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Sample records for vlsi technology wafers

  1. Overlay Tolerances For VLSI Using Wafer Steppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.; Rice, Rory

    1988-01-01

    In order for VLSI circuits to function properly, the masking layers used in the fabrication of those devices must overlay each other to within the manufacturing tolerance incorporated in the circuit design. The capabilities of the alignment tools used in the masking process determine the overlay tolerances to which circuits can be designed. It is therefore of considerable importance that these capabilities be well characterized. Underestimation of the overlay accuracy results in unnecessarily large devices, resulting in poor utilization of wafer area and possible degradation of device performance. Overestimation will result in significant yield loss because of the failure to conform to the tolerances of the design rules. The proper methodology for determining the overlay capabilities of wafer steppers, the most commonly used alignment tool for the production of VLSI circuits, is the subject of this paper. Because cost-effective manufacturing process technology has been the driving force of VLSI, the impact on productivity is a primary consideration in all discussions. Manufacturers of alignment tools advertise the capabilities of their equipment. It is notable that no manufacturer currently characterizes his aligners in a manner consistent with the requirements of producing very large integrated circuits, as will be discussed. This has resulted in the situation in which the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of alignment tools require the attention of a lithography specialist. Unfortunately, lithographic capabilities must be known by many other people, particularly the circuit designers and the managers responsible for the financial consequences of the high prices of modern alignment tools. All too frequently, the designer or manager is confronted with contradictory data, one set coming from his lithography specialist, and the other coming from a sales representative of an equipment manufacturer. Since the latter generally attempts to make his

  2. Full custom VLSI - A technology for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1990-01-01

    Full custom VLSI is presented as a viable technology for addressing the need for the computing capabilities required for the real-time health monitoring of spacecraft systems. This technology presents solutions that cannot be realized with stored program computers or semicustom VLSI; also, it is not dependent on current IC processes. It is argued that, while design time is longer, full custom VLSI produces the fastest and densest VLSI solution and that high density normally also yields low manufacturing costs.

  3. VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoumi, Magdy

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

  4. VLSI technology for smaller, cheaper, faster return link systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Kathy; Ghuman, Parminder; Bennett, Toby; Solomon, Jeff; Dowling, Jason; Welling, John

    1994-01-01

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Application-specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technology has enabled substantially smaller, cheaper, and more capable telemetry data systems. However, the rapid growth in available ASIC fabrication densities has far outpaced the application of this technology to telemetry systems. Available densities have grown by well over an order magnitude since NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) first began developing ASIC's for ground telemetry systems in 1985. To take advantage of these higher integration levels, a new generation of ASIC's for return link telemetry processing is under development. These new submicron devices are designed to further reduce the cost and size of NASA return link processing systems while improving performance. This paper describes these highly integrated processing components.

  5. Comparison of the radiation hardness of various VLSI technologies for defense applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    In this review the radiation hardness of various potential very large scale (VLSI) IC technologies is evaluated. IC scaling produces several countervailing trends. Reducing vertical dimensions tends to increase total dose hardness, while reducing lateral feature sizes may increase susceptibility to transient radiation effects. It is concluded that during the next decade at least, silicon complimentary MOS (CMOS), perhaps on an insulating substrate (SOI) will be the technology of choice for VLSI in defense systems.

  6. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  7. Hybrid silicon wafer-scale packaging technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Wafer-scale integration (WSI) approaches the packaging problem by attempting to fabricate the system monolithically utilizing semiconductor techniques. However, WSI has been plagued by yield problems and the need for redundancy. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a novel hybrid technique that uses pretested integrated circuits mounted into holes etched in a master wafer. The chips are interconnected with planar, thin-film metallization. This approach achieves near WSI density, while allowing the use of separately fabricated and tested devices. Test wafers with three monolithic chips and one chip mounted in a hole were fabricated as proof of concept. The key processes developed include fabrication of metallized and patterned wafers with etched holes, mounting of die in etched holes with planar topside topology, and deposition and patterning of interlevel dielectric and metal links. Selection of suitable materials for die attach and for use as an interlevel dielectric was critical. Wafers were thermally cycled to evaluate the compatibility of the materials and the process. No cracks or chip movement were observed after 50 cycles from -25 to +85/sup 0/C.

  8. A benchmark investigation on cleaning photomasks using wafer cleaning technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Louis; Burnham, Jay; Marmillion, Pat

    2004-12-01

    As new technologies are developed for smaller linewidths, the specifications for mask cleanliness become much stricter. Not only must the particle removal efficiency increase, but the largest allowable particle size decreases. Specifications for film thickness and surface roughness are becoming tighter and consequently the integrity of these films must be maintained in order to preserve the functionality of the masks. Residual contamination remaining on the surface of the mask after cleaning processes can lead to subpellicle defect growth once the mask is exposed in a stepper environment. Only during the last several years, has an increased focus been put on improving mask cleaning. Over the years, considerably more effort has been put into developing advanced wafer cleaning technologies. However, because of the small market involved with mask cleaning, wafer cleaning equipment vendors have been reluctant to invest time and effort into developing cleaning processes and adapting their toolset to accommodate masks. With the advent of 300 mm processing, wafer cleaning tools are now more easily adapted to processing masks. These wafer cleaning technologies may offer a solution to the difficulties of mask cleaning and need to be investigated to determine whether or not they warrant continued investigation. This paper focuses on benchmarking advanced wafer cleaning technologies applied to mask cleaning. Ozonated water, hydrogenated water, super critical fluids, and cryogenic cleaning have been investigated with regards to stripping resist and cleaning particles from masks. Results that include film thickness changes, surface contamination, and particle removal efficiency will be discussed.

  9. National solar technology roadmap: Wafer-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2007-06-01

    This report applies to all bulk-silicon-based PV technologies, including those based on Czochralski, multicrystalline, float-zone wafers, and melt-grown crystals that are 100 μm or thicker, such as ribbons, sheet, or spheral silicon.

  10. A VLSI implementation of DCT using pass transistor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, S.; Lynn, Douglas; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    A VLSI design for performing the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) operation on image blocks of size 16 x 16 in a real time fashion operating at 34 MHz (worst case) is presented. The process used was Hewlett-Packard's CMOS26--A 3 metal CMOS process with a minimum feature size of 0.75 micron. The design is based on Multiply-Accumulate (MAC) cells which make use of a modified Booth recoding algorithm for performing multiplication. The design of these cells is straight forward, and the layouts are regular with no complex routing. Two versions of these MAC cells were designed and their layouts completed. Both versions were simulated using SPICE to estimate their performance. One version is slightly faster at the cost of larger silicon area and higher power consumption. An improvement in speed of almost 20 percent is achieved after several iterations of simulation and re-sizing.

  11. Advanced FTIR technology for the chemical characterization of product wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, P. A.; Bosch-Charpenay, S.; Xu, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Solomon, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in chemically sensitive diagnostic techniques are needed for the characterization of compositionally variable materials such as chemically amplified resists, low-k dielectrics and BPSG films on product wafers. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy is emerging as a preferred technique to characterize film chemistry and composition, due to its non-destructive nature and excellent sensitivity to molecular bonds and free carriers. While FTIR has been widely used in R&D environments, its application to mainstream production metrology and process monitoring on product wafers has historically been limited. These limitations have been eliminated in a series of recent FTIR technology advances, which include the use of 1) new sampling optics, which suppress artifact backside reflections and 2) comprehensive model-based analysis. With these recent improvements, it is now possible to characterize films on standard single-side polished product wafers with much simpler training wafer sets and machine-independent calibrations. In this new approach, the chemistry of the films is tracked via the measured infrared optical constants as opposed to conventional absorbance measurements. The extracted spectral optical constants can then be reduced to a limited set of parameters for process control. This paper describes the application of this new FTIR methodology to the characterization of 1) DUV photoresists after various processing steps, 2) low-k materials of different types and after various curing conditions, and 3) doped glass BPSG films of various concentration and, for the first time, widely different thicknesses. Such measurements can be used for improved process control on actual product wafers.

  12. VLSI circuit techniques and technologies for ultrahigh speed data conversion interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooley, Bruce A.

    1991-04-01

    The performance of digital VLSI signal processing and communications systems is often limited by the data conversion interfaces between digital system-level components and the analog environment in which those components are embedded. The focus of this program has been research into the fundamental nature of such interfaces in systems that digitally process high-bandwidth signals for purposes such as radar imaging, high-resolution graphics, high-definition video, mobile and fiber-optic communications, and broadband instrumentation. Effort has been devoted to the study of both generic circuit functions, such as sampling and comparison, and architectural alternatives relevant to the implementation of high-speed data converters in present and emerging VLSI technologies. Specific results of the research include the design and realization of novel low-power CMOS and BiCMOS sampled-data comparators operating at rates as high as 200 MHz, the exploration of various design approaches to the implementation of high-speed sample-and-hold circuits in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies, and the design of a subranging CMOS analog-to-digital converter that provides 12-bit resolution at a conversion rate of 10 MHz.

  13. Designing defect spins for wafer-scale quantum technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Koehl, William F.; Seo, Hosung; Galli, Giulia; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-11-27

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in the development of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond, which is one of the leading candidates for quantum information technologies. The success of the NV center as a solid-state qubit has stimulated an active search for similar defect spins in other technologically important and mature semiconductors, such as silicon carbide. If successfully combined with the advanced microfabrication techniques available to such materials, coherent quantum control of defect spins could potentially lead to semiconductor-based, wafer-scale quantum technologies that make use of exotic quantum mechanical phenomena like entanglement. In this article, we describe the robust spin property of the NV center and the current status of NV center research for quantum information technologies. We then outline first-principles computational modeling techniques based on density functional theory to efficiently search for potential spin defects in nondiamond hosts suitable for quantum information applications. The combination of computational modeling and experimentation has proven invaluable in this area, and we describe the successful interplay between theory and experiment achieved with the divacancy spin qubit in silicon carbide.

  14. Product assurance technology for custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Jennings, G. A.; Moore, B. T.; Nixon, R. H.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Sievers, M. W.; Stahlberg, N. F.

    1985-01-01

    The technology for obtaining custom integrated circuits from CMOS-bulk silicon foundries using a universal set of layout rules is presented. The technical efforts were guided by the requirement to develop a 3 micron CMOS test chip for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This chip contains both analog and digital circuits. The development employed all the elements required to obtain custom circuits from silicon foundries, including circuit design, foundry interfacing, circuit test, and circuit qualification.

  15. VLSI neuroprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1994-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic hardware implementations of highly parallel computing architectures address several ill-defined and/or computation-intensive problems not easily solved by conventional computing techniques. The concurrent processing architectures developed are derived from a variety of advanced computing paradigms including neural network models, fuzzy logic, and cellular automata. Hardware implementation technologies range from state-of-the-art digital/analog custom-VLSI to advanced optoelectronic devices such as computer-generated holograms and e-beam fabricated Dammann gratings. JPL's concurrent processing devices group has developed a broad technology base in hardware implementable parallel algorithms, low-power and high-speed VLSI designs and building block VLSI chips, leading to application-specific high-performance embeddable processors. Application areas include high throughput map-data classification using feedforward neural networks, terrain based tactical movement planner using cellular automata, resource optimization (weapon-target assignment) using a multidimensional feedback network with lateral inhibition, and classification of rocks using an inner-product scheme on thematic mapper data. In addition to addressing specific functional needs of DOD and NASA, the JPL-developed concurrent processing device technology is also being customized for a variety of commercial applications (in collaboration with industrial partners), and is being transferred to U.S. industries. This viewgraph p resentation focuses on two application-specific processors which solve the computation intensive tasks of resource allocation (weapon-target assignment) and terrain based tactical movement planning using two extremely different topologies. Resource allocation is implemented as an asynchronous analog competitive assignment architecture inspired by the Hopfield network. Hardware realization leads to a two to four order of magnitude speed-up over conventional

  16. Bulk CMOS VLSI Technology Studies. Part 5. The Design and Implementation of a High Speed Integrated Circuit Functional Tester.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    A,D-A1l-B 371 BULK CMOS VLSI TECHNOLOGY STUDIES PART 5 THE DESIGN AND J/2 IPLEMENTATION OF..(U) MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV MISSISSIPPI STATE DEPT OF...SPEED INTEGRATED CIRCUIT FUNCTIONAL TESTER It Principal Investi-s tar J. Donald Trotter Associate Investigator Boyle Dwayne Robbins Mississippi State ...University Department of Electrical Engineering Mississippi State , Mississippi 39762 for Defense Advance Research Projects Agency 1400 Wilson Ave. Ci

  17. On the feasibility of through-wafer optical interconnects for hybrid wafer-scale-integrated architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornak, L. A.; Tewksbury, S. K.

    1987-07-01

    A method, compatible with VLSI processing, is described which makes it possible to fabricate vertical through-wafer optical interconnects for hybrid multiwafer wafer-scale-integrated (WSI) architectures. Using optical devices operating at wavelengths beyond the Si absorption cutoff, a low-loss through-the-wafer propagation between WSI circuit planes can be achieved over the distances of about 1 mm with the interstitial Si wafers as part of the interconnect 'free-space' transmission medium. VLSI-process-compatible SiO2 Fresnel phase-reversal zone plate arrays were fabricated. Initial results show that a 400-percent improvement in optical power coupling through the wafer was obtained.

  18. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Wafer level hermetic packaging based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhan, Cao; Le, Luo

    2009-08-01

    A novel wafer level bonding method based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology is established. A multi-layer sealing ring and the bonding processing are designed, and the amount of solder and the bonding parameters are optimized based on both theoretical and experimental results. Verification shows that oxidation of the solder layer, voids and the scalloped-edge appearance of the Cu6Sn5 phase are successfully avoided. An average shear strength of 19.5 MPa and an excellent leak rate of around 1.9 × 10-9 atm cc/s are possible, meeting the demands of MIL-STD-883E.

  19. Direct wafer bonding technology for large-scale InGaAs-on-insulator transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Li, Jian; Kao, Yung-Chung

    2014-07-28

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V devices on Si wafers have been explored for realizing high device performance as well as merging electrical and photonic applications on the Si platform. Existing methodologies have unavoidable drawbacks such as inferior device quality or high cost in comparison with the current Si-based technology. In this paper, we present InGaAs-on-insulator (-OI) fabrication from an InGaAs layer grown on a Si donor wafer with a III-V buffer layer instead of growth on a InP donor wafer. This technology allows us to yield large wafer size scalability of III-V-OI layers up to the Si wafer size of 300 mm with a high film quality and low cost. The high film quality has been confirmed by Raman and photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the fabricated InGaAs-OI transistors exhibit the high electron mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and uniform distribution of the leakage current, indicating high layer quality with low defect density.

  20. VLSI Implementation of Neuromorphic Learning Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-31

    microsystem. We would like to find a suitable means of learning in analog VLSI for feed-forward and dynamic neural networks. We would like to apply...B. Yuhas, A. Jayakumar, D. Lippe, "A Parallel Gradient Descent Method for Learning in Analog VLSI Neural Networks," in Advances in Neural Information...technology were available. Neural networks are a natural candidate for using such a technology. FINAL REPORT VLSI Implementation of Neuromorphic

  1. New dynamic FET logic and serial memory circuits for VLSI GaAs technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldin, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    The complexity of GaAs field effect transistor (FET) very large scale integration (VLSI) circuits is limited by the maximum power dissipation while the uniformity of the device parameters determines the functional yield. In this work, digital GaAs FET circuits are presented that eliminate the DC power dissipation and reduce the area to 50% of that of the conventional static circuits. Its larger tolerance to device parameter variations results in higher functional yield.

  2. Product assurance technology for procuring reliable, radiation-hard, custom LSI/VLSI electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Allen, R. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Hicks, K. A.; Jennings, G. A.; Lin, Y.-S.; Pina, C. A.; Sayah, H. R.; Zamani, N.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced measurement methods using microelectronic test chips are described. These chips are intended to be used in acquiring the data needed to qualify Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) for space use. Efforts were focused on developing the technology for obtaining custom IC's from CMOS/bulk silicon foundries. A series of test chips were developed: a parametric test strip, a fault chip, a set of reliability chips, and the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) chip, a test circuit for monitoring space radiation effects. The technical accomplishments of the effort include: (1) development of a fault chip that contains a set of test structures used to evaluate the density of various process-induced defects; (2) development of new test structures and testing techniques for measuring gate-oxide capacitance, gate-overlap capacitance, and propagation delay; (3) development of a set of reliability chips that are used to evaluate failure mechanisms in CMOS/bulk: interconnect and contact electromigration and time-dependent dielectric breakdown; (4) development of MOSFET parameter extraction procedures for evaluating subthreshold characteristics; (5) evaluation of test chips and test strips on the second CRRES wafer run; (6) two dedicated fabrication runs for the CRRES chip flight parts; and (7) publication of two papers: one on the split-cross bridge resistor and another on asymmetrical SRAM (static random access memory) cells for single-event upset analysis.

  3. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  4. Wafer topography modeling for ionic implantation mask correction dedicated to 2x nm FDSOI technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jean-Christophe; Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Sungauer, Elodie; Robert, Frédéric; Yesilada, Emek; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Entradas, Jorge; Sturtevant, John L.; Do, Thuy; Granik, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    Reflection by wafer topography and underlying layers during optical lithography can cause unwanted exposure in the resist [1]. This wafer stack effect phenomenon which is neglected for larger nodes than 45nm, is becoming problematic for 32nm technology node and below at the ionic implantation process. This phenomenon is expected to be attenuated by the use of anti-reflecting coating but increases process complexity and adds cost and cycle time penalty. As a consequence, an OPC based solution is today under evaluation to cope with stack effects involved in ionic implantation patterning [2] [3]. For the source drain (SD) ionic implantation process step on 28nm Fully Depleted Silicon-on-Insulator (FDSOI) technology, active silicon areas, poly silicon patterns, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI), Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) areas and the transitions between these different regions result in significant SD implant pattern critical dimension variations. The large number of stack variations involved in these effects implies a complex modeling to simulate pattern degradations. This paper deals with the characterization of stack effects on 28nm node using SOI substrates. The large number of measurements allows to highlight all individual and combined stack effects. A new modeling flow has been developed in order to generate wafer stack aware OPC model. The accuracy and the prediction of the model is presented in this paper.

  5. A New Step-By-Step Aligner For Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Herbert E.; Loebach, Ernst W.

    1980-09-01

    Technological considerations of direct wafer stepping are examined and the requirements of high volume V.L.S.I. production are identified. An advanced step-and-repeat alignment system is presented which fulfills, to a high degree, the criteria developed. Its high numerical aperture 10:1 reduction lens provides high resolution at high contrast level. A new designed illumination system supplies high exposure intensity at excellent uniformity. An automatic step-by-step alignment, focusing and leveling system compensates for irregular wafer topography and its changes during processing. By the capability to follow images already present on the wafer, it allows cross-matching with other exposure systems used for less critical manufacturing steps. The through-the-lens system of feedback-controlled alignment and true focus recognition eliminates from the machine geometric and optical changes such as those caused by temperature variation. Means for protecting both reticle and wafer against such environmental influences as dust, temperature and vibrations are provided. Equipment design permits high throughput for a large variety of die formats. High productivity is achieved by microprocessor-controlled functions and automatic handling as well as specially developed high speed displacement devices. The instrument presented promises new levels of productivity and working line widths while drawing on current knowledge in resist technology and wafer processing.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of add-on price estimate for select silicon wafering technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    The cost of producing wafers from silicon ingots is a major component of the add-on price of silicon sheet. Economic analyses of the add-on price estimates and their sensitivity internal-diameter (ID) sawing, multiblade slurry (MBS) sawing and fixed-abrasive slicing technique (FAST) are presented. Interim price estimation guidelines (IPEG) are used for estimating a process add-on price. Sensitivity analysis of price is performed with respect to cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials (blade life) and utilities, and the production parameters such as slicing rate, slices per centimeter and process yield, using a computer program specifically developed to do sensitivity analysis with IPEG. The results aid in identifying the important cost parameters and assist in deciding the direction of technology development efforts.

  7. Plate-like structure health monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave technology by using bonded piezoelectric ceramic wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zenghua; Zhao, Jichen; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic wafers are applied for the excitation and detection of ultrasonic guided waves to determine the health state of plate-like structures. Two PZT wafers, whose diameter is 11mm and thickness is 0.4mm respectively, are bonded permanently on the surface of a 1mm thick aluminum plate. One of these wafers is actuated by sinusoidal tone burst at various frequencies ranging from 100kHz to 500kHz, the other one is used as a receiver for acquiring ultrasonic guided wave signals. According to the amplitudes and shapes of these received signals, guided wave modes and their proper frequency range by using these wafers are determined. For the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio, the Daubechies wavelet of order 40 is used for signal denoising as the mother wavelet. Furthermore, the detection of an artificial cylindrical through-hole defect is achieved by using S0 at 300kHz. Experimental results show that it is feasible and effective to detect defects in plate-like structures based on ultrasonic guided wave technology by using bonded piezoelectric ceramic wafers.

  8. Model-Based Infrared Metrology for Advanced Technology Nodes and 300 mm Wafer Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Peter A.; Duran, Carlos; Tower, Josh; Mazurenko, Alex; Mantz, Ulrich; Weidner, Peter; Kasic, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy for production semiconductor process monitoring has evolved recently from primarily unpatterned, i.e. blanket test wafer measurements in a limited historical application space of blanket epitaxial, BPSG, and FSG layers to new applications involving patterned product wafer measurements, and new measurement capabilities. Over the last several years, the semiconductor industry has adopted a new set of materials associated with copper/low-k interconnects, and new structures incorporating exotic materials including silicon germanium, SOI substrates and high aspect ratio trenches. The new device architectures and more chemically sophisticated materials have raised new process control and metrology challenges that are not addressed by current measurement technology. To address the challenges we have developed a new infrared metrology tool designed for emerging semiconductor production processes, in a package compatible with modern production and R&D environments. The tool incorporates recent advances in reflectance instrumentation including highly accurate signal processing, optimized reflectometry optics, and model-based calibration and analysis algorithms. To meet the production requirements of the modern automated fab, the measurement hardware has been integrated with a fully automated 300 mm platform incorporating front opening unified pod (FOUP) interfaces, automated pattern recognition and high throughput ultra clean robotics. The tool employs a suite of automated dispersion-model analysis algorithms capable of extracting a variety of layer properties from measured spectra. The new tool provides excellent measurement precision, tool matching, and a platform for deploying many new production and development applications. In this paper we will explore the use of model based infrared analysis as a tool for characterizing novel bottle capacitor structures employed in high density dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips. We will explore

  9. Analog VLSI for active drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vidyabhusan

    In today's cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to increase fuel efficiency which reduces these costs. Even a 1% reduction in drag can translate into estimated savings of tens of millions of dollars in annual fuel costs. Fluid mechanicists believe that microscopic vortex pairs impinging on the surface play an important role in turbulent transport that may cause large skin friction drag. The microscopic nature and unpredictable appearance of these structures has limited practical approaches to their control. With the advent of micromachining technology providing the ability to build mechanical structures with microscopic dimensions, the tools finally exist with which to detect and control the vortex structures. These sensors and actuators require control circuitry between them in order to build a complete system. We propose an analog VLSI system that can process information along a surface in a moving fluid with the goal of controlling actuators to minimize the surface shear stress. We obtain the information from the surface by using microsensors which measure the surface shear stress. The actuators interact with the fluid by moving up and down in an attempt to diminish the impact of the drag-inducing structures in the fluid. We have designed the fabricated an analog control system. We have tested the system in several different experiments to verify its effectiveness in providing a control signal that energizes an actuator. We also have studied the methodology for a completely integrated wafer-scale system.

  10. Customizable VLSI artificial neural network chips based on a novel technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C. Y.; Law, B.; Chapline, G.; Swenson, D.

    1993-09-14

    The human cerebral cortex contains approximately 10{sup 11} neurons and 10{sup 14} synapses. It thus seems logical that any technology intended to mimic human capabilities should have the ability to fabricate a very large number of neurons and even larger numbers of synapses. This paper describes an implementation of hardware neural networks using highly linear thin-film resistor technology and an 8-bit binary weight circuit to produce customizable artificial neural network chips and systems.

  11. 300 mm InGaAs-on-insulator substrates fabricated using direct wafer bonding and the Smart Cut™ technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiez, Julie; Sollier, Sébastien; Baron, Thierry; Martin, Mickaël; Gaudin, Gweltaz; Mazen, Frédéric; Madeira, Florence; Favier, Sylvie; Salaun, Amélie; Alcotte, Reynald; Beche, Elodie; Grampeix, Helen; Veytizou, Christelle; Moulet, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the first demonstration of 300 mm In0.53Ga0.47As-on-insulator (InGaAs-OI) substrates. The use of direct wafer bonding and the Smart Cut™ technology lead to the transfer of high quality InGaAs layer on large Si wafer size (300 mm) at low effective cost, taking into account the reclaim of the III-V on Si donor substrate. The optimization of the three key building blocks of this technology is detailed. (1) The III-V epitaxial growth on 300 mm Si wafers has been optimized to decrease the defect density. (2) For the first time, hydrogen-induced thermal splitting is made inside the indium phosphide (InP) epitaxial layer and a wide implantation condition ranges is observed on the contrary to bulk InP. (3) Finally a specific direct wafer bonding with alumina oxide has been chosen to avoid outgas diffusion at the alumina oxide/III-V compound interface.

  12. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Material removal rate in chemical-mechanical polishing of wafers based on particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxiu, Su; Xiqu, Chen; Jiaxi, Du; Renke, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Distribution forms of abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process are analyzed based on experimental results. Then the relationships between the wafer, the abrasive and the polishing pad are analyzed based on kinematics and contact mechanics. According to the track length of abrasives on the wafer surface, the relationships between the material removal rate and the polishing velocity are obtained. The analysis results are in accord with the experimental results. The conclusion provides a theoretical guide for further understanding the material removal mechanism of wafers in CMP.

  13. A novel technology for fabricating customizable VLSI artificial neural network chips

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.; Law, B.; Chapline, G.; Swenson, D.

    1992-02-05

    This paper describes an implementation of hardware neural networks using highly linear thin-film resistor technology and an 8-bit binary weight circuit to produce customizable artificial neural network chips and systems. These neural networks are programmed using precision laser cutting and deposition. The fast turnaround of laser-based customization allows us to explore different neural network architectures and to rapidly program the synaptic weights. Our customizable chip allows us to expand an artificial network laterally and vertically. This flexibility permits us to build very large neural network systems.

  14. Integrating III-V compound semiconductors with silicon using wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yucai

    2000-12-01

    From Main Street to Wall Street, everyone has felt the effects caused by the Internet revolution. The Internet has created a new economy in the New Information Age and has brought significant changes in both business and personal life. This revolution has placed strong demands for higher bandwidth and higher computing speed due to high data traffic on today's information highway. In order to alleviate this problem, growing interconnection bottlenecks in digital designs have to be solved. The most feasible and practical way is to replace the conventional electrical interconnect with an optical interconnect. Since silicon does not have the optical properties necessary to accommodate these optical interconnect requirements, III-V based devices, most of which are GaAs-based or InP-based, must be intimately interconnected with the Si circuit at chip level. This monolithic integration technology enables the development of both intrachip and interchip optical connectors to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth provided by both high-performance very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits and allied fiber and free-space optical technologies. However, lattice mismatch and thermal expansion mismatches between III-V materials and Si create enormous challenges for developing a feasible technology to tackle this problem. Among all the available approaches today, wafer bonding distinguishes itself as the most promising technology for integration due to its ability to overcome the constraints of both lattice constant mismatch and thermal expansion coefficient differences and even strain due to the crystal orientation. We present our development of wafer bonding technology for integrating III-V with Si in my dissertation. First, the pick-and-place multiple-wafer bonding technology was introduced. Then we systematically studied the wafer bonding of GaAs and InP with Si. Both high temperature wafer fusion and low/room temperature (LT/RT) wafer bonding have been investigated for

  15. Princeton VLSI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    There are three major aspects to our project. The first concerns the development of a procedural approach to the layout of VLSI circuits. The second is the continuing investigation of the census language. Finally, the third is in the area of VLSI circuits.

  16. Princeton VLSI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    There are three major aspects to our project. The first concerns the development of ALI2 which is a procedural language approach to the layout of VLSI circuits. The second is the continuing investigation of the census language. Finally, the third is in the area of testing of VLSI circuits.

  17. Wafer bonding technology for new generation vacuum MEMS: challenges and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, V.; Pabo, E.

    2015-05-01

    Various MEMS devices are incorporated into consumer electronic devices. A particular category of MEMS require vacuum packaging by wafer bonding with the need to encapsulate vacuum levels of 10-2 mbar or higher with long time stability. The vacuum requirement is limiting the choice of the wafer bonding process and raises significant challenges to the existing investigation methods (metrology) used for results qualification. From the broad range of wafer bonding processes only few are compatible with vacuum applications: fusion bonding, anodic bonding, glass frit bonding and metal-based bonding. The outgassing from the enclosed surfaces after bonding will affect the vacuum level in the cavity: in some cases, a getter material is used inside the device cavity to compensate for this outgassing. Additionally the selected bonding process must be compatible with the devices on the wafers being bonded. This work reviews the principles of vacuum encapsulation using wafer bonding. Examples showing the suitability of each process for specific applications types will be presented. A significant challenge in vacuum MEMS fabrication is the lack of analytical methods needed for process characterization or reliability testing. A short overview of the most used methods and their limitations will be presented. Specific needs to be addressed will be introduced with examples.

  18. VLSI Universal Noiseless Coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Lee, Jun-Ji; Fang, Wai-Chi

    1989-01-01

    Proposed universal noiseless coder (UNC) compresses stream of data signals for efficient transmission in channel of limited bandwidth. Noiseless in sense original data completely recoverable from output code. System built as very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit, compressing data in real time at input rates as high as 24 Mb/s, and possibly faster, depending on specific design. Approach yields small, lightweight system operating reliably and consuming little power. Constructed as single, compact, low-power VLSI circuit chip. Design of VLSI circuit chip made specific to code algorithms. Entire UNC fabricated in single chip, worst-case power dissipation less than 1 W.

  19. High Energy IED measurements with MEMs based Si grid technology inside a 300mm Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Merritt

    2012-10-01

    The measurement of ion energy at the wafer surface for commercial equipment and process development without extensive modification of the reactor geometry has been an industry challenge. High energy, wide frequency range, process gases tolerant, contamination free and accurate ion energy measurements are the base requirements. In this work we will report on the complete system developed to achieve the base requirements. The system includes: a reusable silicon ion energy analyzer (IEA) wafer, signal feed through, RF confinement, and high voltage measurement and control. The IEA wafer design required carful understanding of the relationships between the plasma Debye length, the number of grids, intergrid charge exchange (spacing), capacitive coupling, materials, and dielectric flash over constraints. RF confinement with measurement transparency was addressed so as not to disturb the chamber plasma, wafer sheath and DC self-bias as well as to achieve spectral accuracy The experimental results were collected using a commercial parallel plate etcher powered by a dual frequency (VHF + LF). Modeling and Simulations also confirmed the details captured in the IED.

  20. Image processing via VLSI: A concept paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.

    1982-01-01

    Implementing specific image processing algorithms via very large scale integrated systems offers a potent solution to the problem of handling high data rates. Two algorithms stand out as being particularly critical -- geometric map transformation and filtering or correlation. These two functions form the basis for data calibration, registration and mosaicking. VLSI presents itself as an inexpensive ancillary function to be added to almost any general purpose computer and if the geometry and filter algorithms are implemented in VLSI, the processing rate bottleneck would be significantly relieved. A set of image processing functions that limit present systems to deal with future throughput needs, translates these functions to algorithms, implements via VLSI technology and interfaces the hardware to a general purpose digital computer is developed.

  1. Electron multibeam technology for mask and wafer writing at 0.1 nm address grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzgummer, Elmar; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans

    2013-07-01

    IMS Nanofabrication realized a 50 keV electron multibeam proof-of-concept (POC) tool confirming writing principles with 0.1 nm address grid and lithography performance capability. The POC system achieves the predicted 5 nm 1 sigma blur across the 82 μm×82 μm array of 512×512 (262,144) programmable 20 nm beams. 24-nm half pitch (HP) has been demonstrated and complex patterns have been written in scanning stripe exposure mode. The first production worthy system for the 11-nm HP mask node is scheduled for 2014 (Alpha), 2015 (Beta), and first-generation high-volume manufacturing multibeam mask writer (MBMW) tools in 2016. In these MBMW systems the max beam current through the column is 1 μA. The new architecture has also the potential for 1× mask (master template) writing. Substantial further developments are needed for maskless e-beam direct write (EBDW) applications as a beam current of >2 mA is needed to achieve 100 wafer per hour industrial targets for 300 mm wafer size. Necessary productivity enhancements of more than three orders of magnitude are only possible by shrinking the multibeam optics such that 50 to 100 subcolumns can be placed on the area of a 300 mm wafer and by clustering 10 to 20 multicolumn tools. An overview of current EBDW efforts is provided.

  2. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  3. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report outlines the activities of the past year at the NASA SERC on VLSI Design. Highlights for this year include the following: a significant breakthrough was achieved in utilizing commercial IC foundries for producing flight electronics; the first two flight qualified chips were designed, fabricated, and tested and are now being delivered into NASA flight systems; and a new technology transfer mechanism has been established to transfer VLSI advances into NASA and commercial systems.

  4. VLSI implementation of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wilamowski, B M; Binfet, J; Kaynak, M O

    2000-06-01

    Currently, fuzzy controllers are the most popular choice for hardware implementation of complex control surfaces because they are easy to design. Neural controllers are more complex and hard to train, but provide an outstanding control surface with much less error than that of a fuzzy controller. There are also some problems that have to be solved before the networks can be implemented on VLSI chips. First, an approximation function needs to be developed because CMOS neural networks have an activation function different than any function used in neural network software. Next, this function has to be used to train the network. Finally, the last problem for VLSI designers is the quantization effect caused by discrete values of the channel length (L) and width (W) of MOS transistor geometries. Two neural networks were designed in 1.5 microm technology. Using adequate approximation functions solved the problem of activation function. With this approach, trained networks were characterized by very small errors. Unfortunately, when the weights were quantized, errors were increased by an order of magnitude. However, even though the errors were enlarged, the results obtained from neural network hardware implementations were superior to the results obtained with fuzzy system approach.

  5. Launching of multi-project wafer runs in ePIXfab with micron-scale silicon rib waveguide technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Cherchi, Matteo; Harjanne, Mikko; Ylinen, Sami; Kapulainen, Markku; Vehmas, Tapani

    2014-03-01

    Silicon photonics is a rapidly growing R&D field where universities, institutes and companies are all involved and the business expectations for the next few years are high. One of the key enabling elements that led to the present success of silicon photonics is ePIXfab. It is a consortium of institutes that has together offered multi-project wafer (MPW) runs, packaging services, training, and feasibility studies. These services have significantly lowered the barrier of various research groups and companies to start developing silicon photonics. Until now the MPW services have been offered by the ePIXfab partners IMEC, CEA-Leti and IHP, which all use CMOS-type silicon photonics technology with a typical silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide thickness of 220 nm. In November 2013 this MPW offering was expanded by the ePIXfab partner VTT that opened the access to its 3 μm SOI waveguide platform via ePIXfab MPW runs. This technology platform is complementary to the mainstream silicon photonics technology (220 nm) and it offers such benefits as very low losses, small polarization dependency, ultrabroadband operation and low starting costs

  6. VLSI in biomedical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, R; Jones, T

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores the nature of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) systems as applied to the area of medical imaging systems. A general discussion of imaging systems and the techniques employed therein will be presented. With this, the merits of VLSI solutions to the medical imaging problem are presented. Consideration is also given to programmable processors, such as off the shelf DSP processors, semi-custom, and full custom VLSI devices. Through the use of VLSI devices, many image processing algorithms can be integrated into a hardware solution. This has the advantage of increased computational capacity over solutions that would normally employ software techniques.

  7. Verification of VLSI designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windley, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we explore the specification and verification of VLSI designs. The paper focuses on abstract specification and verification of functionality using mathematical logic as opposed to low-level boolean equivalence verification such as that done using BDD's and Model Checking. Specification and verification, sometimes called formal methods, is one tool for increasing computer dependability in the face of an exponentially increasing testing effort.

  8. Future trends in wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.; Neugebauer, C.A.

    1986-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the functional density of VLSI has been achieved without greatly increasing the chip size. In wafer scale integration, the area of an entire wafer is made available to increase the functional density still further. However, the requirement for fault tolerance, additional levels of metallization, excess power dissipation, process conservatism to achieve finite yield, and nonoptimum nature of the AI/SiO/sub 2/ transmission line for cross-wafer communication have made WSI noncompetitive with state-of-the-art VLSI and dense multichip hybrid packaging approaches, at least so far. On the other hand, the potential benefits of WSI are great. Chief among them is the greatly increased expected reliability, which is partly due to an all-monolithic system and partly because of the hope that fault tolerance, which is an absolute requirement for WSI fabrication, can be extended to failure tolerance, and thus the ability to reconfigure during systems operation, and perhaps even transparent to it. Pipeline- or bus-oriented logic structures were found to be the most promising for WSI implementation.

