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Sample records for vital signs laboratory

  1. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the first edition of Vital Signs, a Worldwide Institute publication that provides an annual update on global environmental trends. Includes discussion of the dismantling of nuclear arms, reduction in chlorofluorocarbon production, growth in bicycle production, the decline in cigarette smoking, and decline in military…

  2. Vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... overall health. Normal vital sign ranges for the average healthy adult while resting are: Blood pressure: 90/60 mm/Hg to 120/80 mm/Hg Breathing: 12 to 18 breaths per minute Pulse: 60 to 100 beats per minute Temperature: 97.8°F to 99.1°F (36. ...

  3. Vital Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your weight. Respiratory rate, which measures your breathing. Mild breathing changes can be from causes such as a ... nose or hard exercise. But slow or fast breathing can also be a sign of a serious ...

  4. Vital Signs Rate Meter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

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  5. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  6. Planetary Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  7. Aging changes in vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004019.htm Aging changes in vital signs To use the sharing ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Child Injury

    MedlinePlus

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  9. CDC Vital Signs: Recipe for Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  10. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  11. The vital signs of chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Kapur, Anil; Jahn, Andreas; Enarson, Donald A

    2009-06-01

    The vital signs of pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature and respiratory rate are the 'nub' of individual patient management. At the programmatic level, vital signs could also be used to monitor the burden and treatment outcome of chronic disease. Case detection and treatment outcome constitute the vital signs of tuberculosis control within the WHO's 'DOTS' framework, and similar vital signs could be adapted and used for management of chronic diseases. The numbers of new patients started on therapy in each month or quarter (new incident cases) are sensitive indicators for programme performance and access to services. Using similar reporting cycles, treatment outcomes for all patients can be assessed, the vital signs being: alive and retained on therapy at the respective facility; died; stopped therapy; lost to follow-up; and transferred out to another facility. Retention on treatment constitutes the prevalent number of cases, the burden of disease, and this provides important strategic information for rational drug forecasting and logistic planning. If case numbers and outcomes of chronic diseases were measured reliably and consistently as part of an integrated programmatic approach, this would strengthen the ability of resource-poor countries to monitor and assess their response to these growing epidemics.

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

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  13. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Opioids)

    MedlinePlus

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  14. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePlus

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  15. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Wearable system for vital signs monitoring.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Rita; Loriga, Gianni; Taccini, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    A new concept in healthcare, aimed at providing continuous remote monitoring of user's vital signs, is emerging. An innovative system named WEALTHY is presented, where conducting and piezoresistive materials in the form of fiber and yarn are integrated and used as sensor and electrode elements. The simultaneous recording of vital signs allows parameter extrapolation and inter-signal elaboration that contribute to producing alert messages and synoptic patient tables. Cardiac patients in the rehabilitation phase can be continuously monitored during selected time intervals, such as during physical activity or occurrence of symptoms, to discover potential threats and generate appropriate alerts to the patient and/or to an emergency center. The core of the system sensing is a textile interface, in which the sensing components are elements of the fabric: the sensorized garment is comfortable like a common article of clothing and is made with knitting machines; furthermore, the position of the electrodes and sensors is fixed and the elasticity of the fabric allows a good fitting to the body. The system is provided with a portable electronic unit, where signals are acquired, elaborated and transmitted. A monitoring system allows extrapolation of a new physiological index and data flow coordination as well as alarm management and database creation.

  17. Detecting Vital Signs with Wearable Wireless Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented. PMID:22163501

  18. Detecting vital signs with wearable wireless sensors.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Foster, Robert; Hao, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of wireless technologies and advancements in on-body sensor design can enable change in the conventional health-care system, replacing it with wearable health-care systems, centred on the individual. Wearable monitoring systems can provide continuous physiological data, as well as better information regarding the general health of individuals. Thus, such vital-sign monitoring systems will reduce health-care costs by disease prevention and enhance the quality of life with disease management. In this paper, recent progress in non-invasive monitoring technologies for chronic disease management is reviewed. In particular, devices and techniques for monitoring blood pressure, blood glucose levels, cardiac activity and respiratory activity are discussed; in addition, on-body propagation issues for multiple sensors are presented.

  19. Connected care: reducing errors through automated vital signs data upload.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura B; Banner, Laura; Lozano, Diego; Olney, Christine M; Friedman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Vital signs are a fundamental component of patient care. Omitted or inaccurately transcribed vital sign data could result in inappropriate, delayed, or missed treatment. A previous baseline study determined that error rates for vital signs captured on plain paper then entered into a paper chart or EMR were 10% and 4.4%, respectively. This study evaluated the impact of automated vital signs captured using a PDA with bar-code technology for patient identification. The PDA enabled the wireless capture and transmission of data directly from the vital sign monitor into the EMR. Researchers reviewed 1514 sets of vital signs collected electronically for accuracy and compared the error rate with data from the previous paper and EMR systems. Automated upload of vital signs directly into an EMR reduced the documentation error rate to less than 1%. This represented a significant reduction in vital sign documentation errors with the use of mobile technology when compared with traditional charting methods (P < .001). The automated vital sign data upload system helped promote a culture of patient safety by greatly reducing documentation error rates. Additional safety benefits may include improved timeliness to vital sign data and clinical work-flow processes.

  20. Development of a wearable vital signs monitor for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Jonathan; Lemos, Diego; Meneses, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Alher M

    2010-01-01

    In development countries the vital signs data measurement normally is performed at hospitals or laboratories where patients remain under observation with many electrodes attached on the body. The integration of biomedical data acquisition systems and information technologies (IT) enables continuous real time monitoring of physiological data in daily life, which improves patient's medical care and medical research possibilities. To achieve this goal, the research and development of some wearable intelligent sensors, sensors miniaturization, signal processing, wireless transmission, and databases development for these vital data have been done. Our goal is to implement a wearable system that can be used in places located outside of hospitals and medical institutions coverage area. In this paper, we present the current stage of the project where some intelligent modules have been implemented and other are under construction. Preliminary results concerning Non-Invasive Blood Pressure (NIBP), ECG and wireless connection are also presented.

  1. A Portable Vital Signs Monitor For Field Use.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    casualty bag, to monitor the vital 0 signs of a person sealed therein. •9 9 iii 1.0 INTRODUCTION As early as 1973, as a consequence of Trial CHACE...environments, such as within casualty bags, without breaching the casualty’s protection. Since one of the early design criteria was to measure signs ...National DEfense Canad’i ’Defence nationale A PORTABLE VITAL SIGNS MONITOR FOR FIELD USE IDIBTRMUTION STATEUML A Apprire fmo publi me r m;~s

  2. Rating the Vitality of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickford, J. Albert; Lewis, M. Paul; Simons, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    The Expanded Graded Intergenerational Disruption Scale (EGIDS), developed by Lewis and Simons and based on work by Fishman, provides a means of rating "language vitality"--the level of development or endangerment--where "development" is understood as adding or preserving functions and "endangerment" as loss of…

  3. Hyperspectral vital sign signal analysis for medical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Li, Yao; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Chang, Chein-I.; Hu, Peter; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a completely new technology,) from a hyperspectral imaging perspective, called Hyperspectral Vital Sign Signal Analysis (HyVSSA. A hyperspectral image is generally acquired by hundreds of contiguous spectral bands, each of which is an optical sensor specified by a particular wavelength. In medical application, we can consider a patient with different vital sign signals as a pixel vector in hyperspectral image and each vital sign signal as a particular band. In light of this interpretation, a revolutionary concept is developed, which translates medical data to hyperspectral data in such a way that hyperspectral technology can be readily applied to medical data analysis. One of most useful techniques in hyperspectral data processing is, Anomaly Detection (AD) which in this medical application is used to predict outcomes such as transfusion, length of stay (LOS) and mortality using various vital signs. This study compared transfusion prediction performance of Anomaly Detection (AD) and Logistic Regression (LR).

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Smoking among People with Mental Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are trying to quit. Top of Page Science Behind the Issue MMWR Science Clips Related Pages Vital Signs issue Details: Current ... factsheet [PDF - 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  5. Walking Speed: The Functional Vital Sign

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Addie; Fritz, Stacy L.; Lusardi, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Walking speed (WS) is a valid, reliable, sensitive measure appropriate for assessing and monitoring functional status and overall health in a wide range of populations. These capabilities have led to its designation as the “6th vital sign”. By synthesizing the available evidence on WS, this scholarly review article provides clinicians with a reference tool regarding this robust measure. Recommendations on testing procedures for assessing WS, including optimal distance, inclusion of acceleration/deceleration phases, instructions, and instrumentation are given. After assessing an individual’s WS, clinicians need to know what this value represents. Therefore, WS cut-off values and the corresponding predicted outcomes, as well as minimal detectable change values for specific populations and settings are provided. PMID:24812254

  6. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life hi-res Size hi-res: 673 kb Credits: ESA 2001. Illustration by Medialab Ozone in a planet's spectrum may indicate the presence of life Darwin will most probably look for the spectral signature of ozone, which is unlikely to exist in any quantity for any length of time in the atmosphere of a planet that is not home to life. The background image is a view of Earth seen by the Apollo 17 crew as they traveled toward the Moon. The white patch at the bottom is Antarctica. Unobscured by clouds, Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are visible at the top of this image. The large island off the coast of Africa is the Malagasy Republic. Looking for Earth-like planets hi-res Size hi-res: 2106 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Looking for Earth-like planets Darwin has six telescopes that analyse the atmospheres of Earth-like planets Darwin's flotilla hi-res Size hi-res: 902 Kb Credits: ESA 2002. Illustration by Medialab Darwin's flotilla Darwin's six telescopes, a central view-combining spacecraft, and communication satellite (shown bottom left) Our radio and television broadcasts have been leaking into space since the 1930s, when the first powerful emitters were constructed. However, you can do things the other way around as well. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has used radio telescopes to listen to the cosmos for similar signals. Nowadays, astrobiologists are pinpointing more subtle signs that all life, not just intelligent life, might radiate into space. They call these telltale signatures 'biomarkers'. When ESA's Darwin mission begins sending back data in the next decade, biomarkers will help indicate whether neighbouring planets are inhabited. If we only used radio waves as markers of life, this would exclude all forms of life that have not yet developed the means to emit radio waves. Life has been around for thousands of millions of years, but human beings have used radio waves

  7. [CW bio-radar vital sign detector and experiment study].

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Zhangyan; Zhang, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact vital sign detection technique provides an effective usage in health monitoring applications. A vital sign detector was designed based on microwave bio-radar technique. Using Doppler principle, continuous wave bioradar was designed for tiny body movement detection, short-time Fourier transform and interpolation algorithm were adopted for heart and respiration rate extraction, embedded system was used for system integration, real-time signal processing software was designed on it. Experiments were done by using simulation device and human body for research and performance evaluation. The result shows that the proposed prototype can be used for single target vital signs detection at the distance of 90 cm, and the heart rate result shows a 96% recognition rate.

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Colorectal Cancer Tests Save Lives

    MedlinePlus

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  9. CDC Vital Signs: Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePlus

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  10. Therapeutic touch: influence on vital signs of newborns

    PubMed Central

    Ramada, Nadia Christina Oliveira; Almeida, Fabiane de Amorim; Cunha, Mariana Lucas da Rocha

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective>: To compare vital signs before and after the therapeutic touch observed in hospitalized newborns in neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study performed at a neonatal intensive care unit of a municipal hospital, in the city of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. The sample included 40 newborns submitted to the therapeutic touch after a painful procedure. We evaluated the vital signs, such as heart and respiratory rates, temperature and pain intensity, before and after the therapeutic touch. Results: The majority of newborns were male (n=28; 70%), pre-term (n=19; 52%) and born from vaginal delivery (n=27; 67%). Respiratory distress was the main reason for hospital admission (n=16; 40%). There was a drop in all vital signs after therapeutic touch, particularly in pain score, which had a considerable reduction in the mean values, from 3.37 (SD=1.31) to 0 (SD=0.0). All differences found were statistically significant by the Wilcoxon test (p<0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that therapeutic touch promotes relaxation of the baby, favoring reduction in vital signs and, consequently in the basal metabolism rate. PMID:24488378

  11. Monitoring of Vital Signs with Flexible and Wearable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Khan, Yasser; Ostfeld, Aminy E; Lochner, Claire M; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    Advances in wireless technologies, low-power electronics, the internet of things, and in the domain of connected health are driving innovations in wearable medical devices at a tremendous pace. Wearable sensor systems composed of flexible and stretchable materials have the potential to better interface to the human skin, whereas silicon-based electronics are extremely efficient in sensor data processing and transmission. Therefore, flexible and stretchable sensors combined with low-power silicon-based electronics are a viable and efficient approach for medical monitoring. Flexible medical devices designed for monitoring human vital signs, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, and blood glucose have applications in both fitness monitoring and medical diagnostics. As a review of the latest development in flexible and wearable human vitals sensors, the essential components required for vitals sensors are outlined and discussed here, including the reported sensor systems, sensing mechanisms, sensor fabrication, power, and data processing requirements.

  12. Long-term vital sign measurement using a non-contact vital sign sensor inside an office cubicle setting.

    PubMed

    Hall, T; Malone, N A; Tsay, J; Lopez, J; Nguyen, T; Banister, R E; Lie, D Y C

    2016-08-01

    Heart and respiration rates can be wirelessly measured by extracting the phase shift caused by the periodic displacement of a patient's chest wall. We have developed a phased-array Doppler-based non-contact vital sign (NCVS) sensor capable of long-term vital signs monitoring using an automatic patient tracking and movement detection algorithm. Our NCVS sensor achieves non-contact heart rate monitoring with accuracies of over 90% (i.e, within ±5 Beats-Per-Minute vs. a reference sensor) across a large number of data points collected over various days of the week inside a typical office cubicle setting at a distance of 1.5 meters.

  13. Data acquisition system for Doppler radar vital-sign monitor.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alexander M; Lubecke, Victor M

    2007-01-01

    Automatic gain control (AGC) units increase the dynamic range of a system to compensate for the limited dynamic range of analog to digital converters. This problem is compounded in wireless systems in which large changes in signal strength are effects of a changing environment. These issues are evident in the direct-conversion Doppler radar vital-sign monitor. Utilizing microwave radar signals reflecting off a human subject, a two-channel quadrature receiver can detect periodic movement resulting from cardio-pulmonary activity. The quadrature signal is analyzed using an arctangent demodulation that extracts vital phase information. A data acquisition (DAQ) system is proposed to deal with issues inherent in arctangent demodulation of a quadrature radar signal.

  14. Progressive anomaly detection in medical data using vital sign signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Lee, Li-Chien; Li, Yao; Chang, Chein-I.; Hu, Peter; Mackenzie, Colin

    2016-05-01

    Vital Sign Signals (VSSs) have been widely used for medical data analysis. One classic approach is to use Logistic Regression Model (LRM) to describe data to be analyzed. There are two challenging issues from this approach. One is how many VSSs needed to be used in the model since there are many VSSs can be used for this purpose. Another is that once the number of VSSs is determined, the follow-up issue what these VSSs are. Up to date these two issues are resolved by empirical selection. This paper addresses these two issues from a hyperspectral imaging perspective. If we view a patient with collected different vital sign signals as a pixel vector in hyperspectral image, then each vital sign signal can be considered as a particular band. In light of this interpretation each VSS can be ranked by band prioritization commonly used by band selection in hyperspectral imaging. In order to resolve the issue of how many VSSs should be used for data analysis we further develop a Progressive Band Processing of Anomaly Detection (PBPAD) which allows users to detect anomalies in medical data using prioritized VSSs one after another so that data changes between bands can be dictated by profiles provided by PBPAD. As a result, there is no need of determining the number of VSSs as well as which VSS should be used because all VSSs are used in their prioritized orders. To demonstrate the utility of PBPAD in medical data analysis anomaly detection is implemented as PBP to find anomalies which correspond to abnormal patients. The data to be used for experiments are data collected in University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Shock Trauma Center (STC). The results will be evaluated by the results obtained by Logistic Regression Model (LRM).

  15. Vital sign monitoring utilizing Eulerian video magnification and thermography.

    PubMed

    Aubakir, Bauyrzhan; Nurimbetov, Birzhan; Tursynbek, Iliyas; Varol, Huseyin Atakan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a proof of concept for non-contact extraction of vital signs using RGB and thermal images obtained from a smart phone. Using our method, heart rate, respiratory rate and forehead temperature can be measured concurrently. Face detection and tracking is leveraged in order to allow natural motion of patients. Heart rate is estimated via processing of visible band RGB video using Eulerian Video Magnification technique. Respiratory rate and the temperature is measured using thermal video. Experiments conducted with 11 healthy subjects indicate that heart rate and respiration rate can be measured with 92 and 94 percent accuracy, respectively.

  16. Vital Signs building work-up: The Museum of Anthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, M.S.; Erwine, B.

    1997-12-31

    The paper will present the structure and the results of an in depth study of the Museum of Anthropology, designed by Arthur Erickson Architects for the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and completed in 1976. Part of the Vital Signs Curriculum Project created by Cris Benton and administered through the University of California at Berkeley, this analytic project was designed and carried out by a faculty/student team in the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington. The significance of this study is the simultaneous presentation of qualitative and quantitative information about the thermal and luminous environment of this building.

  17. Speckle POF sensor for detecting vital signs of patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomer, M.; Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Revilla, P.; Herrero, G.; Madruga, F.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, both arterial pulse and respiratory rate have been successfully measured based on changes in speckle patterns of multimode fibers. Using two fiber-based transducers, one located on the wrist and another in the chest, both disturbances were transmitted to the fiber, varying the speckle pattern. These variations of the speckle pattern were captured using a commercial webcam and further processed using different methods. The achieved results have been presented and the simultaneous monitoring of both vital signs has been also discussed. The feasibility to use the proposed sensor system for this application is demonstrated.

  18. Vital sign sensing method based on EMD in terahertz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhengwu; Liu, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact respiration and heartbeat rates detection could be applied to find survivors trapped in the disaster or the remote monitoring of the respiration and heartbeat of a patient. This study presents an improved algorithm that extracts the respiration and heartbeat rates of humans by utilizing the terahertz radar, which further lessens the effects of noise, suppresses the cross-term, and enhances the detection accuracy. A human target echo model for the terahertz radar is first presented. Combining the over-sampling method, low-pass filter, and Empirical Mode Decomposition improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution time-frequency technique and the centroid of the spectrogram are used to estimate the instantaneous velocity of the target's cardiopulmonary motion. The down-sampling method is adopted to prevent serious distortion. Finally, a second time-frequency analysis is applied to the centroid curve to extract the respiration and heartbeat rates of the individual. Simulation results show that compared with the previously presented vital sign sensing method, the improved algorithm enhances the signal-to-noise ratio to 1 dB with a detection accuracy of 80%. The improved algorithm is an effective approach for the detection of respiration and heartbeat signal in a complicated environment.

  19. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  20. A fuzzy model for processing and monitoring vital signs in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The area of the hospital automation has been the subject of much research, addressing relevant issues which can be automated, such as: management and control (electronic medical records, scheduling appointments, hospitalization, among others); communication (tracking patients, staff and materials), development of medical, hospital and laboratory equipment; monitoring (patients, staff and materials); and aid to medical diagnosis (according to each speciality). Methods In this context, this paper presents a Fuzzy model for helping medical diagnosis of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and their vital signs monitored through a multiparameter heart screen. Intelligent systems techniques were used in the data acquisition and processing (sorting, transforming, among others) it into useful information, conducting pre-diagnosis and providing, when necessary, alert signs to the medical staff. Conclusions The use of fuzzy logic turned to the medical area can be very useful if seen as a tool to assist specialists in this area. This paper presented a fuzzy model able to monitor and classify the condition of the vital signs of hospitalized patients, sending alerts according to the pre-diagnosis done helping the medical diagnosis. PMID:21810277

  1. [Evaluation of pain intensity and vital signs in the cardiac surgery postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adriana de Fátima Alencar; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; de Sousa, Ana Cláudia; Almeida, Paulo César

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the changes in vital signs of postoperative cardiac surgery patients, according to the referred pain intensity. This descriptive-exploratory study was performed using quantitative analysis to investigate 38 patients submitted to a first dressing change. The analysis of the data, measured before and after performing the nursing procedure, indicated that the manifestation of pain occurred at different levels. The main changes in vital signs referred to blood pressure. In conclusion, there is a relationship between pain intensity and vital signs, and the care that is delivered is indispensible to reestablishing the health state of the postoperative patient.

  2. Novel Use of Google Glass for Procedural Wireless Vital Sign Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Cara A; Zayed, Mohamed A; Aalami, Oliver; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study investigates the feasibility and potential utility of head-mounted displays for real-time wireless vital sign monitoring during surgical procedures. Methods In this randomized controlled pilot study, surgery residents (n = 14) performed simulated bedside procedures with traditional vital sign monitors and were randomized to addition of vital sign streaming to Google Glass. Time to recognition of preprogrammed vital sign deterioration and frequency of traditional monitor use was recorded. User feedback was collected by electronic survey. Results The experimental group spent 90% less time looking away from the procedural field to view traditional monitors during bronchoscopy (P = .003), and recognized critical desaturation 8.8 seconds earlier; the experimental group spent 71% (P = .01) less time looking away from the procedural field during thoracostomy, and recognized hypotension 10.5 seconds earlier. Trends toward earlier recognition of deterioration did not reach statistical significance. The majority of participants agreed that Google Glass increases situational awareness (64%), is helpful in monitoring vitals (86%), is easy to use (93%), and has potential to improve patient safety (85%). Conclusion In this early feasibility study, use of streaming to Google Glass significantly decreased time looking away from procedural fields and resulted in a nonsignificant trend toward earlier recognition of vital sign deterioration. Vital sign streaming with Google Glass or similar platforms is feasible and may enhance procedural situational awareness.

  3. 75 FR 22630 - Vital Signs Minnesota, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Vital Signs Minnesota, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment... separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Biomedical Dynamics Corporation... unemployment insurance (UI) wages are paid through Biomedical Dynamics Corporation, including on-site...

  4. NASA life sciences. An improvement in vital signs.

    PubMed

    Lawler, A

    2000-08-04

    Last week a hefty Russian module with living and working quarters for astronauts docked with the pieces of the international space station already in orbit, a critical step in creating a full-time orbiting laboratory. Meanwhile, NASA bureaucrats put the finishing touches on a realignment of the agency's struggling biology effort that should bolster fundamental research and allow scientists to make better use of the facility, scheduled to be completed in 2005. The two events raise the hopes of U.S. academic space life scientists that their discipline is at last on the ascent at NASA.

  5. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios.

  6. Monitors Track Vital Signs for Fitness and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Have you ever felt nauseous reading a book in the back seat of a car? Or woken from a deep sleep feeling disoriented, unsure which way is up? Momentary mixups like these happen when the sensory systems that track the body's orientation in space become confused. (In the case of the backseat bookworm, the conflict arises when the reader s inner ear, part of the body s vestibular system, senses the car s motion while her eyes are fixed on the stationary pages of the book.) Conditions like motion sickness are common on Earth, but they also present a significant challenge to astronauts in space. Human sensory systems use the pull of gravity to help determine orientation. In the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station, for example, the body experiences a period of confusion before it adapts to the new circumstances. (In space, even the body s proprioceptive system, which tells the brain where the arms and legs are oriented without the need for visual confirmation, goes haywire, meaning astronauts sometimes lose track of where their limbs are when they are not moving them.) This Space Adaptation Syndrome affects a majority of astronauts, even experienced ones, causing everything from mild disorientation to nausea to severe vomiting. "It can be quite debilitating," says William Toscano, a research scientist in NASA s Ames Research Center Psychophysiology Laboratory, part of the Center s Human Systems Integration Division. "When this happens, as you can imagine, work proficiency declines considerably." Since astronauts cannot afford to be distracted or incapacitated during critical missions, NASA has explored various means for preventing and countering motion sickness in space, including a range of drug treatments. Many effective motion sickness drugs, however, cause undesirable side effects, such as drowsiness. Toscano and his NASA colleague, Patricia Cowings, have developed a different approach: Utilizing biofeedback training methods, the pair can

  7. The detection of 4 vital signs of in-patients Using fuzzy database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris Rangkuti, A.; Erlisa Rasjid, Zulfany

    2014-03-01

    Actually in order to improve in the performance of the Hospital's administrator, by serve patients effectively and efficiently, the role of information technology become the dominant support. Especially when it comes to patient's conditions, such that it will be reported to a physician as soon as possible, including monitoring the patient's conditions regularly. For this reason it is necessary to have a Hospital Monitoring Information System, that is able to provide information about the patient's condition which is based on the four vital signs, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. To monitor the 4 vital signs, the concept of fuzzy logic is used, where the vital signs number approaches 1 then the patient is close to recovery, and on the contrary, when the vital signs number approaches 0 then the patient still has problems. This system also helps nurses to provide answers to the relatives of patients, who wants to know the development of the patient's condition, including the recovery percentage based on the average of Fuzzy max from the 4 vital signs. Using Fuzzy-based monitoring system, the monitoring of the patient's condition becomes simpler and easier.

  8. Cost-effective health services for interactive continuous monitoring of vital signs parameters--the e-Vital concept.

    PubMed

    Prentza, Andriana; Angelidis, Pantelis; Leondaridis, Lefteris; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the e-Vital project is the validation of the market concerning the provision of a novel remote telemedicine service aimed at large sensitive parts of the European population, the "at-risk" citizens, who are usually patients with a stable medical condition that allow a near normal life but may suddenly deteriorate and put life at risk. This service will increase their quality of life and their feeling of safety concerning their health. The e-Vital project focuses on the implementation and exploitation of a modular and ambulatory secure telemedicine platform, which is using easily wearable vital signs monitoring devices, causing minimal discomfort to patients, and which transfer in real time and on-line critical vital parameters to doctors and/or medical experts/consultants, regardless of their location, while getting feedback to increase their feeling of comfort or in case of alarm. The interactive continuous monitoring promises cost effective health services, more active involvement of patients in their own care, and a new sense of realism in making a diagnosis.

  9. Embedded validity indicators on CNS vital signs in youth with neurological diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Brian L; Sherman, Elisabeth M S; Iverson, Grant L

    2014-08-01

    Computerized screening measures can provide valuable information on cognition. However, determining the validity of obtained data is critical for interpretation. The purpose of this study was to examine the embedded validity indicators on the CNS Vital Signs battery in a sample of youth with neurological diagnoses. The sample included 275 children and adolescents (mean = 13.9, SD = 3.0) with neurological disorders. Six out of seven subtests and six of the nine domain scores on CNS Vital Signs had fewer than 5% of the sample flagged as invalid on the embedded indicators. However, the Shifting Attention Test and its derived domain scores had higher rates of being flagged. Patients with one or more flagged scores (18% of sample) were younger and had lower intellectual abilities, psychomotor speed, verbal memory, and performance on other validity tests. Compared to stand-alone validity tests, CNS Vital Signs embedded validity indicators had low sensitivity. More research is needed with the embedded indicators in youth.

  10. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, focusing on the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index, statistics that measure the state of racial inequality, the pay scale of faculty at black colleges and universities, and leading foundation grants to African American higher…

  11. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents statistics on the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, discussing the following: the black/white higher-education equality issue, statistics measuring the state of racial inequality, African-American doctoral degrees at an all-time high, the pay scale of faculty at black colleges and universities, and…

  12. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; students and faculty from black African nations at U.S. colleges and universities; and the pay scale of faculty at black…

  13. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education. Topics include the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; the still-missing statistics on blacks in higher education; and reasons for hope regarding African Americans in higher…

  14. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents statistics on the status of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, examining the following issues: the black-white higher education equality index, the state of racial inequality, state-by-state projections of African American college enrollments for 1995-2015, and the history and status of African Americans in higher…

  15. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure the state of racial inequality; the superior graduation rates of black scholarship athletes; and whether the college athletic powerhouses are ignoring the…

  16. Assessment of cognitive performance using CNS vital signs after electroconvulsive treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wysokiński, Adam; Dzienniak, Małgorzata; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2014-03-01

    Little is known how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) affects cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia. Assessment of cognitive functions in subjects with schizophrenia treated with ECT was performed using CNS Vital Signs computerized battery of tests. Thirteen patients treated with ECT plus antipsychotics were assessed before and after 12 to 15 bilateral ECT sessions. We did not find any important changes between pre-ECT and post-ECT cognitive performance. We also found that CNS Vital Signs is a useful computerized battery test for assessing cognitive functions of subjects treated with ECT.

  17. Bandwidth of non-contact vital sign detection with a noise suppression phase locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zongyang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    In a dual-carrier vital sign detection system, we have designed a noise suppression scheme that uses phase locked loop (PLL) to automatically suppress the noise induced by range correlation and transmission paths. The system uses two microwave carriers at 5.6 and 5.68 GHz generated by two phase locked signal generators to extract the noise and vital sign respectively. The feedback microwave signals are mixed with local 5.68-GHz signal to transfer to the vial sign signal and low frequency intermediate frequency (IF) signal. When the IF signal corresponding to 5.68 GHz microwave signal is locked to a highly stable low noise reference, the noises of IF signal and vital sign signal are suppressed as their corresponding microwave signals are highly correlated. In this system, the noise suppression performance is related to the bandwidth of the PLL, which needs to be carefully designed. Through the theoretical analysis, initial bandwidth is chosen to be 200 Hz. Then the charge pump current is changed to adjust the bandwidth and the corresponding noise suppression performance is evaluated using experiments. The results show the system with a charge pump current 0.625 mA, which corresponds to about 50 Hz bandwidth, exhibits a better noise performance. In addition, at different bandwidth, the vital sign detection system is compared with a design scheme with unlocked PLL and demonstrates superior performance at all bandwidths.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Blood Pressure Control -- Helping Patients Take Their Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: ...

