith, C.; Penteado, P.; Tosi, F.; Pitman, K.M.; Soderblom, L.; Stephan, K.; Hayne, P.; Vixie, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Bellucci, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    This is a data paper designed to facilitate the use of and comparisons to Cassini/visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) spectral mapping data of Saturn's moon Titan. We present thumbnail orthographic projections of flyby mosaics from each Titan encounter during the Cassini prime mission, 2004 July 1 through 2008 June 30. For each flyby we also describe the encounter geometry, and we discuss the studies that have previously been published using the VIMS dataset. The resulting compliation of metadata provides a complementary big-picture overview of the VIMS data in the public archive, and should be a useful reference for future Titan studies. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Use of virtual, interactive, musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in modeling and analysis of shoulder throwing activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hwai-Ting; Nakamura, Yasuo; Su, Fong-Chin; Hashimoto, Jun; Nobuhara, Katsuya; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2005-06-01

    Our purpose in this study was to apply the virtual, interactive, musculoskeletal system (VIMS) software for modeling and biomechanical analysis of the glenohumeral joint during a baseball pitching activity. The skeletal model was from VIMS library and muscle fiber attachment sites were derived from the visible human dataset. The muscular moment arms and function changes are mainly due to the large humeral motion involved during baseball pitching. The graphic animation of the anatomic system using VIMS software is an effective tool to model and visualize the complex anatomical structure of the shoulder for biomechanical analysis.

  9. The Opposition Effect On Saturn's A And B Rings: Observations from Cassini-Vims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Ciarniello, M.; Filacchione, G.; Cerroni, P.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; VIMS Science Team

    2008-09-01

    The opposition effect on Saturn's A and B rings is investigated using the observations of the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We have analyzed the visible channel data coming from sequence S26 acquired December 2006. After the reconstruction of the observations geometric parameters (incidence, emission and phase angles) and the projection of the hyperspectral images over the rings plane we have extracted reflectance profiles at fixed radial distances, studying different regions of A and B rings. We have modeled the profiles using Hapke's equation for the bidirectional reflectance (Hapke, 1983) and using a SIMPLEX procedure to fit the parameters. The analysis of the profiles at three different wavelengths (440, 550 and 700 nm) and the independence of the shape of the profiles from the wavelength enable us to exclude the CBOE (Coherent Backscattering Opposition Effect) in the phase angle range studied. The fit procedure (at 550 nm) applied to all the 59 images of the sequence determines the values, at various radial distances from Saturn's centre, of the four parameters in the bidirectional reflectance equation: single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter of the phase function, amplitude of the Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect and width of SHOE. Mean values of these parameters are calculated both for A and B rings, obtaining in particular for the single scattering albedo A = 0.632, B = 0.8656 and for the SHOE width A = 0.00172, B = 0.00137. Values of the width of SHOE indicate that the effect is due mainly to agglomerates of particles rather than to single particles. An analysis of the asymmetry factor between different images obtained at the same radial distance but at different times points out the presence of gravitational wakes in A ring. This work is supported by an Italian Space Agency (ASI) grant.

  10. Saturn's tropospheric composition and clouds from Cassini/VIMS 4.6-5.1 μm nightside spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, Kevin H.; Momary, Thomas W.; Showman, Adam P.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Roos-Serote, Maarten; Merlet, C.

    2011-08-01

    The latitudinal variation of Saturn's tropospheric composition (NH 3, PH 3 and AsH 3) and aerosol properties (cloud altitudes and opacities) are derived from Cassini/VIMS 4.6-5.1 μm thermal emission spectroscopy on the planet's nightside (April 22, 2006). The gaseous and aerosol distributions are used to trace atmospheric circulation and chemistry within and below Saturn's cloud decks (in the 1- to 4-bar region). Extensive testing of VIMS spectral models is used to assess and minimise the effects of degeneracies between retrieved variables and sensitivity to the choice of aerosol properties. Best fits indicate cloud opacity in two regimes: (a) a compact cloud deck centred in the 2.5-2.8 bar region, symmetric between the northern and southern hemispheres, with small-scale opacity variations responsible for numerous narrow light/dark axisymmetric lanes; and (b) a hemispherically asymmetric population of aerosols at pressures less than 1.4 bar (whose exact altitude and vertical structure is not constrained by nightside spectra) which is 1.5-2.0× more opaque in the summer hemisphere than in the north and shows an equatorial maximum between ±10° (planetocentric). Saturn's NH 3 spatial variability shows significant enhancement by vertical advection within ±5° of the equator and in axisymmetric bands at 23-25°S and 42-47°N. The latter is consistent with extratropical upwelling in a dark band on the poleward side of the prograde jet at 41°N (planetocentric). PH 3 dominates the morphology of the VIMS spectrum, and high-altitude PH 3 at p < 1.3 bar has an equatorial maximum and a mid-latitude asymmetry (elevated in the summer hemisphere), whereas deep PH 3 is latitudinally-uniform with off-equatorial maxima near ±10°. The spatial distribution of AsH 3 shows similar off-equatorial maxima at ±7° with a global abundance of 2-3 ppb. VIMS appears to be sensitive to both (i) an upper tropospheric circulation (sensed by NH 3 and upper-tropospheric PH 3 and hazes) and

  11. Revised Full-Disk Spectra by Cassini-VIMS of the Saturnian Minor Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Clark, R. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. H.; Nicholson, P. D.; Baines, K. H.; Nelson, R. M.; McCord, T. B.

    2009-03-01

    This abstract concern with a detailed re-analysis of the disk-integrated spectra of the minor moons of Saturn (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Calypso and Telesto) obtained by Cassini-VIMS.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The KepVIM catalog (Makarov+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Goldin, A.

    2016-07-01

    The algorithm described in section 4 was applied to the entire collection of "long-cadence" files archived in the MAST for the principal Kepler mission. A single variability-induced motion (VIM) detection corresponds to a complete data set for a given target collected during one quarter. Therefore, a single target can generate up to 17 VIM detections in the catalog. (2 data files).

  13. Titan's aerosol optical properties with VIMS observations at the limb of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannou, Pascal; Seignovert, Benoit; Lavvas, Panayotis; Lemouelic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The study of Titan properties with remote sensing relies on a good knowledge of the atmosphere properties. The in-situ observations made by Huygens combined with recent advances in the definition of methane properties enable to model and interpret observations with a very good accuracy. Thanks to these progresses, we can analyze in this work the observations made at the limb of Titan in order to retrieve information on the haze properties as its vertical profiles but also the spectral behaviour between 0.88 and 5.2 μm.To study the haze layer and more generally the source of opacities in the stratosphere, we use som observation made at the limbe of Titan by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. We used a model in spherical geometry and in single scattering, and we accounted for the multiple scattering with a parallel plane model that evaluate the multiple scattering source function at the plane of the limb.Our scope is to retrieve informations about the vertical distribution of the haze, its spectral properties, but also to obtain details about the shape of the methane windows to disantangle the role of the methane and of the aerosols.We started our study at the latitude of 55°N, with a image taken in 2006 with a relatively high spatial resolution (for VIMS). Our preliminary results shows the spectral properties of the aerosols are the same whatever the altitude. This is a consequence of the large scale mixing. From limb profile between 0.9 and 5.2 μm, we can probe the haze layer from about 500 km (at 0.9 μm) to the ground (at 5.2 μm). We find that the vertical profile of the haze layer shows three distinct scale heights with transitions around 250 km and 350 km. We also clearly a transition around 70-90 km that may be due to the top of a condensation layer.

  14. Emitted Power of Jupiter Based on Cassini CIRS and VIMS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Nixon, Conor A.; Filachionne, Gianrico; Fry, Patrick M.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  15. Emitted Power Of Jupiter Based On Cassini CIRS And VIMS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Nixon, Conor A.; Filacchione, Gianrico; Fry, Patrick M.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  16. Spectrophotometric Modeling of Enceladus Surface Properties and Composition from Vims Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Stephan, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft, is an imaging spectrometer that produces monochromatic images in the 0.35 - 5.12 µm range. During the five years of Cassini mission in the system of Saturn the instrument produced more than 1400 full-disk images of the moons in a wide range of solar phase angles. This huge amount of data allows the study of the spectral and photometric surface properties of the Saturnian satellites. Our work started with the analysis of Rhea’s surface properties (Ciarniello et al., submitted) and we now focus on Enceladus. We applied the Hapke’s radiative transfer model (Hapke,1993) to study the satellite’s spectrum at each available phase angle and the phase curve at each wavelength in the VIMS range. This approach allows to constrain physical properties of the medium composing the surface such as grain size, amount of contaminants, opposition effect mechanisms and surface roughness. The 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 µm absorption bands in the spectrum indicate that the surface of the moon is mainly composed of water ice. However the spectrum shows a small UV downturn which can be explained by the presence of organic contaminants. In order to reproduce this behavior we modeled the surface using a monodisperse grain size distribution of water ice with small inclusions of contaminants. Three mixing modes have been investigated: areal, intimate and intraparticle. Four different organic contaminants have been used: Triton tholin, Titan tholin, Hydrogenated amorphous carbon and tholin from Khare et al. 1993. The best fit is obtained with an intraparticle mixture of water ice and a tiny amount of Triton tholin (0.001%) with particle radius between 60-70 µm. The spectral fit allows to decouple spectral effects by photometric ones and represents the starting point for the phase curve fit allowing to compute the single scattering albedo of the medium. The fit of phase curve for each wavelength shows

  17. Compositional radial variability in the Saturn's system observed by Cassini-VIMS (INVITED) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Nicholson, P. D.; Stephan, K.; Nelson, R.; Baines, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    From ~2200 disk-integrated observations of the moons and several radial mosaics of the rings acquired by Cassini-VIMS, we have found very striking differences among the various objects in the Saturn system, ranging from the almost uncontaminated and water ice-rich surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the metal/organic-rich and red surfaces of Iapetus’ leading hemisphere and Phoebe. In this framework, we have investigated the relationships between the satellite surface composition, orbital distance from Saturn, and average density. In the F ring environment, the inner satellites (Prometheus, Pandora, Janus and Epimetheus) have average surface water ice abundances similar to particles in the C ring and CD but with much less reddening contaminant. Although their orbits are close to the F-ring, Prometheus and Pandora have very evident differences in surface composition: Prometheus is very water ice-rich but at the same time very red at VIS wavelengths. These properties make it very similar to A-B ring particles while Pandora is bluer. Moving outward, the effects of E ring particles, generated by Enceladus plumes become evident as they contaminate surfaces from Mimas to Rhea. We have found some differences between the Lagrangian moons of Tethys: Calypso is much more water ice-rich and bluer with respect to Telesto. Among the outer satellites, moving from Hyperion, to Iapetus and Phoebe, a linear trend is observed relating the decrease of water ice to reddening, with Hyperion resulting as the reddest object of the population. As a further step, we have investigated how these surface properties are correlated with the average densities and dimensions of the moons. Mid-sized icy satellites are in a transition regime, between the high pressure/high density ice phases of Titan and the high porosity/irregular shapes of the minor moons and Hyperion. Low-density (0.5-1.0 g cm-3) satellites show different trends with Prometheus, Pandora and Calypso characterized by high

  18. VIMS Observations of Saturn’s Rings Investigated by means of Montecarlo Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-10-01

    The VIMS instrument onboard Cassini has extensively observed the Saturn’s rings producing a number of mosaics that allow the study of the radial variability of the rings spectral properties at visible and infrared wavelengths. Along with compositional variations some systematic effects induced by observation geometry are observed in the rings spectra, such as phase angle dependence of water ice band depths and spectral reddening. In this paper we investigate the mechanisms at the origin of these photometric effects by adopting a Montecarlo raytracing, in the geometric optics limit. We report about the results obtained from several simulations varying rings physical properties (optical depth, particle size distribution, single particle phase function) in order to investigate the variation of the angular distribution of the light scattered by the ring plane. The results of these simulations indicate that even if the total power reflected by the rings plane is dominated by single scattered light, the multiple scattered fraction (inter-particle scattering) produces a dependence of the spectral features on observation geometry (phase angle) at least for the denser regions of the rings. Moreover using the same Montecarlo code we are able to reproduce the dependence of the spectral features (band depths, spectral slopes) on viewing geometry (incidence, emergence and phase angles). Disentangling illumination effects from rings particle albedo permits a more accurate retrieval of the physical properties (grain size, amount of contaminants) of the regolith that covers the ring particles when radiative transfer models are applied to fit remote sensing spectra. This research is supported by an Italian Space Agency (ASI) grant.

  19. The Ring System of Saturn as Seen by Cassini-VIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.

    2015-08-01

    Since 2004 the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard Cassini has acquired numerous hyperspectral mosaics in the 0.35-5.1 μm spectral range of Saturn's main rings in very different illumination and viewing geometries. These observations have allowed us to infer the ring particles physical properties and composition: water ice abundance is estimated through the 1.25-1.5-2.0 μm band depths, chromophores distribution is derived from visible spectral slopes while organic material is traced by the aliphatic compounds signature at 3.42 μm which appears stronger on CD and C ring than on A-B rings (Filacchione et al., 2014). Observed reflectance spectra are fitted with a spectrophotometric model based on Montecarlo ray-tracing with the scope to infer particles composition while disentangling photometric effects (caused by multiple scattering, opposition surge and forward scattering) which depend on illumination/viewing geometries. Spectral bond albedo for different regions of the rings has been best-fitted using Hapke's radiative transfer modeling (Ciarniello et al, 2011) by choosing different mixtures of water ice, tholin, and amorphous carbon particles populations. While tholin distribution seems to be fairly constant across the rings, the amorphous carbon appears anti-correlated with optical depth. Moreover, dark material contamination is less effective on densest regions, where the more intense rejuvenation processes occur, in agreement with the ballistic transport theory (Cuzzi and Estrada,1998). Finally, the 3.6 μm continuum peak wavelength is used to infer particles temperature, which is anti-correlated with the albedo and the optical depth (tau): low-albedo/low-tau C ring and CD have higher temperatures than A-B rings where albedo and tau are high. This trend matches direct temperature measurements by CIRS (Spilker et al., 2013).

  20. Wave constraints for Titan's Jingpo Lacus and Kraken Mare from VIMS specular reflection lightcurves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Stephan et al. (Stephan, K. et al. [2010]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, 7104-+.) first saw the glint of sunlight specularly reflected off of Titan's lakes. We develop a quantitative model for analyzing the photometric lightcurve generated during a flyby in which the specularly reflected light flux depends on the fraction of the solar specular footprint that is covered by liquid. We allow for surface waves that spread out the geographic specular intensity distribution. Applying the model to the VIMS T58 observations shows that the waves on Jingpo Lacus must have slopes of no greater than 0.15??, two orders of magnitude flatter than waves on Earth's oceans. Combining the model with theoretical estimates of the intensity of the specular reflection allows a tighter constraint on the waves: <0.05?? Residual specular signal while the specular point lies on land implies that either the land is wetted, the wave slope distribution is non-Gaussian, or that 5% of the land off the southwest edge of Jingpo Lacus is covered in puddles. Another specular sequence off of Kraken Mare acquired during Cassini's T59 flyby shows rapid flux changes that the static model cannot reproduce. Points just 1. min apart vary in flux by more than a factor of two. The present dataset does not uniquely determine the mechanism causing these rapid changes. We suggest that changing wind conditions, kilometer-wavelength waves, or moving clouds could account for the variability. Future specular observations should be designed with a fast cadence, at least 6 points per minute, in order to differentiate between these hypotheses. Such new data will further constrain the nature of Titan's lakes and their interactions with Titan's atmosphere. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitors of VIM-2 by screening pharmacologically active and click-chemistry compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Minond, Dmitriy; Saldanha, S Adrian; Subramaniam, Prem; Spaargaren, Michael; Spicer, Timothy; Fotsing, Joseph R; Weide, Timo; Fokin, Valery V; Sharpless, K Barry; Galleni, Moreno; Bebrone, Carine; Lassaux, Patricia; Hodder, Peter

    2009-07-15

    VIM-2 is an Ambler class B metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) capable of hydrolyzing a broad-spectrum of beta-lactam antibiotics. Although the discovery and development of MBL inhibitors continue to be an area of active research, an array of potent, small molecule inhibitors is yet to be fully characterized for VIM-2. In the presented research, a compound library screening approach was used to identify and characterize VIM-2 inhibitors from a library of pharmacologically active compounds as well as a focused 'click' chemistry library. The four most potent VIM-2 inhibitors resulting from a VIM-2 screen were characterized by kinetic studies in order to determine K(i) and mechanism of enzyme inhibition. As a result, two previously described pharmacologic agents, mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy-5,8-bis([2-([2-hydroxyethyl]amino)ethyl]amino)-9,10-anthracenedione) and 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB) were found to be active, the former as a non-competitive inhibitor (K(i)=K(i)(')=1.5+/-0.2microM) and the latter as a slowly reversible or irreversible inhibitor. Additionally, two novel sulfonyl-triazole analogs from the click library were identified as potent, competitive VIM-2 inhibitors: N-((4-((but-3-ynyloxy)methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-iodobenzenesulfonamide (1, K(i)=0.41+/-0.03microM) and 4-iodo-N-((4-(methoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)benzenesulfonamide (2, K(i)=1.4+/-0.10microM). Mitoxantrone and pCMB were also found to potentiate imipenem efficacy in MIC and synergy assays employing Escherichia coli. Taken together, all four compounds represent useful chemical probes to further investigate mechanisms of VIM-2 inhibition in biochemical and microbiology-based assays.

  3. Cassini-VIMS observations of Saturn's main rings: I. Spectral properties and temperature radial profiles variability with phase angle and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Brown, R. H.; Cerroni, P.; Altobelli, N.; Spilker, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral properties and thermal behavior of Saturn's rings are determined from a dataset of ten radial mosaics acquired by Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) between October 29th 2004 and January 27th 2010 with phase angle ranging between 5.7° and 132.4° and elevation angles between -23.5° and 2.6°. These observations, after reduction to spectrograms, e.g. 2D arrays containing the VIS-IR (0.35-5.1 μm) spectral information versus radial distance from Saturn (from 73.500 to 141.375 km, 400 km/bin), allow us to compare the derived spectral and thermal properties of the ring particles on a common reference. Spectral properties: rings spectra are characterized by an intense reddening at visible wavelengths while they maintain a strong similarity with water ice in the infrared domain. Significant changes in VIS reddening, water ice abundance and grain sizes are observed across different radial regions resulting in correlation with optical depth and local structures. The availability of observations taken at very different phase angles allows us to examine spectrophotometric properties of the ring's particles. When observed at high phase angles, a remarkable increase of visible reddening and water ice band depths is found, probably as a consequence of the presence of a red-colored contaminant intimately mixed within water ice grains and of multiple scattering. At low phases the analysis of the 3.2-3.6 μm range shows faint spectral signatures at 3.42-3.52 μm which are compatible with the CH2 aliphatic stretch. The 3.29 μm PAH aromatic stretch absorption is not clearly detectable on this dataset. VIMS results indicate that ring particles contain about 90-95% water ice while the remaining 5-10% is consistent with different contaminants like amorphous carbon or tholins. However, we cannot exclude the presence of nanophase iron or hematite produced by iron oxidation in the rings tenuous oxygen atmosphere, intimately mixed with the ice grains

  4. VimA-Dependent Modulation of Acetyl Coenzyme A Levels and Lipid A Biosynthesis Can Alter Virulence in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Lee, J.; Osbourne, D.; Dou, Y.; Roy, F.; Muthiah, A.; Boskovic, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis VimA protein has multifunctional properties that can modulate several of its major virulence factors. To further characterize VimA, P. gingivalis FLL406 carrying an additional vimA gene and a vimA-defective mutant in a different P. gingivalis genetic background were evaluated. The vimA-defective mutant (FLL451) in the P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 genetic background showed a phenotype similar to that of the vimA-defective mutant (FLL92) in the P. gingivalis W83 genetic background. In contrast to the wild type, gingipain activity was increased in P. gingivalis FLL406, a vimA chimeric strain. P. gingivalis FLL451 had a five times higher biofilm-forming capacity than the parent strain. HeLa cells incubated with P. gingivalis FLL92 showed a decrease in invasion, in contrast to P. gingivalis FLL451 and FLL406, which showed increases of 30 and 40%, respectively. VimA mediated coenzyme A (CoA) transfer to isoleucine and reduced branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The lipid A content and associated proteins were altered in the vimA-defective mutants. The VimA chimera interacted with several proteins which were found to have an LXXTG motif, similar to the sorting motif of Gram-positive organisms. All the proteins had an N-terminal signal sequence with a putative sorting signal of L(P/T/S)X(T/N/D)G and two unique signatures of EXGXTX and HISXXGXG, in addition to a polar tail. Taken together, these observations further confirm the multifunctional role of VimA in modulating virulence possibly through its involvement in acetyl-CoA transfer and lipid A synthesis and possibly by protein sorting. PMID:22144476

  5. The Saturnian Satellite Tethys Observed By Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, R.; Wagner, R.; Clark, R. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C.; Hansen, G. B.; Brown, R. H.; Giese, B.; Roatsch, T.; Matson, D.; Baines, K.; Filiacchione, G.; Cappacione, F.; Rodriguez, S.; Buratti, B. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the variations in spectral properties across the surface of Saturn's satellite Tethys using Cassini/VIMS data and their relationships to geological and/or morphological characteristics as seen in the Cassini/ISS images. Despite the spectral dominance of water ice on Tethys’ surface distinct spectral variations could be detected, which are surprisingly very different from what was expected from the visible albedo derived from Voyager and Cassini camera data. The abundance of water ice usually follows the visible surface albedo as seen on many other satellites. Although on Tethys, the weakest water ice signature could be also measured on the trailing hemisphere as known from Dione and Rhea [1-3], the detailed mapping, however, shows a more complex pattern. Two relatively narrow N/S-trending bands characterized by larger ice particle sizes rather than the higher abundance of water ice separate the Saturn-facing and the anti-Saturnian hemisphere of Tethys. So far, larger ice particles could only be found in geologically young, less weathered portions of the surfaces of the icy Saturnian satellites [2,3]. On Tethys, however, the observed variations might be more complex due to the influence of fine particles from the E-ring coating the surface. In contrast to the prominent graben systems on Dione and Rhea, which show fresh ice exposed on steep walls, no spectral properties could be exclusively associated to Tethys’ extended graben system Ithaca Chasma supporting its geologically old age and that its formation was not caused by the impact event that created Odysseus [4]. References: [1] Clark, R. N., et al. (2008), Icarus, 193(2), 372-386. [2] Stephan, K., et al. (2010) Icarus, 206(2), 631-652. [3] Stephan, K. et al. (2012) PSS, 61(1), 142-160. [4] Giese et al., (2007) GRL, 34(21), L21203.

  6. VIM-4 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter cloacae in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Sonnevend, Á; Ghazawi, A; Yahfoufi, N; Al-Baloushi, A; Hashmey, R; Mathew, M; Tariq, W Z; Pál, T

    2012-12-01

    Screening 34 carbapenem non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae recovered in Abu Dhabi hospitals identified an Enterobacter cloacae strain carrying bla(VIM-4) , bla(CMY-4) and bla(CTX-M-15) . It was isolated from the urine of an Egyptian patient repeatedly hospitalized and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, including carbapenems, in the United Arab Emirates. The bla(VIM-4) coding class I integron, highly similar to In416, was carried on a 175-kilobase non-conjugative incA/C type plasmid also hybridizing with the bla(CMY-4) probe. This is the first detailed report on the isolation of a Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM) -producing enteric bacterium in the Arabian Peninsula with characteristics suggestive of spreading from the Mediterranean region.

  7. The geology of Hotei Regio, Titan: Correlation of Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Barnes, J.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Sotin, C.; Jaumann, R.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Mackowski, D.W.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Joint Cassini VIMS and RADAR SAR data of ???700-km-wide Hotei Regio reveal a rich collection of geological features that correlate between the two sets of images. The degree of correlation is greater than anywhere else seen on Titan. Central to Hotei Regio is a basin filled with cryovolcanic flows that are anomalously bright in VIMS data (in particular at 5 ??m) and quite variable in roughness in SAR. The edges of the flows are dark in SAR data and appear to overrun a VIMS-bright substrate. SAR-stereo topography shows the flows to be viscous, 100-200 m thick. On its southern edge the basin is ringed by higher (???1 km) mountainous terrain. The mountains show mixed texture in SAR data: some regions are extremely rough, exhibit low and spectrally neutral albedo in VIMS data and may be partly coated with darker hydrocarbons. Around the southern margin of Hotei Regio, the SAR image shows several large, dendritic, radar-bright channels that flow down from the mountainous terrain and terminate in dark blue patches, seen in VIMS images, whose infrared color is consistent with enrichment in water ice. The patches are in depressions that we interpret to be filled with fluvial deposits eroded and transported by liquid methane in the channels. In the VIMS images the dark blue patches are encased in a latticework of lighter bands that we suggest to demark a set of circumferential and radial fault systems bounding structural depressions. Conceivably the circular features are tectonic structures that are remnant from an ancient impact structure. We suggest that impact-generated structures may have simply served as zones of weakness; no direct causal connection, such as impact-induced volcanism, is implied. We also speculate that two large dark features lying on the northern margin of Hotei Regio could be calderas. In summary the preservation of such a broad suite of VIMS infrared color variations and the detailed correlation with features in the SAR image and SAR topography

  8. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  9. The Spectral Classes of the Saturnian System Ices: Rings and Satellites Observations by Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    The entire population of the Saturnian system ices was investigated by VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment on board Cassini spacecraft. By the end of the nominal mission a very large dataset of hyperspectral data had been collected in the spectral range 0.35-5.0 micron, which includes the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and rings. In this work we present an analysis of spectrophotometric indicators selected to describe the properties of the ices (I/F continuum levels, visible spectral slopes, band depths and positions), and which were retrieved from about 1500 full-disk observations of satellites as well as from mosaics of the main rings (A, B, C, CD, F) sampled with a resolution of 125 km/pixel along the radial axis. This comparative method allows us to highlight the spectral differences in this population of objects orbiting in the Saturnian system. In particular we have retrieved the distribution of the water ice abundance, which varies between the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the carbon dioxide- and organic-rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Noteworthy is that a significant dichotomy is observed between the two co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, possibly indicating a different origin and evolutionary process: while the first shows a very red visible spectrum (similar to Hyperion), the second has more neutral visible colors, making it a very peculiar object in the Saturnian system. Rings have very peculiar spectral differences when compared with the icy satellites: in the visible range their spectra are characterized by a spectral knee at bluer wavelengths (at about 520 nm compared to 550 nm on satellites); in the infrared range the 1.5-2.0 micron water ice band depths are in general deeper across the A and B rings, indicative of a larger fraction of pure water ice in comparison to

  10. VimA – dependent modulation of the secretome in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, D.; Aruni, A.Wilson; Dou, Y.; Perry, C.; Boskovic, D.S.; Roy, F.; Fletcher, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    The VimA protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a multifunctional protein involved in cell surface biogenesis. To further determine if its acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) transfer and putative sorting functions can affect the secretome, its role in peptidoglycan biogenesis and effects on the extracellular proteins of P. gingivalis FLL92, a vimA-defective mutant, were evaluated. There were structural and compositional differences in the peptidoglycan of P. gingivalis FLL92 compared to the wild-type strain. Sixty-eight proteins were present only in the extracellular fraction of FLL92. Fifteen proteins present in the extracellular fraction of the parent strain were missing in the vimA-defective mutant. These proteins had protein sorting characteristics which included a C terminal motif with a common consensus Gly-Gly – Cterm pattern and polar tail consisting of aromatic amino acid residues. These observations suggest that the VimA protein is likely involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, and corroborates our previous report, which suggests a role in protein sorting. PMID:23134608

  11. Role of vimA in cell surface biogenesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O.; Aruni, Wilson; Roy, Francis; Perry, Christopher; Sandberg, Lawrence; Muthiah, Arun; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2010-01-01

    The Porphyromonas gingivalis vimA gene has been previously shown to play a significant role in the biogenesis of gingipains. Further, in P. gingivalis FLL92, a vimA-defective mutant, there was increased auto-aggregation, suggesting alteration in membrane surface proteins. In order to determine the role of the VimA protein in cell surface biogenesis, the surface morphology of P. gingivalis FLL92 was further characterized. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated abundant fimbrial appendages and a less well defined and irregular capsule in FLL92 compared with the wild-type. In addition, atomic force microscopy showed that the wild-type had a smoother surface compared with FLL92. Western blot analysis using anti-FimA antibodies showed a 41 kDa immunoreactive protein band in P. gingivalis FLL92 which was missing in the wild-type P. gingivalis W83 strain. There was increased sensitivity to globomycin and vancomycin in FLL92 compared with the wild-type. Outer membrane fractions from FLL92 had a modified lectin-binding profile. Furthermore, in contrast with the wild-type strain, nine proteins were missing from the outer membrane fraction of FLL92, while 20 proteins present in that fraction from FLL92 were missing in the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results suggest that the VimA protein affects capsular synthesis and fimbrial phenotypic expression, and plays a role in the glycosylation and anchorage of several surface proteins. PMID:20378652

  12. High-resolution CASSINI-VIMS mosaics of Titan and the icy Saturnian satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Cerroni, P.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Soderbloom, L.A.; Griffith, C.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, Th.; Scholten, F.; Porco, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the CASSINI spacecraft obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn after its arrival at Saturn in June 2004. VIMS operates in a spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m, generating image cubes in which each pixel represents a spectrum consisting of 352 contiguous wavebands. As an imaging spectrometer VIMS combines the characteristics of both a spectrometer and an imaging instrument. This makes it possible to analyze the spectrum of each pixel separately and to map the spectral characteristics spatially, which is important to study the relationships between spectral information and geological and geomorphologic surface features. The spatial analysis of the spectral data requires the determination of the exact geographic position of each pixel on the specific surface and that all 352 spectral elements of each pixel show the same region of the target. We developed a method to reproject each pixel geometrically and to convert the spectral data into map projected image cubes. This method can also be applied to mosaic different VIMS observations. Based on these mosaics, maps of the spectral properties for each Saturnian satellite can be derived and attributed to geographic positions as well as to geological and geomorphologic surface features. These map-projected mosaics are the basis for all further investigations. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biochemical, Mechanistic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2

    SciTech Connect

    Aitha, Mahesh; Marts, Amy R.; Bergstrom, Alex; Møller, Abraham Jon; Moritz, Lindsay; Turner, Lucien; Nix, Jay C.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Page, Richard C.; Tierney, David L.; Crowder, Michael W.

    2014-11-25

    Our study examines metal binding to metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2, demonstrating the first successful preparation of a Co(II)-substituted VIM-2 analogue. Spectroscopic studies of the half- and fully metal loaded enzymes show that both Zn(II) and Co(II) bind cooperatively, where the major species present, regardless of stoichiometry, are apo- and di-Zn (or di-Co) enzymes. We also determined the di-Zn VIM-2 structure to a resolution of 1.55 Å, and this structure supports results from spectroscopic studies. Kinetics, both steady-state and pre-steady-state, show that VIM-2 utilizes a mechanism that proceeds through a very short-lived anionic intermediate when chromacef is used as the substrate. Comparison with other B1 enzymes shows that those that bind Zn(II) cooperatively are better poised to protonate the intermediate on its formation, compared to those that bind Zn(II) non-cooperatively, which uniformly build up substantial amounts of the intermediate.

  14. Biochemical, Mechanistic, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study examines metal binding to metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2, demonstrating the first successful preparation of a Co(II)-substituted VIM-2 analogue. Spectroscopic studies of the half- and fully metal loaded enzymes show that both Zn(II) and Co(II) bind cooperatively, where the major species present, regardless of stoichiometry, are apo- and di-Zn (or di-Co) enzymes. We determined the di-Zn VIM-2 structure to a resolution of 1.55 Å, and this structure supports results from spectroscopic studies. Kinetics, both steady-state and pre-steady-state, show that VIM-2 utilizes a mechanism that proceeds through a very short-lived anionic intermediate when chromacef is used as the substrate. Comparison with other B1 enzymes shows that those that bind Zn(II) cooperatively are better poised to protonate the intermediate on its formation, compared to those that bind Zn(II) non-cooperatively, which uniformly build up substantial amounts of the intermediate. PMID:25356958

  15. Audiovisual Aids and Publications Available from the VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammisch, Sue, Comp.

    This catalog contains an inventory of 16mm films, filmstrips, film loops, slide programs, records, and publications about the marine sciences and sea life that are available from VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center; information on the borrowing of the AV materials is included, as well as prices for books and leaflets. The entries are listed…

  16. Aromatic and aliphatic organic materials on Iapetus: Analysis of Cassini VIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Clark, Roger N.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2014-05-01

    , D.P., Clark, R.N. [2012], op. cit.) and Phoebe (Dalle Ore, C.M., Cruikshank, D.P., Clark, R.N. [2012], op. cit.). Our Gaussian decomposition of the organic band region suggests the presence of molecular bands in addition to those noted above, specifically bands attributable to cycloalkanes, olefinic compounds, CH3OH, and N-substituted PAHs, as well as possible Hn-PAHs (PAHs with excess peripheral H atoms). In a minimalist interpretation of the Gaussian band fitting, we find the ratio of aromatic CH to aliphatic CH2 + CH3 functional groups for both the leading and trailing hemispheres of Iapetus is ∼10, with no clear difference between them. In the aliphatic component of the surface material, the ratio CH2/CH3 is 4.0 on the leading hemisphere and 3.0 on the trailing; both values are higher than those found in interstellar dust and other Solar System materials and the difference between the two hemispheres may be statistically significant. The superficial layer of low-albedo material on Iapetus originated in the interior of Phoebe and is being transported to and deposited on Iapetus (and Hyperion) in the current epoch via the Phoebe dust ring (Tosi, F., Turrini, D., Coradini, A., Filacchione, G., and the VIMS Team [2010]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 403, 1113-1130; Tamayo, D., Burns, J.A., Hamilton, D.P., Hedman, M.M. [2011]. Icarus 215, 260-278). The PAHs on Iapetus exist in a H2O-rich environment, and consequently are subject to UV destruction by hydrogenation on short time-scales. The occurrence of this material is therefore consistent with the assertion that the deposition of the PAH-bearing dust is occurring at the present time. If the organic inventory we observe represents the interior composition of Phoebe, we may be sampling the original material from a region of the solar nebula beyond Neptune where Phoebe formed prior to its capture by Saturn (Johnson, T.V., Lunine, J.I. [2005]. Nature 435, 69-71).