  9. Reliable VLSI sequential controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.; Shamanna, M.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI architecture for synchronous sequential controllers is presented that has attractive qualities for producing reliable circuits. In these circuits, one hardware implementation can realize any flow table with a maximum of 2(exp n) internal states and m inputs. Also all design equations are identical. A real time fault detection means is presented along with a strategy for verifying the correctness of the checking hardware. This self check feature can be employed with no increase in hardware. The architecture can be modified to achieve fail safe designs. With no increase in hardware, an adaptable circuit can be realized that allows replacement of faulty transitions with fault free transitions.

  10. UW VLSI chip tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Neil

    1989-12-01

    We present a design for a low-cost, functional VLSI chip tester. It is based on the Apple MacIntosh II personal computer. It tests chips that have up to 128 pins. All pin drivers of the tester are bidirectional; each pin is programmed independently as an input or an output. The tester can test both static and dynamic chips. Rudimentary speed testing is provided. Chips are tested by executing C programs written by the user. A software library is provided for program development. Tests run under both the Mac Operating System and A/UX. The design is implemented using Xilinx Logic Cell Arrays. Price/performance tradeoffs are discussed.

  11. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  12. Modeling the reliability of a class of fault-tolerant VLSI/WSI systems based on multiple-level redundancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Yuan; Upadhyaya, Shambhu J.

    1994-06-01

    A class of fault-tolerant Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) and Wafer Scale Integration (WSI) schemes, called the multiple-level redundancy, which incorporates both hierarchical and element level redundancy has been proposed for the design of high yield and high reliability large area array processors. The residual redundancy left unused after successfully reconfiguring and eliminating the manufacturing defects can be used to improve the operational reliability of a system. Since existing techniques for the analysis of the effect of residual redundancy on reliability improvement are not applicable, we present a new hierarchical model to estimate the reliability of the systems designed by our approach. Our model emphasizes the effect of support circuit (interconnection) failures on system reliability, leading to more accurate analysis. We discuss two area prediction models, one based on the regular WSI process, another based on the advanced WSI process, to estimate the area-related parameters. This analysis gives an insight into the practical implementations of fault-tolerant schemes in VLSI/WSI technology. Results of a computer experiment conducted to validate our models are also discussed.

  13. Theoretical aspects of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    During the period covered by the grant, two books and ten research papers were written under grant sponsorship. In addition nineteen of the research papers were written and published in conference proceeding. Ten other research manuscripts are now nearing completion. Titles of some of the completed work include: Eigenvalues and Expanders, A Framework of Solving VLSI Graph Layout Problems, Tight Bounds on the Complexity of Parallel Sorting, Wafer-Scale Integration of Systolic Arrays, and The Average Case Analysis of Some On-Line Algorithms for Bin Packing.

  14. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  15. VLSI Architectures for Computing DFT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Reed, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Simplifications result from use of residue Fermat number systems. System of finite arithmetic over residue Fermat number systems enables calculation of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of series of complex numbers with reduced number of multiplications. Computer architectures based on approach suitable for design of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits for computing DFT's. General approach not limited to DFT's; Applicable to decoding of error-correcting codes and other transform calculations. System readily implemented in VLSI.

  16. Design automation for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Donlan, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) is a technique for implementing large digital systems on a single wafer. This thesis describes a system of design automation tools developed to aid in the implementation of wafer scale integrated systems. An overview of wafer scale integration is given with fabrication details and yield considerations discussed. The Wafer architectural Design Language (WDL) used to describe and specify a system architecture to the development system is introduced along with a compiler that translates the high level WDL description into net lists and other internal data bases. Interactive placement tools used to map the system architecture onto the functional die sites on a wafer are described. A very fast line probe router was developed to perform the custom wafer level routing need to personalize each wafer. Router data structures, algorithms, techniques, and results are discussed in detail. Sample wafer scale architectures and the result of their WSI implementations are shown. Also presented is the Wafer Transmission Module (WTM) a packaging technology related to wafer scale integration.

  17. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A new cleaning process for the metallic contaminants on a post-CMP wafer's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baohong, Gao; Yuling, Liu; Chenwei, Wang; Yadong, Zhu; Shengli, Wang; Qiang, Zhou; Baimei, Tan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new cleaning process using boron-doped diamond (BDD) film anode electrochemical oxidation for metallic contaminants on polished silicon wafer surfaces. The BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can efficiently prepare pyrophosphate peroxide, pyrophosphate peroxide can oxidize organic contaminants, and pyrophosphate peroxide is deoxidized into pyrophosphate. Pyrophosphate, a good complexing agent, can form a metal complex, which is a structure consisting of a copper ion, bonded to a surrounding array of two pyrophosphate anions. Three polished wafers were immersed in the 0.01 mol/L CuSO4 solution for 2 h in order to make comparative experiments. The first one was cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide, the second by RCA (Radio Corporation of America) cleaning, and the third by deionized (DI) water. The XPS measurement result shows that the metallic contaminants on wafers cleaned by the RCA method and by pyrophosphate peroxide is less than the XPS detection limits of 1 ppm. And the wafer's surface cleaned by pyrophosphate peroxide is more efficient in removing organic carbon residues than RCA cleaning. Therefore, BDD film anode electrochemical oxidation can be used for microelectronics cleaning, and it can effectively remove organic contaminants and metallic contaminants in one step. It also achieves energy saving and environmental protection.

  18. RF SOI CMOS technology on 1st and 2nd generation trap-rich high resistivity SOI wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi Esfeh, B.; Makovejev, S.; Basso, Didier; Desbonnets, Eric; Kilchytska, V.; Flandre, D.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2017-02-01

    In this work three different types of UNIBOND™ Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafers including one standard HR-SOI and two types of trap-rich high resistivity HR-SOI substrates named enhanced signal integrity high resistivity silicon-on-insulator (eSI HR-SOI) provided by SOITEC are studied and compared. The DC and RF performances of these wafers are compared by means of passive and active devices such as coplanar waveguide (CPW) lines, crosstalk- and noise injection-structures as well as partially-depleted (PD) SOI MOSFETs. It is demonstrated that by employing enhanced signal integrity high resistivity silicon-on-insulator (eSI HR-SOI) compared to HR-SOI wafer, a reduction of 24 dB is measured on both generations of trap-rich HR-SOI for 2nd harmonics. Furthermore, it is shown that in eSI HR-SOI, digital substrate noise is effectively reduced compared with HR-SOI. Purely capacitive behavior of eSI HR-SOI is demonstrated by crosstalk structure. Reduction of self-heating effect in the trap-rich HR-SOI with thinner BOX is finally studied.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Influence of nitrogen dose on the charge density of nitrogen-implanted buried oxide in SOI wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongshan, Zheng; Zhongli, Liu; Ning, Li; Guohua, Li; Enxia, Zhang

    2010-02-01

    To harden silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers fabricated using separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX) to total-dose irradiation, the technique of nitrogen implantation into the buried oxide (BOX) layer of SIMOX wafers can be used. However, in this work, it has been found that all the nitrogen-implanted BOX layers reveal greater initial positive charge densities, which increased with increasing nitrogen implantation dose. Also, the results indicate that excessively large nitrogen implantation dose reduced the radiation tolerance of BOX for its high initial positive charge density. The bigger initial positive charge densities can be ascribed to the accumulation of implanted nitrogen near the Si-BOX interface after annealing. On the other hand, in our work, it has also been observed that, unlike nitrogen-implanted BOX, all the fluorine-implanted BOX layers show a negative charge density. To obtain the initial charge densities of the BOX layers, the tested samples were fabricated with a metal-BOX-silicon (MBS) structure based on SIMOX wafers for high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) analysis.

  20. Fundamentals of Modern VLSI Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taur, Yuan; Ning, Tak H.

    1998-10-01

    This book examines in detail the basic properties and design, including chip integration, of CMOS and bipolar VLSI devices and discusses the various factors that affect their performance. The authors begin with a thorough review of the relevant aspects of semiconductor physics, and proceed to a description of the design of CMOS and bipolar devices. The optimization of these devices for VLSI applications is also covered. The authors highlight the intricate interdependencies and subtle tradeoffs between those device parameters, such as power consumption and packing density, that affect circuit performance and manufacturability. They also discuss in detail the scaling, and physical limits to the scaling, of CMOS and bipolar devices. The book contains many exercises, and can be used as a textbook for senior undergraduate or first-year graduate courses on microelectronics or VLSI devices. It will also be a valuable reference volume for practicing engineers involved in research and development in the electronics industry.

  1. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties.

  2. GaAs VLSI for aerospace electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, G.; Chan, P.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced aerospace electronics systems require high-speed, low-power, radiation-hard, digital components for signal processing, control, and communication applications. GaAs VLSI devices provide a number of advantages over silicon devices including higher carrier velocities, ability to integrate with high performance optical devices, and high-resistivity substrates that provide very short gate delays, good isolation, and tolerance to many forms of radiation. However, III-V technologies also have disadvantages, such as lower yield compared to silicon MOS technology. Achieving very large scale integration (VLSI) is particularly important for fast complex systems. At very short gate delays (less than 100 ps), chip-to-chip interconnects severely degrade circuit clock rates. Complex systems, therefore, benefit greatly when as many gates as possible are placed on a single chip. To fully exploit the advantages of GaAs circuits, attention must be focused on achieving high integration levels by reducing power dissipation, reducing the number of devices per logic function, and providing circuit designs that are more tolerant to process and environmental variations. In addition, adequate noise margin must be maintained to ensure a practical yield.

  3. Development of wafer-level-packaging technology for simultaneous sealing of accelerometer and gyroscope under different pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kanamaru, M.; Okada, R.; Maeda, D.; Hayashi, M.; Isono, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This research demonstrates a newly developed anodic bonding-based wafer-level-packaging technique to simultaneously seal an accelerometer in the atmosphere and a gyroscope in a vacuum with a glass cap for micro-electromechanical systems sensors. It is necessary for the accelerometer, with a damping oscillator, to be sealed in the atmosphere to achieve a high-speed response. As the gyroscope can achieve high sensitivity with a large displacement at the resonant frequency without air-damping, the gyroscope must be sealed in a vacuum. The technique consists of three processing steps: the first bonding step in the atmosphere for the accelerometer, the pressure control step and the second bonding step in a vacuum for the gyroscope. The process conditions were experimentally determined to achieve higher shear strength at the interface of the packaging. The packaging performance of the accelerometer and gyroscope after wafer-level packaging was also investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter at room temperature. The amplitude at the resonant frequency of the accelerometer was reduced by air damping, and the quality factor of the gyroscope showed a value higher than 1000. The reliability of the gyroscope was also confirmed by a thermal cyclic test and an endurance test at high humidity and high temperature.

  4. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  5. Summary of workshop on the application of VLSI for robotic sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T.; Wilcox, B.

    1984-01-01

    It was one of the objectives of the considered workshop to identify near, mid, and far-term applications of VLSI for robotic sensing and sensor data preprocessing. The workshop was also to indicate areas in which VLSI technology can provide immediate and future payoffs. A third objective is related to the promotion of dialog and collaborative efforts between research communities, industry, and government. The workshop was held on March 24-25, 1983. Conclusions and recommendations are discussed. Attention is given to the need for a pixel correction chip, an image sensor with 10,000 dynamic range, VLSI enhanced architectures, the need for a high-density serpentine memory, an LSI-tactile sensing program, an analog-signal preprocessor chip, a smart strain gage, a protective proximity envelope, a VLSI-proximity sensor program, a robot-net chip, and aspects of silicon micromechanics.

  6. The Fifth NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The fifth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design had 13 sessions including Radiation Effects, Architectures, Mixed Signal, Design Techniques, Fault Testing, Synthesis, Signal Processing, and other Featured Presentations. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The presentations share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  7. Diagnosis and reconfiguration of VLSI/WSI array processors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.

    1988-01-01

    Some fault-tolerant techniques and analytical methods are presented for linear, mesh, and tree array processors which are implemented in Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits or Wafer Scale Integration (WSI) circuits. Several techniques are developed for testing, diagnosis, on-line fault detection and reconfiguration of array processors. A testing strategy, built-in self-test, is presented for array processors to achieve the C-testability by which the test length is independent of the size of the array. The signature comparison approach is used for diagnostic algorithms. Reconfiguration schemes with two-level redundancy for mesh and tree arrays are described. An on-line fault detection scheme by using redundant cells and blocks are developed. Analytical tools for reliability are given for evaluating the proposed schemes. A yield estimation model for WSI mesh array processors with two-level redundancy is presented. Distributed as well as clustered defects are considered in this model.

  8. A Coherent VLSI Design Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design.’ PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. MIT. Janu- ary, 1984; also MIT...Andrew L. Ressler, "A Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design." PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. MIT...ISA(7HL E tT T O!I VLSI Memo No. 84-211 November 1984 A Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design* *! Andrew Lewis Ressler** Electrical circuit

  9. Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020—from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366’s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with today’s state-of-the-art technologies. 1366’s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366’s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

  10. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  11. Improved self arbitrated VLSI asynchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterrowd, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved method for designing the class of CMOS VLSI asynchronous sequential circuits introduced in the paper by Sterling R. Whitaker and Gary K. Maki, 'Self Arbitrated VLSI Asynchronous Circuits.' Of main interest here is the simple design by inspection rules that arise from these circuits. This paper presents a variation on these circuits which reduces the number of transistors required.

  12. High-speed VLSI concentrators for terabit intelligent optical backplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supmonchai, Boonchuay; Szymanski, Ted H.

    1998-05-01

    Self-routing `concentrators' are fundamental building blocks of optical switching systems. An N-to-M concentrator can process and extract data packets from N optical channels and forward the packets to M electrical channels, where typically N M. Terabit Optical Backplanes which exploit free-space optical data links, with bandwidths approaching 1 - 10 Terabits per second will require extremely fast self- routing concentrators which can make routing decisions within a few nanoseconds. In this paper, a VLSI analysis of a new circuit called the `Daisy Chain' concentrator is presented. This concentrator has a regular topology suitable for very efficient VLSI layout, which leads to very high clock rates. The analyses are performed using 0.8 micrometers standard cell CMOS technology with the Synopsys CAD tool. The results shows that the proposed concentrator uses substantially less VLSI area from 20 - 50% less in the control logic and up to 150% less on the switching logic than the previous best known concentrator circuit. It also performs significantly faster, ranging from 20 - 40% faster in the control logic and 150 - 300% faster in the switching logic. Using 0.8 micrometers CMOS technology, the proposed concentrator can be used in smart pixel arrays for optical backplanes with clock rates in the range of 500 Mhz. Using faster CMOS or ECL logic, the concentrator can support clock rates in the several Gigahertz range.

  13. A single-supply, monolithic, MIL-STD-1553 transceiver implemented in BiCMOS wafer fabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Thomas L.; Molinari, Lou

    An integrated circuit has been designed for use as a single supply, MIL-STD-1553 transceiver using BiCMOS technology. Use of the BiCMOS fabrication process has advantages over both Bipolar and CMOS technologies. These advantages include: reduced standby current drain, increased flexibility in mating the transceiver to various remote terminals, increased control over output amplitude and rise/fall times, easier methods for adjusting filter response and residual voltage, and reduced chip size (over a CMOS transceiver). Development of this monolithic transceiver opens the door to future advances in remote terminal design. By combining the current driving capacity of Bipolar with the digital design capability of CMOS, the next probable step in the progression of MIL-STD-1553 technology would be a fully monolithic remote terminal. This device would combine a transceiver with the encoder/decoder and protocol logic on a single semiconductor device.

  14. Forming electrical interconnections through semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    An information processing system based on CMOS/SOS technology is being developed by NASA to process digital image data collected by satellites. An array of holes is laser drilled in a semiconductor wafer, and a conductor is formed in the holes to fabricate electrical interconnections through the wafers. Six techniques are used to form conductors in the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers, including capillary wetting, wedge extrusion, wire intersection, electroless plating, electroforming, double-sided sputtering and through-hole electroplating. The respective strengths and weaknesses of these techniques are discussed and compared, with double-sided sputtering and the through-hole plating method achieving best results. In addition, hollow conductors provided by the technique are available for solder refill, providing a natural way of forming an electrically connected stack of SOS wafers.

  15. A Coherent VLSI Design Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, June 1981; also MIT VLSI Memo No. 82-84, March 1982. M. W. Geis, B.-Y. Tsaur, J. C. C. Fan, D. J. Silv ...Totty, and Scott Wills, "Architecture of a Message-Driven Processor" 4:10 Roger C. Perkins, " Copper -Polyimide Interconnects for Ceramic Chip Carriers" 4...Concentrated Binary Alloys ," Robert A. Brown, Chiechiun J. Chang, and Peter M. Adornato, February 1985. (19 pp.) 85-230 "A Hardware Assisted Methodology for

  16. Area-Efficient VLSI Computation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A p w V" QIU-CS-82-108 Area-Efficient VLSI Computation 6 0! " Charles Eric Leiserson Department of Computer Science Carnegie...Doctor of Philosophy. *7 This research was sponsored in part by the Defense Advanced Rcscarch Projects Agency (1)O!)) ARPA Order No. 3597 which is...Office of Naval Research ,under Contract N00014-76-C-i370. The vicws anJ Conclusions contained in this document arc thosC of the Author and should Iot

  17. Systolic VLSI for Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Chang, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional parallel computing method for real-time Kalman filtering is presented. The mathematical formulation of a Kalman filter algorithm is rearranged to be the type of Faddeev algorithm for generalizing signal processing. The data flow mapping from the Faddeev algorithm to a two-dimensional concurrent computing structure is developed. The architecture of the resulting processor cells is regular, simple, expandable, and therefore naturally suitable for VLSI chip implementation. The computing methodology and the two-dimensional systolic arrays are useful for Kalman filter applications as well as other matrix/vector based algebraic computations.

  18. Implementation of three-dimensional SOI-MEMS wafer-level packaging using through-wafer interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiung-Wen; Yang, Hsueh-An; Wang, Wei Chung; Fang, Weileun

    2007-06-01

    Packaging is an emerging technology for microsystem integration. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer has been extensively employed for micromachined devices for its reliable fabrication steps and robust structures. This research reports a packaging approach for silicon-on- insulator-micro-electro-mechanical system (SOI-MEMS) devices using through-wafer vias and anodic bonding technologies. Through-wafer vias are embedded inside the SOI wafers, and are realized using laser drilling and electroplating. These vias provide electrical signal paths to the MEMS device, while isolating MEMS devices from the outer environment. A high-strength hermetic sealing is then achieved after anodic bonding of the through-wafer-vias-embedded SOI wafer to a Pyrex 7740 glass. Moreover, the packaged SOI-MEMS chip is compatible with surface mount technology, and provides a superior way for 3D heterogeneous integration.

  19. Fully-depleted silicon-on-sapphire and its application to advanced VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offord, Bruce W.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the widely recognized advantages of full dielectric isolation, e.g., reduced parasitic capacitance, transient radiation hardness, and processing simplicity, fully-depleted silicon-on-sapphire offers reduced floating body effects and improved thermal characteristics when compared to other silicon-on-insulator technologies. The properties of this technology and its potential impact on advanced VLSI circuitry will be discussed.

  20. Wafer characteristics via reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2010-10-19

    Various exemplary methods (800, 900, 1000, 1100) are directed to determining wafer thickness and/or wafer surface characteristics. An exemplary method (900) includes measuring reflectance of a wafer and comparing the measured reflectance to a calculated reflectance or a reflectance stored in a database. Another exemplary method (800) includes positioning a wafer on a reflecting support to extend a reflectance range. An exemplary device (200) has an input (210), analysis modules (222-228) and optionally a database (230). Various exemplary reflectometer chambers (1300, 1400) include radiation sources positioned at a first altitudinal angle (1308, 1408) and at a second altitudinal angle (1312, 1412). An exemplary method includes selecting radiation sources positioned at various altitudinal angles. An exemplary element (1650, 1850) includes a first aperture (1654, 1854) and a second aperture (1658, 1858) that can transmit reflected radiation to a fiber and an imager, respectfully.

  1. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  2. A second generation 50 Mbps VLSI level zero processing system prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jonathan C.; Shi, Jeff; Speciale, Nick; Bennett, Toby

    1994-01-01

    Level Zero Processing (LZP) generally refers to telemetry data processing functions performed at ground facilities to remove all communication artifacts from instrument data. These functions typically include frame synchronization, error detection and correction, packet reassembly and sorting, playback reversal, merging, time-ordering, overlap deletion, and production of annotated data sets. The Data Systems Technologies Division (DSTD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been developing high-performance Very Large Scale Integration Level Zero Processing Systems (VLSI LZPS) since 1989. The first VLSI LZPS prototype demonstrated 20 Megabits per second (Mbp's) capability in 1992. With a new generation of high-density Application-specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) and a Mass Storage System (MSS) based on the High-performance Parallel Peripheral Interface (HiPPI), a second prototype has been built that achieves full 50 Mbp's performance. This paper describes the second generation LZPS prototype based upon VLSI technologies.

  3. Stable wafer-carrier system

    DOEpatents

    Rozenzon, Yan; Trujillo, Robert T; Beese, Steven C

    2013-10-22

    One embodiment of the present invention provides a wafer-carrier system used in a deposition chamber for carrying wafers. The wafer-carrier system includes a base susceptor and a top susceptor nested inside the base susceptor with its wafer-mounting side facing the base susceptor's wafer-mounting side, thereby forming a substantially enclosed narrow channel. The base susceptor provides an upward support to the top susceptor.

  4. Reconfigurable VLSI architecture for a database processor

    SciTech Connect

    Oflazer, K.

    1983-01-01

    This work brings together the processing potential offered by regularly structured VLSI processing units and the architecture of a database processor-the relational associative processor (RAP). The main motivations are to integrate a RAP cell processor on a few VLSI chips and improve performance by employing procedures exploiting these VLSI chips and the system level reconfigurability of processing resources. The resulting VLSI database processor consists of parallel processing cells that can be reconfigured into a large processor to execute the hard operations of projection and semijoin efficiently. It is shown that such a configuration can provide 2 to 3 orders of magnitude of performance improvement over previous implementations of the RAP system in the execution of such operations. 27 refs.

  5. Wafer screening device and methods for wafer screening

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rupnowski, Przemyslaw

    2014-07-15

    Wafer breakage is a serious problem in the photovoltaic industry because a large fraction of wafers (between 5 and 10%) break during solar cell/module fabrication. The major cause of this excessive wafer breakage is that these wafers have residual microcracks--microcracks that were not completely etched. Additional propensity for breakage is caused by texture etching and incomplete edge grinding. To eliminate the cost of processing the wafers that break, it is best to remove them prior to cell fabrication. Some attempts have been made to develop optical techniques to detect microcracks. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to detect microcracks that are embedded within the roughness/texture of the wafers. Furthermore, even if such detection is successful, it is not straightforward to relate them to wafer breakage. We believe that the best way to isolate the wafers with fatal microcracks is to apply a stress to wafers--a stress that mimics the highest stress during cell/module processing. If a wafer survives this stress, it has a high probability of surviving without breakage during cell/module fabrication. Based on this, we have developed a high throughput, noncontact method for applying a predetermined stress to a wafer. The wafers are carried on a belt through a chamber that illuminates the wafer with an intense light of a predetermined intensity distribution that can be varied by changing the power to the light source. As the wafers move under the light source, each wafer undergoes a dynamic temperature profile that produces a preset elastic stress. If this stress exceeds the wafer strength, the wafer will break. The broken wafers are separated early, eliminating cost of processing into cell/module. We will describe details of the system and show comparison of breakage statistics with the breakage on a production line.

  6. Constant fan-in digital neural networks are VLSI-optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a theoretical proof revealing an intrinsic limitation of digital VLSI technology: its inability to cope with highly connected structures (e.g. neural networks). We are in fact able to prove that efficient digital VLSI implementations (known as VLSI-optimal when minimizing the AT{sup 2} complexity measure - A being the area of the chip, and T the delay for propagating the inputs to the outputs) of neural networks are achieved for small-constant fan-in gates. This result builds on quite recent ones dealing with a very close estimate of the area of neural networks when implemented by threshold gates, but it is also valid for classical Boolean gates. Limitations and open questions are presented in the conclusions.

  7. Design of a Low-Power VLSI Macrocell for Nonlinear Adaptive Video Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, Sergio; Fanucci, Luca; Terreni, Pierangelo

    2004-12-01

    A VLSI macrocell for edge-preserving video noise reduction is proposed in the paper. It is based on a nonlinear rational filter enhanced by a noise estimator for blind and dynamic adaptation of the filtering parameters to the input signal statistics. The VLSI filter features a modular architecture allowing the extension of both mask size and filtering directions. Both spatial and spatiotemporal algorithms are supported. Simulation results with monochrome test videos prove its efficiency for many noise distributions with PSNR improvements up to 3.8 dB with respect to a nonadaptive solution. The VLSI macrocell has been realized in a 0.18[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]m CMOS technology using a standard-cells library; it allows for real-time processing of main video formats, up to 30 fps (frames per second) 4CIF, with a power consumption in the order of few mW.

  8. A coherent VLSI design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfield, P., Jr.; Glasser, L. A.; Knight, T. F., Jr.; Leiserson, C. E.; Rivest, R. L.

    1985-09-01

    The research discussed here is described in more detail in several published and unpublished reports cited. The CAD frame Schema has progressed to the point where it is useful for ample chip designs. The interface to CIF is complete, and work has begun on importing layout libraries. An interface to EDIF is being installed. Simulators can now be connected, and thought is going into organization of VLSI libraries. A plan for the distribution of Schema is now being worked out. Previous results on waveform bounding have been generalized to large classes of problems described in canonical control-theory form. Work has begun on models for interconnect taking account of line inductance. This domain is less general than RLC networks, and there is hope that some of the previously derived bounds still apply. During this period a novel device, the UV write-enabled PROM, was reported at a conference. Work continues on developing useful circuits employing this device.

  9. The VLSI design of error-trellis syndrome decoding for convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Jensen, J. M.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    A recursive algorithm using the error-trellis decoding technique is developed to decode convolutional codes (CCs). An example, illustrating the very large scale integration (VLSI) architecture of such a decode, is given for a dual-K CC. It is demonstrated that such a decoder can be realized readily on a single chip with metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  10. The VLSI design of an error-trellis syndrome decoder for certain convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Jensen, J. M.; Hsu, I.-S.; Truong, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    A recursive algorithm using the error-trellis decoding technique is developed to decode convolutional codes (CCs). An example, illustrating the very large scale integration (VLSI) architecture of such a decode, is given for a dual-K CC. It is demonstrated that such a decoder can be realized readily on a single chip with metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor technology.

  11. The Microelectronics Center: A new force in cooperative VLSI signal processing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, R. B.

    1983-11-01

    The needs of the microelectronics industry in applying VLSI to modern signal processing are stated: (1) to innovate new designs at a rapid rate: (2) to maintain an edge on the numbers of new designs and innovations; (3) to reduces the amount of parallel research and development efforts required to make effective technology and design decisions and to achieve successful market dominance.

  12. Within-wafer CD variation induced by wafer shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-hao; Yang, Mars; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    In order to meet the increasing storage capacity demand and reduce bit cost of NAND flash memories, 3D stacked vertical flash cell array has been proposed. In constructing 3D NAND flash memories, the bit number per unit area is increased as increasing the number of stacked layers. However, the increased number of stacked layers has made the film stress control extremely important for maintaining good process quality. The residual film stress alters the wafer shape accordingly several process impacts have been readily observed across wafer, such as film deposition non-uniformity, etch rate non-uniformity, wafer chucking error on scanner, materials coating/baking defects, overlay degradation and critical dimension (CD) non-uniformity. The residual tensile and compressive stresses on wafers will result in concave and convex wafer shapes, respectively. This study investigates within-wafer CD uniformity (CDU) associated with wafer shape change induced by the 3D NAND flash memory processes. Within-wafer CDU was correlated with several critical parameters including different wafer bow heights of concave and convex wafer shapes, photo resists with different post exposure baking (PEB) temperature sensitivities, and DoseMapper compensation. The results indicated the trend of within-wafer CDU maintains flat for convex wafer shapes with bow height up to +230um and concave wafer shapes with bow height ranging from 0 ~ -70um, while the within-wafer CDU trends up from -70um to -246um wafer bow heights. To minimize the within-wafer CD distribution induced by wafer warpage, carefully tailoring the film stack and thermal budget in the process flow for maintaining the wafer shape at CDU friendly range is indispensable and using photo-resist materials with lower PEB temperature sensitivity is also suggested. In addition, DoseMapper compensation is also an alternative to greatly suppress the within-wafer CD non-uniformity but the photo-resist profile variation induced by across-wafer

  13. The 1991 3rd NASA Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1991-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented from the following sessions: (1) featured presentations 1; (2) very large scale integration (VLSI) circuit design; (3) VLSI architecture 1; (4) featured presentations 2; (5) neural networks; (6) VLSI architectures 2; (7) featured presentations 3; (8) verification 1; (9) analog design; (10) verification 2; (11) design innovations 1; (12) asynchronous design; and (13) design innovations 2.

  14. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  15. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  16. Wafer-scale graphene integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ming; Valdes-Garcia, Alberto; Han, Shu-Jen; Farmer, Damon B; Meric, Inanc; Sun, Yanning; Wu, Yanqing; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Grill, Alfred; Avouris, Phaedon; Jenkins, Keith A

    2011-06-10

    A wafer-scale graphene circuit was demonstrated in which all circuit components, including graphene field-effect transistor and inductors, were monolithically integrated on a single silicon carbide wafer. The integrated circuit operates as a broadband radio-frequency mixer at frequencies up to 10 gigahertz. These graphene circuits exhibit outstanding thermal stability with little reduction in performance (less than 1 decibel) between 300 and 400 kelvin. These results open up possibilities of achieving practical graphene technology with more complex functionality and performance.

  17. Bulk CMOS VLSI Technology Studies. Part 1. Scalable CMOS Design Rules. Part 2. CMOS Approaches to PLA (Programmable Logic Array) Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    microns %H*SIC dimensions. Part 2: Various Programmable Logic Array (PLA) implementations with clocked CMOS technology are explored inthis project...Previous research at MSU has dealt with clocked CMOS circuit styles with some application to gate array and microprocessor applications. Work under this...in this report deals with structured logic schemes based on Programmable Logic Arrays (PLAs). Three different PLA design methods are reported with a

  18. VLSI Implementation Of The Fast Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Paul M.; Ku, Walter H.

    1986-03-01

    A VLSI implementation of a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processor consisting of a mesh interconnection of complex floating-point butterfly units is presented. The Cooley-Tukey radix-2 Decimation-In-Frequency (DIF) formulation of the FFT was chosen since it offered the best overall compromise between the need for fast and efficient algorithmic computation and the need for a structure amenable to VLSI layout. Thus the VLSI implementation is modular, regular, expandable to various problem sizes and has a simple systolic flow of data and control. To evaluate the FFT architecture, VLSI area-time complexity concepts are used, but are now adapted to a complex floating-point number system rather than the usual integer ring representation. We show by our construction that the Thompson area-time optimum bound for the VLSI computation of an N-point FFT, area-time2oc = ORNlogN)1+a] can be attained by an alternative number representation, and hence the theoretical bound is a tight bound regardless of number system representation.

  19. Beginning-to-end wafer bonding for advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrens, Shari N.; Lindner, Paul; Dwyer, Steven; Wimplinger, Markus

    2003-11-01

    The old adage "Work Smarter, Not Harder" is certainly applicable in today's competitive marketplace for Optical MEMS. In order to survive the current economic conditions, high volume manufacturers must get optimum performance and yield from each design and manufactured component. Wafer bonding, and its numerous variants, is entering mainstream production environments by providing solutions throughout the production flow. For example, SOI (silicon on insulator) and other laminated materials such as GaAs/Si are used as cost effective alternatives to molecular epitaxy methods for Bragg mirrors, rf resonators, and hybrid device fabrication. Temporary wafer bonding is used extensively to allow fragile compound semiconductors to be attached to rigid support wafers. This allows for front side and backside processing with a reduction in wafer breakage and increases in thickness uniformity results after backgrind operations. Permanent wafer bonding is used to attach compound semiconductors to each other or silicon to completely integrate optical components and logic or MEMS components. Permanent hermetic sealing is used for waveguide formation and, when combined with vacuum sealing, higher performance is achieved for RF resonators. Finally, many of the low temperature solders and eutectic alloys are finding application in low temperature wafer-to-wafer level packaging of optical devices to ceramic packages. Through clever application of these bonding methods, throughput increases and reduction in fabrication complexity givs a clear edge in the market place. This presentation will provide guidelines and process overviews needed to adopt wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies into the high volume-manufacturing environment.

  20. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  1. Interconnection capacitance models for VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Shyh-Chyi; Liu, Patrick S.; Ru, Jien-Wen; Lin, Shi-Tron

    1998-06-01

    A new set of capacitance models is developed for delay estimation of VLSI interconnections. The set of models is derived for five representative wiring structures, with their combinations covering arbitrary VLSI layouts. A semi-empirical approach is adopted to deal with complicated geometry nature in VLSI and to allow for closed-form capacitance formulas to be developed to provide direct observation of capacitance variation vs process parameters as well as computational efficiency for circuit simulation. The formulas are given explicitly in terms of wire width, wire thickness, dielectric thickness and inter-wire spacing. The models show good agreement with numerical solutions from RAPHAEL and measurement data of fabricated capacitance test structures. The models are further applied and validated on a ring oscillator. It is shown that the frequency of the ring oscillator obtained from HSPICE simulation with our models agrees well with the bench measurement.

  2. Channel routing for VLSI layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schory, Michael

    1988-12-01

    Channel routing for VLSI layout is reviewed and a set of features required of an industrial channel router is defined. A channel router, CAR, was implemented, based on the Greedy and Detour routers. Integrated circuit design is discussed, with attention to the various channel routing problems and models. The major requirements for an industrial channel router to be integrated within general cells and standard cells routing environments are discussed and their fulfillment in CAR is considered. CAR comprises: the Greedy router functionality; the Detour router's obstacle, obstruction and switch box extensions; rectilinear channels; ports located not on standard and immediately surrounding layers; middle ports within the channel; jog on conflict-only to reduce jog use; single layer jogs; and partial pre-routing and dynamic layer optimization. Special features of CAR include: extension of the net definition with a short range tendency; definition of net preferred track; net visibility range in rectilinear channels; an extended area mechanism to deal with obstacles, rectilinear edges, pre-routing and ports on unusual layers; unified jog cost evaluation functions; unified, efficient jog selection; a general evaluation function for track worth; and a net connectivity part to control and handle split nets. Examples are presented of CAR operations.

  3. AFOSR Wafer Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-31

    cleanliness (foreign particles) and surface morphology (roughness). Two silicon wafers, when properly cleaned, can easily bond at room temperature because of...4 Figure IV data for nSi-nGaN bond. Structure is similar to that shown in Figure Difficulties and Knowledge Added Surface Morphology and...Particles One of the most important features of materials in determining whether they will bond is the quality of the bonding surfaces , in both

  4. Reliability of small geometry VLSI devices for microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Marvin H.

    1992-02-01

    This proposal is a continuation of a project which began in August 1986. The goal of the project, in a broad sense, is to perform exploratory research into the physics of carriers in silicon inversion layers with a focus on the issues which affect the reliability of small geometry VLSI devices. This project permits us to study the physical electronics of silicon surfaces and the overlying insulators. In the proposed project we stress the application of this research to the area of Wafer Scale Integration where reliability and fault tolerance are key issues for the SDI program. The extensive signal processing and data storage required to implement high-resolution, sensor-based systems demands that consideration be given to the area of system and component reliability. At the component level the issues revolve around the reliability of the scaled MOS Transistor with nanometric feature sizes. One important area is the susceptibility of the gate insulator to (1) hot electron trapping, (2) premature dielectric breakdown, and (3) space radiation environment considerations which can limit the MTTF of the SDIO mission. A second issue at the component level is the SDI need for low-power, high-density, nonvolatile data storage with nondestructive readout (NDRO), radiation tolerance and immunity to single event upsets (SEU's).

  5. Associative Pattern Recognition In Analog VLSI Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Winner-take-all circuit selects best-match stored pattern. Prototype cascadable very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit chips built and tested to demonstrate concept of electronic associative pattern recognition. Based on low-power, sub-threshold analog complementary oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) VLSI circuitry, each chip can store 128 sets (vectors) of 16 analog values (vector components), vectors representing known patterns as diverse as spectra, histograms, graphs, or brightnesses of pixels in images. Chips exploit parallel nature of vector quantization architecture to implement highly parallel processing in relatively simple computational cells. Through collective action, cells classify input pattern in fraction of microsecond while consuming power of few microwatts.

  6. 30 GHz monolithic balanced mixers using an ion-implanted FET-compatible 3-inch GaAs wafer process technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauhahn, P.; Contolatis, A.; Sokolov, V.; Chao, C.

    1986-01-01

    An all ion-implanted Schottky barrier mixer diode which has a cutoff frequency greater than 1000 GHz has been developed. This new device is planar and FET-compatible and employs a projection lithography 3-inch wafer process. A Ka-band monolithic balanced mixer based on this device has been designed, fabricated and tested. A conversion loss of 8 dB has been measured with a LO drive of 10 dBm at 30 GHz.