  19. Multi-parameter vital sign database to assist in alarm optimization for general care units.

    PubMed

    Welch, James; Kanter, Benjamin; Skora, Brooke; McCombie, Scott; Henry, Isaac; McCombie, Devin; Kennedy, Rosemary; Soller, Babs

    2016-12-01

    Continual vital sign assessment on the general care, medical-surgical floor is expected to provide early indication of patient deterioration and increase the effectiveness of rapid response teams. However, there is concern that continual, multi-parameter vital sign monitoring will produce alarm fatigue. The objective of this study was the development of a methodology to help care teams optimize alarm settings. An on-body wireless monitoring system was used to continually assess heart rate, respiratory rate, SpO2 and noninvasive blood pressure in the general ward of ten hospitals between April 1, 2014 and January 19, 2015. These data, 94,575 h for 3430 patients are contained in a large database, accessible with cloud computing tools. Simulation scenarios assessed the total alarm rate as a function of threshold and annunciation delay (s). The total alarm rate of ten alarms/patient/day predicted from the cloud-hosted database was the same as the total alarm rate for a 10 day evaluation (1550 h for 36 patients) in an independent hospital. Plots of vital sign distributions in the cloud-hosted database were similar to other large databases published by different authors. The cloud-hosted database can be used to run simulations for various alarm thresholds and annunciation delays to predict the total alarm burden experienced by nursing staff. This methodology might, in the future, be used to help reduce alarm fatigue without sacrificing the ability to continually monitor all vital signs.

  20. Presidents' Vital Signs: Implications for Institutional Decision Making. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Glenn M.; Ducanis, Alex J.

    In an examination of institutional decision making, this study identified types of data used by college presidents in assessing their institution's stability and their perception of the comparative importance of various indicators purported to demonstrate the vital signs of an institution. Indicators were in the areas of Student Flow, Finance, and…

  1. A flexible system for vital signs monitoring in hospital general care wards based on the integration of UNIX-based workstations, standard networks and portable vital signs monitors.

    PubMed

    Welch, J P; Sims, N; Ford-Carlton, P; Moon, J B; West, K; Honore, G; Colquitt, N

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a study conducted on general surgical and thoracic surgical floors of a 1000-bed hospital to assess the impact of a new network for portable patient care devices. This network was developed to address the needs of hospital patients who need constant, multi-parameter, vital signs surveillance, but do not require intensive nursing care. Bedside wall jacks were linked to UNIX-based workstations using standard digital network hardware, creating a flexible system (for general care floors of the hospital) that allowed the number of monitored locations to increase and decrease as patient census and acuity levels varied. It also allowed the general care floors to provide immediate, centralized vital signs monitoring for patients who unexpectedly became unstable, and permitted portable monitors to travel with patients as they were transferred between hospital departments. A disk-based log within the workstation automatically collected performance data, including patient demographics, monitor alarms, and network status for analysis. The log has allowed the developers to evaluate the use and performance of the system.

  2. [Design of mobile vital-signs monitoring system for the elderly in nursing home].

    PubMed

    Ren, Pengling; Li, Lifeng; Chen, Longtu; Niu, Haijun; Fan, Yubo

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposed a mobile vital-signs monitoring system based on ZigBee localization and wireless transmission technology for the elderly in nursing home. The system can monitor the vital-signs (pulse, ECG and blood oxygen), localize human body and warn in emergency. The validity and accuracy of this system were testified by the experiments of mobile acquisition and storage of pulse. In these experiments, the measurement of pulse ranged from 50 to 170 time a minute, the mean error of which was less than 3%. The mean error of localizing was less than 4 m. And the data transmission rate was 250 kbps. The system, which effectively conducts the real-time monitoring of the health and safety situation for the elderly, has a great significance for protecting the elderly's life safety.

  3. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  4. Analytical parameters and vital signs in patients subjected to dental extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jané-Pallí, Enric; Arranz-Obispo, Carlos; González-Navarro, Beatriz; Murat, Jesús; Ayuso-Montero, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Santamaría, Amparo; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2017-01-01

    Background Dental consultation may provoke stress to the patient, especially when a dental surgery is going to be performed, stressful situations can cause a reaction in the sympathetic nervous system that could lead to cardiovascular alterations. Blood pressure and cardiac frequency are used often as an indirect measurement and this parameters combined can serve as good indicators of stress. Objective: Analyze the changes in vital signs and analytical parameters induced by a dental extraction. Material and Methods 24 healthy patients who required a simple dental extraction underwent to a blood test and motorization of their pre- and post-extraction vital signs before, at 2 and 48 hours after the procedure. Data analysis was performed by means of repeated measures one way ANOVA followed by multiple comparisons Bonferroni’s Post-hoc test. Results The evaluated patients were 13 women and 11 men with an average age of 35.1. Thirteen patients (54.17% of the sample) were smokers and five were regular drinkers (20.8%). No significant differences were observed in the vital signs with the exception of diastolic blood pressure and cardiac rate that were slightly lower after extraction. Only two analytical parameters showed statistical significant changes. Total bilirubin was significantly higher at 48 hours after extraction and leukocyte count was significantly lower at this time. In any case, the magnitude of the changes observed was very low. The analytical parameters and the vital signs did not show any relevant change. Conclusions Eventual alterations found after simple tooth extraction should not be attributed to the procedure. Key words:Blood pressure, heart rate, monitoring physiologic, oxygen saturation, tooth extraction. PMID:28210440

  5. Is Heart Rate Variability Better Than Routine Vital Signs for Prehospital Identification of Major Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    sinus arrhythmia that was identified by computer algorithm (each cycle indicated by numerals above the RRI waveform); see text for more details about...SampEn], and rate of sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) measured up to the 15th minute of each subject’s prehospital data record. SDNN [8-11] and SampEn [2...themultivariate logistic regressionmodels consisting of different combinations of routine vital signs and rate of sinus arrhythmia for predicting 24-hour PRBC

  6. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs Identified Patients with Substantial Bleeding Prior to Hospital Arrival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    culminating with the first and only deployment of an automated emergency care decision system on board active air ambulances: the APPRAISE system , a...hardware/software platform for automated, real-time analysis of vital-sign data. After developing the APPRAISE system using data from trauma patients...APPRAISE system provided consistent determination of whether or not patients were bleeding. We found that the automated APPRAISE system using a

  7. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  8. Hyperspectral analysis approach to prioritizing vital sign signals for medical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Li-Chien; Gao, Cheng; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Chein-I.; Hu, Peter; Mackenzie, Colin

    2016-05-01

    When medical data are collected there are many Vital Sign Signals (VSSs) that can be used for data analysis. From a hyperspectral imaging perspective, we can consider a patient with different vital sign signals as a pixel vector in hyperspectral image and each vital sign signal as a particular band. In light of this interpretation this paper develops two new concepts of prioritization of VSSs. One is Orthogonal Subspace Projection Residual (OSPR), which measures the residual of a VSS in the orthogonal complement subspace to the space linearly spanned by the remaining VSSs. Another is to construct a histogram for each of VSSs that can be used as a means of ranking VSSs according to a certain criterion for optimality. Several measures are proposed to be used as criteria for VSS prioritization, which are variance, entropy and Kullbak-Leibler (KL) information measure. VSS prioritization can then be used as the VSS selection method to form Logistic Regression model (LRM). In order to determine how many VSSs should be used a recently developed concept, called Virtual Dimensionality (VD) can be used for this purpose. To demonstrate the utility of VSS prioritization, data collected in University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Shock Trauma Center (STC) was used for experiments.

  9. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir; Nazeran, Homer; Siska, Petr

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS). The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person’s chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field. PMID:28075341

  10. A Non-Invasive Multichannel Hybrid Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Vital Sign Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir; Nazeran, Homer; Siska, Petr

    2017-01-08

    In this article, we briefly describe the design, construction, and functional verification of a hybrid multichannel fiber-optic sensor system for basic vital sign monitoring. This sensor uses a novel non-invasive measurement probe based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The probe is composed of two FBGs encapsulated inside a polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS). The PDMS is non-reactive to human skin and resistant to electromagnetic waves, UV absorption, and radiation. We emphasize the construction of the probe to be specifically used for basic vital sign monitoring such as body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate. The proposed sensor system can continuously process incoming signals from up to 128 individuals. We first present the overall design of this novel multichannel sensor and then elaborate on how it has the potential to simplify vital sign monitoring and consequently improve the comfort level of patients in long-term health care facilities, hospitals and clinics. The reference ECG signal was acquired with the use of standard gel electrodes fixed to the monitored person's chest using a real-time monitoring system for ECG signals with virtual instrumentation. The outcomes of these experiments have unambiguously proved the functionality of the sensor system and will be used to inform our future research in this fast developing and emerging field.

  11. Through-Wall Multiple Targets Vital Signs Tracking Based on VMD Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jiaming; Hong, Hong; Zhao, Heng; Li, Yusheng; Gu, Chen; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Targets located at the same distance are easily neglected in most through-wall multiple targets detecting applications which use the single-input single-output (SISO) ultra-wideband (UWB) radar system. In this paper, a novel multiple targets vital signs tracking algorithm for through-wall detection using SISO UWB radar has been proposed. Taking advantage of the high-resolution decomposition of the Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD) based algorithm, the respiration signals of different targets can be decomposed into different sub-signals, and then, we can track the time-varying respiration signals accurately when human targets located in the same distance. Intensive evaluation has been conducted to show the effectiveness of our scheme with a 0.15 m thick concrete brick wall. Constant, piecewise-constant and time-varying vital signs could be separated and tracked successfully with the proposed VMD based algorithm for two targets, even up to three targets. For the multiple targets’ vital signs tracking issues like urban search and rescue missions, our algorithm has superior capability in most detection applications. PMID:27537880

  12. A Web-based vital sign telemonitor and recorder for telemedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Patricia; Gonzalez, Perla; Villanueva, Brenda; Haltiwanger, Emily; Nazeran, Homer

    2004-01-01

    We describe a vital sign telemonitor (VST) that acquires, records, displays, and provides readings such as: electrocardiograms (ECGs), temperature (T), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) over the Internet to any site. The design of this system consisted of three parts: sensors, analog signal processing circuits, and a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). The first part involved selection of appropriate sensors. For ECG, disposable Ag/AgCl electrodes; for temperature, LM35 precision temperature sensor; and for SaO2 the Nonin Oximetry Development Kit equipped with a finger clip were selected. The second part consisted of processing the analog signals obtained from these sensors. This was achieved by implementing suitable amplifiers and filters for the vital signs. The final part focused on development of a GUI to display the vital signs in the LabVIEW environment. From these measurements, important values such as heart rate (HR), beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, SaO2 percentages, and T in both degrees Celsius and Fahrenheit were calculated The GUI could be accessed through the Internet in a Web-page facilitating the possibility of real-time patient telemonitoring. The final system was completed and tested on volunteers with satisfactory results.

  13. Vital signs monitoring plan for the Klamath Network: Phase I report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarr, Daniel; Odion, Dennis; Truitt, Robert E.; Beever, Erik A.; Shafer, Sarah; Duff, Andrew; Smith, Sean B.; Bunn, Windy; Rocchio, Judy; Sarnat, Eli; Alexander, John; Jessup, Steve

    2004-01-01

    This report chronicles the Phase 1 stage of the vital signs monitoring program for the Klamath Network. It consists of two chapters and eleven appendixes. The purposes of Chapter One are to 1) describe the network administrative structure and approach to planning; 2) introduce the Klamath Network parks, their resources, and environmental settings; 3) explain the need for monitoring changes in resources and supporting environments; 4) identify key information gaps that limit understanding of how to best achieve these monitoring goals. The purpose of Chapter Two is to develop the descriptive information provided in Chapter One into a conceptual basis for vital signs monitoring and to present the Network’s initial suite of conceptual models. The Report Appendices provide in-depth information on a variety of topics researched in preparation of the report, including: detailed natural resource profiles for each park, supporting policies and guidelines, regional fire regimes, vegetation types of the parks, exotic species threats, interagency monitoring programs, air issues, water quality (Phase 1 Report), Network vital signs (Scoping Summary Report), rare species, and rare habitats of the parks.

  14. Effects of static magnetic fields on cognition, vital signs, and sensory perception: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Angela; Szostek, Anne; Nees, Frauke; Meyer, Patric; Semmler, Wolfhard; Flor, Herta

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate whether cognitive processes, sensory perception, and vital signs might be influenced by static magnetic fields in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which could pose a risk for health personnel and patients, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that examined effects of static magnetic fields. Studies covering the time from 1992 to 2007 were selected. Cohen's d effects sizes were used and combined in different categories of neuropsychology (reaction time, visual processing, eye-hand coordination, and working memory). Additionally, effects of static magnetic fields on sensory perception and vital signs were analyzed. In the category "neuropsychology," only effects on the visual system were homogeneous, showing a statistically significant impairment as a result of exposure to static magnetic fields (d = -0.415). Vital signs were not affected and effects on sensory perceptions included an increase of dizziness and vertigo, primarily caused by movement during static magnetic field gradient exposures. The number of studies dealing with this topic is very small and the experimental set-up of some of the analyzed studies makes it difficult to accurately determine the effects of static magnetic fields by themselves, excluding nonspecific factors. The implications of these results for MRI lead to suggestions for improvement in research designs.

  15. Understanding the significance, reasons and patterns of abnormal vital signs after gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Bellorin, Omar; Abdemur, Abraham; Sucandy, Iswanto; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2011-06-01

    Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB). This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding. After IRB approval and adherence to HIPAA guidelines, a retrospective review of medical records was performed on 518 patients who underwent LRYGB between October 2002 and October 2006. Vital signs from each patient were monitored hourly. Eight patients out of 518 (1.54%) were discovered to have anastomotic leak. A marked increase in heart rate up to 120 bpm at 20 h after surgery occurred in five of eight patients (62.5%). Of the eight patients who had a leak, seven (87.5%) experienced sustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. On the other hand, 20 patients out of 518 (3.86%) were discovered to have postoperative bleeding. A gradual rather than a dramatic increase in heart rate was recorded in 17 of 20 patients (85%) starting 8 h after surgery. Five patients (25%) had unsustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. Twelve patients in this group (60%) were seen to have cyclical tachycardia that never exceeded 120 bpm at any point during hospitalization. Marginal hypotension was found in seven patients (35%) in this group. Sustained tachycardia with a heart rate exceeding 120 bpm appears to be an indicator of anastomotic leak. Tachycardia less than 120 bpm that has occurred in a cyclical pattern strongly pointed toward postoperative bleeding. Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing LRYGB. This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding.

  16. Developing Brain Vital Signs: Initial Framework for Monitoring Brain Function Changes Over Time.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Hajra, Sujoy; Liu, Careesa C; Song, Xiaowei; Fickling, Shaun; Liu, Luke E; Pawlowski, Gabriela; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Smith, Aynsley M; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Van Den Broek, Rudi; Rizzotti, Rowena; Fisher, Kirk; D'Arcy, Ryan C N

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessment of brain function relies heavily on indirect behavior-based tests. Unfortunately, behavior-based assessments are subjective and therefore susceptible to several confounding factors. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs), derived from electroencephalography (EEG), are often used to provide objective, physiological measures of brain function. Historically, ERPs have been characterized extensively within research settings, with limited but growing clinical applications. Over the past 20 years, we have developed clinical ERP applications for the evaluation of functional status following serious injury and/or disease. This work has identified an important gap: the need for a clinically accessible framework to evaluate ERP measures. Crucially, this enables baseline measures before brain dysfunction occurs, and might enable the routine collection of brain function metrics in the future much like blood pressure measures today. Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential "brain vital signs." This framework enabled the translation/transformation of complex ERP data into accessible metrics of brain function for wider clinical utilization. To formalize the framework, three essential ERPs were selected as initial indicators: (1) the auditory N100 (Auditory sensation); (2) the auditory oddball P300 (Basic attention); and (3) the auditory speech processing N400 (Cognitive processing). First step validation was conducted on healthy younger and older adults (age range: 22-82 years). Results confirmed specific ERPs at the individual level (86.81-98.96%), verified predictable age-related differences (P300 latency delays in older adults, p < 0.05), and demonstrated successful linear transformation into the proposed brain vital sign (BVS) framework (basic attention latency sub-component of BVS framework reflects delays in older adults, p < 0.05). The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and

  17. Vital Signs Evaluation of Human Behaviour via an Autonomous Body Area Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, S.; Takayama, S.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancing Quality of Life (QOL) has long been an explicit and implicit goal for individuals, nations, and the world. QOL involves diverse multidimensional factors spanning wealth, physical health, social well-being, and international relationships. This study presents a definition of QOL combining the measurement of health-related QOL with an autonomous Body Area Network System (BANs). A method of evaluating vital signs is performed and linked to physical intensity assistance in exercise. Specifically, BAN acts as a supportive system which can assist a user in monitoring his or her body's parameters, providing real-time feedbacks and dynamically sharing information from any location to one or more users.

  18. Effect of interaction with clowns on vital signs and non-verbal communication of hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Alcântara, Pauline Lima; Wogel, Ariane Zonho; Rossi, Maria Isabela Lobo; Neves, Isabela Rodrigues; Sabates, Ana Llonch; Puggina, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Compare the non-verbal communication of children before and during interaction with clowns and compare their vital signs before and after this interaction. Methods: Uncontrolled, intervention, cross-sectional, quantitative study with children admitted to a public university hospital. The intervention was performed by medical students dressed as clowns and included magic tricks, juggling, singing with the children, making soap bubbles and comedic performances. The intervention time was 20min. Vital signs were assessed in two measurements with an interval of 1min immediately before and after the interaction. Non-verbal communication was observed before and during the interaction using the Non-Verbal Communication Template Chart, a tool in which non-verbal behaviors are assessed as effective or ineffective in the interactions. Results: The sample consisted of 41 children with a mean age of 7.6±2.7 years; most were aged 7-11 years (n=23; 56%) and were males (n=26; 63.4%). There was a statistically significant difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pain and non-verbal behavior of children with the intervention. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased and pain scales showed decreased scores. Conclusions: The playful interaction with clowns can be a therapeutic resource to minimize the effects of the stressing environment during the intervention, improve the children's emotional state and reduce the perception of pain. PMID:27080219

  19. Menstruation in girls and adolescents: using the menstrual cycle as a vital sign.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Angela; Laufer, Marc R; Breech, Lesley L

    2006-11-01

    Young patients and their parents often are unsure about what represents normal menstrual patterns, and clinicians also may be unsure about normal ranges for menstrual cycle length and amount and duration of flow through adolescence. It is important to be able to educate young patients and their parents regarding what to expect of a first period and about the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. It is equally important for clinicians to have an understanding of bleeding patterns in girls and adolescents, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate young patients' conditions appropriately. Using the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign adds a powerful tool to the assessment of normal development and the exclusion of pathological conditions.

  20. Derivation of a cardiac arrest prediction model using ward vital signs

    PubMed Central

    Churpek, Matthew M.; Yuen, Trevor C.; Park, Seo Young; Meltzer, David O.; Hall, Jesse B.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Rapid response team (RRT) activation criteria were created using expert opinion and have demonstrated variable accuracy in previous studies. We developed a cardiac arrest risk triage (CART) score to predict cardiac arrest (CA) and compared it to the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), a commonly cited RRT activation criterion. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting An academic medical center in the United States. Patients All patients hospitalized from November 2008 to January 2011 who had documented ward vital signs were included in the study. These patients were divided into three cohorts: patients who suffered a CA on the wards, patients who had a ward to intensive care unit (ICU) transfer, and patients who had neither of these outcomes (controls). Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Ward vital signs from admission until discharge, ICU transfer, or ward CA were extracted from the medical record. Multivariate logistic regression was used to predict CA, and the CART score was calculated using the regression coefficients. The model was validated by comparing its accuracy for detecting ICU transfer to the MEWS. Each patient’s maximum score prior to CA, ICU transfer, or discharge was used to compare the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) between the two models. Eighty-eight CA patients, 2820 ICU transfers, and 44519 controls were included in the study. The CART score more accurately predicted CA than the MEWS (AUC 0.84 vs. 0.76;P=0.001). At a specificity of 89.9%, the CART score had a sensitivity of 53.4% compared to 47.7% for the MEWS. The CART score also predicted ICU transfer better than the MEWS (AUC 0.71 vs. 0.67;P<0.001). Conclusions The CART score is simpler and more accurately detected CA and ICU transfer than the MEWS. Implementation of this tool may decrease RRT resource utilization and provide a better opportunity to improve patient outcomes than the MEWS. PMID:22584764

  1. Impact of peer pressure on accuracy of reporting vital signs: An interprofessional comparison between nursing and medical students.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Alyshah; Beran, Tanya N

    2016-01-01

    The hierarchical relationship between nursing and medicine has long been known, yet its direct influence on procedural tasks has yet to be considered. Drawing on the theory of conformity from social psychology, we suggest that nursing students are likely to report incorrect information in response to subtle social pressures imposed by medical students. Second-year medical and third-year nursing students took vital signs readings from a patient simulator. In a simulation exercise, three actors, posing as medical students, and one nursing student participant all took a total of three rounds of vital signs on a high-fidelity patient simulator. In the first two rounds the three actors individually stated the same correct vital signs values, and on the third round the three actors individually stated the same incorrect vital sign values. This same procedure was repeated with actors posing as nursing students, and one medical student. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that nursing student participants (M = 2.84; SD = 1.24) reported a higher number of incorrect vital signs than did medical student participants (M = 2.13; SD = 1.07), F (1,100) = 5.51, p = 0.021 (Cohen's d = 0.61). The study indicated that social pressure may prevent nursing students from questioning incorrect information within interprofessional environments, potentially affecting quality of care.

  2. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  3. The design and implementation of a rescue terminal with vital signs telemonitoring based on Beidou 1 navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junping; Zheng, Bing; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Yubin; Chen, Shifu; Zhang, Meikui; Zhou, Li; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Tongze

    2011-03-01

    This article presents the design and applications of a rescue terminal with positioning, vital signs sensing, and communicating function for special environment. The terminal provides three-dimensional positioning functionality via China's Beidou 1 Navigation Satellite (BD1) System and can collect users' vital signs with a set of wireless sensors. A controller of the terminal is in charge of processing data collected from the wireless sensors and communicating with the monitoring platform. With features such as small sizing, low power consumption, and accurate positioning, this terminal is very helpful in special circumstances such as disaster relief, dangerous outdoor sports and adventure monitoring, and antiterrorism activities.

  4. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-06-24

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors.

  5. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviours, and Cardiovascular Health: When Will Cardiorespiratory Fitness Become a Vital Sign?

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Although it is generally agreed upon that a physically active lifestyle and regular exercise are good for heart health, it is much less appreciated by the public that the prolonged hours of sedentary time resulting from sitting at work or screen time are also risk factors for cardiovascular outcomes and other cardiometabolic diseases. In this short narrative review, evidence is discussed and prudent recommendations are made in the context of the sedentary, affluent lifestyle that characterizes a large proportion of our population. It has become overwhelmingly clear that a sedentary lifestyle is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. In addition, vigorous physical activity and exercise is also associated with metabolic and cardiovascular adaptations that are compatible with cardiovascular health. In that regard, cardiorespiratory fitness, a reliable metric to assess the ability of the cardiovascular system to sustain prolonged physical work, has been shown to be the most powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, way beyond classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol, hypertension, and diabetes. On the basis of the evidence available, it is proposed that both dimensions of overall physical activity level (reducing sedentary time and performing regular physical activity or endurance type exercise) should be targeted to reduce CVD risk. Finally, because of the robust evidence that poor cardiorespiratory fitness is an independent risk factor for CVD and related mortality, it is proposed that this simple physiological metric should be incorporated as a vital sign in CVD risk factor evaluation and management.

  6. Computational Depth of Anesthesia via Multiple Vital Signs Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sadrawi, Muammar; Fan, Shou-Zen; Abbod, Maysam F.; Jen, Kuo-Kuang; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the depth of anesthesia (DoA) index using artificial neural networks (ANN) which is performed as the modeling technique. Totally 63-patient data is addressed, for both modeling and testing of 17 and 46 patients, respectively. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is utilized to purify between the electroencephalography (EEG) signal and the noise. The filtered EEG signal is subsequently extracted to achieve a sample entropy index by every 5-second signal. Then, it is combined with other mean values of vital signs, that is, electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), pulse, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and signal quality index (SQI) to evaluate the DoA index as the input. The 5 doctor scores are averaged to obtain an output index. The mean absolute error (MAE) is utilized as the performance evaluation. 10-fold cross-validation is performed in order to generalize the model. The ANN model is compared with the bispectral index (BIS). The results show that the ANN is able to produce lower MAE than BIS. For the correlation coefficient, ANN also has higher value than BIS tested on the 46-patient testing data. Sensitivity analysis and cross-validation method are applied in advance. The results state that EMG has the most effecting parameter, significantly. PMID:26568957

  7. Health technology assessment review: remote monitoring of vital signs--current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David R; Smith, Gary B

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in communications technologies and associated computing and digital electronics now permit patient data, including routine vital signs, to be surveyed at a distance. Remote monitoring, or telemonitoring, can be regarded as a subdivision of telemedicine - the use of electronic and telecommunications technologies to provide and support health care when distance separates the participants. Depending on environment and purpose, the patient and the carer/system surveying, analysing or interpreting the data could be separated by as little as a few feet or be on different continents. Most telemonitoring systems will incorporate five components: data acquisition using an appropriate sensor; transmission of data from patient to clinician; integration of data with other data describing the state of the patient; synthesis of an appropriate action, or response or escalation in the care of the patient, and associated decision support; and storage of data. Telemonitoring is currently being used in community-based healthcare, at the scene of medical emergencies, by ambulance services and in hospitals. Current challenges in telemonitoring include: the lack of a full range of appropriate sensors, the bulk weight and size of the whole system or its components, battery life, available bandwidth, network coverage, and the costs of data transmission via public networks. Telemonitoring also has the ability to produce a mass of data - but this requires interpretation to be of clinical use and much necessary research work remains to be done.

  8. Health technology assessment review: Remote monitoring of vital signs - current status and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in communications technologies and associated computing and digital electronics now permit patient data, including routine vital signs, to be surveyed at a distance. Remote monitoring, or telemonitoring, can be regarded as a subdivision of telemedicine - the use of electronic and telecommunications technologies to provide and support health care when distance separates the participants. Depending on environment and purpose, the patient and the carer/system surveying, analysing or interpreting the data could be separated by as little as a few feet or be on different continents. Most telemonitoring systems will incorporate five components: data acquisition using an appropriate sensor; transmission of data from patient to clinician; integration of data with other data describing the state of the patient; synthesis of an appropriate action, or response or escalation in the care of the patient, and associated decision support; and storage of data. Telemonitoring is currently being used in community-based healthcare, at the scene of medical emergencies, by ambulance services and in hospitals. Current challenges in telemonitoring include: the lack of a full range of appropriate sensors, the bulk weight and size of the whole system or its components, battery life, available bandwidth, network coverage, and the costs of data transmission via public networks. Telemonitoring also has the ability to produce a mass of data - but this requires interpretation to be of clinical use and much necessary research work remains to be done. PMID:20875149

  9. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  10. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xikun; Jin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT) are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications. PMID:27916877

  11. Short-Range Vital Signs Sensing Based on EEMD and CWT Using IR-UWB Radar.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xikun; Jin, Tian

    2016-11-30

    The radar sensor described realizes healthcare monitoring capable of detecting subject chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities and wirelessly estimating the respiration and heartbeat rates of the subject without attaching any devices to the body. Conventional single-tone Doppler radar can only capture Doppler signatures because of a lack of bandwidth information with noncontact sensors. In contrast, we take full advantage of impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) radar to achieve low power consumption and convenient portability, with a flexible detection range and desirable accuracy. A noise reduction method based on improved ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) and a vital sign separation method based on the continuous-wavelet transform (CWT) are proposed jointly to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in order to acquire accurate respiration and heartbeat rates. Experimental results illustrate that respiration and heartbeat signals can be extracted accurately under different conditions. This noncontact healthcare sensor system proves the commercial feasibility and considerable accessibility of using compact IR-UWB radar for emerging biomedical applications.

  12. Minimal gender differences on the CNS vital signs computerized neurocognitive battery.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Brooks, Brian L; Ashton Rennison, V Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Normative test scores often are corrected for demographic variables that can have an impact on neurocognitive abilities (e.g., gender, age, education, and ethnicity). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are gender differences on the CNS Vital Signs computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants, selected from a large normative database, were 100 healthy adults aged 18 to 68 years old (M(age) = 35.8 years, SD = 13.6) with 15.5 years of education (SD = 2.2). Men (n = 50) and women (n = 50) were individually and precisely matched on age, education, ethnicity, computer use, occupation, and handedness. This battery of seven tests yields 23 test scores, 5 domain scores (Memory, Psychomotor Speed, Reaction Time, Complex Attention, and Cognitive Flexibility), and a total score. Men had significantly better scores than did women on the Finger-Tapping Test for the right hand (p = .006, Cohen's d = 0.57). No other scores were significantly different, although there were small-medium effect sizes in favor of women on Symbol-Digit Coding (d = .39) and Verbal Memory (d = .37). The trends toward gender differences in word-list recognition memory and processing speed are consistent with the literature, but because they were nonsignificant and the effect sizes were modest, the clinician likely does not need to factor this into test interpretation.