  17. Isolation of VIM-2-Producing Pseudomonas monteilii Clinical Strains Disseminated in a Tertiary Hospital in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Gómez, Laura P.; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Román, Elena; Rodríguez, Cristina; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the occurrence of blaVIM-2 in 10 carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas monteilii strains isolated from different clinical samples from patients at the University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in northern Spain. All the blaVIM-2-harboring P. monteilii isolates possessed a class 1 integron, with the cassette array [intI1_blaVIM-2_aac(6′)-Ib_qacEΔ1_sul1]. Our results show the emergence of VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant species other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Pseudomonas putida in a Spanish hospital. P. monteilii, although sporadically isolated, should also be considered an important metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) reservoir. PMID:25421471

  18. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  19. Correlations between Cassini VIMS spectra and RADAR SAR images: Implications for Titan's surface composition and the character of the Huygens Probe Landing Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Anderson, J.A.; Baines, K.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Barrett, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Elachi, C.; Janssen, M.A.; Jaumann, R.; Karkoschka, E.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lopes, R.M.; Lorenz, R.D.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Radebaugh, J.; Rizk, B.; Sotin, C.; Stofan, E.R.; Sucharski, T.L.; Tomasko, M.G.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of RADAR-dark longitudinal dunes seen in Cassini RADAR synthetic aperture images correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as "brown" and "blue" in Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) color composites of short-wavelength infrared spectral cubes (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 ??m). In such composites bluer materials exhibit higher reflectance at 1.3 ??m and lower at 1.6 and 2.0 ??m. The dark brown unit is highly correlated with the RADAR-dark dunes. The dark brown unit shows less evidence of water ice suggesting that the saltating grains of the dunes are largely composed of hydrocarbons and/or nitriles. In general, the bright units also show less evidence of absorption due to water ice and are inferred to consist of deposits of bright fine precipitating tholin aerosol dust. Some set of chemical/mechanical processes may be converting the bright fine-grained aerosol deposits into the dark saltating hydrocarbon and/or nitrile grains. Alternatively the dark dune materials may be derived from a different type of air aerosol photochemical product than are the bright materials. In our model, both the bright aerosol and dark hydrocarbon dune deposits mantle the VIMS dark blue water ice-rich substrate. We postulate that the bright mantles are effectively invisible (transparent) in RADAR synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images leading to lack of correlation in the RADAR images with optically bright mantling units. RADAR images mostly show only dark dunes and the water ice substrate that varies in roughness, fracturing, and porosity. If the rate of deposition of bright aerosol is 0.001-0.01 ??m/yr, the surface would be coated (to optical instruments) in hundreds-to-thousands of years unless cleansing processes are active. The dark dunes must be mobile on this very short timescale to prevent the accumulation of bright coatings. Huygens landed in a region of the VIMS bright and dark blue materials and about 30 km south of the

  20. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  1. Correlations between Cassini VIMS spectra and RADAR SAR images: Implications for Titan's surface composition and the character of the Huygens Probe Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Laurence A.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Barnes, Jason W.; Barrett, Janet M.; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Elachi, Charles; Janssen, Michael A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Karkoschka, Erich; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; McCord, Thomas B.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Rizk, Bashar; Sotin, Christophe; Stofan, Ellen R.; Sucharski, Tracie L.; Tomasko, Martin G.; Wall, Stephen D.

    2007-11-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of RADAR-dark longitudinal dunes seen in Cassini RADAR synthetic aperture images correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as "brown" and "blue" in Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) color composites of short-wavelength infrared spectral cubes (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 μm). In such composites bluer materials exhibit higher reflectance at 1.3 μm and lower at 1.6 and 2.0 μm. The dark brown unit is highly correlated with the RADAR-dark dunes. The dark brown unit shows less evidence of water ice suggesting that the saltating grains of the dunes are largely composed of hydrocarbons and/or nitriles. In general, the bright units also show less evidence of absorption due to water ice and are inferred to consist of deposits of bright fine precipitating tholin aerosol dust. Some set of chemical/mechanical processes may be converting the bright fine-grained aerosol deposits into the dark saltating hydrocarbon and/or nitrile grains. Alternatively the dark dune materials may be derived from a different type of air aerosol photochemical product than are the bright materials. In our model, both the bright aerosol and dark hydrocarbon dune deposits mantle the VIMS dark blue water ice-rich substrate. We postulate that the bright mantles are effectively invisible (transparent) in RADAR synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images leading to lack of correlation in the RADAR images with optically bright mantling units. RADAR images mostly show only dark dunes and the water ice substrate that varies in roughness, fracturing, and porosity. If the rate of deposition of bright aerosol is 0.001-0.01 μm/yr, the surface would be coated (to optical instruments) in hundreds-to-thousands of years unless cleansing processes are active. The dark dunes must be mobile on this very short timescale to prevent the accumulation of bright coatings. Huygens landed in a region of the VIMS bright and dark blue materials and about 30 km south of the

  2. Studies of Saturn's Main Rings at Multiple Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Deau, E.; Filacchione, G.; Morishima, R.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.; Showalter, M.; Pilorz, S.; Brooks, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A wealth of information about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as well as a contribution from scattering between individual particles in a many-particle-thick layer. Preliminary results from our joint studies will be presented. This research was carried out in part at

  3. VIM-based dynamic sparse grid approach to partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shu-Li

    2014-01-01

    Combining the variational iteration method (VIM) with the sparse grid theory, a dynamic sparse grid approach for nonlinear PDEs is proposed in this paper. In this method, a multilevel interpolation operator is constructed based on the sparse grids theory firstly. The operator is based on the linear combination of the basic functions and independent of them. Second, by means of the precise integration method (PIM), the VIM is developed to solve the nonlinear system of ODEs which is obtained from the discretization of the PDEs. In addition, a dynamic choice scheme on both of the inner and external grid points is proposed. It is different from the traditional interval wavelet collocation method in which the choice of both of the inner and external grid points is dynamic. The numerical experiments show that our method is better than the traditional wavelet collocation method, especially in solving the PDEs with the Nuemann boundary conditions.

  4. KPC and VIM producing Enterobacter cloacae strain from a hospital in northeastern Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dianny; Marcano, Daniel; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Salgado, Nurys; Cuaical, Nirvia; Rodriguez, Lucy; Caña, Luisa; Medina, Belkis; Guzman, Militza; De Donato, Marcos

    2015-06-01

    An 83-year-old male patient is admitted to the central hospital in Cumana, Venezuela with severe urinary infection, history of hospitalizaions and prolonged antimicrobial treatments. A strain of Enterobacter cloacae was isolated showing resistance to multiple types of antibiotics (only sensitive to gentamicin), with phenotype of serine- and metallo-carbapenemases. Both, bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC) genes were detected in the isolate. This is the first report of an Enterobacteriaceae species producing both KPC carbapenemase and VIM metallo carbapenemase in Venezuela. This finding has a great clinical and epidemiological impact in the region, because of the feasibility of transferring these genes, through mobile elements to other strains of Enterobacter and to other infection-causing species of bacteria.

  5. Titan through the time of Cassini: a database of VIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo

    2010-04-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn, VIMS has recorded over 104 cubes, containing over 10^7 spectra. This still increasing amount of observations precludes direct inspection of all data, either to select the observations, or to identify the occurrence and time variation of specific spectral or spatial features. Additionally, many VIMS observations are taken as a large number of cubes with small spatial extent, which cannot be meaningfully visualized without assembling mosaics. This work presents titan_browse, a tool developed to deal with these difficulties. Titan_browse comprises both a database of observations, and a visualization tool to inspect them. The database contains every VIMS observation of Titan in the PDS archive, and provides a flexible query system, which can select individual cubes or spatial pixels based on arbitrary functions of the instrumental or photometric data. Once observations are selected, titan_browse can be used to directly inspect them, through mosaics in several map projections, or displaying images of selected bands, or spectra of selected spatial pixels. This allows users to interactively explore the data, to refine queries to obtain those most useful to the intended analysis. The selected cubes or spectra can them be directly exported from the database, either to an IDL session, or to files (one format being the original cubes, in ISIS format). The cubes used in the database were processed to contain more geometric information than either the original PDS files or those that are produced by the VIMS pipeline, including the coordinates of the edges of each spatial pixel (necessary for precise mosaics), and more information on the illumination angles (to aid in analyses of specular reflections). This version of the titan_browse is a complete reimplementation of its previous titan_browse, to overcome the previous coverage and performance limitations, and is the first to be made publicly available.

  6. Titan's surface and atmosphere from Cassini/VIMS data with updated methane opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtzig, M.; Bézard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Lellouch, E.; Drossart, P.; deBergh, C.; Campargue, A.; Boudon, V.; Tyuterev, V.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Kassi, S.; Nikitin, A.; Wang, L.; Solomonidou, A.; Schmitt, B.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present an updated analysis of VIMS data in view of recent developments on the methane opacity in the 1.3-5.2 µm region, a very important parameter in simulating Titan's spectrum. We use a multi-stream radiative transfer model, benefitting from the latest methane absorption coefficients available [1], which allows us to determine more accurately the haze and surface contributions. This code is applied to Cassini/VIMS spectro-imaging data of various regions with very different spectral responses to extract information on the content of the lower atmosphere (0-200 km) as well as on the surface properties. In particular, we update the DISR aerosol model [2] for the Huygens landing site that we then adjust to fit the data for other locations on Titan's disk. Fitting VIMS data taken from 2004 to 2010 (TA to T70), around Titan's mid-latitudes (40°S-40°N), we determine the latitudinal and temporal evolution of the aerosol population, monitoring the North-South Asymmetry. While around the equinox [3] witnessed the collapse of the detached haze layer, we measure a continuous depletion of the aerosols throughout the atmosphere, although the NSA remains with a brighter northern hemisphere. Using this improved atmospheric model, we also retrieve surface albedos simultaneously for all the seven windows in the whole VIMS range for these regions, also recovering the shape of the surface albedo within each window. Eventually, we look for Titan's surface probable chemical composition, using mixtures of dark and complex hydrocarbons like bitumens and tholins, as well as bright CH4, CO2, NH3 and H2O ices of various grain sizes. [4] [1] Campargue, A. et al., (2012) Icarus, submitted. [2] Tomasko, M. et al., (2008) Planetary and Space Science, 56, 669. [3] West, R.A. et al., (2011) Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L06204. [4] Hirtzig, M. et al., (2012) Planetary and Space Science, submitted.

  7. Unbiased estimations of atmosphere vortices: the Saturn's storm by Cassini VIMS-V as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriconi, M. L.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Liberti, G. L.; Filacchione, G.; Oliva, F.

    The size determination of dynamical structures from spectral images poses the question where to fix the shape's boundary. Here we propose a method, suitable for nearly elliptical shape, based on the fit of a 2D Gaussian to the pixel intensities of the spectral image. This method has been tested on a vortex structure embedded in the wake of the 2010 Saturn's giant storm. On January 4th 2012 the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), onboard Cassini, observed a giant vortex in the Saturn's northern hemisphere. The structure was embedded in the wake storm system detected on December 2010 by Fletcher et al. (2011). Therefore, all the VIMS observations focused on the Saturn's storm have been analyzed to investigate its morphology and development. VIMS detected the vortex from May 2011 up to January 2012. The shape and size evolution has been determined for the vortex cloud top, visible at 890 nm. The largest size resulted 4000 km about and seemed to shrinks continuously up to January 2012, while the shape varied in the second half of the year. The vortex oscillated in 2 degrees latitude around 37°N planetocentric latitude, and drifted in longitude by ∼ 0.75 deg/day in westward direction.

  8. The Radial Distribution Of Water Ice And Reddening Material Across Saturn's Icy Satellites And Rings Retrieved From Cassini Vims Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Coradini, A.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Nicholson, P. D.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K. H.

    2010-10-01

    In the past few years we have retrieved the amount of water ice and red contaminant materials distributed across the Saturnian Icy satellites surfaces and Ring regions using Cassini-VIMS observations. These measurements highlight very striking differences among the Saturn system objects, which vary from the almost uncontaminated and water ice-rich surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the metal/organic-rich and red surfaces of Iapetus leading hemisphere and Phoebe. In this framework we have developed a method to compare surface composition versus radial distance from Saturn and satellites' densities. In the F ring environment, the inner minor satellites (Prometheus, Pandora, Janus and Epimetheus) have in average surface water ice abundance similar to C ring and Cassini division particles but with much less reddening contaminant. Although their orbits are close to the F-ring, Prometheus and Pandora have very striking differences in surface composition, Prometheus being very water ice-rich but at the same time very red at VIS wavelengths. These properties make it very similar to A-B ring particles while Pandora is bluer. Moving outwards, we see the effects of E ring particles generated by Enceladus plumes contaminated surfaces from Mimas up to Rhea. We found some differences between Tethys’ lagrangian moons, Calypso being much more water ice-rich and bluer with respect to Telesto. Among outer satellites (Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe) we observe a linear trend in both water ice decrease and in reddening, Hyperion being the reddest object of the population. This research is supported by an Italian Space Agency Grant.

  9. Saturn’s Helium Abundance from Cassini VIMS Stellar Occultations and CIRS Limb Temperature Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Don; Gierasch, Peter J.; Conrath, Barney J.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2014-11-01

    We have used Saturn stellar occultations as observed by Cassini VIMS, in concert with Saturn limb temperature profiles derived from Cassini CIRS data to determine the Helium abundance in Saturn’s atmosphere near a few mbars. This quantity is long sought, as indication of the internal evolution that Saturn has undergone. Additionally, previous attempts to determine this quantity have produced inconsistent results ranging from He/H2=0.03±0.02 using Voyager IRIS and RSS (Conrath et al., 1984) to He/H2=0.13±0.02 using only Voyager IRIS (Conrath & Gautier, 2000) with a similar result being found by Orton and Ingersoll (1980) using Pioneer IRR and RSS (He/H2=0.11±0.04). These discordant results motivate us to try yet another approach to yield this quantity, in this case using the Cassini VIMS stellar occultations to yield a profile of atmospheric density, and nearly co-located Cassini CIRS limb profiles to yield atmospheric temperature. Combining the two results then yields the mean molecular weight and thus the He/H2 mixing ratio. We reported preliminary values from an occultation from the 151st Cassini orbit at DPS in 2011 (He/H2=0.14±0.05), but have since identified errors in that analysis that have caused us to revisit the problem. Additionally, that occultation occurred near the large Saturn northern hemisphere storm, with significant longitudinal temperature gradients present. The longitudinal separation between the CIRS and VIMS footprints could have skewed the results. In this report, we will discuss our latest results with the algorithm errors corrected, and using data from an occultation of Betelgeuse on the 161st Cassini orbit. These data have the best S/N of all stellar occultations caught by Cassini VIMS to date, and the combination of the VIMS/CIRS data doesn’t suffer from problems due to proximity to the storm and its associated spatial gradients in temperature.

  10. Saturn's icy satellites and rings investigated by Cassini-VIMS: III - Radial compositional variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Hedman, M. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Soderblom, L. A.; Tosi, F.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.; McCord, T. B.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K. H.; Flamini, E.

    2012-08-01

    In the last few years Cassini-VIMS, the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, returned to us a comprehensive view of the Saturn's icy satellites and rings. After having analyzed the satellites' spectral properties (Filacchione, G., Capaccioni, F., McCord, T.B., Coradini, A., Cerroni, P., Bellucci, G., Tosi, F., D'Aversa, E., Formisano, V., Brown, R.H., Baines, K.H., Bibring, J.P., Buratti, B.J., Clark, R.N., Combes, M., Cruikshank, D.P., Drossart, P., Jaumann, R., Langevin, Y., Matson, D.L., Mennella, V., Nelson, R.M., Nicholson, P.D., Sicardy, B., Sotin, C., Hansen, G., Hibbitts, K., Showalter, M., Newman, S. [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, paper I) and their distribution across the satellites' hemispheres (Filacchione, G., Capaccioni, F., Clark, R.N., Cuzzi, J.N., Cruikshank, D.P., Coradini, A., Cerroni, P., Nicholson, P.D., McCord, T.B., Brown, R.H., Buratti, B.J., Tosi, F., Nelson, R.M., Jaumann, R., Stephan, K. [2010]. Icarus 206, 507-523, paper II), we proceed in this paper to investigate the radial variability of icy satellites (principal and minor) and main rings average spectral properties. This analysis is done by using 2264 disk-integrated observations of the satellites and a 12 × 700 pixels-wide rings radial mosaic acquired with a spatial resolution of about 125 km/pixel. Using different VIS and IR spectral indicators, e.g. spectral slopes and band depths, we perform a comparative analysis of these data aimed to measure the distribution of water ice and red contaminant materials across Saturn's system. The average surface regolith grain sizes are estimated with different indicators through comparison with laboratory and synthetic spectra. These measurements highlight very striking differences in the population here analyzed, which vary from the almost uncontaminated and water ice-rich surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the metal/organic-rich and red surfaces of Iapetus' leading hemisphere and Phoebe. Rings spectra appear more red than the icy

  11. Saturn's system ices: a comparative spectral study by Cassini-VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Clark, Roger N.; Cuzzi, Jeff N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Coradini, Angioletta; Cerroni, Priscilla; Tosi, Federico; Ciarniello, Mauro; Nicholson, Phil D.; McCord, Thomas B.; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has observed the entire population of Saturnian icy objects, allowing a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division). The results we present are derived from the entire dataset available after about 5 years of the Cassini mission, which consists of more than 2000 full-disk observations of the moons as well as several radial mosaics of the ring system. The spectra of Saturn's satellites are characterized by a step red slope in the 0.35-0.55 µm range, which is highly diagnostic of the presence of organic contaminants and darkening agents on icy surfaces; in the 0.55-0.95 µm range the spectra become more flat and featureless. In the IR range the water ice bands at 1.5-2.0-3.0 µm bands are evident everywhere, while the CO2 ice band at 4.26 µm is seen only on the three external satellites Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Some specific spectrophotometric indicators are chosen to retrieve the macroscopic properties of the ices: I/F continuum levels, 0.35-0.55 and 0.55-0.95 µm spectral slopes, H2O-CO2 ice band depths and band positions. By using these indicators the Saturn's satellites are grouped in distinct classes, noticeably between the almost pure water ice and blue surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic- and carbon dioxide-rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Hyperion and the leading hemisphere of Iapetus have the reddest VIS slopes of the group. Janus' visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive VIS spectral slope, while Epimetheus is more neutral and similar to Iapetus' bright terrains (trailing hemisphere), Mimas and Tethys. The two F ring's shepherd moons, Prometheus and Pandora, have similarities with Atlas, while Calypso and Telesto

  12. Titan's surface properties: correlations among DISR, RADAR and VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, L.

    The vast fields of radar-dark longitudinal dunes in the equatorial region of Titan seen Cassini synthetic aperture radar images correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated in dark in short-wavelength infrared spectral cubes. The "bluer" dark unit shows higher reflectance at 1.3µm and lower at 2.0µm relative to the neutral dark unit. Of these two, the neutral dark unit (correlated with the radar-dark dunes) shows least evidence of water ice. This suggests that the saltating grains of the dunes are dry, hydrocarbon or nitrile particles. The bright unit shows the least evidence of absorption due to water ice and is inferred to consist of bright, very fine tholin dust. The rate of deposition of bright aerosol "snow" is thought to be ˜1µm/yr. Hence the surface would be coated (to optical instruments) in a few years unless cleansing processes are active. The dark dunes must be mobile on this very short timescale to prevent the accumulation of bright coatings. Likewise fluvial/pluvial processes every few years-to-decades must be cleaning the dark floors of the incised channels and dark scoured plains at the Huygens landing site both imaged by DISR. The spatial association between the bright and the blue dark units suggest minor differences in bright coatings and lack of dunes. In this model Xanadu is a large inactive region where eolian, fluvial, pluvial activity is currently at a low ebb.

  13. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  14. A probabilistic functional atlas of the VIM nucleus constructed from pre-, intra- and postoperative electrophysiological and neuroimaging data acquired during the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Belov, Dmitry; Thirunavuukarasuu, A; Benabid, Alim Louis

    2005-01-01

    We have previously introduced a concept of a probabilistic functional atlas (PFA) to overcome limitations of the current electronic stereotactic brain atlases: anatomical nature, spatial sparseness, inconsistency and lack of population information. The PFA for the STN has already been developed. This work addresses construction of the PFA for the ventrointermediate nucleus (PFA-VIM). The PFA-VIM is constructed from pre-, intra- and postoperative electrophysiological and neuroimaging data acquired during the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease patients. The data contain the positions of the chronically implanted electrodes and their best contacts. For each patient, the intercommissural distance, height of the thalamus and width of the third ventricle were measured. An algorithm was developed to convert these data into the PFA-VIM, and to present them on axial, coronal and sagittal planes and in 3-D. The PFA-VIM gives a spatial distribution of the best contacts, and its probability is proportional to best contact concentration in a given location. The region with the highest probability corresponds to the best target. The PFA-VIM is calculated with 0.25-mm3 resolution from 107 best contacts in two situations: with and without lateral compensation against the width of the third ventricle. For the PFA-VIM compensated laterally, the anterior, lateral and dorsal coordinates of the mean value are (in mm) 6.24, 13.83, 1.68 for the left VIM and 6.54, -13.84, 2.10 for the right VIM. The coordinates of the mean value of the highest probability region along with the highest number of the best contacts (P) are: 6.25, 14.25, 1.75, P = 16, for the left VIM, and 6.0, -14.0, 1.00, P = 18, for the right VIM. The coordinate system origin is at the posterior commissure. For the PFA-VIM not compensated laterally, the coordinates of the mean value are 6.24, 13.99, 1.68 for the left VIM and 6.53, -14.13, 2.10 for the right VIM. The coordinates of the mean value of the highest

  15. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  16. Infections with VIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacter cloacae and Their Correlation with Clinical Outcome▿

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Marco; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Perilli, Mariagrazia; Forcella, Chiara; Giordano, Alessandra; Cafiso, Viviana; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence and clinical significance of metallo-β-lactamases among Enterobacter strains isolated from patients with nosocomial infections. We prospectively collected data on patients with Enterobacter infection during a 13-month period. All of the strains were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility, the presence and expression of metallo-β-lactamases, and clonality. Of 29 infections (11 involving the urinary tract, 7 pneumonias, 3 skin/soft tissue infections, 3 intra-abdominal infections, 3 bacteremias, and 2 other infections), 7 (24%) were caused by Enterobacter cloacae strains harboring a blaVIM-1 gene associated or not with a blaSHV12 gene. Infections caused by VIM-1-producing strains were more frequently associated with a recent prior hospitalization (P = 0.006), cirrhosis (P = 0.03), relapse of infection (P < 0.001), and more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy (P = 0.01) than were other infections. All of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem and had blaVIM-1 preceded by a weak P1 promoter and inactivated P2 promoters. Most VIM-1-producing Enterobacter isolates belonged to a main clone, but four different clones were found. Multiclonal VIM-1-producing E. cloacae infections are difficult to diagnose due to an apparent susceptibility to various beta-lactams, including carbapenems, and are associated with a high relapse rate and a more prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:19741074

  17. Nosocomial dissemination of VIM-2-producing ST235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Mikucionyte, G; Zamorano, L; Vitkauskiene, A; López-Causapé, C; Juan, C; Mulet, X; Oliver, A

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug resistance, and particularly the production of carbapenemases linked to international high-risk clones, is of growing concern. While high levels of carbapenem resistance (>60 %) have been reported in Lithuania, so far, there is no information on the underlying mechanisms. Thus, the aim of this work was to determine the molecular epidemiology and prevalence of acquired carbapenemases among 73 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates recovered in a hospital from Kaunas, Lithuania in 2011-2012. The presence of acquired carbapenemases was evaluated through phenotypic (modified Hodge test, cloxacillin inhibition test, double-disc synergy test) and genetic methods [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing]. Clonal relatedness was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Acquired β-lactamases were detected in 19 (26 %) of the isolates, whereas resistance was exclusively chromosomal (OprD inactivation ± AmpC hyperproduction) in the remaining 54 (74 %) isolates. The acquired β-lactamases detected included 16 VIM-2, one PER-1 and two GES enzymes. PFGE revealed that 15 of the 16 VIM-2 isolates belonged to a single clone, identified as the international high-risk clone ST235 by MLST. bla VIM-2 was preceded by aacA7 in a class I integron, similar to epidemic ST235 isolates described in nearby countries. Additionally, sequencing of bla GES revealed the presence of the carbapenem-hydrolysing enzyme GES-5 in one of the isolates and a novel GES variant, designated GES-27, in the other. GES-27 differed from GES-5 by a single amino acid substitution, proline 167, that was replaced by glutamine. Increasing emergence and dissemination of concerning resistance mechanisms and international clones warrants global surveillance and control strategies.

  18. Haze and clouds properties of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex retrieved from Cassini VIMS-V data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; d'Aversa, E.

    2014-04-01

    This work is focused on the retrieval of the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the giant vortex observed in 2011 at Saturn, by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board of Cassini. The retrieval algorithm is based on the optimal estimation technique [15] and takes advantage of a forward radiative transfer model developed by adapting the LibRadtran code [13] to the atmosphere of Saturn. For each of the retrieved parameters - that are effective radii, top pressures and total number densities for each considered deck - a 2D spatial map has been produced.

  19. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  20. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction.

  1. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SCALING LAWS AND THERMAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Shimizu, Toshifumi E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp

    2013-10-20

    In this study we measure physical parameters of the same set of 155 M- and X-class solar flares observed with AIA/SDO as analyzed in Paper I, by performing a differential emission measure analysis to determine the flare peak emission measure EM{sub p} , peak temperature T{sub p} , electron density n{sub p} , and thermal energy E{sub th}, in addition to the spatial scales L, areas A, and volumes V measured in Paper I. The parameter ranges for M- and X-class flares are log (EM{sub p}) = 47.0-50.5, T{sub p} = 5.0-17.8 MK, n{sub p} = 4 × 10{sup 9}-9 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}, and thermal energies of E{sub th} = 1.6 × 10{sup 28}-1.1 × 10{sup 32} erg. We find that these parameters obey the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law T{sub p}{sup 2}∝n{sub p} L and H∝T {sup 7/2} L {sup –2} during the peak time t{sub p} of the flare density n{sub p} , when energy balance between the heating rate H and the conductive and radiative loss rates is achieved for a short instant and thus enables the applicability of the RTV scaling law. The application of the RTV scaling law predicts power-law distributions for all physical parameters, which we demonstrate with numerical Monte Carlo simulations as well as with analytical calculations. A consequence of the RTV law is also that we can retrieve the size distribution of heating rates, for which we find N(H)∝H {sup –1.8}, which is consistent with the magnetic flux distribution N(Φ)∝Φ{sup –1.85} observed by Parnell et al. and the heating flux scaling law F{sub H} ∝HL∝B/L of Schrijver et al.. The fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model in conjunction with the RTV scaling law reproduces the observed power-law distributions and their slopes for all geometrical and physical parameters and can be used to predict the size distributions for other flare data sets, instruments, and detection algorithms.

  2. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  3. N-body ray-tracing modeling of Saturn's rings for analysis of UVIS/VIMS optical depths and CIRS temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Richardson, Derek C.

    2016-10-01

    Various observations of Saturn's A and B rings indicate that ring particles are highly compacted near the mid-plane, making non-uniform structures. Such structures complicate deduction of properties of individual ring particles characterized by, for example, the albedo and the size distribution. Modeling using N-body simulations and ray-tracing calculations is one of the most promising approaches to understanding the dense rings of Saturn. We are developing a ray-tracing code that is applicable to analysis of UVIS/VIMS optical depths and CIRS temperatures. In the presentation, we report optical depth profiles of dense rings produced by large-scale N-body simulations (Ballouz et al. 2016; in preparation) and compare them with those from UVIS/VIMS occultation observations. Ballouz et al. (2016) find that prominent overstability wakes are produced at B ring locations either if the internal density is low and/or the friction forces are strong enough. For low internal density cases, the photometric optical depths become as high as those for the B ring, but rings are not necessarily most transparent when the line of sight is aligned to overstability wakes, in contrast to observations of the outer B ring (Colwell et al. 2007). For cases with high internal density and strong friction, rings become most transparent when the line of sight is roughly aligned to overstability wakes, but the photometric optical depths become much lower than the observed values due to highly transparent inter-wake gaps. These facts may indicate that small particles not considered in the simulations fill inter-wake gaps. We also report the progress of code modifications for analysis of CIRS temperature data. For calculations of the energy balance of ring particles, effects due to multiply scattered photometric light and to mutual heating between ring particles are added to the code.

  4. Investigation of VIM, IMP, NDM-1, KPC AND OXA-48 enzymes in Enterobacteriaceae strains.

    PubMed

    Demir, Yelda; Zer, Yasemin; Karaoglan, Ilkay

    2015-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria especially Enterobacteriaceae species have become an increasing etiologic agent of nosocomial infections. The development of resistance to carbapenems have become an increasing problem in the treatment of nosocomial infections. Especially carbapenamases are common for Enterobacteriaceae strains. This study was performed to detect the types of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from various clinical samples. Enterobacteriaceae species were isolated from urine, blood, tracheal aspirates, wound, and other respiratory samples. Susceptibility of isolates to imipenem, meropenem and ertapenem was tested. Carbapenemase genes were studied using HyplexSuperBug ID kit. VIM (1-13), IMP (1-22), NDM-1, KPC(1-10) and OXA-48 genes were investigated. Ninety-five isolates of Enterobacteriaceae spp. were included in the study. Sixty isolates were resistant to imipenem, meropenem and ertapenem and 20 isolates were found resistant to imipenem or ertapenem while 15 were susceptible to all carbapenems. Among the isolates with carbapenem resistance, 57 were positive for one carbapenemase gene and susceptible isolates did not have carbapenemase gene. OXA-48 was found in 49 of the isolates (86%), NDM-1 in 6 (10.5%) isolates, VIM in 2 isolates. IMP and KPC gene loci were not identified. Carbapenemase genes play a crucial role in the development and spread of resistant strains.

  5. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Newman, S.F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Griffith, C.A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 ??m. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 ??m and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (???0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ISO terminological analysis of the VIM3 concepts 'quantity' and 'kind-of-quantity'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybkaer, René

    2010-06-01

    The recent third edition of the International Vocabulary of Metrology—Basic and General Concepts and Associated Terms (VIM3) (JCGM 200:2008 (Sèvres: BIPM); also ISO/IEC Guide 99:2007 3rd edn (Geneva: ISO)) has undergone important changes, not least by adhering to ISO International Standards on terminology work (ISO 704:2000 Terminology Work—Principles and Methods; ISO 1087-1:2000 Terminology Work—Vocabulary—Part 1: Theory and Application; ISO 10241:1992 International Terminology Standards—Preparation and Layout). A recent critique (Mari 2009 Metrologia 46 L11-L15)—based on Object-Oriented Analysis—centres on the meaning and relation of the two first and fundamental concepts 'quantity'Single quotation marks ('...') or bold type indicate a concept when necessary, double quotation marks ("...") a term or quotation. and the new entry 'kind-of-quantity'. This makes it timely to analyse the two concepts, their relation and their respective role in forming the generic hierarchical concept system of VIM3 from 'property' to individual quantities. It is suggested that 'kind-of-quantity' acts as a division criterionSynonyms are "criterion of subdivision", "type of characteristic(s)", see the annexe..

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of VIM-2-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175, an Epidemic High-Risk Clone.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Otero, Joaquín R; Oliver, Antonio; Chaves, Fernando

    2013-04-11

    The VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant high-risk clone Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type (ST) 175 was isolated in the setting of a large outbreak in Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre (Spain) from 2007 to 2010. This strain was resistant to all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides, with the exception of amikacin, and has become an endemic clone in our institution.

  8. High prevalence of VIM-4 and NDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase among carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Wafaa; Rotimi, Vincent O; Albert, M John; Khodakhast, Fatima; Nordmann, Patrice; Poirel, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms leading to carbapenem resistance among multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates recovered from hospitalized patients with nosocomial infections in Mubarak Al Kabeer Hospital, Kuwait. Fourteen carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates were obtained from inpatients in different wards and intensive care units between April 2009 and February 2011. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined using the E-test method. Genes encoding β-lactamases were characterized by specific PCR amplification, sequencing and conjugation assays. All isolates were identified as metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producers using phenotypic and molecular methods. Eleven of the 14 isolates produced VIM-4 (six Klebsiella pneumoniae, three Escherichia coli, one Enterobacter cloacae and one Klebsiella oxytoca). Three K. pneumoniae isolates produced the MBL NDM-1 and co-produced the plasmid-encoded AmpC CMY-4. The VIM-4-producing isolates co-produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases including CTX-M-15 and some SHV derivatives. The VIM-4 gene was not transferable by conjugation studies of six selected strains. We demonstrated here the emergence of VIM-4- and NDM-1-producing isolates in the largest teaching hospital in Kuwait.

  9. The PdBI arcsecond whirlpool survey (PAWS). I. A cloud-scale/multi-wavelength view of the interstellar medium in a grand-design spiral galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon E.; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jérôme; Schuster, Karl F.; Dumas, Gaëlle; García-Burillo, Santiago; Dobbs, Clare L.; Leroy, Adam K.; Kramer, Carsten; Thompson, Todd A.; Regan, Michael W.

    2013-12-10

    The Plateau de Bure Interferometer Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey has mapped the molecular gas in the central ∼9 kpc of M51 in its {sup 12}CO(1-0) line emission at a cloud-scale resolution of ∼40 pc using both IRAM telescopes. We utilize this data set to quantitatively characterize the relation of molecular gas (or CO emission) to other tracers of the interstellar medium, star formation, and stellar populations of varying ages. Using two-dimensional maps, a polar cross-correlation technique and pixel-by-pixel diagrams, we find: (1) that (as expected) the distribution of the molecular gas can be linked to different components of the gravitational potential; (2) evidence for a physical link between CO line emission and radio continuum that seems not to be caused by massive stars, but rather depends on the gas density; (3) a close spatial relation between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and molecular gas emission, but no predictive power of PAH emission for the molecular gas mass; (4) that the I – H color map is an excellent predictor of the distribution (and to a lesser degree, the brightness) of CO emission; and (5) that the impact of massive (UV-intense) young star-forming regions on the bulk of the molecular gas in central ∼9 kpc cannot be significant due to a complex spatial relation between molecular gas and star-forming regions that ranges from cospatial to spatially offset to absent. The last point, in particular, highlights the importance of galactic environment—and thus the underlying gravitational potential—for the distribution of molecular gas and star formation.

  10. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  12. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, C.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ???800. km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ???90. km; its floor diameter is ???60. km. A central pit/peak, 20-30. km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15. km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21?? and 122?? east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed

  13. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Jason M.; Brown, Robert H.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Barnes, Jason W.; Jaumann, Ralf; Mouélic, Stéphane Le; Sotin, Christophe; Stephan, Katrin; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2010-08-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ˜800 km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ˜90 km; its floor diameter is ˜60 km. A central pit/peak, 20-30 km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15 km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21° and 122° east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed in the

  14. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  15. Probable Interspecies Transfer of the bla(VIM-4) Gene between Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Single Infant Patient.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Katarzyna; Zacharczuk, Katarzyna; Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Wołkowicz, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Podsiadły, Edyta; Demkow, Urszula; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    We report the interspecies transfer of the bla(VLM-4) gene in MBL-producing Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a newborn patient who had received meropenem therapy. We show evidence that gene bla(VIM-4) was transmitted as a part of the class-1 integron on a ca. -90 kb conjugative plasmid. High homology of nucleotide sequence was observed between the integron found in VIM-4 producing E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae strains tested and class-1 integrons previously reporteded in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Hungary and Poland. This finding may suggest P. aeruginosa as a potential source of acquired VIM-4 in Enterobacteriaceae.