  7. Proceedings of the Low-Cost Solar Array Wafering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    The technology and economics of silicon ingot wafering for low cost solar arrays were discussed. Fixed and free abrasive sawing wire, ID, and multiblade sawing, materials, mechanisms, characterization, and innovative concepts were considered.

  8. Ion implantation technology and ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Michiro

    2014-02-01

    Ion implantation (I/I) technology has been developed with a great economic success of industries of VLSI (Very Large-Scale Integrated circuit) devices. Due to its large flexibility and good controllability, the I/I technology has been assuming various challenging requirements of VLSI evolutions, especially in advanced evolutional characteristics of CMOSFET. Here, reviewing the demands of VLSI manufacturing to the I/I technology, required characteristics of ion implanters, and their ion sources are discussed.

  9. Gallium Arsenide wafer scale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. F.; Taylor, G.; Steinvorth, R.; Donlan, B.; Bergendahl, A. S.

    1985-08-01

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) digital MESFET technology has recently begun to appear in the semiconductor marketplace. The initial commercial offerings are at the small to medium scale integration levels. The high speed of these parts would seem to be very attractive for designers of high performance signal processing equipment. Persistent yield problems, however, have prevented the appearance of large scale integrated circuits. As a result, intrapackage and interpackage signal propagation problems such as coupling, parasitics and delay are likely to negate much of the benefits of the fast MESFET logic devices for large systems constructed with such small scale building blocks. An early packaging concept, Wafer Scale Integration (WSI), which could possibly be used to address some of these limitations is reexamined.

  10. Switch floor plants for restructurable VLSI/WSI

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    An electrically programmable switch has become a promising interconection technique for Restructurable VLSI/WSI systems because of its desirable properties, such as field reprogrammability, conventional fabrication technology and ease of changing the target architecture. However, the electrically programmable switch presents several problems to be solved, including long intermodule communication delay due to switches; the intermodule communication delay degrades VLSI/WSI system performance, particularly when it is a dominant factor in determining system speed. In this research, switch floor planning strategies (called switch floor plans) are proposed. The goal of those switch floor plans is to reduce the average intermodule communication delay and the total number of switches in the system. An ICT (Initial Configuration of Target architecture) design concept and the heterogeneous switch blocks over the target/host architecture are used to achieve such a goal. The ICT design is compared to other conventional-yield-enhancement methods by a combinatorial analysis. The proposed switch floor plans are evaluated by a computer simulation. Results show the desirability of the ICT design and the heterogeneous switches in the RVLSI/WSI system design.

  11. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  12. SSI/MSI/LSI/VLSI/ULSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, George

    1984-01-01

    Discusses small-scale integrated (SSI), medium-scale integrated (MSI), large-scale integrated (LSI), very large-scale integrated (VLSI), and ultra large-scale integrated (ULSI) chips. The development and properties of these chips, uses of gallium arsenide, Josephson devices (two superconducting strips sandwiching a thin insulator), and future…

  13. Parallel optical interconnects utilizing VLSI/FLC spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Sheryl M.

    1991-12-01

    Interconnection architectures are a cornerstone of parallel computing systems. However, interconnections can be a bottleneck in conventional computer architectures because of queuing structures that are necessary to handle the traffic through a switch at very high data rates and bandwidths. These issues must find new solutions to advance the state of the art in computing beyond the fundamental limit of silicon logic technology. Today's optoelectronic (OE) technology in particular VLSI/FLC spatial light modulators (SLMs) can provide a unique and innovative solution to these issues. This paper reports on the motivations for the system, describes the major areas of architectural requirements, discusses interconnection topologies and processor element alternatives, and documents an optical arbitration (i.e., control) scheme using `smart' SLMs and optical logic gates. The network topology is given in section 2.1 `Architectural Requirements -- Networks,' but it should be noted that the emphasis is on the optical control scheme (section 2.4) and the system.

  14. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  15. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the

  16. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  17. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S.

    2016-01-01

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology. PMID:27809249

  18. Architecture for VLSI design of Reed-Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The logic structure of a universal VLSI chip called the symbol-slice Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder chip is discussed. An RS encoder can be constructed by cascading and properly interconnecting a group of such VLSI chips. As a design example, it is shown that a (255,223) RD encoder requiring around 40 discrete CMOS ICs may be replaced by an RS encoder consisting of four identical interconnected VLSI RS encoder chips. Besides the size advantage, the VLSI RS encoder also has the potential advantages of requiring less power and having a higher reliability.

  19. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  20. Novel 1.3-micron high-speed directly modulated semiconductor laser device designs and the development of wafer bonding technology for compliant-substrate fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Joseph

    2000-10-01

    substrate production requires the wafer fusion of two substrates. A wafer bonding system has been designed, built and tested to improve wafer bonding techniques for this application. This machine's scalable design is capable of improved reproducibility, uniformity and yield over comparable techniques.

  1. The VLSI design of a Reed-Solomon encoder using Berlekamps bit-serial multiplier algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.; Hsu, I. S.; Wang, K.; Yeh, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Realization of a bit-serial multiplication algorithm for the encoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes on a single VLSI chip using NMOS technology is demonstrated to be feasible. A dual basis (255, 223) over a Galois field is used. The conventional RS encoder for long codes ofter requires look-up tables to perform the multiplication of two field elements. Berlekamp's algorithm requires only shifting and exclusive-OR operations.

  2. Accelerating litho technology development for advanced design node flash memory FEOL by next-generation wafer inspection and SEM review platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Ho; Ahn, Jeongho; Ihm, Dongchul; Chin, Soobok; Lee, Dong-Ryul; Choi, Seongchae; Lee, Junbum; Kang, Ho-Kyu; Sivaraman, Gangadharan; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lakhawat, Rahul; Sanapala, Ravikumar; Lee, Chang Ho; Lobo, Arun

    2012-03-01

    Development of an advanced design node for NAND flash memory devices in semiconductor manufacturing requires accelerated identification and characterization of yield-limiting defect types at critical front-end of line (FEOL) process steps. This enables a shorter development cycle time and a faster production ramp to meet market demand. This paper presents a methodology for detecting defects that have a substantial yield impact on a FEOL after-develop inspection (ADI) layer using an advanced broadband optical wafer defect inspector and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) review tool. In addition, this paper presents experimental data that demonstrates defect migration from an ADI layer to an after-clean inspection (ACI) layer, and provides clear differentiation between yield-impacting critical defects and noncritical defects on the layers. The goal of these studies is to determine the feasibility of implementing an inspection point at ADI. The advantage of capturing yield-limiting defects on an ADI layer is that wafers can be reworked when an excursion occurs, an option that is not always possible for ACI layers. Our investigation is divided into two parts: (1) Inspection of an ADI layer with high sensitivity to find an accurate representation of the defect population and to gain understanding on the propagation of defects from the ADI layer to the ACI layer; and, (2) Inspection of an ACI layer to develop an understanding of unique defects generated by the ACI process step. Overall, this paper discusses the advantages of baselining defectivity at ADI process levels for accelerated development of advanced design node memory devices.

  3. VLSI 'smart' I/O module development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Dan

    The developmental history, design, and operation of the MIL-STD-1553A/B discrete and serial module (DSM) for the U.S. Navy AN/AYK-14(V) avionics computer are described and illustrated with diagrams. The ongoing preplanned product improvement for the AN/AYK-14(V) includes five dual-redundant MIL-STD-1553 channels based on DSMs. The DSM is a front-end processor for transferring data to and from a common memory, sharing memory with a host processor to provide improved 'smart' input/output performance. Each DSM comprises three hardware sections: three VLSI-6000 semicustomized CMOS arrays, memory units to support the arrays, and buffers and resynchronization circuits. The DSM hardware module design, VLSI-6000 design tools, controlware and test software, and checkout procedures (using a hardware simulator) are characterized in detail.

  4. Cascaded VLSI Chips Help Neural Network To Learn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1993-01-01

    Cascading provides 12-bit resolution needed for learning. Using conventional silicon chip fabrication technology of VLSI, fully connected architecture consisting of 32 wide-range, variable gain, sigmoidal neurons along one diagonal and 7-bit resolution, electrically programmable, synaptic 32 x 31 weight matrix implemented on neuron-synapse chip. To increase weight nominally from 7 to 13 bits, synapses on chip individually cascaded with respective synapses on another 32 x 32 matrix chip with 7-bit resolution synapses only (without neurons). Cascade correlation algorithm varies number of layers effectively connected into network; adds hidden layers one at a time during learning process in such way as to optimize overall number of neurons and complexity and configuration of network.

  5. Princeton VLSI Project: Semi-Annual Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    A’D-A149 588 PRINCETON VLSI PROJECT: SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT(U) PRINCETON i/i UNIV NJ DEPT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE R J LIPTON 91...logic. We plan further experiments to further vali- date these results. Finally, we have also found a way to transform any combinational logic cir...Programming Richard J. Lptoi4 Sftp3 , C Nerth - Robert 5edgeutck Jacobo Vaides tDepartment of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Princeton

  6. VLSI Microsystem for Rapid Bioinformatic Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Lue, Jaw-Chyng

    2009-01-01

    A system comprising very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits is being developed as a means of bioinformatics-oriented analysis and recognition of patterns of fluorescence generated in a microarray in an advanced, highly miniaturized, portable genetic-expression-assay instrument. Such an instrument implements an on-chip combination of polymerase chain reactions and electrochemical transduction for amplification and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

  7. Leak detection utilizing analog binaural (VLSI) techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A detection method and system utilizing silicon models of the traveling wave structure of the human cochlea to spatially and temporally locate a specific sound source in the presence of high noise pandemonium. The detection system combines two-dimensional stereausis representations, which are output by at least three VLSI binaural hearing chips, to generate a three-dimensional stereausis representation including both binaural and spectral information which is then used to locate the sound source.

  8. Systolic VLSI Reed-Solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Decoder for digital communications provides high-speed, pipelined ReedSolomon (RS) error-correction decoding of data streams. Principal new feature of proposed decoder is modification of Euclid greatest-common-divisor algorithm to avoid need for time-consuming computations of inverse of certain Galois-field quantities. Decoder architecture suitable for implementation on very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) chips with negative-channel metaloxide/silicon circuitry.

  9. VLED for Si wafer-level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Fu; Chen, Chiming; Yen, Jui-Kang; Chen, Yung-Wei; Tsou, Chingfu; Chang, Chunming; Doan, Trung; Tran, Chuong Anh

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we introduced the advantages of Vertical Light emitting diode (VLED) on copper alloy with Si-wafer level packaging technologies. The silicon-based packaging substrate starts with a <100> dou-ble-side polished p-type silicon wafer, then anisotropic wet etching technology is done to construct the re-flector depression and micro through-holes on the silicon substrate. The operating voltage, at a typical cur-rent of 350 milli-ampere (mA), is 3.2V. The operation voltage is less than 3.7V under higher current driving conditions of 1A. The VLED chip on Si package has excellent heat dissipation and can be operated at high currents up to 1A without efficiency degradation. The typical spatial radiation pattern emits a uniform light lambertian distribution from -65° to 65° which can be easily fit for secondary optics. The correlated color temperature (CCT) has only 5% variation for daylight and less than 2% variation for warm white, when the junction temperature is increased from 25°C to 110°C, suggesting a stable CCT during operation for general lighting application. Coupled with aspheric lens and micro lens array in a wafer level process, it has almost the same light distribution intensity for special secondary optics lighting applications. In addition, the ul-tra-violet (UV) VLED, featuring a silicon substrate and hard glass cover, manufactured by wafer level pack-aging emits high power UV wavelengths appropriate for curing, currency, document verification, tanning, medical, and sterilization applications.

  10. Training probabilistic VLSI models on-chip to recognise biomedical signals under hardware nonidealities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P C; Chen, H

    2006-01-01

    VLSI implementation of probabilistic models is attractive for many biomedical applications. However, hardware non-idealities can prevent probabilistic VLSI models from modelling data optimally through on-chip learning. This paper investigates the maximum computational errors that a probabilistic VLSI model can tolerate when modelling real biomedical data. VLSI circuits capable of achieving the required precision are also proposed.

  11. Parallel optimization algorithms and their implementation in VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Feeley, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Two new parallel optimization algorithms based on the simplex method are described. They may be executed by a SIMD parallel processor architecture and be implemented in VLSI design. Several VLSI design implementations are introduced. An application example is reported to demonstrate that the algorithms are effective.

  12. Image Compression on a VLSI Neural-Based Vector Quantizer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Oscal T.-C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a modified frequency-sensitive self-organization (FSO) algorithm for image data compression and the associated VLSI architecture. Topics discussed include vector quantization; VLSI neural processor architecture; detailed circuit implementation; and a neural network vector quantization prototype chip. Examples of images using the FSO…

  13. Further investigation of EUV process sensitivities for wafer track processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradon, Neil; Nafus, K.; Shite, H.; Kitano, J.; Kosugi, H.; Goethals, M.; Cheng, S.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.; Baudemprez, B.; Van Den Heuvel, D.

    2010-04-01

    As Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography technology shows promising results below 40nm feature sizes, TOKYO ELECTRON LTD.(TEL) is committed to understanding the fundamentals needed to improve our technology, thereby enabling customers to meet roadmap expectations. TEL continues collaboration with imec for evaluation of Coater/Developer processing sensitivities using the ASML Alpha Demo Tool for EUV exposures. The results from the collaboration help develop the necessary hardware for EUV Coater/Developer processing. In previous work, processing sensitivities of the resist materials were investigated to determine the impact on critical dimension (CD) uniformity and defectivity. In this work, new promising resist materials have been studied and more information pertaining to EUV exposures was obtained. Specifically, post exposure bake (PEB) impact to CD is studied in addition to dissolution characteristics and resist material hydrophobicity. Additionally, initial results show the current status of CDU and defectivity with the ADT/CLEAN TRACK ACTTM 12 lithocluster. Analysis of a five wafer batch of CDU wafers shows within wafer and wafer to wafer contribution from track processing. A pareto of a patterned wafer defectivity test gives initial insight into the process defects with the current processing conditions. From analysis of these data, it's shown that while improvements in processing are certainly possible, the initial results indicate a manufacturable process for EUV.

  14. System for slicing wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A newly patented process for slicing silicon wafers that has distinct advantages over methods now widely used is described. The primary advantage of the new system is that it allows the efficient slicing of a number of ingots simultaneously at high speed. The cutting action is performed mechanically, most often with diamond particles that are transported to the cutting zone by a fluid vehicle or have been made an integral part of the blade by plating or impregnation. The new system uses a multiple or ganged band saw, arranged and spaced so that each side, or length, segment of a blade element, or loop, provides a cutting function. Each blade is maintained precisely in position by guides as it enters and leaves each ingot. The cutting action is performed with a conventional abrasive slurry composed of diamond grit suspended in an oil- or water-based vehicle. The distribution system draws the slurry from the supply reservoir and pumps it to the injection tubes to supply it to each side of each ingot. A flush system is provided at the outer end of the work-station zone. In order to reduce potential damage, a pneumatically driven flushing fluid is provided.

  15. VLSI architectures for geometrical mapping problems in high-definition image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper explores a VLSI architecture for geometrical mapping address computation. The geometric transformation is discussed in the context of plane projective geometry, which invokes a set of basic transformations to be implemented for the general image processing. The homogeneous and 2-dimensional cartesian coordinates are employed to represent the transformations, each of which is implemented via an augmented CORDIC as a processing element. A specific scheme for a processor, which utilizes full-pipelining at the macro-level and parallel constant-factor-redundant arithmetic and full-pipelining at the micro-level, is assessed to produce a single VLSI chip for HDTV applications using state-of-art MOS technology.

  16. Computer aided fast turnaround laboratory for research in VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meindl, James D.; Shott, John

    1987-05-01

    The principal objectives of the computer aided/Automated fast turn-around laboratory (CAFTAL) for VLSI are: application of cutting edge computer science and software systems engineering to fast turn-around fabrication in order to develop more productive and flexible new approaches; fast turn-around fabrication of optimized VLSI systems achieved through synergistic integration of system research and device research in aggressive applications such as superfast computers, and investigation of physical limits on submicron VLSI in order to define and explore the most promising technologies. To make a state-of-the-art integrated circuit process more manufacturable, we must be able to understand both the numerous individual process technologies used to fabricate the complete device as well as the important device, circuit and system limitations in sufficient detail to monitor and control the overall fabrication sequence. Specifically, we must understand the sensitivity of device, circuit and system performance to each important step in the fabrication sequence. Moreover, we should be able to predict the manufacturability of an integrated circuit before we actually manufacture it. The salient objective of this program is to enable accurate simulation and control of computer-integrated manufacturing of ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) systems, including millions of submicron transistors in a single silicon chip.

  17. Experimental evaluation of incorporating digital and analog integrated circuit die on a common substrate utilizing silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reamy, Philip C.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this research effort was to investigate the implementation of analog circuits in a wafer scale integration system. A test circuit composed of analog and digital subsystems was designed and tested through simulation. IC die containing this test circuit were utilized in the WSI system fabrication. Preliminary investigations were conducted to evaluate the potential improvements to the IC die mounting procedure, a key step in fabricating functional WSI systems. These investigations demonstrated a procedure which produced repeatable results in achieving acceptable planarization of IC die and host substrate surfaces. These investigations also demonstrated the successful application of a barrier coating material to prevent adhesion between the IC die adhesive and the reference flat during the IC die mounting procedure. An evaluation of candidate polyimides to be used as the interlevel dielectric in the WSI systems was also performed. Test samples for each of the WSI configurations were fabricated and tested for electrical continuity. Additional electrical characterization measurements were conducted on two of the test samples.

  18. Wafer handling and placement tool

    DOEpatents

    Witherspoon, Linda L.

    1988-01-05

    A spring arm tool is provided for clamp engaging and supporting wafers while the tool is hand held. The tool includes a pair of relatively swingable jaw element supporting support arms and the jaw elements are notched to enjoy multiple point contact with a wafer peripheral portion. Also, one disclosed form of the tool includes remotely operable workpiece ejecting structure carried by the jaw elements thereof.

  19. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology.

    PubMed

    Choi, M S; Park, H M; Joo, K N

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  20. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  1. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  2. Development of Megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1980-09-01

    The major goals to develop a cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three-in.-diameter wafers per hour and to reduce the process cost were achieved. The new system consists of an ammonia-hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32-in.-spaced, ion-implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of Megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room-temperature, high-velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis. The following factors contribute to the improved effectiveness of the process: (1) recirculation and filtration of the cleaning solution permit it to be used for at least 100,000 wafers with only a relatively small amount of chemical make-up before discarding; (2) uniform cleanliness is achieved because both sides of the wafer are Megasonically scrubbed to remove particulate impurities; (3) the novel dryer permits wafers to be dried in a high-velocity room-temperature air stream on a moving belt in their quartz carriers; and (4) the personnel safety of such a system is excellent and waste disposal has no adverse ecological impact. With the addition of mechanical transfer arms, two systems like the one developed will produce enough cleaned wafers for a 30-MW/year production facility. A projected scale-up well within the existing technology would permit a system to be assembled that produces about 12,745 wafers per hour; about 11 such systems, each occupying about 110 square feet, would be needed for each cleaning stage of a 500-MW/year production facility.

  3. Automated Product Test Wafer Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew; Minvielle, Anna; Salugsugan, Anita

    1987-04-01

    An automated test wafer procedure has been developed using the KLA 2020 wafer inspector to measure registration and critical dimensions on production wafers. The procedure reduces operator interactions to loading the wafer and entering information for wafer identification. The analysis of the registration data is performed on a PC using the methods established by Perloff to determine both intrafield and grid errors. These results are then used to correct the stepper. CD data is also analyzed by the program and corrections to the exposure time are calculated. It was found that the KLA 2020 is as much as 10 times faster and 4 times more precise in obtaining registration data then an operator reading optical verniers on a microscope. Due to the high precision of the reading, the analysis does not need a large number of readings to obtain precise and accurate stepper corrections. Further, significant improvements can be obtained by adding registration targets to measure the intrafield errors. Using the KLA 2020 and computer analysis we have demonstrated an ability to reduce the errors for a manually aligned run to a one sigma distribution of 0.09 um for x and y translation, 0.4 PPM for scaling and orthogonality, and 2.3 PPM for rotation from the first test wafer for a GCA 6100. Nearly all of this variation is due to operator misalignment or the inability of the stepper to correct the errors. The corrections with this technique measuring the same wafer are precise to + 0.01 um in translation and + 0.5 PPM for rotation, scaling, and orthogonality. It has also been shown that a simple linear equation can be used to correct exposure time, even when a process is not tightly controlled.

  4. A Design Methodology for Optoelectronic VLSI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    soldered to a copper -clad printed circuit (PC) board, are no longer sufficient for today’s high-speed ICs. A processing chip that can compute data at a rate...design approach. A new design methodology has to be adopted to take advan- tage of the benefits that FSOI offers. Optoelectronic VLSI is the coupling of...and connections are made from chip to chip via traces of copper wire, as shown in Figure 2-2. The signal from a logic gate on one chip to a logic gate

  5. Low-frequency noise reduction in vertical MOSFETs having tunable threshold voltage fabricated with 60 nm CMOS technology on 300 mm wafer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamoto, Takuya; Ma, Yitao; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, DC and low-frequency noise (LFN) characteristics have been investigated with actual measurement data in both n- and p-type vertical MOSFETs (V-MOSFETs) for the first time. The V-MOSFETs which was fabricated on 300 mm bulk silicon wafer process have realized excellent DC performance and a significant reduction of flicker (1/f) noise. The measurement results show that the fabricated V-MOSFETs with 60 nm silicon pillar and 100 nm gate length achieve excellent steep sub-threshold swing (69 mV/decade for n-type and 66 mV/decade for p-type), good on-current (281 µA/µm for n-type 149 µA/µm for p-type), low off-leakage current (28.1 pA/µm for n-type and 79.6 pA/µm for p-type), and excellent on-off ratio (1 × 107 for n-type and 2 × 106 for p-type). In addition, it is demonstrated that our fabricated V-MOSFETs can control the threshold voltage (Vth) by changing the channel doping condition, which is the useful and low-cost technique as it has been widely used in the conventional bulk planar MOSFET. This result indicates that V-MOSFETs can control Vth more finely and flexibly by the combined the use of the doping technique with other techniques such as work function engineering of metal-gate. Moreover, it is also shown that V-MOSFETs can suppress 1/f noise (L\\text{gate}WS\\text{Id}/I\\text{d}2 of 10-13-10-11 µm2/Hz for n-type and 10-12-10-10 µm2/Hz for p-type) to one or two order lower level than previously reported nanowire type MOSFET, FinFET, Tri-Gate, and planar MOSFETs. The results have also proved that both DC and 1/f noise performances are independent from the bias voltage which is applied to substrate or well layer. Therefore, it is verified that V-MOSFETs can eliminate the effects from substrate or well layer, which always adversely affects the circuit performances due to this serial connection.

  6. VLSI Design Tools, Reference Manual, Release 2.0.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    intermediate steps are to be deleted . -d def sf ie Specifies a file to be used as a sim2spice definitions file. -m modelfile Specifies a file that... deleted by the -r option. ~~0U SKALSO7 .. sim2spice(I.vls), spcpp(lvl) spice(1.vls) ’NW VLSI Release 2 1 10/1/83 lllIII *lIllll4I PSPICE(I.VLSI) VLSI...is written to troot pex where Iroor is obtained by stripping away any tap from 1u . la.me Specifies the name of the file to procen. A bracketed token

  7. Performances of accumulation-mode n- and p-MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, Philippe; Teramoto, Akinobu; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the electrical and noise performances of accumulation-mode n- and p-MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers and compare them with conventional MOSFETs fabricated either on Si(100) or Si(110) wafers. With regard to electrical performances, accumulation-mode p-type MOSFETs are in every aspect superior. However, its n-type counterpart does not provide the best performances even though they are still superior to conventional transistors when fabricated on the same type of wafer. Conventional inversion-mode n-MOSFETs on Si(100) wafers still display the best performances. The simultaneous improvement and reduction in drivability respectively in the p- and n-type transistors make the accumulation-mode MOSFETs fabricated on Si(110) wafers extremely well suited for complementary technologies owing to their great balance in terms of drivability. With regard to noise evaluation, accumulation-mode MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers exhibit the highest noise level even though they compare relatively well with the inversion transistors on Si(110) wafers, especially for p-type ones. The lowest noise level is obtained for conventional inversion-mode MOSFETs on Si(100) wafers, and the type of wafer upon which transistors are fabricated is the reason. Indeed, the fabrication of high-quality Si/SiO2 interfaces is better achieved for silicon wafers with a (100) crystallographic orientation, leading to few interface defects and consequently less noise.

  8. Artwork analysis tools for VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, C. M.

    1980-06-01

    Current methods of designing Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) chips do not insure that the chips will perform correctly when manufactured. Because the turnaround time on chip fabrication varies from a few weeks to a few months, a scheme other than try it and see if it works is needed. Checking of chips by hand simulation and visual inspection of checkplots will not catch all of the errors. In addition, the number of transistors per chip is likely to increase from ten thousand to over a million in the next few years. This increase in complexity precludes any manual verification methods; some better method is needed. A series of programs that use the actual mask descriptions for input are described. These programs perform various levels of checks on the masks, yielding files suitable for simulation. Some of the checks are the usual 'design rule' checks of looking for minimum line widths and adequate spacing between wires. However, there are many more constraints in VLSI circuits than are expressed by usual design rules. The programs check these constraints using the mask descriptions as input. All of the errors mentioned so far can be classified as syntactic errors; in addition, certain errors are detected. The detection of semantic errors requires various levels of simulation. The input to the simulators is derived from the artwork.

  9. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  10. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  11. Silicon wafer-based tandem cells: The ultimate photovoltaic solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent large price reductions with wafer-based cells have increased the difficulty of dislodging silicon solar cell technology from its dominant market position. With market leaders expected to be manufacturing modules above 16% efficiency at 0.36/Watt by 2017, even the cost per unit area (60-70/m2) will be difficult for any thin-film photovoltaic technology to significantly undercut. This may make dislodgement likely only by appreciably higher energy conversion efficiency approaches. A silicon wafer-based cell able to capitalize on on-going cost reductions within the mainstream industry, but with an appreciably higher than present efficiency, might therefore provide the ultimate PV solution. With average selling prices of 156 mm quasi-square monocrystalline Si photovoltaic wafers recently approaching 1 (per wafer), wafers now provide clean, low cost templates for overgrowth of thin, wider bandgap high performance cells, nearly doubling silicon's ultimate efficiency potential. The range of possible Si-based tandem approaches is reviewed together with recent results and ultimate prospects.

  12. WaferOptics® mass volume production and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, E.; Demeyer, K.

    2010-05-01

    The Anteryon WaferOptics® Technology platform contains imaging optics designs, materials, metrologies and combined with wafer level based Semicon & MEMS production methods. WaferOptics® first required complete new system engineering. This system closes the loop between application requirement specifications, Anteryon product specification, Monte Carlo Analysis, process windows, process controls and supply reject criteria. Regarding the Anteryon product Integrated Lens Stack (ILS), new design rules, test methods and control systems were assessed, implemented, validated and customer released for mass production. This includes novel reflowable materials, mastering process, replication, bonding, dicing, assembly, metrology, reliability programs and quality assurance systems. Many of Design of Experiments were performed to assess correlations between optical performance parameters and machine settings of all process steps. Lens metrologies such as FFL, BFL, and MTF were adapted for wafer level production and wafer mapping was introduced for yield management. Test methods for screening and validating suitable optical materials were designed. Critical failure modes such as delamination and popcorning were assessed and modeled with FEM. Anteryon successfully managed to integrate the different technologies starting from single prototypes to high yield mass volume production These parallel efforts resulted in a steep yield increase from 30% to over 90% in a 8 months period.

  13. SVX3 Six Inch Wafer Failure Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R.

    1999-05-01

    In 1997 an order was placed with Honeywell for 265 four inch SVX3 wafers. After the initial delivery, the processing line at Honeywell was switched to 6 inch wafers. It was quickly apparent that there were serious problems on the 6 inch wafers which were not seen on the 4 inch wafers. Wafers from one of the 6 inch lots generally have a high yield and do not exhibit the center of the wafer via problem. It is not know if bad vias will recover or good vias go bad with time, temperature and radiation.

  14. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  15. NASA Space Engineering Research Center Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) is proud to offer, at its second symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories and the electronics industry. These featured speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design. Questions of reliability in the space environment along with new directions in CAD and design are addressed by the featured speakers.

  16. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  17. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  18. Periodic binary sequence generators: VLSI circuits considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback shift registers are efficient periodic binary sequence generators. Polynomials of degree r over a Galois field characteristic 2(GF(2)) characterize the behavior of shift registers with linear logic feedback. The algorithmic determination of the trinomial of lowest degree, when it exists, that contains a given irreducible polynomial over GF(2) as a factor is presented. This corresponds to embedding the behavior of an r-stage shift register with linear logic feedback into that of an n-stage shift register with a single two-input modulo 2 summer (i.e., Exclusive-OR gate) in its feedback. This leads to Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuit architecture of maximal regularity (i.e., identical cells) with intercell communications serialized to a maximal degree.

  19. Analog VLSI neural network integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kub, F. J.; Moon, K. K.; Just, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two analog very large scale integration (VLSI) vector matrix multiplier integrated circuit chips were designed, fabricated, and partially tested. They can perform both vector-matrix and matrix-matrix multiplication operations at high speeds. The 32 by 32 vector-matrix multiplier chip and the 128 by 64 vector-matrix multiplier chip were designed to perform 300 million and 3 billion multiplications per second, respectively. An additional circuit that has been developed is a continuous-time adaptive learning circuit. The performance achieved thus far for this circuit is an adaptivity of 28 dB at 300 KHz and 11 dB at 15 MHz. This circuit has demonstrated greater than two orders of magnitude higher frequency of operation than any previous adaptive learning circuit.

  20. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  1. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Linscott, I. R.; Peterson, A. M.; Burr, J.; Ekroot, B.; Twicken, J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  2. VLSI processors for signal detection in SETI.

    PubMed

    Duluk, J F; Linscott, I R; Peterson, A M; Burr, J; Ekroot, B; Twicken, J

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is to locate an artificially created signal coming from a distant star. This is done in two steps: (1) spectral analysis of an incoming radio frequency band, and (2) pattern detection for narrow-band signals. Both steps are computationally expensive and require the development of specially designed computer architectures. To reduce the size and cost of the SETI signal detection machine, two custom VLSI chips are under development. The first chip, the SETI DSP Engine, is used in the spectrum analyzer and is specially designed to compute Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs). It is a high-speed arithmetic processor that has two adders, one multiplier-accumulator, and three four-port memories. The second chip is a new type of Content-Addressable Memory. It is the heart of an associative processor that is used for pattern detection. Both chips incorporate many innovative circuits and architectural features.

  3. Implementation of optical interconnections for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Wennie H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Johnston, Alan R.; Guest, Clark C.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress in implementing optical interconnections for VLSI. Four areas are covered: (1) the holographic optical element (HOE), (2) the laser sources, (3) the detectors and associated circuits forming an optically addressed gate, and (4) interconnection experiments in which five gates are actuated from one source. A laser scanner system with a resolution of 12 x 20 microns has been utilized to generate the HOEs. Diffraction efficiency of the HOE and diffracted spot size have been measured. Stock lasers have been modified with a high-frequency package for interconnect experiments, and buried heterostructure fabrication techniques have been pursued. Measurements have been made on the fabricated photodetectors to determine dark current, responsivity, and response time. The optical gates and the overall chip have been driven successfully with an input light beam, as well as with the optical signal interconnected through the one to five holograms.

  4. Hierarchical Design and Verification for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shostak, R. E.; Elliott, W. D.; Levitt, K. N.

    1983-01-01

    The specification and verification work is described in detail, and some of the problems and issues to be resolved in their application to Very Large Scale Integration VLSI systems are examined. The hierarchical design methodologies enable a system architect or design team to decompose a complex design into a formal hierarchy of levels of abstraction. The first step inprogram verification is tree formation. The next step after tree formation is the generation from the trees of the verification conditions themselves. The approach taken here is similar in spirit to the corresponding step in program verification but requires modeling of the semantics of circuit elements rather than program statements. The last step is that of proving the verification conditions using a mechanical theorem-prover.

  5. NREL Core Program; Session: Wafer Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2008-04-01

    This project supports the Solar America Initiative by working on: (1) wafer Si accounts for 92% world-wide solar cell production; (2) research to fill the industry R and D pipeline for the issues in wafer Si; (3) development of industry collaborative research; (4) improvement of NREL tools and capabilities; and (5) strengthen US wafer Si research.

  6. On-wafer magnetic resonance of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles A. E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Booth, James C.; Kabos, Pavel; Usselman, Robert J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance measurements of ferumoxytol and TEMPO were made using an on-wafer transmission line technique with a vector network analyzer, allowing for broadband measurements of small sample volumes (4 nL) and small numbers of spins (1 nmol). On-wafer resonance measurements were compared with standard single-frequency cavity-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using a new power conservation approach and the results show similar line shape. On-wafer magnetic resonance measurements using integrated microfluidics and microwave technology can significantly reduce the cost and sample volumes required for EPR spectral analysis and allow for integration of EPR with existing lab-on-a-chip processing and characterization techniques for point-of-care medical diagnostic applications.

  7. MAPPER alignment sensor evaluation on process wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergeer, N.; Lattard, L.; de Boer, G.; Couweleers, F.; Dave, D.; Pradelles, J.; Bustos, J.

    2013-03-01

    MAPPER Lithography is developing a maskless lithography technology based on massively-parallel electron-beam writing. In order to reduce costs and to minimize the footprint of this tool a new alignment sensor has been developed; based on technologies used for DVD optical heads. A wafer with an alignment mark is scanned with the sensor, resulting in an intensity pattern versus position. From this pattern the mark position can be calculated. Evaluations have been made over the performance of this type of sensor using different mark designs at several lithography process steps for FEOL and BEOL manufacturing. It has been shown that sub-nanometer reproducibility (3σ std) of alignment mark readings can be achieved while being robust against various process steps.

  8. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-02-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  9. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  10. A new VLSI complex integer multiplier which uses a quadratic-polynomial residue system with Fermat numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyu, H. C.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Chang, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A quadratic-polynomial Fermat residue number system (QFNS) has been used to compute complex integer multiplications. The advantage of such a QFNS is that a complex integer multiplication requires only two integer multiplications. In this article, a new type Fermat number multiplier is developed which eliminates the initialization condition of the previous method. It is shown that the new complex multiplier can be implemented on a single VLSI chip. Such a chip is designed and fabricated in CMOS-Pw technology.

  11. A new VLSI complex integer multiplier which uses a quadratic-polynomial residue system with Fermat numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Chang, J. J.; Shyu, H. C.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    A quadratic-polynomial Fermat residue number system (QFNS) has been used to compute complex integer multiplications. The advantage of such a QFNS is that a complex integer multiplication requires only two integer multiplications. In this article, a new type Fermat number multiplier is developed which eliminates the initialization condition of the previous method. It is shown that the new complex multiplier can be implemented on a single VLSI chip. Such a chip is designed and fabricated in CMOS-pw technology.

  12. A bioinspired collision detection algorithm for VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadri, J.; Linan, G.; Stafford, R.; Keil, M. S.; Roca, E.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a bioinspired algorithm for collision detection is proposed, based on previous models of the locust (Locusta migratoria) visual system reported by F.C. Rind and her group, in the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The algorithm is suitable for VLSI implementation in standard CMOS technologies as a system-on-chip for automotive applications. The working principle of the algorithm is to process a video stream that represents the current scenario, and to fire an alarm whenever an object approaches on a collision course. Moreover, it establishes a scale of warning states, from no danger to collision alarm, depending on the activity detected in the current scenario. In the worst case, the minimum time before collision at which the model fires the collision alarm is 40 msec (1 frame before, at 25 frames per second). Since the average time to successfully fire an airbag system is 2 msec, even in the worst case, this algorithm would be very helpful to more efficiently arm the airbag system, or even take some kind of collision avoidance countermeasures. Furthermore, two additional modules have been included: a "Topological Feature Estimator" and an "Attention Focusing Algorithm". The former takes into account the shape of the approaching object to decide whether it is a person, a road line or a car. This helps to take more adequate countermeasures and to filter false alarms. The latter centres the processing power into the most active zones of the input frame, thus saving memory and processing time resources.

  13. A VLSI architecture for high performance CABAC encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania, Hassan; Sudharsanan, Subramania

    2005-07-01

    One key technique for improving the coding e+/-ciency of H.264 video standard is the entropy coder, context- adaptive binary arithmetic coder (CABAC). However the complexity of the encoding process of CABAC is signicantly higher than the table driven entropy encoding schemes such as the Hu®man coding. CABAC is also bit serial and its multi-bit parallelization is extremely di+/-cult. For a high denition video encoder, multi-giga hertz RISC processors will be needed to implement the CABAC encoder. In this paper, we provide an e+/-cient, pipelined VLSI architecture for CABAC encoding along with an analysis of critical issues. The solution encodes a binary symbol every cycle. An FPGA implementation of the proposed scheme capable of 104 Mbps encoding rate and test results are presented. An ASIC synthesis and simulation for a 0.18 ¹m process technology indicates that the design is capable of encoding 190 million binary symbols per second using an area of 0.35 mm2. ¤

  14. Support apparatus for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Torres, Kenneth J.

    2003-06-10

    A support apparatus for minimizing gravitational stress in semiconductor wafers, and particularly silicon wafers, during thermal processing. The support apparatus comprises two concentric circular support structures disposed on a common support fixture. The two concentric circular support structures, located generally at between 10 and 70% and 70 and 100% and preferably at 35 and 82.3% of the semiconductor wafer radius, can be either solid rings or a plurality of spaced support points spaced apart from each other in a substantially uniform manner. Further, the support structures can have segments removed to facilitate wafer loading and unloading. In order to withstand the elevated temperatures encountered during semiconductor wafer processing, the support apparatus, including the concentric circular support structures and support fixture can be fabricated from refractory materials, such as silicon carbide, quartz and graphite. The claimed wafer support apparatus can be readily adapted for use in either batch or single-wafer processors.