  13. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuantao; Chen, Fuming; Jin, Jingxi; Lv, Hao; Li, Sheng; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-01-01

    After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE) methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors. PMID:26115454

  14. A magnetic induction measurement system for adult vital sign monitoring: evaluation of capacitive and inductive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, H.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic induction (MI) measurement technique could provide an unobtrusive contactless method for continuous monitoring of vital signs such as breathing and cardiac activity in bed. In this paper, we present a magnetic induction system to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring heart and lung activity and the preliminary measurement results. The excitation and detection coils are designed to be implemented in a single printed circuit board, allowing the use of the system in a bed with coils under the mattress. The electronic system is based on a 16 bit arbitrary waveform generator (PXI-5422, National instrument) operating at a sample rate of 200 MS/s for the excitation signal and the detected amplified signal is then, sampled at 100 MS/s by a 14 bit digitizer (PXI-5122, National Instruments). The preliminary results at 10 MHz show the ability of the system to detect solutions with different conductivities. However the capacitive effect is in the same order of magnitude as the inductive effect due to eddy currents. Safety of the system has been evaluated to be in accordance with the standards of human exposure to the magnetic fields.

  15. Creating a hospital-wide patient safety net: Design and deployment of ZigBee vital sign sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tia; Selavo, Leo; Welsh, Matt

    2007-10-11

    Advancements in wireless technologies can enable patient monitors to be far more versatile than ones that are used today. We developed wireless vital sign sensors that operate on a robust, infrastructure-independent, and instantaneously deployable wireless communication network. These sensors were easily and rapidly deployed in a diverse variety of care settings to provide continuous patient monitoring.

  16. Reliability and validity of a computerized neurocognitive test battery, CNS Vital Signs.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas; Johnson, Lynda G

    2006-10-01

    CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) is a computerized neurocognitive test battery that was developed as a routine clinical screening instrument. It is comprised of seven tests: verbal and visual memory, finger tapping, symbol digit coding, the Stroop Test, a test of shifting attention and the continuous performance test. Because CNSVS is a battery of well-known neuropsychological tests, one should expect its psychometric properties to resemble those of the conventional tests upon which it is based. 1069 subjects age 7-90 participated in the normative database for CNSVS. Test-retest reliability (TRT) was evaluated in 99 Ss who took the battery on two separate occasions, separated, on the average, by 62 days; the results were comparable to those achieved by equivalent conventional and computerized tests. Concurrent validity studies in 180 subjects, normals and neuropsychiatric patients, indicate correlations that are comparable to the concurrent validity of similar tests. Discriminant validity is supported by studies of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia, post-concussion syndrome and severe traumatic brain injury, ADHD (treated and untreated) and depression (treated and untreated). The tests in CNSVS are also sensitive to malingerers and patients with conversion disorders. The psychometric characteristics of the tests in the CNSVS battery are very similar to the characteristics of the conventional neuropsychological tests upon which they are based. CNSVS is suitable for use as a screening instrument, or as a serial assessment measure. But it is not a substitute for formal neuropsychological testing, it is not diagnostic, and it will have only a limited role in the medical setting, absent the active participation of consulting neuropsychologists.

  17. Statistical assessment on a combined analysis of GRYN-ROMN-UCBN upland vegetation vital signs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    different results and/or computational instability. However, when only fixed effects are of interest, the survey package (svyglm and svyolr) may be suitable for a model-assisted analysis for trend. We provide possible directions for future research into combined analysis for ordinal and continuous vital sign indictors.

  18. Predicting the Need to Perform Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients by Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Patients by Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...to Perform Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients Using New Vital Signs and Artificial Neural Networks P R O J E C T - S U S T A IN IN

  19. Predictive Symptoms and Signs of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeng-How; Huang, Po-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Influenza infection poses annual threats and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis is the key to successful treatment. Laboratory-based diagnosis has various limitations. Diagnosis based on symptoms or signs is still indispensable in clinical practice. We investigated the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza. A prospective study across 2 influenza seasons was performed from June 2010 to June 2012 at 2 branches (Taipei and Lin-Kou) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Patients who visited outpatient clinics with suspected acute respiratory tract infection were sampled by throat swab or nasopharyngeal swab. RT-PCR and/or virus culture were used as a reference standard. We used logistic regression to identify the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection. We also evaluated the performance metrics of different influenza-like illness used in Taiwan, the USA, and WHO. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of influenza infection was 45% (71/158). Fever, cough, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal congestion were significant predictors for influenza infection. Whereas fever + cough had a best sensitivity (86%; confidence interval [CI] 76%–93%), fever + cough and sneezing had a best specificity (77%; CI 62%–88%). Different case definitions of influenza-like illness had comparable accuracy in sensitivity and specificity. Clinical diagnosis based on symptoms and signs is useful for allocating resources, identifying those who may benefit from early antiviral therapy and providing valuable information for surveillance purpose. PMID:26554802

  20. If Health Education Had "Vital Signs", then Where Would We Take Its Pulse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the author shares some thoughts about health education profession, including some things that educators need to do to keep the profession "vital". He also offers some thoughts that educators need to consider as they attempt to respond effectively to the challenges that lie before them now, and face them in the future. He discusses…

  1. A Detailed Algorithm for Vital Sign Monitoring of a Stationary/Non-Stationary Human through IR-UWB Radar

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Faheem; Cho, Sung Ho

    2017-01-01

    The vital sign monitoring through Impulse Radio Ultra-Wide Band (IR-UWB) radar provides continuous assessment of a patient’s respiration and heart rates in a non-invasive manner. In this paper, IR UWB radar is used for monitoring respiration and the human heart rate. The breathing and heart rate frequencies are extracted from the signal reflected from the human body. A Kalman filter is applied to reduce the measurement noise from the vital signal. An algorithm is presented to separate the heart rate signal from the breathing harmonics. An auto-correlation based technique is applied for detecting random body movements (RBM) during the measurement process. Experiments were performed in different scenarios in order to show the validity of the algorithm. The vital signs were estimated for the signal reflected from the chest, as well as from the back side of the body in different experiments. The results from both scenarios are compared for respiration and heartbeat estimation accuracy. PMID:28165416

  2. Evaluating Effects of Language Recognition on Language Rights and the Vitality of New Zealand Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rachel Locker; Manning, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Status planning through legislation made New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) an official language in 2006. But this strong symbolic action did not create resources or mechanisms to further the aims of the act. In this article we discuss the extent to which legal recognition and ensuing language-planning activities by state and community have affected…

  3. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Gholami-Motlagh, Farzaneh; Jouzi, Mina; Soleymani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an inseparable part of our lives and a serious threat to health. Therefore, it is necessary to use certain strategies to prevent disorders caused by anxiety and adjust the vital signs of people. Swedish massage is one of the most recognized techniques for reducing anxiety. This study aims to compare the effects of two massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study with a two-group, crossover design was conducted on 20 healthy women who were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to BNC (Back, Neck, and Chest) or LAF (Leg, Arm, and Face) groups. Massage therapy was carried out for a 14-week period (two 4-week massage therapy sessions and 6 weeks washout stage). Gathered data were analyzed using paired t-test with a significance level of P < 0.05. Results: Both BNC and LAF methods caused a significant decrease in systolic BP in the first stage (P = 0.02, 0.00); however, diastolic BP showed significant decrease only in BNC group (P = 0.01). The mean average of body temperature of LAF group showed a significant decrease in the first stage (P = 0.0.3), and pulse and respiratory rate showed significant decrease in both groups during the second stage (P = 0.00). In addition, anxiety scores showed no significant difference before and after massage therapy (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage therapy caused a decrease in systolic BP, pulse, and respiratory rate. It can be concluded that massage therapy was useful for decreasing the vital signs associated with anxiety in healthy women. PMID:27563325

  4. Effect of Massage Therapy on Vital Signs and GCS Scores of ICU Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unalleviated complications related to hospitalization, including stress, anxiety, and pain, can easily influence different structures, like the neural system, by enhancing the stimulation of sympathetic nervous pathways and causing unstable vital signs and deterioration in the level of consciousness. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of massage therapy by family members on vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS) of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the ICU of the Shariati Hospital during 2012; 45 ICU patients and 45 family members in the experimental group and the same number of patients and family members in the control group were consecutively selected . The data collection instrument consisted of two parts. The first part included demographic data (age, marital status and Body Mass Index) and the second part included a checklist to record the patient’s vital signs (systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR)) and GCS. All measurements were done at the same time in both groups before the intervention (full body massage therapy), and 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours after intervention. The patients were provided with a 60-minute full body massage The massage protocol included static, surface tension, stretching, superficial lymph unload, transverse friction, and myofacial releasing techniques. Results: Significant differences were observed between experimental and control groups in the SBP at 1 hour, SBP 2 hours, and SBP 3 hours, and also in GCS at 1 hour to GCS at 4 hours (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant difference between experimental and control groups in SBP at all time points (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage via family members had several positive effects on the patients’ clinical conditions, and therefore, it should

  5. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system. PMID:26958162

  6. The Nurse Watch: Design and Evaluation of a Smart Watch Application with Vital Sign Monitoring and Checklist Reminders.

    PubMed

    Bang, Magnus; Solnevik, Katarina; Eriksson, Henrik

    Computerized wearable devices such as smart watches will become valuable nursing tools. This paper describes a smart-watch system developed in close collaboration with a team of nurses working in a Swedish ICU. The smart-watch system provides real-time vital-sign monitoring, threshold alarms, and to-do reminders. Additionally, a Kanban board, visualized on a multitouch screen provides an overview of completed and upcoming tasks. We describe an approach to implement automated checklist systems with smart watches and discuss aspects of importance when implementing such memory and attention support. The paper is finalized with an in-development formative evaluation of the system.

  7. Improving the Prediction of Mortality and the Need for Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients Using Standard Vital Signs With Heart-Rate Variability and Complexity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    IMPROVING THE PREDICTION OF MORTALITY AND THE NEED FOR LIFE-SAVING INTERVENTIONS IN TRAUMA PATIENTS USING STANDARD VITAL SIGNS WITH HEART -RATE...effectiveness of using traditional and new vital signs ( heart rate variability and complexity [HRV, HRC]) for predicting mortality and the need for life...from the point of injury via helicopter. Heart rate variability and HRC were calculated using criterion standard R-R interval sequences manually

  8. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered. PMID:22203851

  9. Huntington's Disease: Two-Year Observational Follow-Up of Executive Function Evaluation with CNS Vital Signs Test in an Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; E Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Cerqueira, Ana Claudia; Ferraz, Lígia Maria Chaves; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic, degenerative, and progressive central nervous system disease. It is characterized by motor abnormalities and cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Objective. To describe the precise degree of clinical severity of patients with HD through a new neurocognitive assessment. Methods. Unprecedented battery of computerized tests, CNSVS (Central Nervous System Vital Signs), was applied at three different moments in 2008, 2009, and 2010. The accurate and reliable CNSVS objectively provided the cognitive state of patients and allowed for the evaluation of disease progression. Case Report. P., 26, female, without any medication, with normal psychomotor development is a parent carrier of HD. In 2008, she was diagnosed with HD in accordance with the Medical Genetics Laboratories. Conclusion. The tests may be useful to reveal the exact measure of the current evolutionary stage of HD patients, allowing for more efficient planning of treatment and future procedures, such as the medication, therapy, and physical activity to be administered.

  10. The Feasibility of Digital Pen and Paper Technology for Vital Sign Data Capture in Acute Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Gallagher, Joan; Li, Qi; Spurr, Cindy; McGrath, E. Jan; Kilroy, Susan M.; Prater, Marita

    2006-01-01

    The transition from paper to electronic documentation systems in acute care settings is often gradual and characterized by a period in which paper and electronic processes coexist. Intermediate technologies are needed to “bridge” the gap between paper and electronic systems as a means to improve work flow efficiency through data acquisition at the point of care in structured formats to inform decision support and facilitate reuse. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study conducted on three acute care units at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA to evaluate the feasibility of digital pen and paper technology as a means to capture vital sign data in the context of acute care workflows and to make data available in a flow sheet in the electronic medical record. PMID:17238337

  11. MagIC: a textile system for vital signs monitoring. Advancement in design and embedded intelligence for daily life applications.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Rizzo, Francesco; Meriggi, Paolo; Castiglioni, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Ferratini, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    We recently developed a textile-based system for the unobtrusive assessment of vital signs. The system, named MagIC, was originally designed to collect data in elderly people and cardiac patients while living in a confined environment. Extending the area of application of MagIC from clinics to daily life meant to pay particular attention to the garment design and to the amount of intelligence embedded into the system. In this paper we addressed both these issues by illustrating 1) a new methodology we are developing to help the design of smart garments for daily life applications and 2) an example of embedded intelligence developed for an application of MagIC in ergonomics.

  12. Application of Near-field intra-body communication and spread spectrum technique to vital-sign monitor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    As a novel vital sign monitor, we have developed wireless ECG monitoring system with Near-field intra-body communication technique. However, communication reliability is not so high because transmission channel is noisy and unstable. In order to improve the problem, we utilize spread spectrum (SS), which is known as robust communication technique even through poor transmission channel. First of all, we evaluated characteristics of human body to SS signal. The results show that SS can be used even through human body. Based on this result, we developed and tested near-field intra-body communication device enhanced by SS. The test result shows that SS can solve the problem mentioned above.

  13. A wearable vital signs monitor at the ear for continuous heart rate and pulse transit time measurements.

    PubMed

    Winokur, Eric S; He, David Da; Sodini, Charles G

    2012-01-01

    A continuous, wearable and wireless vital signs monitor at the ear is demonstrated. The device has the form factor of a hearing aid and is wirelessly connected to a PC for data recording and analysis. The device monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a single lead configuration, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) with a MEMS triaxial accelerometer, and the photoplethysmograms (PPG) with 660 nm and 940 nm LED sources and a static photocurrent subtraction analog front end. Clinical tests are conducted, including Valsalva and head-up tilt maneuvers. Peak timing intervals between the ECG, BCG and PPG are extracted and are shown to relate to pre-ejection period and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) extracted from cross-correlation between the PPG and BCG shows improved results compared to the pulse arrival time (PAT) method for tracking changes in MAP.

  14. A Wearable Vital Signs Monitor at the Ear for Continuous Heart Rate and Pulse Transit Time Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Eric S.; Da He, David; Sodini, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous, wearable and wireless vital signs monitor at the ear is demonstrated. The device has the form factor of a hearing aid and is wirelessly connected to a PC for data recording and analysis. The device monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a single lead configuration, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) with a MEMS triaxial accelerometer, and the photoplethysmograms (PPG) with 660nm and 940nm LED sources and a static photocurrent subtraction analog front end. Clinical tests are conducted, including Valsalva and head-up tilt maneuvers. Peak timing intervals between the ECG, BCG and PPG are extracted and are shown to relate to pre-ejection period and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pulse Transit Time (PTT) extracted from cross-correlation between the PPG and BCG shows improved results compared to the pulse arrival time (PAT) method for tracking changes in MAP. PMID:23366488

  15. The use of spectral skin reflectivity and laser doppler vibrometry data to determine the optimal site and wavelength to collect human vital sign signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.

    2012-06-01

    The carotid artery has been used extensively by researchers to demonstrate that Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is capable of exploiting vital sign signatures from cooperative human subjects at stando. Research indicates that, the carotid, although good for cooperative and non-traumatic scenarios, is one of the first vital signs to become absent or irregular when a casualty is hemorrhaging and in progress to circulatory (hypovolemic) shock. In an effort to determine the optimal site and wavelength to measure vital signs off human skin, a human subject data collection was executed whereby 14 subjects had their spectral skin reflectivity and vital signs measured at five collection sites (carotid artery, chest, back, right wrist and left wrist). In this paper, we present our findings on using LDV and re ectivity data to determine the optimal collection site and wavelength that should be used to sense pulse signals from quiet and relatively motionless human subjects at stando. In particular, we correlate maximum levels of re ectivity across the ensemble of 14 subjects with vital sign measurements made with an LDV at two ranges, for two scenarios.

  16. [Coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory data as signs of mechanisms of regulation].

    PubMed

    Genkin, A A

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory signs in patients with diseases of the blood and lymph, respiratory organs, and cardiovascular system were analyzed using OMIS research biomedical system (Intellectual Systems, St. Petersburg. 1993). Correlation coefficient is interpreted not as a measure of relationship between signs, but as an indicator of regulation processes in a live organism. The coefficients of correlation are most frequently different for the signs whose mean values are unchanged under the same conditions. This means that a comparative analysis of relationship between the signs largely contributes to such branches of medicine in which the conclusions are based on analysis of the mean tendencies. Such branches are primarily new tests for early diagnosis of tumorous diseases, assessment of dissemination and malignancy of the process, understanding of the processes of malignant degeneration, etc. Automated analysis of differences in correlations may be useful to decipher the ambiguous and dynamic relationships between different submultiplicities of immunocompetent elements in different forms of immune response (and in various states of the organism). Use of the new system opens new vistas in studies of the signs of vital activity of cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Not only new mechanisms regulating the hemodynamics, respiration, and cardiorespiratory relationships were disclosed; relationships between physiological parameters and cellular elements were revealed, which could be hardly suspected before. A fragment of a study of survival factors in acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (carried out in cooperation with N.N. Mamayev) is presented for illustration. A close positive relationship between the humoral and cellular immunity (at least of their components analyzed in this study) is demonstrated to be destructive for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. An optimal variant is their independent regulation or

  17. Education Vital Signs 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence, Ed.; Bushweller, Kevin, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Begins with a look at the year's major education news: implications of the massacre at Columbine High School, major Supreme Court decisions, and pro- and anti-voucher political rhetoric. Following is an analysis of how the nation is doing on the Goals 2000. Other sections take the pulse of public education and analyze the challenges faced by…

  18. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  20. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  1. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  3. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  7. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  8. Ultra-Wide Patch Antenna Array Design at 60 GHz Band for Remote Vital Sign Monitoring with Doppler Radar Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, Muhammad Saqib; Ghafouri-Shiraz, Hooshang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, ultra-wide patch antenna arrays have been presented at 60 GHz band (57.24-65.88 GHz) with improved gain and beam-width capabilities for remote detection of respiration and heart beat rate of a person with Doppler radar principle. The antennas measured and simulation results showed close agreement. The breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) of a 31-year-old man have been accurately detected from various distances ranging from 5 to 200 cm with both single-antenna and dual-antenna operations. In the case of single-antenna operation, the signal is transmitted and received with the same antenna, whereas in dual-antenna operation, two identical antennas are employed, one for signal transmission and the other for reception. It has been found that in case of the single-antenna operation, the accuracy of the remote vital sign monitoring (RVSM) is good for short distance; however, in the case of the dual-antenna operations, the RVSM can be accurately carried out at relatively much longer distance. On the other hand, it has also been seen that the visual results are more obvious with higher gain antennas when the radar beam is confined just on the subject's body area.

  9. Abrupt discontinuation of alprazolam and cognitive style in patients with panic disorder: early effects on mood, performance, and vital signs.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhuth, E H; Starcevic, Vladan; Qualls, Clifford; Antal, Edward J; Matuzas, William; Javaid, Javaid I; Barnhill, Jamie

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the relationship of alprazolam plasma levels and an anxiety-prone cognitive style to the characteristics and severity of early withdrawal after abrupt discontinuation of alprazolam in 26 patients with panic disorder. After 8 and 9 weeks of fixed-dose treatment, patients were hospitalized for 24 hours. On 1 admission, ordered at random, treatment was maintained; on the other, placebo was substituted double blind. The Anxious Thoughts and Tendencies questionnaire was administered before treatment. Alprazolam plasma levels were measured 7 times on the day after each admission. Before each blood sampling, the Profile of Mood States and performance tasks were administered, and vital signs were recorded. On the day after abrupt discontinuation of alprazolam, Profile of Mood States anxiety, depression, fatigue, and confusion increased; vigor and elation decreased; speed on the digit symbol substitution task improved; and systolic blood pressure increased substantially over time. High Anxious Thoughts and Tendencies scores were related specifically to more anxiety. Our findings (1) confirm that dysphoric mood, fatigue, low energy, confusion, and elevated systolic blood pressure are part of the early syndrome of withdrawal from alprazolam in patients with panic disorder, notably as the drop in plasma levels approaches 50%; (2) indicate a psychomotor deficit persisting beyond dose stabilization; (3) suggest that an anxiety-prone cognitive style measurable before undertaking treatment may be a risk factor for more severe anxiety upon discontinuation; and (4) provide a rationale for applying cognitive behavior therapy during benzodiazepine taper.

  10. Electronic medical record in the simulation hospital: does it improve accuracy in charting vital signs, intake, and output?

    PubMed

    Mountain, Carel; Redd, Roxanne; O'Leary-Kelly, Colleen; Giles, Kim

    2015-04-01

    Nursing care delivery has shifted in response to the introduction of electronic health records. Adequate education using computerized documentation heavily influences a nurse's ability to navigate and utilize electronic medical records. The risk for treatment error increases when a bedside nurse lacks the correct knowledge and skills regarding electronic medical record documentation. Prelicensure nursing education should introduce electronic medical record documentation and provide a method for feedback from instructors to ensure proper understanding and use of this technology. RN preceptors evaluated two groups of associate degree nursing students to determine if introduction of electronic medical record in the simulation hospital increased accuracy in documenting vital signs, intake, and output in the actual clinical setting. During simulation, the first group of students documented using traditional paper and pen; the second group used an academic electronic medical record. Preceptors evaluated each group during their clinical rotations at two local inpatient facilities. RN preceptors provided information by responding to a 10-question Likert scale survey regarding the use of student electronic medical record documentation during the 120-hour inpatient preceptor rotation. The implementation of the electronic medical record into the simulation hospital, although a complex undertaking, provided students a safe and supportive environment in which to practice using technology and receive feedback from faculty regarding accurate documentation.

  11. Microwave stethoscope: development and benchmarking of a vital signs sensor using computer-controlled phantoms and human studies.

    PubMed

    Celik, Nuri; Gagarin, Ruthsenne; Huang, Gui Chao; Iskander, Magdy F; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a new microwave-based method and associated measurement system for monitoring multiple vital signs (VS) as well as the changes in lung water content. The measurement procedure utilizes a single microwave sensor for reflection coefficient measurements, hence the name "microwave stethoscope (MiSt)," as opposed to the two-sensor transmission method previously proposed by the authors. To compensate for the reduced sensitivity due to reflection coefficient measurements, an improved microwave sensor design with enhanced matching to the skin and broadband operation, as well as an advanced digital signal processing algorithm are used in developing the MiSt. Results from phantom experiments and human clinical trials are described. The results clearly demonstrate that MiSt provides reliable monitoring of multiple VS such as the respiration rate, heart rate, and the changes in lung water content through a single microwave measurement. In addition, information such as heart waveforms that correlates well with electrocardiogram is observed from these microwave measurements. Details of the broadband sensor design, experimental procedure, DSP algorithms used for VS extraction, and obtained results are presented and discussed.

  12. Measuring Health Literacy in Caregivers of Children: A Comparison of the Newest Vital Sign and S-TOFHLA

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Andrea K.; Schapira, Marilyn M.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Brousseau, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the performance of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) and the short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) in caregivers of children. Method Caregivers of children ≤ 12 years old seeking care for their child in a pediatric emergency department were tested using the NVS and the S-TOFHLA to measure health literacy. The results were compared with ED use outcomes. Result The S-TOFHLA was found to have a ceiling effect as compared to the NVS; few caregivers scored in low literacy categories (p < 0.0001). This finding was demonstrated in both lower (p=0.01) and higher (p < 0.001) educational attainment groups. The NVS was predictive of ED use outcomes (p=0.02 and p<0.01) whereas the S-TOFHLA was not (p=0.21, p=0.11). Conclusions The measures do not seem to function similarly nor predict health outcomes equally. The NVS demonstrates sensitivity in identifying limited health literacy in younger adult populations. PMID:25006116

  13. Committee Opinion No. 651 Summary: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  14. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 651: Menstruation in Girls and Adolescents: Using the Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable-between 12 years and 13 years-across well-nourished populations in developed countries. Environmental factors, including socioeconomic conditions, nutrition, and access to preventive health care, may influence the timing and progression of puberty. A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Clinicians should educate girls and their caretakers (eg, parents or guardians) about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses. Identification of abnormal menstrual patterns in adolescence may improve early identification of potential health concerns for adulthood. It is important for clinicians to have an understanding of the menstrual patterns of adolescent girls, the ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal menstruation, and the skill to know how to evaluate the adolescent girl patient. By including an evaluation of the menstrual cycle as an additional vital sign, clinicians reinforce its importance in assessing overall health status for patients and caretakers.

  15. Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

  16. Introduction of a new observation chart and education programme is associated with higher rates of vital-sign ascertainment in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Helen; Jones, Aaron; Herkes, Robert; Cook, Kathy; Stirling, Anne; Halbert, Tanya; Yates, Amanda; Lal, Sean; Gardo, Alan; Donnelly, Roy; Gattas, David J

    2011-09-01

    INTRODUCTION Local and national awareness of the need to improve the recognition and response to the clinical deterioration of hospital inpatients is high. The authors designed and implemented a programme to improve recognition of deteriorating patients in their hospital; a new observation chart for vital signs was one of the major elements. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the new chart and associated education programme on the completeness of vital-sign recording in ward areas. METHODS The setting is a university-affiliated teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Three study periods, each lasting 14 days (preintervention, 2 weeks postintervention, 3 months postintervention), were carried out in three wards. The new observation chart was supported by an education programme. The primary outcome measures were the ascertainment rates of individual vital signs as a proportion of total observation sets. RESULTS Documentation of respiratory rate increased from 47.8% to 97.8% (p<0.001) and was sustained at 3 months postintervention (98.5%). Collection of a full set of vital signs also improved by a similar magnitude. Basic neurological observation for all patients was introduced in the new chart; the uptake of this was very good (93.1%). Ascertainment rates of blood pressure and oxygen saturation also increased by small but significant amounts from good baseline rates of 97% or higher. CONCLUSION The introduction of a new observation chart, and education regarding its use and importance, was associated with a major improvement in the recording of respiratory rate and other vital signs.

  17. Using Supervised Machine Learning to Classify Real Alerts and Artifact in Online Multi-signal Vital Sign Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Wang, Donghan; Fiterau, Madalina; Guillame-Bert, Mathieu; Bose, Eliezer; Kaynar, Ata M.; Wallace, David J.; Guttendorf, Jane; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R.; Hravnak, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Use machine-learning (ML) algorithms to classify alerts as real or artifacts in online noninvasive vital sign (VS) data streams to reduce alarm fatigue and missed true instability. METHODS Using a 24-bed trauma step-down unit’s non-invasive VS monitoring data (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], peripheral oximetry [SpO2]) recorded at 1/20Hz, and noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure [BP] less frequently, we partitioned data into training/validation (294 admissions; 22,980 monitoring hours) and test sets (2,057 admissions; 156,177 monitoring hours). Alerts were VS deviations beyond stability thresholds. A four-member expert committee annotated a subset of alerts (576 in training/validation set, 397 in test set) as real or artifact selected by active learning, upon which we trained ML algorithms. The best model was evaluated on alerts in the test set to enact online alert classification as signals evolve over time. MAIN RESULTS The Random Forest model discriminated between real and artifact as the alerts evolved online in the test set with area under the curve (AUC) performance of 0.79 (95% CI 0.67-0.93) for SpO2 at the instant the VS first crossed threshold and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.95) at 3 minutes into the alerting period. BP AUC started at 0.77 (95%CI 0.64-0.95) and increased to 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-0.98), while RR AUC started at 0.85 (95%CI 0.77-0.95) and increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.94–1.00). HR alerts were too few for model development. CONCLUSIONS ML models can discern clinically relevant SpO2, BP and RR alerts from artifacts in an online monitoring dataset (AUC>0.87). PMID:26992068

  18. Real alerts and artifact classification in archived multi-signal vital sign monitoring data: implications for mining big data.

    PubMed

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Chen, Lujie; Dubrawski, Artur; Bose, Eliezer; Clermont, Gilles; Pinsky, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Huge hospital information system databases can be mined for knowledge discovery and decision support, but artifact in stored non-invasive vital sign (VS) high-frequency data streams limits its use. We used machine-learning (ML) algorithms trained on expert-labeled VS data streams to automatically classify VS alerts as real or artifact, thereby "cleaning" such data for future modeling. 634 admissions to a step-down unit had recorded continuous noninvasive VS monitoring data [heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) at 1/20 Hz, and noninvasive oscillometric blood pressure (BP)]. Time data were across stability thresholds defined VS event epochs. Data were divided Block 1 as the ML training/cross-validation set and Block 2 the test set. Expert clinicians annotated Block 1 events as perceived real or artifact. After feature extraction, ML algorithms were trained to create and validate models automatically classifying events as real or artifact. The models were then tested on Block 2. Block 1 yielded 812 VS events, with 214 (26 %) judged by experts as artifact (RR 43 %, SpO2 40 %, BP 15 %, HR 2 %). ML algorithms applied to the Block 1 training/cross-validation set (tenfold cross-validation) gave area under the curve (AUC) scores of 0.97 RR, 0.91 BP and 0.76 SpO2. Performance when applied to Block 2 test data was AUC 0.94 RR, 0.84 BP and 0.72 SpO2. ML-defined algorithms applied to archived multi-signal continuous VS monitoring data allowed accurate automated classification of VS alerts as real or artifact, and could support data mining for future model building.