  16. Fast forward modeling of Titan's infrared spectra to invert VIMS/Cassini hyperspectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rannou, P.; Combe, J.-P.; Corre, L.L.; Tobie, G.; Barnes, J.W.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    The surface of Titan, the largest icy moon of Saturn, is veiled by a very thick and hazy atmosphere. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, conduct an intensive survey of Titan with the objective to understand the complex nature of the atmosphere and surface of the mysterious moon and the way they interact. Accurate radiative transfer modeling is necessary to analyze Titan's infrared spectra, but are often very computer resources demanding. As Cassini has gathered hitherto millions of spectra of Titan and will still observe it until at least 2010, we report here on the development of a new rapid, simple and versatile radiative transfer model specially designed to invert VIMS datacubes. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  17. VIM-2–producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175 Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Villa, Jennifer; Barrado, Laura; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquín R.; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A total of 183 patients were colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at a hospital in Spain during 2007–2010; prevalence increased over this period from 2.8% to 15.3%. To characterize these isolates, we performed molecular epidemiologic and drug resistance analysis. Genotyping showed that 104 (56.8%) isolates belonged to a single major clone (clone B), which was identified by multilocus sequence typing as sequence type (ST) 175. This clone was initially isolated from 5 patients in 2008, and then isolated from 23 patients in 2009 and 76 patients in 2010. PCR analysis of clone B isolates identified the blaVIM-2 gene in all but 1 isolate, which harbored blaIMP-22. ST175 isolates were susceptible to only amikacin (75%) and colistin (100%). Emergence of the ST175 clone represents a major health problem because it compromises therapy for treatment of P. aeruginosa nosocomial infections. PMID:22840969

  18. A comparative study of Saturn's icy satellites spectrophotometric properties by Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; McCord, T. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Brown, R. H.; Bibring, J. P.; Vims Team

    The main spectral properties of Saturn s icy satellites are investigated through the hyperspectral data collected by VIMS Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer in the VIS-NIR range 0 35-5 1 micron from July 2004 to nowadays In this work we make a comparative analysis of more than 500 full-disk spectra obtained at different phase angles and leading-trailing coverage for 14 satellites Mimas Enceladus Tethys Dione Rhea Hyperion Iapetus Janus Epimetheus Telesto Calypso Atlas Prometheus Pandora The amount of contaminants organics and tholins on the surfaces is estimated thanks to the visible spectral slopes abundance of water ice and particle sizes are retrieved through the 1 5 2 0 and 3 0 micron absorption band strengths We present here also preliminary phase curves and mean full-disk spectra This work is supported by an ASI Italian Space Agency grant

  19. Spectroscopy, morphometry, and photoclinometry of Titan's dunefields from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Sotin, C.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Jaumann, R.; Beyer, R.A.; Buratti, B.J.; Pitman, K.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-resolution (500 m/pixel) Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) T20 observations of Titan resolve that moon's sand dunes. The spectral variability in some dune regions shows that there are sand-free interdune areas, wherein VIMS spectra reveal the exposed dune substrate. The interdunes from T20 are, variously, materials that correspond to the equatorial bright, 5-??m-bright, and dark blue spectral units. Our observations show that an enigmatic "dark red" spectral unit seen in T5 in fact represents a macroscopic mixture with 5-??m-bright material and dunes as its spectral endmembers. Looking more broadly, similar mixtures of varying amounts of dune and interdune units of varying composition can explain the spectral and albedo variability within the dark brown dune global spectral unit that is associated with dunes. The presence of interdunes indicates that Titan's dunefields are both mature and recently active. The spectrum of the dune endmember reveals the sand to be composed of less water ice than the rest of Titan; various organics are consistent with the dunes' measured reflectivity. We measure a mean dune spacing of 2.1 km, and find that the dunes are oriented on the average in an east-west direction, but angling up to 10?? from parallel to the equator in specific cases. Where no interdunes are present, we determine the height of one set of dunes photoclinometrically to be between 30 and 70 m. These results pave the way for future exploration and interpretation of Titan's sand dunes. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS landing site on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Sotin, C.; Clenet, H.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.; Brown, R.H.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    Titan is one of the primary scientific objectives of the NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini-Huygens mission. Scattering by haze particles in Titan's atmosphere and numerous methane absorptions dramatically veil Titan's surface in the visible range, though it can be studied more easily in some narrow infrared windows. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft successfully imaged its surface in the atmospheric windows, taking hyperspectral images in the range 0.4-5.2 ??m. On 26 October (TA flyby) and 13 December 2004 (TB flyby), the Cassini-Huygens mission flew over Titan at an altitude lower than 1200 km at closest approach. We report here on the analysis of VIMS images of the Huygens landing site acquired at TA and TB, with a spatial resolution ranging from 16 to14.4 km/pixel. The pure atmospheric backscattering component is corrected by using both an empirical method and a first-order theoretical model. Both approaches provide consistent results. After the removal of scattering, ratio images reveal subtle surface heterogeneities. A particularly contrasted structure appears in ratio images involving the 1.59 and 2.03 ??m images north of the Huygens landing site. Although pure water ice cannot be the only component exposed at Titan's surface, this area is consistent with a local enrichment in exposed water ice and seems to be consistent with DISR/Huygens images and spectra interpretations. The images show also a morphological structure that can be interpreted as a 150 km diameter impact crater with a central peak. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cassini VIMS 0.9-5.1 Micron Spectra of the Small Inner Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Hicks, M. D.; Bauer, J. M.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filaccione, G.; Mosher, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The small satellites of Saturn are a family of objects with unique properties. They include the coorbitals Janus and Epimetheus; Pan with an orbit within the main ring system; Atlas, which orbits directly outside the A-ring; and the remote captured small satellites. Visible and infrared reflection spectra were obtained for the first time for 6 of the inner small satellites by the Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). This instrument has 352 channels spanning the 0.35-5.1 spectral range and with spatial resolution up to 0.25 mradians in the infrared. The new VIMS spectra suggest that the surfaces of these satellites are composed almost entirely of water ice. This finding is consistent with their high geometric albedos in the visible and near-IR. Differences in the water-ice band positions in their spectra are related to particle size differences on their surfaces. The spectra of the Tethys Lagrangians (Telesto and Calypso) are nearly identical to that of Tethys, with strong ice absorption bands and no evidence for the presence of other volatiles. Surprisingly, the spectra of Janus and Epimetheus are significantly different: the slope of Janus from 0.9 to 1.2 microns is unlike that of Epimetheus and water ice. These results suggest that Janus may have undergone a recent collision which knocked water-ice particles from its surface to reveal native materials. Our results suggest that the inner satellites are covered with ice particles from Saturn's ring system, particularly the distended E-ring, which ultimately originates from the plumes of Enceladus. Thus, the spectrum of Janus offers a unique opportunity to understand the provenance and nature of the small inner icy satellites of Saturn. Funded by NASA

  2. Saturn's B Ring and Cassini Division from Cassini RSS, VIMS, and UVIS Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard; Colwell, Joshua; Nicholson, Phillip; Hedman, Matthew; Marouf, Essam; Rappaport, Nicole J.; McGhee, Colleen; Batista, A.; de Silva, A.; Flores, S.; Geiling, N.; Graves, K.; Guo, L.; Kee, L. Huang. Y.; Larson, K.; Moreno, J.; Mowla, L.; Nelson, E.; Pang, Z.; Sanchez, T.; Stephens, K.; Strother, C.; Judd, K.; Snyderman, R.; Stroud, D.; Youngblood, A.

    Saturn's B ring demarcates the inner edge of the dynamically fascinating Cassini Division, replete with eccentric and circular ringlets and gaps. We present kinematical models for ringlets and gaps in the Cassini Division, and the outer edge of the B ring, from more than 100 individual Cassini occultations using RSS, VIMS, and UVIS instruments. Recent investigations of the B ring outer edge and Cassini Division features, using two decades of Earth-based and spacecraft occultation measurements, show hints of regularity amidst the complexity of the region. Hedman et al. (2010), using Cassini VIMS stellar occultation data and Cassini RSS and historical data from French et al. (2010), found a quasi-regular spacing of ringlets and gaps, with inner edges of gaps measurably non-circular and outer edges nearly circular. They proposed a dynamical mechanism whereby the non-circular B ring edge resonantly controls the structure of the Cassini Division gaps. The shape of the B ring edge is dominated by an m=2 mode, controlled by Mimas, although the dynamical interaction is still poorly understood. Cassini ISS images show the presence of multiple modes, possibly transient (Spitale et al. 2010). The long time series of the present data set, densely sampling the Cassini orbital tour from 2005-2009, coupled with the Voyager 1 and 2 data from 1980 and 1981, the widely-observed 28 Sgr stellar occultation of 1989, and Hubble Space Telescope stellar occultations in 1991 and 1995, provide the opportunity to determine the orbital elements and precession rates of the non-circular Cassini Division features, and to compare multi-mode libration and circulation models for the B ring edge. These are essential ingredients for detailed tests of dynamical models for the structure of the Cassini Division and its possible connection to the B ring.

  3. First report of VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Maroui, Itto; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Aboulkacem, Asmae; Ouarrak, Khadija; Sbiti, Mohammed; Louzi, Housssain; Timinouni, Mohammed; Belhaj, Abdelhaq

    2016-03-01

    The emergence and the rapid spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying carbapenemases represent a serious threat to public health due to their delicate therapy. This work was performed to establish the resistance profile and to detect carbapenemases producing in 123 P. aeruginosa isolates. Among these 55 are environmental isolates and 68 are from the two major hospitals of Meknes-Tafilalet region in Morocco. All strains were tested against 14 antipseudomonal drugs by disc diffusion method. On carbapenem resistant strains minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem were determined by the E-test method. The modified Hodge test and EDTA tests were used for the detection of carbapenemases and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), respectively. PCR and DNA sequencing were conducted to detect carbapenemase-encoding genes and the enzyme types. 12% of isolates was susceptible to all antibiotics tested and Carbapenem resistance was observed in 33 P. aeruginosa isolates, 33.3% of them were multi-drug resistant. Among carbapenem resistant strains only two (6.1%) were positive for carbapenemases and also for MBLs. In addition to their resistance to almost all β-lactams tested, the MBLs producing strains were resistant to aminoglycosides. Molecular biology techniques confirmed the phenotypic results obtained for the two strains carbapenemase producers and demonstrated that each one of them carried blaVIM-2. The present study reports the first isolation of blaVIM genes in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Morocco. Such isolates represent a serious emerging threat requiring strict hygiene measures to better control their spread.

  4. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  5. Vertical structure mapping of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS-V data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Adriani, Alberto; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Liberti, Gian Luigi

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North springtime hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe, starting from May 2011, and it was still present in the December 2012 observations In this work we have analyzed the data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V). VIMS-V operates in the spectral range 350 - 1050 nm with a nominal spectral resolution of 7.3 nm and a nominal angular resolution of 500 μrad. Spectral data have been first analyzed by a forward radiative transfer model based on the LibRadtran code, then an inverse model has used to retrieve microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds overlying the vortex. The forward model relies on the assumptions of a plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, the Mie theory to compute single scattering properties and the molecular scattering adapted to Saturn’s atmosphere. The inverse code is based on the optimal estimation technique, it is robust and capable to handle several free parameters at a time. The best fits to the observed radiance spectra are obtained by means of a least square analysis, in which the cost function is minimized taking advantage of the Gauss-Newton method. Applying this procedure, we produced spatial maps for each of the free parameters, including: effective radii for the particles size distributions of each cloud or aerosol deck; total number densities of the particles; and top pressures of each deck. In this work we focused on the data retrieved by VIMS on August 2011. We plan to extend the analysis on data retrieved months later, to map the evolution the parameters undergo in time. The analysis extension to the range 1.0-5.0 micron, covered by the infrared channel of VIMS (VIMS-IR) is also planned.

  6. Dispersal of Carbapenemase blaVIM-1 Gene Associated with Different Tn402 Variants, Mercury Transposons, and Conjugative Plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Tato, Marta; Coque, Teresa M.; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of blaVIM-1 within four different genetic platforms from distinct Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an area with a low prevalence of metallo-β-lactamase producers is reported. Forty-three VIM-1-producing isolates (including 19 Enterobacter cloacae, 2 Escherichia coli, and 2 P. aeruginosa isolates, 18 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, and 2 Klebsiella oxytoca isolate) recovered from 2005 to 2007 and corresponding to 15 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types were studied. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates corresponded to a hospital outbreak, and the P. aeruginosa isolates were sporadically recovered. The genetic context of the integrons carrying blaVIM-1 (arbitrarily designated types A, B, C, and D) was characterized by PCR mapping based on known Tn402 and mercury transposons and further sequencing. Among Enterobacteriaceae isolates, blaVIM-1 was part of integrons located either in an In2-Tn402 element linked to Tn21 (type A; In110-blaVIM-1-aacA4-aadA1) or in a Tn402 transposon lacking the whole tni module [type B; In113-blaVIM-1-aacA4-dhfrII (also called dfrB1)-aadA1-catB2] and the transposon was associated with an IncHI2 or IncI1 plasmid, respectively. Among P. aeruginosa isolates, blaVIM-1 was part of a new gene cassette array located in a defective Tn402 transposon carrying either tniBΔ3 and tniA (type C; blaVIM-1-aadA1) or tniC and ΔtniQ (type D; blaVIM-1-aadB), and both Tn402 variants were associated with conjugative plasmids of 30 kb. The dissemination of blaVIM-1 was associated with different genetic structures and bacterial hosts, depicting a complex emergence and evolutionary network scenario in our facility, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Knowledge of the complex epidemiology of blaVIM-1 is necessary to control this emerging threat. PMID:19901094

  7. blaVIM-2 Cassette-Containing Novel Integrons in Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida Isolates Disseminated in a Korean Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Lim, Jong Back; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Chong, Yunsop; Kim, June Myung; Livermore, David M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and genetic properties of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas isolates collected at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea since 1995. The prevalence of imipenem resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates reached 16% in 1997, when 9% of the resistant organisms were found to produce VIM-2 β-lactamase, a class B enzyme previously found only in P. aeruginosa isolates from Europe. VIM-2-producing isolates of Pseudomonas putida were also detected. Resistance was transferable from both these species to P. aeruginosa PAO4089Rp by filter mating, although the resistance determinant could not be found on any detectable plasmid. Serotyping showed that many of the VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to serotypes O:11 and O:12, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNA revealed that many had identical profiles, whereas the P. putida isolates were diverse. Sequencing showed that the blaVIM-2 genes resided as cassettes in class 1 integrons. In contrast to previous VIM-encoding integrons, the integron sequenced from a P. aeruginosa isolate had blaVIM located downstream of a variant of aacA4. blaVIM also lay in a class 1 integron in a representative P. putida strain, but the organization of this integron was different from that sequenced from the P. aeruginosa strain. In conclusion, the metallo-β-lactamase produced by these imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas isolates was VIM-2, and the accumulation of producers reflected clonal dissemination as well as horizontal spread. Strict measures are required in order to control a further spread of resistance. PMID:11897589

  8. Emergence of sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae coproducing NDM-1 and VIM-1 metallo-β-lactamases in a Greek hospital.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, C C; Malli, E; Florou, Z; Sarrou, S; Hrabak, J; Mantzarlis, K; Zakynthinos, E; Petinaki, E

    2017-03-01

    Sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae, coproducing NDM-1 and VIM-1 metallo-β-lactamases, were isolated in a Greek hospital. blaNDM-1 was part of a Tn125 derivative, located on an ~90-kb plasmid similar to the NDM-1-encoding plasmid pB-3002cz. blaVIM-1 was located in an In-e541-like integron, carried on a multireplicon (IncA/C and IncR) plasmid of ~180kb.

  9. Multiclonal spread of VIM-1-producing Enterobacter cloacae isolates associated with In624 and In488 integrons located in an IncHI2 plasmid.

    PubMed

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Brañas, Patricia; Orellana, M Angeles; Otero, Joaquín R; Chaves, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Over a 6-year period (2007-2012), the emergence of Enterobacter cloacae isolates resistant to β-lactams and with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems was observed in Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre (Madrid, Spain). To determine the possible role of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in the resistance profile of these isolates, a molecular and clinical epidemiological study was performed, including determination of patients' clinical characteristics, genetic diversity of strains, resistance mechanisms to carbapenems, and the genetic environment of VIM-1. A total of 73 E. cloacae isolates showed resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and reduced susceptibility to at least one carbapenem during 2007-2012. PCR amplification revealed the presence of bla(VIM-1) gene in 37 isolates, bla(VIM-2) in 1 isolate and bla(KPC) in 5 isolates. Molecular typing showed high clonal diversity of E. cloacae isolates carrying bla(VIM-1). The genetic environment of bla(VIM-1) was investigated and two integron structures were found: intI-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-dfrB1-aadA1-catB2-qacEΔ1/sul1 (In624); and intI-bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-aadA1-qacEΔ1/sul1 (In488). Isolates belonging to three clones (A, F and G) harboured different types of integron (In624 or In488) despite belonging to the same clone. Conjugal experiments showed an association with a conjugative plasmid of ca. 300 kb belonging to IncHI2 group, which is common in Spanish hospitals, suggesting that the widespread dissemination of bla(VIM-1) may be due to horizontal transfer of mobile genetic determinants rather than the result of spreading of a few clones. These results have implications for infection control programmes in the hospital.

  10. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  11. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  12. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae harbouring blaKPC-3 and blaVIM-2 from central Italy.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Mariagrazia; Bottoni, Carlo; Grimaldi, Alessandro; Segatore, Bernardetta; Celenza, Giuseppe; Mariani, Maurizio; Bellio, Pierangelo; Frascaria, Patrizia; Amicosante, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    The frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae is increasing in Italian hospitals and poses an emerging threat to the management of infections in hospitalized patients. In this study, we report a detailed molecular characterization of a K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae KP1/11 isolate from the decubitus ulcer of a hospitalized patient with a serious infection. K. pneumoniae KP1/11 produces KPC-3 and VIM-2 β-lactamases. The bla(KPC-3) gene is harbored in a large plasmid in a complex structure of Tn3-based transposon, Tn4401a. The chromosomal DNA of K. pneumoniae harbored also 2 class 1 integrons with different variable regions: 1) orfD-aacA8; 2) aacA29-bla(VIM-2).

  13. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  14. Saturn's Regional and Global Cloud Properties from Cassini/VIMS 4.5-5.1 Micron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Baines, K. H.; Momary, T. W.; Orton, G. S.; Roos-Serote, M.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Exploiting a region of Saturn's thermal-IR spectrum between 4.5-5.1 microns where there is a dearth of opacity sources, Cassini/VIMS has revealed a wealth of dynamical phenomena in the 1-4 bar region that are transforming our understanding of the gas giant. Narrow dark lanes and discrete cloud features are observed in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. The NEMESIS optimal-estimation retrieval algorithm (Irwin et al., JSQRT, 2008) is used to model the 4.5-5.1 micron region using the correlated-k approximation. We determine (a) the sensitivity and correlations associated with determinations of cloud properties and gaseous composition from the Cassini/VIMS dataset; (b) the meridional variation in opacity sources (a multi-layer cloud model, the abundances of phosphine and arsine); (c) the contribution of the thermal and reflected components to VIMS spectra and (d) the spatial variability of opacity sources associated with Saturn's string of pearls and ribbon wave features in the northern hemisphere. The meridional gradients in composition are compared to the Cassini/CIRS derivations of phosphine at higher altitudes (pressures less than 1 bar; Fletcher et al., Icarus, 2009). The seasonal origin of the north-south asymmetry in 5-micron opacity (Baines et al., BAAS, 2006) and the dynamical motions associated with Saturn's complex zonal wave activity will be discussed. The vertical distribution of cloud opacity demonstrates the necessity for aerosols at the 2-3 bar level to successfully replicate the VIMS data. Finally, we search Cassini/CIRS mapping observations at 15.0 cm-1 resolution for mid-IR counterparts (0.1-0.5 bar) to the zonal wave activity in the deeper troposphere (1-4 bars) to investigate the vertical coupling in Saturn's troposphere.

  15. Clonal Spread of Colistin-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Coproducing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Neonates at a Tunisian University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Battikh, Hajer; Harchay, Chiraz; Dekhili, Amal; Khazar, Khaoula; Kechrid, Fehima; Zribi, Meriem; Masmoudi, Afef; Fendri, Chedlia

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we have attempted to report the first clonal spread of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae coproducing KPC and VIM carbapenemases in the neonatal unit of Rabta Teaching Hospital of Tunis (Tunisia). This retrospective study was performed from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 in the Microbiology Laboratory at the Rabta University Hospital of Tunis. Twenty-one nonreplicate colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae were isolated from 19 patients hospitalized in the neonatal unit and 2 patients in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). Most of the strains were isolated from invasive specimens. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR analysis and nucleotide sequencing of the blaKPC and blaVIM genes were performed. Mortality was reported in 92% of cases. All the strains were resistant to colistin (minimum inhibitory concentration [MICs] ranged from 8 to 12 mg/L). The MICs for imipenem of K. pneumoniae isolates ranged from 3 to 256 mg/L for 13 strains that were characterized as intermediate or resistant. The MICs for ertapenem were higher than 32 mg/L for the 19 resistant strains. All the isolates were sensitive to tigecycline and chloramphenicol. PFGE analysis revealed two clones (I and II). Twenty of the 21 colistin-resistant, carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to clone I. Only one strain was related to clone II. PCR analysis and nucleotide sequencing revealed that the 20 isolates belonged to clone I, coproduced the blaKPC and blaVIM genes. A single strain (clone II), which was isolated in the ICU, did not produce KPC and VIM carbapenemases. All strains did not produce OXA-48.

  16. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  17. Spread and persistence of VIM-1 Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in three German swine farms in 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jennie; San José, Mateo; Roschanski, Nicole; Schmoger, Silvia; Baumann, Beatrice; Irrgang, Alexandra; Friese, Anika; Roesler, Uwe; Helmuth, Reiner; Guerra, Beatriz

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in livestock is considered as a threat for public health. In Germany, VIM-1-producing Escherichia (E.) coli sequence type (ST) 88 and Salmonella Infantis isolates harbouring blaVIM-1IncHI2 plasmids have been isolated from swine and poultry farms. A retrospective study was performed to determine if there was a broader distribution of VIM-1-positive isolates in any of the carbapenemase-positive swine farms. Selective incubation (carbapenem-containing broth) of 249 conserved cultures collected in three farms (2011-2012), allowed the detection of 40 blaVIM-1-positive isolates. Apart from the already known non-motile Salmonella Infantis isolate R25 (farm S1) and R27 (S2), a third isolate was recovered from farm S3. For E. coli, additional to isolates R29 and R178 (S2), 35 new isolates were identified in the same farm during all the sampling periods (three dates, 2011) and in samples from different animals, farm environment, manure and flies. The newly identified E. coli and Salmonella isolates showed similar genetic and phenotypic characteristics (XbaI-PFGE profiles, antimicrobial resistance patterns, plasmid content, phylogroups, antigenic formula) to those in the previously described strains, suggesting microevolution within the clonal lines within one fattening period. The study shows that persistence of carbapenemase-producing clonal lines in livestock farms is possible, and underlines the need for harmonised monitoring and surveillance studies to follow up the occurrence of such bacteria in European livestock.

  18. Titan's cloud seasonal activity from winter to spring with Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Burgalat, J.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Since Saturn orbital insertion in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has been observing Titan throughout most of the northern winter season (October 2002-August 2009) and the beginning of spring, allowing a detailed monitoring of Titan's cloud coverage at high spatial resolution with close flybys on a monthly basis. This study reports on the analysis of all the near-infrared images of Titan's clouds acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during 67 targeted flybys of Titan between July 2004 and April 2010.The VIMS observations show numerous sporadic clouds at southern high and mid-latitudes, rare clouds in the equatorial region, and reveal a long-lived cloud cap above the north pole, ubiquitous poleward of 60??N. These observations allow us to follow the evolution of the cloud coverage during almost a 6-year period including the equinox, and greatly help to further constrain global circulation models (GCMs). After 4. years of regular outbursts observed by Cassini between 2004 and 2008, southern polar cloud activity started declining, and completely ceased 1. year before spring equinox. The extensive cloud system over the north pole, stable between 2004 and 2008, progressively fractionated and vanished as Titan entered into northern spring. At southern mid-latitudes, clouds were continuously observed throughout the VIMS observing period, even after equinox, in a latitude band between 30??S and 60??S. During the whole period of observation, only a dozen clouds were observed closer to the equator, though they were slightly more frequent as equinox approached. We also investigated the distribution of clouds with longitude. We found that southern polar clouds, before disappearing in mid-2008, were systematically concentrated in the leading hemisphere of Titan, in particular above and to the east of Ontario Lacus, the largest reservoir of hydrocarbons in the area. Clouds are also non-homogeneously distributed with longitude at southern mid

  19. Epidemiology and virulence of VIM-4 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients in eastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Meradji, Samah; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bentakouk, Mohamed Cherif; Nayme, Kaotar; Zerouali, Khalid; Mazouz, Dekhil; Chettibi, Houria; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) in burn patients from eastern Algeria, CRPA virulence factors and the molecular epidemiology of CRPA. The overall prevalence of CRPA was 48.38%. Seven (46.66%) isolates were metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) producers and contained the MBL genes blaVIM-4 (n=6) and blaVIM-2 (n=1). Risk factors for CRPA infection were urinary catheter use and intubation (p=0.008). A high percentage of virulence factors (86.6% of these isolates were able to produce protease; 73.3% of isolates has DNase; and 66.6% were haemolysin positive) was observed in CRPA isolates. Among the seven MBL-producing isolates, four had the same clonal profile. The class 1 integrons, which contained the aadA7 gene cassette, were detected in six isolates. The 16SrRNA methylase gene, rmtB, was detected in one strain. All CRPA isolates were biofilm formers. A study on the kinetics of biofilm production revealed that biofilm production increased when the concentration of imipenem or ciprofloxacin and the incubation time increased. This is the first study to report the presence of VIM-4-producing P. aeruginosa from North Africa and also of the high prevalence of CRPA isolates. Based on our study of burn unit patients, the high percentage of P. aeruginosa with virulence factors and multi-drug resistance is alarming.

  20. Cassini VIMS Spectra of the Earth from Saturn Orbit: an Extrasolar Planet Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roger Nelson; Hedman, Matthew M.; Brown, Robert H.; Filacchione, Gianrico; Nicholson, Philip D.; Barnes, Jason W.

    2015-11-01

    Cassini VIMS has obtained spectra of the Earth while in Saturn orbit making observations of the Saturn system when the sun was behind Saturn. The observations, made in September 15, 2006 and July 19, 2013 are visible-near-infrared spectra (0.35 - 5.1 microns) of the Earth obtained at the furthest distance from the sun to date. The Earth was sub-pixel, 0.0088 milliradian in 2013 and 0.0085 milliradian in 2006, and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. A VIMS pixel IFOV is 0.25 x 0.5milliradian. As such, these data are likely representative of the first spectra that might be obtained of extrasolar terrestrial-like planets. What information can be derived from such remote observations? The observation made in 2013 had a phase angle of 97 degrees with multipleimage cubes providing a higher S/N average. The 2006 observation was made at a phase angle of 33 degrees but is a single cube, 1 pixel. The 2006 observation has Africa dominant on the disk, while the 2013 observation is mostly ocean with part of South America in sunlight. The 2013 visible data show clear signatures of Rayleigh scattering but this blue coloring can be from both the atmosphere and/or ocean. The 2006 data show a flatter spectrum, a signature of land. Both observations include the Moon in the field of view. The 0.35-2.5 micron spectral range shows significant absorption due to H2O liquid + gas. The thermal signature is very strong with the highest S/N of the entire spectrum. The best fit preliminary temperatures are 280 K with a small 380 K component (from the Moon), putting at least some of the planet in the goldilocks zone. There is strong absorption by CO2 at 4.25 microns in both 2013 and 2006 data. There is possible detection of chlorophyll and oxygen emission but higher S/N would be required for a positive detection. The spectral profile of the thermal emission could be used to constrain the diameter of the planet. If such spectra were obtained of an extrasolar planet, we could conclude that the

  1. The Sleepy Anticyclonic Eye of the Great Storm on Saturn as seen by Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, Kevin; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    The Great Storm that erupted at 34o N on Saturn in late 2010 obliterated the String of Pearls feature in that region and left a lasting remnant - a clear 5-μm bright zone around the entire globe inhabited by a lone anticyclone that persists to the present time. We have observed this enduring oval with Cassini/VIMS since 2011 and note that it exhibits a somewhat latitudinally oscillatory nature as it bobs in Saturn's zonal currents. Centered at 35.9o planetocentric latitude in May 2011, it drifted northward to 37.8o in 2012, floated near 37o through 2013, settled as far south as ~36.5o in 2014, bobbed northward to ~37o in 2015, and now appears to reside at about ~36.3o in early 2016. It has also periodically bumped up against the dark band above it, spinning off material in 2013 and 2015. We measured a prograde zonal drift speed of ~22 m/s in 2012, increasing as much as 60% through 2013, then relaxing back to a more moderate ~15 m/s in 2014 and 2015. Early indications are that it has slowed considerably in 2016 to about ~4.7 m/s, which would be the slowest drift rate we've yet measured for it, but still consistent with the Voyager Wind Profile for this region. The feature has varied in size over time as it spins, spanning 4.9o x 3.2o in 2011, elongating to 7.3o x 2.9o by 2013, contracting to 5.5o x 2.9o in 2014, enlarging again to ~9o x ~4o in 2015, and currently averaging ~6.6o x ~3.5o in 2016. It currently is symmetrically oval in shape. It has varied in terms of cloudiness, being ~ 90% 5-μm dark (obscured) in 2011, whereas by 2013 it was mostly bright (clear) with a thin dark edge, returning to ~90% dark in 2015, and currently about 98% obscured. We have used night observations to isolate thermal flux, and found that the mean 5-μm flux coming from the anticyclone has diminished steadily by about 50% since 2013. We are monitoring this trend. The entire storm latitude of ~34o N itself has remained persistently 5-μm bright since 2011, but is slowly dimming as it

  2. Equatorial belt of Titan: Aaru Region as seen by VIMS/Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Brossier, Jeremy; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Jaumann, Ralf; Brown, Robert H.

    2016-10-01

    Since eleven years of observation, near-infrared imaging data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini1 reveal a variety of surface units that are compositionally and structurally distinct2, 3. The analysis of these units enables constraining the surface composition of Titan, which is of prime importance for modelling Titan's interior, surface, and atmosphere, particularly in the search for an endogenic methane source. For this study, we investigate a selection of units of interest seen in VIMS data by comparatively applying an empirical correction4, 5 and a radiative transfer code6-8 in order to correct for atmospheric contributions and retrieve surface albedo. SAR swaths from the Radar instrument are also used for geomorphological mapping purposes. We focus on the region of Aaru, located in the equatorial belt and centered at 10°N and 340°W, where several geological features have been identified: (1) infrared-brown dunes material; (2) a strongly eroded impact crater named Paxsi9 (3) mountainous and infrared-bright plateaus; and (4) infrared-blue areas devoid of dunes (similar to those seen in other regions probably enriched in water-ice, such as Chusuk Planitia10). By using our radiative transfer model, we estimate the surface albedo of regions of our interest within different infrared units of the Aaru region and compare with spectra of surface candidates, starting with water-ice and tholins. As seen in the similar study over Sinlap crater and its surroundings11, this method of analysis allows understanding of the compositional and structural relations between the different spectral units.References: 1 Brown, R. H. et al. (2005) SSR. 2 Barnes, J. W. et al. (2007) Icarus, 186 (1). 3 Soderblom, L. A. et al. (2007) PSS, 55 (13). 4 Cornet, T. et al. (2012) Icarus, 218 (2). 5 Le Mouélic, S. et al. (2012) PSS, 73 (1). 6 Hirtzig, M. et al. (2013) Icarus, 226 (1). 7 Solomonidou, A. et al. (2014) JGR, 119 (8). 8 Maltagliati, L. et al

  3. The Polar Winds of Saturn as Determined by Cassini/VIMS: Seasonally Variable or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.; Cassini/VIMS Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The high inclination of Cassini's current orbit allows VIMS to once again obtain spectacular views of Saturn’s poles, not seen since 2008. We present new imagery and investigate the effect of seasonal variability on Saturn’s polar winds. The north pole now basks in spring daylight and we again observe the long-enduring northern Polar Hexagon, discovered in Voyager imagery by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988). This feature seemed to stay fixed in a rotational system defined by the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch & Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253-256, 1981) in both original Voyager and 2008 VIMS observations. Yet new images indicate a shift, with the hexagon rotating ~10° of longitude from Nov. 2012 to May 2013. Discrete clouds still race around the edges of the 5-μm-bright hexagon at speeds of ~100 m/s, as we observed in 2008 (Baines, Momary, et al., Plan. Space. Sci 57, 1671-1681, 2009). We also recover a massive storm system residing just inside the hexagon edge at ~80° N. lat. Since 2008, this storm has shifted poleward by 1.5° and turned 5 μm dark (cloudy), where it was 5 μm bright when last observed (i.e. cloud free). It now moves zonally faster at ~25 m/s vs. ~14 m/s in 2008. This enduring "shepherd" storm may force and maintain the hexagon shape. We also recover twin 5-μm-dark storms (Snake Eyes) moving slowly at ~15 m/s near 67° N lat. However, while the two features appear to maintain a relatively constant zonal separation on average (14° ), with the trailing feature remaining near 67° N lat., the leading storm appears to oscillate ~1° in latitude and drift in longitude. At the south pole, discrete clouds whirl, now in darkness, around a hurricane-like vortex consisting of a cloudless "eye" extending at least 1 bar deeper than surrounding rings of clouds. These clouds still appear to be moving as a classical vortex with winds reaching a maximum of ~200 m/s near 87° S lat. and then falling off to zero at the pole. In contrast

  4. Spectroscopic Identification of E-Ring Deposits on Enceladus Using Cassini-Vims Dat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, F.; Schenk, P.; Tosi, F.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus' surface is composed mostrly of pure water ice. The Cassini spacecraft has observed present-day geologic activity at the moon's South Polar region (the so-called "Tiger Stripes"). Plumes of micron-sized particles composed of water ice and other contaminants (CO2, NH3, CH4) erupting from this region are the major source of Saturn's E-ring. Some of this material, however, falls on Enceladus' surface to form deposits that extend to the north at ~220°E and ~40°E and whose highest concentration is at the south pole. The Cassini VIMS spectrometer acquires hyperspectral data in the 0.3-5.1 μm spectral range. We selected VIMS cubes of Enceladus in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm), and minimized photometric effects due to different illumination conditions by normalizing all spectra at 2.23 μm. We aim to identify E-ring deposits across Enceladus' surface through the variation in band depth of the main water-ice spectral features located at 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 μm. Since plumes deposits on the surface undergo darkening processes for less time than surrounding terrains, they appear brighter and so the water-ice absorption bands must be deeper. For all pixels in the selected cubes, we measured the band depths for the main water-ice absorptions and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak, whose value relates to grain size. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths across Enceladus, we divided the surface into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell. This approach clearly identifies plums deposits. As expected, the highest concentrations occur at Enceladus' south pole, where band depths values are the deepest across the entire moon's surface. Our results confirm that plume particles fall in north-oriented patterns at ~40°E and ~220°E, and disappear around ~0°E and ~180°E. In addition, we observed a possible non-plume related regional variation in all major water ice absorption bands on the leading

  5. Investigations of Saturn’s Main Rings over Broad Range of Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Showalter, Mark; Pilorz, Stu; Brooks, Shawn; Ciarniello, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    An abundance of information about the characteristics of Saturn’s ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by comparing the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation.CIRS temperatures, ISS colors and UVIS brightness appear to vary noticeably with phase angle, but are not a strong function of spacecraft elevation angle. Color, temperature and brightness dependence on solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the infrared ice absorption band depths change with the solar phase angle, in particular between 0-20° and at high phase. This trend indicates that single scattering approximation is correct only at low phases (<20°) while at high phase multiple scattering must be taken into account.These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith, as well as scattering between individual particles or clumps in a many-particle-thick layer. Initial results from our joint studies will be presented.This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  6. Triple wavelength monitor PDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Deukhee; Ha, Chang-woo; Shin, Sang-cheol; Kwon, Kyoung-soo; Ko, Joo-yul; Kang, Shin-jae

    2006-08-01

    Recently the demand for high-capacity optical storage systems compatible with CD, DVD, and Blue is growing. We designed the Vertical NIP photodiode with a diameter of 700um and the trans-impedance circuits by using 0.6um BiCMOS process. The measured sensitivity of the photodiode is 0.25, 0.42, and 0.48A/W for 405, 650, and 780nm wavelength lights, respectively. The capacitance of the PD is 4.5pF. Monitor PDIC for detecting triple wavelength lights is presented in this paper. The complete monitor PDIC with the NIP photodiode of 700um in diameter occupies 1900um*1200um. -3dB bandwidth is 110MHz and the temperature drift of output voltage is 3.2%.