  15. A single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (225, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a single VLSI chip for computing syndromes in the (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of the dual basis multiplication algorithm. The same architecture can be applied to design VLSI chips to compute various kinds of number theoretic transforms.

  16. Hypervelocity impact on silicon wafers with metallic and polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, E. A.; Scott, H. J.; Abraham, M.; Kearsley, A. T.

    2001-10-01

    Current and near future developments in microsystem technologies (MST, also known as MEMS) are defining a new trend towards lower mass, smaller volume spacecraft, without loss of functionality. The MST spacecraft components are etched onto silicon wafers coated with different metallic or polymeric material layers (typically 1-2 microns in thickness). These silicon wafers are then integrated to provide the spacecraft structure subsystem. For the majority of spacecraft, small debris and meteoroid impacts are not often able to cause large satellite platform failures, due to the shielding provided by existing structural and thermal materials and the high percentage of 'empty volume' contained within a typical spacecraft structure. Smaller satellites incorporating MST and based on silicon wafers, whilst presenting a smaller surface area, are expected to be vulnerable to impacts as the lower subsystem mass defines a less substantial structure, providing significantly less protection against impact. This paper presents results of a BNSC-funded study aimed at identifying the vulnerability of MST technologies based on silicon wafers to space debris and meteoroid impact. Hypervelocity impact tests were carried out on silicon wafers coated with five different types of deposited material. Multiple glass spheres were fired simultaneously at velocities in the range of 6 km/s. The impact results identify the hypervelocity impact response of the silicon wafers. The impacted targets showed a brittle material damage morphology (defined by fracture) and linked to the crystalline structure of the silicon wafer. As predicted from the mechanical properties, it was found that the silicon tended to fracture along the 111 planes. Cross-sectioned craters also showed the crystalline structure of the silicon, with the onset of fracture-driven spall on the rear surface. The metal and polymeric coatings produced diverse damage morphologies, with delamination zones being up to twice the diameter

  17. Bat Azimuthal Echolocation Using Interaural Level Differences: Modeling and Implementation by a VLSI-Based Hardware System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    VLSI modeling uses analog and digital circuits to mimic the massively-parallel computations seen in neural ...systems. At individual neuron level, neural computation is of relatively low precision. Analog VLSI circuits can easily provide efficient low-precision...nature of analog VLSI circuits fabrication. To mimic the massively- parallel computations seen in neural systems, neuromorphic VLSI modeling

  18. High performance LWIR microbolometer with Si/SiGe quantum well thermistor and wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roer, Audun; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Wolla, Erik; Hohler, Erling; Kittilsland, Gjermund

    2011-11-01

    An uncooled microbolometer with peak responsivity in the long wave infrared region of the electromagnetic radiation is developed at Sensonor Technologies. It is a 384 x 288 focal plane array with a pixel pitch of 25μm, based on monocrystalline Si/SiGe quantum wells as IR sensitive material. The high sensitivity (TCR) and low 1/f noise are the main performance characteristics of the product. The frame rate is maximum 60Hz and the output interface is digital (LVDS). The quantum well thermistor material is transferred to the read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) by direct wafer bonding. The ROIC wafer containing the released pixels is bonded in vacuum with a silicon cap wafer, providing hermetic encapsulation at low cost. The resulting wafer stack is mounted in a standard ceramic package. In this paper the architecture of the pixels and the ROIC, the wafer packaging and the electro-optical measurement results are presented.

  19. Silicon hybrid Wafer Scale Integration (WSI) used to fabricate a Hilbert transform integrated circuit module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, Daniel J.

    1990-12-01

    This research was performed in order to develop a superior processing schedule for fabricating wafer-scale integration (WSI) circuit modules. This technology allows the design of circuitry that spans the entire surface of a silicon substrate wafer. The circuit element employed in this research was the Hilbert transform, a digital phase-shifting circuit. The transform was incorporated into a three integrated circuit (IC) die package that consisted of a mechanically supportive silicon wafer, three IC die, and a planarizing silicon wafer. The die were epoxied into this wafer using a Teflon block as a flat, and the combination was epoxied onto the substrate wafer, forming the IC module. The original design goals of this research were to keep the IC die and wafer planar and to electrically characterize of the module's interconnections. The first goal was met; the resultant process uses a low temperature (50 C) cure to achieve die-to-wafer planarity of within 5 microns. The second was not met due to the inability to pattern the chosen photosensitive dielectric material. Recommendations for further research included the need to use a stable non-stick surface as a epoxy cure fixture and the need to investigate the photopatternable dielectric material.

  20. VLSI digital demodulator co-processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Karen J.; Buznitsky, Mitchell A.; Lindsey, Mark J.

    A demodulation coprocessor that incorporates into a single VLSI package a number of important arithmetic functions commonly encountered in demodulation processing is developed. The LD17 demodulator is designed for use in a digital modem as a companion to any of the commercially available digital signal processing (DSP) microprocessors. The LD17 includes an 8-b complex multiplier-accumulator (MAC), a programmable tone generator, a preintegrator, a dedicated noncoherent differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) calculator, and a program/data sequencer. By using a simple generic interface and small but powerful instruction set, the LD17 has the capability to operate in several architectural schemes with a minimum of glue logic. Speed, size, and power constraints will dictate which of these schemes is best for a particular application. The LD17 will be implemented in a 1.5-micron DLM CMOS gate array and packaged in an 84-pin JLCC. With the LD17 and its memory, the real-time processing compatibility of a typical DSP microprocessor can be extended to sampling rates from hundreds to thousands of kilosamples per second.

  1. Performance optimization of digital VLSI circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Marple, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Designers of digital VLSI circuits have virtually no computer tools available for the optimization of circuit performance. Instead, a designer relies extensively on circuit-analysis tools, such as circuit simulation (SPICE) and/or critical-delay-path analysis. A circuit-analysis approach to digital design is very labor-intensive and seldom produces a circuit with optimum area/delay or power/delay trade off. The goal of this research is to provide a synthesis approach to the design of digital circuits by finding the sizes of transistors that optimize circuits by finding the sizes of transistors that optimize circuit performance (delay, area, power). Solutions are found that are optimum for all possible delay paths of a given circuit and not for just a single path. The approach of this research is to formulate the problem of area/delay or power/delay optimization as a nonlinear program. Conditions for optimality are then established using graph theory and Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Finally, the use of augmented-Lagrangian and projected-Lagrangian algorithms are reviewed for the solution of the nonlinear programs. Two computer programs, PLATO and COP, were developed by the author to optimize CMOS PLA's (PLATO) and general CMOS circuits (COP). These tools provably find the globally optimum transistor sizes for a given circuit. Results are presented for PLA's and small- to medium-sized cells.

  2. Role for optical signal and image processing in the VLSI era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. B. G.

    1986-02-01

    Likely areas for applications of optical signal processing (OSP) in the near-term, which is now dominated by VLSI technologies, are discussed. VLSI devices have the attributes of arbitrary accuracy, predictability of performance and versatility. The devices can be manufactured before extensive definition of their possible applications. Optical devices are analog and suffer inflexibility of application, variations in performance due to, e.g., temperature, and limited dynamic range. Optical devices can carry extremely high bandwidths at ultra-high speeds, significant factors in remote sensing and parallel processing applications. The range of applications for Fourier optics is limited by the capabilities of peripheral systems, e.g., the ability to adjust the FOV for SAR systems and computer memory storage. Although the range of OSP applications is limited by a lack of suitable peripherals, digital devices are approaching maximum complexity, size and processing speeds. It is speculated that the first nominal application of OSP devices will be where optical inputs are specified and where an acousto-optic analyzer are necessary. The usage of the technology will, in any case, be limited for at least a decade.

  3. Non-Reciprocal on Wafer Microwave Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-27

    materials for on-wafer microwave devices concentrated on barium hexagonal ferrite (BaM) films grown on Si because these material is a good candidate...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We studied the growth, structural and magnetic properties of the hexagonal ferrite (BaAlxFe12-xO19) films on a surface of...Pt template/Si wafer. We determine that our hexagonal ferrite films are highly textured, with the c axis perpendicular to the Si wafer surface and

  4. A radial basis function neurocomputer implemented with analog VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Steven S.; Chau, Paul M.; Tawel, Raoul

    An electronic neurocomputer which implements a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is described. The RBFNN is a network that utilizes a radial basis function as the transfer function. The key advantages of RBFNNs over existing neural network architectures include reduced learning time and the ease of VLSI implementation. This neurocomputer is based on an analog/digital hybrid design and has been constructed with both custom analog VLSI circuits and a commercially available digital signal processor. The hybrid architecture is selected because it offers high computational performance while compensating for analog inaccuracies, and it features the ability to model large problems.

  5. A VLSI implementation for synthetic aperture radar image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premkumar, A.; Purviance, J.

    1990-01-01

    A simple physical model for the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is presented. This model explains the one dimensional and two dimensional nature of the received SAR signal in the range and azimuth directions. A time domain correlator, its algorithm, and features are explained. The correlator is ideally suited for VLSI implementation. A real time SAR architecture using these correlators is proposed. In the proposed architecture, the received SAR data is processed using one dimensional correlators for determining the range while two dimensional correlators are used to determine the azimuth of a target. The architecture uses only three different types of custom VLSI chips and a small amount of memory.

  6. A radial basis function neurocomputer implemented with analog VLSI circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Steven S.; Chau, Paul M.; Tawel, Raoul

    1992-01-01

    An electronic neurocomputer which implements a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is described. The RBFNN is a network that utilizes a radial basis function as the transfer function. The key advantages of RBFNNs over existing neural network architectures include reduced learning time and the ease of VLSI implementation. This neurocomputer is based on an analog/digital hybrid design and has been constructed with both custom analog VLSI circuits and a commercially available digital signal processor. The hybrid architecture is selected because it offers high computational performance while compensating for analog inaccuracies, and it features the ability to model large problems.

  7. A single chip VLSI Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The transform decoding technique used in a previous design is replaced by a time domain algorithm. A new architecture that implements such an algorithm permits efficient pipeline processing with minimum circuitry. A systolic array is also developed to perform erasure corrections in the new design. A modified form of Euclid's algorithm is implemented by a new architecture that maintains the throughput rate with less circuitry. Such improvements result in both enhanced capability and a significant reduction in silicon area, therefore making it possible to build a pipeline (31,15)RS decoder on a single VLSI chip.

  8. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  9. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    DOEpatents

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  10. Performance Evaluations of Ceramic Wafer Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles will require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced ramjet/scramjet engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Seal temperatures in these locations can exceed 2000 F, especially when the seals are in contact with hot ceramic matrix composite sealing surfaces. NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced ceramic wafer seals to meet the needs of these applications. High temperature scrub tests performed between silicon nitride wafers and carbon-silicon carbide rub surfaces revealed high friction forces and evidence of material transfer from the rub surfaces to the wafer seals. Stickage between adjacent wafers was also observed after testing. Several design changes to the wafer seals were evaluated as possible solutions to these concerns. Wafers with recessed sides were evaluated as a potential means of reducing friction between adjacent wafers. Alternative wafer materials are also being considered as a means of reducing friction between the seals and their sealing surfaces and because the baseline silicon nitride wafer material (AS800) is no longer commercially available.

  11. Stress Voiding During Wafer Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    1999-03-01

    Wafer processing involves several heating cycles to temperatures as high as 400 C. These thermal excursions are known to cause growth of voids that limit reliability of parts cut from the wafer. A model for void growth is constructed that can simulate the effect of these thermal cycles on void growth. The model is solved for typical process steps and the kinetics and extent of void growth are determined for each. It is shown that grain size, void spacing, and conductor line width are very important in determining void and stress behavior. For small grain sizes, stress relaxation can be rapid and can lead to void shrinkage during subsequent heating cycles. The effect of rapid quenching from process temperatures is to suppress void growth but induce large remnant stress in the conductor line. This stress can provide the driving force for void growth during storage even at room temperature. For isothermal processes the model can be solved analytically and estimates of terminal void size a nd lifetime are obtained.

  12. Kerfless Silicon Precursor Wafer Formed by Rapid Solidification: October 2009 - March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, A.

    2011-06-01

    1366 Direct Wafer technology is an ultra-low-cost, kerfless method of producing crystalline silicon wafers compatible with the existing dominant silicon PV supply chain. By doubling utilization of silicon and simplifying the wafering process and equipment, Direct Wafers will support drastic reductions in wafer cost and enable module manufacturing costs < $1/W. This Pre-Incubator subcontract enabled us to accelerate the critical advances necessary to commercialize the technology by 2012. Starting from a promising concept that was initially demonstrated using a model material, we built custom equipment necessary to validate the process in silicon, then developed sufficient understanding of the underlying physics to successfully fabricate wafers meeting target specifications. These wafers, 50 mm x 50 mm x 200 ..mu..m thick, were used to make prototype solar cells via standard industrial processes as the project final deliverable. The demonstrated 10% efficiency is already impressive when compared to most thin films, but still offers considerable room for improvement when compared to typical crystalline silicon solar cells.

  13. A universal process development methodology for complete removal of residues from 300mm wafer edge bevel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Mai; Linnane, Michael; Longstaff, Chris; Ueda, Kenichi; Winter, Tom

    2006-03-01

    Many yield limiting, etch blocking defects are attributed to "flake" type contamination from the lithography process. The wafer edge bevel is a prime location for generation of this type of defect. Wafer bevel quality is not readily observed with top down or even most off axis inspection equipment. Not all chemistries are removed with one "universal" cleaning process. IC manufacturers must maximize usable silicon area as well. These requirements have made traditional chemical treatments to clean the wafer edge inadequate for many chemistry types used in 193nm processing. IBM has evaluated a method to create a robust wafer bevel and backside cleaning process. An August Technology AXi TM Series advanced macro inspection tool with E20 TM edge inspection module has been used to check wafer bevel cleanliness. Process impact on the removal of post apply residues has been investigated. The new process used backside solvent rinse nozzles only and cleaned the wafer bevel completely. The use of the topside edge solvent clean nozzles was eliminated. Thickness, wet film defect measurements (wet FM), and pattern wafer defect monitors showed no difference between the new backside rinse edge bead removal process and the process of record. Solvent topside edge bead removal of both bottom anti-reflective coatings and resist materials showed better cut width control and uniformity. We conclude that the topside solvent edge bead removal nozzle can be removed from the process. Backside solvent rinse nozzles can clean the backside of the wafer, the wafer bevel, and can wrap to the front edge of the wafer to provide a uniform edge bead removal cut width that is not sensitive to coater module tolerances. Recommendations are made for changes to the typical preventive maintenance procedures.

  14. Overlay distortions in wafer-scale integration lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.

    1993-08-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) lithography is the technique used to fabricate ultra large scale integration (ULSI) integrated circuits significantly greater in size than current products. Applications for WSI lithography include large solid state detector arrays, large area liquid crystal displays, high speed mainframe supercomputers, and large random access memories. The lithography technology required to manufacture these devices is particularly challenging, requiring stringent control of both submicron critical dimensions and accurate alignment of level to level device patterns over large chip areas.

  15. Cellular pulse-coupled neural network with adaptive weights for image segmentation and its VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiter, Juerg; Ramacher, Ulrich; Heittmann, Arne; Matolin, Daniel; Schuffny, Rene

    2004-05-01

    We present a cellular pulse coupled neural network with adaptive weights and its analog VLSI implementation. The neural network operates on a scalar image feature, such as grey scale or the output of a spatial filter. It detects segments and marks them with synchronous pulses of the corresponding neurons. The network consists of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are coupled to their nearest neighbors via adaptive synaptic weights. Adaptation follows either one of two empirical rules. Both rules lead to spike grouping in wave like patterns. This synchronous activity binds groups of neurons and labels the corresponding image segments. Applications of the network also include feature preserving noise removal, image smoothing, and detection of bright and dark spots. The adaptation rules are insensitive for parameter deviations, mismatch and non-ideal approximation of the implied functions. That makes an analog VLSI implementation feasible. Simulations showed no significant differences in the synchronization properties between networks using the ideal adaptation rules and networks resembling implementation properties such as randomly distributed parameters and roughly implemented adaptation functions. A prototype is currently being designed and fabricated using an Infineon 130nm technology. It comprises a 128 × 128 neuron array, analog image memory, and an address event representation pulse output.

  16. The design plan of a VLSI single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The very large-scale integration (VLSI) architecture of a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder for decoding both errors and erasures is described. A decoding failure detection capability is also included in this system so that the decoder will recognize a failure to decode instead of introducing additional errors. This could happen whenever the received word contains too many errors and erasures for the code to correct. The number of transistors needed to implement this decoder is estimated at about 75,000 if the delay for received message is not included. This is in contrast to the older transform decoding algorithm which needs about 100,000 transistors. However, the transform decoder is simpler in architecture than the time decoder. It is therefore possible to implement a single chip (255, 223) Reed-Solomon decoder with today's VLSI technology. An implementation strategy for the decoder system is presented. This represents the first step in a plan to take advantage of advanced coding techniques to realize a 2.0 dB coding gain for future space missions.

  17. A multi coding technique to reduce transition activity in VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vithyalakshmi, N.; Rajaram, M.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in VLSI technology have enabled the implementation of complex digital circuits in a single chip, reducing system size and power consumption. In deep submicron low power CMOS VLSI design, the main cause of energy dissipation is charging and discharging of internal node capacitances due to transition activity. Transition activity is one of the major factors that also affect the dynamic power dissipation. This paper proposes power reduction analyzed through algorithm and logic circuit levels. In algorithm level the key aspect of reducing power dissipation is by minimizing transition activity and is achieved by introducing a data coding technique. So a novel multi coding technique is introduced to improve the efficiency of transition activity up to 52.3% on the bus lines, which will automatically reduce the dynamic power dissipation. In addition, 1 bit full adders are introduced in the Hamming distance estimator block, which reduces the device count. This coding method is implemented using Verilog HDL. The overall performance is analyzed by using Modelsim and Xilinx Tools. In total 38.2% power saving capability is achieved compared to other existing methods.

  18. Compact VLSI neural computer integrated with active pixel sensor for real-time ATR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Udomkesmalee, Gabriel; Alkalai, Leon

    1997-04-01

    A compact VLSI neural computer integrated with an active pixel sensor has been under development to mimic what is inherent in biological vision systems. This electronic eye- brain computer is targeted for real-time machine vision applications which require both high-bandwidth communication and high-performance computing for data sensing, synergy of multiple types of sensory information, feature extraction, target detection, target recognition, and control functions. The neural computer is based on a composite structure which combines Annealing Cellular Neural Network (ACNN) and Hierarchical Self-Organization Neural Network (HSONN). The ACNN architecture is a programmable and scalable multi- dimensional array of annealing neurons which are locally connected with their local neurons. Meanwhile, the HSONN adopts a hierarchical structure with nonlinear basis functions. The ACNN+HSONN neural computer is effectively designed to perform programmable functions for machine vision processing in all levels with its embedded host processor. It provides a two order-of-magnitude increase in computation power over the state-of-the-art microcomputer and DSP microelectronics. A compact current-mode VLSI design feasibility of the ACNN+HSONN neural computer is demonstrated by a 3D 16X8X9-cube neural processor chip design in a 2-micrometers CMOS technology. Integration of this neural computer as one slice of a 4'X4' multichip module into the 3D MCM based avionics architecture for NASA's New Millennium Program is also described.

  19. Analog CMOS Nonlinear Cells and Their Applications in VLSI Signal and Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachab, Nabil Ibrahim

    1990-01-01

    The development of reconfigurable analog CMOS building blocks and their applications in analog VLSI is discussed and introduced in much the same way a logic gate is used in digital VLSI. They simultaneously achieve four -quadrant multiplication and division. These applications include multiplication, signal squaring, division, signal inversion, amplitude modulation. New all MOS implementations of the Hopfield like neural networks are developed by using the new cells. In addition new and novel techniques for sensor linearization and for MOSFET-C programmable-Q and omega_{n} filters are introduced. The new designs are simple, versatile, programmable and make effective use of analog CAD tools. Moreover, they are easily extendable to other technologies such as GaAs and BiCMOS. The objective of these designs is to achieve reduction in Silicon area and power consumption and reduce the interconnections between cells. It is also sought to provide a robust design that is CAD-compatible and make effective use of the standard cell library approach. This will offer more versatility and flexibility for analog signal processing systems and neural networks. Some of these new cells and a 3-neuron neural system are fabricated in a 2mum CMOS process. Experimental results of these circuits verify the validity of this new design approach.

  20. Hybrid VLSI/QCA Architecture for Computing FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarres, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    A data-processor architecture that would incorporate elements of both conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) has been proposed to enable the highly parallel and systolic computation of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). The proposed circuit would complement the QCA-based circuits described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42; Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20855) Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 32; and Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20869), Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 35. The cited prior articles described the limitations of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA. To recapitulate: In a VLSI circuit, signal paths that are required not to interact with each other must not cross in the same plane. In contrast, for reasons too complex to describe in the limited space available for this article, suitably designed and operated QCAbased signal paths that are required not to interact with each other can nevertheless be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes.

  1. A special purpose silicon compiler for designing supercomputing VLSI systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, N.; Murugavel, P.; Kamakoti, V.; Shankarraman, M. J.; Rangarajan, S.; Mallikarjun, M.; Karthikeyan, B.; Prabhakar, T. S.; Satish, V.; Venkatasubramaniam, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    Design of general/special purpose supercomputing VLSI systems for numeric algorithm execution involves tackling two important aspects, namely their computational and communication complexities. Development of software tools for designing such systems itself becomes complex. Hence a novel design methodology has to be developed. For designing such complex systems a special purpose silicon compiler is needed in which: the computational and communicational structures of different numeric algorithms should be taken into account to simplify the silicon compiler design, the approach is macrocell based, and the software tools at different levels (algorithm down to the VLSI circuit layout) should get integrated. In this paper a special purpose silicon (SPS) compiler based on PACUBE macrocell VLSI arrays for designing supercomputing VLSI systems is presented. It is shown that turn-around time and silicon real estate get reduced over the silicon compilers based on PLA's, SLA's, and gate arrays. The first two silicon compiler characteristics mentioned above enable the SPS compiler to perform systolic mapping (at the macrocell level) of algorithms whose computational structures are of GIPOP (generalized inner product outer product) form. Direct systolic mapping on PLA's, SLA's, and gate arrays is very difficult as they are micro-cell based. A novel GIPOP processor is under development using this special purpose silicon compiler.

  2. An Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment for VLSI Built with COSMOS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelides, Marios C.; Agius, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents Bigger Bits, an interactive multimedia learning environment that teaches students about VLSI within the context of computer electronics. The system was built with COSMOS (Content Oriented semantic Modelling Overlay Scheme), which is a modelling scheme that we developed for enabling the semantic content of multimedia to be used…

  3. CMOS VLSI Layout and Verification of a SIMD Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Jianqing

    1996-01-01

    A CMOS VLSI layout and verification of a 3 x 3 processor parallel computer has been completed. The layout was done using the MAGIC tool and the verification using HSPICE. Suggestions for expanding the computer into a million processor network are presented. Many problems that might be encountered when implementing a massively parallel computer are discussed.

  4. Optimal Planning and Execution of DoD VLSI Activities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-17

    DMD (RShT) USDR3 of funding by VHSIC Program is preferred. mlect preferred VPD/ADUSD Office. funding/control and alternative. 1.5 Augment staff of VUSIC...Industry Competition J. Gansler TASC Impact of VHSIC G. Heilmeier T.I. OSS Summer Study R. Kahn DARPA DARPA VLSI Program D. Kennedy Stanford

  5. Preparation and Characterization of PZT Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, A.; Rao, B. S. S. Chandra; Kamath, S. V.; Sen, A.; Maiti, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    Piezoelectric materials have recently attracted a lot of attention for ultrasonic structural health monitoring (shm) in aerospace, defence and civilian sectors, where they can act as both actuators and sensors. Incidentally, piezoelectric materials in the form of wafers (pwas-piezoelectric wafer active sensor, approx. 5-10 mm square and 0.2-0.3 mm thickness) are inexpensive, non intrusive and non-resonant wide band devices that can be surface-mounted on existing structures, inserted between the layers of lap joints or embedded inside composite materials. The material of choice for piezoelectric wafers is lead zirconate titanate (PZT) of composition close to morphotropic phase boundary [pb(zr0.52 ti0.48)o3]. However, an excess pbo is normally added to pzt as a densification aid and also to make up for the lead loss during high temperature sintering. Hence, it is of paramount importance to know how the shift of the lead content from the morphotropic composition affects the piezoelectric and mechanical properties of the sintered wafers, keeping in view the importance of mechanical properties of wafers in shm. In the present study, we observed that with the increase in the lead content of the sintered wafers, the dielectric and piezoelectric constants decreased. However, the elastic modulus, hardness and fracture toughness of the wafers increased with increasing lead content in the composition. Hence, the lead content in the sintered wafers should be optimized to get acceptable piezoelectric and mechanical

  6. Research in VLSI Systems. Heuristic Programming Project & VLSI Theory Project. A Fast Turn Around Facility for Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    and VLSI-Oriented Algorithms A forthcoming paper discloses two techniques developed by Peter Hochschild, Ernst Mayr , and Alan Siegel for solving graph...83] Hochschild, P., Mayr , E., and Siegel, A. Techniques for Solving Graph Problems in Parallel Environments. 1983. to appear in Twenty-forth FOCS...Hochschild, P., Mayr , E., and Siegel, A. Techniques for Solving Graph Problems in Parallel Environments. 1983. to appear in Twenty-forth FOCS Proceedings

  7. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  8. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  9. Compact SMES with a superconducting film in a spiral groove on a Si wafer formed by MEMS technology with possible high-energy storage volume density comparable to that of rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, N.; Iguchi, N.; Kusano, Y.; Fukano, T.; Hioki, T.; Ichiki, A.; Bessho, T.; Motohiro, T.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a novel approach to make a compact SMES unit composed of a stack of Si wafers using a well-established MEMS process was proposed. The concept was backed up by pilot estimations for energy storage capacity and mechanical strength to endure electromagnetic stress. The estimated volume density of the storable energy is comparable to that of rechargeable batteries and the mechanical strength of Si wafer endures the electromagnetic stress imposed on it. These estimations support the feasibility of this novel concept, although there needs to be more detailed design of the system for its practical realization. Furthermore, there are a lot of challenges to overcome. The first step of the experimental proof of this new concept was successfully performed through several repeated test fabrications. In one of these test fabrications, the theoretically estimated upper limit value of the energy storage corresponding to a pilot design of a spiral superconducting NbN coil in the spiral trench formed on a Si wafer 10.15 cm in diameter was attained.

  10. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  11. ALD Enabled Wafer Level Polymer Packaging for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yadong

    Wafer level polymer packaging for MEMS is a cost-effective approach that is also compatible with microelectronic packaging technologies. However, polymer packages are not hermetic and cannot be used for MEMS devices, which usually demand vacuum or low moisture environment inside the packages. This problem can be solved by applying atomic layer deposition (ALD) of nano-scaled Al 2O3 or other inorganic materials over the polymer packages. Defects and mechanical cracks in ALD coatings are major concerns for hermetic/vacuum sealing. Several techniques have been developed to inspect such defects and cracks. Assisted by the electroplating copper technique, we have reduced the defect density by 1000 times for an ultra-thin, 2-nm ALD Al2O 3 film. Such an ultra-thin coating is essential to enhance coating's mechanical toughness. The toughness is usually determined by monitoring coating's crack initiation and growth in a bending test. A real-time, non-destructive inspection technique has been developed for in-situ characterization of an ALD film coated on a surface or buried in a multilayer structure. With the knowledge and technology established, we have successfully demonstrated a wafer-level polymer packaging process for MEMS using a Pirani gauge as the vacuum sensor. The leak rate through the polymer package has been reduced by 100 times by the ALD Al2O3 coating. More importantly, we have developed models and identified issues that are critical to ALD-enabled wafer level polymer packaging for MEMS.

  12. Material requirements for the adoption of unconventional silicon crystal and wafer growth techniques for high-efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Jasmin; del Cañizo, Carlos; Wagner, Hannes; Castellanos, Sergio; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-10-15

    Silicon wafers comprise approximately 40% of crystalline silicon module cost and represent an area of great technological innovation potential. Paradoxically, unconventional wafer-growth techniques have thus far failed to displace multicrystalline and Czochralski silicon, despite four decades of innovation. One of the shortcomings of most unconventional materials has been a persistent carrier lifetime deficit in comparison to established wafer technologies, which limits the device efficiency potential. In this perspective article, we review a defect-management framework that has proven successful in enabling millisecond lifetimes in kerfless and cast materials. Control of dislocations and slowly diffusing metal point defects during growth, coupled to effective control of fast-diffusing species during cell processing, is critical to enable high cell efficiencies. As a result, to accelerate the pace of novel wafer development, we discuss approaches to rapidly evaluate the device efficiency potential of unconventional wafers from injection-dependent lifetime measurements.

  13. Material requirements for the adoption of unconventional silicon crystal and wafer growth techniques for high-efficiency solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Hofstetter, Jasmin; del Cañizo, Carlos; Wagner, Hannes; ...

    2015-10-15

    Silicon wafers comprise approximately 40% of crystalline silicon module cost and represent an area of great technological innovation potential. Paradoxically, unconventional wafer-growth techniques have thus far failed to displace multicrystalline and Czochralski silicon, despite four decades of innovation. One of the shortcomings of most unconventional materials has been a persistent carrier lifetime deficit in comparison to established wafer technologies, which limits the device efficiency potential. In this perspective article, we review a defect-management framework that has proven successful in enabling millisecond lifetimes in kerfless and cast materials. Control of dislocations and slowly diffusing metal point defects during growth, coupled tomore » effective control of fast-diffusing species during cell processing, is critical to enable high cell efficiencies. As a result, to accelerate the pace of novel wafer development, we discuss approaches to rapidly evaluate the device efficiency potential of unconventional wafers from injection-dependent lifetime measurements.« less

  14. Development of megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1980-01-01

    A cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three in. diameter wafers per hour was developed with a reduction in process cost. The system consists of an ammonia hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32 in. spaced, ion implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room temperature, high velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis.

  15. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  16. Noise-margin limitations on gallium-arsenide VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Stephen I.; Sundaram, Mani

    1988-01-01

    Two factors which limit the complexity of GaAs MESFET VLSI circuits are considered. Power dissipation sets an upper complexity limit for a given logic circuit implementation and thermal design. Uniformity of device characteristics and the circuit configuration determines the electrical functional yield. Projection of VLSI complexity based on these factors indicates that logic chips of 15,000 gates are feasible with the most promising static circuits if a maximum power dissipation of 5 W per chip is assumed. While lower power per gate and therefore more gates per chip can be obtained by using a popular E/D FET circuit, yields are shown to be small when practical device parameter tolerances are applied. Further improvements in materials, devices, and circuits wil be needed to extend circuit complexity to the range currently dominated by silicon.

  17. An Efficient VLSI Architecture of the Enhanced Three Step Search Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Baishik; Mukherjee, Rohan; Saha, Priyabrata; Chakrabarti, Indrajit

    2016-09-01

    The intense computational complexity of any video codec is largely due to the motion estimation unit. The Enhanced Three Step Search is a popular technique that can be adopted for fast motion estimation. This paper proposes a novel VLSI architecture for the implementation of the Enhanced Three Step Search Technique. A new addressing mechanism has been introduced which enhances the speed of operation and reduces the area requirements. The proposed architecture when implemented in Verilog HDL on Virtex-5 Technology and synthesized using Xilinx ISE Design Suite 14.1 achieves a critical path delay of 4.8 ns while the area comes out to be 2.9K gate equivalent. It can be incorporated in commercial devices like smart-phones, camcorders, video conferencing systems etc.

  18. Genesis Ultrapure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    A device removes, with high precision, the majority of surface particle contamination greater than 1-micron-diameter in size from ultrapure semiconductor wafer materials containing implanted solar wind samples returned by NASA's Genesis mission. This cleaning device uses a 1.5-liter/minute flowing stream of heated ultrapure water (UPW) with 1- MHz oscillating megasonic pulse energy focused at 3 to 5 mm away from the wafer surface spinning at 1,000 to 10,000 RPM, depending on sample size. The surface particle contamination is removed by three processes: flowing UPW, megasonic cavitations, and centripetal force from the spinning wafer. The device can also dry the wafer fragment after UPW/megasonic cleaning by continuing to spin the wafer in the cleaning chamber, which is purged with flowing ultrapure nitrogen gas at 65 psi (.448 kPa). The cleaner also uses three types of vacuum chucks that can accommodate all Genesis-flown array fragments in any dimensional shape between 3 and 100 mm in diameter. A sample vacuum chuck, and the manufactured UPW/megasonic nozzle holder, replace the human deficiencies by maintaining a consistent distance between the nozzle and wafer surface as well as allowing for longer cleaning time. The 3- to 5-mm critical distance is important for the ability to remove particles by megasonic cavitations. The increased UPW sonication time and exposure to heated UPW improve the removal of 1- to 5-micron-sized particles.

  19. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.; Johns, K.

    1992-10-01

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We`ll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers.

  20. A systematic method for configuring VLSI networks of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Neftci, Emre; Chicca, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Giacomo; Douglas, Rodney

    2011-10-01

    An increasing number of research groups are developing custom hybrid analog/digital very large scale integration (VLSI) chips and systems that implement hundreds to thousands of spiking neurons with biophysically realistic dynamics, with the intention of emulating brainlike real-world behavior in hardware and robotic systems rather than simply simulating their performance on general-purpose digital computers. Although the electronic engineering aspects of these emulation systems is proceeding well, progress toward the actual emulation of brainlike tasks is restricted by the lack of suitable high-level configuration methods of the kind that have already been developed over many decades for simulations on general-purpose computers. The key difficulty is that the dynamics of the CMOS electronic analogs are determined by transistor biases that do not map simply to the parameter types and values used in typical abstract mathematical models of neurons and their networks. Here we provide a general method for resolving this difficulty. We describe a parameter mapping technique that permits an automatic configuration of VLSI neural networks so that their electronic emulation conforms to a higher-level neuronal simulation. We show that the neurons configured by our method exhibit spike timing statistics and temporal dynamics that are the same as those observed in the software simulated neurons and, in particular, that the key parameters of recurrent VLSI neural networks (e.g., implementing soft winner-take-all) can be precisely tuned. The proposed method permits a seamless integration between software simulations with hardware emulations and intertranslatability between the parameters of abstract neuronal models and their emulation counterparts. Most important, our method offers a route toward a high-level task configuration language for neuromorphic VLSI systems.

  1. A VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.; Reed, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    A pipeline structure of a transform decoder similar to a systolic array was developed to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. An important ingredient of this design is a modified Euclidean algorithm for computing the error locator polynomial. The computation of inverse field elements is completely avoided in this modification of Euclid's algorithm. The new decoder is regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  2. vPELS: An E-Learning Social Environment for VLSI Design with Content Security Using DRM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Jahangir; Chowdhury, Morshed; Batten, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a proposal for personal e-learning system (vPELS [where "v" stands for VLSI: very large scale integrated circuit])) architecture in the context of social network environment for VLSI Design. The main objective of vPELS is to develop individual skills on a specific subject--say, VLSI--and share resources with peers.…

  3. Sensor-based driving of a car with fuzzy inferencing VLSI chips and boards. [Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the sensor-based driving of a car in a-priori unknown environments using human-like'' reasoning schemes. The schemes are implemented on custom-designed VLSI fuzzy inferencing boards and are used to investigate two control modes for driving a car on the basis of very sparse and imprecise range data. In the first mode, the car navigates fully autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up, slow down, stop, or back up depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor channels to perceive the environment. Sample results are presented which illustrate the feasibility of developing autonomous navigation systems and robust safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing VLSI hardware and human-like'' reasoning schemes.