  19. Evaluation of Standard Versus Nonstandard Vital Signs Monitors in the Prehospital and Emergency Departments: Results and Lessons Learned from a Trauma Patient Care Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-24

    anddisplay prehospital and hospital physiologic data in real time on a handheld computer and in the trauma bay.Multivariate logistic regression...Wilkins) LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic/care management, level IV. KEY WORDS: Prehospital physiologic data; lifesaving interventions; vital signs; signal...and interfaces (i.e., ‘‘smart device’’ or non-SVSMs) capable of supplying the medic with constant physiologic observations and datamay enhance the care

  20. Respiratory flow and vital signs associated with the intensity of functional electrical stimulation delivered to human abdominal muscles during quiet breathing

    PubMed Central

    Sewa, Yoko; Tomita, Kazuhide; Okuno, Yukako; Ose, Hirotaka; Imura, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increasing the intensity of functional electrical stimulation delivered to abdominal muscles during quiet breathing on respiratory flow, vital signs and pain in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Electrical stimulation was delivered bilaterally using one pair of high-conductivity gel-skin plate electrodes, placed on both sides of the abdomen, to nine healthy males. Subjects were required to breathe normally through a face mask for 2 minutes while in a supine position. The stimulation intensity was incrementally increased by 10 mA until reaching 100 mA. Respiratory parameters, vital signs and pain based on the visual analog scale were measured for each intensity of electrical stimulation. [Results] Transcutaneous oxygen saturation showed a slight upward trend in association with increasing stimulation intensity, but there were no significant changes in pulse or blood pressure. Respiratory flow, tidal volume, and minute ventilation increased significantly as the stimulation intensity rose. [Conclusion] This study revealed that functional electrical stimulation can be safely delivered to human abdominal muscles without causing vital sign abnormalities. It was also found that the appropriate intensity level of electrical stimulation for achieving effects on respiratory flow while also minimizing pain is 60–80 mA. PMID:28174447

  1. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological tests. ..., physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart from the claimant's own statements... psychological phenomena which can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic...

  2. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological tests. ..., physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart from the claimant's own statements... psychological phenomena which can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic...

  3. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological tests. ..., physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart from the claimant's own statements... psychological phenomena which can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic...

  4. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological tests. ..., physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart from the claimant's own statements... psychological phenomena which can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic...

  5. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, etc.) x-rays, and psychological tests. ..., physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart from the claimant's own statements... psychological phenomena which can be shown by the use of medically acceptable laboratory diagnostic...

  6. Delay-bounded semi-reliable vital sign transmission protocol for mobile telemedicine over a CDMA 1x EV-DO network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tong H; Yoo, Sun K

    2008-04-01

    The reliable and instant transmission of vital signs is important for remote time-critical patient care through a telemedicine system. However, sometimes the reliability and instantaneity conditions cannot be satisfied simultaneously under a high-noise mobile network, because they are reciprocal to each other. In this paper, the vital sign transmission protocol (VSTP) running over a CDMA 1x EVDO (Code Division Multiple Access 1x Evolution Data Only) mobile network is proposed to comply with both the reliability and instantaneity requirements. The switching buffer management scheme is combined with a hybrid error control scheme, consisting of forward error correction (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ). The CDMA 1x EVDO mobile network is modeled by two states using the Markov wireless channel model to test transmission performance under diverse network conditions. Throughout the noisy environment simulation, the performance of the VSTP is compared with the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to demonstrate its efficacy over error-prone mobile network.

  7. A study on reception electrodes for the vital-sign monitor using near-field intra-body communication enhanced by spread spectrum technique.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    As a novel vital sign monitor, we have developed wireless ECG monitoring system with Near-field intra-body communication (NF-IBC) technique. However, it was hard to ensure communication reliability because transmission channel is noisy and unstable. In order to solve the problem, we utilize spread spectrum (SS), which is known as robust communication technique even through poor transmission channel. In previous study, we have already developed an ECG monitor using NF-IBC enhanced by SS. In this paper, we evaluated on structure of the reception electrode for reliable communication. Based on the evaluations with bit error rate, we suggested the reception electrode structure which can keep the communication reliability. As the results we considered that we can expand the reception electrode up to 2.25 m(2). Moreover, we proposed the structure of the reception electrodes that can keep the communication reliability. Finally we suggested how to use the SS NF-IBC vital-sign monitor in room that larger than 2.25 m(2), and we had shown the practicability of the systems.

  8. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people’s activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of “smart clothing” system. PMID:28208620

  9. A Review of Wearable Technologies for Elderly Care that Can Accurately Track Indoor Position, Recognize Physical Activities and Monitor Vital Signs in Real Time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao

    2017-02-10

    Rapid growth of the aged population has caused an immense increase in the demand for healthcare services. Generally, the elderly are more prone to health problems compared to other age groups. With effective monitoring and alarm systems, the adverse effects of unpredictable events such as sudden illnesses, falls, and so on can be ameliorated to some extent. Recently, advances in wearable and sensor technologies have improved the prospects of these service systems for assisting elderly people. In this article, we review state-of-the-art wearable technologies that can be used for elderly care. These technologies are categorized into three types: indoor positioning, activity recognition and real time vital sign monitoring. Positioning is the process of accurate localization and is particularly important for elderly people so that they can be found in a timely manner. Activity recognition not only helps ensure that sudden events (e.g., falls) will raise alarms but also functions as a feasible way to guide people's activities so that they avoid dangerous behaviors. Since most elderly people suffer from age-related problems, some vital signs that can be monitored comfortably and continuously via existing techniques are also summarized. Finally, we discussed a series of considerations and future trends with regard to the construction of "smart clothing" system.

  10. Camera-Based, Non-Contact, Vital-Signs Monitoring Technology May Provide a Way for the Early Prevention of SIDS in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Meng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tsien, Joe Z.; Lu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a baby younger than 1-year-old. Even though researchers have discovered some factors that may put babies at extra risk, SIDS remains unpredictable up until now. One hypothesis is that impaired cardiovascular control may play a role in the underlying mechanism of SIDS. A reduction of heart rate variability (HRV) and progressive decrease in heart rate (HR) have been observed in infants who have later succumbed to SIDS. Many clues indicated the heart could be the final weakness in SIDS. Therefore, continuous monitoring of the dynamic changes within the heart may provide a possible preventive strategy of SIDS. Camera-based photoplethysmography was recently demonstrated as a contactless method to determine HR and HRV. This perspective presents a hypothesis that a camera-based, non-contact, vital-sign monitoring technology, which can indicate abnormal changes or a sudden loss of vital signs in a timely manner, may enable a crucial and low-cost means for the early prevention of SIDS in newborn infants. PMID:28066320

  11. From cardiac to respiratory rate, from cardiac sounds to pulse velocity: a noncontact unified approach for the monitoring of vital signs by means of optical vibrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; De Melis, M.; Morbiducci, U.; Segers, P.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we report experimental data obtained using a novel, non contact and unified approach for the monitoring of some important vital parameters: Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, Respiration Rate, Filling Time, Pulse Transit Time. The measurement approach - named optical vibrocardiography (VCG) - has been recently described by some of the authors for what concerns the assessment of a single parameter or measurement and technical aspects. Here, we discuss the experimental setup realized to operate optical VCG in order to measure the previously cited vital parameters. We present two novel configurations for the assessment of the respiration rate and the pulse transit time. The quantities measured by optical VCG have been compared with the ones measured with golden standard instrumentations; the comparison reference instruments has shown differences with no statistical and clinical significance. Optical VCG therefore can be considered a valid, fully non-contact measurement method for the assessment of vital signs, with the additional advantage that such parameters can be assessed using one single instrument instead of a set of dedicated devices.

  12. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Robert

    2007-10-01

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite.

  13. The San Francisco Community Vital Signs: using web-based tools to facilitate the mobilizing for action through planning and partnerships process.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Katz, Mitchell H

    2011-01-01

    A coalition of local public health system stakeholders in San Francisco developed a community assessment and strategic planning tool, the San Francisco Community Vital Signs (SFCVS). The SFCVS builds on the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) model by incorporating Internet-based technology into local public health system evaluation and strengthening. This article describes the overlap between the SFCVS and MAPP processes, the manner in which information technology facilitated the SFCVS process, and a template for infusing a Web-based platform into the MAPP model. Internet-based applications helped to implement many (16 of 41; 39%) of the components of the SFCVS process. Of these 16 process measures, the majority (10; 63%) required the use of Web-based technology. The SFCVS demonstrates that a MAPP-like process can leverage the Internet to augment the functionality of public health activities.

  14. Multiple programs: essential to the scientific vitality of the DOE Defense Program Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, P; Barnes, P D; Cummings, J; Eagan, R; Edgeworth, J; Fortner, R; Green, G; Hazi, A; Katz, M; Poppe, C

    1997-01-01

    The future of the Department of Energy's Defense Program (DP) laboratories-Los Alamos, Livermore, and Sandia-has been extensively debated and examined over the past several years. To assist in this process, I have asked that a set of documents be prepared, which, when taken together, present a comprehensive picture of the three laboratories. This document describes the multiprogram nature of the DP laboratories and the value of their involvement in non-DP work as it relates to the nuclear weapons program. The other two documents, Integration and Collaboration.. Solving Science and Technology Problems for the Nation (DOE/DP-96009797) and Roles and Responsibilities of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Laboratories in the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (DOE/DP-97000280), describe respectively the integrated nature of the DP laboratories and the roles of the laboratories as they meet their individual and collective responsibilities of ensuring the safety and reliabilities of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile.

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and managers to understand how to develop water management programs to reduce the risk of Legionnaires’ disease. Working with health, academic, and industry partners to develop and evaluate guidelines ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Secondhand Smoke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Everyone can Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW or go to www.smokefree.gov for free help, if they or someone they know smokes and wants to quit. Make their homes and vehicles 100% smokefree. Opening a window or using fans or ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... previously-uninsured Americans. Investing in the use of electronic health records and case management services in federally- ... invested to help networks of health centers adopt electronic health records (EHR) and other health information technology ( ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... understand the laws and regulations that control the marketing and sale of alcohol. Collaborate with states and ... the Community Guide.* Support local control of the marketing and sale of alcohol. Support the minimum legal ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Hispanic Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injury Prevention & Control Gateway to Health Communication & Social Marketing Practice On Other Web Sites MedlinePlus - Hispanic American ... en Español [PDF - 1.61 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... not use the device. Include warning statements in marketing materials about the risk of using the device. ... en Español [PDF - 1.16 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Language: ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Trucker Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... 2015 317,000 An estimated 317,000 motor vehicle crashes involving a large truck were reported to ...

  2. Vital statistics of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) under laboratory conditions: III. Rhodnius neglectus.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Jorge Eduardo; Nieves, Eliana Lorena

    2011-07-01

    Five cohorts of 100 eggs of Rhodnius neglectus Lent 1954 (Hemiptera Reduviidae) were reared simultaneously in the laboratory under constant conditions (26 +/- 1 degrees C and 60 +/- 10% RH), with mortality and fecundity data recorded weekly. We calculated stage-specific developmental times, age-specific mortality and fecundity, stage-specific and total preadult mortality, and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r0 = 0.21), the finite population growth rate (h = 1.23), the net reproductive rate (R0 = 314.24), and the generation time (T = 21.45 wk). Elasticity analysis showed that the dominant life-history traits determining lamda were the adult female survival, and the survival of instar V nymphs (molting into adult females). Adult females dominated the stage-specific reproductive value, and the egg stage dominated the stable stage distribution (SSD). The damping ratio (p = 1.11) suggests a relatively rapid period of recovery to a disturbed SSD. Results were compared with previous values from the literature and conform relatively well, considering that environmental conditions were not always the same. Compared with two other species of the same genus, Rhodnius neivai Lent 1953 and Rhodnius prolixus Stål 1859, R. neglectus ranked higher in fecundity (total eggs/ female /life) and in female longevity, intermediate in the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r0), and lower in developmental time and mortality. By fitting a logistic model of population growth to the density field values of a spontaneous colonization of two field experimental chicken coops we estimated the intrinsic rate of natural increase and carrying capacity parameters, and compared the former with our laboratory results.

  3. Data quality of a wearable vital signs monitor in the pre-hospital and emergency departments for enhancing prediction of needs for life-saving interventions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Darrah, Mark I; Salinas, Jose

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the quality of data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments when using a wearable vital signs monitor and examine the efficacy of a combined model of standard vital signs and respective data quality indices (DQIs) for predicting the need for life-saving interventions (LSIs) in trauma patients. It was hypothesised that prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients is associated with data quality. Also, a model utilizing vital signs and DQIs to predict the needs for LSIs would be able to outperform models using vital signs alone. Data from 104 pre-hospital trauma patients transported by helicopter were analysed, including means and standard deviations of continuous vital signs, related DQIs and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores for LSI and non-LSI patient groups. DQIs involved percentages of valid measurements and mean deviation ratios. Various multivariate logistic regression models for predicting LSI needs were also obtained and compared through receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Demographics of patients were not statistically different between LSI and non-LSI patient groups. In addition, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction of LSI needs in patients using heart rate and DQIs (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.86) than using heart rate alone (AUC of 0.73). Likewise, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction using heart rate, total GCS score and DQIs (AUC of 0.99) than using heart rate and total GCS score (AUC of 0.92). AUCs were statistically different (p < 0.05). This study showed that data quality could be used in addition to continuous vital signs for predicting the need for LSIs in trauma patients. Importantly, trauma systems should incorporate processes to regulate data quality of physiologic data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments. By doing so, data quality could be improved and lead to better prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients.

  4. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  5. Evaluation of the A&D UA-767 and Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs noninvasive blood pressure monitors using a blood pressure simulator.

    PubMed

    Davis, P D; Dennis, J L; Railton, R

    2005-03-01

    The performance of five units of the A&D UA-767 NIBP monitor and five units of the Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs noninvasive blood pressure monitor was evaluated with the Biotek BP Pump blood pressure simulator under a variety of conditions. Using the simulator to provide a normal blood pressure waveform at 80 bpm over a range of pressures, it was found that the mean bias for the combined results from the A&D monitors was 1.9+/-2.8 mmHg and from the Welch Allyn monitors was 0.7+/-2.4 mmHg. No individual measurement showed a bias greater than 10 mmHg. A bias of greater than 5 mmHg was present in 28 out of 150 measurements for the A&D monitor and 10 out of 150 measurements for the Welch Allyn monitor. These results are comparable with ratings achieved by the instruments when tested previously according to the British Hypertension Society protocol, but testing with a simulator allowed assessment of aspects of performance which were not included in the British Hypertension Society protocol.

  6. Estuarine water quality in parks of the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network: Development and early implementation of vital signs estuarine nutrient-enrichment monitoring, 2003-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopp, Blaine S.; Nielsen, Martha; Glisic, Dejan; Neckles, Hilary A.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents results of pilot tests of a protocol for monitoring estuarine nutrient enrichment for the Vital Signs Monitoring Program of the National Park Service Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network. Data collected from four parks during protocol development in 2003-06 are presented: Gateway National Recreation Area, Colonial National Historic Park, Fire Island National Seashore, and Assateague Island National Seashore. The monitoring approach incorporates several spatial and temporal designs to address questions at a hierarchy of scales. Indicators of estuarine response to nutrient enrichment were sampled using a probability design within park estuaries during a late-summer index period. Monitoring variables consisted of dissolved-oxygen concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, water temperature, salinity, attenuation of downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), and turbidity. The statistical sampling design allowed the condition of unsampled locations to be inferred from the distribution of data from a set of randomly positioned "probability" stations. A subset of sampling stations was sampled repeatedly during the index period, and stations were not rerandomized in subsequent years. These "trend stations" allowed us to examine temporal variability within the index period, and to improve the sensitivity of the monitoring protocol to detecting change through time. Additionally, one index site in each park was equipped for continuous monitoring throughout the index period. Thus, the protocol includes elements of probabilistic and targeted spatial sampling, and the temporal intensity ranges from snapshot assessments to continuous monitoring.

  7. The effects of dietary chromium(III) picolinate on growth performance, vital signs, and blood measurements of pigs during immune stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beob G; Lindemann, Merlin D; Cromwell, Gary L

    2010-06-01

    This experiment used 24 pigs (26.0 kg) to investigate the effects of dietary chromium (Cr) on pigs challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Following 35 days of diet exposure, the immune stress treatments were: (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) injection and no Cr, (2) LPS injection and no Cr, (3) LPS injection and Cr 1,000 ppb, and (4) LPS injection and Cr 2,000 ppb. At 0 h, PBS or LPS was injected intraperitoneally in each pig. During the first 12 h post-injection, pigs challenged with LPS lost 951 g, while the PBS group gained 170 g (p < 0.001). Compared with the PBS group, LPS-challenged pigs consumed less feed (p < 0.01) during the first 24 h. The LPS group had higher rectal temperature at 2 and 4 h and higher respiratory rate at 1.3 and 8.5 h than the PBS group (p < 0.05). Plasma collected at 3 h had higher cortisol (p < 0.001) and lower glucose (p < 0.05) concentrations in the LPS group than the PBS group. However, supplemental Cr did not affect the response variables. Overall, the LPS challenge affects growth performance, vital signs, and plasma variables, but dietary Cr is unable to moderate stress-related effects associated with an LPS challenge.

  8. Clinical Signs and Symptoms and Laboratory Findings of Methadone Poisoning in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poisoning accounts for about 7% of all accidents in children under 5 years and is implicated in over 5% of all childhood deaths in developing countries. Objectives: Due to the potential risks of methadone poisoning in children and increased cases of methadone poisoning among Iranian children, this study was conducted to investigate the clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory findings of methadone toxicity in children. Patients and Methods: The present retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study describes the clinical symptoms and signs and laboratory findings of methadone poisoning in children under 12 years old in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, during the years 2009 to 2013. Results: Of 58 patients, 33 (56.9%) were male and 25 (43.1%) female (P = 0.294). The mean age of patients was 5.2 ± 1.0 years. All the cases of poisoning happened with methadone syrup, due to unsafe keeping of methadone in mineral water bottles and containers of other drugs. Signs and symptoms included drowsiness (91.4 %), miosis (75.9%), vomiting (69.0%), ineffective breathing (any kind of breathing problem except apnea) (62.1%), apnea (53.4%), cyanosis (43.1%), seizure (8.6%), ataxia (6.9%) and delirium (3.4%). Conclusions: Keeping methadone in appropriate containers and warning methadone consumers about the dangerous side effects of its consumption and the symptoms of methadone poisoning in children may minimize the occurrence of this form of poisoning and its complications in children. PMID:26199683

  9. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee.

  10. Estuarine water quality in parks of the Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network: vital signs estuarine nutrient-enrichment monitoring, 2006-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, James M.; Nixon, Matthew E.; Neckles, Hilary A.; Pooler, Penelope S.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes results of water-quality monitoring within estuaries of the National Park Service Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network (NCBN) from 2006 through 2011. Data collection formed part of the NCBN Vital Signs Monitoring Program implemented to detect threats of estuarine nutrient enrichment. Data included here were collected from six parks at predetermined intervals: Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts (2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011); Fire Island National Seashore, New York (2009, 2011); Gateway National Recreation Area, New York and New Jersey (2010); Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia (2006, 2008, 2010); George Washington Birthplace National Monument, Virginia (2009, 2011); and Colonial National Historic Park, Virginia (2008, 2010). Monitoring variables consisted of dissolved-oxygen concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, attenuation of downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), turbidity, water temperature, and salinity. All monitoring was conducted during four-week summer index periods. The monitoring design incorporated data collection at multiple, complementary spatial and temporal scales. Within each park, a spatial survey was conducted once during the index period following a probability design using a grid of tessellated hexagons as the basis for sample site selection. The spatial survey was supplemented with weekly measurements at a subset of sites and continuous monitoring at a single reference site. Within parks, data were reported as area-weighted water-quality conditions during each index period, the location and extent of estuarine area within condition categories, and spatial and temporal trends. In addition, we used a repeated measures analysis of variance to determine the extent to which variability in three water quality metrics (chlorophyll a in surface water, dissolved oxygen in bottom water, and water clarity expressed by PAR attenuation) was explained by year to year changes in

  11. Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates' Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes.

    PubMed

    Gormally, Cara

    2017-01-01

    For science learning to be successful, students must develop attitudes toward support future engagement with challenging social issues related to science. This is especially important for increasing participation of students from underrepresented populations. This study investigated how participation in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes affected students' attitudes toward science, focusing on deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students in bilingual learning environments (i.e., taught in American Sign Language and English). Analysis of reflection assignments and interviews revealed that the majority of students developed positive attitudes toward science and scientific attitudes after participating in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes. Attitudinal growth appears to be driven by student value of laboratory activities, repeated direct engagement with scientific inquiry, and peer collaboration. Students perceived that hands-on experimentation involving peer collaboration and a positive, welcoming learning environment were key features of inquiry-based laboratories, affording attitudinal growth. Students who did not perceive biology as useful for their majors, careers, or lives did not develop positive attitudes. Students highlighted the importance of the climate of the learning environment for encouraging student contribution and noted both the benefits and pitfalls of teamwork. Informed by students' characterizations of their learning experiences, recommendations are made for inquiry-based learning in college biology.

  12. Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Signing Undergraduates’ Attitudes toward Science in Inquiry-Based Biology Laboratory Classes

    PubMed Central

    Gormally, Cara

    2017-01-01

    For science learning to be successful, students must develop attitudes toward support future engagement with challenging social issues related to science. This is especially important for increasing participation of students from underrepresented populations. This study investigated how participation in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes affected students’ attitudes toward science, focusing on deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing signing students in bilingual learning environments (i.e., taught in American Sign Language and English). Analysis of reflection assignments and interviews revealed that the majority of students developed positive attitudes toward science and scientific attitudes after participating in inquiry-based biology laboratory classes. Attitudinal growth appears to be driven by student value of laboratory activities, repeated direct engagement with scientific inquiry, and peer collaboration. Students perceived that hands-on experimentation involving peer collaboration and a positive, welcoming learning environment were key features of inquiry-based laboratories, affording attitudinal growth. Students who did not perceive biology as useful for their majors, careers, or lives did not develop positive attitudes. Students highlighted the importance of the climate of the learning environment for encouraging student contribution and noted both the benefits and pitfalls of teamwork. Informed by students’ characterizations of their learning experiences, recommendations are made for inquiry-based learning in college biology. PMID:28188279

  13. CDC Vital Signs: Asthma in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people with asthma. Promote improvements in indoor air quality for people with asthma through measures such as ... healthy schools and workplaces, and improvements in outdoor air quality. Health care providers can Determine the severity of ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    MedlinePlus

    ... and guidance for decision making based on proven practices. Increasing access to mental health and substance abuse treatment through the Affordable ... that do not involve prescription painkillers. Follow best practices for ... health problems. Avoiding combinations of prescription painkillers and ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... a co-payment. Top of Page Problem Doctors, nurses, and other health professionals should screen all adult ... community activities that reduce drinking too much. Doctors, nurses, health plans, and insurers can Screen all adult ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... No woman should die of cervical cancer. Doctors, nurses, and health systems can: Help women understand what ... Early Detection Program , Title X Family Planning Doctors, nurses, and health systems can Help women understand which ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem More adults with disabilities need to get physical activity. Adults with disabilities who get no physical activity ... Adults with disabilities are more likely to get physical activity if doctors recommend it. Only 44% of adults ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Today's Heroin Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) - Linking PDMPs to Health IT National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention CMS Improvements to Medicare Drug and Health Plans U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Information on Naloxone Auto- ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Safer Food Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... germs found in sick people and in contaminated foods. Information technology is helping investigators in many places work together. Efforts by food industries are helping trace contaminated foods to their ...

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Where's the Sodium?

    MedlinePlus

    ... MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Where's the sodium? There's too much in many common foods. Recommend ... Problem Not all foods are created equal Understanding sodium in foods can be confusing Types of foods ...

  1. Writing and Feelings: Checking Our Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Alice G.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a series of studies of both student and professional writers. Concludes that writers' emotions change discernibly when they compose. Finds intensified positive emotions (such as excitement and happiness), weakened negative-passive emotions (shame and boredom), and less variable negative-active emotions (including fear and anger). (SG)

  2. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the Affordable Care Act. Doctors, nurses, and health care systems can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of medical care. Counsel patients who do not have HIV on how to prevent ... or mental health services. Work with health departments to get and ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MMWR Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MMWR Science Clips Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... spectrum disorders are completely preventable. Problem Alcohol can harm a developing baby before a woman knows she ... aware that any level of alcohol use could harm their baby. All types of alcohol can be ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... 41MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Progress on Childhood Obesity Many States Show Declines Language: English Español ( ... are more likely to be obese later in childhood and adolescence. In these older children and adolescents, ...

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePlus

    ... safety efforts happening across the state. Health care facility CEOs/administrators can: Implement systems to alert receiving ... Germs spread between patients and across health care facilities. Antibiotic resistance is a threat. Nightmare germs called ...

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... the Issue Related Pages February 2014 43% Motor vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased ...

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Deaths How is the US doing? Language: ... Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Problem Motor vehicle crash deaths in the US are still too ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... enforcement seat belt laws allow police to stop vehicles just because someone is not wearing a seat ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Methadone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to deaths from using harmful amounts of opioid or narcotic pain relievers, including drugs ... other painkillers, is commonly prescribed for chronic problems like back pain even though it might ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective enforcement of all FDA model Food Code provisions, including worker health and hygiene. Funding state and ... and local governments can Adopt and enforce all provisions of the FDA model Food Code to better ...

  13. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections: clinical signs, pathology and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Clinical signs and pathological features are still the corner-stones to suspect and diagnose overt disease associated with PCV2 infection. The clinico-pathological scope of this viral infection has been expanded over time. From the initial description of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, some enteric, respiratory and reproductive disorders have been subsequently linked with PCV2. Porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome, an immunocomplex disease, has also been associated with infection by this virus. All together, these conditions have been grouped under the name of porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD) or porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The precise mechanisms by which a PCV2 infected pig develops a PCV2 subclinical infection or a clinical PCVD/PCVAD are still to be fully elucidated, but inferences based upon clinical, gross and histologic findings from field cases of disease have been useful to suggest the pathogenesis of this viral infection. The objective of the present review is to update the current knowledge on the clinical and pathological scope of PCV2 infections, as well as on their diagnosis. Moreover, a proposal on a unified PCVD/PCVAD terminology and clearly defined diagnostic criteria for these conditions are also given.

  14. NIPER Lab WARDEN -- Description and LabVIEW{reg_sign} executable code of a general-purpose laboratory-automation program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    This report is Volume 1 (the description) of a two volume series that describes a general purpose, automation computer program developed by NIPER for data acquisition/control/analysis/presentation. This software was developed to provide interactive computer control of a variety of instruments typically found in laboratories and pilot plants in order to improve efficiency in operation and safe handling of potentially hazardous operations. For example, it is easily adaptable for operating a laboratory that conducts experiments at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, such as those found in a steamflooding laboratory. The software was developed in an object-oriented graphical language around National Instruments` LabVIEW{reg_sign} which is the future trend in automation programming.

  15. Vitalism as Pathos.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Thomas

    This paper addresses the remarkable longevity (in spite of numerous 'refutations') of the idea of vitalism in the biological sciences and beyond. If there is to be a renewed vitalism today, however, we need to ask - on what kind of original conception of life should it be based? This paper argues that recent invocations of a generalized, processual variety of vitalism in the social sciences and humanities above all, however exciting in their scope, miss much of the basic originality - and interest - of the vitalist perspective itself. The paper argues that any renewed spirit of vitalism in the contemporary era would have to base itself on the normativity of the living organism rather than on any generalized conceptions of process or becoming. In the terms of the paper, such a vitalism would have to be concrete and 'disciplinary' rather than processual or generalized. Such a vitalism would also need to accommodate, crucially, the pathic aspects of life - pathology, sickness, error; in short everything that makes us, as living beings, potentially weak, without power, at a loss. Sources for such a pathic vitalism might be found above all in the work of Georges Canguilhem - and Friedrich Nietzsche - rather than primarily in Bergson, Whitehead or Deleuze.

  16. Identifying the most sensitive and specific sign and symptom combinations for cholera: results from an analysis of laboratory-based surveillance data from Haiti, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Mentor Ali Ber; Schaad, Nicolas; Steenland, Maria W; Mintz, Eric D; Emmanuel, Rossignol; Freeman, Nicole; Boncy, Jacques; Adrien, Paul; Joseph, Gerard A; Katz, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Since October 2010, over 700,000 cholera cases have been reported in Haiti. We used data from laboratory-based surveillance for diarrhea in Haiti to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of the cholera case definitions recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). From April 2012 to May 2013, we tested 1,878 samples from hospitalized patients with acute watery diarrhea; 1,178 (62.7%) yielded Vibrio cholerae O1. The sensitivity and specificity of the WHO case definition for cholera in an epidemic setting were 91.3% and 43.1%, respectively, and the PPV and NPV were 72.8% and 74.8%, respectively. The WHO case definition for cholera in an area where cholera is not known to be present had lower sensitivity (63.1%) and NPV (55.1%) but higher specificity (74.2%) and PPV (80.0%). When laboratory diagnostic testing is not immediately available, clinicians can evaluate signs and symptoms to more accurately identify cholera patients.

  17. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  18. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  19. Collegial Environment Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Richard L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The Commission on Instruction of the New York State Association of Two-Year Colleges sponsored a competition which solicited papers on exemplary practices and procedures that improve the spirit of vitality and morale in two-year colleges. This special journal issue includes the brief papers accepted for the competition. After Richard L. Rinehart's…

  20. Protecting Religious Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    1998-01-01

    Jerry Cammarata's poignant article provides a valuable opportunity to discuss the Supreme Court's wisdom in prohibiting nondenominational prayer in public schools in 1962 ("Engel v. Vitale") and to review current case law. The Constitution permits prayer chosen and spoken privately by a student, supported by family, friends, and clergy.…

  1. Physical evaluation and the prevention of medical emergencies: vital signs.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1993-01-01

    It was assumed that dentists employ a complete system of physical evaluation for all new patients in their dental practices. Results of a survey of 1,588 dentists demonstrated that the use of a written medical history questionnaire was commonplace; however, recording of blood pressure and heart rate and rhythm on all new patients was quite limited. A greater percentage of dentists monitored blood pressure when there was a history of cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure. Monitoring of the heart rate and rhythm, even in patients with cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure, was severely limited in scope. A significant number of dentists still employ racemic epinephrine impregnated gingival retraction cord, and of these, 40% had observed "epinephrine-reactions."