  7. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  8. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    PubMed

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  9. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Edmund YS; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation. PMID:17343764

  10. Evaluation of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Production and Carriage of bla-VIM Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mahmood; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Pourbabaee, Mohammad; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase-production among Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has become a challenge for treatment of infections due to these resistant bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the metallo-β-lactamase-production and carriage of bla-VIM genes among carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to July 2015. One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from 600 patients with burn wound infections treated at Imam-Musa-Kazem Hospital in Isfahan city, Iran. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened by disk diffusion using CLSI guidelines. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using an imipenem-EDTA double disk synergy test (EDTA-IMP DDST). For detection of MBL genes including bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and sequencing were used. Results Among the 150 P. aeruginosa isolates, 144 (96%) were resistant to imipenem by the disk diffusion method, all of which were identified as metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates by EDTA-IMP DDST. Twenty-seven (18%) and 8 (5.5%) MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates harbored bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes, respectively. Conclusions Our findings showed a high occurrence of metallo-β-lactamase production among P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patient infections in our region. Also, there are P. aeruginosa isolates carrying the bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes in Isfahan province. PMID:28144604

  11. Millimeter wavelength thermographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Cacak, R K; Winans, D E; Edrich, J; Hendee, W R

    1981-01-01

    Two new types of thermographic instruments sensitive to millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation have been designed, constructed, and tested. These instruments utilize wavelengths that are three orders of magnitude longer and much more penetrating than those used in conventional infrared thermography. The instruments are capable of detecting apparent thermal variations as small as a fraction of a degree existing at tissue depths of several millimeters below the skin. By comparison, conventional IR thermographic units are limited to sampling radiation emitted only from the surface. The millimeter wave thermographic units are designed to contribute to the clinical detection of breast abnormalities with the specific aim of accurately and noninvasively detecting breast cancer.

  12. Suggested isosbestic wavelength calibration in clinical analyses.

    PubMed

    Hoxter, G

    1979-01-01

    I recommend the use of isosbestic points for conveniently checking the wavelength scale of spectrophotometers in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Colorimetric pH indicators, hemoglobin derivatives, and other radiation-absorbing substances that are convertible into stable isomers of different absorption spectra provide a means for calibrating many different wavelengths by comparing the absorptivities of these isomers in equimolar solutions. The method requires no special precautions and results are independent of substance concentration and temperature between 4 and 45 degrees C. Isosbestic calibration may be important for (e.g.) coenzyme-dependent dehydrogenase activity determinations and in quality assurance programs.

  13. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  14. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  15. Constraints on the Variability of the Tropospheric Methane Abundance on Titan from Cassini VIMS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Penteado F.; Griffith, C.; VIMS Team

    2006-09-01

    Titan's methane cycles between the atmosphere and the surface, similarly to the hydrological cycle on Earth, as its frequently observed clouds and surface fluvial features indicate. With the constant loss of methane due to photolysis, a surface source is needed to preserve the current high methane abundance in the atmosphere. However, no liquid surfaces or active volcanism have been identified so far, so that the surface branch of Titan's hydrological cycle and its interaction with the atmosphere are yet largely unconstrained. The lack of large liquid surfaces and the preferential occurence of the methane clouds in small areas in the south suggest that the methane distribution on Titan's troposphere might be highly variable, confining the clouds to regions near the surface sources. We present Cassini VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) observations of the 0.64µm methane band, and the constraints on the spatial variation of methane abundance derived from it. The depth of the band is sensitive to the methane as well as the scattering of light by the haze, which increases the apparent methane optical depth. In order to separate the effect of variation in the methane abundance to that of the haze, we compare the methane band depth to the haze optical depth. We find that the band increases to the south of Titan's equator, independently from the haze variation. To quantify the methane variation, we reproduce the observed spectra with radiative transfer models based on the haze properties and vertical distribution at the equatorial region derived by the Huygens DISR (Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer) team. We find that the band is most sensitive to the higher troposphere and the methane abundance at 20-40 km altitude. We present constraints on the latitudinal distribution of haze, tropospheric methane, and discuss their uncertainties.

  16. Constrains on the nature of Titan's surface from Cassini/VIMS and RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Drossart, Pierre; Schmitt, Bernard; Philippe, Sylvain; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert; Bratsolis, Emannuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Cassini remote-sensing instruments for more than 10 years now and in situ by the Huygens instruments back in 2005. For the surface, the presence of diverse terrains in terms of morphology and composition suggest both exogenic and endogenic processes to be at play. In this study, we investigate the surface and atmospheric contributions from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range and the RADAR/SAR data for the distinction of geomorphological units. We focus here on those units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1; 2] and Malaska et al. (2015) [3]: mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and the areas previously suggested to have experienced change such as the possible cryovolcanic and evaporite features (Barnes et al. 2013; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015) [4; 5; 6]. With the use of a recently updated radiative transfer code, we evaluate the atmospheric contribution and extract the pure surface albedo information for each region of interest. The extracted albedo shapes and values are then tested against spectra of constituents that are considered to be the best Titan candidate materials, including a very recent library of Titan ice spectra [7]. We find that many of the units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar materials, which help us provide implications on their endogenic or exogenic origin. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the regions that have shown temporal changes are also presented. References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-558, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, in press; [3] Malaska, M., et al. : Icarus, submitted; [4] Barnes, J., et al.: Planetary Science, 2:1, 2013; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [6] Solomonidou, A., et al.: Icarus, in press; [7] Schmitt, B., et al.: GhoSST datacase (ghosst.osug.fr).

  17. The Saturnian satellite Tethys observed by the Cassini-VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Wagner, Roland; Clark, Roger N.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Dalle Ore, Christina; Hansen, Gary B.; Brown, Robert H.; Giese, Bernd; Roatsch, Thomas; Matson, Dennis; Baines, Kevin; Filiacchione, Gianrico; Rodriguez, Sebastian; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Phil D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    In order to further our understanding of the Saturnian system we studied the variations in spectral properties across the surface of Saturn's satellite Tethys using Cassini/VIMS data and their relationships to geological and/or morphological characteristics as seen in the Cassini/ISS images. Despite the spectral dominance of water ice on Tethys' surface distinct spectral variations could be detected, which are surprisingly very different from what was expected from the visible albedo derived from Voyager and Cassini data. The abundance of water ice usually follows the visible surface albedo as seen on many other satellites. Thus, the weakest water ice signature could be also measured on the trailing hemisphere of Tethys, as known from Dione and Rhea [1-3]. The detailed mapping, however, shows a more complex pattern. Two relatively narrow N/S-trending bands, interpreted to be composed of larger ice particle sizes rather than the higher abundance of water ice, separate the Saturn-facing and the anti-Saturnian hemisphere of Tethys. So far, larger ice particles could only be found in geologically young, less weathered portions of the surfaces of the icy Saturnian satellites [2,3]. On Tethys, however, the observed variations might be more complex due to the influence of fine particles from the E-ring coating the surface. In contrast to the prominent graben systems on Dione and Rhea, which show fresh ice exposed on steep walls, no spectral properties could be exclusively associated to Tethys' extended graben system Ithaca Chasma supporting its geologically old age and that its formation was not caused by the impact event that created Odysseus [4]. References: [1] Clark, R. N., et al. (2008), Icarus, 193(2), 372-386. [2] Stephan, K., et al. (2010) Icarus, 206(2), 631-652. [3] Stephan, K. et al. (2012) PSS, 61(1), 142-160. [4] Giese et al., (2007) GRL, 34(21), L21203.

  18. Titan's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS solar occultations: CH4, CO and evidence for C2H6 absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe; de Kok, Remco J.; Sicardy, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the VIMS solar occultations dataset, which allows us to extract vertically resolved information on the characteristics of Titan's atmosphere between ∼100 and 700 km with a vertical resolution of ∼10 km. After a series of data treatment procedures to correct problems in pointing stability and parasitic light, 4 occultations out of 10 are retained. This sample covers different seasons and latitudes of Titan. The transmittances show clearly the evolution of the haze, with the detection of the detached layer at ∼310 km in September 2011 at mid-northern latitudes. Through the inversion of the transmission spectra with a line-by-line radiative transfer code we retrieve the vertical distribution of CH4 and CO mixing ratio. For methane inversion we use its 1.4, 1.7 and 2.3 μm bands. The first two bands are always in good agreement and yield an average stratospheric abundance of 1.28 ± 0.08%, after correcting for forward-scattering effects, with no significant differences between the occultations. This is significantly less than the value of 1.48% obtained by the GCMS/Huygens instrument. We find that the 2.3 μm band cannot be used for the extraction of methane abundance because it is blended with other absorptions, not included in our atmospheric model. The analysis of the residual spectra after the inversion shows that such additional absorptions are present through a great part of the VIMS wavelength range. We attribute many of these bands, including the one at 2.3 μm, to gaseous ethane, whose near-infrared spectrum is not well modeled yet. Ethane also contributes significantly to the strong absorption at 3.2-3.5 μm that was previously attributed only to C-H stretching bands from aerosols. Ethane bands may affect the surface windows too, especially at 2.7 μm. Other residual bands are generated by stretching modes of C-H, C-C and C-N bonds. In addition to the C-H stretch from aliphatic hydrocarbons at 3.4 μm, we detect a strong and

  19. Imaging of a Newly Forming Polar Hood Over The South Pole of Titan By VIMS/Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; West, R. A.; Rannou, P.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Cornet, T.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Since August 2009 equinox, the southern hemisphere of Titan entered in fall. A polar hood corresponding to an area of denser haze appears to be progressively forming right above the south pole of Titan, according to the latest observations made by the optical imaging instruments onboard Cassini spacecraft. This behavior is predicted to occur by the GCMs, when the south pole is progressively entering into darkness with the coming southern winter. We focus here on the observations made by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The newly observed phenomenon clearly appears in hyperspectral images acquired by VIMS during the T83 (22 May 2012), T84 (6 June 2012) and T85 (24 July 2012) targeted flybys. No equivalent feature had been observed before in the entire VIMS data set since the insertion of the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn orbit in July 2004. The altitude of this newly observed polar hood during the T83 observation is higher than 250 km, indicating that it does not correspond to any usual cloud observed so far. The inclined orbit of Cassini has allowed observations of this polar hood on the limb of Titan (T83, T84, T85) with a phase angle less than 36°, and directly from above with a phase angle of 96° during an untargeted flyby on 27 June 2012. A vast polar cloud was observed above the north pole at the beginning of the Cassini mission, but considering that a season on Titan lasts seven years, the feature that is currently forming over the south pole might corresponds to the very first stages of what was observed in the north. The Cassini solstice mission will allow the continuous monitoring of this phenomenon up to 2017.

  20. Search for and limits on plume activity on Mimas, Tethys, and Dione with the Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Faulk, S.P.; Mosher, J.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations of Mimas, Tethys, and Dione obtained during the nominal and extended missions at large solar phase angles were analyzed to search for plume activity. No forward scattered peaks in the solar phase curves of these satellites were detected. The upper limit on water vapor production for Mimas and Tethys is one order of magnitude less than the production for Enceladus. For Dione, the upper limit is two orders of magnitude less, suggesting this world is as inert as Rhea (Pitman, K.M., Buratti, B.J., Mosher, J.A., Bauer, J.M., Momary, T., Brown, R.H., Nicholson, P.D., Hedman, M.M. [2008]. Astrophys. J. Lett. 680, L65-L68). Although the plumes are best seen at ???2.0. ??m, Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) Narrow Angle Camera images obtained at the same time as the VIMS data were also inspected for these features. None of the Cassini ISS images shows evidence for plumes. The absence of evidence for any Enceladus-like plumes on the medium-sized saturnian satellites cannot absolutely rule out current geologic activity. The activity may below our threshold of detection, or it may be occurring but not captured on the handful of observations at large solar phase angles obtained for each moon. Many VIMS and ISS images of Enceladus at large solar phase angles, for example, do not contain plumes, as the active "tiger stripes" in the south pole region are pointed away from the spacecraft at these times. The 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission is scheduled to gather additional measurements at large solar phase angles that are capable of revealing activity on the saturnian moons. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  1. A RT-based Technique for the Analysis and the Removal of Titan's Atmosphere by Cassini/VIMS-IR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Tosi, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Grassi, D.; Oliva, F.; Dinelli, B. M.; Castelli, E.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2004, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), together with the CIRS and UVIS spectrometers, aboard the Cassini spacecraft has provided insight on Saturn and Titan atmospheres through remote sensing observations. The presence of clouds and aerosols in Titan's dense atmosphere makes the analysis of the surface radiation a difficult task. For this purpose, an atmospheric radiative transfer (RT) model is required. The implementation of a RT code, which includes multiple scattering, in an inversion algorithm based on the Bayesian approach, can provide strong constraints about both the surface albedo and the atmospheric composition. The application of this retrieval procedure we have developed to VIMS-IR spectra acquired in nadir or slant geometries allows us to retrieve the equivalent opacity of Titan's atmosphere in terms of variable aerosols and gaseous content. Thus, the separation of the atmospheric and surface contributions in the observed spectrum is possible. The atmospheric removal procedure was tested on the spectral range 1-2.2μm of publicly available VIMS data covering the Ontario Lacus and Ligeia Mare regions. The retrieval of the accurate composition of Titan's atmosphere is a much more complex task. So far, the information about the vertical structure of the atmosphere by limb spectra was mostly derived under conditions where the scattering could be neglected [1,2]. Indeed, since the very high aerosol load in the middle-low atmosphere produces strong scattering effects on the measured spectra, the analysis requires a RT modeling taking into account multiple scattering in a spherical-shell geometry. Therefore the use of an innovative method we are developing based on the Monte-Carlo approach, can provide important information about the vertical distribution of the aerosols and the gases composing Titan's atmosphere.[1]Bellucci et al., (2009). Icarus, 201, Issue 1, p. 198-216.[2]de Kok et al., (2007). Icarus, 191, Issue 1, p. 223-235.

  2. Mapping the Methane and Aerosol Distributions within Titan's Troposphere: Complementing The Cassini/VIMS T90 Flyby of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot

    2012-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is mainly nitrogen gas with several trace constituents, including methane at the few percent level. The presence of methane has been a puzzle for decades, since the CH4 in Titan's atmosphere is expected to be destroyed by UV photolysis in ten million years or so. The source of Titan's atmospheric methane continues to be a major question. We propose a set of three STIS image cubes with the G750M grating at 0.62, 0.72 and 0.89 |*|m methane bands. These bands probe altitudes from the surface to 70 km; unlike CH4 bands at 1.6 or 2.3 |*|m, these cubes will provide a 3-D picture of Titan's troposphere {below 40 km}. The Cassini/VIMS visible channel has not been useful for this purpose for two reasons: its spectral resolution {about R=100} is coarse and its inconsistent background subtraction scheme that can lead to "stripes." HST/STIS resolves Titan's 1" disk into over 80 spatially resolved spectra, each with a spectral resolution greater than R=5000. STIS is a unique tool for mapping the 3-D distributions of CH4 and aerosols in Titan's troposphere.We request observations within a day of the Cassini flyby of Titan on April 5, 2013 around 21:40 UT in order to combine Cassini/VIMS and STIS mage cubes. Together, the visible {STIS} and IR {VIMS} image cubes will probe altitudes from the surface to the stratosphere {several hundred km}. The proposed STIS image cubes will provide the best tropospheric map of CH4 to date, relevant to surface/atmospheric coupling of CH4, latitudinal inhomogeneity of CH4 or aerosols, or the presence of condensates at low altitudes.

  3. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe.

  4. Resistome Analysis of Enterobacter cloacae CY01, an Extensively Drug-Resistant Strain Producing VIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase from China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Wu, Ai-Wu; Su, Dan-Hong; Lin, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Resistome analysis of clinical VIM-1-producing Enterobacter cloacae strain CY01 from China revealed the presence of multiple resistance determinants. Two resistance plasmids were identified in CY01. The pCY-VIM plasmid was 14 kb in size and possessed a replicase gene (repA), a gene cluster encoding the partitioning function (parABC), and a carbapenemase gene (blaVIM-1). Another 5.9-kb plasmid, pCY-MdT, with an aac(6′)-Ib gene, was very closely related (13 nucleotide differences) to pMdT1, a ColE1 plasmid carrying aac(6′)-Ib-cr4. PMID:25114139

  5. Combined disc methods for the detection of KPC- and/or VIM-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae: improving reliability for the double carbapenemase producers.

    PubMed

    Miriagou, V; Tzelepi, E; Kotsakis, S D; Daikos, G L; Bou Casals, J; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2013-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strains co-producing klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) and verona integron-encoded metallo-beta-lactamase (VIM) are frequently isolated in Greece and have also occurred in other European countries. Conventional combined disc tests exhibit low sensitivity against these emerging pathogens. We have evaluated modifications of the KPC/Metallo-β-Lactamase Confirmation kit (ROSCO) exhibiting high diagnostic value against KPC, VIM and KPC + VIM producers. The key changes were the inclusion of additional combined tablets containing meropenem plus two inhibitors (dipicolinic acid (1000 μg per tablet) for metallo-β-lactamases and a boronic acid derivative for KPCs) and the replacement of aminophenylboronic acid by phenylboronic acid (400 μg per tablet).

  6. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  7. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  8. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  9. Coproduction of KPC-18 and VIM-1 Carbapenemases by Enterobacter cloacae: Implications for Newer β-Lactam–β-Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Gina K.; Snyder, James W.; McElheny, Christi L.; Thomson, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain G6809 with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems was identified from a patient in a long-term acute care hospital in Kentucky. G6809 belonged to sequence type (ST) 88 and carried two carbapenemase genes, blaKPC-18 and blaVIM-1. Whole-genome sequencing localized blaKPC-18 to the chromosome and blaVIM-1 to a 58-kb plasmid. The strain was highly resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam. Insidious coproduction of metallo-β-lactamase with KPC-type carbapenemase has implications for the use of next-generation β-lactam–β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. PMID:26719440

  10. Coproduction of KPC-18 and VIM-1 Carbapenemases by Enterobacter cloacae: Implications for Newer β-Lactam-β-Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Gina K; Snyder, James W; McElheny, Christi L; Thomson, Kenneth S; Doi, Yohei

    2016-03-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain G6809 with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems was identified from a patient in a long-term acute care hospital in Kentucky. G6809 belonged to sequence type (ST) 88 and carried two carbapenemase genes, bla(KPC-18) and bla(VIM-1). Whole-genome sequencing localized bla(KPC-18) to the chromosome and bla(VIM-1) to a 58-kb plasmid. The strain was highly resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam. Insidious coproduction of metallo-β-lactamase with KPC-type carbapenemase has implications for the use of next-generation β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations.

  11. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  12. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  13. Titan's mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Drossart, Pierre; Brown, Robert H.; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Bernard; Le Gall, Alice; Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Villanueva, Edward; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the surface of Saturn's moon Titan by means of two Cassini instruments used in synergy. We apply a radiative transfer code to VIMS hyperspectral data to correct the strong atmospheric contribution and extract information on surface composition (Hirtzig et al. 2014; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015). We then put this in the context of terrain morphology by use of denoised Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images (Bratsolis et al. 2012). We examine here the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS, which includes key geological features identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) and Malaska et al. (2015): mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic deposits. We find that many of the different units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar material mixtures. The Huygens landing site and the candidate evaporitic regions are compositionally similar to the variable plains. We also find that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, suggesting the presence of surface activity, while a number of other regions such as Hotei Regio and the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged (Solomonidou et al. 2015). The surface albedo variations, together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features, suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanic processes (with important implications for the satellite's astrobiological potential) as also indicated by recent interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses (Sohl et al. 2014). In previous studies (Lopes et al. 2015; Solomonidou et al. 2015) we showed that a variety of surface processes could be linked to the formation of the various geomorphological units (aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine

  14. Cassini VIMS and RADAR investigation of Titan's equatorial regions: a case for changes in surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Malaska, Michael; Stephan, Katrin; Sotin, Christophe; Drossart, Pierre; Jaumann, Ralf; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Brown, Robert H.

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens instruments revealed that Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has - in many aspects - a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface [1;2;3]. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmosphere interactions, and climate evolution. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse terrains, suggesting exogenic and endogenic processes, whose composition remains largely unknown. Interpreting surface features further requires precise knowledge of the contribution by the dense intervening atmosphere, especially the troposphere, which can be recovered from near-IR data such as those collected by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) collects in the so-called "methane windows". In order to simulate the atmospheric contribution and extract surface information, a statistical tool (PCA) and a radiative transfer code are applied on certain regions of interest (i.e. possibly geologically varying and suggested in some cases to be cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic in origin) [4;5;7]. We also analyze RADAR despeckled SAR images in terms of morphology [6]. For comparison, we also look at undifferentiated plains and dune fields regions that are not expected to change with time. We find that Tui Regio and Sotra Patera change with time becoming darker and brighter respectively in terms of surface albedo while the plains and the suggested evaporitic areas in the equatorial regions do not present any significant change [5]. The surface brightening of Sotra supports a possible internal rather than exogenic origin. The unchanged surface behavior of the plains supports a sedimentary origin rather than cryovolcanic. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the changed regions with time are also presented. We therefore suggest that temporal variations of surface albedo (in chemical composition and/or morphology) exist for some areas

  15. Constraints on the nature of various Titan Geomorphological Units with Cassini/VIMS and SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Schmitt, Bernard; Philippe, Sylvain; Malaska, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Janssen, Michael A.; Le Gall, Alice; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Drossart, Pierre; Brown, Robert H.; Maltagliati, Luca; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the lower atmosphere of Titan from Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) spectro-imaging data by use of a recently updated radiative transfer code in the near-IR range and RADAR/SAR data for the distinction of geomorphological units. We focus here on the geological major units identified in [1;2] and [3]: mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic features (the latter two are albedo features, [4;5;6]). We infer surface properties (like absolute surface albedo and morphology) and atmospheric contributions, in particular the haze content. We find that the Huygens landing site and the candidate evaporitic regions pair compositionally with the variable plains, thus indicating that units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar materials. Similarly for the labyrinth terrains and the undifferentiated plains. On the contrary, many regions from the same geomorphological unit show compositional variations depending on location (i.e. undifferentiated plains). These differences provide implications on the endogenic or exogenic origin of the various units. In previous studies we showed that the processes most likely linked to the formation of the various geomorphological units are aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, and lacustrine, in addition to the deposition of organics through the atmosphere. Currently, we are working on deriving information on the chemical composition of the aforementioned regions from the extracted surface albedos using an extensive library of ices and tholins [e.g. 7]. This will shed light on the potential formation processes (Solomonidou et al. in prep.). Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the regions that have shown temporal changes (i.e. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera; [6]) are also presented.References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-558, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 270, 162-182, 2016; [3] Malaska, M., et al

  16. Titan’s mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Coustenis, Athena; Malaska, Michael; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Drossart, Pierre; Janssen, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert H.; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission instruments have revealed Titan to have a complex and dynamic atmosphere and surface. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse surface terrains in terms of morphology and composition, suggesting both exogenic and endogenic processes [1]. We define both the surface and atmospheric contributions in the VIMS spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range [2]. To complement this dataset, the Cassini RADAR instrument provides additional information on the surface morphology, from which valuable geological interpretations can be obtained [3]. We examine the origin of key Titan terrains, covering the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS. The different geological terrains we investigate include: mountains, plains, labyrinths, craters, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporite features. We have found that the labyrinth terrains and the undifferentiated plains seem to consist of a very similar if not the same material, while the different types of plains show compositional variations [3]. The processes most likely linked to their formation are aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, in addition to the deposition of atmospheric products though the process of photolysis and sedimentation of organics. We show that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions. The surface albedo variations together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanism processes (with important implications for the satellite’s astrobiological potential) as also indicated by new interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses [4]. However, an explanation attributed to exogenic processes is also possible [5]. We will report on results from our most recent

  17. Imported PER-1 producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PER-1 producing Acinetobacter baumanii and VIM-2-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Dora; Szentandrássy, Julia; Juhász, Zsuzsa; Katona, Katalin; Nagy, Károly; Rókusz, László

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanii are important nosocomial pathogens with wide intrinsic resistance. However, due to the dissemination of the acquired resistance mechanisms, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo beta-lactamase (MBL) production, multidrug resistant strains have been isolated more often. Case presentation We report a case of a Hungarian tourist, who was initially hospitalized in Egypt and later transferred to Hungary. On the day of admission PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa, PER-1 producing A. baumannii, SHV-5-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were subcultured from the patient's samples in Hungary. Comparing the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the P. aeruginosa strains from the patient to the P. aeruginosa strains occurring in this hospital, we can state that the PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa and VIM-2-producing P. aeruginosa had external origin. Conclusion This is the first report of PER-1-producing P. aeruginosa,and PER-1-producing A. baumanii strains in Hungary. This case highlights the importance of spreading of the beta-lactamase-mediated resistance mechanisms between countries and continents, showing the importance of careful screening and the isolation of patients arriving from a different country. PMID:18513394

  18. Additive-Subtractive Two-Wavelength ESPI Contouring by Using a Synthetic Wavelength Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Frei, B; Kästle, R; Sennhauser, U

    1998-05-01

    The addition correlation of two speckle fields by simultaneousillumination at different wavelengths is used for object contouring ina Twyman-Green-type interferometer. Fringe visibility is enhancedwhen the stochastic speckle background intensity obtained from areference plane modulation is subtracted. We calculate the contourphase map by using a phase-shift algorithm in the syntheticwavelength. A comparison with a sequential illumination, phasedifference method based on a laser wavelength phase shift isgiven. The test setup does not need to be stable on aninterferometric scale, and therefore a method is provided that lendsitself to applications in noisy environments.

  19. Gut eradication of VIM-1 producing ST9 Klebsiella oxytoca after fecal microbiota transplantation for diarrhea caused by a Clostridium difficile hypervirulent R027 strain.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Sergio; Morosini, María-Isabel; Cobo, Marta; Foruny, José Ramón; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Cobo, Javier; Romero, José; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    We report the fecal carriage eradication of a VIM-1-producing ST9 Klebsiella oxytoca strain in a pluripathological 84-year-old woman after fecal microbiota transplantation to control relapsing R027 hypervirulent Clostridium difficile infections. The donor was her son, in which the absence of fecal carbapenemase-producing bacteria was corroborated.

  20. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  1. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  2. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  3. Molecular detection of metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from hospitalized patients in the hospitals of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mansour; Vaez, Hamid; Moghoofeie, Mohsen; Hadifar, Shima; Oryan, Golfam; Faghri, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious problems, especially in people, who have immunodeficiency. In recent times, metallo-β-lactamase (MBLs) resistance in this bacterium has led to some difficulties in treating bacterial infections. The metallo-beta-lactamase family of genes, including blaVIM-1, is being reported with increasing frequency worldwide. The aim of this study is the detection of the metallo-β-lactamase gene blaVIM-1 in imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (IRPA) strains isolated from hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, 106 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from various nosocomial infections. The isolates were identified, tested for susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and all the imipenem-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of MBLs by using the combined disk (IMP-EDTA). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was determined by E-test on the Mueller-Hinton agar. To detect the blaVIM-1 gene, the isolates were subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Of all the P. aeruginosa isolates, 62 (58.5%) were found to be imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Twenty-six (42%) of the imipenem-resistant isolates were MBL positive. None of these isolates carried the blaVIM-1 gene using the PCR assay. Conclusion: The results demonstrated the serious therapeutic threat of the MBL-producing P. aeruginosa populations. The rate of imipenem resistance due to MBL was increased dramatically. Early detection and infection-control practices are the best antimicrobial strategies for this organism. None of MBL-producing isolates in this study carry the blaVIM-1 gene; therefore, another gene in the MBL family should be investigated. PMID:25802826

  4. Fragment-based discovery of inhibitor scaffolds targeting the metallo-β-lactamases NDM-1 and VIM-2.

    PubMed

    Christopeit, Tony; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S

    2016-04-15

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) render bacteria resistant to β-lactam antibiotics and are interesting drug targets to prevent the hydrolysis of β-lactam antibiotics. So far, there are no MBL inhibitors in clinical use and particularly the design of broad spectrum inhibitors targeting several MBLs has been difficult. In this study, we report four fragments inhibiting the clinically relevant New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) and Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase 2 (VIM-2). The fragments were identified from a library using an orthogonal screening strategy combining a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay and an enzyme inhibition assay. The identified fragments showed dissociation constants (KD) ranging from 181 to 2100 μM. The binding mode of the fragments was explored using QM-polarized ligand docking. All four fragments represent interesting scaffolds for the design of broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors.

  5. Multiple-wavelength tunable laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tunable laser includes dispersion optics for separating generated laser pulses into first and second wavelength pulses directed along first and second optical paths. First and second reflective mirrors are disposed in the first and second optical paths, respectively. The laser's output mirror is partially reflective and partially transmissive with respect to the first wavelength and the second wavelength in accordance with provided criteria. A first resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the first mirror, while a second resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the second mirror. The second resonator length is a function of the first resonator length.

  6. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  7. Full-disk observations of the saturnian moons in the VIS-NIR spectral range by Cassini- VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Adriani, A.; McCord, T. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Brown, R. H.; Bibring, J.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D. L.; Mennella, V.; Robert, N. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Moriconi, M.

    2006-12-01

    During the first two years of the Cassini's nominal mission, VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) has explored the whole system of Saturnian icy satellites. Here we report a comparative analysis of more than 600 full-disk observations obtained from July 2004 to nowadays for 15 regular and minor satellites: Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Telesto, Calypso, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. These observations, done from the equatorial plane, are particularly suitable to highlight the spectral differences between the leading and trailing sides of the regular satellites as function of the illumination angle (Filacchione et al., 2006a, 2006b); a byproduct of this activity is the measurement of the phase curves. The combined use of several VIS and IR spectral quantities (e.g. spectral slopes, water ice bands strengths, continuum levels, etc.) allows to find correlations between classes of satellites orbiting at different distances from Saturn: in this way it is possible to discriminate the almost pure ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso from the organic rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe (Tosi et al., 2006). This research was completed thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), Grant ASI/Cassini I/031/05/0. Filacchione et al., 2006a. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves, Icarus, in press. Filacchione et al., 2006b. VIS-NIR Spectral Properties of Saturn's Minor Icy Moons. 37th LPSC, abstract no.1271 Tosi et al., 2006. Iapetus, Phoebe and Hyperion: Are They Related? 37th LPSC, abstract no.1582

  8. Clouds and hazes vertical structure mapping of Saturn 2011 - 2012 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; D'Aversa, E.

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe starting from May 2011 and it was still present in observations recorded on June 2013. In this work we have analyzed the vortex data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V) in August 2011 and January 2012. An inverse model, based on the Bayesian approach and using the Gauss-Newton iterative method to minimize the cost function, has been developed to analyze those data. The model takes advantage of the results of a supporting forward radiative transfer model which relies on the assumptions of plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, Mie theory to compute particles single scattering properties, and molecular scattering adapted to Saturn's atmosphere. Applying the inverse model we could retrieve the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the vortex and produce spatial maps for each retrieved parameter. Thanks to this study, the vertical structure of the hazes in this region has been quantitatively addressed for the first time. The comparative analysis of the results from the two observations seems to suggest that in 6 months the atmospheric dynamics, responsible for the formation and subsistence of the vortex, is weakening and the atmosphere is returning to a more stationary state. In addition, we suggest a correction for the imaginary part of the refractive index of the tropopause haze. This new value, that allows a better convergence between observed and simulated spectra, does not yet identify a composition of the haze and further investigation is needed to understand the real nature of the need for such a modification.

  9. The Atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the Near-Infrared: First Results of Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, K. H.; Drossart, P.; Momary, T. W.; Formisano, V.; Griffith, C.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J. P.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Coradini, A.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D. L.; McCord, T. B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2005-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to approximately 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of approximately 0.5 ms(exp -1), favoring prograde, from the

  10. Not So Titanic Winds: Cassini/VIMS Observations of Cloud Features in the Southern Hemisphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, T. W.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R. H.; Jaumann, R.; Drossart, P.; Cassini VIMS

    2004-11-01

    One atmospheric science objective of VIMS is to measure windspeeds of cloud features in the Saturnian system at known altitudes, as determined from the 352 spectral bands that VIMS provides. The Titan encounter of 2 July 2004 provided the first opportunity to measure cloud-tracked winds on Titan. Spectral imagery revealed that cloud coverage of Titan was sparse, covering less than 1.5% of the observed sunlit surface. Nevertheless several clouds were followed during the encounter. The most prominent cloud, comprising the bulk of the cloud coverage, was located near the South Pole ( 87 degrees south, 0 degrees lon) and was roughly circular with a diameter of 600 ± 110 km. We tracked this feature over 11 images spanning a 13 hour period. In an attempt to quantify movement of the clouds in a Titanian windstream, we navigated the clouds using three distinct methods: 1) by tracking the brightest pixel in each cloud feature and employing SPICE kernel derived geometry, 2) similarly, by tracking the centroid of the main cloud feature, and 3) for the first time for an outer solar system body, by tracking relative to surface features seen in atmospheric spectral windows, most notably at 2.02 microns. The variable brightness of the most prominent cloud feature and its proximity to the South Pole of Titan make it rather difficult to track accurately. However, preliminary results obtained by tracking the centroid of the main cloud feature, as well as by tracking relative to surface features, indicate that there is little movement over a period of 13 hours. Specifically, we measure a mean windspeed of 0.5 ± 3.3 m/s in the prograde direction.