  4. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  5. Thin, High Lifetime Silicon Wafers with No Sawing; Re-crystallization in a Thin Film Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel Sachs Tonio Buonassisi

    2013-01-16

    The project fits within the area of renewable energy called photovoltaics (PV), or the generation of electricity directly from sunlight using semiconductor devices. PV has the greatest potential of any renewable energy technology. The vast majority of photovoltaic modules are made on crystalline silicon wafers and these wafers accounts for the largest fraction of the cost of a photovoltaic module. Thus, a method of making high quality, low cost wafers would be extremely beneficial to the PV industry The industry standard technology creates wafers by casting an ingot and then sawing wafers from the ingot. Sawing rendered half of the highly refined silicon feedstock as un-reclaimable dust. Being a brittle material, the sawing is actually a type of grinding operation which is costly both in terms of capital equipment and in terms of consumables costs. The consumables costs associated with the wire sawing technology are particularly burdensome and include the cost of the wire itself (continuously fed, one time use), the abrasive particles, and, waste disposal. The goal of this project was to make wafers directly from molten silicon with no sawing required. The fundamental concept was to create a very low cost (but low quality) wafer of the desired shape and size and then to improve the quality of the wafer by a specialized thermal treatment (called re-crystallization). Others have attempted to create silicon sheet by recrystallization with varying degrees of success. Key among the difficulties encountered by others were: a) difficulty in maintaining the physical shape of the sheet during the recrystallization process and b) difficulty in maintaining the cleanliness of the sheet during recrystallization. Our method solved both of these challenges by encapsulating the preform wafer in a protective capsule prior to recrystallization (see below). The recrystallization method developed in this work was extremely effective at maintaining the shape and the cleanliness of the

  6. Detection of Metal Contamination on Silicon Wafer Backside and Edge by New TXRF Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Motoyuki; Formica, Joseph; Shen, Liyong

    2009-09-01

    In conventional 200 mm wafer processing, backside defects are not considered to be of much concern because they are obscured by wafer backside topography. However, in current 300 mm wafer processing where both sides of a wafer are polished, backside defects require more consideration. In the beginning, backside defect inspection examined particle contamination because particle contamination adversely influences the depth of field in lithography. Recently, metal contamination is of concern because backside metal contamination causes cross-contamination in a process line, and backside metals easily transfer to the front surface. As the industry strives to yield more devices from the area around the wafer edge, edge exclusion requirements have also become more important. The current International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors [1] requires a 2 mm edge exclusion. Therefore, metal contamination must be controlled to less than 2 mm from the edge because metal contamination easily diffuses in silicon wafers. To meet these current semiconductor processing requirements, newly developed zero edge exclusion TXRF (ZEE-TXRF) and backside measurement TXRF (BAC-TXRF) are effective metrology methods.

  7. A front-end wafer-level microsystem packaging technique with micro-cap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yuh-Min

    2002-09-01

    The back-end packaging process is the remaining challenge for the micromachining industry to commercialize microsystem technology (MST) devices at low cost. This dissertation presents a novel wafer level protection technique as a final step of the front-end fabrication process for MSTs. It facilitates improved manufacturing throughput and automation in package assembly, wafer level testing of devices, and enhanced device performance. The method involves the use of a wafer-sized micro-cap array, which consists of an assortment of small caps micro-molded onto a material with adjustable shapes and sizes to serve as protective structures against the hostile environments during packaging. The micro-cap array is first constructed by a micromachining process with micro-molding technique, then sealed to the device wafer at wafer level. Epoxy-based wafer-level micro cap array has been successfully fabricated and showed good compatibility with conventional back-end packaging processes. An adhesive transfer technique was demonstrated to seal the micro cap array with a MEMS device wafer. No damage or gross leak was observed while wafer dicing or later during a gross leak test. Applications of the micro cap array are demonstrated on MEMS, microactuators fabricated using CRONOS MUMPS process. Depending on the application needs, the micro-molded cap can be designed and modified to facilitate additional component functions, such as optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical functions, which are not easily achieved in the device by traditional means. Successful fabrication of a micro cap array comprised with microlenses can provide active functions as well as passive protection. An optical tweezer array could be one possibility for applications of a micro cap with microlenses. The micro cap itself could serve as micro well for DNA or bacteria amplification as well.

  8. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  9. VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) Design Tools Reference Manual - Release 1.0.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    34" SUBCXT Sabna N1 < N2 N3 ... > 1_V/NW VLSI Release 1 -18- * SPICE User’s Guide UW/NW VLSI Consortium Examples: .SUBCKT OPAMP 12 3 4 A circuit definition... OPAMP This card must be the last one for any subcircuit definition. The subcircuit name, if included, indicates which subcircuit definition is being

  10. Mask and wafer cost of ownership (COO) from 65 to 22 nm half-pitch nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Litt, Lloyd C.; Wüest, Andrea; Palaiyanur, Shyam

    2008-05-01

    Anticipating the cost of ownership (COO) of different lithography approaches into the future is an act of faith. It requires that one believe that all of the lithographic problems with next generation lithography (NGL) approaches will be sufficiently resolved to support the production of manufacturing wafers. This paper assumes that all of the necessary technologies will be available in the future and that the cost of the components can be extrapolated from historic cost trends. Mask and wafer costs of a single critical lithography layer for the 65, 45, 32 and 22 nm half-pitch (HP) nodes will be compared for immersion, double process (DP), double expose (DE), extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and imprint technologies. The mask COO analysis assumes that the basic yield of an optical mask is constant from node to node and that the infrastructure that allows this performance will be in place when the technologies are needed. The primary differences in mask costs among lithography approaches are driven by the patterning write time and materials. The wafer COO is driven by the mask cost (for the low wafer-per-mask use case), the lithography tool cost, and the effective wafers per hour (wph) for the lithography approach being considered.

  11. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  12. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  13. Silicon hybrid wafer scale integration interconnect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyke, James C.

    1989-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of interconnections that have been proposed for use in silicon hybrid wafer scale integration (WSI) approaches were investigated. The study was based on a set of 5 inch test wafers, containing various interconnection structures previously designed at AFIT. Two test wafers used a special polyimide dielectric, while a third was composed of a benzocyclobutene (BCB). The investigated structures represented 10 cm length aluminum, coupled, stripline-like transmission lines. The metrics used included continuity measurements, ac measurement of the characteristic impedance and coupling levels, and pulsed-signal response measurements. Continuity results indicated transmission and leakage failures in all wafers, although the failure mechanisms were sometimes wafer-specific. The characteristic impedance measurement technique was flawed, but revealed interesting information concerning the driving-point impedances of the structures. Most coupled structures manifested coupling responses which were consistent in shape with theoretical estimates, but higher in magnitude by 10 to 20 dB. All structures revealed coupling levels lower than -25 dB. Despite correlation difficulties, the results implied that transmission line behavior is manifested in WSIC interconnections.

  14. On-wafer high temperature characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, L.; ǎghici, F., Dr; Rusu, I.; Brezeanu, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work a on-wafer high temperature characterization system for wide bandgap semiconductor devices and circuits has been designed, implemented and tested. The proposed system can perform the wafer temperature adjustment in a large domain, from the room temperature up to 3000C with a resolution better than +/-0.50C. In order to obtain both low-noise measurements and low EMI, the heating element of the wafer chuck is supplied in two ways: one is from a DC linear power supply connected to the mains electricity, another one is from a second DC unit powered by batteries. An original temperature control algorithm, different from classical PID, is used to modify the power applied to the chuck.

  15. Environmentally benign processing of YAG transparent wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-12-01

    Transparent yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) wafers were successfully produced via aqueous tape casting and vacuum sintering techniques using a new environmentally friendly binder, a copolymer of isobutylene and maleic anhydride with the commercial name ISOBAM (noted as ISOBAM). Aqueous YAG slurries were mixed by ball-milling, which was followed by de-gassing and tape casting of wafers. The final YAG green tapes were homogenous and flexible, and could be bent freely without cracking. After the drying and sintering processes, transparent YAG wafers were achieved. The microstructures of both the green tape and vacuum-sintered YAG ceramic were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Phase compositions were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmittance was measured in UV-VIS regions with the result that the transmittance is 82.6% at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  16. An Asynchronous Low Power and High Performance VLSI Architecture for Viterbi Decoder Implemented with Quasi Delay Insensitive Templates

    PubMed Central

    Devi, T. Kalavathi; Palaniappan, Sakthivel

    2015-01-01

    Convolutional codes are comprehensively used as Forward Error Correction (FEC) codes in digital communication systems. For decoding of convolutional codes at the receiver end, Viterbi decoder is often used to have high priority. This decoder meets the demand of high speed and low power. At present, the design of a competent system in Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology requires these VLSI parameters to be finely defined. The proposed asynchronous method focuses on reducing the power consumption of Viterbi decoder for various constraint lengths using asynchronous modules. The asynchronous designs are based on commonly used Quasi Delay Insensitive (QDI) templates, namely, Precharge Half Buffer (PCHB) and Weak Conditioned Half Buffer (WCHB). The functionality of the proposed asynchronous design is simulated and verified using Tanner Spice (TSPICE) in 0.25 µm, 65 nm, and 180 nm technologies of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company (TSMC). The simulation result illustrates that the asynchronous design techniques have 25.21% of power reduction compared to synchronous design and work at a speed of 475 MHz. PMID:26558289

  17. Making Porous Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. Porous regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "Porous Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).

  18. Metallic nanowires by full wafer stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, O; Villanueva, G; Savu, V; Sidler, K; van den Boogaart, M A F; Brugger, J

    2008-11-01

    Aluminum and gold nanowires were fabricated using 100 mm stencil wafers containing nanoslits fabricated with a focused ion beam. The stencils were aligned and the nanowires deposited on a substrate with predefined electrical pads. The morphology and resistivity of the wires were studied. Nanowires down to 70 nm wide and 5 mum long have been achieved showing a resistivity of 10 microOmegacm for Al and 5 microOmegacm for Au and maximum current density of approximately 10(8) A/cm(2). This proves the capability of stencil lithography for the fabrication of metallic nanowires on a full wafer scale.

  19. Si-gold-glass hybrid wafer bond for 3D-MEMS and wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Jayaprakash; Pratap, Rudra

    2017-01-01

    We report a relatively low temperature (<400 °C) hybrid wafer bonding process that results in the simultaneous anodic and eutectic bonding in different predetermined regions of the wafer. This hybrid bonding process has potential applications in CMOS-MEMS device integration and wafer level packaging. We demonstrate the process by realizing a simple MEMS cantilever beam and a complex MEMS gyroscope structure. These structures are characterized for ohmic contact and electromechanical response to verify the electrical interconnect and the mechanical strength of the structure at the bond interface.

  20. Image and Video Compression with VLSI Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, W.; Sheu, B.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced motion-compensated predictive video compression system based on artificial neural networks has been developed to effectively eliminate the temporal and spatial redundancy of video image sequences and thus reduce the bandwidth and storage required for the transmission and recording of the video signal. The VLSI neuroprocessor for high-speed high-ratio image compression based upon a self-organization network and the conventional algorithm for vector quantization are compared. The proposed method is quite efficient and can achieve near-optimal results.

  1. A VLSI architecture for simplified arithmetic Fourier transform algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Irving S.; Shih, Ming-Tang; Truong, T. K.; Hendon, E.; Tufts, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The arithmetic Fourier transform (AFT) is a number-theoretic approach to Fourier analysis which has been shown to perform competitively with the classical FFT in terms of accuracy, complexity, and speed. Theorems developed in a previous paper for the AFT algorithm are used here to derive the original AFT algorithm which Bruns found in 1903. This is shown to yield an algorithm of less complexity and of improved performance over certain recent AFT algorithms. A VLSI architecture is suggested for this simplified AFT algorithm. This architecture uses a butterfly structure which reduces the number of additions by 25 percent of that used in the direct method.

  2. A VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder.

    PubMed

    Shao, H M; Truong, T K; Deutsch, L J; Yuen, J H; Reed, I S

    1985-05-01

    A pipeline structure of a transform decoder similar to a systolic array is developed to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. An important ingredient of this design is a modified Euclidean algorithm for computing the error-locator polynomial. The computation of inverse field elements is completely avoided in this modification of Euclid's algorithm. The new coder is regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation. An example illustrating both the pipeline and systolic array aspects of this decoder structure is given for a RS code.

  3. On implementing large binary tree architectures in VLSI and WSI

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, H.Y.; Singh, A.D.

    1989-04-01

    The complete binary tree is known to support the parallel execution of important algorithms, which has given rise to much interest in implementing such architectures in VLSI and WSI. For large trees, the classical H-tree layout approaches suffers from area inefficiency and long interconnects. Other proposed schemes are not well suited for the implementation of defect-tolerant designs. This paper presents an efficient scheme for the layout of large binary tree architectures by embedding the complete binary tree in a two-dimensional array of processing elements.

  4. Advanced Technology Component Derating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Mike, ’WSI: A Technology For Reliability,’ Yield Modeling And Defect Tolerance In VLSI 73. Meredith, John W., ’Microelectronics Reliability,’ IEEE Region...34Reterojunction Bipolar Digital ICs Using M=VD Material,’ IEEE Gallium Arsenide Tntegrated Circuit Symposium, 1986 156 121. Wilhems n, Finn, Yee

  5. Silicon Alignment Pins: An Easy Way to Realize a Wafer-to-Wafer Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile; Reck, Theodore J.; Lin, Robert H.; Peralta, Alejandro; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; Siles, Jose; Toda, Risaku; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cooper, Ken B.; Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Submillimeter heterodyne instruments play a critical role in addressing fundamental questions regarding the evolution of galaxies as well as being a crucial tool in planetary science. To make these instruments compatible with small platforms, especially for the study of the outer planets, or to enable the development of multi-pixel arrays, it is essential to reduce the mass, power, and volume of the existing single-pixel heterodyne receivers. Silicon micromachining technology is naturally suited for making these submillimeter and terahertz components, where precision and accuracy are essential. Waveguide and channel cavities are etched in a silicon bulk material using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) techniques. Power amplifiers, multiplier and mixer chips are then integrated and the silicon pieces are stacked together to form a supercompact receiver front end. By using silicon micromachined packages for these components, instrument mass can be reduced and higher levels of integration can be achieved. A method is needed to assemble accurately these silicon pieces together, and a technique was developed here using etched pockets and silicon pins to align two wafers together.

  6. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  7. In-line TEM sample preparation and wafer return strategy for rapid yield learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicaïs-Lépinay, N.; André, F.; Brevers, S.; Guyader, P.; Trouiller, C.; Kwakman, L. F. Tz.; Pokrant, S.; Verkleij, D.; Schampers, R.; Ithier, L.; Sicurani, E.; Wyon, C.

    2006-03-01

    Full wafer dual beam FIB-SEM systems have received a lot of industrial interest in the last years and by now are operational in several 200mm and 300mm fabs. These tools offer a 3D-physical characterization capability of defects and device structures and as such allow for more rapid yield learning and increased process control. Moreover, if SEM resolution is insufficient to reveal defect origin or the necessary process details, it is now also possible to prepare TEM samples using a controlled, easy to learn in-situ process and to efficiently continue the characterization with a high resolution TEM inspection. Thanks to latest hardware developments and the high degree of automation of this TEM sample preparation process, wafers no longer need to be broken and remain essentially free from contamination. Hence, the TEM lamella process can be considered as non-destructive and wafers may continue the fabrication process flow. In this paper we examine the SEM and TEM application capabilities offered by in-line dual beam systems. To qualify the wafer return strategy, the particle contamination generated by the system hardware as well as the process-induced contamination have been investigated. The particle levels measured are fully acceptable to adopt the wafer return strategy. Ga-contamination does exist but is sufficiently low and localized so that the wafer return strategy can be applied safely in the back-end of line process. Yield analysis has confirmed that there is no measurable impact on device yield. Although yet to be proven for the frond-end of line processes, the wafer return strategy has been demonstrated as a valuable one already in the backend of line processes. The as developed non-destructive 3-D SEM-TEM characterization capability does offer value added data that allow to determine the root cause of critical process defects in almost real-time and this for both standard (SEM) and more advanced (TEM) technologies.

  8. Bubble-domain circuit wafer evaluation coil set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T. T.; Williams, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Coil structures have been designed to permit nondestructive testing of bubble wafers. Wafers can be electrically or optically inspected and operated from quasi-static frequency to maximum device operating frequency.

  9. Noncontact sheet resistance measurement technique for wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Rommel, J. Martin; Litovsky, Roman; Becla, Peter; Lojek, Bohumil; Bryson, Frank; Blake, Julian

    1995-12-01

    A new technique, MICROTHERM, has been developed for noncontact sheet resistance measurements of semiconductor wafers. It is based on the application of microwave energy to the wafer, and simultaneous detection of the infrared radiation resulting from ohmic heating. The pattern of the emitted radiation corresponds to the sheet resistance distribution across the wafer. This method is nondestructive, noncontact, and allows for measurements of very small areas (several square microns) of the wafer.

  10. New VLSI complexity results for threshold gate comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1996-12-31

    The paper overviews recent developments concerning optimal (from the point of view of size and depth) implementations of COMPARISON using threshold gates. We detail a class of solutions which also covers another particular solution, and spans from constant to logarithmic depths. These circuit complexity results are supplemented by fresh VLSI complexity results having applications to hardware implementations of neural networks and to VLSI-friendly learning algorithms. In order to estimate the area (A) and the delay (T), as well as the classical AT{sup 2}, we shall use the following {open_quote}cost functions{close_quote}: (i) the connectivity (i.e., sum of fan-ins) and the number-of-bits for representing the weights and thresholds are used as closer approximations of the area; while (ii) the fan-ins and the length of the wires are used for closer estimates of the delay. Such approximations allow us to compare the different solutions-which present very interesting fan-in dependent depth-size and area-delay tradeoffs - with respect to AT{sup 2}.

  11. Graph isomorphism algorithm for verification of VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresh, Kobi

    1987-08-01

    VLSI circuit verification requires comparison between the physical layout and the corresponding circuit description. This is done by generating graphs from the layout and the schematic, and an algorithm is required to compare the graphs and accurately locate differences. A randomized algorithm for this purpose is presented. The principles and basic concepts of the algorithm are presented and the construction of the isomorphism function is described. Automatic error correction techniques are described and the problems involved in deciding which elements in a graph are considered incorrect are discussed. Human engineering and system engineering aspects of reporting comparison results to the user of a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system are considered. The algorithm is presented in detail, and an overview is presented of its general structure and stages. Experimental results are presented of the use of the algorithm in handling various kinds of graphs. Two aspects of computer science are described, in describing how an algorithm that solves a well known problem in graph theory is devised, implemented and used as a CAD tool for designing VLSI circuits.

  12. Front-end wafer-level microsystem packaging technique with microcap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yuh-Min; Bachman, Mark; Li, Guann-pyng

    2002-07-01

    Packaging represents a significant and expensive obstacle in commercializing microsystem technology (MST) devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), micro-optical-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS), microsensors, microactuators and other micromachined devices. This paper describes a novel wafer level protection method for MST devices which facilitates improved manufacturing throughput and automation in package assembly, wafer level testing of devices, and enhanced device performance. The method involves the use of a wafer-sized micro-cap array. This array consists of an assortment of small caps molded onto a material with adjustable shapes and sizes to serve as protective structures against the hostile environments associated with packaging. It may also include modifications which enhance its adhesion to the MST wafer or increase the MST device function. Depending on the application, the micro-molded cap can be designed and modified to facilitate additional functions, such as optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical functions, which are not easily achieved in the device by traditional means. The fabrication method, materials selection, and the compatibility of the micro cap device to conventional packaging process are discussed in this paper. The results of wafer-level micro cap packaging demonstrations are also presented.

  13. Silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration achieved with multilevel aluminum interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Grant L.; Kolesar, Edward S.

    A silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration (WSI) technique has been developed to interconnect complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Electrical performance tests and processing diagnostics reveal that the interconnect design is very promising. The wafer-scale integrated circuit was fabricated by mounting two CMOS integrated circuit dies into etched wells and then planarizing the surface of the silicon wafer substrate. Next the wafer's surface was coated with a photosensitive polyimide and patterned with vias to accommodate the interconnecting conductors. The CMOS dies were two-bit shift registers and were electrically interconnected with aluminum conductors using conventional silicon processing techniques. A diagnostic evaluation was accomplished to determine the electrical continuity of the conductors and via contacts. When compared to a complementary wire-bonded interconnect scheme, the silicon WSI technology was found to be the superior performer at 1-MHz operating frequencies. Discontinuous interconnects were evaluated, and the failures were identified to occur at the severe topographical steps encountered on the substrate wafer's surface.

  14. Concepts for on-board satellite image registration. Volume 3: Impact of VLSI/VHSIC on satellite on-board signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aanstoos, J. V.; Snyder, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Anticipated major advances in integrated circuit technology in the near future are described as well as their impact on satellite onboard signal processing systems. Dramatic improvements in chip density, speed, power consumption, and system reliability are expected from very large scale integration. Improvements are expected from very large scale integration enable more intelligence to be placed on remote sensing platforms in space, meeting the goals of NASA's information adaptive system concept, a major component of the NASA End-to-End Data System program. A forecast of VLSI technological advances is presented, including a description of the Defense Department's very high speed integrated circuit program, a seven-year research and development effort.

  15. First On-Wafer Power Characterization of MMIC Amplifiers at Sub-Millimeter Wave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Gaier, T.; Samoska, L.; Deal, W. R.; Radisic, V.; Mei, X. B.; Yoshida, W.; Liu, P. S.; Uyeda, J.; Barsky, M.; Lai, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in semiconductor technology have enabled advanced submillimeter wave (300 GHz) transistors and circuits. These new high speed components have required new test methods to be developed for characterizing performance, and to provide data for device modeling to improve designs. Current efforts in progressing high frequency testing have resulted in on-wafer-parameter measurements up to approximately 340 GHz and swept frequency vector network analyzer waveguide measurements to 508 GHz. On-wafer noise figure measurements in the 270-340 GHz band have been demonstrated. In this letter we report on on-wafer power measurements at 330 GHz of a three stage amplifier that resulted in a maximum measured output power of 1.78mW and maximum gain of 7.1 dB. The method utilized demonstrates the extension of traditional power measurement techniques to submillimeter wave frequencies, and is suitable for automated testing without packaging for production screening of submillimeter wave circuits.

  16. Wafer sub-layer impact in OPC/ORC models for advanced node implant layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le-Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Michel, Jean-Christophe; Sungauer, Elodie; Yesilada, Emek; Robert, Frederic; Lan, Song; Feng, Mu; Wang, Lei; Depre, Laurent; Kapasi, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    From 28 nm technology node and below optical proximity correction (OPC) needs to take into account light scattering effects from prior layers when bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) is not used, which is typical for ionic implantation layers. These effects are complex, especially when multiple sub layers have to be considered: for instance active and poly structures need to be accounted for. A new model form has been developed to address this wafer topography during model calibration called the wafer 3D+ or W3D+ model. This model can then be used in verification (using Tachyon LMC) and during model based OPC to increase the accuracy of mask correction and verification. This paper discusses an exploration of this new model results using extended wafer measurements (including SEM). Current results show good accuracy on various representative structures.

  17. Integratible Process for Fabrication of Fluidic Microduct Networks on a Single Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, C.M.; Ashby, C.I.; Bridges, M.M.; Griego, L.; Wong, C.C.

    1999-09-07

    We present a microelectronics fabrication compatible process that comprises photolithography and a key room temperature SiON thin film plasma deposition to define and seal a fluidic microduct network. Our single wafer process is independent of thermo-mechanical material properties, particulate cleaning, global flatness, assembly alignment, and glue medium application, which are crucial for wafer fusion bonding or sealing techniques using a glue medium. From our preliminary experiments, we have identified a processing window to fabricate channels on silicon, glass and quartz substrates. Channels with a radius of curvature between 8 and 50 {micro}m, are uniform along channel lengths of several inches and repeatable across the wafer surfaces. To further develop this technology, we have begun characterizing the SiON film properties such as elastic modulus using nanoindentation, and chemical bonding compatibility with other microelectronic materials.

  18. Steel bridge fatigue crack detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Ziehl, Paul; Ozevin, Didem; Pollock, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are well known for its dual capabilities in structural health monitoring, acting as either actuators or sensors. Due to the variety of deterioration sources and locations of bridge defects, there is currently no single method that can detect and address the potential sources globally. In our research, our use of the PWAS based sensing has the novelty of implementing both passive (as acoustic emission) and active (as ultrasonic transducers) sensing with a single PWAS network. The combined schematic is using acoustic emission to detect the presence of fatigue cracks in steel bridges in their early stage since methods such as ultrasonics are unable to quantify the initial condition of crack growth since most of the fatigue life for these details is consumed while the fatigue crack is too small to be detected. Hence, combing acoustic emission with ultrasonic active sensing will strengthen the damage detection process. The integration of passive acoustic emission detection with active sensing will be a technological leap forward from the current practice of periodic and subjective visual inspection, and bridge management based primarily on history of past performance. In this study, extensive laboratory investigation is performed supported by theoretical modeling analysis. A demonstration system will be presented to show how piezoelectric wafer active sensor is used for acoustic emission. Specimens representing complex structures are tested. The results will also be compared with traditional acoustic emission transducers to identify the application barriers.

  19. Uniaxially strained silicon by wafer bonding and layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Radu, I.; Muster, F.; Singh, R.; Reiche, M.; Petzold, M.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.

    2007-02-01

    Uniaxial strain on wafer-level was realised by mechanically bending and direct wafer bonding of Si wafers in the bent state followed by thinning one of the Si wafers by the smart-cut process. This approach is flexible and allows to obtain different strain values at wafer-level in both tension and compression. UV micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the strain in the thin transferred Si layers. Numerical modelling by 3D finite elements of the strain provided a good description of the experimental results.

  20. The VLSI design of a single chip Reed-Solomon encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1982-01-01

    A design for a single chip implementation of a Reed-Solomon encoder is presented. The architecture that leads to this single VLSI chip design makes use of a bit serial finite field multiplication algorithm.

  1. Analog Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Implementations of Artificial Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    There has been a recent resurgence of interest in the multi- disciplinary field of artificial neural networks . Artificial neural networks , originally...e.g., backpropagation, hopfield, bidirectional associative memories, etc.). Artificial Neural Networks , Analog VLSI.

  2. Parallel VLSI architecture emulation and the organization of APSA/MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, John T.

    1987-01-01

    The Applicative Programming System Architecture (APSA) combines an applicative language interpreter with a novel parallel computer architecture that is well suited for Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) implementation. The Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) can simulate VLSI circuits by allocating one processing element in its square array to an area on a square VLSI chip. As long as there are not too many long data paths, the MPP can simulate a VLSI clock cycle very rapidly. The APSA circuit contains a binary tree with a few long paths and many short ones. A skewed H-tree layout allows every processing element to simulate a leaf cell and up to four tree nodes, with no loss in parallelism. Emulation of a key APSA algorithm on the MPP resulted in performance 16,000 times faster than a Vax. This speed will make it possible for the APSA language interpreter to run fast enough to support research in parallel list processing algorithms.

  3. Correlation between reticle- and wafer-CD difference of multiple 28nm reticle-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Richter, Frank; Thamm, Thomas; Ackmann, Paul; Staples, Marc; Weisbuch, Francois; Kurth, Karin; Schenker, Joerg; Leschok, Andre; GN, Fang Hong

    2012-11-01

    Reticle critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is an important criterion for the qualification of mask layer processes. Normally, the smaller the three sigma value of reticle CDU is, the better is the reticle CDU performance. For qualification of mask processes, the mask layers to be qualified should have a comparable reticle CDU compared to the process of record (POR) mask layers. Because the reticle critical dimension (CD) measurement is based on algorithms like "middle side lobe measurement", evaluation of the reticle CD-values can not reflect aspects like the sidewall angle of the reticle and variation in corner rounding which may be critical for 45nm technology nodes (and below). All involved tools and processes contribute to the wafer intra-field CDU (scanner, track, reticle, metrology). Normally, the reticle contribution to the wafer CDU should be as small as possible. In order to reduce the process contributions to the wafer intra-field CDU during the mask qualification process, the same toolset (exposure tool, metrology tool) should be applied as for the POR. Out of the results of these investigations the correlation between wafer measurement to target (MTT) and reticle MTT can be obtained in order to accurately qualify the CDU performance of the mask processes. We will demonstrate the correlation between reticle MTT and wafer MTT by use of multiple mask processes and alternative mask blank materials. We will investigate the results of four process-layers looking at advanced binary maskblank material from two different suppliers (moreover the results of a 2X-via layer as an example for a phase-shift maskblank is discussed). Objective of this article is to demonstrate the distribution between reticle MTT and wafer MTT as a qualification criterion for mask processes. The correlation between wafer CD-difference and reticle CD-difference of these mask processes are demonstrated by having performed investigations of dense features of different 28nmtechnology

  4. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  5. Thermal modeling of wafer-based precision glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Shen, Lianguan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Mujun

    2016-10-01

    Wafer based precision glass optics manufacturing has been an innovative approach for combining high accuracy with mass production. However, due to the small ratio of thickness and diameter of the glass wafer, deformation and residual stress would be induced for the nonuniform temperature distribution in the glass wafer after molding. Therefore, thermal modelling of the heating system in the wafer based precision glass molding (PGM) process is of great importance in optimizing the heating system and the technique of the process. The current paper deals with a transient thermal modelling of a self-developed heating system for wafer based PGM process. First, in order to investigate the effect of radiation from the surface and interior of the glass wafer, the thermal modeling is simulated with a discrete ordinates radiation model in the CFD software FLUENT. Temperature distribution of the glass wafer obtained from the simulations is then used to evaluate the performance of heating system and investigate some importance parameters in the model, such as interior and surface radiation in glass wafer, thermal contact conductance between glass wafer and molds, thickness to diameter ratio of glass wafer. Finally, structure modification in the molding chamber is raised to decrease the temperature gradient in the glass wafer and the effect is significant.

  6. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.; St. Martin, Edward; Arora, Michelle; de la Garza, Linda

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  7. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  8. Pursuit, Avoidance, and Cohesion in Flight: Multi-Purpose Control Laws and Neuromorphic VLSI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    As the next step (past the head-direction cell system) in our spatial navigation efforts, we are developing a neuromorphic analog VLSI -based model...but have begun circuit designs that utilize a floating-gate memory synaptic array. The episodic memory uses a two stage neural network: a feature...Control Laws and Neuromorphic VLSI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 070402-7705 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-07-1-0446 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  9. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  10. Wafer dicing utilizing unique beam shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Laser dicing of wafers is of keen interest to the semiconductor and LED industry. Devices such as ASICs, Ultra-thin Wafer Scale Packages and LEDS are unique in that they typically are formed from various materials in a multilayered structure. Many of these layers include active device materials, passivation coatings, conductors and dielectric films all deposited on top of a bulk wafer substrate and all potentially having differing ablation thresholds. These composite multi-layered structures require high finesse laser processes to ensure yields, cut quality and low process cost. Such processes have become very complex over the years as new devices have become miniaturized, requiring smaller kerf sizes. Of critical concern is the need to minimize substrate micro-cracking or lift off of upper layers along the dicing streets which directly corresponds to bulk device strength and device operational integrity over its projected lifetime. Laser processes involving the sequential use of single or multiple diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers, such as UV DPSS (355nn, 266nm, 532 nm), VIS DPSS (~532 nm) and IR DPSS (1064nm, 1070nm) as well as (UV, VIS, NIR, FIR and Eye Safe Wavelengths) DPFL (Diode Pumped Fiber Lasers) lasers to penetrate various and differing material layers and substrates including Silicon Carbide (SiC), Silicon, GaAs and Sapphire. Development of beam shaping optics with the purpose of permitting two or more differing energy densities within a single focused or imaged beam spot would provide opportunities for pre-processing or pre-scribing of thinner cover layers, while following through with a higher energy density segment to cut through the bulk base substrates. This paper will describe the development of beam shaping optical elements with unique beam shapes that could benefit dicing and patterning of delicate thin film coatings. Various designs will be described, with processing examples using LED wafer materials.

  11. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  12. Optical characterization of SiC wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Pophristic, M.; Long, F.H.; Ferguson, I.

    1999-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate wafers of both 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC. The two-phonon Raman spectra from both 4H- and 6H-SiC have been measured and found to be polytype dependent, consistent with changes in the vibrational density of states. They have observed electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in both 4H- and 6H-SiC at room temperature. They have found that electronic Raman scattering from the nitrogen defect levels is significantly enhanced with excitation by red or near IR laser light. These results demonstrate that the laser wavelength is a key parameter in the characterization of SiC by Raman scattering. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a noninvasive, in situ diagnostic for SiC wafer production and substrate evaluation. They also present results on time-resolved photoluminescence spectra of n-type SiC wafers.

  13. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  14. Wafer-level reliability characterization for wafer-level packaged microbolometer with ultra-small array size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Yeoun; Yang, Chungmo; Park, Jae Hong; Jung, Ho; Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Woo; Mitchell, Jay; Hwang, Wook Joong; Lee, Kwyro

    2013-06-01

    For the development of small and low cost microbolometer, wafer level reliability characterization techniques of vacuum packaged wafer are introduced. Amorphous silicon based microbolometer-type vacuum sensors fabricated in 8 inch wafer are bonded with cap wafer by Au-Sn eutectic solder. Membrane deflection and integrated vacuum sensor techniques are independently used to characterize the hermeticity in a wafer-level. For the packaged wafer with membrane thickness below 100um, it is possible to determine the hermeticity as screening test by optical detection technique. Integrated vacuum sensor having the same structure as bolometer pixel shows the vacuum level below 100mTorr. All steps from packaging process to fine hermeticity test are implemented in wafer level to prove the high volume and low cost production.

  15. Efficient VLSI architecture for training radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhe-Cheng; Hwang, Wen-Jyi

    2013-03-19

    This paper presents a novel VLSI architecture for the training of radial basis function (RBF) networks. The architecture contains the circuits for fuzzy C-means (FCM) and the recursive Least Mean Square (LMS) operations. The FCM circuit is designed for the training of centers in the hidden layer of the RBF network. The recursive LMS circuit is adopted for the training of connecting weights in the output layer. The architecture is implemented by the field programmable gate array (FPGA). It is used as a hardware accelerator in a system on programmable chip (SOPC) for real-time training and classification. Experimental results reveal that the proposed RBF architecture is an effective alternative for applications where fast and efficient RBF training is desired.

  16. Macromodeling and optimization of digital MOS VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, M. D.; Glasser, L. A.

    1986-03-01

    Power consumption and signal delay are crucial to the design of high-performance VLSI circuits. This paper presents CAD tools for modeling and optimizing digital MOS designs. The tools determine the transistor sizes that minimize circuit power consumption subject to constraints on signal path delays. Computational efficiency is obtained through macromodeling techniques and a specialized optimization algorithm. The macromodels are based on device equations, and encapsulate logic gate behavior in a set of simple yet accurate formulas. The optimization algorithm exploits properties of the digital MOS domain to convert the primal optimization problem into a dual form which is much easier to solve. The result is a pair of CAD tools that can optimize a circuit in roughly the amount of time needed to perform a transistor level simulation of the circuit.

  17. VLSI-based Video Event Triggering for Image Data Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-duration, on-orbit microgravity experiments require a combination of high resolution and high frame rate video data acquisition. The digitized high-rate video stream presents a difficult data storage problem. Data produced at rates of several hundred million bytes per second may require a total mission video data storage requirement exceeding one terabyte. A NASA-designed, VLSI-based, highly parallel digital state machine generates a digital trigger signal at the onset of a video event. High capacity random access memory storage coupled with newly available fuzzy logic devices permits the monitoring of a video image stream for long term (DC-like) or short term (AC-like) changes caused by spatial translation, dilation, appearance, disappearance, or color change in a video object. Pre-trigger and post-trigger storage techniques are then adaptable to archiving only the significant video images.

  18. Laser cutting silicon-glass double layer wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yecheng; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at introducing the laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) technology to solve the silicon-glass double layer wafer dicing problems in the packaging procedure of silicon-glass device packaged by WLCSP technology, investigating the feasibility of this idea, and studying the crack propagation process of LITP cutting double layer wafer. In this paper, the physical process of the 1064 nm laser beam interact with the double layer wafer during the cutting process was studied theoretically. A mathematical model consists the volumetric heating source and the surface heating source has been established. The temperature and stress distribution was simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) was added to the simulation as the supplementary features to simulate the crack propagation process and the crack propagation profile. The silicon-glass double layer wafer cutting verification experiment under typical parameters was conducted by using the 1064 nm semiconductor laser. The crack propagation profile on the fracture surface was examined by optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and XFEM status. It was concluded that the quality of the finished fracture surface has been greatly improved, and the experiment results were well supported by the numerical simulation results.

  19. Improving wafer level CD uniformity for logic applications utilizing mask level metrology and process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Avi; Trautzsch, Thomas; Buttgereit, Ute; Graitzer, Erez; Hanuka, Ori

    2013-09-01

    Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is one of the key parameters necessary to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC). The extension of 193nm based lithography usage combined with design rule shrinkage makes process control, in particular the wafer level CDU control, an extremely important and challenging task in IC manufacturing. In this study the WLCD-CDC closed loop solution offered by Carl Zeiss SMS was examined. This solution aims to improve the wafer level intra-field CDU without the need to run wafer prints and extensive wafer CD metrology. It combines two stand-alone tools: The WLCD tool which measures CD based on aerial imaging technology while applying the exact scanner-used illumination conditions to the photomask and the CDC tool which utilizes an ultra-short femto-second laser to write intra-volume shading elements (Shade-In Elements™) inside the photomask bulk material. The CDC process changes the dose going through the photomask down to the wafer, hence the wafer level intra-field CDU improves. The objective of this study was to evaluate how CDC process is affecting the CD for different type of features and pattern density which are typical for logic and system on chip (SOC) devices. The main findings show that the linearity and proximity behavior is maintained by the CDC process and CDU and CDC Ratio (CDCR) show a linear behavior for the different feature types. Finally, it was demonstrated that the CDU errors of the targeted (critical) feature have been effectively eliminated. In addition, the CDU of all other features have been significantly improved as well.