  2. CDC Vital Signs: HIV and Injection Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention and treatment, including medication-assisted treatment and mental health services. Providing guidelines to healthcare providers for appropriate prescribing practices to reduce opioid abuse and overdoses. Monitoring national ...

  3. Amniotic fluid as a vital sign for fetal wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Dubil, Elizabeth A; Magann, Everett F

    2013-05-01

    Introduction: Amniotic fluid, once thought to merely provide protection and room for necessary movement and growth for the fetus, is now understood to be a highly complex and dynamic system that is studied as a data point to interpret fetal wellbeing. Methods: Assessment of amniotic fluid volume is now routine when performing a sonographic evaluation of fetal status and is an important consideration in the assessment and management of perinatal morbidity and mortality.(1)(,)(2) In this review, we will cover the dynamics that affect amniotic fluid volume, review methods for measurement and quantification of volume, review definitions for normative data as related to neonatal outcomes, and provide evidence based guidance on the workup and management options for oligoydramnios and polyhydramnios in singleton and twin pregnancies. Conclusions: When abnormalities of fluid exist, appropriate workup to uncover the underlying etiology should be initiated as adverse fetal outcomes are sometimes associated with these variations from normalcy.

  4. CDC Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MMWR Science Clips High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Out of Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... cdc.gov/GISCVH2/ High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol Among US Adults SOURCES: National Health and Nutrition ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Making Food Safer to Eat

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Critical Control Point management system and applying technologies (for example, use of high temperatures in pasteurization and cooking) to reduce contamination. Putting into action new policies that focus on preventing food safety problems and address new challenges. Change in ...

  6. Hydroacoustic estimates of fish abundance. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1991-03-01

    Hydroacoustics, as defined in the context of this report, is the use of a scientific sonar system to determine fish densities with respect to numbers and biomass. These two parameters provide a method of monitoring reservoir fish populations and detecting gross changes in the ecosystem. With respect to southeastern reservoirs, hydroacoustic surveys represent a new method of sampling open water areas and the best technology available. The advantages of this technology are large amounts of data can be collected in a relatively short period of time allowing improved statistical interpretation and data comparison, the pelagic (open water) zone can be sampled efficiently regardless of depth, and sampling is nondestructive and noninvasive with neither injury to the fish nor alteration of the environment. Hydroacoustics cannot provide species identification and related information on species composition or length/weight relationships. Also, sampling is limited to a minimum depth of ten feet which precludes the use of this equipment for sampling shallow shoreline areas. The objective of this study is to use hydroacoustic techniques to estimate fish standing stocks (i.e., numbers and biomass) in several areas of selected Tennessee Valley Reservoirs as part of a base level monitoring program to assess long-term changes in reservoir water quality.

  7. Education Vital Signs. Leadership: The Toughest Job in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Nora

    2003-01-01

    Examines administration, motivation, and compensation among educational leaders. Discusses the high-stakes, high-stress jobs of superintendents, assistant superintendents, subject-area supervisors, principals, and assistant principals. Also looks at the role of school board members and the importance of teamwork in education. (Contains one table…

  8. CDC Vital Signs: E-cigarette Ads and Youth

    MedlinePlus

    ... en Español [PDF - 2.7 MB] CDC Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips E-cigarette Ads and ... 2.4 million middle and high school students were current (past 30-day) users of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, in 2014. Most e- ...

  9. Wireless Vital Sign Sensor Network Simulations for Mass Casualty Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-27

    Casualty, Network Simulation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: Unclassified 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19 19a. NAME OF... security takes priority over medical treatment of the wounded, so it assumed that only two responders are available to provide medical care during...in ZigBee products. Since ZigBee software stacks are widely available and since a standard exists for ZigBee use in healthcare, it is a very

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Reducing Sodium in Children's Diets The pressure is on to ... choices. Problem Commonly eaten foods have too much sodium. How much is too much? US children ages ...

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescribe PrEP, more HIV infections could be prevented. Health care providers can: Test patients for HIV as a regular part of ... Helping to monitor PrEP use and its effects. Health care providers can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of ...

  12. Evaluation of Wireless Vital Signs Monitor in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients). An additional 23 prehospital patients were excluded because of missing or incomplete data...tool (J Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9.), and is among the important findings from this project...Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9 2) Van Haren RM, Ryan ML, Thorson CM, Namias N, Livingstone AS, Proctor KG: Bilateral near infrared

  13. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2010. The greatest number of infections occurred among gay and bisexual youth. Nearly half of all new ... Over half (54%) of new infections among young gay and bisexual males are in African Americans. About ...

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens ages 15 to 17 have ever had sex. Teen births in the US have declined over the ... parents. Parents, guardians, and caregivers can Talk with teens about sex , including: Normal sexual development, and how and when ...

  15. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.27 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips New Hope for Stopping HIV Testing and Medical Care ... AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and early death. There's new hope today for stopping HIV in the US. ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.6 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Hepatitis C Testing baby boomers saves lives Recommend on ... baby boomers got infected before the dangers of hepatitis C were well known. Anyone can get hepatitis ...

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Adult Seat Belt Use in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... enforcement seat belt laws achieved 88% use.* Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for ...

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly but Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries Costly but Preventable Language: English Español ( ... and how to prevent future crashes. Problem Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: More People Walk to Better Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top of Page What Can Be Done US government is Working with partners to carry out the ... people to be more active. State or local governments can Consider walking when creating long-range community ...

  20. Education Vital Signs. Common Measures: A Challenging Year for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Robin L.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the state of education. Through text and graphs, describes enrollment trends; spending on school construction, maintenance, and operations; changes in ACT and SAT scores; public opinion of educational vouchers and charter schools; and the growth of educational technology. (Contains eight graphs.) (WFA)

  1. Vital tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Kihn, Patricia W

    2007-04-01

    Vital tooth whitening, when administered correctly, is by all accounts one of the safest, most conservative, least expensive, and most effective aesthetic procedures currently available to patients. This article traces the evolution of the technology, describes what is known about the mechanism of action and explores such issues as toxicology and side effects associated with tooth whitening. The article also describes the various tooth-whitening systems, which include dentist-supervised night-guard bleaching, in-office or power bleaching, and bleaching with over-the-counter bleaching products. Combination treatments and light-activated treatments are also discussed. Finally, the article summarizes the areas of research needed in this field.

  2. Vitalism, purpose and superstition.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Saher, Marieke

    2007-02-01

    Developmental studies have shown that children assign purpose to objects more liberally than adults, and that they explain biological processes in terms of vitalistic causality. This study tested the hypothesis that similar misconceptions can be found among superstitious adults. The results from 116 superstitious and 123 sceptical individuals showed that more than sceptics, superstitious individuals attributed purpose to objects, and explained biological processes in terms of organ intentionality and energy transmission. In addition, they thought of energy as a vital force, attributing life and mental properties to it. These conceptual confusions were positively associated to all types of superstitions as well as belief in alternative medicine. The results support the argument that category mistakes and ontological confusions underlie superstitious and vitalistic thinking.

  3. Ethnolinguistic Vitality and Intergroup Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that ethnolinguistic vitality depends on four crucial social psychological factors: perceived strength differential, intergroup distance, utilitarianism and intergroup discordance. The influence of these factors on the vitality of subordinate and dominant groups is outlined. It is proposed that the vitality of both types of groups…

  4. Development of a portable vital sensing system for home telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, F; Sankai, Y

    2007-01-01

    For safe and effective home medical care, a network system for observing one's vital signs noninvasively and evaluating one's health conditions is highly desirable. In this paper, we described a portable vital sensing system and a home medical server to establish a home telemedicine system. In order to develop a portable vital sensing system, physiological sensing circuit, digital signal processor and wireless communication device are integrated into a small electrical circuit, called "smart telecom unit" with a size of 25mm * 37mm. By using a smart telecom unit, noninvasive vital sensing units including blood pressure, electrocardiograph, pulse wave and body temperature were developed. These sensing units are able to communicate vital records to a home medical server, which consists of a small computer and virtual physiological model to estimate health conditions and can seamlessly connect to the Internet. The accuracy and stability were evaluated in the system performance test. As a result of a performance test of a portable vital sensing system, these vital data could be measured easily and noninvasively. In addition, vital sensing system is able to communicate vital records to home medical server. Hence, it could be confirmed that it was useful to analyze daily health condition in order to prevent a lifestyle disease like hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes.

  5. Computer analysis of slow vital capacity spirograms.

    PubMed

    Primiano, F P; Bacevice, A E; Lough, M D; Doershuk, C F

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a digital computer program which evaluates the vital capacity and its subdivisions, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity. The algorithm examines the multibreath spirogram, a continuous record of quiet breathing interspersed among repeated slow, large volume maneuvers. Quiet breaths are recognized by comparing features of each breath to the respective average and variation of these features for all breaths. A self-scaling, iterative procedure is used to identify those end-tidal points that most likely represent the subject's functional residual capacity. A least-squared error baseline is then fit through these points to partition the vital capacity. Twenty-three spirograms from patients with documented pulmonary disease were independently analyzed by the computer, a pulmonary function technician, and the laboratory supervisor. No practical differences were found among the results. However, the computer's values, in contrast to those of the technician, were reproducible on repeated trials and free of computational and transcriptional errors.

  6. Vitalism in naive biological thinking.

    PubMed

    Morris, S C; Taplin, J E; Gelman, S A

    2000-09-01

    Vitalism is the belief that internal bodily organs have agency and that they transmit or exchange a vital force or energy. Three experiments investigated the use of vitalistic explanations for biological phenomena by 5- and 10-year-old English-speaking children and adults, focusing on 2 components: the notion that bodily organs have intentions and the notion that some life force or energy is transmitted. The original Japanese finding of vitalistic thinking was replicated in Experiment 1 with English-speaking 5-year-olds. Experiment 2 indicated that the more active component of vitalism for these children is a belief in the transfer of energy during biological processes, and Experiment 3 suggested an additional, albeit lesser, role for organ intentionality. A belief in vital energy may serve a causal placeholder function within a naive theory of biology until a more precisely formulated mechanism is known.

  7. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    sharp that they cause paper cuts. Stains. If you accidentally spill some food or drink on your clothes, make sure you attempt to remove it as soon as possible and preferably within the same lunar cycle. Some teachers seem to think they should be worn with pride like the stains on a chemistry teacher's white coat. This is a myth. Materials. For scientists continually teaching about the wonder of smart materials, physics teachers are remarkably conservative in their choice of materials for their clothes. Try to break out from the traditional corduroy and tweed and practise what you teach. It is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Steven Chapman Science Year Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science Signing Off takes a humorous and irreverent look at physics education. The views expressed here are those of the author and are not endorsed by the Editorial Board for Physics Education. Can you contribute a zany attitude or humorous anecdote? Please send your offering to ped@iop.org marked Signing Off.

  8. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  9. Understanding and Forecasting Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karan, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Forecasting of ethnolinguistic vitality can only be done within a well-functioning descriptive and explanatory model of the dynamics of language stability and shift. It is proposed that the Perceived Benefit Model of Language Shift, used with a taxonomy of language shift motivations, provides that model. The model, based on individual language…

  10. Vitalism in Naive Biological Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Suzanne C.; Taplin, John E.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Three experiments investigated use of vitalistic explanations for biological phenomena by 5- and 10-year-olds and by adults. Results replicated the original Japanese finding of vitalistic thinking among English-speaking 5-year-olds, identified the more active component of vitalism as a belief in the transfer of energy during biological processes,…

  11. Eight Factors in School Vitality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strommen, Merton P.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of 30 National Catholic Educational Association Schools examined their ability to make needed program changes according to Davis' eight factors: Awareness of Need, Resistances, Values, Information, Ability, Timing, Circumstances, and Yield. This article compares a vital, growing school and a declining one on these eight factors.…

  12. Forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, or inspiratory vital capacity: which is the best measure of vital capacity?

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S K

    1998-01-01

    Vital capacity can be measured as forced vital capacity (FVC), slow vital capacity (SVC), and inspiratory vital capacity (IVC). Although it is well known that the latter two are generally greater, a systematic comparison of the three in subjects with different degrees of airways obstruction has not been made. Sixty asthmatics and 20 normal subjects performed maneuvers for measurement of FVC, SVC, and IVC on a dry, rolling-seal spirometer. The severity of airways obstruction in asthmatics was classified as mild, moderate, and severe. There was no significant difference between FVC, SVC, and IVC in normal subjects. However, the three measurements of vital capacity were significantly different in all subgroups of asthmatics. FVC was smaller than both SVC and IVC. The differences were more marked in patients with moderate and severe degrees of airways obstruction. The differences between SVC and IVC were small and clinically not important. Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) expressed as percent of FVC, SVC, and IVC, was not different in normals and asthmatics with mild airways obstruction. The ratios were significantly different in asthmatics with moderate and severe airways obstruction. FEV1/IVC ratio was the lowest in both the groups followed by FEV1/SVC and FEV1/FVC. IVC and SVC are greater than FVC in patients with airways obstruction. This difference increases as the degree of obstruction increases. The difference between SVC or IVC and FVC serves as an indicator of air trapping. Both FVC and IVC could be measured and the largest VC used to calculate the FEV1/VC ratio because this increases the sensitivity of spirometry in detecting airways obstruction.

  13. Physical activity and cognitive vitality.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Voss, Michelle W; Erickson, Kirk I; Kramer, Arthur F

    2015-01-03

    We examine evidence supporting the associations among physical activity (PA), cognitive vitality, neural functioning, and the moderation of these associations by genetic factors. Prospective epidemiological studies provide evidence for PA to be associated with a modest reduction in relative risk of cognitive decline. An evaluation of the PA-cognition link across the life span provides modest support for the effect of PA on preserving and even enhancing cognitive vitality and the associated neural circuitry in older adults, with the majority of benefits seen for tasks that are supported by the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. The literature on children and young adults, however, is in need of well-powered randomized controlled trials. Future directions include a more sophisticated understanding of the dose-response relationship, the integration of genetic and epigenetic approaches, inclusion of multimodal imaging of brain-behavior changes, and finally the design of multimodal interventions that may yield broader improvements in cognitive function.

  14. Vanishing coccolith vital effects with alleviated CO2 limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Chan, I. Z. X.; McClelland, H. L. O.; Heureux, A. M. C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2015-09-01

    By recreating a range of geologically relevant concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the laboratory, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the vital effects in both carbon and oxygen isotopes of coccolith calcite of multiple species relates to ambient DIC concentration. Under high DIC levels, all the examined coccoliths lacked any offset from inorganic calcite, whereas in low (present-day) DIC concentrations, these vital effects and interspecies differences become substantial. These laboratory observations support the recent hypothesis from field observations that the appearance of interspecific vital effect in coccolithophores coincides with the long-term Neogene decline of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The present study brings further valuable constraints on coccolith isotopic compositions by demonstrating the threshold for the absence of vital effects under high DIC regimes. From a mechanistic viewpoint, we show that the vital effect is determined by physiology; growth rate, cell size and relative rates of photosynthesis and calcification, and a modulation of these parameters with ambient carbon availability. This study provides palaeoceanographers with a biogeochemical framework that can be utilised to further develop the use of calcareous nannofossils in palaeoceanography to derive sea surface temperature and pCO2 levels.

  15. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  16. Wearable vital parameters monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramaliu, Radu Vadim; Vasile, Alexandru; Bacis, Irina

    2015-02-01

    The system we propose monitors body temperature, heart rate and beside this, it tracks if the person who wears it suffers a faint. It uses a digital temperature sensor, a pulse sensor and a gravitational acceleration sensor to monitor the eventual faint or small heights free falls. The system continuously tracks the GPS position when available and stores the last valid data. So, when measuring abnormal vital parameters the module will send an SMS, using the GSM cellular network , with the person's social security number, the last valid GPS position for that person, the heart rate, the body temperature and, where applicable, a valid fall alert or non-valid fall alert. Even though such systems exist, they contain only faint detection or heart rate detection. Usually there is a strong correlation between low/high heart rate and an eventual faint. Combining both features into one system results in a more reliable detection device.

  17. Vitalism, complexity and the concept of spin.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, L R

    2002-01-01

    Vital Force is a concept that has suffered at the hands of the current medical model. An attempt is made to show how it might be possible to explain Vital Force in terms of complexity theory. A metaphor is introduced for the operation of Vital Force in terms of gyroscopic motion.

  18. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James

    2012-08-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some critics of Darwin advocate the teaching of intelligent design theory along with Darwin's theory, and others seek to eliminate even the mention of evolution from science classes altogether. Many of these critics base their objections on the claim that non-living matter cannot give rise to living matter. After considering some of the various meanings assigned to `vitalism' over the years, I argue that a considerable portion of Darwin deniers support a literal version of vitalism that is not scientifically respectable. Their position seems to be that since life cannot arise naturally, Darwin's theory accomplishes nothing: If it can only account for life forms changing from one to another (even this is disputed by some) but not how life arose in the first place, what's the point? I argue that there is every reason to believe that living and non-living matter differ only in degree, not in kind, and that all conversation about Darwinism should start with the assumption that abiogenesis is possible unless or until compelling evidence of its impossibility is presented. That is, I advocate a position that the burden of proof lies with those who claim "Life only comes from life." Until that case is made, little weight should be given to their position.

  19. Noninvasive vital body chemistry sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Winston; Gasca, Rebecca; Spariosu, Kalin; Low, Peter W.

    2000-08-01

    There is a need for real-time unobtrusive monitoring of the vital body chemistry and general health status of military personnel during training and in hostile battlefield environments. Monitoring the health of a soldier who is an integral part of a military mission is important, because a compromise in his/her ability to act at a certain moment could jeopardize the operation. The most accessible measure of a person's health at any given instant is his/her anaerobic metabolism rate (O2 debt), which is indicative of the changes in skeletal muscle and cerebral oxygenation. Anaerobic metabolism data can be used by paramedics to save lives. Lactate levels are important measure of oxygen debt. Lactate is a weak acid that is produced by cells when they break down glucose to produce energy by anaerobic metabolism (a chemical process that does not require oxygen). In this project we developed, constructed, and tested a compact personal optical sensor for monitoring lactate via sweat metabolite analysis. The sensor quantifies the change of the optical properties caused by lactate chemistry. Our miniaturized noninvasive lactate sensor measures minute changes of the lactate between 0-130 mM in near real time.

  20. Warning Signs After Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our Cause Our mission Fighting premature birth About us Annual report Our work Community impact Global programs Research Need help? Frequently asked questions Contact us Tools & ...

  1. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  2. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  3. Sign language Web pages.

    PubMed

    Fels, Deborah I; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G

    2006-01-01

    The WORLD WIDE WEB has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The present article describes a system that allows sign language-only Web pages to be created and linked through a video-based technique called sign-linking. In two studies, 14 Deaf participants examined two iterations of signlinked Web pages to gauge the usability and learnability of a signing Web page interface. The first study indicated that signing Web pages were usable by sign language users but that some interface features required improvement. The second study showed increased usability for those features; users consequently couldnavigate sign language information with ease and pleasure.

  4. [Computerizing the radiological sign].

    PubMed

    Bertaud, V; Belhadj, I; Dameron, O; Garcelon, N; Hendaoui, L; Marin, F; Duvauferrier, R

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article is to present to the radiologist the different theories of the sign and their consequences for sign representation in computer systems. All the theories of the sign are presented, but the most relevant are highlighted in order to explain the great modeling systems currently in use (such as DICOM-SR or the UMLS). The constructivist approach of the notion of disease, the semiosis process, which starting from signs produces new signs, and the structuralist analysis of sign through language are emphasized. The purpose of this analysis is to end up with a consensual representation of the sign that can be understood by human beings and processed by machines. Such a representation, also known as an ontology, is based on a semantic organization of language, thus allowing medicine to become a truly scientific discipline. It aims at disambiguating the symbols given to machines, which will help us in our reasoning.

  5. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  6. Battlefield triage life signs detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Park, Byung-Kwon; Li, Changzhi; Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders

    2008-04-01

    Getting to wounded soldiers on the battlefield is a precarious task, and medics have a very high casualty rate. It is therefore a vital importance to prioritize which soldiers to attend to first. The first step is to detect life signs - if a soldier is dead or alive, and prioritize recovery of live soldiers. The second step is to obtain vital signs from live soldiers, and use this to prioritize which are in most urgent need of attention. Our team at Kai Sensors, University of Hawaii and University of Florida is developing Doppler radar heart sensing technology that provides the means to detect life signs, respiration and/or heart beat, at a distance, even for subjects lying motionless, e.g., unconscious subjects, wearing body armor, and hidden from direct view. Since this technology can deliver heart rate information with high accuracy, it may also enable the assessment of a subject's physiological and psychological state based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Thus, the degree of a subject's injury may also be determined. The software and hardware developments and challenges for life signs detection and monitoring for battlefield triage will be discussed, including heart signal detection from all four sides of the human body, detection in the presence of body armor, and the feasibility of HRV parameter extraction.

  7. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  8. Sign language and autism.

    PubMed

    Bonvillian, J D; Nelson, K E; Rhyne, J M

    1981-03-01

    Research findings and issues in teaching sign language to nonspeaking autistic children are reviewed. Data on over 100 children indicate that nearly all autistic children learn receptive and expressive signs, and many learn to combine signs. These children also exhibit marked improvement in adaptive behaviors. Speech skills are acquired by fewer children and may be developed through simultaneous speech and sign training. Possible explanations for these results are given, together with suggestions for future research and data collection. Recommended innovations include exposure to fluent signers and training in discourse and code-switching. Different sign language teaching methods need to be investigated more fully, including emphasis on training sign language within the children's total environment and with greater staff and parental participation.

  9. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  10. 46 CFR 128.130 - Vital systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... auxiliaries vital to the vessel's survivability and safety. (10) Any other marine-engineering system... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT... vessel's survivability and safety. For the purpose of this subchapter, the following are vital...

  11. Vanishing coccolith vital effects with alleviated carbon limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, M.; Chan, I. Z. X.; McClelland, H. L. O.; Heureux, A. M. C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    By recreating a range of geologically relevant concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the laboratory, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the vital effects in both carbon and oxygen isotopes of coccolith calcite of multiple species relates to ambient DIC concentration. Under high DIC levels, all the examined coccoliths exhibit significantly reduced isotopic offsets from inorganic calcite compared to the substantial vital effects expressed at low (preindustrial and present-day) DIC concentrations. The supply of carbon to the cell exerts a primary control on biological fractionation in coccolith calcite via the modulation of coccolithophore growth rate, cell size and carbon utilisation by photosynthesis and calcification, altogether accounting for the observed interspecific differences between coccolith species. These laboratory observations support the recent hypothesis from field observations that the appearance of interspecific vital effect in coccolithophores coincides with the long-term Neogene decline of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and bring further valuable constraints by demonstrating a convergence of all examined species towards inorganic values at high pCO2 regimes. This study provides palaeoceanographers with a biogeochemical framework that can be utilised to further develop the use of calcareous nannofossils in palaeoceanography to derive sea surface temperature and pCO2 levels, especially during periods of relatively elevated pCO2 concentrations, as they prevailed during most of the Meso-Cenozoic.

  12. UCR Library Sign System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Riverside. Library.

    This manual outlines the procedures to be used for producing and placing signs within the libraries of the University of California, Riverside and presents examples of signs which conform to the library sign policy. The sign policy itself is described as well as procedures for requesting new or revised signs and for sign removal. Drawings of…

  13. Sign-a-Palooza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorran, Charles; Reynolds, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    A halo of signs, some stuffed into thick plastic sheaths while others curled under yellow tape, cluttered the service desks of the New City Library. They bleated out messages of closings, procedures, and warnings. Their number undermined their cause. All too often a customer would ask a question that was answered by the very sign they had pushed…

  14. Standardization of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  15. Connecting the Equals Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ian; Pratt, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Children tend to view the equals sign as an operator symbol bereft of the rich relational properties of equality statements. It has been argued by some that this restricted view of the equals sign is due to cultural or cognitive factors. We suggest a significant factor is that rich relational meanings lack relevance within the context of…

  16. Forms of vitality play in infancy.

    PubMed

    Español, Silvia; Martínez, Mauricio; Bordoni, Mariana; Camarasa, Rosario; Carretero, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative study based on the constant comparative method to initiate the systematic study of forms of vitality play. This is an unnoticed non-figurative play frame linked to early social play and temporal arts in which child and adult elaborate the dynamics of their own movements and sounds in a repetition-variation form. In the introduction we present the theoretical underpinnings and the sporadic observations we have done in previous studies. Then, by the iterative observations of the recorded material of a longitudinal case study on play during the third year of life, we generated the general category of forms of vitality play and four subcategories of display modes of forms of vitality play (improvised forms of vitality play, ritualized forms of vitality play, forms of vitality play combined with pretend play, and forms of vitality play combined with role playing) which are illustrated with descriptive narratives. We discuss the properties of the developed categories, the limits of the present study, and the need to continue systematizing the research on this playful activity.

  17. Impaired vitality form recognition in autism.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Magali J; Veroni, Vania; Bruschweiler-Stern, Nadia; Pieraccini, Cinzia; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Barthélémy, Catherine; Malvy, Joëlle; Sinigaglia, Corrado; Stern, Daniel N; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2013-08-01

    Along with the understanding of the goal of an action ("what" is done) and the intention underlying it ("why" it is done), social interactions largely depend on the appraisal of the action from the dynamics of the movement: "how" it is performed (its "vitality form"). Do individuals with autism, especially children, possess this capacity? Here we show that, unlike typically developing individuals, individuals with autism reveal severe deficits in recognizing vitality forms, and their capacity to appraise them does not improve with age. Deficit in vitality form recognition appears, therefore, to be a newly recognized trait marker of autism.

  18. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    PubMed

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings.

  19. Signs of Overload

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Signs of Overload Page Content Article Body Although stress is a ... 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  20. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet our Partners How to Get Involved Donate Dermatomyositis (DM) Share print email share facebook twitter google ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? For many decades, DM was considered “ polymyositis with ...

  1. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Guidance Infection Control: Hospital Infection Control: Home ... Mouth Infection) Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Signs and Symptoms ...

  2. Detecting Signs of Intrusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    your systems, you should investigate any warnings they sound. Although monitors are not fool- proof, they can be part of an effective early warning ...Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar...1997 Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar Suresh Konda John Richael Derek Simmel Networked Systems

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Heart Age - Is Your Heart Older Than You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Heart Age Is Your Heart Older Than You? Language: ... that increase heart age. Problem US adults have hearts 7 years older than they should be. Though ...

  4. Electronically captured, patient‐reported physical function: an important vital sign in obesity medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, J.; Wood, G. C.; Seiler, C.; Cook, A.; Lent, M. R.; Still, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Impaired physical function (i.e., inability to walk 200 feet, climb a flight of stairs or perform activities of daily living) predicts poor clinical outcomes and adversely impacts medical and surgical weight management. However, routine assessment physical function is seldom performed clinically. The PROMIS Physical Function Short Form 20a (SF‐20a) is a validated questionnaire for assessing patient reported physical function, which includes published T‐score percentiles adjusted for gender, age and education. However, the effect that increasing levels of obesity has on these percentiles is unclear. We hypothesized that physical function would decline with increasing level of obesity independent of gender, age, education and comorbidity. Materials and Methods This study included 1,627 consecutive weight management patients [(mean ± SEM), 44.7 ± 0.3 years and 45.1 ± 0.2 kg/m2] that completed the PROMIS SF‐20a during their initial consultation. We evaluated the association between obesity level and PROMIS T‐score percentiles using multiple linear regression adjusting for gender, age, education and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Results Multiple linear regression T‐score percentiles were lower in obesity class 2 (−12.4%tile, p < 0.0001), class 3 (−17.0%tile, p < 0.0001) and super obesity (−25.1%tile, p < 0.0001) compared to class 1 obesity. Conclusion In patients referred for weight management, patient reported physical function was progressively lower in a dose‐dependent fashion with increasing levels of obesity, independent of gender, age, education and CCI. PMID:28090345

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Children Eating More Fruit, Not Vegetables

    MedlinePlus

    ... be able to consume more while staying within calorie needs. SOURCE: USDA, www.ChooseMyPlate.gov View larger ... on children eating more fruit, not vegetables [PSA - 0:60 seconds] Winnable Battles: Nutrition, Physical Activity, and ...

  6. Association of Shock, Coagulopathy, and Initial Vital Signs with Massive Transfusion in Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Forces in the global war on terrorism: 2001–2004. Ann Surg. 2007;245:986–991. 3. Brohi K, Cohen MJ, Ganter MT, et al. Acute coagulopathy of trauma...Cohn SM, Murtha M. Early coagulopathy predicts mortality in trauma. J Trauma. 2003;55:39–44. 5. Hess JR, Brohi K, Dutton RP, et al. The coagulopathy of...Gilmore D, et al. Epidemiology of immediate and early trauma deaths at an urban Level I trauma center. Am Surg. 1998;64:950–954. 30. Brohi K, Singh J

  7. Sleep stage classification by non-contact vital signs indices using Doppler radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Suzumura, Kazuki; Matsui, Takemi

    2016-08-01

    Disturbed sleep has become more common in recent years. To improve the quality of sleep, undergoing sleep observation has gained interest as a means to resolve possible problems. In this paper, we evaluate a non-restrictive and non-contact method for classifying real-time sleep stages and report on its potential applications. The proposed system measures heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body movements, and respiratory signals of a sleeping person using two 24-GHz microwave radars placed beneath the mattress. We introduce a method that dynamically selects the window width of the moving average filter to extract the pulse waves from the radar output signals. The Pearson correlation coefficient between two HR measurements derived from the radars overnight, and the reference polysomnography was the average of 88.3% and the correlation coefficient for HRV parameters was the average of 71.2%. For identifying wake and sleep periods, the body-movement index reached sensitivity of 76.0%, and a specificity of 77.0% with 10 participants. Low-frequency (LF) components of HRV and the LF/HF ratio had a high degree of contribution and differed significantly across the three sleep stages (REM, LIGHT, and DEEP; p <; 0.01). In contrast, high-frequency (HF) components of HRV were not significantly different across the three sleep stages (p > 0.05). We applied a canonical discriminant analysis to identify wake or sleep periods and to classify the three sleep stages with leave-one-out cross validation. Classification accuracy was 66.4% for simply identifying wake and sleep, 57.1% for three stages (wake, REM, and NREM) and 34% for four stages (wake, REM, LIGHT, and DEEP). This is a novel system for measuring HRs, HRV, body movements, and respiratory intervals and for measuring high sensitivity pulse waves using two radar signals. It simplifies measurement of sleep stages and may be employed at nursing care facilities or by the general public to improve sleep quality.