  11. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  12. Wavelength calibration with Fabry Perot Interferometers - yes we can!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franziskus Bauer, Florian; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    Hollow-cathode lamps (HCLs) are used as default wavelength standard for spectroscopic measurements but have a number of well-known shortcomings. Advancing to cm/s precision in radial velocity experiments requires more stable calibration sources with more uniform line distributions. Fabry Perot Interferometers (FPI) are a practical alternative with a well-suited line distribution at relatively low cost. We present a simple method to characterize FPIs using standard HCLs and including the FPI spectrum in the wavelength calibration process. We propose to use the HCL wavelength solution to define a rough wavelength scale that is used to approximate the FPI peak positions. We assume that the FPI mirror distance is a smooth function of wavelength and utilize the large number of FPI peaks (typically 10^4) to consistently model all FPI peak wavelengths. With this approach, we anchor the dense FPI lines with the absolute HCL-scale combining their precision and accuracy. We test our method with the HARPS spectrograph and compare our wavelength calibration to one derived from a laser frequency comb (LFC) spectrum. Our combined HCL/FPI wavelength calibration removes the known, large-amplitude distortions of 50 m/s that occur in the HCL solution. Direct comparison with the LFC solution bears only small differences between the LFC and the HCL/FPI solutions and demonstrates that the HCL/FPI solution can overcome the most important shortcomings in HCL wavelength solutions. An FPI can provide an economical alternative to LFCs in particular for smaller projects.

  13. Spatial phase stepping wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; García-Márquez, Jorge; Fodor, Jozsua; Juncar, Patrick

    2005-03-01

    A new way of evaluating the ratio between a reference wavelength radiation and an unknown wavelength radiation in a two-beam interferometer is proposed here. The advantage of two-beam interferometry is the sinusoidal fringe signal for which precise phase detection algorithms exist. Modern algorithms can cope with different sources of errors, and correct them. We recall the principle of the Michelson-type lambdameter using temporal interference and we introduce the Young-type lambdameter using spatial interference. The Young-type lambdameter is based on the acquisition of the interference pattern from two point sources (e.g. two ends of monomode fibres projected onto a CCD camera). The measurement of an unknown wavelength can be achieved by comparing with a reference wavelength. Accurate interference phase maps can be calculated using spatial phase shifting. In this way, each small group of contiguous pixels acts as a single interferometer, and the whole set of pixels corresponds to many hundreds or thousands of interferometric measurement system units. The analysis of uncertainties shows that resolutions better than 10-7 can be achieved. An advantage of the fibre wavelength metre described here is the measurement velocity that takes only a few seconds.

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from a New York City Hospital Belonging to Sequence Type 258 and Carrying blaKPC-2 and blaVIM-4.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Mariana; Deshpande, Lalitagauri M; Mills, Janet C; Jones, Ronald N; Soave, Rosemary; Jenkins, Stephen G; Schuetz, Audrey N

    2016-01-04

    Among 69 of 139 (49.6%) carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae carrying blaKPC, 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae was also positive for blaVIM. The isolate belonged to sequence type 258 (ST258) and carried blaKPC-2 on a copy of Tn4401a and blaVIM-4 on a class 1 integron. Genes were located on distinct plasmids belonging to Inc types A/C and FII. Elevated expression of the efflux pump AcrAB-TolC (acrA, 15.3 times) and reduced expression of outer membrane protein genes ompK35 and ompK37 (0.16 and 0.081 times, respectively) associated with various amino acid alterations on OmpK37 were observed. The presence of two carbapenemases in ST258 K. pneumoniae is of great concern due to the ability of this organism to widely disseminate.

  15. Predominance of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates carrying blaIMP and blaVIM metallo-β-lactamases in a major hospital in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Guzmán-Marte, Anel; Madriz, Vivian; Somogyi, Teresita; Rodríguez, César; García, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the molecular basis of the resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from a tertiary-level health facility in San José, Costa Rica. A total of 198 non-duplicated isolates were evaluated for their susceptibility to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. The production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), the presence of MBL encoding genes (blaIMP, blaVIM and blaGIM-1) and the occurrence of these genes within class 1 integrons were investigated. In addition, an ERIC2 PCR fingerprinting method was used to elucidate the distribution of the detected MBL genes within the strain collection. Of the 198 isolates tested, 125 (63.1 %) were categorized as carbapenem-resistant. The majority (88.8 %) of the carbapemen-resistant isolates also showed resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Among the carbapenem-resistant isolates, 102 (81.6 %) showed MBL activity. Strikingly, both blaIMP and blaVIM genes were simultaneously detected in most (94.1 %) of the 102 MBL producers. Five carbapenem-resistant MBL producers were positive only for blaIMP genes. Almost 70 % of the isolates examined harboured the intI1 gene, accompanied by the sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes in 136 (99 %) and 122 (89 %) isolates, respectively. The majority (94.4 %) of the carbapenem-resistant isolates carried the intI1 gene, in contrast to 26 % of the carbapenem-susceptible isolates. Ninety-three out of 96 (96.9 %) isolates carrying both blaIMP and blaVIM genes also harboured the intI1, sul1 and qacEΔ1 genes. Gene cassettes from carbapenem-susceptible and MBL-negative carbapenem-resistant isolates encoded aminoglycoside-resistance enzymes (aadA2, aadA4 and aadA6) as well as orfD and qacF genes. RAPD analysis distributed 126 of the isolates in 29 clusters. Eighty of the 90 blaIMP (+) blaVIM (+) isolates were sorted into 16

  16. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  17. Plasmid Profile Analysis and bla VIM Gene Detection of Metalo β-lactamase (MBL) Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    M, Jeya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent colonizer of hospitalized patients. They are responsible for serious infections such as meningitis, urological infections, septicemia and pneumonia. Carbapenem resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is currently increasingly reported which is often mediated by production of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL). Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates may involve reduced cell wall permeability, production of chromosomal and plasmid mediated β lactamases, aminoglycosides modifying enzymes and an active multidrug efflux mechanism. Objective: This study is aimed to detect the presence and the nature of plasmids among metallo-β-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Also to detect the presence of bla VIM gene from these isolates. Materials and Methods: Clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showing the metalo-β-lactamase enzyme (MBL) production were isolated. The MBL production was confirmed by three different methods. From the MBL producing isolates plasmid extraction was done by alkaline lysis method. Plasmid positive isolates were subjected for blaVIM gene detection by PCR method. Results: Two thousand seventy six clinical samples yielded 316 (15.22%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, out of which 141 (44.62%) were multidrug resistant. Among them 25 (17.73%) were metallo-β-lactamase enzyme producers. Plasmids were extracted from 18 out of 25 isolates tested. Five out of 18 isolates were positive for the blaVIM gene detection by the PCR amplification. Conclusion: The MBL producers were susceptible to polymyxin /colistin with MIC ranging from 0.5 – 2μg/ml. Molecular detection of specific genes bla VIM were positive among the carbapenem resistant isolates. PMID:25120980

  18. Similar frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates producing KPC and VIM carbapenemases in diverse genetic clones at tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, Johanna M; Cienfuegos, Astrid V; Ocampo, Ana M; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea; Jiménez, J Natalia

    2014-11-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of bla(VIM), bla(IMP), bla(NDM), bla(OXA-48), and bla(KPC) genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The bla(VIM-2) and bla(KPC-2) genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains.

  19. Similar Frequencies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Producing KPC and VIM Carbapenemases in Diverse Genetic Clones at Tertiary-Care Hospitals in Medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Vanegas, Johanna M.; Cienfuegos, Astrid V.; Ocampo, Ana M.; López, Lucelly; del Corral, Helena; Roncancio, Gustavo; Sierra, Patricia; Echeverri-Toro, Lina; Ospina, Sigifredo; Maldonado, Natalia; Robledo, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious health threat worldwide due to the limited options available for its treatment. Understanding its epidemiology contributes to the control of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates in five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to March 2014. All hospitalized patients infected by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were included. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaNDM, blaOXA-48, and blaKPC genes plus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. A total of 235 patients were enrolled: 91.1% of them were adults (n = 214), 88.1% (n = 207) had prior antibiotic use, and 14.9% (n = 35) had urinary tract infections. The blaVIM-2 and blaKPC-2 genes were detected in 13.6% (n = 32) and 11.5% (n = 27), respectively, of all isolates. Two isolates harbored both genes simultaneously. For KPC-producing isolates, PFGE revealed closely related strains within each hospital, and sequence types (STs) ST362 and ST235 and two new STs were found by MLST. With PFGE, VIM-producing isolates appeared highly diverse, and MLST revealed ST111 in four hospitals and five new STs. These results show that KPC-producing P. aeruginosa is currently disseminating rapidly and occurring at a frequency similar to that of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa isolates (approximately 1:1 ratio) in Medellín, Colombia. Diverse genetic backgrounds among resistant strains suggest an excessive antibiotic pressure resulting in the selection of resistant strains. PMID:25210071

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas sp. Strain Carrying blaIMP-25 and blaVIM-2 Carbapenemase Genes from Hospital Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yiyi; Wu, Wenjing; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas strain WCHP16 recovered from hospital sewage in West China Hospital, Chengdu, China was found to carry two carbapenemase genes blaIMP-25 and blaVIM-2. Here, we report its 5.7-Mb draft genome sequence, comprising 141 contigs and an average 59.53% G+C content. The genome contained 5,504 coding sequences and 67 tRNA genes. PMID:27795238

  1. Nosocomial Outbreak of VIM-1-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates of Multilocus Sequence Type 15: Molecular Basis, Clinical Risk Factors, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Romero, Isabel; Asensio, Ángel; Muñoz-Algarra, María; Isidoro, Beatriz; Vindel, Ana; Álvarez-Avello, José; Balandín-Moreno, Bárbara; Cuevas, Oscar; Fernández-Romero, Sara; Azañedo, Luisa; Sáez, David; Campos, José

    2012-01-01

    We study the epidemiology, molecular basis, clinical risk factors, and outcome involved in the clonal dissemination of VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the hospital setting. All patients infected/colonized by carbapenem-nonsusceptible K. pneumoniae (CNSKP) in 2009 were included. Molecular epidemiology was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed by PCR and sequencing. Plasmids were studied by PFGE with S1 nuclease digestion and for incompatibility group by a PCR-based replicon typing scheme. Risk factors associated with CNSKP colonization/infection were assessed by an observational case-control study. All 55 patients studied were infected (n = 28) or colonized (n = 27) by VIM-1-producing K. pneumoniae. All but one acquired isolates of a single clone (PFGE cluster 1 [C1], sequence type 15 [ST15]), while another clone (PFGE C2, ST340) was detected in four patients. C1 isolates also produced the new extended-spectrum β-lactamase SHV-134. blaVIM-1 was carried in a class 1 integron and an untypeable plasmid of ∼50 bp. The number of days that the patient received mechanical ventilation, the use of parenteral nutrition, previous treatment with linezolid, and treatment with extended-spectrum cephalosporins for more than 7 days were detected to be independent risk factors for CNSKP acquisition. The VIM-1-producing K. pneumoniae ST15 clone has a high capacity to spread among intensive care unit patients with severe underlying conditions. A high rate of associated mortality and great difficulty in controlling the spread of this clone, without permanent behavioral changes in the personnel, were observed. PMID:22005997

  2. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Metallo-β-Lactamase IMP-1 and VIM-2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains From Different Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abiri, Ramin; Mohammadi, Pantea; Shavani, Navid; Rezaei, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosais a frequent nosocomial pathogen that causes severe diseases in many settings. Carbapenems, including meropenem and imipenem, are effective antibiotics against this organism. However, the use of carbapenems has been hampered by the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenemsvia different mechanisms such as the production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), which hydrolyze all carbapenems. Several kinds of MBLs have been reported, among them VIM and IMP types being the most clinically significant carbapenemases. Objectives: We aimed to determine the distribution of blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 transferable genes encoding MBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from three academic hospitals in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: From 22nd June to 22nd September 2012, 225 isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected. These isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility with the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method, and the MBLs were assessed using the imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. The isolates were investigated for blaVIM-2 and blaIMP-1 genes using polymerase chain reaction. Results: Among the 225 isolates, 33.7% (76/225) and 18.1% (41/225) were resistant to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Of the 76 imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, 45 (59.2%) were positive for MBLs, 34 (75%) strains carried the blaIMP-1 gene, and 1 (2.2%) strain carried the blaVIM-2 gene. Conclusions: Our results showed that there was a high frequency of IMP-1 positive P. aeruginosa in the different wards of the hospitals. PMID:26495110

  3. Photometric properties of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS: Relevance to titan's hemispherical albedo dichotomy and surface stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Brown, R.H.; Hapke, B.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter returned spectral imaging data as the spacecraft undertook six close encounters with Titan beginning 7 July, 2004. Three of these flybys each produced overlapping coverage of two distinct regions of Titan's surface. Twenty-four points were selected on approximately opposite hemispheres to serve as photometric controls. Six points were selected in each of four reflectance classes. On one hemisphere each control point was observed at three distinct phase angles. From the derived phase coefficients, preliminary normal reflectances were derived for each reflectance class. The normal reflectance of Titan's surface units at 2.0178 ??m ranged from 0.079 to 0.185 for the most absorbing to the most reflective units assuming no contribution from absorbing haze. When a modest haze contribution of ??=0.1 is considered these numbers increase to 0.089-0.215. We find that the lowest three reflectance classes have comparable normal reflectance on either hemisphere. However, for the highest brightness class the normal reflectance is higher on the hemisphere encompassing longitude 14-65?? compared to the same high brightness class for the hemisphere encompassing 122-156?? longitude. We conclude that an albedo dichotomy observed in continental sized units on Titan is due not only to one unit having more areal coverage of reflective material than the other but the material on the brighter unit is intrinsically more reflective than the most reflective material on the other unit. This suggests that surface renewal processes are more widespread on Titan's more reflective units than on its less reflective units. We note that one of our photometric control points has increased in reflectance by 12% relative to the surrounding terrain from July of 2004 to April and May of 2005. Possible causes of this effect include atmospheric processes such as ground fog or orographic clouds; the suggestion of

  4. Significance of dual polarized long wavelength radar for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Long wavelength systems with improved penetration capability have been considered to have the potential for minimizing the vegetation contribution and enhancing the surface return variations. L-band imagery of the Arkansas geologic test site provides confirmatory evidence of this effect. However, the increased wavelength increases the sensitivity to larger scale structure at relatively small incidence angles. The regularity of agricultural and urban scenes provides large components in the low frequency-large scale portion of the roughness spectrum that are highly sensitive to orientation. The addition of a cross polarized channel is shown to enable the interpreter to distinguish vegetation and orientational perturbations in the surface return.

  5. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  6. Clonal Transmission of Gram-Negative Bacteria with Carbapenemases NDM-1, VIM-1, and OXA-23/72 in a Bulgarian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Yvonne; Trifonova, Angelina; Pietsch, Michael; Brunner, Magdalena; Todorova, Iva; Gergova, Ivanka; Wilharm, Gottfried; Werner, Guido; Savov, Encho

    2016-07-26

    We characterized 72 isolates with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems (50 Acinetobacter spp., 13 Proteus mirabilis, five Escherichia coli, one Morganella morganii, one Enterobacter cloacae, one Providencia rettgeri, and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa) from a hospital in Sofia, Bulgaria. Different β-lactamase genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. Bacterial strain typing was performed by enzymatic macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing as well as multilocus sequence typing for selected isolates. The majority of Acinetobacter baumannii (46/50) and one Acinetobacter pittii isolate harbored carbapenemase genes blaOXA-23 or blaOXA-72; two A. baumannii contained both genes. PFGE typing of all A. baumannii showed the presence of nine different clones belonging to eight sequence types ST350, ST208, ST436, ST437, ST449, ST231, ST502, and ST579. Molecular characterization of the remaining isolates confirmed the presence of one NDM-1-producing E. coli-ST101 clone (five isolates) and one P. mirabilis clone (13 isolates) with VIM-1 and CMY-99. Furthermore, NDM-1 was identified in P. rettgeri and M. morganii and VIM-2 in the P. aeruginosa isolate. The permanent introduction of OXA-23/72 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii clones into the hospital and the repeated occurrence of one VIM-1-producing P. mirabilis and one NDM-1-producing E. coli-ST101 clone over a period of more than 1 year is of concern and requires intensified investigations.

  7. Rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cancan; Zheng, Fen; Rui, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for rapid detection of blaKPC, blaNDM, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes. Six oligonucleotides, including outer, inner, and loop primers, were designed for eight distinct regions in each target gene. Two qualitative criteria were used to evaluate LAMP reactions: visual inspection of color change and real-time detection of fluorescence change. The lower detection limit was 10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction for real-time detection and 100 CFU per reaction for visual inspection for each gene. Two hundred twenty-two carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates (including 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 100 Acinetobacter sp., and 22 Enterobacteriaceae) were tested by LAMP assay. At the same time, these isolates were confirmed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis. In these clinical isolates, the results of 11 strains with blaNDM, 11 strains with blaKPC, 11 strains with blaVIM, and 2 strains with blaIMP obtained using LAMP assays were concordant with conventional PCR. The LAMP method reported here may be a useful and powerful tool for rapid detection of blaNDM, blaKPC, blaIMP, and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in bacteria.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Evaluation of Metallo-Beta Lactamase Genes Including bla- IMP and bla- VIM Types in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aghamiri, Samira; Amirmozafari, Nour; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Fouladtan, Babak; Samadi Kafil, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lactamase producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are important etiological agents of hospital infections. Carbapenems are among the most effective antibiotics used against Pseudomonas infections, but they can be rendered infective by group B β -lactamase, commonly called metallo-beta lactamase. In this study, the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of P. aeruginosa strains isolated from 9 different hospitals in Tehran, Iran, as well as the prevalence of MBLs genes (bla- VIM and bla- IMP ) were determined. A total of 212 strains of P. aeruginosa recovered from patients in hospitals in Tehran were confirmed by both biochemical methods and PCR. Their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns were determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Following MIC determination, imipenem resistant strains were selected by DDST method which was followed by PCR tests for determination of MBLs genes: bla- IMP and bla- VIM . The results indicated that, in the DDST phenotypic method, among the 100 imipenem resistant isolates, 75 strains were MBLs positive. The PCR test indicated that 70 strains (33%) carried bla- VIM gene and 20 strains (9%) harbored bla- IMP . The results indicated that the extent of antibiotic resistance among Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. This may be due to production of MBLs enzymes. Therefore, determination of antibiotic sensitivity patterns and MBLs production by these bacteria, can be important in control of clinical Pseudomonas infection.

  9. Six Years of Fermi-LAT and Multi-Wavelength Monitoring of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy 3c 120: Jet Dissipation At Sub-Parsec Scales from the Central Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Doi, A.; Inoue, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Gurwell, M. A.; Tahara, M.; Kataoka, J.; Itoh, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength monitoring results for the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 120 in the MeV/GeV, sub-millimeter, and 43 GHz bands over 6 yr. Over the past 2 yr, the Fermi-Large Area Telescope sporadically detected 3C 120 with high significance and the 230 GHz data also suggest an enhanced activity of the source. After the MeV/GeV detection from 3C 120 in MJD 56240-56300, 43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring revealed a brightening of the radio core, followed by the ejection of a superluminal knot. Since we observed the γ-ray and VLBA phenomena in temporal proximity to each other, it is naturally assumed that they are physically connected. This assumption was further supported by the subsequent observation that the 43 GHz core brightened again after a γ-ray flare occurred around MJD 56560. We can then infer that the MeV/GeV emission took place inside an unresolved 43 GHz core of 3C 120 and that the jet dissipation occurred at sub-parsec distances from the central black hole (BH), if we take the distance of the 43 GHz core from the central BH as ˜0.5 pc, as previously estimated from the time lag between X-ray dips and knot ejections. Based on our constraints on the relative locations of the emission regions and energetic arguments, we conclude that the γ rays are more favorably produced via the synchrotron self-Compton process, rather than inverse Compton scattering of external photons coming from the broad line region or hot dusty torus. We also derived the electron distribution and magnetic field by modeling the simultaneous broadband spectrum.

  10. SIX YEARS OF FERMI-LAT AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH MONITORING OF THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120: JET DISSIPATION AT SUB-PARSEC SCALES FROM THE CENTRAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Doi, A.; Inoue, Y.; Stawarz, L.; Cheung, C. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Itoh, R.; Gurwell, M. A.; Tahara, M.; Kataoka, J.

    2015-01-30

    We present multi-wavelength monitoring results for the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 120 in the MeV/GeV, sub-millimeter, and 43 GHz bands over 6 yr. Over the past 2 yr, the Fermi-Large Area Telescope sporadically detected 3C 120 with high significance and the 230 GHz data also suggest an enhanced activity of the source. After the MeV/GeV detection from 3C 120 in MJD 56240–56300, 43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring revealed a brightening of the radio core, followed by the ejection of a superluminal knot. Since we observed the γ-ray and VLBA phenomena in temporal proximity to each other, it is naturally assumed that they are physically connected. This assumption was further supported by the subsequent observation that the 43 GHz core brightened again after a γ-ray flare occurred around MJD 56560. We can then infer that the MeV/GeV emission took place inside an unresolved 43 GHz core of 3C 120 and that the jet dissipation occurred at sub-parsec distances from the central black hole (BH), if we take the distance of the 43 GHz core from the central BH as ∼0.5 pc, as previously estimated from the time lag between X-ray dips and knot ejections. Based on our constraints on the relative locations of the emission regions and energetic arguments, we conclude that the γ rays are more favorably produced via the synchrotron self-Compton process, rather than inverse Compton scattering of external photons coming from the broad line region or hot dusty torus. We also derived the electron distribution and magnetic field by modeling the simultaneous broadband spectrum.

  11. A newly discovered impact crater in Titan's Senkyo: Cassini VIMS observations and comparison with other impact features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Lawrence, K.; Brown, R.H.; Le, Mouelic S.; Soderblom, J.M.; Barnes, J.; Clark, R.N.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Senkyo is an equatorial plain on Titan filled with dunes and surrounded by hummocky plateaus. During the Titan targeted flyby T61 on August 25, 2009, the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft observed a circular feature, centered at 5.4?? N and 341??W, that superimposes the dune fields and a bright plateau. This circular feature, which has been named Paxsi by the International Astronomical Union, is 120??10 km in diameter (measured from the outer edge of the crater rim) and exhibits a central bright area that can be interpreted as the central peak or pit of an impact crater. Although there are only a handful of certain impact craters on Titan, there are two other craters that are of similar size to this newly discovered feature and that have been studied by VIMS: Sinlap (Le Mou??lic et al, 2008) and Selk (Soderblom et al, 2010). Sinlap is associated with a large downwind, fan-like feature that may have been formed from an impact plume that rapidly expanded and deposited icy particles onto the surface. Although much of the surrounding region is covered with dunes, the plume region is devoid of dunes. The formation process of Selk also appears to have removed (or covered up) dunes from parts of the adjacent dune-filled terrain. The circular feature on Senkyo is quite different: there is no evidence of an ejecta blanket and the crater itself appears to be infilled with dune material. The rim of the crater appears to be eroded by fluvial processes; at one point the rim is breached. The rim is unusually narrow, which may be due to mass wasting on its inside and subsequent infill by dunes. Based on these observations, we interpret this newly discovered feature to be a more eroded crater than both Sinlap and Selk. Paxsi may have formed during a period when Titan was warmer and more ductile than it is currently. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Compositional mapping of Saturn's satellite Dione with Cassini VIMS and implications of dark material in the Saturn system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Jaumann, R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Brown, R.H.; Hoefen, T.M.; Stephan, K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Nelson, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini VIMS has obtained spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy data on numerous satellites of Saturn. A very close fly-by of Dione provided key information for solving the riddle of the origin of the dark material in the Saturn system. The Dione VIMS data show a pattern of bombardment of fine, sub-0.5-??m diameter particles impacting the satellite from the trailing side direction. Multiple lines of evidence point to an external origin for the dark material on Dione, including the global spatial pattern of dark material, local patterns including crater and cliff walls shielding implantation on slopes facing away from the trailing side, exposing clean ice, and slopes facing the trailing direction which show higher abundances of dark material. Multiple spectral features of the dark material match those seen on Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, Epimetheus and the F-ring, implying the material has a common composition throughout the Saturn system. However, the exact composition of the dark material remains a mystery, except that bound water and, tentatively, ammonia are detected, and there is evidence both for and against cyanide compounds. Exact identification of composition requires additional laboratory work. A blue scattering peak with a strong UV-visible absorption is observed in spectra of all satellites which contain dark material, and the cause is Rayleigh scattering, again pointing to a common origin. The Rayleigh scattering effect is confirmed with laboratory experiments using ice and 0.2-??m diameter carbon grains when the carbon abundance is less than about 2% by weight. Rayleigh scattering in solids is also confirmed in naturally occurring terrestrial rocks, and in previously published reflectance studies. The spatial pattern, Rayleigh scattering effect, and spectral properties argue that the dark material is only a thin coating on Dione's surface, and by extension is only a thin coating on Phoebe, Hyperion, and Iapetus, although the dark material abundance

  13. Lunar polarization studies at 3.1 mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, T. L.; Cogdell, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the distribution of linearly polarized lunar thermal emission were made at a wavelength of 3.1 mm with The University of Texas 4.88 m parabolic reflector (0.042 deg HPBW). A shadow corrected, rough surface, thermal emission model for a homogeneous moon was least-squares-fitted to the polarization data. Results indicate an effective lunar dielectric constant of 1.34 plus or minus 0.04 with surface roughness characterized by a standard deviation of 17 (plus or minus 5) deg for surface slopes with a normal probability density, independent of lunar phase. A comparison of these results with published values at other wavelengths suggests that the effective lunar dielectric constant, as obtained by lunar emission measurements, decreases with decreasing wavelength of observation. This wavelength dependence may be interpreted in terms of an inhomogeneous surface and/or a surface that possesses intermediate scale surface roughness.

  14. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  15. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  16. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  17. Expanding plasma structure and its evolution toward long wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sgro, A. G.; Peter Gary, S.; Lemons, D. S.

    1989-09-01

    The expansion of a plasma slab across an initially uniform magnetic field is simulated by the use of a two-dimensional electromagnetic hybrid (particle ions, fluid electrons of nonzero mass) computer code. The expanding plasma develops magnetic-field-aligned structure on time scales faster than an ion gyroperiod. Through the full duration of the /ital m//sub /ital i////ital m//sub /ital e// =100 simulation, the structure wavelength is well predicted by the wavelength at maximum growth rate from the linear Vlasov theory of the lower hybrid drift instability modified by deceleration. At /ital m//sub /ital i////ital m//sub /ital e// =400, the late time structure wavelength is about 1.5 times the early time value. At /ital m//sub /ital i////ital m//sub /ital e// =1836, the structure wavelength at early times is close to that corresponding to the maximum growth rate of linear theory, while at later times the structure wavelength becomes about twice as long as its early time value. These three results suggest that the ratio of the late time wavelength to the early time value gradually increases with /ital m//sub /ital i////ital m//sub /ital e//. Extrapolation of this scaling to larger /ital m//sub /ital i////ital m//sub /ital e// values is consistent with structure wavelengths observed in an expanding aluminum plasma experiment (J. Appl. Phys. J. /bold 20/, 157 (1981)), as well as the observed wavelength in the expanding barium plasma of the AMPTE magnetotail experiment (J. Geophys. Res. /bold 92/, 5777 (1987)).

  18. Multi-wavelength applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadely, Ross

    2010-12-01

    Using an array of multi-wavelength data, we examine a variety of astrophysical problems with gravitational lensing. First, we seek to understand the mass distribution of an early-type galaxy with an analysis of the lens Q0957+561. We dissect the lens galaxy into luminous and dark components, and model the environment using results from weak lensing. Combining constraints from newly-discovered lensed images and stellar population models, we find the lens has a density profile which is shallower than isothermal, unlike those of typical early-type galaxies. Finally, using the measured time delay between the quasar images we find the Hubble constant to be H 0 = 79.3+6.7-8.5 km s-1 Mpc-1 . One intriguing application of lensing is to exploit the lens magnification boost to study high-redshift objects in greater detail than otherwise possible. Here, we analyze the mid-infrared properties of two lensed z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, using Spitzer /IRS spectra to study their rest-frame ˜ 5-12 μm emission. Both systems exhibit strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in the spectra, indicating strong star formation and the absence of significant AGN activity. For SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, this detection belies that inferred from optical measurements, indicating mid-IR spectroscopy provides key information needed to understand the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. While lensing provides measurements of the macroscopic properties of lens systems, it can also shed light on small-scale structure of galaxies. To identify and understand lens substructure, we examine the multi-wavelength properties of flux ratios for six lenses. Variations of the flux ratios with wavelength can be used to study the lensed quasars and the small-scale mass distribution of lens galaxies. We detect strong multi-wavelength variations in the lenses HE 0435-1223 and SDSS 0806+2006. For HE 0435-1223, we study its

  19. Self-gravity wake structures in Saturn's a ring revealed by Cassini vims

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Salo, H.; Wallis, B.D.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    During the summer of 2005, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft observed a series of occultations of the star o Ceti (Mira) by Saturn's rings. These observations revealed pronounced variations in the optical depth of the A ring with longitude, which can be attributed to oriented structures in the rings known as self-gravity wakes. While the wakes themselves are only tens of meters across and below the resolution of the measurements, we are able to obtain information about the orientation and shapes of these structures by comparing the observed transmission at different longitudes with predictions from a simple model. Our findings include the following: (1) The orientation of the wakes varies systematically with radius, trailing by between 64?? and 72?? relative to the local radial direction. (2) The maximum transmission peaks at roughly 8% for B = 3.45?? in the middle A ring (???129,000 km). (3) Both the wake orientation and maximum transmission vary anomalously in the vicinity of two strong density waves (Janus 5:4 and Mimas 5:3). (4) The ratio of the wake vertical thickness H to the wake pattern wavelength ?? (assuming infinite, straight, regularly-spaced wake structures) varies from 0.12 to 0.09 across the A ring. Gravitational instability theory predicts ?? ??? 60 m, which suggests that the wake structures in the A ring are only ???6 m thick. ?? 2007. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Storm clouds on Saturn: Lightning-induced chemistry and associated materials consistent with Cassini/VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Delitsky, M.L.; Momary, T.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Thunderstorm activity on Saturn is associated with optically detectable clouds that are atypically dark throughout the near-infrared. As observed by Cassini/VIMS, these clouds are ~20% less reflective than typical neighboring clouds throughout the spectral range from 0.8 ??m to at least 4.1 ??m. We propose that active thunderstorms originating in the 10-20 bar water-condensation region vertically transport dark materials at depth to the ~1 bar level where they can be observed. These materials in part may be produced by chemical processes associated with lightning, likely within the water clouds near the ~10 bar freezing level of water, as detected by the electrostatic discharge of lightning flashes observed by Cassini/RPWS (e.g., Fischer et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev., 137, 271-285). We review lightning-induced pyrolytic chemistry involving a variety of Saturnian constituents, including hydrogen, methane, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, phosphine, and water. We find that the lack of absorption in the 1-2 ??m spectral region by lightning-generated sulfuric and phosphorous condensates renders these constituents as minor players in determining the color of the dark storm clouds. Relatively small particulates of elemental carbon, formed by lightning-induced dissociation of methane and subsequently upwelled from depth - perhaps embedded within and on the surface of spectrally bright condensates such as ammonium hydrosulfide or ammonia - may be a dominant optical material within the dark thunderstorm-related clouds of Saturn. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography selectively extracting wavelength information from wavelength-multiplexed holograms.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Mori, Ryota; Kikunaga, Shuhei; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography that selectively extracts wavelength information from five wavelength-multiplexed holograms is presented. Specific phase shifts for respective wavelengths are introduced to remove the crosstalk components and extract only the object wave at the desired wavelength from the holograms. Object waves in multiple wavelengths are selectively extracted by utilizing 2π ambiguity and the subtraction procedures based on phase-shifting interferometry. Numerical results show the validity of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also experimentally demonstrated.

  3. Far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Yochai; Gjonaj, Bergin; David, Asaf; Dolev, Shimon; Shterman, Doron; Bartal, Guy

    2015-03-23

    We present direct far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) by conventional optics means. Plasmonic wavelength as short as 231 nm was observed for 532 nm illumination on a Ag−Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} platform, demonstrating the capability to characterize SPPs well below the optical diffraction limit. This is done by scaling a sub-wavelength interferometric pattern to a far-field resolvable periodicity. These subwavelength patterns are obtained by coupling light into counter-propagating SPP waves to create a standing-wave pattern of half the SPP wavelength periodicity. Such patterns are mapped by a scattering slit, tilted at an angle so as to increase the periodicity of the intensity pattern along it to more than the free-space wavelength, making it resolvable by diffraction limited optics. The simplicity of the method as well as its large dynamic range of measurable wavelengths make it an optimal technique to characterize the properties of plasmonic devices and high-index dielectric waveguides, to improve their design accuracy and enhance their functionality.

  4. Polarization-Insensitive Metalenses at Visible Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, M; Zhu, A Y; Roques-Carmes, C; Chen, W T; Oh, J; Mishra, I; Devlin, R C; Capasso, F

    2016-11-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate highly efficient, polarization-insensitive planar lenses (metalenses) at red, green, and blue wavelengths (λ = 660, 532, and 405 nm). Metalenses with numerical apertures (NA) of 0.85 and 0.6 and corresponding efficiencies as high as 60% and 90% are achieved. These metalenses are less than 600 nm-thick and can focus incident light down to diffraction-limited spots as small as ∼0.64λ and provide high-resolution imaging. In addition, the focal spots are very symmetric with high Strehl ratios. The single step lithography and compatibility with large-scale fabrication processes make metalenses highly promising for widespread applications in imaging and spectroscopy.

  5. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  6. Extension of distance measurement range in a sinusoidal wavelength-scanning interferometer using a liquid-crystal wavelength filter with double feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Osami; Saito, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Takeda, Mitsuo; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2007-08-10

    The optical path difference (OPD) and amplitude of a sinusoidal wavelength scanning (SWS) are controlled with a double feedback control system in an interferometer, so that a ruler marking every wavelength and a ruler with scales smaller than a wavelength are generated. These two rulers enable us to measure an OPD longer than a wavelength. A liquid-crystal Fabry-Perot interferometer (LC-FPI) is adopted as a wavelength-scanning device, and double sinusoidal phase modulation is incorporated in the SWS interferometer. Because of a high resolution of the LC-FPI, the upper limit of the measurement range can be extended to 280 microm by the use of the phase lock where the amplitude of the SWS is doubled in the feedback control. The ruler marking every wavelength is generated between 80 microm and 280 microm, and distances are measured with a high accuracy of the order of a nanometer in real time.