  20. Yield-enhanced routing for high-performance VLSI designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Arunshankar; Chen, Howard H.; Koren, Israel

    1997-09-01

    It is widely recognized that interconnects will be the main bottleneck in enhancing the performance of future deep sub-micron VLSI designs. Interconnects do not "scale" well with decreasing feature sizes and therefore dominate the delays in the integrated circuit. In addition to RC delays, crosstalk noise also contributes significantly to the delays experienced by a signal. Interconnects are more susceptible to manufacturing defects and therefore affect the product yields significantly. Recently, several channel-routing based solutions have been proposed to minimize crosstalk noise and also enhance yield of the routing. While these approaches are effective, they do not provide maximum benefits as they are either constrained by a particular design methodology or are post-routing steps which have limited scope for significant improvement. Also, design for manufacturabiity objectives have not been fully exploited by VLSI CAD tools as they do not integrate seamlessly into the conventional design flow and the added overheads make it less attractive. In this paper, we propose a modified routing algorithm that maximizes yield and reduces crosstalk noise while using minimal area for the routing. The yield enhancement objective has been integrated into the routing phase as a preferred constraint (a constraint that will be satisfied only if the primary constraints of minimal area and wire length have been satisfied) and fits well into the conventional design flow. This enables the router to produce an output which provides maximum achievable critical area reduction for the given routing solution. Post-routing layout modification is also done with the objective of minimizing the interaction area between the interconnects by exploiting the gridless property of the router. The above algorithm is incorporated into GLITTER (the gridless, variable width channel router), and the results on channel-routing benchmarks are presented. These results show a significant reduction in the

  1. Spike-driven synaptic plasticity: theory, simulation, VLSI implementation.

    PubMed

    Fusi, S; Annunziato, M; Badoni, D; Salamon, A; Amit, D J

    2000-10-01

    We present a model for spike-driven dynamics of a plastic synapse, suited for aVLSI implementation. The synaptic device behaves as a capacitor on short timescales and preserves the memory of two stable states (efficacies) on long timescales. The transitions (LTP/LTD) are stochastic because both the number and the distribution of neural spikes in any finite (stimulation) interval fluctuate, even at fixed pre- and postsynaptic spike rates. The dynamics of the single synapse is studied analytically by extending the solution to a classic problem in queuing theory (Takacs process). The model of the synapse is implemented in aVLSI and consists of only 18 transistors. It is also directly simulated. The simulations indicate that LTP/LTD probabilities versus rates are robust to fluctuations of the electronic parameters in a wide range of rates. The solutions for these probabilities are in very good agreement with both the simulations and measurements. Moreover, the probabilities are readily manipulable by variations of the chip's parameters, even in ranges where they are very small. The tests of the electronic device cover the range from spontaneous activity (3-4 Hz) to stimulus-driven rates (50 Hz). Low transition probabilities can be maintained in all ranges, even though the intrinsic time constants of the device are short (approximately 100 ms). Synaptic transitions are triggered by elevated presynaptic rates: for low presynaptic rates, there are essentially no transitions. The synaptic device can preserve its memory for years in the absence of stimulation. Stochasticity of learning is a result of the variability of interspike intervals; noise is a feature of the distributed dynamics of the network. The fact that the synapse is binary on long timescales solves the stability problem of synaptic efficacies in the absence of stimulation. Yet stochastic learning theory ensures that it does not affect the collective behavior of the network, if the transition probabilities are

  2. Nanotribology of nanooxide materials in ionic liquids on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidunsani, Ahmad Termizi; Radiman, Shahidan; Hassan, Masjuki Haji; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Nanotribological properties have a significant impact on daily life. Ionic liquids (ILs) are becoming new favourable lubricants currently in researches. Addition of nanooxide materials in lubricants provide improvements to new technology. In this study, we determine nanotribological properties of BMIM+BF4- IL addition of different amount of ZnO nanomaterial on single crystals silicon wafer (Si110). The viscosity changes of IL samples against temperature increase were determined by rheological method. Nanotribological properties were determined by changes in friction coefficient and wear rate on silicon substrate surfaces using a reciprocating friction and wear monitor in 1 hour duration time. Aluminium cylinders acted as pins used to rub Si (110) substrate sample surfaces. Thus, on range between 0 mg to 3.5 mg of ZnO nanooxide material dispersed in 10ml BMIM+BF4- showed a good friction coefficient, wear and surface roughness reduction.

  3. Thinning of PLZT ceramic wafers for sensor integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na; Liu, Weiguo

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of transparent PLZT ceramics can be tailored by controlling the component of them, and therefore showed excellent dielectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric properties. To integrate the ceramics with microelectronic circuit to realize integrated applications, the ceramic wafers have to be thinned down to micrometer scale in thickness. A7/65/35 PLZT ceramic wafer was selected in this study for the thinning process. Size of the wafer was 10×10mm with an initial thickness of 300μm. A novel membrane transfer process (MTP) was developed for the thinning and integration of the ceramic wafers. In the MTP process, the ceramic wafer was bonded to silicon wafer using a polymer bonding method. Mechanical grinding method was applied to reduce the thickness of the ceramic. To minimize the surface damage in the ceramic wafer caused by the mechanical grinding, magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method was utilized to polish the wafer. White light interference (WLI) apparatus was used to monitor the surface qualities of the grinded and ploished ceramic wafers. For the PLZT membrane obtained from the MTP process, the final thickness of the thinned and polished wafer was 10μm, the surface roughness was below 1nm in rms, and the flatness was better than λ/5.

  4. A low-power VLSI implementation for fast full-search variable block size motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Tang, Hua

    2013-09-01

    Variable block size motion estimation (VBSME) is becoming the new coding technique in H.264/AVC. This article presents a low-power VLSI implementation for VBSME, which employs a fast full-search block-matching algorithm to reduce power consumption, while preserving the optimal motion vectors (MVs). The fast full-search algorithm is based on the comparison of the current minimum sum of absolute difference (SAD) to a conservative lower bound so that unnecessary SAD calculations can be eliminated. We first experimentally determine the specific conservative lower bound of SAD and then implement the fast full-search algorithm in FPGA and 0.18 µm CMOS technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a fast full-search block-matching algorithm is explored to reduce power consumption in the context of VBSME and implemented in hardware. Experiment results show that the proposed design can save power consumption by 45% compared to conventional VBSME designs that give optimal MV based on the full-search algorithms.

  5. A Low Cost VLSI Architecture for Spike Sorting Based on Feature Extraction with Peak Search

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuan-Jyun; Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Chen, Chih-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a novel VLSI architecture for spike sorting with high classification accuracy, low area costs and low power consumption. A novel feature extraction algorithm with low computational complexities is proposed for the design of the architecture. In the feature extraction algorithm, a spike is separated into two portions based on its peak value. The area of each portion is then used as a feature. The algorithm is simple to implement and less susceptible to noise interference. Based on the algorithm, a novel architecture capable of identifying peak values and computing spike areas concurrently is proposed. To further accelerate the computation, a spike can be divided into a number of segments for the local feature computation. The local features are subsequently merged with the global ones by a simple hardware circuit. The architecture can also be easily operated in conjunction with the circuits for commonly-used spike detection algorithms, such as the Non-linear Energy Operator (NEO). The architecture has been implemented by an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) with 90-nm technology. Comparisons to the existing works show that the proposed architecture is well suited for real-time multi-channel spike detection and feature extraction requiring low hardware area costs, low power consumption and high classification accuracy. PMID:27941631

  6. VLSI design of an RSA encryption/decryption chip using systolic array based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chi-Chia; Lin, Bor-Shing; Jan, Gene Eu; Lin, Jheng-Yi

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the VLSI design of a configurable RSA public key cryptosystem supporting the 512-bit, 1024-bit and 2048-bit based on Montgomery algorithm achieving comparable clock cycles of current relevant works but with smaller die size. We use binary method for the modular exponentiation and adopt Montgomery algorithm for the modular multiplication to simplify computational complexity, which, together with the systolic array concept for electric circuit designs effectively, lower the die size. The main architecture of the chip consists of four functional blocks, namely input/output modules, registers module, arithmetic module and control module. We applied the concept of systolic array to design the RSA encryption/decryption chip by using VHDL hardware language and verified using the TSMC/CIC 0.35 m 1P4 M technology. The die area of the 2048-bit RSA chip without the DFT is 3.9 × 3.9 mm2 (4.58 × 4.58 mm2 with DFT). Its average baud rate can reach 10.84 kbps under a 100 MHz clock.

  7. CMOS-analogous wafer-scale nanotube-on-insulator approach for submicrometer devices and integrated circuits using aligned nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Wang, Chuan; Lin, Albert; Patil, Nishant; Gomez, Lewis; Kumar, Akshay; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-01-01

    Massive aligned carbon nanotubes hold great potential but also face significant integration/assembly challenges for future beyond-silicon nanoelectronics. We report a wafer-scale processing of aligned nanotube devices and integrated circuits, including progress on essential technological components such as wafer-scale synthesis of aligned nanotubes, wafer-scale transfer of nanotubes to silicon wafers, metallic nanotube removal and chemical doping, and defect-tolerant integrated nanotube circuits. We have achieved synthesis of massive aligned nanotubes on complete 4 in. quartz and sapphire substrates, which were then transferred to 4 in. Si/SiO(2) wafers. CMOS analogous fabrication was performed to yield transistors and circuits with features down to 0.5 mum, with high current density approximately 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratios. In addition, chemical doping has been used to build fully integrated complementary inverter with a gain approximately 5, and a defect-tolerant design has been employed for NAND and NOR gates. This full-wafer approach could serve as a critical foundation for future integrated nanotube circuits.

  8. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Speller, R. D.; Evans, P. M.; Allinson, N. M.; Wells, K.

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  9. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-07

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  10. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chuanxin M; Nandyala, Sirish K; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems.

  11. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chuanxin M.; Nandyala, Sirish K.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin–Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems. PMID:25538613

  12. Method of bond strength evaluation for silicon direct wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Alexander; Avagyan, Avag; Davies, Brady R.

    2001-09-01

    A crack-opening method used for characterization of silicon direct wafer bonding (DWB) techniques was analyzed. Mathematical model describing the influence of the pattern shape on the wafer pair resistance curve, so-called the R-curve, was developed. Two-dimensional patterns were created on a mirror-polished silicon wafer surface by a combination of photolithography, deposition and etching steps. Experimental observations did show that structured wafers can be used for large bond energy measurements. We propose utilization of structured wafers for bond energy measurements. It allows R-curve shape manipulation, increases the method sensitivity, and reduces probability of wafer failure. The resulting theory can also be used for developing new experimental methods for large bond energy measurements.

  13. Brewster's angle silicon wafer terahertz linear polarizer.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Gallot, Guilhem

    2011-07-18

    We present a new cost-effective terahertz linear polarizer made from a stack of silicon wafers at Brewster's angle, andevaluate its performances. We show that this polarizer is wide-band, has a high extinction ratio (> 6 × 10(3)) and very small insertion losses (< 1%). We provide measurements of the temporal waveforms after linearly polarizing the THz beam and show that there is no distortion of the pulse. We compare its performances with a commercial wire-grid polarizer, and show that the Brewster's angle polarizer can conveniently be used to control the power of a terahertz beam.

  14. Wafer-Level Membrane-Transfer Process for Fabricating MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A process for transferring an entire wafer-level micromachined silicon structure for mating with and bonding to another such structure has been devised. This process is intended especially for use in wafer-level integration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have been fabricated on dissimilar substrates. Unlike in some older membrane-transfer processes, there is no use of wax or epoxy during transfer. In this process, the substrate of a wafer-level structure to be transferred serves as a carrier, and is etched away once the transfer has been completed. Another important feature of this process is that two electrodes constitutes an electrostatic actuator array. An SOI wafer and a silicon wafer (see Figure 1) are used as the carrier and electrode wafers, respectively. After oxidation, both wafers are patterned and etched to define a corrugation profile and electrode array, respectively. The polysilicon layer is deposited on the SOI wafer. The carrier wafer is bonded to the electrode wafer by using evaporated indium bumps. The piston pressure of 4 kPa is applied at 156 C in a vacuum chamber to provide hermetic sealing. The substrate of the SOI wafer is etched in a 25 weight percent TMAH bath at 80 C. The exposed buried oxide is then removed by using 49 percent HF droplets after an oxygen plasma ashing. The SOI top silicon layer is etched away by using an SF6 plasma to define the corrugation profile, followed by the HF droplet etching of the remaining oxide. The SF6 plasma with a shadow mask selectively etches the polysilicon membrane, if the transferred membrane structure needs to be patterned. Electrostatic actuators with various electrode gaps have been fabricated by this transfer technique. The gap between the transferred membrane and electrode substrate is very uniform ( 0.1 m across a wafer diameter of 100 mm, provided by optimizing the bonding control). Figure 2 depicts the finished product.

  15. High density circuit technology, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Dry processing - both etching and deposition - and present/future trends in semiconductor technology are discussed. In addition to a description of the basic apparatus, terminology, advantages, glow discharge phenomena, gas-surface chemistries, and key operational parameters for both dry etching and plasma deposition processes, a comprehensive survey of dry processing equipment (via vendor listing) is also included. The following topics are also discussed: fine-line photolithography, low-temperature processing, packaging for dense VLSI die, the role of integrated optics, and VLSI and technology innovations.

  16. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  17. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  18. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  19. Direct To Digital Holography For High Aspect Ratio Inspection of Semiconductor Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. E. (Tommy); Hunt, Martin A.; Bahm, Tracy M.; Baylor, Larry R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Chidley, Matthew D.; Dai, Xiaolong; Delahanty, Robert J.; El-Khashab, Ayman; Gilbert, Judd M.; Goddard, James S.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Hickson, Joel D.; Hylton, Kathy W.; John, George C.; Jones, Michael L.; Mayo, Michael W.; Marek, Christopher; Price, John H.; Rasmussen, David A.; Schaefer, Louis J.; Schulze, Mark A.; Shen, Bichuan; Smith, Randall G.; Su, Allen N.; Tobin, Kenneth W.; Usry, William R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Weber, Karsten S.; Owen, Robert W.

    2003-09-01

    Direct to Digital Holography (DDH) has been developed as a semiconductor wafer inspection tool and in particular as a tool for seeing defects in high aspect ratio (HAR) structures on semiconductor wafers and also for seeing partial-height defects. While the tool works very well for general wafer inspection, it has unusual capabilities for high aspect ratio inspection (HARI) and for detecting thin residual film defects (partial height defects). Inspection of HAR structures is rated as one of the highest unmet priorities of the member companies of International SEMATECH, and finding residual thin film defects (in some cases called "stringers") is also a very difficult challenge. The capabilities that make DDH unusually sensitive include: 1) the capture of the whole wave—both the classical amplitude captured by traditional optical systems, and the phase of the wave, with phase potentially measured to ˜1/1000'th of a wavelength or ˜2 to 3 Angstroms for a deep ultra-violet (DUV) laser; 2) heterodyne detection—this allows it to capture very low signal levels; and 3) a head-on geometry using a collimated laser beam that allows best penetration of HAR structures. The basic features and methods of this patented technology are presented, along with simple calculations of signal strength and expected noise levels for various circumstances. Full-wave numerical calculations of electromagnetic field penetration into HAR contacts and experimental results from various wafer types and structures are also presented.

  20. High density circuit technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    The metal (or dielectric) lift-off processes used in the semiconductor industry to fabricate high density very large scale integration (VLSI) systems were reviewed. The lift-off process consists of depositing the light-sensitive material onto the wafer and patterning first in such a manner as to form a stencil for the interconnection material. Then the interconnection layer is deposited and unwanted areas are lifted off by removing the underlying stencil. Several of these lift-off techniques were examined experimentally. The use of an auxiliary layer of polyimide to form a lift-off stencil offers considerable promise.

  1. Wafer-scale boundary value integrated circuit architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Frias, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) technology offers the potential for improving speed and reliability of a large integrated circuit system. An architecture is presented for a boundary value integrated circuit engine which lends itself to implementation in WSI. The philosophy underpinning this architecture includes local communication, cell regularity, and fault tolerance. The research described here proposes, investigates, and simulates this computer architecture and its flaw avoidance schemes for a WSI implementation. Boundary value differential equation computations are utilized in a number of scientific and engineering applications. A boundary value machine is ideally suited for solutions of finite difference and finite element problems with specified boundary values. The architecture is a 2-D array of computational cells. Each basic cell has four bit serial processing elements (PEs) and a local memory. Most communications is limited to transfer between adjacent PEs to reduce complexity, avoid long delays, and localize the effects of silicon flaws. Memory access time is kept short by restricting memory service to PEs in the same cell. I/O operation is performed by means of a row multiple single line I/O bus, which allows fast, reliable and independent data transference. WSI yield losses are due to gross defects and random defects. Gross defects which affect large portions of the wafer are usually fatal for any WSI implementation. Overcoming random defects which cover either a small area or points is achieved by defect avoidance schemes that are developed for this architecture. Those schemes are provided at array, cell, and communication level. Capabilities and limitations of the proposed WSI architecture can be observed through the simulations. Speed degradation of the array and the PE due to silicon defects is observed by means of simulation. Also, module and bus utilization are computed and presented.

  2. Product assurance technology efforts: Technical accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Product assurance technology topics addressed include: wafer acceptance procedures, test chips, test structures, test chip methodology, fault models, and the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite test chip.

  3. The design, fabrication, and test of a new VLSI hybrid analog-digital neural processing element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyong, Mark R.; Findley, Randall L.; Fields, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid analog-digital neural processing element with the time-dependent behavior of biological neurons has been developed. The hybrid processing element is designed for VLSI implementation and offers the best attributes of both analog and digital computation. Custom VLSI layout reduces the layout area of the processing element, which in turn increases the expected network density. The hybrid processing element operates at the nanosecond time scale, which enables it to produce real-time solutions to complex spatiotemporal problems found in high-speed signal processing applications. VLSI prototype chips have been designed, fabricated, and tested with encouraging results. Systems utilizing the time-dependent behavior of the hybrid processing element have been simulated and are currently in the fabrication process. Future applications are also discussed.

  4. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  5. Analysis of wafer heating in 14nm DUV layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Minghetti, Blandine; Lee, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    To further shrink the contact and trench dimensions, Negative Tone Development (NTD) has become the de facto process at these layers. The NTD process uses a positive tone resist and an organic solvent-based negative tone developer which leads to improved image contrast, larger process window and smaller Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF)[1]. The NTD masks have high transmission values leading to lens heating and as observed here wafer heating as well. Both lens and wafer heating will contribute to overlay error, however the effects of lens heating can be mitigated by applying lens heating corrections while no such corrections exist for wafer heating yet. Although the magnitude of overlay error due to wafer heating is low relative to lens heating; ever tightening overlay requirements imply that the distortions due to wafer heating will quickly become a significant part of the overlay budget. In this work the effects, analysis and observations of wafer heating on contact and metal layers of the 14nm node are presented. On product wafers it manifests as a difference in the scan up and scan down signatures between layers. An experiment to further understand wafer heating is performed with a test reticle that is used to monitor scanner performance.

  6. Strength of Si Wafers with Microcracks: A Theoretical Model; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Rupnowski, P.; Sopori, B.

    2008-05-01

    This paper concentrates on the modeling of the strength of photovoltaic (PV) wafers. First a multimodal Weibull distribution is presented for the strength of a silicon specimen with bulk, surface, and edge imperfections. Next, a specific case is analyzed of a PV wafer with surface damage that takes the form of subsurface microcracks.

  7. A VLSI decomposition of the deBruijn graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, O.; Dolinar, S.; Mceliece, R.; Pollara, F.

    1990-01-01

    A new Viterbi decoder for convolutional codes with constraint lengths up to 15, called the Big Viterbi Decoder, is under development for the Deep Space Network. It will be demonstrated by decoding data from the Galileo spacecraft, which has a rate 1/4, constraint-length 15 convolutional encoder on board. Here, the mathematical theory underlying the design of the very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) chips that are being used to build this decoder is explained. The deBruijn graph B sub n describes the topology of a fully parallel, rate 1/v, constraint length n+2 Viterbi decoder, and it is shown that B sub n can be built by appropriately wiring together (i.e., connecting together with extra edges) many isomorphic copies of a fixed graph called a B sub n building block. The efficiency of such a building block is defined as the fraction of the edges in B sub n that are present in the copies of the building block. It is shown, among other things, that for any alpha less than 1, there exists a graph G which is a B sub n building block of efficiency greater than alpha for all sufficiently large n. These results are illustrated by describing a special hierarchical family of deBruijn building blocks, which has led to the design of the gate-array chips being used in the Big Viterbi Decoder.

  8. A Modified ART 1 Algorithm more Suitable for VLSI Implementations.

    PubMed

    Linares-Barranco, Bernabe; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents a modification to the original ART 1 algorithm ([Carpenter and Grossberg, 1987a], A massively parallel architecture for a self-organizing neural pattern recognition machine, Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing, 37, 54-115) that is conceptually similar, can be implemented in hardware with less sophisticated building blocks, and maintains the computational capabilities of the originally proposed algorithm. This modified ART 1 algorithm (which we will call here ART 1(m)) is the result of hardware motivated simplifications investigated during the design of an actual ART 1 chip [Serrano-Gotarredona et al., 1994, Proc. 1994 IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks (Vol. 3, pp. 1912-1916); [Serrano-Gotarredona and Linares-Barranco, 1996], IEEE Trans. VLSI Systems, (in press)]. The purpose of this paper is simply to justify theoretically that the modified algorithm preserves the computational properties of the original one and to study the difference in behavior between the two approaches. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. High performance genetic algorithm for VLSI circuit partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Partitioning is one of the biggest challenges in computer-aided design for VLSI circuits (very large-scale integrated circuits). This work address the min-cut balanced circuit partitioning problem- dividing the graph that models the circuit into almost equal sized k sub-graphs while minimizing the number of edges cut i.e. minimizing the number of edges connecting the sub-graphs. The problem may be formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. Experimental studies in the literature have shown the problem to be NP-hard and thus it is important to design an efficient heuristic algorithm to solve it. The approach proposed in this study is a parallel implementation of a genetic algorithm, namely an island model. The information exchange between the evolving subpopulations is modeled using a fuzzy controller, which determines an optimal balance between exploration and exploitation of the solution space. The results of simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the standard sequential genetic algorithm both in terms of solution quality and convergence speed. As a direction for future study, this research can be further extended to incorporate local search operators which should include problem-specific knowledge. In addition, the adaptive configuration of mutation and crossover rates is another guidance for future research.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy of wafer-scale graphene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hugen; Xia, Fengnian; Zhu, Wenjuan; Freitag, Marcus; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Bol, Ageeth A; Tulevski, George; Avouris, Phaedon

    2011-12-27

    We report spectroscopy results from the mid- to far-infrared on wafer-scale graphene, grown either epitaxially on silicon carbide or by chemical vapor deposition. The free carrier absorption (Drude peak) is simultaneously obtained with the universal optical conductivity (due to interband transitions) and the wavelength at which Pauli blocking occurs due to band filling. From these, the graphene layer number, doping level, sheet resistivity, carrier mobility, and scattering rate can be inferred. The mid-IR absorption of epitaxial two-layer graphene shows a less pronounced peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 eV compared to that in exfoliated bilayer graphene. In heavily chemically doped single-layer graphene, a record high transmission reduction due to free carriers approaching 40% at 250 μm (40 cm(-1)) is measured in this atomically thin material, supporting the great potential of graphene in far-infrared and terahertz optoelectronics.

  11. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    ZL Liau; LR Danielson; PM Fourspring; L Hu; G Chen; GW Turner

    2006-11-27

    Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.

  12. Backside EBR process performance with various wafer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Vangheluwe, Rik; Erich, Daub; Sanada, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary to avoid top coat film peeling. To achieve suitable stacking architecture for immersion lithography process, an EBR process that delivers tightly controlled film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference is needed. We demonstrated a new bevel rinse system on a SOKUDO RF3 coat-and-develop track for immersion lithography. The performance of the new bevel rinse system for various wafer properties was evaluated. It was found that the bevel rinse system has a good controllability of film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference. The results indicate that the bevel rinse system has a large margin for wafer centering accuracy, back side particles, wafer shape and substrates with good film edge position controllability, uniformity and clean apex. The system has been demonstrated to provide a suitable film stacking architecture for immersion lithography mass production process.

  13. On implementing large binary tree architectures in VLSI and WSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hee Yong; Singh, Adit D.

    1989-04-01

    An efficient scheme for the layout of large binary-tree architectures is presented. The method involves embedding the complete binary tree in a two-dimensional array of processing elements and utilizes virtually 100 percent of the processing elements in the array as computing elements; it also shows substantial improvements in propagation delay and maximum edge length over H-tree layouts. It is shown that the layouts obtained readily lend themselves to fault-tolerant designs for overcoming fabrication defects in large-area and wafer-scale implementations of binary-tree architectures.

  14. Compensating measured intra-wafer ring oscillator stage delay with intra-wafer exposure dose corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Staf; Nackaerts, Axel; Dusa, Mircea; Carpaij, Rene; Vandenberghe, Geert; Finders, Jo

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use measurements on real working devices to derive more information than typically measured by the classic line-width measurement techniques. The first part of the paper will discuss the principle of the measurements with a ring oscillator, a circuit used to measure the speed of elementary logic gates. These measurements contribute to the understanding of the exact timing dependencies in circuits, which is of utmost importance for the design and simulation of these circuits. When connecting an odd number of digital inverting stages in a ring, the circuit has no stable digital state but acts as an analog oscillator with the oscillation frequency dependent on the analog propagation delay of the signals through the stages. By varying some conditions during a litho step, the delay change caused by the process condition change can be measured very accurately. The response of the ring oscillator delay to exposure dose is measured and presented in this paper together with a comparison of measured line-width values of the poly gate lines. The second part of the paper will focus on improving the intra-wafer variation of the stage delay. A number of ring oscillators are put in a design at different slit and scan locations. 200mm wafers are processed with 48 full dies present. From the intra-wafer delay fingerprint and the dose sensitivity of the delay an intra-wafer dose correction, also called a dose recipe, is calculated. This dose recipe is used on the scanner to compensate for effects that are the root cause for the delay profile; including reticle and processing such as track, etch and annealing.

  15. Rapid defect detections of bonded wafer using near infrared polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chi Seng; Asundi, Anand K.

    2011-10-01

    In modern field of microelectronics and MEMS, wafer bonding has emerged as an important processing step in wide range of manufacturing applications. During the manufacturing process, even in the modern clean room, small defects result from trapped particles and gas bubbles exist at bonded interface. Defects and trapped particles may exist on the top and bottom of the wafers, or at the interface of bonded wafer pair. These inclusions will generate high stress around debond region at the wafers bonded interface. In this paper, inspection at the bonded interface will be the interest of investigation. Since silicon wafer is opaque to visible light, defect detection at the bonded interface of silicon wafer is not possible. Due to the fact that silicon wafer is transparent to wavelength greater than 1150nm, an Near Infrared Polariscope which has showed some promises on residual stress measurement on silicon devices has been adapted and developed. This method is based on the well known photoelastic principles, where the stress variations are measured based on the changes of light propagation velocity in birefringence material. The results are compared and contrast with conventional Infrared Transmission Imaging tool (IRT) which is widely used to inspect the bonded silicon wafer. In this research, the trapped particles that are not visible via conventional infrared transmission method are identified via the generated residual stress pattern. The magnitude of the residual stress fields associated with each defect is examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The stress field generated at the wafers bonded interface will looks like a 'butterfly' pattern. Wafer pairs Pyrex-Si and Si-Si bonded interface will be examined.

  16. A procedural method for the efficient implementation of full-custom VLSI designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belk, P.; Hickey, N.

    1987-01-01

    An imbedded language system for the layout of very large scale integration (VLSI) circuits is examined. It is shown that through the judicious use of this system, a large variety of circuits can be designed with circuit density and performance comparable to traditional full-custom design methods, but with design costs more comparable to semi-custom design methods. The high performance of this methodology is attributable to the flexibility of procedural descriptions of VLSI layouts and to a number of automatic and semi-automatic tools within the system.

  17. On the VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder using systolic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.; Reed, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    A new very large scale integration (VLSI) design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The transform decoding technique used in a previous article is replaced by a time domain algorithm through a detailed comparison of their VLSI implementations. A new architecture that implements the time domain algorithm permits efficient pipeline processing with reduced circuitry. Erasure correction capability is also incorporated with little additional complexity. By using a multiplexing technique, a new implementation of Euclid's algorithm maintains the throughput rate with less circuitry. Such improvements result in both enhanced capability and significant reduction in silicon area.

  18. On the VLSI design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder using systolic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Howard M.; Reed, Irving S.

    1988-01-01

    A new very large scale integration (VLSI) design of a pipeline Reed-Solomon decoder is presented. The transform decoding technique used in a previous article is replaced by a time domain algorithm through a detailed comparison of their VLSI implementations. A new architecture that implements the time domain algorithm permits efficient pipeline processing with reduced circuitry. Erasure correction capability is also incorporated with little additional complexity. By using multiplexing technique, a new implementation of Euclid's algorithm maintains the throughput rate with less circuitry. Such improvements result in both enhanced capability and significant reduction in silicon area.

  19. The parylene-aluminum multilayer interconnection system for wafer scale integration and wafer scale hybrid packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, N.; Dabral, S.; McDonald, J. F.

    1989-03-01

    Polyimides have been considered as interlayer dielectrics for wafer scale integration (WSI) and wafer scale hybrid packaging (WSHP). However, high temperature curing steps for polyimide lead to large stresses in polyimide films. This is due to differing thermal expansion coefficients of the metal conductor, insulator and substrate materials causing yield and reliability problems. Polyimides also require the use of solvents, and tend to outgas during subsequent processing. They tend to absorb moisture with resulting degradation of dielectric constants. Also, the spin on method used to apply and planarize polyimide layers exhibits nonuniformity of thickness on large wafers. In this paper we examine parylene (Poly-p-xylylene) and some of its derivatives as possible interlayer dielectrics due to some of their attractive features. Parylene has a low dielectric constant. It can be vapor deposited at low temperatures and in vacuum. It is also highly resistant to corrosion and is a clear, transparent material with possible use for optical interconnections. This paper studies the reactive ion etching properties for polyimides and parylenes in an oxygen containing plasma under identical conditions. The etching rates of the parylenes and polyimides have been compared. The surface properties of these polymers are examined. Further, the film growth properties of aluminum deposited on the etched surfaces using the ionized cluster beam are investigated.

  20. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers with through-wafer interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xuefeng

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) is a promising candidate for making ultrasound transducer arrays for applications such as 3D medical ultrasound, non-destructive evaluation and chemical sensing. Advantages of CMUTs over traditional piezoelectric transducers include low-cost batch fabrication, wide bandwidth, and ability to fabricate arrays with broad operation frequency range and different geometric configurations on a single wafer. When incorporated with through-wafer interconnects, a CMUT array can be directly integrated with a front-end integrated circuit (IC) to achieve compact packaging and to mitigate the effects of the parasitic capacitance from the connection cables. Through-wafer via is the existing interconnect scheme for CMUT arrays, and many other types of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices. However, to date, no successful through-wafer via fabrication technique compatible with the wafer-bonding method of making CMUT arrays has been demonstrated. The through-wafer via fabrication steps degrade the surface conditions of the wafer, reduce the radius of curvature, thus making it difficult to bond. This work focuses on new through-wafer interconnect techniques that are compatible with common MEMS fabrication techniques, including both surface-micromachining and direct wafer-to-wafer fusion bonding. In this dissertation, first, a through-wafer via interconnect technique with improved characteristics is presented. Then, two implementations of through-wafer trench isolation are demonstrated. The through-wafer trench methods differ from the through-wafer vias in that the electrical conduction is through the bulk silicon instead of the conductor in the vias. In the first implementation, a carrier wafer is used to provide mechanical support; in the second, mechanical support is provided by a silicon frame structure embedded inside the isolation trenches. Both implementations reduce fabrication complexity compared to the through-wafer

  1. The challenges encountered in the integration of an early test wafer surface scanning inspection system into a 450mm manufacturing line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; McGarvey, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The introduction of early test wafer (ETW) 450mm Surface Scanning Inspection Systems (SSIS) into Si manufacturing has brought with it numerous technical, commercial, and logistical challenges on the path to rapid recipe development and subsequent qualification of other 450mm wafer processing equipment. This paper will explore the feasibility of eliminating the Polystyrene Latex Sphere deposition process step and the subsequent creation of SSIS recipes based upon the theoretical optical properties of both the SSIS and the process film stack(s). The process of Polystyrene Latex Sphere deposition for SSIS recipe generation and development is generally accepted on the previous technology nodes for 150/200/300mm wafers. PSL is deposited with a commercially available deposition system onto a non-patterned bare Si or non-patterned filmed Si wafer. After deposition of multiple PSL spots, located in different positions on a wafer, the wafer is inspected on a SSIS and a response curve is generated. The response curve is based on the the light scattering intensity of the NIST certified PSL that was deposited on the wafer. As the initial 450mm Si wafer manufacturing began, there were no inspection systems with sub-90nm sensitivities available for defect and haze level verification. The introduction of a 450mm sub-30nm inspection system into the manufacturing line generated instant challenges. Whereas the 450mm wafers were relatively defect free at 90nm, at 40nm the wafers contained several hundred thousand defects. When PSL was deposited onto wafers with these kinds of defect levels, PSL with signals less than the sub-90nm defects were difficult to extract. As the defectivity level of the wafers from the Si suppliers rapidly improves the challenges of SSIS recipe creation with high defectivity decreases while at the same time the cost of PSL deposition increases. The current cost per wafer is fifteen thousand dollars for a 450mm PSL deposition service. When viewed from the

  2. Wafer-level micro-optics: trends in manufacturing, testing, packaging, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Gong, Li; Rieck, Juergen; Zheng, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology (KET) for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the last decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks (supercomputer, ROADM), bringing high-speed internet to our homes (FTTH). Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flashlight shaping elements, the secondary camera, and ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. We report on the state of the art in wafer-based manufacturing, testing, packaging and present examples and applications for micro-optical components and systems.

  3. Wafer-level vacuum packaging for an optical readout bi-material cantilever infrared FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuyu; Zhou, Xiaoxiong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the design and fabrication of an uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) on quartz substrate and the wafer-level vacuum packaging for the IR FPA in view of an optical readout method. This FPA is composed of bi-material cantilever array which fabricated by the Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, and the wafer-level packaging of the IR FPA is realized based on AuSn solder bonding technique. The interface of soldering is observed by scan electron microscope (SEM), which indicates that bonding interface is smooth and with no bubbles. The air leakage rate of packaged FPA is measured to be 1.3×10-9 atm·cc/s.

  4. On the design of GaN vertical MESFETs on commercial LED sapphire wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Noor Elahi, Asim M.; Mo, Chen; Jiang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jie; Ashok, S.; Xu, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Design of GaN-based vertical metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) on commercial light-emitting-diode (LED) epi-wafers has been proposed and proof of principle devices have been fabricated. In order to better understand the IV curves, these devices have been simulated using the charge transport model. It was found that shrinking the drain pillar size would significantly help in reaching cut-off at much lower gate bias even at high carrier concentration of unintentionally doped GaN and considerable leakage current caused by the Schottky barrier lowering. The realization of these vertical MESFETs on LED wafers would allow their chip-level integration. This would open a way to many intelligent lighting applications like on-chip current regulator and signal regulation/communication in display technology.

  5. Cost-effective, high-volume molecular beam epitaxy using a multi 6-in wafer reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Larry; Davison, Damian; Cornfeld, Arthur; Towner, Frederick; Hartzell, Dave

    2001-07-01

    The rapidly expanding market of wireless communication has drastically increased the demand for GaAs-based devices and circuits. This demand has driven the industry to increasingly larger diameter substrates for cost-effective, high-volume production. IQE Inc., a division of IQE plc has recently developed the technology to grow epitaxial structures on 150 mm (6-in) GaAs substrates using a multi 6-in wafer MBE platform with material characteristics exceeding those achieved on a multi 4-in platform. The new platform is configured to produce four 6-in epiwafers per platen and is projected to produce up to 21 000 wafers per year. This paper presents the methodology that was chosen to qualify the reactor for production. Discussions focus on machine performance, material quality, and capability. In-depth discussions of capacity, throughput, and reproducibility are included. The advantages of using statistical process control for high-volume production are presented.

  6. Laser processing of ceramic and crystalline wafer substrates for microelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenasi, David; Binder, Alexander; Jaber, Houssam; Kern, Holger; Mueller, Norbert; Ziegert, Andreas

    2003-07-01

    Ceramic and crystalline wafer substrates are widely used in microelectronics. The individual choice is based on their thermal, optical and mechanical properties. For a variety of applications high quality laser micro processing of these materials, i.e. the generation of blind and through holes, grooves and even complex three dimensional micro structures, is gaining in importance. The department of applied laser technologies of the LMTB GmbH has conducted extensive studies on the versatility of q-switch Nd:YAG laser systems for the micro structuring of ceramic and crystalline wafer substrates that differ strongly in their optical and mechanical properties, such as Al2O3, AlN, sapphire, Si and SiC. This paper discusses the laser material micro machining results in respect to the laser parameters used to optimize the micro processing quality and speed for the different materials.