  8. Textile technology for the vital signs monitoring in telemedicine and extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Meriggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Francesco; Castiglioni, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Ferratini, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    This paper illustrates two extensive applications of a smart garment we previously developed for the monitoring of ECG, respiration, and movement. In the first application, the device, named Maglietta Interattiva Computerizzata (MagIC), was used for the home monitoring of cardiac patients. The used platform included MagIC for signals collection, a touchscreen computer with a dedicated software for data handling, and a universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS) dongle for data transmission, via email, to three cardiologists. Three patients daily-performed 3-min telemonitoring sessions for 30 days by using the platform. The whole system behaved correctly in 85 out of 90 sessions. In five instances, a second session was required due to UMTS traffic congestion. Only in three sessions, cardiologists asked the patient to repeat the acquisition because of poor signal quality. In the second application, MagIC was used to evaluate the effects of high-altitude hypoxia on sleep and 24 h daily life in 30 healthy subjects at 3500 and 5400 m above sea level on Mount Everest slopes. The use of MagIC garment was reported to be simple and requiring short instrumentation time even in the demanding expedition environment. The signal quality was adequate in 111 out of 115 recordings and 90% of the subjects found the vest comfortable.

  9. Patient Prognosis from Vital Sign Time Series: Combining Convolutional Neural Networks with a Dynamical Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Li-wei; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Snoek, Jasper; Nemati, Shamim

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a stacked switching vector-autoregressive (SVAR)-CNN architecture to model the changing dynamics in physiological time series for patient prognosis. The SVAR-layer extracts dynamical features (or modes) from the time-series, which are then fed into the CNN-layer to extract higher-level features representative of transition patterns among the dynamical modes. We evaluate our approach using 8-hours of minute-by-minute mean arterial blood pressure (BP) from over 450 patients in the MIMIC-II database. We modeled the time-series using a third-order SVAR process with 20 modes, resulting in first-level dynamical features of size 20×480 per patient. A fully connected CNN is then used to learn hierarchical features from these inputs, and to predict hospital mortality. The combined CNN/SVAR approach using BP time-series achieved a median and interquartile-range AUC of 0.74 [0.69, 0.75], significantly outperforming CNN-alone (0.54 [0.46, 0.59]), and SVAR-alone with logistic regression (0.69 [0.65, 0.72]). Our results indicate that including an SVAR layer improves the ability of CNNs to classify nonlinear and nonstationary time-series. PMID:27790623

  10. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics on the progress of African Americans in U.S. institutions of higher education, including data from the Black-White Higher Education Equality Index; statistics measuring the state of racial inequality in the United States; data ranking the nation's law schools according to percentages of African American students; and data on…

  11. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of the progress of African Americans in U.S. higher education institutions, focusing on the black-white higher education equality index, statistics that measure the state of racial inequality, ranking the nation's law schools by percentages of black students, state-by-state review of African American enrollments in…

  12. Vital Signs: The Current State of African Americans in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents a statistical record of African Americans' progress in U.S. higher education institutions, discussing: the black-white higher education equality index; statistics that measure racial inequality; ranking law schools by percentage of black students; black enrollments at the nation's highest-ranked universities and highest-ranked liberal…

  13. Vital Signs: Fruit and vegetable intake among children - United States, 2003-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Americans do not consume nearly enough fruits and vegetables. Increasing the contribution of fruits and vegetables to Americans’ diets may add under-consumed nutrients, reduce the risk of leading causes of illness and death, and help with weight management. Encouraging children to consume ade...

  14. The Use of Postural Vital Signs in the Assessment of Fluid Volume Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandel, Jane Corrigan

    1990-01-01

    Blood pressure and pulse are measured in supine and upright positions, and certain differences between the values are said to indicate fluid volume disturbance. Most discussions of this "orthostatic test" do not explain how it should be done, and they differ from what has been observed in a practice setting. (MLW)

  15. A Digital Signal Processor for Doppler Radar Sensing of Vital Signs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    It is caused by a small reflux flow of blood back into the aortic valve and coronary vessels. This dicrotic notch in the heart signal is clipped...Bulky analog filters can now be replaced by software implemented algorithms. These technological advances make the construction of a mobile remote...implementation flexibility, filters with closer tolerances, utilizes fewer components and has an overall lower price. DSP software not only replaces

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Binge Drinking a Serious, Under-Recognized Problem Among Women and Girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Underage drinking is affected by exposure to alcohol marketing. Underage drinking is also influenced by adult drinking, ... alcohol use. Reporting on youth exposure to alcohol marketing because it influences underage drinking. We know what ...

  17. Computational Gene Mapping to Analyze Continuous Automated Real-Time Vital Signs Monitoring Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-23

    baseline study group of 191 adult (>17 years) patients was identified with TBI severe enough to require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and...of intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) [6,7]. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) techniques, prognostic...other adverse VS-related events in 6-hour intervals from the time of admission through the first 72 hours. “Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure

  18. Detection of Low-volume Blood Loss: Compensatory Reserve Versus Traditional Vital Signs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    received significant crystalloid resuscitation.22 Techniques have been described to discriminate between true anemia and hemodilution; however, they require...Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. value in children ,30 and require an invasive monitoring device. Near-infrared...1029. 22. Van PY, Riha GM, Cho SD, Underwood SJ, Hamilton GJ, Anderson R, Ham LB, Schreiber MA. Blood volume analysis can distinguish true anemia from

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies for a Bio-Impedance Vital-Sign Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Patterson R: Bioelectric impedance measurement. In: Bronzino JD. The biomedical engineering handbook. Boca Raton, CRC Press, 1995. pp 1223-1230. 35 11...28. Cohen A: Biomedical signals: Origin and dynamic characteristics; frequency domain analysis. In: Bronzino JD. The biomedical engineering handbook

  20. Uranus: a middleware architecture for dependable AAL and vital signs monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept.

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Protect Patients from Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Protect patients from antibiotic resistance Language: English ... hours later. Know when to stop antibiotic treatment. Health care facility CEOs/ administrators can Prevent infections and their ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Antibiotic Rx in Hospitals: Proceed with Caution ... resistance and improving prescribing practices. Work with other health care facilities to prevent infections, transmission, and resistance. Problem ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now

    MedlinePlus

    ... 62 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- Think Sepsis. Time Matters.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Think sepsis. Time matters. Language: English Español ( ... the antibiotic type, dose, and duration are correct. Health care facility CEOs/administrators can Make infection control a ...

  5. Detecting specific health-related events using an integrated sensor system for vital sign monitoring.

    PubMed

    Adnane, Mourad; Jiang, Zhongwei; Choi, Samjin; Jang, Hoyoung

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for the detection of apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data is presented. The method is based on the intelligent combination of an integrated sensor system for long-time cardiorespiratory signal monitoring and dedicated signal-processing packages. Integrated sensors are a PVDF film and conductive fabric sheets. The signal processing package includes dedicated respiratory cycle (RC) and QRS complex detection algorithms and a new method using the respiratory cycle variability (RCV) for detecting apnea/hypopnea periods in physiological data. Results show that our method is suitable for online analysis of long time series data.

  6. Vital Signs: Food categories contributing the most to sodium consumption - United States, 2007-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of the U.S. population consumes sodium in excess of daily guidelines (<2,300 mg overall and 1,500 mg for specific populations). Excessive sodium consumption raises blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the nation’s first and fourth leading causes of death. I...

  7. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1992: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-eight designated swimming beaches, four informal swimming areas, two canoe launching or landing sites, and two additional sites on a canoeing stream were sampled at least ten times each during 30-day sampling periods in the summer of 1992. One designated swimming beach, one informal swimming area, and two canoe launching or landing sites exceeded the recommended criterion of geometric mean concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria of 200/100 mL. In addition to these four sites, five designated swimming beaches and one informal swimming area exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended criterion by having more than 10 percent of the fecal coliform samples with concentrations greater than 400/100 mL. Rainfall was an important factor for these six sites and the four sites that did not meet the geometric mean criterion. Some sampling sites are affected by rainfall more than others. When bacteria concentrations increase after rainfall, it indicates that site is vulnerable to contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution. Recreational use of these sites following rainfall is discouraged. If samples collected within 24 hours of rainfall (one-half inch or more) are excluded, all-but one of the ten sites have better bacteriological water quality, and two meet both the geometric mean and maximum concentration criteria. Five canoe access locations on the Bear Creek floatway, plus one site upstream and another downstream of the floatway were sampled eight times each during 1992. All seven sites met recreation criteria.

  8. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2012-13: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This paper features an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. "The Facilities Performance Indicators Report" is designed for survey…

  9. Facilities Performance Indicators Report 2011-12: Tracking Your Facilities Vital Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an expanded Web-based "Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) Report." The purpose of APPA's Facilities Performance Indicators is to provide a representative set of statistics about facilities in educational institutions. APPA's Information and Research Committee's goal for this year was to enhance the…

  10. Assessing Vital Signs: Applying Two Participatory Evaluation Frameworks to the Evaluation of a College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Susan C.; Magilvy, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation research has been in progress to clarify the concept of participatory evaluation and to assess its impact. Recently, two theoretical frameworks have been offered--Daigneault and Jacob's participatory evaluation measurement index and Champagne and Smits' model of practical participatory evaluation. In this case report, we apply these…

  11. Progress Monitoring in an Integrated Health Care System: Tracking Behavioral Health Vital Signs.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Franklin, Allie; Mercer, Brian; Fraynt, Rebecca; Simon, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Progress monitoring implementation in an integrated health care system is a complex process that must address factors such as measurement, technology, delivery system care processes, patient needs and provider requirements. This article will describe how one organization faced these challenges by identifying the key decision points (choice of measure, process for completing rating scale, interface with electronic medical record and clinician engagement) critical to implementation. Qualitative and quantitative data will be presented describing customer and stakeholder satisfaction with the mental health progress monitoring tool (MHPMT) as well as organizational performance with key measurement targets.

  12. Clinical validation of LTMS-S: A wearable system for vital signs monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Olivier; Ferrario, Damien; Proença, Martin; Porchet, Jacques-André; Falhi, Abdessamad; Grossenbacher, Olivier; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Della Ricca, Nicolas; Sartori, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    LTMS-S is a new wearable system for the monitoring of several physiological signals--including a two-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)--and parameters, such as the heart rate, the breathing rate, the peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), the core body temperature (CBT), and the physical activity. All signals are measured using only three sensors embedded within a vest. The sensors are standalone with their own rechargeable battery, memory, wireless communication and with an autonomy exceeding 24 hours. This paper presents the results of the clinical validation of the LTMS-S system.

  13. Vital Signs Screening for Alcohol Misuse in a Rural Primary Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, J. Paul; Guyinn, Monique R.; Matthews, Michael; Okosun, Ike; Dent, M. Marie

    2008-01-01

    Context: Alcohol misuse is more common in rural areas, and rural problem drinkers are less likely to seek alcohol treatment services. Rural clinics face unique challenges to implementing routine alcohol screening and intervention. Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using the single alcohol screening question (SASQ) during routine nursing vital…

  14. Vital Signs: Preparing for Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus--United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-08

    Widespread Zika virus transmission in the Region of the Americas since 2015 has heightened the urgency of preparing for the possibility of expansion of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus during the 2016 mosquito season. CDC and other U.S. government agencies have been working with state and local government partners on prevention and early detection of Zika virus infection and will increase these activities during April as part of their preparation for the anticipated emergence of mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus in the continental United States.

  15. A novel ultra-wideband 80 GHz FMCW radar system for contactless monitoring of vital signs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siying; Pohl, Antje; Jaeschke, Timo; Czaplik, Michael; Köny, Marcus; Leonhardt, Steffen; Pohl, Nils

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an ultra-wideband 80 GHz FMCW-radar system for contactless monitoring of respiration and heart rate is investigated and compared to a standard monitoring system with ECG and CO(2) measurements as reference. The novel FMCW-radar enables the detection of the physiological displacement of the skin surface with submillimeter accuracy. This high accuracy is achieved with a large bandwidth of 10 GHz and the combination of intermediate frequency and phase evaluation. This concept is validated with a radar system simulation and experimental measurements are performed with different radar sensor positions and orientations.

  16. Uranus: A Middleware Architecture for Dependable AAL and Vital Signs Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Coronato, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The design and realization of health monitoring applications has attracted the interest of large communities both from industry and academia. Several research challenges have been faced and issues tackled in order to realize effective applications for the management and monitoring of people with chronic diseases, people with disabilities, elderly people. However, there is a lack of efficient tools that enable rapid and possibly cheap realization of reliable health monitoring applications. The paper presents Uranus, a service oriented middleware architecture, which provides basic functions for the integration of different kinds of biomedical sensors. Uranus has also distinguishing characteristics like services for the run-time verification of the correctness of running applications and mechanisms for the recovery from failures. The paper concludes with two case studies as proof of concept. PMID:22736998

  17. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... informational content of records series and electronic records systems determines which are vital records. Only... ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified? Agencies identify vital records in the context of the emergency management function. Vital records are those...

  18. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... informational content of records series and electronic records systems determines which are vital records. Only... ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.16 How are vital records identified? Agencies identify vital records in the context of the emergency management function. Vital records are those...

  19. From Vitality to Vital Exhaustion and Other States of "Tense Tiredness": A New Biopsychosocial Risk Domain.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Alan; Cohen, Randy

    2017-04-01

    Fatigue is a common prodromal symptom for various medical conditions, including acute myocardial infarction. Fatigue is also the core component of vital exhaustion, which consists of a specific triad: excessive fatigue, increased irritability, and feelings of demoralization. In this issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, Frestad and Prescott present a meta-analysis of 16 studies, involving 53,337 participants, which found vital exhaustion to be associated with an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and recurrent cardiac events among individuals with established CHD. After discussing methodological limitations of the studies included in this meta-analysis, we describe these findings in terms of a larger genre of risk that is biopsychosocial in origin and tied to two types of tiredness: "calm tiredness" and "tense tiredness." The former is regenerative, while the latter enhances disease risk. We propose that besides vital exhaustion, other symptoms of negative affect may combine with tiredness to produce increased clinical risk, such as the presence of depressed mood, an inability to relax or recover after work, and symptoms of burnout. We further propose that vital exhaustion can be considered as part of a larger paradigm, ranging from a positive state of vitality to a negative state of exhaustion of vitality. We conclude this editorial by emphasizing the importance of improving vitality and the need to clarify biobehavioral mechanisms that play a role in the association between vital exhaustion and adverse CHD outcomes. New interventions are needed that target reducing exhaustion and improving vitality for individuals at high risk of CHD.

  20. Vital physical signals measurements using a webcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jianfei; Yan, Yonggang; Yao, Lifeng

    2013-10-01

    Non-contact and remote measurements of vital physical signals are important for reliable and comfortable physiological self-assessment. In this paper, we provide a new video-based methodology for remote and fast measurements of vital physical signals such as cardiac pulse and breathing rate. A webcam is used to track color video of a human face or wrist, and a Photoplethysmography (PPG) technique is applied to perform the measurements of the vital signals. A novel sequential blind signal extraction methodology is applied to the color video under normal lighting conditions, based on correlation analysis between the green trace and the source signals. The approach is successfully applied in the measurement of vital signals under the condition of different illuminating in which the target signal can also be found out accurately. To assess the advantages, the measuring time of a large number of cases is recorded correctly. The experimental results show that it only takes less than 30 seconds to measure the vital physical signals using presented technique. The study indicates the proposed approach is feasible for PPG technique, which provides a way to study the relationship of the signal for different ROI in future research.

  1. The Meaning of Signs:

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article reconstructs the diagnostic act of the French pox in the French-disease hospital of sixteenth-century Augsburg. It focuses on how the participants in the clinical encounter imagined the configuration of the pox and its localization in the human body. Of central importance for answering this question is the early modern conception of physical signs. It has been argued that it was due to a specific understanding of bodily signs and their relationship to a disease and its causes, that disease definition and classification in the early modern period showed a high degree of flexibility and fluidity. This paper looks at how the sixteenth-century theoretical conception of physical signs not only shaped the diagnosis and treatment of the pox but also reflected the overall organization of institutions. PMID:17242549

  2. Self-leadership and physical vitality.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter F; Georgianna, Sibylle; Roux, Gregor

    2010-10-01

    The current study examined the extension of an approach to self-leadership using strategies which focus on (1) constructive thoughts, (2) natural rewards, and (3) effective behavior. The suggested extension refers to strategies which improve physical vitality, fitness, and well-being. A sample of 163 students answered scale items selected and composed to measure the four categories of self-leadership strategies. Confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modelling indicated that strategies focusing on physical vitality, fitness, and well-being represent an independent category of self-leadership strategies. Implications for research and application were discussed.

  3. [Evaluation of vital constants. 18th century].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, Natividad; Ortega Martínez, Carmen

    2002-05-01

    The evaluation of patients' vital statistics is part of health care and in many cases this is the first step in knowing what is the health status of a patient. Therefore, we are interested in analysing what knowledge nurses had regarding these vital statistics during the 18th century, how they evaluated these statistics and what treatment they applied in order to maintain or balance them whenever they became unstable. A manual written by a nurse in the 18th century in order to aid her colleagues in their treatment of patients is the source of the authors' research material.

  4. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  5. Signs in Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of signs in Elizabeth George Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver," in which a settler youth and a young Indian learn to communicate by signs, and how the signs reveal much about each character's culture. Summarizes the plot elements of the book, including characters who are not as sympathetic to the Indian point of view.…

  6. Objective Local Vitality and Linguistic Networks as Predictors of Perceived Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincze, László; Harwood, Jake

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the relationship between objective ethnolinguistic vitality, individual networks of linguistic contacts (INLCs) and perceived vitality among German-speaking (N = 415) and Italian-speaking (N = 379) adolescents in South Tyrol, Italy. Supporting our hypothesis, we found that INLC has a greater effect on perceived…

  7. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  8. Sign Language Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  9. Signing in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  10. Warning Signs of Bullying

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide If you know someone in serious distress or danger, don’t ignore the problem. Get help right away . Back to top Signs a Child is Bullying Others Kids may be bullying others if they: ...

  11. Sign-away Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  12. The Vital Program: Transforming ICT Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Pete; Twining, Peter; Walsh, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Developing a model for effective large-scale continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers remains a significant obstacle for many governments worldwide. This article describes the development and evolution of Vital--a CPD program designed to enhance the teaching of information communication technology in state-funded primary and…

  13. Refereed Publications of Vital Business Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaszczynski, Carol; Scott, James Calvert; Green, Diana J.

    2009-01-01

    Problem: No systematic research has explored the refereed publications records of vital business educators. Data Collection Procedures: A total of 120 prominent business educators were mailed a survey about their publication practices and history, yielding a 61% usable return rate from 73 completed questionnaires. Results: The six research…

  14. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  15. The Impact of Zodiac Signs on Human Nature and Fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, Naira

    2015-07-01

    Horoscope signs have unavoidable impact on human behaviour and interests, health and even fate. Moreover, intermingled with the impact of planets they become a powerful force able to bring about unbelievable changes. The investigation reveals that horoscopes have existed in the Armenian reality since ancient times. The most striking fact about their eistence is that in order to have and use zodiak signs in one's national culture, the nation should first of all have sufficient knowledge in Astrological Sciences since the system of zodiak signs has a direct reference to the cognitive processes and scientific knowledge of the universe, astrological issues and sometimes even there is a hint on hidden signs and messages. Anania Shirakatsi, one of the learned Armenians, had to display much diplomacy with the Armenian Church and religion when discussing the topic in his manuscripts. His observations are still of much importance and vitality even today.

  16. Laboratory Turnaround Time

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Turnaround time (TAT) is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This review summarises the literature regarding laboratory TAT, focusing on the different definitions, measures, expectations, published data, associations with clinical outcomes and approaches to improve TAT. It aims to provide a consolidated source of benchmarking data useful to the laboratory in setting TAT goals and to encourage introduction of TAT monitoring for continuous quality improvement. A 90% completion time (sample registration to result reporting) of <60 minutes for common laboratory tests is suggested as an initial goal for acceptable TAT. PMID:18392122

  17. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  18. The Integral Sign Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith

    2007-07-01

    We will observe the unusual warped disk galaxy known as the Integral Sign Galaxy, UGC 3697, with a small two-position WFPC2 mosaic. Observations will be obtained in three broad band filters and the resulting image will be released on the 19th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on ~April 24, 2009. Multidrizzled mosaics will be made available through the archive.

  19. Hot and Cold Ethnicities: Modes of Ethnolinguistic Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the summary of the special issue of "JMMD" "Ethnolinguistic vitality". The volume shows convincingly that ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions as measured by standard methodology such as the Subjective Ethnolinguistic Vitality Questionnaires (SEVQ) are not reliable indicators of actual vitality. Evidence that ethnolinguistic…

  20. Vital nodes identification in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Chen, Duanbing; Ren, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Real networks exhibit heterogeneous nature with nodes playing far different roles in structure and function. To identify vital nodes is thus very significant, allowing us to control the outbreak of epidemics, to conduct advertisements for e-commercial products, to predict popular scientific publications, and so on. The vital nodes identification attracts increasing attentions from both computer science and physical societies, with algorithms ranging from simply counting the immediate neighbors to complicated machine learning and message passing approaches. In this review, we clarify the concepts and metrics, classify the problems and methods, as well as review the important progresses and describe the state of the art. Furthermore, we provide extensive empirical analyses to compare well-known methods on disparate real networks, and highlight the future directions. In spite of the emphasis on physics-rooted approaches, the unification of the language and comparison with cross-domain methods would trigger interdisciplinary solutions in the near future.

  1. Optical Sensor for Measuring American Lobster Vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  2. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-10

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  3. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

    2009-02-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

  4. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    PubMed Central

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  5. Sign Language Comprehension: The Case of Spanish Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Ortiz, I. R.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were…

  6. Sign of coma.

    PubMed

    Skjaerlund, J M

    1988-06-15

    The oblique focusing defect of spherical lenses, known as coma, is described by Seidel as the second of five correction terms (third order) to the Gauss theory. The concept is clear for a refracting surface that is free of spherical aberration; however, the impossibility of eliminating spherical aberration from a single lens with spherical surfaces can confuse the understanding of the second aberration, coma. A way of understanding the comatic effect even in the presence of spherical aberration is described. Confusion over the sign of coma, as indicated by mistakes in optics textbooks, is addressed. This paper suggests corrections to some interpretations of coma found in the literature.

  7. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  8. INFINITY construction contract signed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  9. Quine and the Segregrational Sign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, George

    1999-01-01

    In the context of theory of integrational linguistics, the segregational sign is distinguished from the integrational sign, and the operation of the former is analyzed. Focus is on how logic guides the sign, and how the theory of W. V. Quine accounts for these issues. (MSE)

  10. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  11. [Body temperature and its importance as a vital constant].

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ma Nelia Soto; García, José Ma; Fernández, Blanca Marín

    2009-09-01

    The authors carried out a theoretical review about body temperature as a decisive vital sign to maintain homeostasis. Emphasis needs be placed on the importance of maintaining a constant temperature within a range of 36.8 degrees C +/- 0.4 degrees C. After a brief review about thermoregulation mechanisms and thermal behavior in living organisms, the authors emphasize human beings' property as a homeo-thermal entity with characteristics which enable him to maintain a relatively constant body temperature in spite of physiological variations which make this temperature fluctuate. Upon evaluation this constant, we distinguish between relative values for superficial and central temperatures, detailing those mechanisms which influence the production or loss of heat that intervene to regulate body temperature by means of physioiogical responses to old and heat. Finally, the authors describe the necessity to maintain boy temperature following Virginia Henderson's fourteen necessities scale, once the factors which could modify it are kno wn in order to comprehend the meaning of measurements and their subsequent interpretation which leads to distinct Nursing diagnoses directed towards achieving independence in resolving this necessity.

  12. Activated barrier for protection of special nuclear materials in vital areas

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, R.E.; Miranda, J.E.; Reigle, D.L.; Valente, A.D.

    1984-07-15

    The Argonne National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory have recently installed an activated barrier, the Access Denial System (ADS) for the upgrade of safeguards of special nuclear materials. The technology of this system was developed in the late 70's by Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The installation was the first for the Department of Energy. Subsequently, two additional installations have been completed. The Access Denial System, combined with physical restraints, provide the system delay. The principal advantages of the activated barrier are: (1) it provides an order of magnitude improvement in delay over that of a fixed barrier, (2) it can be added to existing vital areas with a minimum of renovations, (3) existing operations are minimally impacted, and (4) health and safety risks are virtually nonexistent. Hardening of the vital areas using the ADS was accomplished in a cost-effective manner. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. [The Einstein sign].

    PubMed

    Treska, V

    2003-02-01

    Untreated rupture of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is fatal in almost 100% of the patients. In the majority of cases the assessment of a correct, early diagnosis is simple (hypotension, backache, abdominal pain, pulsating resistance in the abdomen) and makes a prompt surgical or endovascular operation possible. In some instances however rupture of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta simulates other clinical conditions (acute cholecystitis, acute diverculitis of the sigmoid) which may delay the correct diagnosis and reduce the patient's chance of survival. The author describes, based on historical documents, the treacherous course of the disease in the scientific genius Albert Einstein where rupture of an aneurysm simulated acute cholecystitis, and in the world literature this symptomatology was subsequently described as Einstein's sign.

  14. To Capture a Face: A Novel Technique for the Analysis and Quantification of Facial Expressions in American Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Kegl, Judy

    2006-01-01

    American Sign Language uses the face to express vital components of grammar in addition to the more universal expressions of emotion. The study of ASL facial expressions has focused mostly on the perception and categorization of various expression types by signing and nonsigning subjects. Only a few studies of the production of ASL facial…

  15. 36 CFR 1223.16 - How are vital records identified?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... financial rights of the Government and of the persons affected by its actions. Vital records also include... informational content of records series and electronic records systems determines which are vital records....

  16. Sign language comprehension: the case of Spanish sign language.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Ortiz, I R

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were interpreters). Sign language comprehension was assessed using passages of secondary level. After being exposed to the passages, the participants had to tell what they had understood about them, answer a set of related questions, and offer a title for the passage. Sign language comprehension by deaf participants was quite acceptable but not as good as that by hearing signers who, unlike deaf participants, were not only late learners of sign language as a second language but had also learned it through formal training.

  17. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/.

  18. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-9 Segregation of vital circuits. (a) General. A branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  19. The vital issues process: Strategic planning for a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Engi, D.; Glicken, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Vital Issues process (VIp) is a strategic planning tool initially developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Office of Foreign Intelligence (OFI)* of the US Department of Energy (DOE). It was further developed and refined through its application to a variety of strategic purposes for a range of public and semipublic organizations. The VIp provides a structured mechanism for assisting organizations in accomplishing specified objectives by identifying and prioritizing a portfolio of strategic issues, programmatic areas, or responses to a specified problem. It employs day-long panel meetings in a specified format to elicit a broad range of perspectives on a particular issue in a nonconfrontational manner and to facilitate the interaction and synthesis of diverse viewpoints on a specific topic. The VIp is unique in its incorporation of two primary approaches in each panel session: a qualitative or transactional segment, which entails the synthesis of the alternatives through negotiations or discussion, and a quantitative or net benefit maximization segment, an analytical approach, which involves prioritization of the alternatives using pairwise comparisons. This combination of facilitated group discussion and quantitative ranking provides input to strategic management decisions in the form of stakeholder-defined and -prioritized items as well as information on potential barriers to the implementation of policies and programs. This is the final volume in the series Identifying Vital Issues: New Intelligence Strategies for a New World, a three-volume set that gives an accounting of the VIp as implemented for OFI. This volume provides an in-depth description of the methodology used in the VIp.

  20. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign…

  1. Awareness of Deaf Sign Language and Gang Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cynthia; Morgan, Robert L.

    There have been increasing incidents of innocent people who use American Sign Language (ASL) or another form of sign language being victimized by gang violence due to misinterpretation of ASL hand formations. ASL is familiar to learners with a variety of disabilities, particularly those in the deaf community. The problem is that gang members have…

  2. Signs of Change: Contemporary Attitudes to Australian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slegers, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    This study explores contemporary attitudes to Australian Sign Language (Auslan). Since at least the 1960s, sign languages have been accepted by linguists as natural languages with all of the key ingredients common to spoken languages. However, these visual-spatial languages have historically been subject to ignorance and myth in Australia and…

  3. Incidence and clinical vital parameters in primary ketosis of Murrah buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankit; Sindhu, Neelesh; Kumar, Parmod; Kumar, Tarun; Charaya, Gaurav; Surbhi; Jain, V. K.; Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence and clinical vital parameters in cases of primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes brought to teaching veterinary clinical complex, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar and from adjoining villages of the district Hisar, Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The investigation was conducted on 24 clinical cases (out of total 145 screened) of primary ketosis. The diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of clinical signs and significantly positive two tests for ketone bodies in urine (Rothera’s and Keto-Diastix strip test). Data collected were statistically analyzed using independent Student’s t-test. Results: Overall incidence of disease in these areas was found to be 16.55% and all the animals were recently parturited (mean: 1.42±0.14 month), on an average in their third lactation (mean: 2.38±0.30) and exhibited clinical signs such as selective anorexia (refusal to feed on concentrate diet), drastic reduction in milk yield (mean: 64.4±5.35%), ketotic odor from urine, breath, and milk and rapid loss of body condition. All the clinical vital parameters in ketotic buffaloes (body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and rumen movements) were within normal range. Conclusion: Primary ketosis in Murrah buffaloes was the most common seen in the third lactation, within the first 2 months after parturition with characteristics clinical signs and no variability in vital parameters. The disease has severe effect on the production status of affected animal. PMID:27047203

  4. Utilization of the wastes of vital activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gusarov, B. G.; Drigo, Y. A.; Novikov, V. M.; Samsonov, N. M.; Farafonov, N. S.; Chizhov, S. V.; Yazdovskiy, V. I.