  7. On the Discovery of CO Nighttime Emissions on Titan by Cassini/VIMS: Derived Stratospheric Abundances and Geological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainesa, Kevin H.; Drossart, Pierre; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Sotin, Christophe; Momary, Thomas W.; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of CO thermal emissions discovered on the nightside of Titan by Baines et al. [2005. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/VIMS. Earth, Moon, and Planets, 96, 119-147] in Cassini/VIMS spectral imagery. We identify these emission features as the P and R branches of the 1-0 vibrational band of carbon monoxide (CO) near 4.65 microns. For CH3D, the prominent Q branch of the nu(2) fundamental band of CH3D near 4.55 microns is apparent. CO2 emissions from the strong nu(3) vibrational band are virtually absent, indicating a CO2 abundance several orders of magnitude less than CO, in agreement with previous investigations. Analysis of CO emission spectra obtained over a variety of altitudes on Titan's nightside limb indicates that the stratospheric abundance of CO is 32 +/- 15 ppm, and together with other recent determinations, suggests a vertical distribution of CO nearly constant at this value from the surface throughout the troposphere to at least the stratopause near 300 km altitude. The corresponding total atmospheric content of CO in Titan is similar to 2.9 +/- 1.5 x 10(exp 14) kg. Given the long lifetime of CO in the oxygen-poor Titan atmosphere (similar to 0.5-1.0 Gyr), we find a mean CO atmospheric production rate of 6 +/- 3 x 10(exp 5) kg yr(exp -1). Given the lack of primordial heavy noble gases observed by Huygens [Niemann et al., 2005. The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS on the Huygens probe. Nature, 438, 779-784], the primary source of atmospheric CO is likely surface emissions. The implied CO/CH4 mixing ratio of near-surface material is 1.8 +/- 0.9 x 10(exp -4), based on an average methane surface emission rate over the past 0.5 Gyr of 1.3 x 10(exp -13) gm cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) as required to balance hydrocarbon haze production via methane photolysis [Wilson and Atreya, 2004. Current state of modeling the photochemistry of Titan's mutually dependent

  8. On the discovery of CO nighttime emissions on Titan by Cassini/VIMS: Derived stratospheric abundances and geological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baines, K.H.; Drossart, P.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Atreya, S.K.; Sotin, C.; Momary, T.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of CO thermal emissions discovered on the nightside of Titan by Baines et al. [2005. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/VIMS. Earth, Moon, and Planets, 96, 119-147]. in Cassini/VIMS spectral imagery. We identify these emission features as the P and R branches of the 1-0 vibrational band of carbon monoxide (CO) near 4.65 ??m. For CH3D, the prominent Q branch of the ??2 fundamental band of CH3D near 4.55 ??m is apparent. CO2 emissions from the strong v3 vibrational band are virtually absent, indicating a CO2 abundance several orders of magnitude less than CO, in agreement with previous investigations. Analysis of CO emission spectra obtained over a variety of altitudes on Titan's nightside limb indicates that the stratospheric abundance of CO is 32??15 ppm, and together with other recent determinations, suggests a vertical distribution of CO nearly constant at this value from the surface throughout the troposphere to at least the stratopause near 300 km altitude. The corresponding total atmospheric content of CO in Titan is ???2.9??1.5??1014 kg. Given the long lifetime of CO in the oxygen-poor Titan atmosphere (???0.5-1.0 Gyr), we find a mean CO atmospheric production rate of 6??3??105 kg yr-1. Given the lack of primordial heavy noble gases observed by Huygens [Niemann et al., 2005. The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS on the Huygens probe. Nature, 438, 779-784], the primary source of atmospheric CO is likely surface emissions. The implied CO/CH4 mixing ratio of near-surface material is 1.8??0.9??10-4, based on an average methane surface emission rate over the past 0.5 Gyr of 1.3??10-13 gm cm-2 s-1 as required to balance hydrocarbon haze production via methane photolysis [Wilson and Atreya, 2004. Current state of modeling the photochemistry of Titan's mutually dependent atmosphere and ionosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E06002 Doi:10.1029/2003JE002181]. This

  9. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8).

  10. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  11. Submillimeter-wavelength space-based imaging radar. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, W.M.

    1988-05-31

    This report considers the use of a submillimeter wavelength space-based imaging radar. The main application envisioned is midcourse decoy discrimination for strategic defense, for which it would have the capability of producing a series of images, in real time, at strategic ranges, with less than meter-scale resolution and with modest power requirements. Undoubtedly, there are other applications. The requirements for a SAR and ISAR imaging radar at submillimeter wavelength are determined, and the prospect for the development of rf sources to power the radar is examined.

  12. Quantum information processing with long-wavelength radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, David; Weidt, Sebastian; Randall, Joseph; Lekitsch, Bjoern; Webster, Simon; Navickas, Tomas; Grounds, Anton; Rodriguez, Andrea; Webb, Anna; Standing, Eamon; Pearce, Stuart; Sari, Ibrahim; Kiang, Kian; Rattanasonti, Hwanjit; Kraft, Michael; Hensinger, Winfried

    To this point, the entanglement of ions has predominantly been performed using lasers. Using long wavelength radiation with static magnetic field gradients provides an architecture to simplify construction of a large scale quantum computer. The use of microwave-dressed states protects against decoherence from fluctuating magnetic fields, with radio-frequency fields used for qubit manipulation. I will report the realisation of spin-motion entanglement using long-wavelength radiation, and a new method to efficiently prepare dressed-state qubits and qutrits, reducing experimental complexity of gate operations. I will also report demonstration of ground state cooling using long wavelength radiation, which may increase two-qubit entanglement fidelity. I will then report demonstration of a high-fidelity long-wavelength two-ion quantum gate using dressed states. Combining these results with microfabricated ion traps allows for scaling towards a large scale ion trap quantum computer, and provides a platform for quantum simulations of fundamental physics. I will report progress towards the operation of microchip ion traps with extremely high magnetic field gradients for multi-ion quantum gates.

  13. Evolution of a Dark Anti-Cyclone on Saturn Associated with the Great Lightning Storm of 2010/2011 Through the Eyes of Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.

    2012-10-01

    A massive dark anti-cyclonic storm system on Saturn spanning some 7∘ of longitude and 2∘ of latitude was observed by Cassini/VIMS at a planetocentric latitude of 37∘ on 4 January 2012 and 26 January 2012. During this time, it drifted some 54∘ of longitude at a speed of 23.1 ± 0.2 m/s prograde, a drift speed which correlates well with the canonical Voyager (and VIMS) wind profiles for Saturn at this latitude. The spot also drifted northward during this time by 1∘ and became noticeably "squished" in morphology. Using this drift rate and extrapolating backward, we find that the position corresponds to the large (> 5,000 km) anti-cyclone observed by VIMS on 11 May 2011 at 35.4∘ latitude (pc) and 49.4∘ W. longitude. This would represent 8 months of observation of this titanic feature, which was associated with the major lightning storm of 2010-2011, following the spot as it changed in size and morphology and drifted northward. The spot underwent a dramatic shift in shape in the 3 weeks of January, changing from roughly oval to a highly elongated pancake shape as it apparently bumped up against the dark band at 40∘ latitude and experienced a powerful shear. The evolution suggests that we are watching the death throes of this feature in our most recent observations. Finally, the dark spot was darker than surrounding regions in May 2011 and maintained its dark color across all pseudo-continua from 1.0 to 4.0 μm between May 2011 and early January 2012.

  14. Spread of TEM, VIM, SHV, and CTX-M β-Lactamases in Imipenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli Isolated from Egyptian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy Mohammed, El sayed; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Mohammed El sayed, Hanan; Al Johery, Said abd Elmohsen; Abdel Ghani Hassanein, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli resulting from β-lactamases have been reported to be an important cause of nosocomial infections and are a critical therapeutic problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of imipenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolates and detection of blaVIM, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1, and blaCTX-M-9 genes in these clinical isolates in Egyptian hospitals. The isolates were collected from various clinical samples, identified by conventional methods and confirmed by API 20E. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was determined by Kirby-Bauer technique and interpreted according to CLSI. Production of blaVIM, blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M genes was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Direct sequencing from PCR products was subsequently carried out to identify and confirm these β-lactamases genes. Out of 65 isolates, (46.1%) Escherichia coli, (26.2%) Klebsiella pneumoniae, and (10.7%) Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified as the commonest Gram-negative bacilli. 33(50.8%) were imipenem-resistant isolates. 22 isolates (66.7%) carried blaVIM, 24(72.7%) had blaTEM, and 5(15%) showed blaSHV, while 12(36%), 6(18.2%), and 0(0.00%) harbored blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-9, and blaCTX-M-8/25, respectively. There is a high occurrence of β-lactamase genes in clinical isolates and sequence analysis of amplified genes showed differences between multiple SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) sites in the same gene among local isolates in relation to published sequences. PMID:27123005

  15. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  16. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  17. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  18. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  19. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  20. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  1. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  2. Multi-wavelength study of MGRO J2019+37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chao; Chen, Song-Zhan; Yuan, Qiang; Cao, Zhen; He, Hui-Hai; Sheng, Xiang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    MGRO J2019+37, within the Cygnus region, is a bright extended source revealed by Milagro at 12-35 TeV. This source is almost as bright as the Crab Nebula in the northern sky, but is not confirmed by ARGO-YBJ around the TeV scale. Up to now, no obvious counterpart at low energy wavelengths has been found. Hence, MGRO J2019+37 is a rather mysterious object and its VHE γ-ray emission mechanism is worth investigating. In this paper, a brief summary of the multi-wavelength observations from radio to γ-rays is presented. All the available data from XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL at X-ray, and Fermi-LAT at γ-ray bands, are used to get constraints on its emission flux at low energy wavelengths. Then, its possible counterparts and the VHE emission mechanism are discussed.

  3. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  4. Multi-wavelength study of the opposition effect on Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiorgio, K.; Ferrari, C. C.; Rodriguez, S.

    2012-12-01

    The opposition effect manifests itself as an important surge of the radiance factor when the phase angle approaches 0°. Since its discovery on Saturn's rings (1), several effects have been proposed to explain it, such as the Ring-Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (R-SHOE), the Coherent Backscattering Opposition Effect (CBOE) or the SHOE within the regolith that may cover ring particles. The relative importance of all these effects is still badly constraint (2). It is usually assumed that the R-SHOE cannot provide such a narrow peak as observed and is therefore considered as negligible. We will show that if the full viewing and lighting geometry are considered, this effect has to be taken into account, therefore providing a very good probe to measure the thickness and the filling factor of Saturn's Rings. Furthermore, the regolith contributions to the effect, i.e. CBOE and SHOE, depend on its absorption coefficient and its mean free path (3) and therefore should then depend on the wavelength. This is not the case for the R-SHOE because it mostly depends on the filling factor, the thickness and the particle size. We will present a multi-wavelength study of Saturn's rings opposition effect supported by the data of the VIMS-CASSINI instrument (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and show if our understanding of those effects is incomplete as proposed by (4) or not. (1) H,Abhandl.Bayer.Akad.Wiss.K1.II18,172,188 (2) Salo and French, Icarus, 2010 (3) Hapke, Icarus, 2002, (4) Hapke et al., Journal of Geophysical Reasearch, Vol 117, 2012

  5. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-kilobase IncN plasmid carrying the blaVIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Miriagou, V; Papagiannitsis, C C; Kotsakis, S D; Loli, A; Tzelepi, E; Legakis, N J; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2010-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including bla(VIM-1), aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes.

  6. Sequence of pNL194, a 79.3-Kilobase IncN Plasmid Carrying the blaVIM-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Miriagou, V.; Papagiannitsis, C. C.; Kotsakis, S. D.; Loli, A.; Tzelepi, E.; Legakis, N. J.; Tzouvelekis, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of pNL194, a VIM-1-encoding plasmid, is described in this study. pNL194 (79,307 bp) comprised an IncN-characteristic segment (38,940 bp) and a mosaic structure (40,367 bp) including blaVIM-1, aacA7, aadA1, aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA12, aphA1, strA, strB, and sul1. Tn1000 or Tn5501 insertion within fipA probably facilitated recruitment of additional mobile elements carrying resistance genes. PMID:20660690

  7. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  8. Excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence of graphene oxide controlled by strain.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Scott K; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Gang; Wang, Chao; Yang, Feng; Huang, Fuqiang; Wu, Nianqiang

    2017-02-09

    Unlike conventional fluorophores, the fluorescence emission of graphene oxide (GO) sheets can shift hundreds of nanometers as the excitation wavelength increases. The excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence is referred to as a giant red-edge effect and originates in a local reorganization potential slowing down the solvation dynamics of the excited state to the same time scale as the fluorescence lifetime. The present work has discovered that out-of-plane strain in the graphene oxide sheet leads to the intra-layer interaction necessary to slow down the solvation time scale. The oxygen percentage, dopant percentage, disorder, and strain are correlated with the presence and extent of the red-edge effect in oxygen, boron, nitrogen, and fluorine doped graphene oxide. Of these commonly cited possibilities, only out-of-plane strain is directly correlated to the red-edge effect. Furthermore, it is shown that the extent of the red-edge effect, or how far the emission wavelength can shift with increasing excitation wavelength, can be tuned by the electronegativity of the dopant. The present work interprets why the giant red-edge effect is present in some GO sheets but not in other GO sheets.

  9. Multi-wavelength narrow linewidth fiber laser based on distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jingsheng; Qi, Haifeng; Song, Zhiqiang; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2016-09-01

    A narrow linewidth laser configuration based on distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) with eight wavelengths in the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid is presented and realized. In this laser configuration, eight phase-shifted gratings in series are bidirectionally pumped by two 980-nm laser diodes (LDs). The final laser output with over 10-mW power for each wavelength can be obtained, and the maximum power difference within eight wavelengths is 1.2 dB. The laser configuration with multiple wavelengths and uniform power outputs can be very useful in large scaled optical fiber hydrophone fields.

  10. The Evolution of Saturn’s Storm-Perturbed Latitudinal Band Determined from Cassini/VIMS Daytime and Nighttime Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, K. H.; Sromovsky, Larry A.; Fry, Patrick M.; Moimary, Thomas W.; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Saturn’s Great Storm of 2010-2011 was one of the most powerful convective events ever witnessed, as indicated, for example, by its ability to deliver spectrally-identifiable water ice to the top of its convective tower ~200 km above the water vapor condensation level near 20 bar (Sromovsky, L. A., et al., Icarus 226, 402-418. 2013), and by its ability over ~ 6 months to encircle the planet with apparently anvil-like ammonia clouds sheared away from the top of its convective tower(s). Within a half-year after the storm subsided in mid-2011, these globe-encircling anvil-like clouds appeared to have largely disappeared, replaced by a 5-micron-bright band encircling the planet over nearly the same latitude region the storm generated clouds had been, indicating a dramatic decrease in the opacity of aerosols sensitive to 5-micron radiation (heat) emanating from the warm depths of the planet. Here we present quantitative results on the 5-year evolution of this storm-affected, 5-micron-bright region, from its initial appearance associated with a large anti-cyclone that formed in the Spring of 2011 through May 26-27, 2015, using both daytime and nighttime Cassini/VIMS spectral maps. Compared to the “normal”, unperturbed regional cloud structure upstream of the storm as observed on Feb 24, 2011, we find that the initial 5-micron-bright region on May 11, 2011 had lost ~60% of its upper-cloud (100-500 mbar) opacity (i. e., nominally, 2.7 opacity post-storm at 2-microns vs 7.1 pre-storm) and that the pressure of an opaque, putatively NH4SH, optically-thick “sheet” cloud dropped in altitude from a pre-storm level of 2.9 bar to the 3.2-bar level post-storm. Subsequently over the next 4 years, the upper-cloud region recovered half of its lost opacity, reaching ~5.6 on March 21, 2014 (and nearly recovered, to ~ 7 in our tentative May 26-27, 2015 data), corresponding to an e-folding time back to pre-storm opacity of 2.7 years, but the lower cloud has dropped down to the 3

  11. Discovery of Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds against the Metallo-β-lactamase VIM-2 by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Based Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Christopeit, Tony; Carlsen, Trine Josefine O; Helland, Ronny; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S

    2015-11-12

    Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) inhibitors can restore the function of carbapenem antibiotics and therefore help to treat infections of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study, we report novel fragments inhibiting the clinically relevant MBL Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM-2). The fragments were identified from a library of 490 fragments using an orthogonal screening approach based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay combined with an enzyme inhibition assay. The identified fragments showed IC50 values between 14 and 1500 μM and ligand efficiencies (LE) between 0.48 and 0.23 kcal/mol per heavy atom. For two of the identified fragments, crystal structures in complex with VIM-2 were obtained. The identified fragments represent novel inhibitor scaffolds and are good starting points for the design of potent MBL inhibitors. Furthermore, the established SPR based assay and the screening approach can be adapted to other MBLs and in this way improve the drug discovery process for this important class of drug targets.

  12. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  13. Sinusoidal-wavelength-scanning interferometer with double feedback control for real-time distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Osami; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takamasa

    2002-07-01

    In addition to a conventional phase a the interference signal of a sinusoidal-wavelength-scanning interferometer has a phase-modulation amplitude Zb that is proportional to the optical path difference L and amplitude b of the wavelength scan. L and b are controlled by a double feedback system so that the phase alpha and the amplitude Zb are kept at 3pi/2 and pi, respectively. The voltage applied to a device that displaces a reference mirror to change the optical path difference becomes a ruler with scales smaller than a wavelength. Voltage applied to a device that determines the amplitude of the wavelength scan becomes a ruler marking every wavelength. These two rulers enable one to measure an absolute distance longer than a wavelength in real time.

  14. Single-wavelength STED microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Stephen C.

    2011-03-01

    The zero-point STED microscope (US Pat. 5,866,911)1 was the first far-field microscope to overcome the diffraction limit, but optimally it requires two expensive synchronized short-pulsed lasers. Replacing the synchronized pulsed lasers with CW lasers had been proposed to reduce costs1, but this seriously reduced resolution compared to a similarly powered pulsed STED microscope. A recent theoretical and experimental study (Nat. Methods 4, 915 (2007))3 argued that CW STED has better resolution than previously believed, but there appear to be flaws in the theory sufficient to raise questions about its reported experimental confirmation. We describe an alternative approach to reducing cost of the STED microscope while preserving resolution. A portion of the beam from a femtosecond pulsed laser of a wavelength able to excite fluorescence by multiphoton absorption, is passed through a long optical fiber to stretch the pulses to reduce their peak power so they can no longer excite but can quench by stimulated emission. The stretched pulses are shaped into a doughnut profile and then recombined with the first beam for interaction with the specimen. With suitable fluorophores, this instrument should be able to match the resolution performance of the pulsed laser STED microscope using separate lasers. Particularly when added to an existing multiphoton microscope, such performance should be achievable at extremely low added cost.

  15. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  16. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  17. Short-wavelength MEMS-tunable VCSELs.

    PubMed

    Cole, Garrett D; Behymer, Elaine; Bond, Tiziana C; Goddard, Lynford L

    2008-09-29

    We present electrically-injected MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths below 800 nm. Operation in this wavelength range, near the oxygen A-band from 760-780 nm, is attractive for absorption-based optical gas sensing. These fully-monolithic devices are based on an oxide-aperture AlGaAs epitaxial structure and incorporate a suspended dielectric Bragg mirror for wavelength tuning. By implementing electrostatic actuation, we demonstrate the potential for tuning rates up to 1 MHz, as well as a wide wavelength tuning range of 30 nm (767-737 nm).

  18. Adding the p16(INK4a) marker to the traditional 3-marker (ER/Vim/CEA) panel engenders no supplemental benefit in distinguishing between primary endocervical and endometrial adenocarcinomas in a tissue microarray study.

    PubMed

    Han, Chih-Ping; Lee, Ming-Yung; Kok, Lai-Fong; Ruan, Alexandra; Wu, Tina S; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yi

    2009-09-01

    Endocervical adenocarcinomas (ECAs) and endometrial adenocarcinomas (EMAs) are malignancies that affect the uterus; however, their biologic behaviors are quite different. This distinction has clinical significance, because the appropriate therapy may depend on the site of tumor origin. In this study, we not only compare the individual expression status of 4 immunomarkers [estrogen receptor (ER), vimentin (Vim), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and p16], but also evaluate whether p16 adds value to the ER/Vim/CEA panel characteristics and performance in distinguishing between primary ECA and EMA. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed using paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissues from 38 hysterectomy specimens, including 14 ECAs and 24 EMAs. Tissue microarray sections were immunostained with 4 antibodies, by the avidin-biotin complex method for antigen visualization. The staining intensity and area extent of the immunohistochemical reactions were evaluated using the semiquantitative scoring system. The 3 markers (ER, Vim, CEA) and their respective panel expressions showed statistically significant (P<0.05) frequency differences in ECA and EMA tumors. The p16 marker also revealed a significant frequency difference (P<0.05) between ECA and EMA, but did not demonstrate any supplementary benefit to the traditional 3-marker panel. In conclusion, when histomorphologic and clinical doubt exist as to the primary site of origin, we suggest that the conventional 3-marker (ER/Vim/CEA) panel is appropriate. Ancillary p16-marker testing does not add value to the 3-marker panel in distinguishing between primary ECA and EMA.

  19. A climatological study of the composition of Titan upper atmosphere from VIMS-IR soundings in limb geometry has been carried out for HCN, C_2H_2 and CH_4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriconi, M. L.; Adriani, A.; Dinelli, B. M.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Filacchione, G.; D'Aversa, E.

    A climatological study of the composition of Titan upper atmosphere from VIMS-IR soundings in limb geometry has been carried out for (HCN), (C_2H_2) and (CH_4). The results of this study are here presented for the 2004-2012 period.

  20. Maps based on 53 GHz (5.7 mm wavelength)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Maps based on 53 GHz (5.7 mm wavelength) observations made with the DMR over the entire 4-year mission (top) on a scale from 0 - 4 K, showing the near-uniformity of the CMB brightness, (middle) on a scale intended to enhance the contrast due to the dipole described in the slide 19 caption, and (bottom) following subtraction of the dipole component. Emission from the Milky Way Galaxy is evident in the bottom image. See slide 19 caption for information about map smoothing and projection.

  1. A ten-year surveillance study of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a tertiary care Greek university hospital: predominance of KPC- over VIM- or NDM-producing isolates.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulou, Aikaterini; Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Bartzavali, Christina; Vamvakopoulou, Sophia; Marangos, Markos; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Christofidou, Myrto

    2016-03-01

    Resistance patterns and carbapenemase gene presence among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from the University General Hospital of Patras, Greece during a ten-year period were analysed under a surveillance programme for multi-drug-resistant bacteria. From 2005 to 2014, K. pneumoniae isolates from clinically significant specimens were identified by the Vitek 2 Advanced Expert System. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the agar disc diffusion method and Etest. The strains were tested for the presence of blaVIM, blaIMP, blaKPC, blaNDM and blaOXA-48 genes by PCR. PFGE of chromosomal Xbal DNA digests was performed. A total of 3449 K. pneumoniae isolates were recovered during the last decade. Among them, 1668 (48 %) were carbapenemase-producing: 1333 (80%) K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-, 286 (17%) Verona imipenemase (VIM), 45 (3%) KPC- and VIM-, and four New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM)-producing. Their resistance rates to gentamicin, colistin and tigecycline were 41%, 23% and 16%, respectively. VIM-producing K. pneumoniae were isolated in 2005 and since 2008 have been endemic. KPC-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) isolates were introduced in 2008 and until now represent the predominant carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae in our institution. PFGE of 97 KPC-Kp strains identified three types: A, 84 (87%); B, 11 (11%); and E, two (2%). Eleven co-producing KPC and VIM K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to PFGE B. The four NDM-positives were classified to type F. The number of K. pneumoniae bacteraemias increased during the study period, which may be solely attributed to the increase of carbapenemase-producing isolates. The threat of carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae emphasizes the urgent need for implementation of infection control measures and budgetary allocations to infection control.

  2. Wavelength specific excitation of gold nanoparticle thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Thomas M.; James, Kurtis T.; Beharic, Jasmin; Moiseeva, Evgeniya V.; Keynton, Robert S.; O'Toole, Martin G.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) continue to empower researchers with the ability to sense and actuate at the micro scale. Thermally driven MEMS components are often used for their rapid response and ability to apply relatively high forces. However, thermally driven MEMS often have high power consumption and require physical wiring to the device. This work demonstrates a basis for designing light-powered MEMS with a wavelength specific response. This is accomplished by patterning surface regions with a thin film containing gold nanoparticles that are tuned to have an absorption peak at a particular wavelength. The heating behavior of these patterned surfaces is selected by the wavelength of laser directed at the sample. This method also eliminates the need for wires to power a device. The results demonstrate that gold nanoparticle films are effective wavelength-selective absorbers. This "hybrid" of infrared absorbent gold nanoparticles and MEMS fabrication technology has potential applications in light-actuated switches and other mechanical structures that must bend at specific regions. Deposition methods and surface chemistry will be integrated with three-dimensional MEMS structures in the next phase of this work. The long-term goal of this project is a system of light-powered microactuators for exploring cellular responses to mechanical stimuli, increasing our fundamental understanding of tissue response to everyday mechanical stresses at the molecular level.

  3. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  4. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  5. GHRS Cycle 5 Echelle Wavelength Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1995-07-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle A. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  6. Emergence of a pandrug-resistant VIM-1-producing Providencia stuartii clonal strain causing an outbreak in a Greek intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Douka, Evangelia; Perivolioti, Efstathia; Kraniotaki, Elena; Fountoulis, Kimon; Economidou, Foteini; Tsakris, Athanassios; Skoutelis, Athanassios; Routsi, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe an outbreak caused by a pandrug-resistant Providencia stuartii strain involving 15 critically ill patients in a Greek intensive care unit (ICU) during September-November 2011. All isolates harboured the blaVIM-1 gene and a class 1 integron structure of 1913 bp as well as blaSHV-5 and blaTEM-1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrated that isolates from all 15 patients belonged to a single P. stuartii clonal type. As all of the infected patients were hospitalised during overlapping time periods, horizontal intra-ICU transmission was considered as the main route for the dissemination of the outbreak strain. The outbreak ended following reinforcement of infection control measures, including implementation of additional barrier precautions for infected patients.

  7. A preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-VAR work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of double melted (vacuum induction melted (VIM), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR)), solution treated, work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 alloy bar (5.50 in. (13.97 cm) diameter). Two sets of tensile specimens, one direct single aged and the other direct double aged, were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 200 ksi (1378.96 MPa) and 168 ksi (1158.33 MPa), respectively, were realized at ambient temperature, for the direct double aged specimen. No failures occurred in the single or double edged longitudinal and transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test showed no mechanical property degradation.

  8. Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas spp. in Korea: High Prevalence of Isolates with VIM-2 Type and Emergence of Isolates with IMP-1 Type

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Park, Ae Ja; Kim, Moon Yeun; Lee, Hee Joo; Cho, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Jung Oak; Yong, Dongeun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Two Korean nationwide studies showed that metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs)-producing-Pseudomonas spp. are not rare. The aim of this study was to assess the trends of MBL-producing isolates among imipenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas spp. Materials and Methods Imipenem-resistant clinical isolates were collected from 23 hospitals and one commercial laboratory participating in the KONSAR program in 2005. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect MBL genes. Results Alleles of MBL genes were detected in 10.8% of 415 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 66.7% of 12 P. putida isolates from 18 of 24 hospitals/laboratory. Among the 14 IMP-1-like and 39 VIM-2-like MBLs, emergence of IMP-6 was detected for the first time. Conclusion Prevalence of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa has not significantly increased, but IMP-6 emerged in P. aeruginosa. PMID:19568593

  9. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Campbell, E.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Storm, E.

    1985-03-05

    Three important high-temperature, high-density experiments were conducted recently using the 10-TW, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous experiments with long wavelength lasers (lambda greater than or equal to 1..mu..m) in which inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray laser, and other high-temperature physics concepts were being tested. The demonstrations were: (1) large-scale plasmas (typical dimensions of up to 1000 laser wavelengths) were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped. (2) Deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 g/cm/sup 3/ and a pressure of 10/sup 10/ atm. (3) A 700-fold amplification of soft x rays by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 A (62 eV) from Se/sup +24/ ions was observed in a laser-generated plasma. Isoelectronic scaling to 155 A (87 eV) in Y/sup +29/ was also demonstrated.

  10. In70 of Plasmid pAX22, a blaVIM-1-Containing Integron Carrying a New Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase Gene Cassette

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2001-01-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to β-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-β-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a blaVIM-1 determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the blaVIM-1 gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3′)-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3′)-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5′ and 3′ conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3′ conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most β-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  11. First description of NDM-1-, KPC-2-, VIM-2- and IMP-4-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in a single Chinese teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wan, L-G; Deng, Q; Cao, X-W; Yu, Y; Xu, Q-F

    2015-01-01

    A total of 180 non-duplicate carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were recovered from patients hospitalized between December 2010 and January 2012 at a Chinese hospital. Eight KPC-2, four NDM-1, one VIM-2, and five KPC-2 plus IMP-4 producers were identified and all were multidrug resistant due to the presence of other resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (CTX-M-15, SHV-12), 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtB) and plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance determinants (qnrA, B, S, aac(6')-Ib-cr). Nine K. pneumoniae clones (Kpn-A1/ST395, Kpn-A3/ST11, Kpn-A2/ST134, Kpn-B/ST263, Kpn-C/ST37, Kpn-D/ST39, Kpn-E/ST1151, Kpn-F/ST890, Kpn-G/ST1153) were identified. bla KPC-2 was located on transferable ~65 kb IncL/M (ST395, ST11, ST134, ST39) and ~100 kb IncA/C (ST37, ST1153, ST890) plasmids, respectively. On the other hand, bla NDM-1 was associated with a ~70 kb IncA/C plasmid (ST263). However, non-typable plasmids of ~40 kb containing bla VIM-2 were detected in the ST1151 clone. This work reports the first co-occurrence of four diverse types of carbapenemase of K. pneumoniae clones from a single hospital in China. IncA/C, IncL/M, and other successful plasmids may be important for the dissemination of carbapenemases, producing a complex epidemiological picture.

  12. Extensively drug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates containing blaVIM-2 and elements of Salmonella genomic island 2: a new genetic resistance determinant in Northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M; Marshall, Steven H; Ray, Amy J; Rather, Philip N; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Dumford, Donald; O'Shea, Patrick; Domitrovic, T Nicholas J; Salata, Robert A; Chavda, Kalyan D; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Vila, Alejandro J; Haussler, Susanne; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenems are a mainstay of treatment for infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Carbapenem resistance mediated by metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) remains uncommon in the United States, despite the worldwide emergence of this group of enzymes. Between March 2012 and May 2013, we detected MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in a university-affiliated health care system in northeast Ohio. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients, defined the resistance determinants and structure of the genetic element harboring the blaMBL gene through genome sequencing, and typed MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seven patients were affected that were hospitalized at three community hospitals, a long-term-care facility, and a tertiary care center; one of the patients died as a result of infection. Isolates belonged to sequence type 233 (ST233) and were extensively drug resistant (XDR), including resistance to all fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams; two isolates were nonsusceptible to colistin. The blaMBL gene was identified as blaVIM-2 contained within a class 1 integron (In559), similar to the cassette array previously detected in isolates from Norway, Russia, Taiwan, and Chicago, IL. Genomic sequencing and assembly revealed that In559 was part of a novel 35-kb region that also included a Tn501-like transposon and Salmonella genomic island 2 (SGI2)-homologous sequences. This analysis of XDR strains producing VIM-2 from northeast Ohio revealed a novel recombination event between Salmonella and P. aeruginosa, heralding a new antibiotic resistance threat in this region's health care system.

  13. Design of arrayed waveguide gratings for optical wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Jane C.

    1998-12-01

    With the ever increasing demand on transmission capacity, it is important to utilize the bandwidth of existing fiber through optical wavelength division multiplexing. An arrayed waveguide grating offers a compact and stable solution that can function both as a multiplexer and a demultiplexer. The basic structure of the device consists of two star couplers connected by an array of waveguides to form a grating. The device can be scaled to support a large number of narrowly spaced wavelength channels. The major focus of this thesis is on developing the tools and concepts for the design and analysis of such devices. A simple linear systems model, that includes the discrete grating properties, waveguide mode field profiles for the waveguide grating array, and the Fourier transform operation of the star couplers, is introduced to study the transmission characteristics. A modified finite difference beam propagation method (BPM) for cylindrical coordinates is formulated for analysis of the radially diverging/converging waveguide array when the waveguides are close enough for mutual coupling. The combination of BPM with the linear systems model forms the basis for simulation of the whole device. Factors that contribute to the performance of the device in terms of channel uniformity, crosstalk level, sensitivity of center wavelength, wavelength dispersion and polarization effects are considered. Issues that related to the layout geometry are also examined. The predictions of our analysis are confirmed by the design and testing of a five-channel arrayed waveguide grating device based on SiO2/Si planar waveguide technology. It is designed for use with a multi-wavelength VCSEL array centered at 850 nm. Experimental results show good agreement with simulation.

  14. Multiple-wavelength free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvinskis, Robert; Giggenbach, Dirk; Henniger, Hennes; Perlot, Nicolas; David, Florian

    2003-07-01

    Free-space optical communications systems in the atmosphere, based on intensity modulation and direct detection, are heavily affected by fading caused by turbulence cells of varying scale and motion. Several data sets of fading measurements under different scenarios have been recorded demonstrating this effect. In this paper we introduce a form of free-space laser communications involving a source operating on several wavelengths. The goal is to overcome atmospheric interference on a communications link. We have performed simulations using the DLR PILab Matlab toolbox. These indicate the extent to which the turbulence and beam properties interact. Experimental investigations are planned. Further properties are also taken into account, including the choice of appropriate laser bandwidth and wavelengths, the effect of atmospheric absorption from aerosols and molecular absorption lines, as well as effects of atmospheric structure on beam propagation. Possible scenarios for application of this scheme will be presented as well.

  15. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, R B; Grist, E; Thompson, K; Woodhead, A D

    1993-01-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm--the UV-A and visible spectral regions. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8341684

  16. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Sub-wavelength focusing meta-lens.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-03-25

    We show that a planar plasmonic metamaterial with spatially variable meta-atom parameters can focus transmitted light into sub-wavelength hot-spots located beyond the near-field of the metamaterial. By nano-structuring a gold film we created an array of meta-lenses generating foci of 160 nm (0.2λ) in diameter when illuminated by a wavelength of 800 nm. We attribute the occurrence of sub-wavelength hotspots beyond the near field to the phenomenon of superoscillation.

  18. High Power Short Wavelength Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    Unlimited güä^äsjäsiiiüüü X NRTC-77-43R P I High Power Short Wavelength Laser Development November 1977 D. B. Cohn and W. B. Lacina...NO NRTC-77-43R, «. TITLE fana »uetjjitj BEFORE COMPLETING FORM CIPIENT’S CATALOO NUMBER KIGH.POWER SHORT WAVELENGTH LASER DEVELOPMENT , 7...fWhtn Data Enterte NRTC-77-43R HIGH POWER SHORT WAVELENGTH LASER DEVELOPMENT ARPA Order Number: Program Code Number: Contract Number: Principal

  19. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  20. Wavelength multicasting in silicon photonic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Lee, Benjamin G; Turner-Foster, Amy C; Foster, Mark A; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L; Bergman, Keren

    2010-08-16

    We demonstrate a scalable, energy-efficient, and pragmatic method for high-bandwidth wavelength multicasting using FWM in silicon photonic nanowires. We experimentally validate up to a sixteen-way multicast of 40-Gb/s NRZ data using spectral and temporal responses, and evaluate the resulting data integrity degradation using BER measurements and power penalty performance metrics. We further examine the impact of this wavelength multicasting scalability on conversion efficiency. Finally, we experimentally evaluate up to a three-way multicast of 160-Gb/s pulsed-RZ data using spectral and temporal responses, representing the first on-chip wavelength multicasting of pulsed-RZ data.

  1. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  2. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  3. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2010-01-01

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the 3P0, 3P1, and 3P2 metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  4. A novel wavelength availability advertisement based ASON routing protocol implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Wanyi

    2005-11-01

    operator can make a good trade off between the wavelength availability advertisement Protocol Average Overhead and Blocking Probability by adopting and adjusting the routing update triggers; and the last is that wavelength availability advertisement throughout the optical network is applicable and our ASON routing protocol implementation could be applied in ASON when its scale is not too large and if the calls do not arrive and leave the network in a too frequent pace.