  7. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  8. Development of optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lai, Qun-Huang; Lin, Chern-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The data of a wafer with defects can provide engineers with very important information and clues to improve the yield rate and quality in manufacturing. This paper presents a microscope automatic positioning and wafer detection system with human-machine interface based on image processing and fuzzy inference algorithms. In the proposed system, a XY table is used to move the position of each die on 6 inch or 8 inch wafers. Then, a high-resolution CCD and one set of two-axis optical linear encoder are used to accurately measure the position on the wafer. Finally, the developed human-machine interface is used to display the current position of an actual wafer in order to complete automatic positioning, and a wafer map database can be created. In the process of defect detection, CCD is used for image processing, and during preprocessing, it is required to filter noise, acquire the defect characteristics, define the defective template, and then take the characteristic points of the defective template as the reference input for fuzzy inference. A high-accuracy optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system is thus constructed. This study focused on automatic detection of spots, scratches, and bruises, and attempted to reduce the time to detect defective die and improve the accuracy of determining the defects of semiconductor devices.

  9. Techniques for the evaluation of outgassing from polymeric wafer pods

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.C.; Liang, A.; Thornberg, S.M.; Bender, S.F.; Lujan, R.D.; Blewer, R.S.; Bowers, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in using wafer-level isolation environments or pods (microenvironments) to provide a more controllable, cleaner wafer environment during wafer processing. It has been shown that pods can be effective in reducing the amount of particulate contamination on wafers during manufacturing. However, there have also been studies that indicate that pods and wafer boxes can be the source of condensible, molecular organic contamination. This paper summarizes the work that has been performed during the past year at Sandia National Laboratories` Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) on (1) devising standard, low-temperature, high sensitivity techniques to detect outgassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polymers used to construct wafer pods and (2) development of a technique that can be used to continuously measure the condensible contamination within pods so that the pod environment can be monitored during manufacturing. Although these techniques have been developed specifically for assessing contamination threats from wafer pods, they can be used to evaluate other potential contamination sources. The high sensitivity outgassing techniques can be used to evaluate outgassing of volatiles from other clean-room materials and the real-time outgassing sensor can be used to monitor contamination condensation in non-pod environments such as ballroom-type cleanrooms and minienvironments.

  10. A fast lightstripe rangefinding system with smart VLSI sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruss, Andrew; Carley, L. Richard; Kanade, Takeo

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the research is to build a compact, high performance lightstripe rangefinder using a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) smart photosensor array. Rangefinding, the measurement of the three-dimensional profile of an object or scene, is a critical component for many robotic applications, and therefore many techniques were developed. Of these, lightstripe rangefinding is one of the most widely used and reliable techniques available. Though practical, the speed of sampling range data by the conventional light stripe technique is severely limited. A conventional light stripe rangefinder operates in a step-and-repeat manner. A stripe source is projected on an object, a video image is acquired, range data is extracted from the image, the stripe is stepped, and the process repeats. Range acquisition is limited by the time needed to grab the video images, increasing linearly with the desired horizontal resolution. During the acquisition of a range image, the objects in the scene being scanned must be stationary. Thus, the long scene sampling time of step-and-repeat rangefinders limits their application. The fast range sensor proposed is based on the modification of this basic lightstripe ranging technique in a manner described by Sato and Kida. This technique does not require a sampling of images at various stripe positions to build a range map. Rather, an entire range image is acquired in parallel while the stripe source is swept continuously across the scene. Total time to acquire the range image data is independent of the range map resolution. The target rangefinding system will acquire 1,000 100 x 100 point range images per second with 0.5 percent range accuracy. It will be compact and rugged enough to be mounted on the end effector of a robot arm to aid in object manipulation and assembly tasks.

  11. Analysis of the interdigitated back contact solar cells: The n-type substrate lifetime and wafer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Chen; Jia, Rui; Sun, Yun; Xing, Zhao; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xin-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    The n-type silicon integrated-back contact (IBC) solar cell has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, whereas its performance is very sensitive to the wafer of low quality or the contamination during high temperature fabrication processing, which leads to low bulk lifetime τbulk. In order to clarify the influence of bulk lifetime on cell characteristics, two-dimensional (2D) TCAD simulation, combined with our experimental data, is used to simulate the cell performances, with the wafer thickness scaled down under various τbulk conditions. The modeling results show that for the IBC solar cell with high τbulk, (such as 1 ms-2 ms), its open-circuit voltage Voc almost remains unchanged, and the short-circuit current density Jsc monotonically decreases as the wafer thickness scales down. In comparison, for the solar cell with low τbulk (for instance, < 500 μs) wafer or the wafer contaminated during device processing, the Voc increases monotonically but the Jsc first increases to a maximum value and then drops off as the wafer’s thickness decreases. A model combing the light absorption and the minority carrier diffusion is used to explain this phenomenon. The research results show that for the wafer with thinner thickness and high bulk lifetime, the good light trapping technology must be developed to offset the decrease in Jsc. Project supported by the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Projects (Grant Nos. 2012AA050304 and Y0GZ124S01), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104319, 11274346, 51202285, 51402347, and 51172268), and the Fund of the Solar Energy Action Plan from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. Y3ZR044001 and Y2YF014001).

  12. Photolithography diagnostic expert systems: a systematic approach to problem solving in a wafer fabrication facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherwax Scott, Caroline; Tsareff, Christopher R.

    1990-06-01

    One of the main goals of process engineering in the semiconductor industry is to improve wafer fabrication productivity and throughput. Engineers must work continuously toward this goal in addition to performing sustaining and development tasks. To accomplish these objectives, managers must make efficient use of engineering resources. One of the tools being used to improve efficiency is the diagnostic expert system. Expert systems are knowledge based computer programs designed to lead the user through the analysis and solution of a problem. Several photolithography diagnostic expert systems have been implemented at the Hughes Technology Center to provide a systematic approach to process problem solving. This systematic approach was achieved by documenting cause and effect analyses for a wide variety of processing problems. This knowledge was organized in the form of IF-THEN rules, a common structure for knowledge representation in expert system technology. These rules form the knowledge base of the expert system which is stored in the computer. The systems also include the problem solving methodology used by the expert when addressing a problem in his area of expertise. Operators now use the expert systems to solve many process problems without engineering assistance. The systems also facilitate the collection of appropriate data to assist engineering in solving unanticipated problems. Currently, several expert systems have been implemented to cover all aspects of the photolithography process. The systems, which have been in use for over a year, include wafer surface preparation (HMDS), photoresist coat and softbake, align and expose on a wafer stepper, and develop inspection. These systems are part of a plan to implement an expert system diagnostic environment throughout the wafer fabrication facility. In this paper, the systems' construction is described, including knowledge acquisition, rule construction, knowledge refinement, testing, and evaluation. The roles

  13. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  14. A pipeline VLSI design of fast singular value decomposition processor for real-time EEG system based on on-line recursive independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ju; Shih, Wei-Yeh; Chang, Jui Chung; Feng, Chih Wei; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a pipeline VLSI design of fast singular value decomposition (SVD) processor for real-time electroencephalography (EEG) system based on on-line recursive independent component analysis (ORICA). Since SVD is used frequently in computations of the real-time EEG system, a low-latency and high-accuracy SVD processor is essential. During the EEG system process, the proposed SVD processor aims to solve the diagonal, inverse and inverse square root matrices of the target matrices in real time. Generally, SVD requires a huge amount of computation in hardware implementation. Therefore, this work proposes a novel design concept for data flow updating to assist the pipeline VLSI implementation. The SVD processor can greatly improve the feasibility of real-time EEG system applications such as brain computer interfaces (BCIs). The proposed architecture is implemented using TSMC 90 nm CMOS technology. The sample rate of EEG raw data adopts 128 Hz. The core size of the SVD processor is 580×580 um(2), and the speed of operation frequency is 20MHz. It consumes 0.774mW of power during the 8-channel EEG system per execution time.

  15. Performances of a VLSI wide dynamic range current-to-frequency converter for strip ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, G. C.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Peroni, C.; Zampieri, A.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we report on the design and test of a 14-channel VLSI chip to perform the current to frequency conversion for parallel plate strip ionization chambers. The chambers measure the intensity and the geometrical characteristics of a therapeutical beam.

  16. VLSI chip-set for data compression using the Rice algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venbrux, J.; Liu, N.

    1990-01-01

    A full custom VLSI implementation of a data compression encoder and decoder which implements the lossless Rice data compression algorithm is discussed in this paper. The encoder and decoder reside on single chips. The data rates are to be 5 and 10 Mega-samples-per-second for the decoder and encoder respectively.

  17. An Efficient Circulant MIMO Equalizer for CDMA Downlink: Algorithm and VLSI Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuanbin; Zhang, Jianzhong(Charlie); McCain, Dennis; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

    2006-12-01

    We present an efficient circulant approximation-based MIMO equalizer architecture for the CDMA downlink. This reduces the direct matrix inverse (DMI) of size[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] with[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] complexity to some FFT operations with[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] complexity and the inverse of some[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] submatrices. We then propose parallel and pipelined VLSI architectures with Hermitian optimization and reduced-state FFT for further complexity optimization. Generic VLSI architectures are derived for the[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] high-order receiver from partitioned[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] submatrices. This leads to more parallel VLSI design with[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] further complexity reduction. Comparative study with both the conjugate-gradient and DMI algorithms shows very promising performance/complexity tradeoff. VLSI design space in terms of area/time efficiency is explored extensively for layered parallelism and pipelining with a Catapult C high-level-synthesis methodology.

  18. A VLSI Processor Design of Real-Time Data Compression for High-Resolution Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, W.

    1994-01-01

    For the high-resolution imaging radar systems, real-time data compression of raw imaging data is required to accomplish the science requirements and satisfy the given communication and storage constraints. The Block Adaptive Quantizer (BAQ) algorithm and its associated VLSI processor design have been developed to provide a real-time data compressor for high-resolution imaging radar systems.

  19. A VLSI analog pipeline read-out for electrode segmented ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, G. C.; Bouvier, S.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Figus, M.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Pernigotti, E.; Thenard, J. M.; Zampieri, A.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the design and test of a 32-channel VLSI chip based on the analog pipeline memory concept. The charge from a strip of a ionization chamber, is stored as a function of time in a switched capacitor array. The cell reading can be done in parallel with the writing.

  20. Wafer Stepper Characterization And Process Control Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S. C.; Friedberg, C. B.

    1982-09-01

    A process control vehicle is described which allows the characterization and comparison of wafer steppers with respect to distortion, resolution, uniformity, and misregistration. A block of test structures consisting of optical resolution patterns, verniers, and electrical line width and misalignment resistors is arrayed on an 11 x 11 grid which fills the entire available field of a 10X reticle. Fach block also contains a pair of targets for the THE laser-interferometric auto-alignment system. The ability of the auto-aligner to acquire such targets to within 500 is exploited as a metrology tool whereby the measured coordinates at each site are compared to the ideal (theoretical) coordinates to generate a vector distortion map across the field. Subsequent reduction of misregistration data is accomplished via application of the six parameter model developed by Perloff and co-workers. It is shown that these diagnostic tools permit the rapid characterization of distortion anisotropy for a given stepper and can be used to optimize and monitor level-to-level regis-tration. Further applications are suggested.

  1. Wafer-bonded 2-D CMUT arrays incorporating through-wafer trench-isolated interconnects with a supporting frame.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xuefeng; Wygant, Ira O; Lin, Der-Song; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on wafer-bonded, fully populated 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays. To date, no successful through-wafer via fabrication technique has been demonstrated that is compatible with the wafer-bonding method of making CMUT arrays. As an alternative to through-wafer vias, trench isolation with a supporting frame is incorporated into the 2-D arrays to provide through-wafer electrical connections. The CMUT arrays are built on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer, and all electrical connections to the array elements are brought to the back side of the wafer through the highly conductive silicon substrate. Neighboring array elements are separated by trenches on both the device layer and the bulk silicon. A mesh frame structure, providing mechanical support, is embedded between silicon pillars, which electrically connect to individual elements. We successfully fabricated a 16 x 16-element 2-D CMUT array using wafer bonding with a yield of 100%. Across the array, the pulse-echo amplitude distribution is uniform (rho = 6.6% of the mean amplitude). In one design, we measured a center frequency of 7.6 MHz, a peak-to-peak output pressure of 2.9 MPa at the transducer surface, and a 3-dB fractional bandwidth of 95%. Volumetric ultrasound imaging was demonstrated by chip-to-chip bonding one of the fabricated 2-D arrays to a custom-designed integrated circuit (IC). This study shows that through-wafer trench-isolation with a supporting frame is a viable solution for providing electrical interconnects to CMUT elements and that 2-D arrays fabricated using waferbonding deliver good performance.

  2. SCIL nanoimprint solutions: high-volume soft NIL for wafer scale sub-10nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorkamp, R.; Verschuuren, M. A.; van Brakel, R.

    2016-10-01

    Nano-patterning materials and surfaces can add unique functionalities and properties which cannot be obtained in bulk or micro-structured materials. Examples range from hetro-epitaxy of semiconductor nano-wires to guiding cell expression and growth on medical implants. [1] Due to the cost and throughput requirements conventional nano-patterning techniques such as deep UV lithography (cost and flat substrate demands) and electron-beam lithography (cost, throughput) are not an option. Self-assembly techniques are being considered for IC manufacturing, but require nano-sized guiding patterns, which have to be fabricated in any case.[2] Additionally, the self-assembly process is highly sensitive to the environment and layer thickness, which is difficult to control on non-flat surfaces such as PV silicon wafers or III/V substrates. Laser interference lithography can achieve wafer scale periodic patterns, but is limited by the throughput due to intensity of the laser at the pinhole and only regular patterns are possible where the pattern fill fraction cannot be chosen freely due to the interference condition.[3] Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a promising technology for the cost effective fabrication of sub-micron and nano-patterns on large areas. The challenges for NIL are related to the technique being a contact method where a stamp which holds the patterns is required to be brought into intimate contact with the surface of the product. In NIL a strong distinction is made between the type of stamp used, either rigid or soft. Rigid stamps are made from patterned silicon, silica or plastic foils and are capable of sub-10nm resolution and wafer scale patterning. All these materials behave similar at the micro- to nm scale and require high pressures (5 - 50 Bar) to enable conformal contact to be made on wafer scales. Real world conditions such as substrate bow and particle contaminants complicate the use of rigid stamps for wafer scale areas, reducing stamp lifetime and

  3. A CMOS VLSI IC for real-time opto-electronic two-dimensional histogram generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstein, James K.

    1993-12-01

    Histogram generation, a standard image processing operation, is a record of the intensity distribution in the image. Histogram generation has straightforward implementations on digital computers using high level languages. A prototype of an optical-electronic histogram generator was designed and tested for 1-D objects using wirewrapped MSI TTL components. The system has shown to be fairly modular in design. The aspects of the extension to two dimensions and the VLSI implementation of this design are discussed. In this paper, we report a VLSI design to be used in a two-dimensional real-time histogram generation scheme. The overall system design is such that the electronic signal obtained from the optically scanned two-dimensional semi-opaque image is processed and displayed within a period of one cycle of the scanning process. Specifically, in the VLSI implementation of the two-dimensional histogram generator, modifications were made to the original design. For the two-dimensional application, the output controller was analyzed as a finite state machine. The process used to describe the required timing signals and translate them to a VLSI finite state machine using Computer Aided Design Tools is discussed. In addition, the circuitry for sampling, binning, and display were combined with the timing circuitry on one IC. In the original design, the pulse width of the electronically sampled photodetector is limited with an analog one-shot. The high sampling rates associated with the extension to two dimensions requires significant reduction in the original 1-D prototype's sample pulse width of approximately 75 ns. The alternate design using VLSI logic gates will provide one-shot pulse widths of approximately 3 ns.

  4. Stress-warping relation in thin film coated wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, J.; Khan, W. A.; Arnold, T.; Hirschl, C.

    2017-02-01

    A misfit strain or stress in a thin layer on the surface of a wafer lets the composite disk warp. When the wafer is thin and large, the Stoney estimation of the film stress as function of the curvature yields large errors. We present a nonlinear analytical model that describes the relationship between warpage and film stress on an anisotropic wafer, and give evidence for its suitability for large thin wafers by a comparison to finite element results. Finally, we show the confidence limit of the Stoney estimation and the benefit by the nonlinear model. For thin coatings, it can be succesfully used even without knowledge of the film properties, which was the main advantage of the Stoney estimation.

  5. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-03-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefectTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  6. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  7. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2008-10-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefecTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  8. Stress rate and proof-testing of silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture mechanics test methods were applied to evaluate the proof-test characteristics of single-crystal silicon wafers. The results indicate that the strength distribution of silicon wafers is truncated by proof-testing. No subcritical crack growth occurred during proof-loading, as inferred from the lack of a stress-rate effect on strength. Mechanical proof-testing appears to be an effective method for eliminating weak samples before cell processing.

  9. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Kelly, Michael J.; Medernach, John W.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  10. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  11. Use of nanoporous columnar thin film in the wafer-level packaging of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Kee; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new packaging technology that uses a nanoporous columnar thin film to seal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices at the wafer level. In the proposed packaging process, the processing temperature is 350 °C. The process is relatively inexpensive compared to wafer level packaging processes, because the wafer-bonding step is eliminated and the die size is shrunk. In the suggested approach, a sputtered columnar thin film at room temperature forms vertical nanopores as etch holes, and an air cavity is formed by the removal of a sacrificial layer through the nanopores in the columnar membrane. Subsequent hermetic vacuum packaging of the cavity is achieved by depositing thin films over the membrane under low pressure. The hermeticity of the packaging was verified by using an optical surface morphology microscope to measure the deflection change of the sealing membrane before and after breaking of the vacuum through an interconnected membrane. The long-term hermeticity was monitored by measuring the maximum central deflection of the PECVD sealing layer over a period of 170 days. The precise pressure (0.7 Torr) and short-term (30 days) pressure change inside the cavity were measured by encapsulated Ni Pirani gauges, representing packaged freestanding MEMS devices.

  12. Atomically flattening of Si surface of silicon on insulator and isolation-patterned wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Rihito; Akagawa, Naoya; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Akinobu; Li, Xiang; Obara, Toshiki; Kimoto, Daiki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi; Ohmi, Tadahiro; Kamata, Yutaka; Kumagai, Yuki; Shibusawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    By introducing high-purity and low-temperature Ar annealing at 850 °C, atomically flat Si surfaces of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and shallow-trench-isolation (STI)-patterned wafers were obtained. In the case of the STI-patterned wafer, this low-temperature annealing and subsequent radical oxidation to form a gate oxide film were introduced into the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process with 0.22 µm technology. As a result, a test array circuit for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a very large number (>260,000) of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) having an atomically flat gate insulator/Si interface was successfully fabricated on a 200-mm-diameter wafer. By evaluating 262,144 nMOSFETs, it was found that not only the gate oxide reliability was improved, but also the noise amplitude of the gate-source voltage related to the random telegraph noise (RTN) was reduced owing to the introduction of the atomically flat gate insulator/Si interface.

  13. Wave-front propagation of rinsing flows on rotating semiconductor wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostad, John M.; Ylitalo, Andy; Walls, Daniel J.; Mui, David S. L.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-11-01

    The semiconductor manufacturing industry is migrating to a cleaning technology that involves dispersing cleaning solutions onto a rotating wafer, similar to spin-coating. Advantages include a more continuous overall fabrication process, lower particle level, no cross contamination from the back side of a wafer, and less usage of harsh chemicals for a lower environmental impact. Rapid rotation of the wafer during rinsing can be more effective, but centrifugal forces can pull spiral-like ribbons of liquid radially outward from the advancing wave-front where particles can build up, causing higher instances of device failure at these locations. A better understanding of the rinsing flow is essential for reducing yield losses while taking advantage of the benefits of rotation. In the present work, high-speed video and image processing are used to study the dynamics of the advancing wave-front from an impinging jet on a rotating substrate. The flow-rate and rotation-speed are varied for substrates coated with a thin layer of a second liquid that has a different surface tension than the jet liquid. The difference in surface tension of the two fluids gives rise to Marangoni stresses at the interface that have a significant impact on the rinsing process, despite the extremely short time-scales involved.

  14. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  15. Stability of laser-propelled wafer satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Prashant; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Zhang, Qicheng; Madajian, Jonathan; Brashears, Travis; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Cohen, Alexander; Griswold, Janelle

    2016-09-01

    For interstellar missions, directed energy is envisioned to drive wafer-scale spacecraft to relativistic speeds. Spacecraft propulsion is provided by a large array of phase-locked lasers, either in Earth orbit or stationed on the ground. The directed-energy beam is focused on the spacecraft, which includes a reflective sail that propels the craft by reflecting the beam. Fluctuations and asymmetry in the beam will create rotational forces on the sail, so the sail geometry must possess an inherent, passive stabilizing effect. A hyperboloid shape is proposed, since changes in the incident beam angle due to yaw will passively counteract rotational forces. This paper explores passive stability properties of a hyperboloid reflector being bombarded by directed-energy beam. A 2D cross-section is analyzed for stability under simulated asymmetric loads. Passive stabilization is confirmed over a range of asymmetries. Realistic values of radiation pressure magnitude are drawn from the physics of light-mirror interaction. Estimates of beam asymmetry are drawn from optical modeling of a laser array far-field intensity using fixed and stochastic phase perturbations. A 3D multi-physics model is presented, using boundary conditions and forcing terms derived from beam simulations and lightmirror interaction models. The question of optimal sail geometry can be pursued, using concepts developed for the baseline hyperboloid. For example, higher curvature of the hyperboloid increases stability, but reduces effective thrust. A hyperboloid sail could be optimized by seeking the minimum curvature that is stable over the expected range of beam asymmetries.

  16. Mapping stresses in high aspect ratio polysilicon electrical through-wafer interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Himani; Krabbe, Joshua D.; Farsinezhad, Samira; van Popta, Andy C.; Wakefield, Nick G.; Fitzpatrick, Glen A.; Shankar, Karthik

    2015-04-01

    Electrical through-wafer interconnect technologies such as vertical through-silicon vias (TSVs) are essential in order to maximize performance, optimize usage of wafer real estate, and enable three-dimensional packaging in leading edge electronic and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) products. Although copper TSVs have the advantage of low resistance, highly doped polysilicon TSVs offer designers a much larger range of processing options due to the compatibility of polysilicon with high temperatures and also with the full range of traditional CMOS processes. Large stresses are associated with both Cu and polysilicon TSVs, and their accurate measurement is critical for determining the keep-out zone (KOZ) of transistors and for optimizing downstream processes to maintain high yield. This report presents the fabrication and stress characterization of 400-μm deep, 20-Ω resistance, high aspect ratio (25:1) polysilicon TSVs fabricated by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) followed by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polysilicon with in-situ boron doping. Micro-Raman imaging of the wafer surface showed a maximum stress of 1.2 GPa occurring at the TSV edge and a KOZ of ˜9 to 11 μm. For polysilicon TSVs, the stress distribution in the TSVs far from the wafer surface(s) was not previously well-understood due to measurement limitations. Raman spectroscopy was able to overcome this limitation; a TSV cross section was examined and stresses as a function of both depth and width of the TSVs were collected and are analyzed herein. An 1100°C postanneal was found to reduce average stresses by 40%.

  17. New i-line and deep-UV optical wafer stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Robert; Disessa, Peter A.

    1991-07-01

    A new line of optical wafer steppers is discussed. These tools, which have been developed in conjunction with Sematech and its member companies, feature new high-numerical aperture, widefield reduction lenses for operation at either i-line (365 nm) or deep-UV (248 nm) wavelengths. The i-line tool achieves practical resolution at the 0.50 micrometers level with usable working focal depth, while the deep-UV tool is capable of practical resolution at the 0.35 micrometers level with usable working focal depth. The design of these tools incorporates and expands upon optical wafer stepper technologies which have been field proven, particularly in the areas of alignment, focusing, INSITUTM metrology, automatic calibration, and diagnostic utilities. New features added to theses tools, to support their application at or below 0.50 micrometers , include a new system structure designed for inherent stability to maintain tight coupling among the imaging and alignment subsystems, and wafer stage advancements to achieve increased positioning accuracy, which supports obtaining overall tool overlay accuracy commensurate with sub-half-micron resolution. Of particular significance is the incorporation of a field-by-field leveling system, which optimizes the usable depth of focus over large image fields on product wafers. The tools also include an entirely new control system, which has been designed based on a new hierarchical control architecture, and incorporates digital servo controls and automated diagnostics. The control interface is designed as an intuitive graphic touch screen display, providing simplicity to the operator and significant job process flexibility, compatible with advanced memory and Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) fab operations. Design considerations for these tools are described together with performance results obtained in the field.

  18. Micromachining of a fiber-to-waveguide coupler using grayscale lithography and through-wafer etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Thomas; Zablocki, Mathew; Shi, Shouyan; Murakowski, Janusz; Prather, Dennis

    2008-02-01

    For some time, the micro-optics and photonics fields have relied on fabrication processes and technology borrowed from the well-established silicon integrated circuit industry. However, new fabrication methodologies must be developed for greater flexibility in the machining of micro-optic devices. To this end, we have explored grayscale lithography as an enabler for the realization of such devices. This process delivers the ability to sculpt materials arbitrarily in three dimensions, thus providing the flexibility to realize optical surfaces to shape, transform, and redirect the propagation of light efficiently. This has opened the door for new classes of optical devices. As such, we present a fiber-to-waveguide coupling structure utilizing a smoothly contoured lensing surface in the device layer of a silicon-on insulator (SOI) wafer, fabricated using grayscale lithography. The structure collects light incident normally to the wafer from a singlemode optical fiber plugged through the back surface and turns the light into the plane of the device layer, focusing it into a single-mode waveguide. The basis of operation is total internal reflection, and the device therefore has the potential advantages of providing a large bandwidth, low polarization sensitivity, high efficiency, and small footprint. The structure was optimized with a simulated annealing algorithm in conjunction with two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation accelerated on the graphics processing unit (GPU), and achieves a theoretical efficiency of approximately seventy percent, including losses due to Fresnel reflection from the oxide/silicon interface. Initial fabrication results validate the principle of operation. We discuss the grayscale fabrication process as well as the through-wafer etch for mechanical stabilization and alignment of the optical fiber to the coupling structure. Refinement of the through-wafer etch process for high etch rate and appropriate sidewall taper are

  19. High Throughput, Noncontact System for Screening Silicon Wafers Predisposed to Breakage During Solar Cell Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Basnyat, P.; Mehta, V.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a non-contact, on-line system for screening wafers that are likely to break during solar cell/module fabrication. The wafers are transported on a conveyor belt under a light source, which illuminates the wafers with a specific light distribution. Each wafer undergoes a dynamic thermal stress whose magnitude mimics the highest stress the wafer will experience during cell/module fabrication. As a result of the stress, the weak wafers break, leaving only the wafers that are strong enough to survive the production processes. We will describe the mechanism of wafer breakage, introduce the wafer system, and discuss the results of the time-temperature (t-T) profile of wafers with and without microcracks.

  20. Improving on-wafer CD correlation analysis using advanced diagnostics and across-wafer light-source monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Rechtsteiner, Gregory; Lalovic, Ivan; Bekaert, Joost

    2014-04-01

    With the implementation of multi-patterning ArF-immersion for sub 20nm integrated circuits (IC), advances in equipment monitoring and control are needed to support on-wafer yield performance. These in-situ equipment monitoring improvements, along with advanced litho-cell corrections based on on-wafer measurements, enable meeting stringent overlay and CD control requirements for advanced lithography patterning. The importance of light-source performance on lithography pattering (CD and overlay) has been discussed in previous publications.[1-3] Recent developments of Cymer ArF light-source metrology and on-board monitoring enable end-users to detect, for each exposed wafer, changes in the near-field and far-field spatial profiles and polarization performance, [4-6] in addition to the key `optical' scalar parameters, such as bandwidth, wavelength and energy. The major advantage of this capability is that the key performance metrics are sampled at rates matched to wafer performance, e.g. every exposure field across the wafer, which is critical for direct correlation with on-wafer performance for process control and excursion detection.

  1. Fast on-wafer electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical characterization of piezoresistive cantilever force sensors.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, G; Villanueva, L G; Perez-Murano, F; Bausells, J

    2012-01-01

    Validation of a technological process requires an intensive characterization of the performance of the resulting devices, circuits, or systems. The technology for the fabrication of micro and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) is evolving rapidly, with new kind of device concepts for applications like sensing or harvesting are being proposed and demonstrated. However, the characterization tools and methods for these new devices are still not fully developed. Here, we present an on-wafer, highly precise, and rapid characterization method to measure the mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical properties of piezoresistive cantilevers. The setup is based on a combination of probe-card and atomic force microscopy technology, it allows accessing many devices across a wafer and it can be applied to a broad range of MEMS and NEMS. Using this setup we have characterized the performance of multiple submicron thick piezoresistive cantilever force sensors. For the best design we have obtained a force sensitivity Re(F) = 158μV/nN, a noise of 5.8 μV (1 Hz-1 kHz) and a minimum detectable force of 37 pN with a relative standard deviation of σ(r) ≈ 8%. This small value of σ(r), together with a high fabrication yield >95%, validates our fabrication technology. These devices are intended to be used as bio-molecular detectors for the measurement of intermolecular forces between ligand and receptor molecule pairs.

  2. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, Sanghyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-02-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates.

  3. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates. PMID:26864968

  4. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  5. Data storage technology comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1990-01-01

    The role of data storage and data storage technology is an integral, though conceptually often underestimated, portion of data processing technology. Data storage is important in the mass storage mode in which generated data is buffered for later use. But data storage technology is also important in the data flow mode when data are manipulated and hence required to flow between databases, datasets and processors. This latter mode is commonly associated with memory hierarchies which support computation. VLSI devices can reasonably be defined as electronic circuit devices such as channel and control electronics as well as highly integrated, solid-state devices that are fabricated using thin film deposition technology. VLSI devices in both capacities play an important role in data storage technology. In addition to random access memories (RAM), read-only memories (ROM), and other silicon-based variations such as PROM's, EPROM's, and EEPROM's, integrated devices find their way into a variety of memory technologies which offer significant performance advantages. These memory technologies include magnetic tape, magnetic disk, magneto-optic disk, and vertical Bloch line memory. In this paper, some comparison between selected technologies will be made to demonstrate why more than one memory technology exists today, based for example on access time and storage density at the active bit and system levels.

  6. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 3: Silicon sheet: Wafers and ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briglio, A.; Dumas, K.; Leipold, M.; Morrison, A.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective of the Silicon Sheet Task of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the development of one or more low cost technologies for producing silicon sheet suitable for processing into cost-competitive solar cells. Silicon sheet refers to high purity crystalline silicon of size and thickness for fabrication into solar cells. Areas covered in the project were ingot growth and casting, wafering, ribbon growth, and other sheet technologies. The task made and fostered significant improvements in silicon sheet including processing of both ingot and ribbon technologies. An additional important outcome was the vastly improved understanding of the characteristics associated with high quality sheet, and the control of the parameters required for higher efficiency solar cells. Although significant sheet cost reductions were made, the technology advancements required to meet the task cost goals were not achieved.

  7. Investigation of the Relationship between Whole-Wafer Strength and Control of Its Edge Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ying; Tsai, Ming-Hsing; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Jing, Ming-Haw; Chang, Yukon

    2009-12-01

    Silicon wafer breakage has become a major concern for all semiconductor fabrication lines because it is brittle, and thus high stresses are easily induced in its manufacture. The production cost of devices significantly increases even for a breakage loss of a few percent if wafers are broken near completion. Even wafer breakage near the beginning of the process is significant. In this investigation, we develop a brand new approach to reducing breakage by using a charge-coupled device (CCD) to capture the cross-section image of the wafer at its edge; the data measured at the edge can be used to determine overall wafer strength. Analysis of the image of the wafer edge is used to characterize silicon strength, and a simple drop test is conducted to elucidate wafer failure, improving our understanding of the accumulation of stress in the wafer bulk before failure. We also describe many of the improvements that have resulted in the virtual elimination of wafer breakage due to unidentified causes. Our analysis gives the optimal front size (B1), edge widths (A1,A2), and bevel angle (θ) for the edge profiles of wafers to prevent wafer breakage. Briefly, when a suitable material and suitable process control approaches are utilized, silicon wafer breakage can be prevented. This is the first investigation providing evidence that whole-wafer strength is an important issue. We present a physical model to explain why wafer fracture has become an increasingly serious problem as the diameter of wafers has increased. The control of wafer edge geometry has been demonstrated to be an effective means of protecting wafers with large diameters against breakage. This model reveals that the breakage rate of wafers can be reduced by controlling the uniformity of the differences between the front size and the rear edge widths during the wafer manufacturing process.

  8. Development of a Wafer Positioning System for the Sandia Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronosky, John B.; Smith, Tony G.; Darnold, Joel R.

    1996-01-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  9. Assessing the viability of multi-electron beam wafer inspection for sub-20nm defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Brad; Lercel, Michael; Bunday, Benjamin; Malloy, Matt

    2014-10-01

    SEMATECH has initiated a program to accelerate the development and commercialization of multi-electron beam based technologies as successor for wafer defect inspection in high volume semiconductor manufacturing. This paper develops the basic electron-optical performance requirements and establishes criteria for tool specifications. The performance variations within a large array of electron beams must be minimal in order to maximize defect capture rates while simultaneously minimizing false counts, so a series of experimental evaluations are described to quantify the random and systematic variations in beam current, spot size, detector channel noise level, and defect sensitivity.

  10. 100% foundry compatible packaging and full wafer release and die separation technique for surface micromachined devices

    SciTech Connect

    OLIVER,ANDREW D.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.

    2000-04-06

    A completely foundry compatible chip-scale package for surface micromachines has been successfully demonstrated. A pyrex (Corning 7740) glass cover is placed over the released surface micromachined die and anodically bonded to a planarized polysilicon bonding ring. Electrical feedthroughs for the surface micromachine pass underneath the polysilicon sealing ring. The package has been found to be hermetic with a leak rate of less than 5 x 10{sup {minus}8} atm cm{sup {minus}3}/s. This technology has applications in the areas of hermetic encapsulation and wafer level release and die separation.

  11. Quantitative phase measurement for wafer-level optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Wen, Yongfu; Wang, Zhaomin; Yang, Fang; Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Wafer-level-optics now is widely used in smart phone camera, mobile video conferencing or in medical equipment that require tiny cameras. Extracting quantitative phase information has received increased interest in order to quantify the quality of manufactured wafer-level-optics, detect defective devices before packaging, and provide feedback for manufacturing process control, all at the wafer-level for high-throughput microfabrication. We demonstrate two phase imaging methods, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE) to measure the phase of the wafer-level lenses. DHM is a laser-based interferometric method based on interference of two wavefronts. It can perform a phase measurement in a single shot. While a minimum of two measurements of the spatial intensity of the optical wave in closely spaced planes perpendicular to the direction of propagation are needed to do the direct phase retrieval by solving a second-order differential equation, i.e., with a non-iterative deterministic algorithm from intensity measurements using the Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE). But TIE is a non-interferometric method, thus can be applied to partial-coherence light. We demonstrated the capability and disability for the two phase measurement methods for wafer-level optics inspection.

  12. Measuring Radiation Patterns of Reconfigurable Patch Antennas on Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus and technique have been devised for measuring the radiation pattern of a microwave patch antenna that is one of a number of identical units that have been fabricated in a planar array on a high-resistivity silicon wafer. The apparatus and technique are intended, more specifically, for application to such an antenna that includes a DC-controlled microelectromechanical system (MEMS) actuator for switching the antenna between two polarization states or between two resonance frequencies. Prior to the development of the present apparatus and technique, patch antennas on wafers were tested by techniques and equipment that are more suited to testing of conventional printed-circuit antennas. The techniques included sawing of the wafers to isolate individual antennas for testing. The equipment included custom-built test fixtures that included special signal launchers and transmission-line transitions. The present apparatus and technique eliminate the need for sawing wafers and for custom-built test fixtures, thereby making it possible to test antennas in less time and at less cost. Moreover, in a production setting, elimination of the premature sawing of wafers for testing reduces loss from breakage, thereby enhancing yield.

  13. A subthreshold aVLSI implementation of the Izhikevich simple neuron model.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Venkat; Ghosh, Abhishek; Aparin, Vladimir; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2010-01-01

    We present a circuit architecture for compact analog VLSI implementation of the Izhikevich neuron model, which efficiently describes a wide variety of neuron spiking and bursting dynamics using two state variables and four adjustable parameters. Log-domain circuit design utilizing MOS transistors in subthreshold results in high energy efficiency, with less than 1pJ of energy consumed per spike. We also discuss the effects of parameter variations on the dynamics of the equations, and present simulation results that replicate several types of neural dynamics. The low power operation and compact analog VLSI realization make the architecture suitable for human-machine interface applications in neural prostheses and implantable bioelectronics, as well as large-scale neural emulation tools for computational neuroscience.