    1979-01-01

    The recycling of wastes from the biological complex for use in life-support systems is discussed. Topics include laboratory equipment, heat treatment of waste materials, mineralization of waste products, methods for production of ammonium hydroxide and nitric acid, the extraction of sodium chloride from mineralized products, and the recovery of nutrient substances for plants from urine.

  5. [Trace elements maintaining the vital functions].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yasuaki

    2016-07-01

    In a healthy condition, trace elements constituting the living body are regulated and maintained their balance of each other and their range of physiological optimum concentration in order to maintain the normal vital functions. When the optimum conditions of their balance and their homeostasis, however, are broken down by deficiency or excess of certain trace element, an excess accumulation or deficiency of specified element is induced and it follows that peculiar disease is caused according to function of each specified element. Generally, the disturbance of major elements such as O, C, H, N, Ca, P will induce a nutrition lesion and electrolytic abnormality, and the disturbance of 10 trace elements such as Fe, F, Si, Zn, Sr, Rb, Br, Pb, Mn, Cu being at ppm order and 14 ultra-trace elements such as Al, Cd, Sn, Ba, Hg, Se, I, Mo, Ni, B, Cr, As, Co, V being at ppb order will give rise to functional disorder of enzyme and physiological active substance in living body.

  6. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  7. NUHOMS{reg_sign} update

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, N.

    1995-12-31

    NUHOMS{reg_sign} is the dry spent fuel storage and transportation technology selected to date by the majority of commercial nuclear utilities. The author first gives a system overview of the NUHOMS{reg_sign}. Next she discusses the project status and licensing status. She closes with an update of the multi-purpose canister.

  8. The Typology of Literary Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Robert M.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the usefulness for literary studies of some of Pierce's key terms and concepts: icon, index, symbol, image, and diagram. Argues that Pierce's description of signs may be usefully applied to literary signs and particularly to the problem of symbolism. Charts. (RB)

  9. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…

  10. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  11. Speech Cues and Sign Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattingly, Ignatius G.

    Parallels between sign stimuli and speech cues suggest some interesting speculations about the origins of language. Speech cues may belong to the class of human sign stimuli which, as in animal behavior, may be the product of an innate releasing mechanism. Prelinguistic speech for man may have functioned as a social-releaser system. Human language…

  12. 3 CFR - Presidential Signing Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presidential Signing Statements Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 9, 2009 Presidential Signing Statements Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies For nearly two centuries, Presidents have issued statements addressing constitutional or...

  13. Arabic Sign Language: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Fattah, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Sign language in the Arab World has been recently recognized and documented. Many efforts have been made to establish the sign language used in individual countries, including Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and the Gulf States, by trying to standardize the language and spread it among members of the Deaf community and those concerned. Such efforts produced…

  14. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  15. Maintaining control is team's vital role.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Liz; Frankel, Chris; Johns, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    In an environment where there is an ever-increasing use of reliable electronic control, it is easy to become complacent about the need for in-depth knowledge of how the controls actually work. After all, experts who can diagnose and fix such systems are only a phone call away, and a new unit can easily be fitted. Sometimes this is not the case at Bendigo Health, as we have a number of systems with a "black box" set of controls that can take days, or weeks, to fix, and cannot be fixed locally. To better manage and maintain our infrastructure, the Buildings & Infrastructure Department at Bendigo Health includes a number of employees who concentrate on building management systems (BMS). The BMS group plays a vital role in the complete lifecycle of projects that include control and monitoring of the plant within the hospital setting. A good example of this role was in the design, build, installation and commissioning, of two new negative pressure suites at Bendigo Health. The BMS group's involvement in this particular project included the door interlocking, the air conditioning and exhaust fan control, and a comprehensive alarm panel and overrides, all of which can be monitored centrally via the existing BMS system. The involvement of the BMS group, following the DHS guidelines, resulted in the architect and consulting engineers revisiting their designs and improving them to the benefit of both patient care and staff safety. The advantages of projects such as the negative pressure suites installed by the BMS group include the fact that that the hospital gains facilities that work correctly and according to industry guidelines; and the design, installation, and controls of the plant are understood by the people who will be maintaining the infrastructure. This paper will provide an overview of the work undertaken by the BMS group at Bendigo Health, using the negative pressure suites as an exemplar.

  16. [Hemiplegia with two Babinski's sign].

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Montoya, María C; Camacho, John E; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Bayona, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Neurological signs and symptoms are very important to establish a correct neurological diagnosis. We present here a Colombian female patient, 60 years-old, who had ischaemic stroke in the left cerebral media artery. It produced right hemiplegia, motor aphasia, "central" facial palsy and atrophy of right platysma muscle. This latter finding, described originally by Joseph Babinski as "The Babinski Sign" was observed only two years and seven months after the ictus even when she had, previously, been evaluated by several neurologists. The underdiagnosis of clinical signs like the one described here may lead to erroneous diagnosis that will, ultimately, affect neurorehabilitation measures.

  17. [Skin signs in child abuse].

    PubMed

    Pau-Charles, I; Darwich-Soliva, E; Grimalt, R

    2012-03-01

    Child abuse is far more prevalent today than is generally recognized. Up to 90% of victims suffer physical abuse that can be observed in signs on the skin. Dermatologists are particularly qualified to identify these signs and distinguish them from other conditions that can mimic abuse. This review covers the signs of child abuse that can be observed on the skin. We discuss clues that can help differentiate between lesions caused by abuse and those that are accidental, and we describe the skin conditions that mimic physical abuse.

  18. Hush sign: a new clinical sign in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Bilir, Erhan; Erdem, Atilla; Gomceli, Yasemin B; Kurt, G Semiha; Serdaroglu, Ayse

    2005-05-01

    Neurologists have been analyzing the clinical behaviors that occur during seizures for many years. Several ictal behaviors have been defined in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal behaviors are especially important in the evaluation of epilepsy surgery candidates. We propose a new lateralizing sign in TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere-the "hush" sign. Our patients were 30- and 21-year old women (Cases 1 and 2, respectively). Their epileptogenic foci were localized to the right mesial temporal region after noninvasive presurgical investigations. Case 1 had no cranial MRI abnormality, whereas cranial MRI revealed right hippocampal atrophy in Case 2. These women repeatedly moved their right index fingers to their mouth while puckering their lips during complex partial seizures. We have named this ictal behavior the "hush" sign. Anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy was performed in both patients, and pathological examinations revealed hippocampal sclerosis. The "hush" sign no longer occurred after seizures were controlled. They were seizure free as of 30 and 31 months of follow-up, respectively. We believe that the "hush" sign may be supportive of a diagnosis of TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere. This sign may occur as a result of ictal activation of a specific brain region in this hemisphere.

  19. New Approaches in Vital Pulp Therapy in Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam; Parisay, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Vitality of dental pulp is essential for long-term tooth survival. The aim of vital pulp therapy is to maintain healthy pulp tissue by eliminating bacteria from the dentin-pulp complex. There are several different treatment options for vital pulp therapy in extensively decayed or traumatized teeth. Pulp capping or pulpotomy procedures rely upon an accurate assessment of the pulp status, and careful management of the remaining pulp tissue. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of new approaches in vital pulp therapy in permanent teeth. PMID:24396371

  20. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC Meetings ...

  1. Signs and Symptoms of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serology Publications and Resources Multimedia MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Signs & Symptoms of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  2. Sign Language Versus Spoken Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    1978-01-01

    In the debate over continuities versus discontinuities in the emergence of language, sign language is not taken to be the antithesis, but is presented as the antecedent of spoken languages. (Author/HP)

  3. Diagnosing Dementia--Positive Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  4. Postmortem sole incisions - a new sign of heroin overdose?

    PubMed

    Benomran, Fawzi

    2008-01-01

    Postmortem sole incisions have been observed in a number of heroin overdose fatalities. Acqueintance of those victims confessed to producing those incisions as a life saving procedure in a futile attempt to help the comatose overdose victim. They thought that bleeding the unconscious victim would remove the overdose, in manner similar to bloodletting or phlebotomy which is still popular in the Gulf region. The presence of such wounds has become a first indication or rather "sign" of heroin poisoning. In such cases, laboratory investigation confirmed the pathologist's preliminary suspicion. In Dubai, postmortem sole incisions are important sign of death from heroin overdose even in the absence of other classical signs. This sign becomes more credible when accompanied by other signs and/or circumstantial evidence suggestive of heroin use. It is suggested that this should be called "bloodletting sign" of death from heroin overdose. The sign should not be confused with the self-inflicted cuts seen on the arms and forearms of drug misusers which are caused for other reasons.

  5. xdamp: An IDL{reg_sign}-based Data Manipulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.

    1995-04-01

    The original DAMP (DAta Manipulation Program) was written by Mark Hedemann of Sandia National Laboratories and used the CA-DISSPLA{trademark} (available from Computer Associates International, Inc., Garden City, NY) graphics package as its engine. It was used to plot, modify, and otherwise manipulate the one-dimensional data waveforms (data vs time) from a wide variety of accelerators. With the waning of CA-DISSPLA and the increasing popularity of UNIX{reg_sign}-based workstations, a replacement was needed. This package uses the IDL{reg_sign} software, available from Research Systems Incorporated in Boulder, Colorado, as the engine, and creates a set of widgets to manipulate the data in a manner similar to the original DAMP. IDL is currently supported on a wide variety of UNIX platforms such as IBM{reg_sign} workstations, Hewlett Packard workstations, SUN{reg_sign} workstations, Microsoft{reg_sign} Windows{trademark} computers, Macintosh{reg_sign} computers and Digital Equipment Corporation VMS{reg_sign} systems. Thus, this program should be portable across many platforms. We have verified operation, albeit with some IDL bugs, on IBM UNIX platforms, DEC Alpha systems, HP 9000/7OO series workstations, and Macintosh computers, both regular and PowerPC{trademark} versions.

  6. Faculty Vitality and Institutional Productivity: Critical Perspectives for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shirley M., Ed.; Lewis, Darrell R., Ed.

    Issues concerning faculty career vitality, including institutional policy options and demographic and external pressures, are addressed in 12 chapters. In the first chapter, Shirley M. Clark, Carol M. Boyer, and Mary Corcoran review theoretical and conceptual issues concerning institutional and faculty vitality. The following chapters and authors…

  7. Workforce and Economic Vitality Issue Paper. Aging Initiative: Project 2030.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Human Services, St. Paul.

    A public policy study in Minnesota, conducted as part of Project 2030, looked at the impacts of the aging of the baby boom generation on the work force and the economic vitality of the state by the year 2030. The study found the following general trends affecting the work force and economic vitality and noted the relation of each to the aging…

  8. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  9. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  10. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  11. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  12. 22 CFR 92.80 - Obtaining American vital statistics records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obtaining American vital statistics records. 92... statistics records. Individuals who inquire as to means of obtaining copies of or extracts from American... Vital Statistics Office at the place where the record is kept, which is usually in the capital city...

  13. Evidence of a Housing Decision Chain in Rural Community Vitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Christine C.; Crull, Sue R.; Bruin, Marilyn J.; Yust, Becky L.; Shelley, Mack C.; Laux, Sharon; Memken, Jean; Niemeyer, Shirley; White, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and explain the role housing plays in rural community vitality. Community vitality refers to economic strength and social well-being. In spring 2002 we collected primary interview data from informants in 134 small rural communities in nine north-central states and identified related secondary data from…

  14. An Expanded Model of Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dankoski, Mary E.; Palmer, Megan M.; Laird, Thomas F. Nelson; Ribera, Amy K.; Bogdewic, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Many faculty in today's academic medical centers face high levels of stress and low career satisfaction. Understanding faculty vitality is critically important for the health of our academic medical centers, yet the concept is ill-defined and lacking a comprehensive model. Expanding on previous research that examines vital faculty in higher…

  15. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-9 Segregation of vital circuits. (a) General....

  16. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-9 Segregation of vital circuits. (a) General....

  17. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  18. Mars Analytical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagati, M. Gawad; Ale-Ibrahaim, Kordi; Bins, Llonda; Davis, Michael; Gamalo, Johnny; Johnson, Matt; May, Neal; Seneviratne, Waruna; Yurko, Aric; Yurko, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    As mankind continues to explore the solar system, planetary colonization may become an important goal. Permanently manned space stations, bases on the moon, and colonization of Mars will be important steps in this exploration. The colonization and exploration of Mars will be a particular challenge. As mankind one day attempts this colonization, knowledge of the Martian environment and human capacity to live there will become vitally important. The first scientific outposts on Mars will need research laboratories to make discoveries about how we can better live there and use the natural resources of the planet to sustain human life. The design of a laboratory for an existing Martian base is the purpose of this project. A laboratory on Mars would be very useful to the scientists we send.

  19. Reflexology: its effects on physiological anxiety signs and sedation needs.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Khorshid, Leyla; Uyar, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether reflexology has an effect on the physiological signs of anxiety and level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support, a single blinded, randomized controlled design with repeated measures was used in the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey. Patients (n = 60) aged between 18 and 70 years and were hospitalized in the intensive care unit and receiving mechanically ventilated support. Participants were randomized to a control group or an intervention group. The latter received 30 minutes of reflexology therapy on their feet, hands, and ears for 5 days. Subjects had vital signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes of the intervention. In the collection of the data, "American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale" was used. The reflexology therapy group had a significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate than the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the averages of the scores that the patients included in the experimental and control groups received from the agitation, anxiety, sleep, and patient-ventilator synchrony subscales of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale. Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  20. What Are the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contents It's important to know the signs of Alzheimer's disease. If you know the signs, you can get help right away. Some signs of the disease are listed here: Diagnosis Doctors now have several methods and tools to ...

  1. Photonics approach to traffic signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, Dariusz; Galas, Jacek; CzyŻewski, Adam; Rymsza, Barbara; Kornalewski, Leszek; Kryszczyński, Tadeusz; Mikucki, Jerzy; Wikliński, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Marek; Malasek, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    The automotive industry has been always a driving force for all economies. Despite of its beneficial meaning to every society it brings also many issues including wide area of road safety. The latter has been enforced by the increasing number of cars and the dynamic development of the traffic as a whole. Road signs and traffic lights are crucial in context of good traffic arrangement and its fluency. Traffic designers are used to treat horizontal road signs independently of vertical signs. However, modern light sources and growing flexibility in shaping optical systems create opportunity to design more advanced and smart solutions. In this paper we present an innovative, multidisciplinary approach that consists in tight interdependence of different traffic signals. We describe new optical systems together with their influence on the perception of the road user. The analysis includes maintenance and visibility in different weather conditions. A special attention has been focused on intersections of complex geometry.

  2. Ivy Sign in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Saglam, Muzaffer; Yildiz, Bulent; Anagnostakou, Vania; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic disease characterized by the progressive stenosis and collateral development of the distal internal carotid arteries. In this disease, several collateral vascular structures develop following stenosis and occlusion. The ivy sign is a characteristic Magnetic rezonance imaging (MRI) finding frequently encountered in patients with moyamoya. It can be observed both in post contrast T1-weighted images and Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. While this sign manifests in the form of contrasting on the cortical surfaces due to the formation of leptomeningeal collateral development and increased numbers of pial vascular webs on post contrast images, in FLAIR images it originates from the slow arterial flow in the leptomeningeal collateral vascular structures. In this case, we presented the Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) signs of moyamoya disease and “ivy sign” in MRI and its development mechanism in a 16 years old female patient. PMID:27026766

  3. Real-Time Detection and Tracking of Vital Signs with an Ambulatory Subject Using Millimeter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelson, Ilya V.

    Finding a subject's heart rate from a distance without any contact is a difficult and very practical problem. This kind of technology would allow more comfortable patient monitoring in hospitals or in home settings. It would also allow another level of security screening, as a person's heart rate increases in stressful situations, such as when lying or hiding malicious intent. In addition, the fact that the heart rate is obtained remotely means that the subject would not have to know he/she is being monitored at all, adding to the efficacy of the measurement. Using millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal can be obtained that contains composite chest wall motion made up of component motions due to cardiac activity, respiration, and interference. To be of use, these components have to be separated from each other by signal processing. To do this, the quadrature and in-phase components of the received signal are analyzed to get a displacement waveform. After that, processing can be done on that waveform in either the time or frequency domains to find the individual heartbeats. The first method is to find the power spectrum of the displacement waveform and to look for peaks corresponding to heartbeats and respiration. Another approach is to examine the signal in the time domain using wavelets for multiresolution analysis. One more method involves studying the statistics of the wavelet-processed signal. The final method uses a heartbeat model along with probabilistic processing to find heartbeats. For any of the above methods to work, the millimeter-wave sensor has to be accurately pointed at the subject's chest. However, even small subject motions can render the rest of the gathered data useless as the antenna may have lost its aim. To combat this, a color and a depth camera are used with a servo-pan/tilt base. My program finds a face in the image and subsequently tracks that face through upcoming frames. The pan/tilt base adjusts the aim of the antenna depending on the subject's position. This makes the entire system self-aiming and also allows the subject to move to a new location and to have data acquisition continue.

  4. A vital signs telemonitoring system - interoperability supported by a personal health record systema and a cloud service.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Miguel F; Cajiao, Alejandro; Hidalgo, José A; Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Quintero, Víctor M; Rendón, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the development process of an acquisition and data storage system managing clinical variables through a cloud storage service and a Personal Health Record (PHR) System. First, the paper explains how a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) that captures data from two sensors corresponding to arterial pressure and heart rate is designed. Second, this paper illustrates how data collected by the WBAN are transmitted to a cloud storage service. It is worth mentioning that this cloud service allows the data to be stored in a persistent way on an online database system. Finally, the paper describes, how the data stored in the cloud service are sent to the Indivo PHR System, where they are registered and charted for future revision by health professionals. The research demonstrated the feasibility of implementing WBAN networks for the acquisition of clinical data, and particularly for the use of Web technologies and standards to provide interoperability with PHR Systems at technical and syntactic levels.

  5. Evaluation of Noninvasive Measurement Methods and Systems for Application in Vital Signs Detection. Part 1. Literature Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    values was found in patients with heart disease [13]. This finding was especially true in tle case of valvular incompetence [13,14]. If this is the...argued strongly against the theory that the larynx was the origin of respiratory sounds.* Based on Martini and Muller’s observations (23], Fahr [131...variations happen even with normal people without any diseases of the lung. They suggested that the *’ site of production of the sound and its

  6. Ecological thresholds as a basis for defining management triggers for National Park Service vital signs: case studies for dryland ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Miller, Mark E.; Belote, R. Travis; Garman, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Threshold concepts are used in research and management of ecological systems to describe and interpret abrupt and persistent reorganization of ecosystem properties (Walker and Meyers, 2004; Groffman and others, 2006). Abrupt change, referred to as a threshold crossing, and the progression of reorganization can be triggered by one or more interactive disturbances such as land-use activities and climatic events (Paine and others, 1998). Threshold crossings occur when feedback mechanisms that typically absorb forces of change are replaced with those that promote development of alternative equilibria or states (Suding and others, 2004; Walker and Meyers, 2004; Briske and others, 2008). The alternative states that emerge from a threshold crossing vary and often exhibit reduced ecological integrity and value in terms of management goals relative to the original or reference system. Alternative stable states with some limited residual properties of the original system may develop along the progression after a crossing; an eventual outcome may be the complete loss of pre-threshold properties of the original ecosystem. Reverting to the more desirable reference state through ecological restoration becomes increasingly difficult and expensive along the progression gradient and may eventually become impossible. Ecological threshold concepts have been applied as a heuristic framework and to aid in the management of rangelands (Bestelmeyer, 2006; Briske and others, 2006, 2008), aquatic (Scheffer and others, 1993; Rapport and Whitford 1999), riparian (Stringham and others, 2001; Scott and others, 2005), and forested ecosystems (Allen and others, 2002; Digiovinazzo and others, 2010). These concepts are also topical in ecological restoration (Hobbs and Norton 1996; Whisenant 1999; Suding and others, 2004; King and Hobbs, 2006) and ecosystem sustainability (Herrick, 2000; Chapin and others, 1996; Davenport and others, 1998). Achieving conservation management goals requires the protection of resources within the range of desired conditions (Cook and others, 2010). The goal of conservation management for natural resources in the U.S. National Park System is to maintain native species and habitat unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. Achieving this goal requires, in part, early detection of system change and timely implementation of remediation. The recent National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program (NPS I&M) was established to provide early warning of declining ecosystem conditions relative to a desired native or reference system (Fancy and others, 2009). To be an effective tool for resource protection, monitoring must be designed to alert managers of impending thresholds so that preventive actions can be taken. This requires an understanding of the ecosystem attributes and processes associated with threshold-type behavior; how these attributes and processes become degraded; and how risks of degradation vary among ecosystems and in relation to environmental factors such as soil properties, climatic conditions, and exposure to stressors. In general, the utility of the threshold concept for long-term monitoring depends on the ability of scientists and managers to detect, predict, and prevent the occurrence of threshold crossings associated with persistent, undesirable shifts among ecosystem states (Briske and others, 2006). Because of the scientific challenges associated with understanding these factors, the application of threshold concepts to monitoring designs has been very limited to date (Groffman and others, 2006). As a case in point, the monitoring efforts across the 32 NPS I&M networks were largely designed with the knowledge that they would not be used to their full potential until the development of a systematic method for understanding threshold dynamics and methods for estimating key attributes of threshold crossings. This report describes and demonstrates a generalized approach that we implemented to formalize understanding and estimating of threshold dynamics for terrestrial dryland ecosystems in national parks of the Colorado Plateau. We provide a structured approach to identify and describe degradation processes associated with threshold behavior and to estimate indicator levels that characterize the point at which a threshold crossing has occurred or is imminent (tipping points) or points where investigative or preventive management action should be triggered (assessment points). We illustrate this method for several case studies in national parks included in the Northern and Southern Colorado Plateau NPS I&M networks, where historical livestock grazing, climatic change, and invasive species are key agents of change. The approaches developed in these case studies are intended to enhance the design, effectiveness, and management-relevance of monitoring efforts in support of conservation management in dryland systems. They specifically enhance National Park Service (NPS) capacity for protecting park resources on the Colorado Plateau but have applicability to monitoring and conservation management of dryland ecosystems worldwide.

  7. The Association Between Vital Signs and Major Hemorrhagic Injury is Significantly Improved After Controlling for Sources of Measurement Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    blood volume (laceration or fracture of a solid organ, thoracic or abdominal hematoma , vascular injury that required operative repair, or limb amputation...a 60% PPV; see Fig. 1). Patient 2 had a grade III liver laceration; a fractured , disrupted pelvis; and a femur fracture and received 3 U of RBC. Thin

  8. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs to Identify Patients with Substantial Bleeding before Hospital Arrival: A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    activating the cardiac catheterization team when the prehospital ECG shows ST-elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with chest pain illustrates...this article is prohibited. to reduce door-to-balloon times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocar- dial infarction undergoing primary

  9. Waist circumference as a vital sign in cardiology 20 years after its initial publication in the American Journal of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-15

    In 1994, we reported in The American Journal of Cardiology that a simple anthropometric measurement, waist circumference, was related to the amount of abdominal visceral adipose tissue measured by computed tomography. An elevated waist circumference was also found to be associated with several features of the cardiometabolic risk profile such as glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and an atherogenic dyslipidemic profile that included hypertriglyceridemia and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Although a linear relation was found between waist circumference and these metabolic alterations, we reported that a waist circumference value of about 100 cm was associated with a high probability of finding diabetogenic and atherogenic abnormalities. The present short report provides a brief update of issues that have been raised regarding the measurement of waist circumference and its clinical use over a period of 20 years since the original publication.

  10. Spectrum-averaged Harmonic Path (SHAPA) algorithm for non-contact vital sign monitoring with ultra-wideband (UWB) radar.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen; Javaid, Abdul Q; Weitnauer, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Spectrum-averaged Harmonic Path (SHAPA) algorithm for estimation of heart rate (HR) and respiration rate (RR) with Impulse Radio Ultrawideband (IR-UWB) radar. Periodic movement of human torso caused by respiration and heart beat induces fundamental frequencies and their harmonics at the respiration and heart rates. IR-UWB enables capture of these spectral components and frequency domain processing enables a low cost implementation. Most existing methods of identifying the fundamental component either in frequency or time domain to estimate the HR and/or RR lead to significant error if the fundamental is distorted or cancelled by interference. The SHAPA algorithm (1) takes advantage of the HR harmonics, where there is less interference, and (2) exploits the information in previous spectra to achieve more reliable and robust estimation of the fundamental frequency in the spectrum under consideration. Example experimental results for HR estimation demonstrate how our algorithm eliminates errors caused by interference and produces 16% to 60% more valid estimates.

  11. Emergency Medical Service and In-Hospital Vital Signs as Predictors of Subsequent PTSD Symptom Severity in Pediatric Injury Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nugent, Nicole R.; Christopher, Norman C.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The present study investigated the extent to which heart rate (HR) levels soon after a traumatic event predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity assessed 6 weeks and 6 months later in child trauma victims. Methods: Participants consisted of 82 children (56 boys, 26 girls) aged 8-18 who were admitted to a…

  12. Standard circumstances and vital goals: comments on Venkatapuram's critique.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Lennart

    2013-06-01

    This article is a reply to Venkatapuram's critique in his article Health, Vital Goals, Capabilities, this volume. I take issue mainly with three critical points put forward by Venkatapuram with regard to my theory of health. (1) I deny that the contents of my vital goals are relative to each community or context, as Venkatapuram claims. There is no conceptual connection at all between standard circumstances and vital goals, as I understand these concepts. (2) Venkatapuram notes that I stop short of filling the framework of vital goals with any content and thereby make my concept of health less concrete. I reply that some vital goals are indeed universal, viz. the ones which are necessary conditions for survival. Many other vital goals are individual and cannot therefore be included in a universal list. (3) Venkatapuram claims that my definition of vital goals is too broad, since it entails that some persons without any disease can be regarded as ill. However, in my understanding health is a relational concept from a state of complete health to a state of maximal illness. In this framework, a minor reduction of a state of complete health does not entail illness. This article also contains a comparison between my theory of health and Martha Nussbaum's theory of capabilities for dignity.

  13. Astrological birth signs in suicide: hypothesis or speculation?

    PubMed

    Salib, Emad

    2003-04-01

    Astrology is no longer regarded as a science by many, because its claims are almost impossible to test empirically in controlled laboratory conditions and it can not meet the scientific need to be reproducible. However, the majority of those who read their 'star signs' can identify aspects of their personality in what they read and it is possible that this may influence their attitudes and actions. The literature has neglected astrological signs as a possible predictor of suicide ideation. To see whether astrological birth signs are associated with suicide and the method used, data was collected from the Public Health Department in North Cheshire representing all the Cheshire Coroner's verdicts of suicide, and open verdicts, in all deceased aged 60 and above between 1989 and 2000. The observed occurrence of deaths due to natural causes, and suicide, in relation to birth signs did not differ significantly from what would be expected from chance. However, the distribution of suicide by hanging appeared significantly higher in those with a birth sign of Virgo and lowest in Sagittarius and Scorpio. The distribution of violent and non-violent suicides in relation to star signs showed higher occurences of violent death in persons born in the summer months.

  14. IET control building (TAN620). interior room. sign says, "emergency equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). interior room. sign says, "emergency equipment for metal fires." INEEL negative no. HD-21-1-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  16. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  17. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  18. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  19. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  20. Carcinogen Control in the Chemical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents general and specific guidelines for handling carcinogens. Additional topics include: definition of potential occupational carcinogens; classification of carcinogens; inventory requirements; signs and labels for materials and laboratories; decontamination and disposal procedures; medical surveillance for employees working with controlled…

  1. Sign Language Interpreter Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) in order to evaluate the need for a proposed Sign Language Interpreter program. OCC's study focused on validating and updating findings from a similar research project begun in fall 1989 by Macomb Community College (MCC) in Warren, Michigan. Federal and state legislation, data from…

  2. NEW APPROACHES: Questions of sign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, G.

    1998-07-01

    Positive and negative signs are frequently misapplied. In textbooks, the subject of their correct use is often ignored. This might not be because the subject is trivial. Misuse in those same books suggests it might be because authors are unaware of some basic rules.

  3. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Warning Signs of Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 By themselves, any one ... faster. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  4. The Sociolinguistics of Sign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ceil, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines how sign languages are distributed around the world; what occurs when they come in contact with spoken and written languages, and how signers use them in a variety of situations. Each chapter introduces the key issues in a particular area of inquiry and provides a comprehensive review of the literature. The seven…

  5. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  6. Moral Vitalism: Seeing Good and Evil as Real, Agentic Forces.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Brock; Bain, Paul; Buhrmester, Michael D; Gómez, Ángel; Vázquez, Alexandra; Knight, Clinton G; Swann, William B

    2015-08-01

    Moral vitalism refers to a tendency to view good and evil as actual forces that can influence people and events. We introduce a scale designed to assess the belief in moral vitalism. High scorers on the scale endorse items such as "There are underlying forces of good and evil in this world." After establishing the reliability and criterion validity of the scale (Studies 1, 2a, and 2b), we examined the predictive validity of the moral vitalism scale, showing that "moral vitalists" worry about being possessed by evil (Study 3), being contaminated through contact with evil people (Study 4), and forfeiting their own mental purity (Study 5). We discuss the nature of moral vitalism and the implications of the construct for understanding the role of metaphysical lay theories about the nature of good and evil in moral reasoning.