  5. Multi-wavelength characterization of the outskirts of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Judit; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    We have explored late-type spiral galaxies with truncated radial surface brightness profiles. Based on the study of optical color profiles, Bakos et al. (2008) suggested that truncated (TYPE II) galaxies have a generally older stellar population in their outer regions: one observable consequence of this would be a strong dependence of the structural parameters of the outer disk on the observing wavelength. To corroborate this result, we obtained surface brightness profiles using data from GALEX(UV), SDSS(optical), UKIDSS(NIR) and SPITZER-IRAC(IR). We have characterized the behaviour of the outer disk by obtaining the ratio of the inner and outer scale-lengths. Here we show the example of NGC0450. Our results suggest that there is an existing general trend of the scale-length ratio: from bluer to redder bands the scale-length ratio decreases, which is in accordance with the idea of the old smooth stellar disk in the outer disk.

  6. Apparatus for shifting the wavelength of light

    DOEpatents

    McCulla, William H.; Allen, Jr., John D.

    1983-01-01

    A light beam is reflected back and forth between a rotating body having a retroreflection corner at opposite ends thereof and a fixed mirror to change the wavelength of the light beam by the Doppler effect.

  7. Low Noise Mid-Wavelength IR Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-19

    Several ICIP structures were grown by MBE and fabricated into devices with a cut -off wavelength near 4-5 µm. Experimental results obtained from these... cut -off wavelength near 4-5 µm. Experimental results obtained from these devices have indicated improved device performance at high temperatures...zone (3), consisting of several GaSb/AlSb QWs. Zone (2) is composed of a series of digitally-graded InAs/AlSb QWs that form an energy ladder with

  8. SALSA - A lunar submillimeter-wavelength array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Marsh, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design for a Synthesis Array for Lunar Submillimeter Astronomy (SALSA) is described with emphasis on information relevant to its implementation. SALSA is optimized to synthesize images of astronomical sources at wavelengths between 60 and 300 microns with an angular resolution of 10 milliarcseconds at the shortest wavelength. The discussion covers engineering considerations and descriptions of subsystems, including the environmental shield, antenna, and beam transport.

  9. A three wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Town, R; Rosen, M

    2010-12-16

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths, and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry.

  10. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths. PMID:27659800

  11. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-09-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths.

  12. Wavelength Calibration of the VLT-UVES Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.; Griest, Kim

    2010-11-01

    We attempt to measure possible miscalibration of the wavelength scale of the VLT-UVES spectrograph. We take spectra of QSO HE0515-4414 through the UVES iodine cell which contains thousands of well-calibrated iodine lines and compare these lines to the wavelength scale from the standard thorium-argon pipeline calibration. Analyzing three exposures of this z = 1.71 QSO, we find two distinct types of calibration shifts needed to correct the Th/Ar wavelength scale. First, there is an overall average velocity shift of between 100 m s-1 and 500 m s-1 depending upon the exposure. Second, within a given exposure, we find intra-order velocity distortions of 100 m s-1 up to more than 200 m s-1. These calibration errors are similar to, but smaller than, those found earlier in the Keck HIRES spectrometer. We discuss the possible origins of these two types of miscalibration. We also explore the implications of these calibration errors on the systematic error in measurements of Δ α \\over α, the change in the fine-structure constant derived from measurement of the relative redshifts of absorption lines in QSO absorption systems. The overall average, exposure-dependent shifts should be less relevant for fine-structure work, but the intra-order shifts have the potential to affect these results. Using either our measured calibration offsets or a Gaussian model with sigma of around 90 m s-1, Monte Carlo mock experiments find errors in Δ α \\over α of between 1 × 10-6 N -1/2 sys and 3 × 10-6 N -1/2 sys, where N sys is the number of systems used and the range is due to dependence on how many metallic absorption lines in each system are compared.

  13. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of high gradient ({ge} 1 GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented.

  14. Semiconductor devices for optical communications in 1 micron band of wavelength. [gallium indium arsenide phosphide lasers and diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suematsu, Y.; Iga, K.

    1980-01-01

    Crystal growth and the characteristics of semiconductor lasers and diodes for the long wavelength band used in optical communications are examined. It is concluded that to utilize the advantages of this band, it is necessary to have a large scale multiple wavelength communication, along with optical cumulative circuits and optical exchangers.

  15. The 2007 International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM), JCGM 200:2008 [ISO/IEC Guide 99]: Meeting the need for intercontinentally understood concepts and their associated intercontinentally agreed terms.

    PubMed

    De Bièvre, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Unambiguous and consistent concepts and terms such as measurand, metrological traceability, measurement uncertainty, comparability of measurement results, target measurement uncertainty, etc., must govern the description of measurements in order to enable a valid comparison of measurement results. That is not yet the case as numerous workshops over the last decade have shown worldwide and as chemical literature continuously displays. For international trade in food and feed to be fair, for border-crossing implementation of environmental regulations to be the same for all parties concerned, for interchangeability of results of clinical measurements to become a reality, for any border-crossing interpretation of measurement results in chemistry to become possible, well understood and mutually accepted, common and well defined concepts and terms are essential. Similarly, their translations from one language--English--to 30-40 other languages, must be realized and fixed unequivocally. Countries using English as common language have not yet fully realized that they are at a considerable advantage over countries where such translated terms describing concepts may not yet be available, let alone understood and accepted. A number of ambiguities in the definitions and terms are described which illustrate the importance of the revision (1997-2007) of the International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM), henceforth conveniently called "VIM3", especially since chemical measurement is covered in this VIM for the first time in history: 'measurand' 'metrological comparability of measurement results' 'metrology' 'metrological compatibility of measurement results' 'measurement result' 'metrological traceability' (incl 'to the SI') 'measurement uncertainty' 'target measurement uncertainty' 'calibration hierarchy' 'quantity' and many others. It is concluded that the revised VIM is of primordial importance for good understanding within and between the measurement communities worldwide.

  16. Geomorphological significance of Ontario Lacus on Titan: Integrated interpretation of Cassini VIMS, ISS and RADAR data and comparison with the Etosha Pan (Namibia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Lopez Gonzalez, T.; Sotin, C.; Tobie, G.; Fleurant, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-04-01

    Ontario Lacus is the largest lake of the whole southern hemisphere of Titan, Saturn's major moon. It has been imaged twice by each of the Cassini imaging systems (Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) in 2004 and 2005, Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2007 and 2009 and RADAR in 2009 and 2010). We compile a geomorphological map and derive a "hydrogeological" interpretation of Ontario Lacus, based on a joint analysis of ISS, VIMS and RADAR SAR datasets, along with the T49 altimetric profile acquired in December 2008. The morphologies observed on Ontario Lacus are compared to landforms of a semi-arid terrestrial analog, which resembles Titan's lakes: the Etosha Pan, located in the Owambo Basin (Namibia). The Etosha Pan is a flat-floored depression formed by dissolution, under semi-arid conditions, of a surface evaporitic layer (calcretes) controlled by groundwater vertical motions. We infer that Ontario Lacus is an extremely flat and shallow depression lying in an alluvial plain surrounded by small mountain ranges under climatic conditions similar to those of terrestrial semi-arid regions. Channels are seen in the southern part of Ontario Lacus in VIMS and RADAR data, acquired at a 2-years time interval. Their constancy in location with time implies that the southern portion of the depression is probably not fully covered by a liquid layer at the time of the observations, and that they most probably run on the floor of the depression. A shallow layer of surface liquids, corresponding to the darkest portions of the RADAR images, would thus cover about 53% of the surface area of the depression, of which almost 70% is located in its northern part. These liquid-covered parts of the depression, where liquid ethane was previously identified, are interpreted as topographic lows where the "alkanofer" raises above the depression floor. The rest of the depression, and mostly its southern part, is interpreted as a flat and smooth exposed floor, likely composed of a

  17. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, David E.

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E x B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  18. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  19. Effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2016-09-01

    In microholographic recording, expensive laser diodes having no spectrum broadening (single mode) and no wavelength variation are used. On the other hand, in conventional optical disk systems, cheap laser diodes having spectrum broadening (multimode) and wavelength variation are used. It is a great advantage if the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems can be used for microholographic recording. Therefore, the effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The laser diodes were modeled so that the full width at 1/e2 maximum of the spectrum was 0.8 nm and the center wavelength was 405 nm. The numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85 and the thickness of the recording medium was 300 μm. The diffraction efficiency of the diffracted beam from a microhologram was calculated using the coupled wave theory and the following results were obtained. The diffraction efficiency decreased by three orders of magnitude by replacing single-mode laser diodes with multimode laser diodes, which makes it necessary to enhance the readout signal. The tolerance of the optical path length difference between the signal and reference beams was -50 110 μm, which makes it necessary to adjust the optical path length difference. The tolerance of the wavelength variation was 405 +/- 0.5 nm, which makes it necessary to select the laser diodes. The conclusion was that it is not practical to use the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems for microholographic recording.

  20. The Ongoing Evolution of a Long-Lived Anticyclone in Saturn’s Great Storm Region as seen by Cassini/VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Once the home of the enigmatic String of Pearls feature on Saturn, the region of 34o N was the scene of a titanic storm system that swept around the planet in late 2010/2011. It left two things in its wake - a clear 5-μm bright zone around the planet, and a curious and persistent anticylone, both of which remain to this day. We have observed this anticyclone with Cassini/VIMS since 2011 and find that it seems to oscillate up and down latitudinally in this stormy region. Centered at 35.9o planetocentric latitude in May 2011, it drifted northward to 37.8o in 2012, hovered near 37o through 2013, then settled southward back down to ~35.9o in 2014. 2015 has it once again drifting northward to ~37o. It also periodically interacts with the dark band above it exchanging material in August 2013 and May 2015. We measured a prograde zonal drift speed of ~22 m/s in 2012, increasing as much as 60% through 2013, then relaxing back to a more moderate ~15 m/s in 2014 as the oval sagged southward. We expect its current 15.4 m/s rate to increase if it continues to drift northward in latitude, following the Voyager wind profile. The feature has varied in size as well, spanning 4.9o x 3.2o in 2011, elongating zonally to 7.3o x 2.9o by 2013, contracting in 2014 to an average of ~5.5o x ~2.9o, and growing again to ~9o x ~4o in 2015, with an extended tendril of material streaming off one edge in May. By August, it was symmetrically oval again. It has varied in terms of cloudiness, being ~90% 5-μm dark (obscured) in 2011, whereas by 2013 it was mostly bright (clear) with a thin dark edge, now returning to ~90% dark in 2015. By utilizing night observations to isolate thermal flux, we find that the mean 5-μm flux coming from the anticyclone has diminished steadily by about 50% since 2013. The storm latitude of ~34o N itself has remained remarkably 5-μm bright since 2011, but has begun to dim as well, and is now bisected by a thin dark cloudy ribbon which appears associated with the

  1. Wavelength-codified fiber laser hydrogen detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigosa-Blanch, A.; Díez, A.; González-Segura, A.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.

    2005-11-01

    We report a scheme for an optical hydrogen detector that codifies the information in wavelength. The system is based on an erbium-doped fiber laser with two coupled cavities and a Palladium-coated tapered fiber within one of the laser cavities. The tapered fiber acts as the hydrogen-sensing element. When the sensing element is exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere, its attenuation decreases changing the cavity losses. This change leads the system to switch lasing from the wavelength of the auxiliary cavity to the characteristic wavelength of the cavity which contains the sensing element. The detection level can be shifted by adjusting the reflective elements of the cavity containing the sensing element.

  2. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  3. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  4. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  5. Wavelength Dependence on the Space Charge Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Teague, L.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2012-05-31

    The distribution of the internal electric field in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) materials has significant effects on the charge collection ability. Light exposure at various wavelengths is a relatively unexplored process that alters charge collection at the anode contact. The use of multiple wavelengths can target charge carriers at various trap energies and positions throughout the crystal. The controlled illumination increases charge collection by releasing trapped electron and hole carriers in the crystal despite differences in light energy. Our study presents the results from our investigation of the effect of external illumination of CZT on the internal electric field via the Pockels effect. The space charge collection is further analyzed based on location and intensity relative to the specific wavelength of illumination.

  6. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  8. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  9. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  10. New design for a wavelength demultiplexing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethmann, Konrad; Orghici, Rozalia; Pichler, Elke; Zywietz, Urs; Schimdt, Thomas; Gleissner, Uwe; Kelb, Christian; Roth, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Carsten; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG) originally designed as demultiplexing device and manufactured with well established silicon wafer technology are already used successfully as compact spectrometers with high resolution1. In this paper, the concept of a new design for a wavelength demultiplexing device based on tailor-made polymers is presented. The motivation for a new design is a smaller footprint of the device and the avoidance of bended waveguides and the associated losses. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize the design. Using microscope projection lithography and hot embossing a first polymer based device was realized. Its characterization and the achieved performance in terms of resolution and covered wavelength range will be discussed.

  11. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  12. New method for spectrofluorometer monochromator wavelength calibration.

    PubMed

    Paladini, A A; Erijman, L

    1988-09-01

    A method is presented for wavelength calibration of spectrofluorometer monochromators. It is based on the distortion that the characteristic absorption bands of glass filters (holmium or didymium oxide), commonly used for calibration of spectrophotometers, introduce in the emitted fluorescence of fluorophores like indole, diphenyl hexatriene, xylene or rhodamine 6G. Those filters or a well characterized absorber with sharp bands like benzene vapor can be used for the same purpose. The wavelength calibration accuracy obtained with this method is better than 0.1 nm, and requires no modification in the geometry of the spectrofluorometer sample compartment.

  13. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  14. Optimal wavelength selection for noncontact reflection photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral Martinez, Luis F.; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we obtain backscattered signals from human forehead for wavelengths from 380 to 980 nm. The results reveal bands with strong pulsatile signals that carry useful information. We describe those bands as the most suitable wavelengths in the visible and NIR regions from which heart and respiratory rate parameters can be derived using long distance non-contact reflection photoplethysmography analysis. The latter results show the feasibility of a novel technique for remotely detection of vital signs in humans. This technique, which may include morphological analysis or maps of tissue oxygenation, is a further step to real non-invasive remote monitoring of patients.

  15. Millimeter wavelength spectroscopy and continuum studies of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbout, P. A.; Davis, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Careful observations were made at 86.1 GHz to derive the absolute brightness temperatures of the Sun (7914 + or - 192 K), Venus (357.5 + or - 13.1 K), Jupiter (179.4 + or - 4.7K), and Saturn (153.4 + or - 4.8 K) with a standard error of about 3%. This is a significant improvement in accuracy over previous results. A stable transmitter and novel superheterodyne receiver were constructed and used to determine the effective collecting area of the MWO 4.9 m antenna relative to a previously calibrated standard gain horn. The thermal scale was set by calibrating the radiometer with carefully constructed and tested hot and cold loads. The brightness temperatures may be used to establish an absolute calibration scale and to determine the antenna aperture and beam efficiencies of other radio telescopes at 3.5 mm wavelength.

  16. Wavelength-Selective Photovoltaics for Power-generating Greenhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Sue; Loik, Michael; Shugar, David; Corrado, Carley; Wade, Catherine; Alers, Glenn

    2014-03-01

    While photovoltaic (PV) technologies are being developed that have the potential for meeting the cost target of 0.50/W per module, the cost of installation combined with the competition over land resources could curtail the wide scale deployment needed to generate the Terrawatts per year required to meet the world's electricity demands. To be cost effective, such large scale power generation will almost certainly require PV solar farms to be installed in agricultural and desert areas, thereby competing with food production, crops for biofuels, or the biodiversity of desert ecosystems. This requirement has put the PV community at odds with both the environmental and agricultural groups they would hope to support through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. A possible solution to this challenge is the use of wavelength-selective solar collectors, based on luminescent solar concentrators, that transmit wavelengths needed for plant growth while absorbing the remaining portions of the solar spectrum and converting it to power. Costs are reduced through simultaneous use of land for both food and power production, by replacing the PV cells by inexpensive long-lived luminescent materials as the solar absorber, and by integrating the panels directly into existing greenhouse or cold frames. Results on power generation and crop yields for year-long trials done at academic and commercial greenhouse growers in California will be presented.

  17. CBET Experiments with Wavelength Shifting at the Nike Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, James; McKenty, P.; Bates, J.; Myatt, J.; Shaw, J.; Obenschain, K.; Oh, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Tsung, F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Serlin, V.

    2016-10-01

    Studies conducted at NRL during 2015 searched for cross-beam energy transport (CBET) in small-scale plastic targets with strong gradients in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The targets were irradiated by two widely separated beam arrays in a geometry similar to polar direct drive. Data from these shots will be presented that show a lack of a clear CBET signature even with wavelength shifting of one set of beams. This poster will discuss the next campaign being planned, in part, with modelling codes developed at LLE. The next experiments will use a target configuration optimized to create stronger SBS growth. The primary path under consideration is to increase scale lengths 5-10x over the previous study by using exploding foils or low density foams. In addition to simulations, the presentation will also discuss improvements to the diagnostic suite and laser operations; for example, a new set of etalons will be available for the next campaign that should double the range of wavelength shifting between the two beam arrays. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  18. Synthesized femtosecond laser pulse source for two-wavelength contouring with simultaneously recorded digital holograms.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Thomas; Steinmeyer, Günter; Grunwald, Ruediger; Falldorf, Claas; Bonitz, Jens; Kaufmann, Christian; Kebbel, Volker; Griebner, Uwe

    2009-02-16

    A dual-wavelength femtosecond laser pulse source and its application for digital holographic single-shot contouring are presented. The synthesized laser source combines sub-picosecond time scales with a wide reconstruction range. A center wavelength distance of the two separated pulses of only 15 nm with a high contrast was demonstrated by spectral shaping of the 50 nm broad seed spectrum centered at 800 nm. Owing to the resulting synthetic wavelength, the scan depth range without phase ambiguity is extended to the 100-microm-range. Single-shot dual-wavelength imaging is achieved by using two CMOS cameras in a Twyman-Green interferometer, which is extended by a polarization encoding sequence to separate the holograms. The principle of the method is revealed, and experimental results concerning a single axis scanner mirror operating at a resonance frequency of 0.5 kHz are presented. Within the synthetic wavelength, the phase difference information of the object was unambiguously retrieved and the 3D-shape calculated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that single-shot two-wavelength contouring on a sub-ps time scale is reported.

  19. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-ESR-VAR work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion resistance of triple melted vacuum induction melted (VIM), electro-slag remelted (ESR), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR), solution treated, work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 alloy bars 4.00 in. (10.16) and 5.75 in. (14.60 cm) diameter. Tensile, charpy v-notched impact, and compact tension specimens were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 220 ksi (1516.85 MPa) and 200 ksi (1378.00 MPa) respectively, were realized at ambient temperature. Additional charpy impact and compact tension tests were performed at -100 F (-73 C). Longitudinal charpy impact strength equalled or exceeded 12.0 ft-lbs (16.3 Joules) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) while longitudinal compact (LC) tension fracture toughness strength remained above 79 ksi (86.80 MPa) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) temperatures. No failures occurred in the longitudinal or transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test indicated no mechanical property degradation.

  20. Dissemination of clinical isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca harboring CMY-31, VIM-1, and a New OXY-2-type variant in the community.

    PubMed

    Tsakris, Athanassios; Poulou, Aggeliki; Markou, Fani; Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Kristo, Ioulia; Pournaras, Spyros

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the epidemiological link of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca isolates causing community-onset infections among patients attending our outpatient department and to investigate the underlying resistance mechanisms. The isolates were tested by agar dilution MICs, phenotypic carbapenemase testing, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PCR assays and nucleotide sequencing were employed for the identification of bla gene types and the mapping of the integron-containing metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene. During the study period (January 2005 to April 2007), nine broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. oxytoca clinical isolates were prospectively collected from separate outpatients with urinary tract infections. In all cases, the patients had been hospitalized or exposed to health care facilities during the preceding year. Molecular typing revealed that all isolates belonged to the same K. oxytoca clonal type, which contained five PFGE subtypes. A novel chromosomal OXY-2 β-lactamase type variant (OXY-2-9) was detected in all isolates, but no mutations in the promoter region justifying bla(OXY) gene overproduction were detected. In addition, all isolates harbored the plasmidic CMY-31 (LAT-4) AmpC cephalosporinase, while three of them harbored VIM-1 MBL in a class 1 integron structure. This is the first study to present the dissemination in the community of multidrug-resistant K. oxytoca isolates causing extrahospital infections.

  1. Colistin- and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca harboring blaVIM-2 and an insertion in the mgrB gene isolated from blood culture.

    PubMed

    Simon, Michaela; Melzl, Holger; Hiergeist, Andreas; Richert, Katharina; Falgenhauer, Linda; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gerlach, Roman G; Fuchs, Kornelius; Reischl, Udo; Gessner, André; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    A carbapenemase-producing colistin-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca isolate was recovered from a blood culture of a female patient without previous report of risk factors to obtain multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. A combination of biochemical and molecular methods was used to identify the resistance mechanism of this isolate. Carbapenemase production was mediated by Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM)-2. Colistin resistance was not due to plasmid- borne mcr-1 gene, but we found an integration of IS5-like sequence in the mgrB gene of K. oxytoca. This gene is known to be an important regulator of the PhoPQ two-component system, and the disruption of this gene is most likely the cause of lipid A modification resulting in colistin resistance of our isolate. To the best of our knowledge this constitutes the first report of a carbapenemase-producing K. oxytoca with colistin resistance, a case that demonstrates the limited treatment options for infections with multidrug-resistant organisms.

  2. Dissemination of Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca Harboring CMY-31, VIM-1, and a New OXY-2-Type Variant in the Community ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tsakris, Athanassios; Poulou, Aggeliki; Markou, Fani; Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Kristo, Ioulia; Pournaras, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the epidemiological link of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca isolates causing community-onset infections among patients attending our outpatient department and to investigate the underlying resistance mechanisms. The isolates were tested by agar dilution MICs, phenotypic carbapenemase testing, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PCR assays and nucleotide sequencing were employed for the identification of bla gene types and the mapping of the integron-containing metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene. During the study period (January 2005 to April 2007), nine broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. oxytoca clinical isolates were prospectively collected from separate outpatients with urinary tract infections. In all cases, the patients had been hospitalized or exposed to health care facilities during the preceding year. Molecular typing revealed that all isolates belonged to the same K. oxytoca clonal type, which contained five PFGE subtypes. A novel chromosomal OXY-2 β-lactamase type variant (OXY-2-9) was detected in all isolates, but no mutations in the promoter region justifying blaOXY gene overproduction were detected. In addition, all isolates harbored the plasmidic CMY-31 (LAT-4) AmpC cephalosporinase, while three of them harbored VIM-1 MBL in a class 1 integron structure. This is the first study to present the dissemination in the community of multidrug-resistant K. oxytoca isolates causing extrahospital infections. PMID:21555768

  3. Use of Imipenem To Detect KPC, NDM, OXA, IMP, and VIM Carbapenemase Activity from Gram-Negative Rods in 75 Minutes Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, M. V.; Zurita, A. N.; Pyka, J. S.; Murray, T. S.; Hodsdon, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics has led to a greater reliance upon carbapenems, but the expression of carbapenemases threatens to limit the utility of these drugs. Current methods to detect carbapenemase activity are suboptimal, requiring prolonged incubations during which ineffective therapy may be prescribed. We previously described a sensitive and specific assay for the detection of carbapenemase activity using ertapenem and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we assessed 402 Gram-negative rods, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae expressing IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM, and/or OXA carbapenemases, by using imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem with LC-MS/MS assays. LC-MS/MS methods for the detection of intact and hydrolyzed carbapenems from an enrichment broth were developed. No ion suppression was observed, and the limits of detection for all three drugs were below 0.04 μg/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of meropenem and ertapenem for carbapenemase activity among non-Enterobacteriaceae were low, but imipenem demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 95%, respectively, among all Gram-negative rods (GNR) tested, including both Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. LC-MS/MS allows for the analysis of more complex matrices, and this LC-MS/MS assay could easily be adapted for use with primary specimens requiring growth enrichment. PMID:24789180

  4. Differential Expression of ADAM23, CDKN2A (P16), MMP14 and VIM Associated with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    PubMed

    Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Babeto, Erica; Candido, Natalia Maria; Franco, Fernanda Craveiro; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Rahal, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Though benign, giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) can become aggressive and can exhibit a high mitotic rate, necrosis and rarely vascular invasion and metastasis. GCTB has unique histologic characteristics, a high rate of multinucleated cells, a variable and unpredictable growth potential and uncertain biological behavior. In this study, we sought to identify genes differentially expressed in GCTB, thus building a molecular profile of this tumor. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), immunohistochemistry and analyses of methylation to identify genes that are putatively associated with GCTB. The expression of the ADAM23 and CDKN2A genes was decreased in GCTB samples compared to normal bone tissue, measured by qPCR. Additionally, a high hypermethylation frequency of the promoter regions of ADAM23 and CDKN2A in GCTB was observed. The expression of the MAP2K3, MMP14, TIMP2 and VIM genes was significantly higher in GCTB than in normal bone tissue, a fact that was confirmed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The set of genes identified here furthers our understanding of the molecular basis of GCTB.

  5. Fast and reliable interrogation of USFBG sensors based on MG-Y laser discrete wavelength channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohollahnejad, Jalal; Xia, Li; Cheng, Rui; Ran, Yanli; Su, Lei

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we propose to use discrete wavelength channels of a single chip MG-Y laser to interrogate an ultra-short fiber Bragg grating with a wide Gaussian spectrum. The broadband Gaussian spectrum of USFBG is sampled by the wavelength channels of MG-Y laser, through which the center of the spectrum. The measurement inherits the important features of a common tunable laser interrogation technique, namely its high flexibility, natural insensitivity to intensity variations relative to common intensity-based approaches. While for traditional tunable laser methods, it requires to sweep the whole spectrum to obtain the center wavelength of the spectrum, for the proposed scheme, just a few discrete wavelength channels of laser are needed to be acquired, which leads to significant improvements of the efficiency and measurement speed. This reliable and low cost concept could offer the good foundation for USFBGs future applications in large scale distributed measurements, especially in time domain multiplexing scheme.

  6. Concepts for a short wavelength rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Shchelkunov, S.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Three concepts of an rf gun to be operated at 0.1-10 mm wavelengths are considered. In all the concepts, the rf system exploits an accelerating traveling wave. In comparison with a classical decimeter standing-wave rf gun, we analyze the advantages of new concepts, available rf sources, and achievable beam parameters.

  7. Short wavelength radio observations of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Passive radio observations are discussed from 1 mm to 2 cm wavelengths. The interferometric technique was used to observe the brightness of the rings. The reflectivity and disk temperature are also considered. The differences between radio and radar observations are examined and discussed.

  8. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  9. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  10. Age-related changes in wavelength discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shinomori, Keizo; Schefrin, Brooke E.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Wavelength discrimination functions (420 to 620–650 nm) were measured for four younger (mean 30.9 years) and four older (mean 72.5 years) observers. Stimuli consisted of individually determined isoluminant monochromatic lights (10 Td) presented in each half of a 2° circular bipartite field with use of a Maxwellian-view optical system. A spatial two-alternative forced-choice method was used in combination with a staircase procedure to determine discrimination thresholds across the spectrum. Small but consistent elevations in discrimination thresholds were found for older compared with younger observers. Because the retinal illuminance of the stimuli was equated across all observers, these age-related losses in discrimination are attributable to neural changes. Analyses of these data reveal a significant change in Weber fraction across adulthood for a chromatically opponent pathway receiving primarily antagonistic signals from middle-wavelength-sensitive and long-wavelength-sensitive cones but not for a short-wavelength-sensitive cone pathway. PMID:11205976

  11. Pump noise cancellation in parametric wavelength converters.

    PubMed

    Ataie, Vahid; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andereas O J; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-12-10

    A novel technique for pump noise effect mitigation in parametric wavelength converters is introduced. The method relies on digital signal processing and effectively takes advantage of the correlation property between the pump and idler, imposed by the parametric interaction. A 4 dB improvement in receiver performance is demonstrated experimentally for the conventional 10 Gbps OOK signal converted over 20 nm.

  12. Aero-Optics at Shorter Wavelengths.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    heliostat 1.93 1788 60 coelostat 2.40 2161 60 Changing from a CO2 laser to an iodine laser gives a wavelength ratio of 1/8. Assuming S is fixed, the...thickness and velocity profile. When the wall is concave to the external flow, Gortler vortices may occur. Cooling or heating can alter boundary layer

  13. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  14. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  15. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  16. Investigation of optimum wavelengths for oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huong, Audrey K. C.; Stockford, Ian M.; Crowe, John A.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2009-07-01

    An evaluation of the optimum choice of wavelengths, when using the 'Modified Lambert-Beer law' to estimate blood oxygen saturation, that minimises the mean error across a range of oxygen saturation values is presented. The stability of this approach and its susceptibility to noise are also considered.

  17. Long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A. B.; Daly, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that gravity and topography anomalies on the earth's surface may provide new information about deep processes occurring in the earth, such as those associated with mantle convection. Two main reasons are cited for this. The first is the steady improvement that has occurred in the resolution of the long wavelength gravity field, particularly in the wavelength range of a few hundred to a few thousand km, mainly due to increased coverage of terrestrial gravity measurements and the development of radar altimeters in orbiting satellites. The second reason is the large number of numerical and laboratory experiments of convection in the earth, including some with deformable upper and lower boundaries and temperature-dependent viscosity. The oceans are thought to hold the most promise for determining long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies, since their evolution has been relatively simple in comparison with that of the continents. It is also shown that good correlation between long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies exists over some portions of the ocean floor

  18. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  19. SWCam: the short wavelength camera for the CCAT Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Gordon J.; Parshley, Stephen; Nikola, Thomas; Cortes-Medellin, German; Schoenwald, Justin; Rajagopalan, Ganesh; Niemack, Michael D.; Jenness, Tim; Gallardo, Patricio; Koopman, Brian; Dowell, Charles D.; Day, Peter K.; Hollister, Matthew I.; Kovacs, Attila; LeDuc, Henry G.; McKenney, Christopher M.; Monroe, Ryan M.; Yoshida, Hiroshige; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Swenson, Loren J.; Radford, Simon J.; Nguyen, Hien Trong; Mroczkowski, Anthony K.; Glenn, Jason; Wheeler, Jordan; Maloney, Philip; Brugger, Spencer; Adams, Joseph D.; Bertoldi, Frank; Schaaf, Reinhold; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Marsden, Galen; Sayers, Jack; Chapman, Scott; Vieira, Joaquin D.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the Short Wavelength Camera (SWCam) for the CCAT observatory including the primary science drivers, the coupling of the science drivers to the instrument requirements, the resulting implementation of the design, and its performance expectations at first light. CCAT is a 25 m submillimeter telescope planned to operate at 5600 meters, near the summit of Cerro Chajnantor in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. CCAT is designed to give a total wave front error of 12.5 μm rms, so that combined with its high and exceptionally dry site, the facility will provide unsurpassed point source sensitivity deep into the short submillimeter bands to wavelengths as short as the 200 μm telluric window. The SWCam system consists of 7 sub-cameras that address 4 different telluric windows: 4 subcameras at 350 μm, 1 at 450 μm, 1 at 850 μm, and 1 at 2 mm wavelength. Each sub-camera has a 6' diameter field of view, so that the total instantaneous field of view for SWCam is equivalent to a 16' diameter circle. Each focal plane is populated with near unit filling factor arrays of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LEKIDs) with pixels scaled to subtend an solid angle of (λ/D)2 on the sky. The total pixel count is 57,160. We expect background limited performance at each wavelength, and to be able to map < 35(°)2 of sky to 5 σ on the confusion noise at each wavelength per year with this first light instrument. Our primary science goal is to resolve the Cosmic Far-IR Background (CIRB) in our four colors so that we may explore the star and galaxy formation history of the Universe extending to within 500 million years of the Big Bang. CCAT's large and high-accuracy aperture, its fast slewing speed, use of instruments with large format arrays, and being located at a superb site enables mapping speeds of up to three orders of magnitude larger than contemporary or near future facilities and makes it uniquely sensitive, especially in the short submm bands.

  20. Imaging Uranus at Submillimeter to Centimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Butler, B. J.; Gurwell, M. A.

    2007-10-01

    We have been making regular observations of Uranus for the past several years, in part to search for variability associated with the 2007 equinox. We will present an analysis of our current data set, spanning wavelengths from 1 mm to 20 cm (using the SMA and VLA radio observatories), including our latest data collected in August of 2007. These wavelengths probe the atmosphere from pressures of 1 to 50 bars, which extends from the lower tropopause far into convectively dominated regions, and includes several altitudes of cloud formation. We have found that, at all our wavelengths, the planet appears symmetric, with both the north (spring) and south (fall) polar regions being radio bright. At pressures greater than a few bars, this is almost certainly due to the poles being depleted in atmospheric absorbers by convective processes (Hofstadter and Butler 2003, Icarus 165, 168-180). Near 1 bar, the bright poles could be due to the physical temperature being 5 K higher there than at the equator, or due to a strong depletion of CH4 vapor over the poles. A combination of the two seems likely, as compositional variations are consistent with the circulation inferred from several data sets, and 2 K temperature variations are found both in theoretical models (Friedson and Ingersoll 1987, Icarus 69, 135-156) and in Voyager infrared measurements made in 1986 during southern summer solstice (Hanel et al. 1986, Science 233, 70-74). We will discuss these results in the context of observations of Uranus made at other wavelengths, and recent images we have acquired of Neptune at radio wavelengths. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. We acknowledge the support of NASA's Planetary Astronomy program, and of the VLA and SMA observatories.