  7. Bioceramic Materials and the Changing Concepts in Vital Pulp Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yangpei; Bogen, George; Lim, Jung; Shon, Won-Jun; Kang, Mo K

    2016-05-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is devised to preserve and maintain vitality of pulpally involved teeth challenged by a variety of intraoral conditions. Notable progress has been made in this field due to a better understanding of pulp physiology, improved clinical protocols and advanced bioceramic materials paired with adhesive technology. With focused case selection, conservative VPT can provide reliable treatment options for permanent teeth diagnosed with normal pulps or reversible pulpitis.

  8. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  9. Lexical Borrowing in American Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battison, Robbin

    This book is written primarily for those studying linguistic topics in the area of sign language, but also can be useful to sign language teachers who want to understand more about American Sign Language (ASL). Pen-and-ink illustrations allow the reader with no knowledge of sign language to follow the discussion. The hypothesis examined in this…

  10. Eye Gaze in Creative Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Michiko; Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of eye gaze in creative sign language. Because eye gaze conveys various types of linguistic and poetic information, it is an intrinsic part of sign language linguistics in general and of creative signing in particular. We discuss various functions of eye gaze in poetic signing and propose a classification of gaze…

  11. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  12. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  13. 13 CFR 305.12 - Project sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Project sign. 305.12 Section 305... WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.12 Project sign. The... the construction period of a sign or signs at a conspicuous place at the Project site indicating...

  14. Tactile Signing with One-Handed Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesch, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Tactile signing among persons with deaf-blindness is not homogenous; rather, like other forms of language, it exhibits variation, especially in turn taking. Early analyses of tactile Swedish Sign Language, tactile Norwegian Sign Language, and tactile French Sign Language focused on tactile communication with four hands, in which partially blind or…

  15. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning sign. 154.1830 Section 154.1830 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1830 Warning sign. (a) The master... a warning sign: (1) At the gangway facing the shore so that the sign may be seen from the shore;...

  17. Numeral Incorporation in Japanese Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktejik, Mish

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the morphological process of numeral incorporation in Japanese Sign Language. Numeral incorporation is defined and the available research on numeral incorporation in signed language is discussed. The numeral signs in Japanese Sign Language are then introduced and followed by an explanation of the numeral morphemes which are…

  18. In health--vital capacity is maximum in supine position.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Pramanik, T; Prajapati, R; Pandit, R; Singh, S

    2011-06-01

    Vital capacity, frequently measured clinically as an index of pulmonary function, gives useful information about the strength of respiratory muscles and other aspects of lung functions. It is generally noted in sitting position. As in the supine position, respiratory excursions of diaphragm is highest in normal breathing, this study was planned to note whether there occurred any alteration in vital capacity in supine position in comparison to that noted in sitting position. Young sedentary non smoker healthy medial students (n = 100, age 19-22 years) of Nepal Medical College participated as volunteers in this study. Body mass index (BMI) of each of them was calculated. Vital capacity was noted in sitting position and in supine position with the help of a spirometer, following the standard procedure. Result exhibited greater vital capacity in supine posture than in sitting position in the same individual. Diaphragm is the major muscle of inspiration, responsible for some two-thirds of the vital capacity. Naturally, in supine posture the scope of diaphragmatic movements increased and as a result, vital capacity exhibited greater value in comparison to that recorded in sitting posture.

  19. The "guitar pick" sign: a novel sign of retrobulbar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jonathan; Sanz, Geoffrey E; Matero, David; Guth, Todd; Erickson, Catherine; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2011-05-01

    Retrobulbar hemorrhage is a rare complication of blunt ocular trauma. Without prompt intervention, permanent reduction in visual acuity can develop in as little as 90 minutes. We report a novel bedside ultrasound finding of conical deformation of the posterior ocular globe: the "guitar pick" sign. In our elderly patient, the ocular globe shape normalized post-lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis. Identifying this sonographic finding may add to the clinical examination when deciding whether to perform decompression.

  20. Old Signs, New Signs, Whose Signs? Sociolinguistic Variation in the NZSL Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rachel; McKee, David

    2011-01-01

    Lexicographers, teachers and interpreters of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) are challenged by the degree of lexical variation that exists in this young language. For instance, most numerals between one and twenty have two or more variants in common use (McKee, McKee, and Major 2008), a situation that contrasts with most established spoken…

  1. Differential diagnosis of leukocoria and strabismus, first presenting signs of retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Balmer, Aubin; Munier, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Leukocoria in infants is always a danger signal as retinoblastoma, a malignant retinal tumor, is responsible for half of the cases in this age group. More common signs should also be considered suspicious until proved otherwise, such as strabismus, the second most frequent sign of retinoblastoma. Less frequent manifestations are inflammatory conditions resistant to treatment, hypopyon, orbital cellulitis, hyphema or heterochromia. Other causal pathologies, including persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), Coats’ disease, ocular toxocariasis or retinopathy of prematurity, may also manifest the same warning signs and require specialized differential diagnosis. Members of the immediate family circle are most likely to notice the first signs, the general practitioner, pediatrician or general ophthalmologist the first to be consulted. On their attitude will depend the final outcome of this vision and life-threatening disease. Early diagnosis is vital. PMID:19668520

  2. NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  3. [The vitalism of Paul-Joseph Barthez (1734-1806)].

    PubMed

    Han, Hee Jin

    2010-06-30

    In The Logic of Life (1970), Francois Jacob (1920- ), Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1965), proclaimed the end of vitalism based on the concept of life. More than two decades before this capital sentence condemning vitalism was pronounced, Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995), a French philosopher of medicine, already acknowledged that eighteenth-century vitalism was scientifically retrograde and politically reactionary or counter-revolutionary insofar as it was rooted in the animism of Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734). The negative preconception of the term 'vitalism' came to be established as an orthodox view, since Claude Bernard (1813-1878) unfairly criticized contemporary vitalism in order to propagate his idea of experimental medicine. An eminent evolutionary biologist like Ernst Mayr (1904-2005) still defended similar views in This is Biology (1997), arguing that if vitalists were decisive and convincing in their rejection of the Cartesian model (negative heuristics), however they were equally indecisive and unconvincing in their own explanatory endeavors (positive heuristics). Historically speaking, vitalists came to the forefront for their outstanding criticism of Cartesian mechanism and physicochemical reductionism, while their innovative concepts and theories were underestimated and received much less attention. Is it true that vitalism was merely a pseudo-science, representing a kind of romanticism or mysticism in biomedical science? Did vitalists lack any positive heuristics in their biomedical research? Above all, what was actually the so.called 'vitalism'? This paper aims to reveal the positive heuristics of vitalism defined by Paul.Joseph Barthez (1734-1806) who was the founder of the vitalist school of Montpellier. To this end, his work and idea are introduced with regard to the vying doctrines in physiology and medicine. At the moment when he taught at the medical school of Montpellier, his colleagues advocated the mechanism of Rene

  4. The pivotal sign of CANVAS.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jens Alexander; Wichmann, Werner W; Weber, Konrad Peter

    2013-10-29

    A 75-year-old woman complained about insecure gait since age 55. Clinical examination revealed signs of cerebellar ataxia, bilateral vestibulopathy, and peripheral sensory impairment. Sensory nerve action potentials were absent. The visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) was impaired (video on the Neurology(®) Web site at www.neurology.org, figure 1) and the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia (figure 2) with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) was made.(1) CANVAS is considered to be a recessive disorder with a mean age at onset of 60 years.(2) VVOR impairment is its characteristic clinical sign.(2) It can only be elicited if both smooth-pursuit eye movements and the vestibulo-ocular reflex are deficient. Normally, both are redundant at low head velocities.(2.)

  5. Correcting vital information: estimating infant mortality, Brazil, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    de Frias, Paulo Germano; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a simplified method of correcting vital information and estimating the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil. METHODS Vital data in the information systems on mortality and live births were corrected using correction factors, estimated based on events not reported to the Brazilian Ministry of Health and obtained by active search. This simplified method for correcting vital information for the period 2000-2009 for Brazil and its federal units establishes the level of adequacy of information on deaths and live births by calculating the overall coefficient of mortality standardized by age and the ratio between reported and expected live births, respectively, in each Brazilian municipality. By applying correction factors to the number of deaths and live births reported in each county, the vital statistics were corrected, making it possible to estimate the coefficient of infant mortality. RESULTS The highest correction factors were related to infant deaths, reaching values higher than 7 for municipalities with very precarious mortality information. For deaths and live births, the correction factors exhibit a decreasing gradient as indicators of adequacy of the vital information improve. For the year 2008, the vital information corrected by the simplified method per state were similar to those obtained in the research of active search. Both the birth rate and the infant mortality rate decreased in the period in all Brazilian regions. In the Northeast, the annual rate of decline was 6.0%, the highest in Brazil (4.7%). CONCLUSIONS The active search of deaths and births allowed correction factors to be calculated by level of adequacy of mortality information and live births. The simplified method proposed here allowed vital information to be corrected per state for the period 2000-2009 and the progress of the coefficient of infant mortality in Brazil, its regions and states to be assessed. PMID:24626543

  6. CERN single sign on solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormancey, E.

    2008-07-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his Active Directory group membership can be checked before allowing access to a specific web page.

  7. School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Patricia; Palassis, John

    2006-01-01

    The guide presents information about ordering, using, storing, and maintaining chemicals in the high school laboratory. The guide also provides information about chemical waste, safety and emergency equipment, assessing chemical hazards, common safety symbols and signs, and fundamental resources relating to chemical safety, such as Material…

  8. Enhancing early communication through infant sign training.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rachel H; Cotnoir-Bichelman, Nicole M; McKerchar, Paige M; Tate, Trista L; Dancho, Kelly A

    2007-01-01

    Existing research suggests that there may be benefits to teaching signing to hearing infants who have not yet developed vocal communication. In the current study, each of 4 infants ranging in age from 6 to 10 months was taught a simple sign using delayed prompting and reinforcement. In addition, Experiment 1 showed that 2 children independently signed in a variety of novel stimulus conditions (e.g., in a classroom, with father) after participating in sign training under controlled experimental conditions. In Experiment 2, crying and whining were replaced with signing when sign training was implemented in combination with extinction.

  9. Duelling Ontologies: Might Vitalism Offer Balance and Value?

    PubMed

    Richards, Dennis; Emmanuel, Elizabeth; Grace, Sandra

    2016-12-16

    This article is part of a project investigating chiropractors' beliefs on the role of vitalism in their philosophical and practice approaches and how that might contribute to addressing current epidemics of non-communicable diseases. It aims to present atomism, reductionism, materialism and mechanism as fundamental ontologies in biomedicine and to examine what role these might play in its struggle to deal with these epidemics; to present vitalism as a fundamental ontology existing in chiropractic along with these ontologies of biomedicine; and to discuss how imbalances in the use of these ontologies and practices stemming from them might be contributing to difficulties in addressing these epidemics. The use of more balanced approaches by chiropractors involving not only mechanistic biomedical ontologies but also an increased focus on vitalism might offer value in addressing these epidemics and should be investigated.

  10. Helpful Self-Control: Autonomy Support, Vitality, and Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Muraven, Mark; Gagné, Marylène; Rosman, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Why someone exerts self-control may influence how depleting a task is. Feeling compelled to exert self-control require more self-control strength than exerting self-control for more autonomous reasons. Across three experiments, individuals whose autonomy was supported while exerting self-control performed better on a subsequent test of self-control as compared to individuals who had more pressure placed upon them while exerting self-control. The differences in self-control performance were not due to anxiety, stress, unpleasantness, or reduced motivation among the controlled participants. Additional analyses suggested that the decline in self-control performance was mediated by subjective vitality. Feelings of autonomy support lead to enhanced feelings of subjective vitality. This increased vitality may help replenish lost ego-strength, which lead to better self-control performance subsequently. PMID:18496610

  11. A Review on Vital Pulp Therapy in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Parisay, Iman; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining deciduous teeth in function until their natural exfoliation is absolutely necessary. Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is a way of saving deciduous teeth. The most important factors in success of VPT are the early diagnosis of pulp and periradicular status, preservation of the pulp vitality and proper vascularization of the pulp. Development of new biomaterials with suitable biocompatibility and seal has changed the attitudes towards preserving the reversible pulp in cariously exposed teeth. Before exposure and irreversible involvement of the pulp, indirect pulp capping (IPC) is the treatment of choice, but after the spread of inflammation within the pulp chamber and establishment of irreversible pulpitis, removal of inflamed pulp tissue is recommended. In this review, new concepts in preservation of the healthy pulp tissue in deciduous teeth and induction of the reparative dentin formation with new biomaterials instead of devitalization and the consequent destruction of vital tissues are discussed. PMID:25598803

  12. A review on vital pulp therapy in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Parisay, Iman; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Forghani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining deciduous teeth in function until their natural exfoliation is absolutely necessary. Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is a way of saving deciduous teeth. The most important factors in success of VPT are the early diagnosis of pulp and periradicular status, preservation of the pulp vitality and proper vascularization of the pulp. Development of new biomaterials with suitable biocompatibility and seal has changed the attitudes towards preserving the reversible pulp in cariously exposed teeth. Before exposure and irreversible involvement of the pulp, indirect pulp capping (IPC) is the treatment of choice, but after the spread of inflammation within the pulp chamber and establishment of irreversible pulpitis, removal of inflamed pulp tissue is recommended. In this review, new concepts in preservation of the healthy pulp tissue in deciduous teeth and induction of the reparative dentin formation with new biomaterials instead of devitalization and the consequent destruction of vital tissues are discussed.

  13. Rapid assessment of Malawi's civil registration and vital statistics system.

    PubMed

    Nichols, E K; Giles, D; Kang'oma, S; Mwalwanda, L; Onaka, A; Notzon, F

    2015-09-21

    In 2010, Malawi adopted a National Registration Act, making the registration of births and deaths compulsory, and efforts to improve Malawi's civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) system are underway. During a participatory-style workshop, stakeholders completed a rapid assessment of the national civil registration and vital statistics systems. While participants discussed and scored each item in a standard tool, the workshop focused on sharing of partners' roles and challenges. The workshop has enhanced receptiveness in collaboration, and an inter-ministerial technical working group has now been formed to develop a strategic plan and conduct a comprehensive assessment to guide future improvements.

  14. Rapid assessment of Malawi's civil registration and vital statistics system

    PubMed Central

    Giles, D.; Kang'oma, S.; Mwalwanda, L.; Onaka, A.; Notzon, F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Malawi adopted a National Registration Act, making the registration of births and deaths compulsory, and efforts to improve Malawi's civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) system are underway. During a participatory-style workshop, stakeholders completed a rapid assessment of the national civil registration and vital statistics systems. While participants discussed and scored each item in a standard tool, the workshop focused on sharing of partners' roles and challenges. The workshop has enhanced receptiveness in collaboration, and an inter-ministerial technical working group has now been formed to develop a strategic plan and conduct a comprehensive assessment to guide future improvements. PMID:26399284

  15. Types of vital statistics available in different countries

    PubMed Central

    1954-01-01

    This article analyses the types of vital statistical data available in the 58 major statistical areas of the world, covering about half the world population. The information for the rest of the world can be assumed to be even less complete. Tables are given showing the number of areas supplying information for the various tabulations in the vital statistics section of the United Nations Demographic Yearbook, and the availability of each tabulation for each area. Other tables indicate which items of substantive interest are given on national statistical-report forms in the same areas, and with what frequency. PMID:13199672

  16. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  17. LPT. Low power test control building (TAN641) east facade. Sign ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Low power test control building (TAN-641) east facade. Sign says "Energy and Systems Technology Laboratory, INEL" (Post-ANP-use). Camera facing west. INEEL negative no. HD-40-3-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Conditional sign flip via teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Pasquale, Ferdinando de; Paganelli, Simone

    2004-08-01

    We present a model to realize a probabilistic conditional sign flip gate using only linear optics. The gate operates in the space of number-state qubits and is obtained by a nonconventional use of the teleportation protocol. Both a destructive and a nondestructive version of the gate are presented. In the former case an Hadamard gate on the control qubit is combined with a projective teleportation scheme mixing control and target. The success probability is 1/2. In the latter case we need a quantum encoder realized via the interaction of the control qubit with an ancillary state composed of two maximally entangled photons. The success probability is 1/4.

  19. Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick bite) Fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle ... examples of EM rashes Later Signs and Symptoms (days to months after tick bite) Severe headaches and ...

  20. Grandfather Moose: Sign Language Nursery Rhymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Harley

    1987-01-01

    "Grandfather Moose" rhymes, written to follow the Mother Goose tradition, are short, appealing, easy-to-memorize sign language nursery rhymes which employ visual poetic devices such as similar signs and transitional flow of movement. (CB)

  1. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  2. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  3. Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Listen ©istock.com/ KatarzynaBialasiewicz People who drink too much alcohol might forget things that happened when they were ...

  4. Sign Language From the Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson sent a special sign language message to Earth. Interpretation done by non-certified users of American Sign Language (ASL) who are fluent in conversational ASL; syntax...

  5. The Paget-Gorman Sign System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jacqueline

    1981-01-01

    The Paget-Gorman Sign System, a signed English approach shown to be effective with deaf or hard of hearing children, has been helpful in developing phrase structure in hearing impaired mentally retarded students. (CL)

  6. Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Infants & Children Page Content ​Eye exams ... treated successfully. What are warning signs of a vision problem? Babies up to 1 year of age: ...

  7. Suicide warning signs in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rudd, M David

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses suicide warning signs in clinical practice and has three simple goals: 1) to help practitioners differentiate in a clinically meaningful fashion between warning signs and risk factors for suicide; 2) to articulate the link among warning signs for suicide, hopelessness, and intent to die; and 3) to assist practitioners in applying warning signs in day-to-day clinical practice, doing so in a concrete and effective manner.

  8. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions.

  9. Danger signs in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2010-07-01

    ADRs are frequently considered iatrogenic complications and, therefore, pose a specific challenge for the physician-patient relationship. Early recognition of a potential ADR is possible, especially on the skin, in addition to characteristic clinical danger signs. Cutaneous manifestations are variable, depending on the causative pathomechanism. It is impossible to conclude the causative agent from the morphology of the cutaneous lesions. The intake of several drugs in the time before the elicitation of the drug reaction usually poses a diagnostic challenge. It is crucial for the precision of any further allergological work-up to document the type of rash precisely as well as the time course of drug intake and appearance of the first symptoms. involvement of internal organs or circulating blood cells. Timely recognition of such cutaneous lesions and the correct differential diagnosis with prompt withdrawal of the putative culprit drug are essential to reducing morbidity and preventing mortality. This article discusses risk factors, early symptoms, and danger signs indicating a possibly severe course of an ADR and advises on early actions.

  10. Similarities & Differences in Two Brazilian Sign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira-Brito, Lucinda

    1984-01-01

    mparison of sign language used by Urubu-Kaapor Indians in the Amazonian jungle (UKSL) and sign language used by deaf people in Sao Paulo (SPSL). In the former situation, deaf people are more integrated and accepted into their community than in Sao Paulo, because most hearing individuals are able and willing to use sign language to communicate with…

  11. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  12. 12 CFR 328.1 - Official sign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official sign. 328.1 Section 328.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY ADVERTISEMENT OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.1 Official sign. (a) The official sign referred to in this part shall be 7″ by...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  15. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  16. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  18. 33 CFR 127.1113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.1113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Design and Construction § 127.1113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this...

  19. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  20. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  1. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 127.113 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer area for LNG must have warning signs that— (1) Meet paragraph (b) of this section; (2) Can be seen from...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  4. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  6. 30 CFR 56.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warning signs. 56.4101 Section 56.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  9. 30 CFR 57.4101 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warning signs. 57.4101 Section 57.4101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4101 Warning signs. Readily visible signs prohibiting smoking...

  10. A Segmental Framework for Representing Signs Phonetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The arguments for dividing the signing stream in signed languages into sequences of phonetic segments are compelling. The visual records of instances of actually occurring signs provide evidence of two basic types of segments: postural segments and trans-forming segments. Postural segments specify an alignment of articulatory features, both manual…

  11. Research on the Translation of Public Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiannan, Ma

    2012-01-01

    Because of the increasing international image of China, the translation of public signs in city has become the very important issue. From the point of view of cross-cultural communication, the public signs have crucial influence on the image of the city, even for the whole China. However, there exist many translation errors of the public signs in…

  12. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Danger signs. 57.12021 Section 57.12021 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Danger signs. 57.12021 Section 57.12021 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12021 - Danger signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Danger signs. 57.12021 Section 57.12021 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Underground § 57.12021 Danger signs. Suitable danger signs shall be posted at all major...

  15. Sign Language Planning: Pragmatism, Pessimism and Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Graham H.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the present collection of sign language planning studies. Contextualising the analyses against the backdrop of core issues in the theory of language planning and the evolution of applied sign linguistics, it is argued that--while the sociolinguistic circumstances of signed languages worldwide can, in many respects, be…

  16. Dictionaries of African Sign Languages: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaling, Constanze H.

    2012-01-01

    This article gives an overview of dictionaries of African sign languages that have been published to date most of which have not been widely distributed. After an introduction into the field of sign language lexicography and a discussion of some of the obstacles that authors of sign language dictionaries face in general, I will show problems…

  17. Library Sign Systems. Workshop Program Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, Patricia M.

    These program materials from the Library Sign Systems Workshop include a news story on the workshop; notes in outline form for a speech presented by Joe Sonderman, president of a graphic designs firm; and an annotated bibliography on signs and sign systems. The news release summarizes a presentation by Dorothy Pollet and Peter Haskell, editors of…

  18. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach…

  19. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vital records program, agencies must: (a) Specify agency staff responsibilities; (b) Appropriately... complete; and (d) Ensure that vital records are adequately protected, accessible, and immediately usable....

  20. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vital records program, agencies must: (a) Specify agency staff responsibilities; (b) Appropriately... complete; and (d) Ensure that vital records are adequately protected, accessible, and immediately usable....

  1. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vital records program, agencies must: (a) Specify agency staff responsibilities; (b) Appropriately... complete; and (d) Ensure that vital records are adequately protected, accessible, and immediately usable....

  2. Strengthening Ecological Mindfulness through Hybrid Learning in Vital Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy "tool" used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice,…

  3. Inferring Ethnolinguistic Vitality in a Community of Northeast Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John Charles

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of ethnolinguistic vitality as the framework for a sociolinguistic survey measuring attitudes to multilingualism and reporting on the experiences of a community of Northeast Thailand (Isan) that forms part of Thailand's largest minority. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of participants in a…

  4. Implementing a Smart Method to Eliminate Artifacts of Vital Signals

    PubMed Central

    Javadpour, A.; Mohammadi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electroencephalography (EEG) has vital and significant applications in different medical fields and is used for the primary evaluation of neurological disorders. Hence, having easy access to suitable and useful signal is very important. Artifacts are undesirable confusions which are generally originated from inevitable human activities such as heartbeat, blinking of eyes and facial muscle activities while receiving EEG signal. It can bring about deformation in these waves though. Objective The objective of this study was to find a suitable solution to eliminate the artifacts of Vital Signals. Methods In this study, wavelet transform technique was used. This method is compared with threshold level. The threshold intensity is efficiently crucial because it should not remove the original signal instead of artifacts, and does not hold artifact signal instead of original ones. In this project, we seek to find and implement the algorithm with the ability to automatically remove the artifacts in EEG signals. For this purpose, the use of adaptive filtering methods such as wavelet analysis is appropriate. Finally, we observed that Functional Link Neural Network (FLN) performance is better than ANFIS and RBFN to remove such artifacts. Results We offer an intelligent method for removing artifacts from vital signals in neurological disorders. Conclusion The proposed method can obtain more accurate results by removing artifacts of vital signals and can be useful in the early diagnosis of neurological and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26688799

  5. Project VITAL. Final Financial Status and Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Arthur

    In its third year of funding, Project VITAL (Volunteers In Training Act and Learn) was designed to provide literacy training to 500 librarians, coordinators, and volunteers working in literacy programs. Through the techniques of improvisational theater, structured scenarios were enacted dealing with illiteracy, women's concerns of domestic…

  6. Organizational Diversity, Vitality and Outcomes in the Civil Rights Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olzak, Susan; Ryo, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Sociologists often assert, but rarely test, the claim that organizational diversity benefits social movements by invigorating movement vitality and facilitating success. Our analysis of black civil rights organizations shows that goal and tactical diversity of a social movement is largely a function of organizational density, level of resources…

  7. Science: Videotapes for Inservice Training for Active Learning. VITAL Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissock, Craig, Ed.

    This handbook, and the VITAL Science Series videotapes, contain 12 lessons that are examples of some of the many ways of organizing elementary school classrooms for science instruction. The videotapes that are available separately demonstrate full class and small group activities, the use of learning centers, cooperative learning, and outdoor…

  8. The Locus of Career Vitality. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William

    The context for considering faculty career vitality is addressed. It is suggested that the unit of study should be individual, and that both internal and external influences should be considered. A contrasting view is that the institution should be the unit of study. A Pennsylvania State University study revealed that faculty career decisions were…

  9. Subjective Vitality and Patterns of Acculturation: Four Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin; Vedernikova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comparative analysis of the subjective vitalities (SVs) of the minority groups of Latvia (Russian-speakers), Lithuania (Russian-speakers and Poles) and Mari El (Maris) in the Russian Federation, with a particular focus on the Mari case. The same extended version of the SV questionnaire was used in quantitative surveys in all…

  10. Ethnolinguistic Vitality among Japanese-Brazilians: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakamoto, Mitsuyo; Matsubara Morales, Leiko

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores ethnolinguistic vitality among Japanese-Brazilians ("Nikkeis"). First, an 18-item questionnaire was administered to 33 individuals who attended a seminar on bilingual studies held in São Paulo. Then, two bilingual "Nikkei" teachers who participated in the questionnaire and who grew up to be bilinguals…

  11. Armed Forces VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Walter H.; Zerface, W. A., Ed.

    Armed Services VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work) is described as a cooperative program with the Department of Defense which (1) introduces career opportunities and training available through volunteer service enlistment, (2) will be provided to senior high schools at no cost, and (3) presents materials in both printed and microfilm…

  12. Ten Indicators of Vitality in Smaller Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a means of quickly ascertaining the relative health of smaller academic libraries by presenting a top ten list of vitality indicators. The list is based on an observational convenience sampling of thirty smaller academic libraries across the United States. The indicators making the list were those which appeared most often in…

  13. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  14. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  15. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  16. Transformative and Restorative Learning: A Vital Dialectic for Sustainable Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores the potential of critical transformative learning for revitalizing citizen action, particularly action toward a sustainable society. Through an action research process with 14 university extension participants, it was found that a dialectic of transformative and restorative learning is vital for fostering active citizenship.…

  17. Media Use and Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Bilingual Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moring, Tom; Husband, Charles; Lojander-Visapaa, Catharina; Vincze, Laszlo; Fomina, Joanna; Manty, Nadja Nieminen

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the relationships between media, media use and language retention. In pursuing this aim, we explore the utility of ethnolinguistic vitality (EV) as a fruitful conceptual tool. The extant research on the relationship between the media and language retention and development provides an encouragement to pursue in more detail…

  18. Social Security: Strengthening a Vital Safety Net for Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Since 1935, Social Security has provided a vital safety net for millions of Americans who cannot work because of age or disability. This safety net has been especially critical for Americans of Latino decent, who number more than 50 million or nearly one out of every six Americans. Social Security is critical to Latinos because it is much more…

  19. Language Attrition, Language Shift, and Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagmur, Kutlay; de Bot, Kees; Korzilius, Hubert

    1999-01-01

    Presents findings of research investigating first-language attrition of Turkish speakers in Australia and the role of subjunctive ethnolinguistic vitality perceptions in that process. Examines the relationship between societal factors and individuals' perceptions of the language contact situation as reflected in their speech behavior. (Author/VWL)

  20. History dependence of vital capacity in constricted lungs.

    PubMed

    Olson, Thomas P; Wilson, Theodore A; Johnson, Bruce D; Hyatt, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Measurements of dynamic force-length behavior of maximally activated strips of smooth muscle during oscillatory length changes show that force decreases well below the isometric force during the shortening phase of the oscillation. The magnitude of the decrease depends on the rate of shortening; for slower shortening, the decrease is smaller and force is larger. Modeling of expiratory flow, based on these data, predicts that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the rate of expiration. In maximally constricted lungs, forced vital capacity (FVC) is predicted to be 16% smaller than control, and vital capacity for a very slow expiration (SVC), 31% less than control. These predictions were tested by measuring FVC and SVC in constricted normal subjects. In the first group of 9 subjects, four maneuvers were made following the delivery of two doses of methacholine in the order: SVC, FVC, FVC, SVC. In a second group of 11 subjects, two maneuvers were performed at each dose in the order: FVC, SVC. At the highest dose of methacholine, FVC for both trials in group 1 and for the one trial in group 2 were all approximately 13% less than control, a slightly smaller decrease than predicted. SVC for the 1st trial in group 1 was 27% less than control, also slightly smaller than predicted. The difference between FVC and SVC for this trial, 13%, was close to the predicted difference of 15%. However, SVC for the 2nd trial in group 1 (preceded by 3 vital capacity maneuvers) and for group 2 (preceded by 1) were no different from FVC. We conclude that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the dynamic force-length properties of smooth muscle and that the history dependence of the dynamic properties of smooth muscle is more complicated than has been inferred from oscillatory force-length behavior.