  1. Using Long Wavelength Gravity to Understand Continental Structure and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Susan

    2013-04-01

    In most interpretations of gravity data, the long wavelength signal is removed as an unimportant regional contribution. This convention is largely historical; in the past it was difficult to model data at a variety of scales, and regional/residual separation became standard practice. This is especially true in exploration studies where near surface ore deposits are the target (e.g. LaFehr and Nabighian, 2012). With the development of a large variety of rapid 2D and 3D gravity modelling packages that are widely available, a more regional context for ore deposits and other crustal features can be considered. The inclusion of the regional long wavelength signal in the interpretation can dramatically alter the result, especially when the scale of consideration is on the order of the scale of crustal flexure. Large basins, such as the South African Karoo basin (Mesozoic) and even the smaller Witwatersrand basin (Archean), are likely to have deformed the Moho during their formation, although not all of these features appear to be preserved in present-day Moho geometry. Gravity modelling to Moho depths may dramatically alter the detailed interpretation of the deeper sections of these basins, with implications for resources such as gold, coal, gas and even carbon capture and storage (CCS). A clear cut example of this is seen in the interpretation of the gravity data of the Bushveld Complex (BC). When the crust is allowed to flex, the mafic lithologies of the BC can be allowed to connect laterally, resulting in an enormous layered intrusion 400 x 400 km across. This interpretation has been confirmed by the presence of BC xenoliths in a kimberlite near the centre of the Complex (Webb, Ashwal and Cawthorn, 2011, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol., 162: 101-107). The implication is that the BC mineral resources are also likely to be laterally connected, easily quadrupling the amount of mineralization, although the depth of the deposits remains uncertain. Due to the inherent ambiguity

  2. The IAG solar flux atlas: Accurate wavelengths and absolute convective blueshift in standard solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Mrotzek, N.; Lemke, U.; Hinrichs, J.; Reinsch, K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new solar flux atlas with the aim of understanding wavelength precision and accuracy in solar benchmark data. The atlas covers the wavelength range 405-2300 nm and was observed at the Institut für Astrophysik, Göttingen (IAG), with a Fourier transform spectrograph (FTS). In contrast to other FTS atlases, the entire visible wavelength range was observed simultaneously using only one spectrograph setting. We compare the wavelength solution of the new atlas to the Kitt Peak solar flux atlases and to the HARPS frequency-comb calibrated solar atlas. Comparison reveals systematics in the two Kitt Peak FTS atlases resulting from their wavelength scale construction, and shows consistency between the IAG and the HARPS atlas. We conclude that the IAG atlas is precise and accurate on the order of ± 10 m s-1 in the wavelength range 405-1065 nm, while the Kitt Peak atlases show deviations as large as several ten to 100 m s-1. We determine absolute convective blueshift across the spectrum from the IAG atlas and report slight differences relative to results from the Kitt Peak atlas that we attribute to the differences between wavelength scales. We conclude that benchmark solar data with accurate wavelength solution are crucial to better understand the effect of convection on stellar radial velocity measurements, which is one of the main limitations of Doppler spectroscopy at m s -1 precision. Data (FITS files of the spectra) and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A65

  3. An international evaluation of holmium oxide solution reference materials for wavelength calibration in molecular absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Travis, John C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Mercader, Flora; Ruíz, Arquímedes; Early, Edward A; Smith, Melody V; Noël, Mario; Maley, Marissa; Kramer, Gary W; Eckerle, Kenneth L; Duewer, David L

    2002-07-15

    Commercial spectrophotometers typically use absorption-based wavelength calibration reference materials to provide wavelength accuracy for their applications. Low-mass fractions of holmium oxide (Ho2O3) in dilute acidic aqueous solution and in glass matrixes have been favored for use as wavelength calibration materials on the basis of spectral coverage and absorption band shape. Both aqueous and glass Ho2O3 reference materials are available commercially and through various National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). Three NMIs of the North American Cooperation in Metrology (NORAMET) have evaluated the performance of Ho3-(aq)-based Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) under "routine" operating conditions using commercial instrumentation. The study was not intended to intercompare national wavelength scales but to demonstrate comparability of wavelength measurements among the participants and between two versions of the CRMs. It was also designed to acquire data from a variety of spectrophotometers for use in a NIST study of wavelength assignment algorithms and to provide a basis for a possible reassessment of NIST-certified Ho3+(aq) band locations. The resulting data show a substantial level of agreement among laboratories, instruments, CRM preparations, and peak-location algorithms. At the same time, it is demonstrated that the wavelength comparability of the five participating instruments can actually be improved by calibrating all of the instruments to the consensus Ho3+(aq) band locations. This finding supports the value of absorption-based wavelength standards for calibrating absorption spectrophotometers. Coupled with the demonstrated robustness of the band position values with respect to preparation and measurement conditions, it also supports the concept of extending the present approach to additional NMIs in order to certify properly prepared dilute acidic Ho2O3 solution as an intrinsic wavelength standard.

  4. Driving-laser wavelength dependence of high-order harmonic generation in H{sub 2}{sup +} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Candong; Zeng Zhinan; Wei Pengfei; Liu Peng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2010-03-15

    The electron-nuclear dynamics of one-dimensional H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular high harmonic generation is investigated by numerical integration of the non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. It is found that the nuclear motion and electron ionization are more significant for the longer wavelength and the stronger intensity of the driving laser pulse. When the ground-state H{sub 2}{sup +} molecule is driven by a short laser pulse (ten optical cycles in the calculations), a strong signature of nuclear motion is seen in the wavelength scaling (800-2000 nm) of harmonic yield, following a {lambda}{sup -(7-8)} scaling law at a constant laser intensity. It is attributed to the fast ground-state depletion induced by the strong nuclear motion, when using the long wavelength. Consequently, the wavelength scaling gives an insight into the nuclear dynamics.

  5. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  6. Dual-wavelength laser with topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum in solid-state lasers for the first time to our knowledge. Single tunable Hermite-Gaussian (HG0,n) (0 ≤ n ≤ 7) laser modes with dual wavelength were generated using an isotropic cavity. With a mode-converter, the corresponding Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0,n) laser modes were obtained. The oscillating laser modes have two types of photons at the wavelengths of 1077 and 1081 nm and equal orbital angular momentum of nħ per photon. These results identify the possibility of simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal and controllable orbital angular momentum. It can be proposed that this laser should have promising applications in many fields based on its compact structure, tunable orbital angular momentum, and simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  9. Discrete Wavelength-Locked External Cavity Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    A prototype improved external cavity laser (ECL) was demonstrated in the second phase of a continuing effort to develop wavelength-agile lasers for fiber-optic communications and trace-gas-sensing applications. This laser is designed to offer next-generation performance for incorporation into fiber-optic networks. By eliminating several optical components and simplifying others used in prior designs, the design of this laser reduces costs, making lasers of this type very competitive in a price-sensitive market. Diode lasers have become enabling devices for fiber optic networks because of their cost, compactness, and spectral properties. ECLs built around diode laser gain elements further enhance capabilities by virtue of their excellent spectral properties with significantly increased (relative to prior lasers) wavelength tuning ranges. It is essential to exploit the increased spectral coverage of ECLs while simultaneously insuring that they operate only at precisely defined communication channels (wavelengths). Heretofore, this requirement has typically been satisfied through incorporation of add-in optical components that lock the ECL output wavelengths to these specific channels. Such add-in components contribute substantially to the costs of ECL lasers to be used as sources for optical communication networks. Furthermore, the optical alignment of these components, needed to attain the required wavelength precision, is a non-trivial task and can contribute substantially to production costs. The design of the present improved ECL differs significantly from the designs of prior ECLs. The present design relies on inherent features of components already included within an ECL, with slight modifications so that these components perform their normal functions while simultaneously effecting locking to the required discrete wavelengths. Hence, add-in optical components and the associated cost of alignment can be eliminated. The figure shows the locking feedback signal

  10. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity.

  11. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li; Geisler, Wilson S; May, Keith A

    2011-01-01

    We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats). Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  12. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  13. Synchronous two-wavelength temporal interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Gao, Zhan; Qin, Jie; Li, Guangyu; Feng, Ziang; Wang, Shengjia

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry is an optical measuring method with the character of non-destructive, high sensitivity and high accuracy. However, its measurement range is limited by the phase ambiguity. Hence the method with two separate different wavelengths light source is introduced to enlarge the measurement range. As for the two-wavelength interferometry case, phase shifting is the traditional way to acquire the phase map, it needs to repeat the measurement twice, which means the measurement cannot be accomplished in real time. Hence to solve the problem, a temporal sequence interferometry has been used. This method can obtain the desired phase information in real time by using the Fourier transform methods of the interferogram recorded in a sequence while the object is being deformed. But, it is difficult to retrieve the phase information directly due to the multi extreme points in one period of the cosine function. In this paper, an algorithm based on the wavelet ridge analysis is adopted to retrieve the two wavelength phase fluctuation caused by the displacement simultaneously. The preliminary experiment is conducted and the results are compared with theoretical simulations to validate the proposed approach. The laser emits light with two wavelengths 532 nm and 473 nm, two separated interference patterns in time sequence are detected by the CCD camera in the same time. The overlapped interferograms of two colors are analyzed by this algorithm and the corresponding phase information are obtained. The maximum error value between the simulation and theory is 0.03 um and the relative error is 0.33%.

  14. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties.

  15. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  16. Robust Fixed-Wavelength Laser Eye Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    protection : ■ protection against a few known wavelengths, such as used by friendly forces, and ■ protection against lasers that are frequency-agile, or...for flashblindness protection but were too slow for use against lasers. Many goggle materials have been developed to protect against specific laser...hazard to the eyes offered by currently fielded range-finders and designators requires that eye protection against these devices be made available

  17. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  18. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  19. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  20. Gas sensing using wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Flores, D.; Ferreira, J.; Frazao, O.; Santos, J. L.; Baptista, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental setup has been developed for different gas species sensing based on the Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The target is the measurement of ammonia, carbon dioxide and methane concentrations. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region using optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity are modulated applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allows the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise is reduced. The wavelength modulated laser light is tuned to the absorption line of the target gas and the absorption information can be retrieved by means of synchronous detection using a lock-in amplifier, where the amplitude of the second harmonic of the laser modulation frequency is proportional to the gas concentration. The amplitude of the second harmonic is normalised by the average laser intensity and detector gain through a LabVIEW® application, where the main advantage of normalising is that the effects of laser output power fluctuations and any variations in laser transmission, or optical-electrical detector gain are eliminated. Two types of sensing heads based on free space light propagation with different optical path length were used, permitting redundancy operation and technology validation.

  1. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  2. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  3. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  4. Scales, scales and more scales.

    PubMed

    Weitzenhoffer, Andre M

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the nature, uses, and limitations of the large variety of existing, so-called, hypnosis scales; that is, instruments that have been proposed for the assessment of hypnotic behavior. Although the major aim of most of the scales ostensively seems to be to assess several aspects of hypnotic states, they are found generally to say little about these and much more about responses to suggestions. The greatest application of these scales is to be found in research, but they also have a limited place in clinical work.

  5. Two-dimensional wavelength demultiplexing employing multilevel arrayed waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Minghua; Wang, Yuelin

    2004-03-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) optical wavelength demultiplexing is demonstrated by employing multilevel arrayed waveguides as a 2D diffraction grating, named the 2D arrayed waveguide grating (2D-AWG). Since the monochromatic lightwave is diffracted by the 2D-AWG to a series of periodic spots with 2D diffraction orders in both x and y directions while the dispersion direction is never parallel to the x or y direction, we can obtain 2D wavelength demultiplexing exploiting diffraction orders of either the x or y direction. One of the two dispersion components is designed much larger than the other, and the correspondent spatial free spectral range component is set properly to ensure high diffraction efficiency. The input and output ports can also be designed based on the multilevel lightwave circuit (MLC), and their level planes can be tuned parallel to that of the MLC-based 2D-AWG, which makes it feasible to integrate the 2D-AWG with the input port and/or the output port. It provides a promising way to realize large-scale and high-density optical multiplexers/demultiplexers.

  6. Dark matter indirect searches: Multi-wavelength and anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2016-05-01

    If dark matter is made of particles governed by weak-scale physics, they may annihilate or decay to leave observable signatures in high-energy gamma-ray sky. In addition, any charged particles produced by the same process will also give low-frequency photons through successive electromagnetic interactions. Plenty of data from modern astrophysical measurements of various wavelengths, especially gamma rays, enabled new analysis techniques to search for these dark matter signatures with an unprecedented sensitivities. Since it is very likely that signatures of dark matter annihilation or decay is hidden in the gamma-ray data, one should fully utilize all available data including: (1) energy spectrum of all wavelengths ranging from radio to very-high-energy gamma rays; (2) spatial clustering probed with the angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background; (3) cross correlation between the gamma-ray distribution with nearby galaxy catalogs; and (4) gamma-ray-flux distribution. I will review recent theoretical and observational developments in all these aspects, and discuss prospects for the future towards discovery of dark matter as an elementary particle in physics beyond the standard model.

  7. Alternative explanation for intermediate--wavelength magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shure, L.; Parker, R.L.

    1981-12-10

    Harrison and Carle and others have examined very long profiles of the magnetic field and have calculated one-dimensional power spectra. In these they expect to see, but do not find, a minimum in power at intermediate wavelengths, between 65 and 150 km. Conventional one-dimensional models of the field predict very little power in this band, which lies between the spectral peaks arising from sources in the crust and the core. Mantle sources or high-intensity, long-wavelength magnetizations have been proposed to account for the observations. An alternative, more plausible explanation is that one-dimensional spectra of two-dimensional fields contain contributions from wavenumbers in the perpendicular (i.e., nonsampled) direction. Unless the seafloor spreading anomalies are perfectly lineated at right angles to the profile, some low-wavenumber energy must be attributed to this effect; we propose that such directional aliasing is a major factor in the power spectra. To support this idea we discuss theoretical models and analyze a large-scale marine survey.

  8. Multi-wavelength fluorometry for anaerobic digestion process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Morel, E; Santamaria, K; Perrier, M; Guiot, S R; Tartakovsky, B

    2005-01-01

    Applicability of multi-wavelength fluorometry for anaerobic digestion process monitoring was investigated in a 3.5 L upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) lab-scale reactor. Both off-line and on-line monitoring of key process parameters was tested. Off-line emission spectra were measured at an angle of 90 degrees to the excitation beam using a cuvette. On-line measurements were carried out using a fiber optic probe in the external recirculation line of the digester. Fluorescence spectra were correlated to available analytical measurements to obtain partial least square regression models. An independent set of measurements was used to validate the regression models. Model estimations showed reasonable agreement with analytical measurements with multiple determination coefficients (R2) between 0.6 and 0.95. Results showed that offline fluorescence measurements can be used for fast estimation of anaerobic digestor effluent quality. At the same time, the on-line implementation of multi-wavelength fluorescence measurements can be used for realtime process monitoring and, potentially, for on-line process control.

  9. CO concentration in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere of Titan: non-LTE analysis of VIMS dayside limb observations at 4.7 mu m.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiano, F.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Funke, B.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Ridolfi, M.; Dinelli, B. M.

    During the last 20 years, many works have focused on the atmospheric concentration of CO on Titan, giving contradictory results. In particular, no measurement of the CO abundance above 300 km has been done yet, due to the faint emission of CO above that altitude. On the other hand, such a study is particularly awaited as a confirmation of photochemical models that predict a uniform volume mixing ratio of CO in the whole Titan's atmosphere. Moreover, given that CO is the main reservoir of oxygen in Titan's atmosphere and its presence is linked to water, the matter is of astrobiological interest too. The analysis of VIMS (Visual & Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, onboard Cassini) daytime limb measurements of Titan at 4.7 mu m, corresponding to the vibrational bands of CO, allows such a study: CO molecules are significantly excited by solar radiation and the otherwise faint infrared signal of the upper atmosphere is large, allowing to probe this region too. On the other hand, the strong non-LTE behavior of CO infrared emission above 200 km, strongly coupled to N2 and CH4 vibrational levels, represents an extra complexity of the data analysis. In order to deal with CO non-LTE emission, we have developed a non-LTE excitation - de- excitation model for the first two CO vibrational levels of the two most abundant isotopo- logues. We consider the contribution of absorption of radiation in the fundamental, first hot and first overtone bands and evaluate the possible contribution of different collisional processes, mainly the coupling with the first excited state of N2 and with several levels of CH4. The solution of the non-LTE problem is obtained \\citep{Funke2012} through GRANADA , a non-LTE population algorithm based on Lambda iteration resolution strategy, eventually coupled to a Curtis-Matrix type approach. The result shows a significant over-population of the first vibrational level above 300km and of the second level in the whole atmosphere. The possibility of further

  10. Dual-wavelength retinal image registration based on vessel segmentation and optic disc detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yong-li; Dai, Yun; Gao, Chun-ming; Du, Rui

    2016-09-01

    The dual-wavelength retinal image registration is one of the critical steps in the spectrophotometric measurements of oxygen saturation in the retinal vasculature. The dual-wavelength images (570 nm and 600 nm) are simultaneously captured by dual-wavelength retinal oximeter based on commercial fundus camera. The retinal oxygen saturation is finally measured after vessel segmentation, image registration and calculation of optical density ratio of the two images. Because the dual-wavelength images are acquired from different optical path, it is necessary to go through image registration before they are used to analyze the oxygen saturation. This paper presents a new approach to dual-wavelength retinal image registration based on vessel segmentation and optic disc detection. Firstly, the multi-scale segmentation algorithm based on the Hessian matrix is used to realize vessel segmentation. Secondly, after optic disc is detected by convergence index filter and the center of the optic disc is obtained by centriod algorithm, the translational difference between the images can be determined. The center of the optic disc is used as the center of rotation, and the registration based on mutual information can be achieved using contour and gray information of vessels through segmented image. So the rotational difference between the images can be determined too. The result shows that the algorithm can provide an accurate registration for the dual-wavelength retinal image.

  11. From Satellites to Rings: The Diversity of the Saturnian System Ices in the VIS-NIR at the End of Cassini-VIMS Nominal Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2008-09-01

    After four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the whole population of Saturnian icy objects allowing a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division). The results we present are derived from the whole dataset available at june 2008 which consists of about 1500 full-disk observations of the moons as well as several radial mosaics of the ring system. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (I/F continua, VIS spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide IR bands strengths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to identify the disk-integrated compositional units of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants” abundances and typical regolith grain properties for both satellites and rings. These quantities are varying between the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Some significant differences are detected in the VIS colors of co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, with the first very red and therefore similar to Hyperion while the last is more "neutral” these results could help to decipher the origins and evolutional story of these two moons. The water ice band strengths of the A-B rings are the most intense of the Saturnian system denoting a minimal presence of "contaminants” which can be estimated thanks to the 350-520 nm spectral slope. Finally we compare these spectral parameters with some TNOs and outer solar system objects (1995UG5, 90377-Sedna, 1996TO66, Pholus, Triton, Charon, Oberon, Titania) to search for possible analogies. This research was possible thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  12. Acoustic dynamics of network-forming glasses at mesoscopic wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, C.; Pontecorvo, E.; Cerullo, G.; Chiasera, A.; Ruocco, G.; Schirmacher, W.; Scopigno, T.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of long-range structural order in amorphous solids induces well known thermodynamic anomalies, which are the manifestation of distinct peculiarities in the vibrational spectrum. Although the impact of such anomalies vanishes in the long wavelength, elastic continuum limit, it dominates at length scales comparable to interatomic distances, implying an intermediate transition regime still poorly understood. Here we report a study of such mesoscopic domains by means of a broadband version of picosecond photo-acoustics, developed to coherently generate and detect hypersonic sound waves in the sub-THz region with unprecedented sampling efficiency. We identify a temperature-dependent fractal v3/2 frequency behaviour of the sound attenuation, pointing to the presence of marginally stable regions and a transition between the two above mentioned limits. The essential features of this behaviour are captured by a theoretical approach based on random spatial variation of the shear modulus, including anharmonic interactions. PMID:23653205

  13. Modeling of a dual-wavelength pumped metastable argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Sun, PengFei; Wang, XinBing; Zuo, DuLuo

    2017-03-01

    Optically pumped metastable argon laser is an attractive research topic of innovative gas lasers, but the slow collisional relaxation rates of 1s 4–1s 5 (in Paschen notation) may form a bottleneck on the cycling of active atoms and decrease the laser output at room temperature. Here, by employing a method of a dual-wavelength pump, we demonstrate the removal of accumulation on the 1s 4 level and the improvement of output power in the simulation. The simulated results show that a large increase in laser output is possible with a relatively weak assistant pump intensity. This method offers a feasible way to scale the laser to higher gain.

  14. A Novel Portable Multi-Wavelength Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Andy; Dickinson, B.

    There is an established need for a portable and affordable Q-switched laser system for use in studio conservation and small scale field use. The ideal system would be capable of producing a variety of wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared with sufficient energy per pulse to treat a wide range of materials including stone, marble, terracotta, wood, organic materials, bone, parchment, textiles, and metals. In this paper we report on such a system which is capable of delivering Q-switched output at 1,064nm in excess of 300mJ per pulse and at repetition rates of up to 25 Hz. Additional outputs are also reported at 266 nm, 355 nm, 532 nm, and 2.94 μm. Preliminary cleaning results on a small range of objects using the Q-switched 1,064nm output are presented.

  15. Carbon structures with three-dimensional periodicity at optical wavelengths

    PubMed

    Zakhidov; Baughman; Iqbal; Cui; Khayrullin; Dantas; Marti; Ralchenko

    1998-10-30

    Porous carbons that are three-dimensionally periodic on the scale of optical wavelengths were made by a synthesis route resembling the geological formation of natural opal. Porous silica opal crystals were sintered to form an intersphere interface through which the silica was removed after infiltration with carbon or a carbon precursor. The resulting porous carbons had different structures depending on synthesis conditions. Both diamond and glassy carbon inverse opals resulted from volume filling. Graphite inverse opals, comprising 40-angstrom-thick layers of graphite sheets tiled on spherical surfaces, were produced by surface templating. The carbon inverse opals provide examples of both dielectric and metallic optical photonic crystals. They strongly diffract light and may provide a route toward photonic band-gap materials.

  16. Radio emission of the sun at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Piotrovich, V. V.

    This review article deals with the radio emission originating from different solar atmospheric regions - the quiet solar atmosphere, active regions and solar flares. All experimental data of the quiet Sun brightness temperature at the region of 0.1 - 20 mm wavelength are summarized. The quiet Sun brightness distributions across the disk and values of the solar radio radius are reviewed. The properties of the sources of sunspot-associated active region emission and radio brightness depression associated with Hα-filaments are considered in comparison with observations at centimetre and optical domains. The observational properties of millimetre wave bursts and their correlations with similar phenomena at other domains are reviewed. Special reference is devoted to nearly 100% correlation impulsive radio bursts with hard X-ray bursts. Existence of the fine temporal structure containing many spikes with time scales up to 10 ms as well as observations of quasi-periodic millisecond oscillations are discussed.

  17. Multi-Wavelength Characterization of the Outskirts of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Judit; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2010-06-01

    We have explored late-type spiral galaxies with truncated radial surface brightness profiles. Based on the study of optical color profiles, [1] suggested that truncated (TYPE II) galaxies have a generally older stellar population in their outer regions: one observable consequence of this would be a strong dependence of the structural parameters of the outer disk on the observing wavelength. To corroborate this result, we obtained surface brightness profiles using data from GALEX(UV), SDSS(optical), 2MASS/UKIDSS(NIR) and SPITZER-IRAC(IR). We have characterized the behaviour of the outer disk by obtaining the ratio of the inner and outer scale-lengths. Here we show the example of NGC3184. Our results suggest that there is an existing general trend of the scale-length ratio: from bluer to redder bands the scale-length ratio decreases, which is in accordance with the stellar disk being dominated by an older stellar population in the outer disk.

  18. Saturn's aurora observed by the Cassini camera at visible wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Wellington, Danika

    2016-01-01

    The first observations of Saturn's visible-wavelength aurora were made by the Cassini camera. The aurora was observed between 2006 and 2013 in the northern and southern hemispheres. The color of the aurora changes from pink at a few hundred km above the horizon to purple at 1000-1500 km above the horizon. The spectrum observed in 9 filters spanning wavelengths from 250 nm to 1000 nm has a prominent H-alpha line and roughly agrees with laboratory simulated auroras. Auroras in both hemispheres vary dramatically with longitude. Auroras form bright arcs between 70° and 80° latitude north and between 65° and 80° latitude south, which sometimes spiral around the pole, and sometimes form double arcs. A large 10,000-km-scale longitudinal brightness structure persists for more than 100 h. This structure rotates approximately together with Saturn. On top of the large steady structure, the auroras brighten suddenly on the timescales of a few minutes. These brightenings repeat with a period of ∼1 h. Smaller, 1000-km-scale structures may move faster or lag behind Saturn's rotation on timescales of tens of minutes. The persistence of nearly-corotating large bright longitudinal structure in the auroral oval seen in two movies spanning 8 and 11 rotations gives an estimate on the period of 10.65 ± 0.15 h for 2009 in the northern oval and 10.8 ± 0.1 h for 2012 in the southern oval. The 2009 north aurora period is close to the north branch of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) detected at that time.

  19. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  20. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  1. Characterisation of IncA/C2 plasmids carrying an In416-like integron with the blaVIM-19 gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 of Greek origin.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radosław; Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Skálová, Anna; Chudějová, Kateřina; Dobiasova, Hana; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hrabák, Jaroslav

    2016-02-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of three multidrug resistance (MDR) IncA/C-like plasmids from Enterobacteriaceae isolates carrying the VIM-type carbapenemase-encoding integrons In4863 (blaVIM-19-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) or In4873 (blaVIM-1-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2) were determined, which are the first In416-like elements identified in Greece. Plasmids pKP-Gr642 and pKP-Gr8143 were from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST383 isolates, whereas plasmid pEcl-Gr4873 was from an Enterobacter cloacae ST88 isolate. Sequencing showed that pKP-Gr642 (162787bp) and pKP-Gr8143 (154395bp) consisted of the type 1 IncA/C2 conserved backbone, the blaCMY-2-like gene-containing region, and the ARI-B (with the sul2 gene) and ARI-A (with a class 1 integron) resistance islands, like the plasmid pUMNK88_161 from the USA. The third plasmid, pEcl-Gr4873 (153958bp), exhibited extensive similarity with the type 2 IncA/C2 plasmid pR55 from France. pEcl-Gr4873 carried only one resistance island of a hybrid transposon structure inserted in a different location to ARI-A in type 1 A/C2 plasmids. In all three plasmids, the In416-like integrons In4863 or In4873 were identified within non-identical class II transposon structures. All three In416-like-carrying regions presented significant similarities with the MDR region of the IncA/C2 plasmid pCC416 from Italy, carrying the prototype In416 integron (blaVIM-4-aacA7-dfrA1-ΔaadA1-smr2). These findings provided the basis for speculations regarding the evolution of IncA/C2 plasmids with In416-like integrons, and confirmed the rapid evolution of some IncA/C2 plasmid lineages. Considering the broad host range of IncA/C2 molecules, it seems that pKP-Gr642, pKP-Gr8143 and pEcl-Gr4873 plasmids might support the diffusion of In416-like integrons among Enterobacteriaceae.

  2. Effect of Prior Warm Rolling on the Retained Austenite Content and Hardening Response of VIM-VAR (Vacuum-Induction Melted, Vacuum-Arc Remelted) AISI M-50 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    THE P-tTAiNED AJSTENITE’ CCNT𔃻NT AN[, -RDENiNG RESPONSE OF(V.I!,-VAR) NISI M-50 STEEL , by Nestor H. Camerino, Jr. March 1985 Thesis Advisor: T. 1...March 1995 Response of (VIM-VAR) AISI Y-50 Steel G. ’PERFORMINGORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) 111. CON-RACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*) Nestor H. Camerino, Jr. S...Austenite "M 2A. ATRACT (Corttinue an r"W#0e side it nwet.oomv anto 140.Mfy by W$"R ae ;-.ýThe objective of warm rolling M-50 bearing steel is

  3. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  4. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    shock tube dissociation of fluorine azide, (2) identify and characterize alternatives to BiF as the lasant in an excited NF driven laser , (3) develop...L.F. Phillips KINETICS OF 12 FOLLOWING ArF LASER EXCITATION: THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF THE A’(2u) STATE J. Phys. Chem., 88, 6084 (1984) 267. Tellinghuisen...VISIBLE WAVELENGTH CHEMICAL LASER SCHEMES BASED ON THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF CHLORINE AZIDE Proc. Int. Conf on.LASERS 󈨟, Eds. F.J. Duarte and D.G. Harris

  5. Wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Li, Junjie; Kan, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram composed of subwavelength metallic antennas is designed and demonstrated experimentally in the terahertz (THz) regime. Different character patterns are generated at the separated working frequencies 0.50 THz and 0.63 THz which determine a narrow frequency bandwidth of 130 GHz. The two working frequencies are around the central resonance frequency of the antennas where antennas behave strong wavefront modulation. Each antenna is fully utilized to control the wavefront of the metasurface at different frequencies by an optimization algorithm. The results demonstrate a candidate way to design multi-colors optical display elements. PMID:27752118

  6. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  7. Young's experiment with a double slit of sub-wavelength dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-08-12

    We report that the interference pattern of Young's double-slit experiment changes as a function of polarization in the sub-wavelength diffraction regime. Experiments carried out with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy reveal that diffracted waves from sub-wavelength-scale slits exhibit either positive or negative phase shift with respect to Gouy phase depending on the polarization. Theoretical explanation based on the induction of electric current and magnetic dipole in the vicinity of the slits shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  8. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  9. Wavelength Shifters and Interactions of EDTA with Acrylic & LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Yuvraj; SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA had negligible effects on the Young's Modulus of acrylic. EDTA is also slightly soluble in LAB, but can be completely removed by rinsing with water. Additionally, the study of the light yield and alpha/beta timing profiles of two wavelength shifters - bisMSB and perylene - is critical to determining which should be added to the 0 νββ isotope (tellurium) LAB cocktail. Small-scale results hint that perylene might be better, but this is being confirmed with larger-scale tests. The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA

  10. Monolithic single mode interband cascade lasers with wide wavelength tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Scheuermann, J.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-11-01

    Monolithic two-section interband cascade lasers offering a wide wavelength tunability in the wavelength range around 3.7 μm are presented. Stable single mode emission in several wavelength channels was realized using the concept of binary superimposed gratings and two-segment Vernier-tuning. The wavelength selective elements in the two segments were based on specially designed lateral metal grating structures defined by electron beam lithography. A dual-step dry etch process provided electrical separation between the segments. Individual current control of the segments allowed wavelength channel selection as well as continuous wavelength tuning within channels. A discontinuous tuning range extending over 158 nm in up to six discrete wavelength channels was achieved. Mode hop free wavelength tuning up to 14 nm was observed within one channel. The devices can be operated in continuous wave mode up to 30 °C with the output powers of 3.5 mW around room temperature.

  11. Laser-to-electricity energy converter for short wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wavelength energy converter can be made using Schottky barrier structure. It has wider band gap than p-n junction silicon semiconductors, and thus it has improved response at wavelengths down to and including ultraviolet region.

  12. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M.; Krysa, A. B.

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5 nm at 300 K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11 nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  13. Dye mixtures for ultrafast wavelength shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.; Liu, L.; Palsule, C.; Borst, W.; Wigmans, R.; Barashkov, N.

    1994-12-31

    Particle detectors based on scintillation processes have been used since the discovery of radium about 100 years ago. The fast signals that can be obtained with these detectors, although often considered a nice asset, were rarely essential for the success of experiments. However, the new generation of high energy particle accelerators require particle detectors with fast response time. The authors have produced fast wavelength shifters using mixtures of various Coumarin dyes with DCM in epoxy-polymers (DGEBA+HHPA) and measured the properties of these wavelength shifters. The particular mixtures were chosen because there is a substantial overlap between the emission spectrum of Coumarin and the absorption spectrum of DCM. The continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectra have been studied as a function of component concentration to optimize the decay times, emission peaks and quantum yields. The mean decay times of these mixtures are in the range of 2.5--4.5 ns. The mean decay time increases with an increase in Coumarin concentration at a fixed DCM concentration or with a decrease in DCM concentration at a fixed Coumarin concentration. This indicates that the energy transfer is radiative at lower relative DCM concentrations and becomes non-radiative at higher DCM concentrations.

  14. Wavelengths for EVE coronal dimming signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Simoes, P. J. D. A.; Kukstas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range. We have shown that dimmings occurred in most of the 31 X-class flares that occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations, we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejections from the low corona. We can estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked" at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. Because of its high photon throughput, EVE data determine line centroids with precisions of a few km/s equivalent. In the present study we analyze the wavelengths of the dimmed regions, characterizing their displacements from the mean wavelengths as functions of heliographic position, time, event magnitude, and excitation state of Fe.

  15. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  16. Raman Amplifier Performance under New Wavelength Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ashraf A. M.; Mustafa, Fathy M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the benefits of Raman amplifier (RA) for long-haul Ultra Wideband (UW)-WDM optical communications systems, we are studying and investigating how to widen the bandwidth and flatten the gain of RA by testing it in a new wider range of wavelengths (1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm) instead of the benchmark range (1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm). Four different ranges of signal wavelengths are used in this paper with the aim of testing the performance of RA model proposed in [13-15]: 1. 1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.45 μm 2. 1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm 3. 1.65 μm≤λsignal≤1.75 μm 4. 1.43 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm Different model sizes are used and analyzed to get wider bandwidth and more flat gain.

  17. Retinal injury thresholds for blue wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Lund, David J; Stuck, Bruce E; Edsall, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The interaction mechanism leading to laser-induced retinal alteration can be thermal or non-thermal, depending upon the wavelength of the laser radiation and the duration of the exposure. To investigate the effect of exposure duration on the interaction mechanism, retinal injury thresholds in the rhesus monkey were experimentally measured for exposure to laser radiation at wavelengths of 441.6, 457.9, 476.5, and 496.5 nm. Exposure durations were 0.1, 1, 5, 16, and 100 s; and 1/e retinal irradiance diameters were 50, 125, and 327 microm. Tissue response was observed via ophthalmoscope 1 h and 48 h post exposure. Thermal and non-thermal damage thresholds were obtained depending upon the exposure duration. These threshold data are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature for 100-s duration exposures, but differences were noted for shorter exposures. The current study yielded an estimated injury threshold for 1-s duration, 327-microm retinal irradiance diameter exposures at 441.6 nm, which is an order of magnitude higher than that previously reported. This study provides evidence that laser-induced retinal damage is primarily induced via thermal mechanisms for exposures shorter than 5 s in duration. Arguments are presented that support an amendment of the thermal hazard function, R(lambda).

  18. Long-Wavelength Instability in Marangoni Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHook, Stephen J.; Schatz, Michael F.; Swift, Jack B.; McCormick, W. D.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1996-01-01

    Our experiments in thin liquid layers (approximately 0.1 mm thick) heated from below reveal a well-defined long-wavelength instability: at a critical temperature difference across the layer, the depth of the layer in the center of the cell spontaneously decreases until the liquid-air interface ruptures and a dry spot forms. The onset of this critical instability occurs at a temperature difference across the liquid layer that is 35% smaller than that predicted in earlier theoretical studies of a single layer model. Our analysis of a two-layer model yields predictions in accord with the observations for liquid layer depths greater than or equal to 0.15 mm, but for smaller depths there is an increasing difference between our predictions and observations (the difference is 25% for a layer 0.06 mm thick). In microgravity environments the long-wavelength instability observed in our terrestrial experiments is expected to replace cellular convection as the primary instability in thick as well as thin liquid layers heated quasistatically from below.

  19. SHORT-WAVELENGTH MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: tina@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  20. Comparison of the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods for determining the solvation-response function

    SciTech Connect

    Gardecki, J.A.; Maroncelli, M.

    1999-03-04

    A comparison of the solvation/spectral-response functions obtained by two independent techniques, the single-wavelength and spectral-reconstruction methods, is reported. Determination of the best wavelengths for application of the linear-single-wavelength approximation for the solute coumarin 153 (C153) is achieved using radiative rate data and steady-state emission spectra in a series of 36 different solvents at room temperature. The optimal linear wavelength is found to be 555 nm. (This wavelength, which is on the red side of the spectrum, yields superior results when compared to the more traditional choice of 470--480 nm, on the blue side.) Response functions determined using both 560- and 470-nm observation wavelengths are compared to previously reported spectral-reconstruction results in 24 solvents. A comparison of the characteristic times indicates that the linear-single-wavelength method can be used to predict solvation times with an accuracy of roughly {+-}30--40% (1 standard deviation) using suitably scaled data collected at {approximately}560 nm. Application of a nonlinear version of the single-wavelength method does not provide increased accuracy.

  1. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."