  14. Tunable multi-wavelength fiber lasers based on an Opto-VLSI processor and optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal; Lee, Yong Tak

    2009-12-07

    A multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser based on the use of an Opto-VLSI processor in conjunction with different optical amplifiers is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Opto-VLSI processor can simultaneously select any part of the gain spectrum from each optical amplifier into its associated fiber ring, leading to a multiport tunable fiber laser source. We experimentally demonstrate a 3-port tunable fiber laser source, where each output wavelength of each port can independently be tuned within the C-band with a wavelength step of about 0.05 nm. Experimental results demonstrate a laser linewidth as narrow as 0.05 nm and an optical side-mode-suppression-ratio (SMSR) of about 35 dB. The demonstrated three fiber lasers have excellent stability at room temperature and output power uniformity less than 0.5 dB over the whole C-band.

  15. Recovery Act - CAREER: Sustainable Silicon -- Energy-Efficient VLSI Interconnect for Extreme-Scale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Patrick

    2014-01-31

    The research goal of this CAREER proposal is to develop energy-efficient, VLSI interconnect circuits and systems that will facilitate future massively-parallel, high-performance computing. Extreme-scale computing will exhibit massive parallelism on multiple vertical levels, from thou­ sands of computational units on a single processor to thousands of processors in a single data center. Unfortunately, the energy required to communicate between these units at every level (on­ chip, off-chip, off-rack) will be the critical limitation to energy efficiency. Therefore, the PI's career goal is to become a leading researcher in the design of energy-efficient VLSI interconnect for future computing systems.

  16. VLSI architectures for computing multiplications and inverses in GF(2-m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.; Truong, T. K.; Shao, H. M.; Deutsch, L. J.; Omura, J. K.; Reed, I. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite field arithmetic logic is central in the implementation of Reed-Solomon coders and in some cryptographic algorithms. There is a need for good multiplication and inversion algorithms that are easily realized on VLSI chips. Massey and Omura recently developed a new multiplication algorithm for Galois fields based on a normal basis representation. A pipeline structure is developed to realize the Massey-Omura multiplier in the finite field GF(2m). With the simple squaring property of the normal-basis representation used together with this multiplier, a pipeline architecture is also developed for computing inverse elements in GF(2m). The designs developed for the Massey-Omura multiplier and the computation of inverse elements are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  17. WARP: Weight Associative Rule Processor. A dedicated VLSI fuzzy logic megacell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagni, A.; Poluzzi, R.; Rizzotto, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    During the last five years Fuzzy Logic has gained enormous popularity in the academic and industrial worlds. The success of this new methodology has led the microelectronics industry to create a new class of machines, called Fuzzy Machines, to overcome the limitations of traditional computing systems when utilized as Fuzzy Systems. This paper gives an overview of the methods by which Fuzzy Logic data structures are represented in the machines (each with its own advantages and inefficiencies). Next, the paper introduces WARP (Weight Associative Rule Processor) which is a dedicated VLSI megacell allowing the realization of a fuzzy controller suitable for a wide range of applications. WARP represents an innovative approach to VLSI Fuzzy controllers by utilizing different types of data structures for characterizing the membership functions during the various stages of the Fuzzy processing. WARP dedicated architecture has been designed in order to achieve high performance by exploiting the computational advantages offered by the different data representations.

  18. Learning and optimization with cascaded VLSI neural network building-block chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, T.; Eberhardt, S. P.; Tran, M.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    To demonstrate the versatility of the building-block approach, two neural network applications were implemented on cascaded analog VLSI chips. Weights were implemented using 7-b multiplying digital-to-analog converter (MDAC) synapse circuits, with 31 x 32 and 32 x 32 synapses per chip. A novel learning algorithm compatible with analog VLSI was applied to the two-input parity problem. The algorithm combines dynamically evolving architecture with limited gradient-descent backpropagation for efficient and versatile supervised learning. To implement the learning algorithm in hardware, synapse circuits were paralleled for additional quantization levels. The hardware-in-the-loop learning system allocated 2-5 hidden neurons for parity problems. Also, a 7 x 7 assignment problem was mapped onto a cascaded 64-neuron fully connected feedback network. In 100 randomly selected problems, the network found optimal or good solutions in most cases, with settling times in the range of 7-100 microseconds.

  19. Design and evaluation of fault-tolerant VLSI/WSI processor arrays. Final technical report, 1 July 1985-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Fortes, J.A.

    1987-12-31

    This document is the final report of work performed under the project entitled Design and Evaluation of Fault-Tolerant VLSI/WSI Processor Arrays supported by the Innovative Science and Technology Office of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization and administered through the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. 00014-85-k-0588. With the concurrence of Dr. Clifford Lau, the Scientific Officer for this project, this final report consists of reprints of publications reporting work performed under the project. In the attached list of publications are papers where fault-tolerant systems for processor arrays are proposed and studied. Studies on algorithmic and software aspects relevant to the systems are also reported, as well as hardware and reconfigurability issues for fault-tolerant processor arrays.

  20. Design Implementation and Testing of a VLSI High Performance ASIC for Extracting the Phase of a Complex Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Ronald C.

    2002-09-01

    This thesis documents the research, circuit design, and simulation testing of a VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) ASIC which extracts phase angle information from a complex sampled signal using the arctangent relationship: (phi=tan/-1 (Q/1). Specifically, the circuit will convert the In-Phase and Quadrature terms into their corresponding phase angle. The design specifications were to implement the design in CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors) technology with a minimum transistor count and ability to operate at a clock frequency of 700 MHz. Research on the arctangent function was performed to determine mathematical calculation methods and the CORDIC method was chosen to achieve the stated design specifications. MATLAB simulations were used to calculate and verify accuracy and to implement Quine-McClusky logic minimization. T-SPICE netlists were generated and simulations were run to determine transistor and circuit electrical operation and timing. Finally, overall circuit logic functionality of all possible input combinations was completed using a VHDL (VHSIC(Very High Speed Integrated Circuit) Hardware Description Language) simulation program.

  1. A novel approach: high resolution inspection with wafer plane defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Wihl, Mark; Shi, Rui-fang; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    High Resolution reticle inspection is well-established as a proven, effective, and efficient means of detecting yield-limiting mask defects as well as defects which are not immediately yield-limiting yet can enable manufacturing process improvements. Historically, RAPID products have enabled detection of both classes of these defects. The newly-developed Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) detector technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. Wafer Plane Inspection accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. This has the effect of reducing sensitivity to non-printing defects while enabling higher sensitivity focused in high MEEF areas where small reticle defects still yield significant printing defects on wafers. WPI is a new inspection mode that has been developed by KLA-Tencor and is currently under test with multiple customers. It employs the same transmitted and reflected-light high-resolution images as the industry-standard high-resolution inspections, but with much more sophisticated processing involved. A rigorous mask pattern recovery algorithm is used to convert the transmitted and reflected light images into a modeled representation of the reticle. Lithographic modeling of the scanner is then used to generate an aerial image of the mask. This is followed by resist modeling to determine the exposure of the photoresist. The defect detectors are then applied on this photoresist plane so that only printing defects are detected. Note that no hardware modifications to the inspection system are required to enable this detector. The same tool will be able to perform both our standard High Resolution inspections and the Wafer Plane Inspection detector. This approach has several important features. The ability to ignore non

  2. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  3. Application of a VLSI vector quantization processor to real-time speech coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, G.; Gersho, A.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to a working vector quantization processor for speech coding that is based on a first-generation VLSI chip which efficiently performs the pattern-matching operation needed for the codebook search process (CPS). Using this chip, the CPS architecture has been successfully incorporated into a compact, single-board Vector PCM implementation operating at 7-18 kbits/sec. A real time Adaptive Vector Predictive Coder system using the CPS has also been implemented.

  4. Exploration and Evaluation of Nanometer Low-power Multi-core VLSI Computer Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    reliable system that can be utilized for producing state-of-the- art computer architectures, especially for silicon implementations. The research...stitch elements together via placing each layout and routing wire between known pins. Early layout editors, such as the Magic Layout Editor, had...within the University of Berkeley mainly for a public domain VLSI tool called Magic [15]. The Tcl language is useful in that it has an easy-to- learn

  5. A Systolic VLSI Design of a Pipeline Reed-solomon Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, H. M.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Yuen, J. H.; Reed, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    A pipeline structure of a transform decoder similar to a systolic array was developed to decode Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. An important ingredient of this design is a modified Euclidean algorithm for computing the error locator polynomial. The computation of inverse field elements is completely avoided in this modification of Euclid's algorithm. The new decoder is regular and simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  6. Growth of silver nanowires on GaAs wafers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang

    2011-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanowires with chemically clean surfaces have been directly grown on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers through a simple solution/solid interfacial reaction (SSIR) between the GaAs wafers themselves and aqueous solutions of silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) at room temperature. The success in synthesis of Ag nanowires mainly benefits from the low concentration of surface electrons in the semi-insulating GaAs wafers that can lead to the formation of a low-density of nuclei that facilitate their anisotropic growth into nanowires. The resulting Ag nanowires exhibit rough surfaces and reasonably good electric conductivity. These characteristics are beneficial to sensing applications based on single-nanowire surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and possible surface-adsorption-induced conductivity variation.

  7. Wafer-scale synthesis and transfer of graphene films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbin; Bae, Sukang; Jang, Houk; Jang, Sukjae; Zhu, Shou-En; Sim, Sung Hyun; Song, Young Il; Hong, Byung Hee; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2010-02-10

    We developed means to produce wafer scale, high-quality graphene films as large as 3 in. wafer size on Ni and Cu films under ambient pressure and transfer them onto arbitrary substrates through instantaneous etching of metal layers. We also demonstrated the applications of the large-area graphene films for the batch fabrication of field-effect transistor (FET) arrays and stretchable strain gauges showing extraordinary performances. Transistors showed the hole and electron mobilities of the device of 1100 +/- 70 and 550 +/- 50 cm(2)/(V s) at drain bias of -0.75 V, respectively. The piezo-resistance gauge factor of strain sensor was approximately 6.1. These methods represent a significant step toward the realization of graphene devices in wafer scale as well as application in optoelectronics, flexible and stretchable electronics.

  8. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  9. Low cost wafer metrology using a NIR low coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gwang; Seo, Yong Bum; Joo, Ki-Nam

    2013-06-03

    In this investigation, a low cost Si wafer metrology system based on low coherence interferometry using NIR light is proposed and verified. The whole system consists of two low coherence interferometric principles: low coherence scanning interferometry (LCSI) for measuring surface profiles and spectrally-resolved interferometry (SRI) to obtain the nominal optical thickness of the double-sided polished Si wafer. The combination of two techniques can reduce the measurement time and give adequate dimensional information of the Si wafer. The wavelength of the optical source is around 1 μm, for which transmission is non-zero for undoped silicon and can be also detected by a typical CCD camera. Because of the typical CCD camera, the whole system can be constructed inexpensively.

  10. Minority lifetime degradation of silicon wafers after electric zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. C.; Yang, C. F.; Lan, C. W.

    2015-06-01

    The degradation of minority lifetime of mono- and multi-crystalline silicon wafers after electric zone melting, a simple and contamination-free process, was investigated. The thermal-stress induced dislocations were responsible to the degradation; however, the grain size also played a crucial role. It was believed that the grain boundaries helped the relaxation of thermal stress, so that the degradation was reduced as the grain size decreased. In addition to lifetime mapping and etch pit density, photoluminescence mapping was also used to examine the electrically active defects after zone melting. Factors affecting lifetime degradation of silicon wafers after electric zone melting were examined. Small-grain multi-crystalline wafers showed better lifetime after zone melting. Twining area showed better lifetime. The formation of new grains relaxed the thermal stress mitigating lifetime degradation.

  11. Microwave Induced Direct Bonding of Single Crystal Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budraa, N. K.; Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1999-01-01

    We have heated polished doped single-crystal silicon wafers in a single mode microwave cavity to temperatures where surface to surface bonding occurred. The absorption of microwaves and heating of the wafers is attributed to the inclusion of n-type or p-type impurities into these substrates. A cylindrical cavity TM (sub 010) standing wave mode was used to irradiate samples of various geometry's at positions of high magnetic field. This process was conducted in vacuum to exclude plasma effects. This initial study suggests that the inclusion of impurities in single crystal silicon significantly improved its microwave absorption (loss factor) to a point where heating silicon wafers directly can be accomplished in minimal time. Bonding of these substrates, however, occurs only at points of intimate surface to surface contact. The inclusion of a thin metallic layer on the surfaces enhances the bonding process.

  12. Characterizing SOI Wafers By Use Of AOTF-PHI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Li, Guann-Pyng; Zang, Deyu

    1995-01-01

    Developmental nondestructive method of characterizing layers of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer involves combination of polarimetric hyperspectral imaging by use of acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTF-PHI) and computational resources for extracting pertinent data on SOI wafers from polarimetric hyperspectral images. Offers high spectral resolution and both ease and rapidity of optical-wavelength tuning. Further efforts to implement all of processing of polarimetric spectral image data in special-purpose hardware for sake of procesing speed. Enables characterization of SOI wafers in real time for online monitoring and adjustment of production. Also accelerates application of AOTF-PHI to other applications in which need for high-resolution spectral imaging, both with and without polarimetry.

  13. High efficiency heterojunction solar cells on n-type kerfless mono crystalline silicon wafers by epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Watabe, Yoshimi; Hao, Ruiying; Ravi, T. S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a heterojunction (HJ) solar cell on n-type epitaxially grown kerfless crystalline-silicon (c-Si) with a conversion efficiency of 22.5%. The total cell area is 243.4 cm2. The cell has a short-circuit current density of 38.6 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 735 mV, and a fill factor of 0.791. The key advantages and technological tasks of epitaxial wafers for HJ solar cells are discussed, in comparison with conventional n-type Czockralski c-Si wafers. The combination of HJ and kerfless technology can lead to high conversion efficiency with a potential at low cost.

  14. Large-size, high-uniformity, random silver nanowire networks as transparent electrodes for crystalline silicon wafer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shouyi; Ouyang, Zi; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2013-05-06

    Metal nanowire networks are emerging as next generation transparent electrodes for photovoltaic devices. We demonstrate the application of random silver nanowire networks as the top electrode on crystalline silicon wafer solar cells. The dependence of transmittance and sheet resistance on the surface coverage is measured. Superior optical and electrical properties are observed due to the large-size, highly-uniform nature of these networks. When applying the nanowire networks on the solar cells with an optimized two-step annealing process, we achieved as large as 19% enhancement on the energy conversion efficiency. The detailed analysis reveals that the enhancement is mainly caused by the improved electrical properties of the solar cells due to the silver nanowire networks. Our result reveals that this technology is a promising alternative transparent electrode technology for crystalline silicon wafer solar cells.

  15. Nanoimprint wafer and mask tool progress and status for high volume semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoichi; Seki, Junichi; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuki; Azuma, Hisanobu; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Sato, Chiaki; Sakai, Fumio; Takabayashi, Yukio; Aghili, Ali; Mizuno, Makoto; Choi, Jin; Jones, Chris E.

    2016-10-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are many criteria that determine whether a particular technology is ready for wafer manufacturing. Defectivity and mask life play a significant role relative to meeting the cost of ownership (CoO) requirements in the production of semiconductor devices. Hard particles on a wafer or mask create the possibility of inducing a permanent defect on the mask that can impact device yield and mask life. By using material methods to reduce particle shedding and by introducing an air curtain system, the lifetime of both the master mask and the replica mask can be extended. In this work, we report results that demonstrate a path towards achieving mask lifetimes of better than 1000 wafers. On the mask side, a new replication tool, the FPA-1100 NR2 is introduced. Mask replication is required for nanoimprint lithography (NIL), and criteria that are crucial to the success of a replication platform include both particle control, resolution and image placement accuracy. In this paper we discuss the progress made in both feature resolution and in meeting the image placement specification for replica masks.

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a semiconductor wafer

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-07

    Apparatus for measuring thicknesses of semiconductor wafers is discussed, comprising: housing means for supporting a wafer in a light-tight environment; a light source mounted to the housing at one side of the wafer to emit light of a predetermined wavelength to normally impinge the wafer; a light detector supported at a predetermined distance from a side of the wafer opposite the side on which a light source impinges and adapted to receive light transmitted through the wafer; and means for measuring the transmitted light. 4 figs.

  17. Overview of recent direct wafer bonding advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriceau, H.; Rieutord, F.; Fournel, F.; Le Tiec, Y.; Di Cioccio, L.; Morales, C.; Charvet, A. M.; Deguet, C.

    2010-12-01

    Direct wafer bonding processes are being increasingly used to achieve innovative stacking structures. Many of them have already been implemented in industrial applications. This article looks at direct bonding mechanisms, processes developed recently and trends. Homogeneous and heterogeneous bonded structures have been successfully achieved with various materials. Active, insulating or conductive materials have been widely investigated. This article gives an overview of Si and SiO2 direct wafer bonding processes and mechanisms, silicon-on-insulator type bonding, diverse material stacking and the transfer of devices. Direct bonding clearly enables the emergence and development of new applications, such as for microelectronics, microtechnologies, sensors, MEMs, optical devices, biotechnologies and 3D integration.

  18. An application of selective electrochemical wafer thinning for silicon characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.; Stein, H.J.; Stevenson, J.O.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique is reported for the rapid determination of interstitial oxygen (O{sub i}) in heavily doped n{sup +} and p{sup +} silicon. This technique includes application of a selective electrochemical thinning (SET) process and FTIR transmittance measurement on a limited area of a silicon wafer. The O{sub i} is calculated using ASTM F1188--88 with the IOC 88 calibration factor. An advantage of SET over mechanical thinning is that the original wafer thickness and diameter are maintained for additional processing. 1 tab.

  19. The influence of wafer elasticity on acoustic waves during LIGA development.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2003-12-01

    During acoustically stimulated LIGA development, a wafer receives sound waves from both sides at a wide variety of incidence angles that vary in time depending on the orientation of the wafer relative to the multiple transducers that are typically actuated in a periodic sequence. It is important to understand the influence of these variables on the transmission of energy through the wafer as well as the induced motion of the wafer itself because these processes impact the induced acoustic streaming of the fluid within features, the mechanism presently thought responsible for enhanced development of LIGA features. In the present work, the impact of wafer elasticity on LIGA development is investigated. Transmission waves, wafer bending waves, and the related concepts such as critical bending frequency, mechanical impedance, coincidence, and resonance, are discussed. Supercritical-frequency incident waves induce supersonic bending waves in the wafer. Incident wave energy is channeled into three components, transmitted, reflected and energy deposited to the wafer, depending on the wafer material, thickness and wave incidence angle. Results show at normal incidence for a 1-mm PMMA wafer, about 47% of the wave energy is deposited in the wafer. The wafer gains almost half of the incident energy, a result that agrees well with the Bankert et a1 measurements. In LIGA development, transmitted waves may sometimes produce strong acoustic motion of the developer on the wafer backside, especially for the so-called coincidence case in which almost all incident wave energy transfers to the backside. Wafer bending waves cause wafer oscillation at high frequency, promoting the development process, but features shaking may weaken their attachments to the substrate. Resonance is not likely for the entire wafer, but may occur in short and wide wafer feature columns, which are least likely to break away from the substrate, perhaps resulting in good agitation of the fluid in adjacent

  20. HED-TIE: A Wafer Scale Approach for Fabricating Hybrid Electronic Devices with Trench Isolated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sreetama; Bülz, Daniel; Solonenko, Dmytro; Reuter, Danny; Deibel, Carsten; Hiller, Karla; Zahn, Dietrich; Salvan, Georgeta

    2017-03-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid electronic devices (HEDs) offer opportunities for functionalities that are not easily obtainable with either organic or inorganic materials individually. In the strive for down-scaling the channel length in planar geometry HEDs the records were achieved with electron beam lithography or nanoimprint lithography. Their application on the wafer level is, however, cost intensive and time consuming. Here, we propose the trench isolated electrodes (TIE) technology as a fast, cost effective, wafer level approach for fabrication of planar HEDs with electrode gaps in the range of 100 nm. The TIE technology is inspired from the process flow which has been successfully implemented in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and is based on standard photolithography and a series of isotropic and anisotropic etching steps and trench refilling with silicon oxide. We demonstrate that the formation of the organic channel can be realized by deposition from solution as well as by thermal evaporation of organic molecules. To underline one key feature of planar HED-TIEs, namely full accessibility of the active area of the devices by external stimuli such as light, TIPS-pentacene/Au HED-TIEs were successfully tested for possible application as hybrid photodetectors in the visible spectral range.

  1. Combining mask and OPC process verification for improved wafer patterning and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ayman; Abdelghany, Hesham

    2016-10-01

    As technology advances into deep submicron nodes, the mask manufacturing process accuracy become more important. Mask Process Correction (MPC) has been transitioning from Rules-Based Mask Process correction to Model-Based Mask Process Correction mode. MPC is a subsequent step to OPC, where additional perturbation is applied to the mask shapes to correct for the mask manufacturing process. Shifting towards full model-based MPC is driven mainly by the accuracy requirements in advanced technology nodes, both for DUV and EUV processes. In the current state-of-the-art MPC process, MPC is completely decoupled from OPC, where each of them assumes that the other is executing perfectly. However, this decoupling is not suitable anymore due to the limited tolerance in the mask CDU budget and the increased wafer CDU requirements required from OPC. It is becoming more important to reduce any systematic mask errors, especially where they matter the most. In this work, we present a new combined-verification methodology that allows testing the combined effect of mask process and lithography process together and judging the final wafer patterning quality. This has the potential to intercept risks due to superposition of OPC and MPC correction residual errors, and capturing and correcting such a previously hidden source of patterning degradation.

  2. Wafer and reticle positioning system for the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    WRONOSKY,JOHN B.; SMITH,TONY G.; CRAIG,MARCUS J.; STURGIS,BEVERLY R.; DARNOLD,JOEL R.; WERLING,DAVID K.; KINCY,MARK A.; TICHENOR,DANIEL A.; WILLIAMS,MARK E.; BISCHOFF,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    This paper is an overview of the wafer and reticle positioning system of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Engineering Test Stand (ETS). EUVL represents one of the most promising technologies for supporting the integrated circuit (IC) industry's lithography needs for critical features below 100nm. EUVL research and development includes development of capabilities for demonstrating key EUV technologies. The ETS is under development at the EUV Virtual National Laboratory, to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data that supports production-tool development. The stages and their associated metrology operated in a vacuum environment and must meet stringent outgassing specifications. A tight tolerance is placed on the stage tracking performance to minimize image distortion and provide high position repeatability. The wafer must track the reticle with less than {+-}3nm of position error and jitter must not exceed 10nm rms. To meet these performance requirements, magnetically levitated positioning stages utilizing a system of sophisticated control electronics will be used. System modeling and experimentation have contributed to the development of the positioning system and results indicate that desired ETS performance is achievable.

  3. New LEEPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Takao

    2014-10-01

    A new concept of semiconductor lithography is presented. The new technology is tentatively called as New LEEPL since it is an outgrowth of LEEPL which has been developed around 2002. However the new system is completely different from LEEPL. Instead of a single membrane mask used in LEEPL, we use "mask wafer" where mask patterns are made on a wafer by NIL at corresponding positions of chip patterns of chip wafer. The mask patterns on mask wafer have parallel struts structure of 2 division complementary mask (2-DCMPS) Gold (or Si ) dots of thickness of ~50μm are made on the surface of struts and scribing region for equalizing the temperature of mask wafer and chip wafer. Without these contact dots the temperature difference of ~0.5 K will be generated by full power of 1000μA at 2KV. Both mask wafer and chip wafer are cramped together and kept united throughout the processes. The overlay errors between mask patterns and corresponding chip patterns are measured optically. The error map data are fed to 10 e-beam column array to correct the overlay placement errors. Each column does not have main scanning deflector but has tiny deflector only for beam-tilt operation to correct errors. It can deliver 100μA without space charge blur and thus the resolution of L/S pattern of 10nm range can be achieved at resist thickness of 20nm. The e-beam exposure over the mask is performed by the stage motion. Since mask wafer does not have thermal distortion, the thin membrane's distortion alone will affect the image placement accuracy. In order to obtain less than 1nm distortion of the membrane, the size of 2-DCPS must be smaller 0.7mm.

  4. Face-to-face transfer of wafer-scale graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Libo; Ni, Guang-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Liu, Bo; Castro Neto, Antonio H.; Loh, Kian Ping

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted worldwide interest since its experimental discovery, but the preparation of large-area, continuous graphene film on SiO2/Si wafers, free from growth-related morphological defects or transfer-induced cracks and folds, remains a formidable challenge. Growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on Cu foils has emerged as a powerful technique owing to its compatibility with industrial-scale roll-to-roll technology. However, the polycrystalline nature and microscopic roughness of Cu foils means that such roll-to-roll transferred films are not devoid of cracks and folds. High-fidelity transfer or direct growth of high-quality graphene films on arbitrary substrates is needed to enable wide-ranging applications in photonics or electronics, which include devices such as optoelectronic modulators, transistors, on-chip biosensors and tunnelling barriers. The direct growth of graphene film on an insulating substrate, such as a SiO2/Si wafer, would be useful for this purpose, but current research efforts remain grounded at the proof-of-concept stage, where only discontinuous, nanometre-sized islands can be obtained. Here we develop a face-to-face transfer method for wafer-scale graphene films that is so far the only known way to accomplish both the growth and transfer steps on one wafer. This spontaneous transfer method relies on nascent gas bubbles and capillary bridges between the graphene film and the underlying substrate during etching of the metal catalyst, which is analogous to the method used by tree frogs to remain attached to submerged leaves. In contrast to the previous wet or dry transfer results, the face-to-face transfer does not have to be done by hand and is compatible with any size and shape of substrate; this approach also enjoys the benefit of a much reduced density of transfer defects compared with the conventional transfer method. Most importantly, the direct growth and spontaneous attachment of graphene on the underlying

  5. Radiation-Hardened Wafer Scale Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-25

    tim technology. A system built with conventional ICs and packaging would be very much larger. The required radiation dose rate and single - event upset ...assuming a 10:1 scaling at the analog to digital converters . (See footnote in Section 2.5.1.) This scale factor is used, for example, in ground-based...transistors which resulted in 5 different circuits . Static CMOS circuitry was used for radiation resistance. All 5 circuits were designed and built

  6. Ultra-Gradient Test Cavity for Testing SRF Wafer Samples

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Pogue, P.M. McIntyre, A.I. Sattarov, C. Reece

    2010-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz test cavity has been designed to test wafer samples of superconducting materials. This mushroom shaped cavity, operating in TE01 mode, creates a unique distribution of surface fields. The surface magnetic field on the sample wafer is 3.75 times greater than elsewhere on the Niobium cavity surface. This field design is made possible through dielectrically loading the cavity by locating a hemisphere of ultra-pure sapphire just above the sample wafer. The sapphire pulls the fields away from the walls so the maximum field the Nb surface sees is 25% of the surface field on the sample. In this manner, it should be possible to drive the sample wafer well beyond the BCS limit for Niobium while still maintaining a respectable Q. The sapphire's purity must be tested for its loss tangent and dielectric constant to finalize the design of the mushroom test cavity. A sapphire loaded CEBAF cavity has been constructed and tested. The results on the dielectric constant and loss tangent will be presented

  7. An Advanced Wafer Stepper For Sub-Micron Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Herbert E.; Loebach, Ernst W.

    1987-09-01

    An advanced wafer stepper is presented addressing the specific problems involved by sub-micron lithography such as alignment and focusing to multilayer resist films. New sub-systems were developed while maintaining principles well proven in a previous design. The system is described emphasizing the new sub-systems, and performance data are presented.

  8. Scatterometry on pelliclized masks: an option for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Benson, Craig; Higuchi, Masaru; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Kwon, Michael; Yedur, Sanjay; Li, Shifang; Lee, Sangbong; Tabet, Milad

    2007-03-01

    Optical scatterometry-based metrology is now widely used in wafer fabs for lithography, etch, and CMP applications. This acceptance of a new metrology method occurred despite the abundance of wellestablished CD-SEM and AFM methods. It was driven by the desire to make measurements faster and with a lower cost of ownership. Over the last year, scatterometry has also been introduced in advanced mask shops for mask measurements. Binary and phase shift masks have been successfully measured at all desired points during photomask production before the pellicle is mounted. There is a significant benefit to measuring masks with the pellicle in place. From the wafer fab's perspective, through-pellicle metrology would verify mask effects on the same features that are characterized on wafer. On-site mask verification would enable quality control and trouble-shooting without returning the mask to a mask house. Another potential application is monitoring changes to mask films once the mask has been delivered to the fab (haze, oxide growth, etc.). Similar opportunities apply to the mask metrologist receiving line returns from a wafer fab. The ability to make line-return measurements without risking defect introduction is clearly attractive. This paper will evaluate the feasibility of collecting scatterometry data on pelliclized masks. We explore the effects of several different pellicle types on scatterometry measurements made with broadband light in the range of 320-780 nm. The complexity introduced by the pellicles' optical behavior will be studied.

  9. Method for reuse of wafers for growth of vertically-aligned wire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Spurgeon, Joshua M; Plass, Katherine E; Lewis, Nathan S; Atwater, Harry A

    2013-06-04

    Reusing a Si wafer for the formation of wire arrays by transferring the wire arrays to a polymer matrix, reusing a patterned oxide for several array growths, and finally polishing and reoxidizing the wafer surface and reapplying the patterned oxide.

  10. Bonding silicon-on-insulator to glass wafers for integrated bio-electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Blick, Robert H.; Kim, D. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report a method for bonding silicon-on-insulator wafers onto glass wafers. After pre-cleaning the wafers by an ozone and ultraviolet exposure, followed by mega-sonic water rinse, the SOI wafers are bonded to glass wafers in a vacuum chamber. This is performed at a temperature of 400 °C under an applied voltage of 700 V. The interface between the glass and SOI wafer is tested mechanically and inspected by electron beam microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate removal of the silicon bulk layer after wafer bonding. The quality of the single crystalline Si thin film on the glass wafers has been verified by four-circle x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This process will allow us the integration of thin-film electronics in biological sensor applications.

  11. A novel low-voltage low-power analogue VLSI implementation of neural networks with on-chip back-propagation learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Manuel; Garde, Andres; Murillo, Pilar; Serrano, Luis

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a novel design and implementation of a VLSI Analogue Neural Net based on Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) with on-chip Back Propagation (BP) learning algorithm suitable for the resolution of classification problems is described. In order to implement a general and programmable analogue architecture, the design has been carried out in a hierarchical way. In this way the net has been divided in synapsis-blocks and neuron-blocks providing an easy method for the analysis. These blocks basically consist on simple cells, which are mainly, the activation functions (NAF), derivatives (DNAF), multipliers and weight update circuits. The analogue design is based on current-mode translinear techniques using MOS transistors working in the weak inversion region in order to reduce both the voltage supply and the power consumption. Moreover, with the purpose of minimizing the noise, offset and distortion of even order, the topologies are fully-differential and balanced. The circuit, named ANNE (Analogue Neural NEt), has been prototyped and characterized as a proof of concept on CMOS AMI-0.5A technology occupying a total area of 2.7mm2. The chip includes two versions of neural nets with on-chip BP learning algorithm, which are respectively a 2-1 and a 2-2-1 implementations. The proposed nets have been experimentally tested using supply voltages from 2.5V to 1.8V, which is suitable for single cell lithium-ion battery supply applications. Experimental results of both implementations included in ANNE exhibit a good performance on solving classification problems. These results have been compared with other proposed Analogue VLSI implementations of Neural Nets published in the literature demonstrating that our proposal is very efficient in terms of occupied area and power consumption.

  12. Characteristics and issues of haze management in a wafer fabrication environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Ha; Hwang, Dae Ho; Jeong, Goo Min; Lee, Young Mo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Yim, Dong Gyu

    2014-10-01

    The haze nucleation and growth phenomenon on critical photomask surfaces has periodically gained attention as it has significantly impacted wafer printability for different technology nodes over the years. A number of process solutions have been promoted in the semiconductor industry which has been shown to suppress or minimize the propensity for haze formation, but none of these technologies can stop every instance of haze. Fortunately, a novel technology which uses a dry (no chemical effluents) removal system, laser-based, through pellicle process has been reported recently. The technology presented here avoids many of the shortcomings of the wet clean process mentioned previously. The dry clean process extends the life of the photomask; maintains more consistent CD's, phase, and transmission; avoids adjustment to the exposure dose to account for photomask changes, reduces the number of required inspections and otherwise improves the efficiency and predictability of the lithography cell. We report on the performance of photomask based on a design developed to study the impact of metrology variations on dry clean process. In a first step we focus on basic characteristics: CD variation, phase, Cr/MoSi transmission, pellicle transmission, registration variations. In a second step, we evaluate haze removal and prevention performance and wafer photo margin. Haze removal is studied on the masks for several haze types and various exposure conditions. The results of this study show that some of metrology variation are likely to be a problem at high technology node, and haze removal performance is determined whether the component of haze is remained or not after treatment.

  13. Switchable adhesion for wafer-handling based on dielectric elastomer stack transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepaß, T.; Butz, J.; Förster-Zügel, F.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Vacuum grippers are often used for the handling of wafers and small devices. In order to evacuate the gripper, a gas flow is created that can harm the micro structures on the wafer. A promising alternative to vacuum grippers could be adhesive grippers with switchable adhesion. There have been some publications of gecko-inspired adhesive devices. Most of these former works consist of a structured surface which adheres to the object manipulated and an actuator for switching the adhesion. Until now different actuator principles have been investigated, like smart memory alloys and pneumatics. In this work for the first time dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DEST) are combined with a structured surface. DESTs are a promising new transducer technology with many applications in different industry sectors like medical devices, human-machine-interaction and soft robotics. Stacked dielectric elastomer transducers show thickness contraction originating from the electromechanical pressure of two compliant electrodes compressing an elastomeric dielectric when a voltage is applied. Since DESTs and the adhesive surfaces previously described are made of elastomers, it is self-evident to combine both systems in one device. The DESTs are fabricated by a spin coating process. If the flat surface of the spinning carrier is substituted for example by a perforated one, the structured elastomer surface and the DEST can be fabricated in one process. By electrical actuation the DEST contracts and laterally expands which causes the gecko-like cilia to adhere on the object to manipulate. This work describes the assembly and the experimental results of such a device using switchable adhesion. It is intended to be used for the handling of glass wafers.

  14. Integrated optical MEMS using through-wafer vias and bump-bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Frederick, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    This LDRD began as a three year program to integrate through-wafer vias, micro-mirrors and control electronics with high-voltage capability to yield a 64 by 64 array of individually controllable micro-mirrors on 125 or 250 micron pitch with piston, tip and tilt movement. The effort was a mix of R&D and application. Care was taken to create SUMMiT{trademark} (Sandia's ultraplanar, multilevel MEMS technology) compatible via and mirror processes, and the ultimate goal was to mate this MEMS fabrication product to a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics substrate. Significant progress was made on the via and mirror fabrication and design, the attach process development as well as the electronics high voltage (30 volt) and control designs. After approximately 22 months, the program was ready to proceed with fabrication and integration of the electronics, final mirror array, and through wafer vias to create a high resolution OMEMS array with individual mirror electronic control. At this point, however, mission alignment and budget constraints reduced the last year program funding and redirected the program to help support the through-silicon via work in the Hyper-Temporal Sensors (HTS) Grand Challenge (GC) LDRD. Several months of investigation and discussion with the HTS team resulted in a revised plan for the remaining 10 months of the program. We planned to build a capability in finer-pitched via fabrication on thinned substrates along with metallization schemes and bonding techniques for very large arrays of high density interconnects (up to 2000 x 2000 vias). Through this program, Sandia was able to build capability in several different conductive through wafer via processes using internal and external resources, MEMS mirror design and fabrication, various bonding techniques for arrayed substrates, and arrayed electronics control design with high voltage capability.

  15. Model, analysis, and evaluation of the effects of analog VLSI arithmetic on linear subspace-based image recognition.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Gonzalo; Figueroa, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Typical image recognition systems operate in two stages: feature extraction to reduce the dimensionality of the input space, and classification based on the extracted features. Analog Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) is an attractive technology to achieve compact and low-power implementations of these computationally intensive tasks for portable embedded devices. However, device mismatch limits the resolution of the circuits fabricated with this technology. Traditional layout techniques to reduce the mismatch aim to increase the resolution at the transistor level, without considering the intended application. Relating mismatch parameters to specific effects in the application level would allow designers to apply focalized mismatch compensation techniques according to predefined performance/cost tradeoffs. This paper models, analyzes, and evaluates the effects of mismatched analog arithmetic in both feature extraction and classification circuits. For the feature extraction, we propose analog adaptive linear combiners with on-chip learning for both Least Mean Square (LMS) and Generalized Hebbian Algorithm (GHA). Using mathematical abstractions of analog circuits, we identify mismatch parameters that are naturally compensated during the learning process, and propose cost-effective guidelines to reduce the effect of the rest. For the classification, we derive analog models for the circuits necessary to implement Nearest Neighbor (NN) approach and Radial Basis Function (RBF) networks, and use them to emulate analog classifiers with standard databases of face and hand-writing digits. Formal analysis and experiments show how we can exploit adaptive structures and properties of the input space to compensate the effects of device mismatch at the application level, thus reducing the design overhead of traditional layout techniques. Results are also directly extensible to multiple application domains using linear subspace methods.

  16. Research News: Are VLSI Microcircuits Too Hard to Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1980-01-01

    This research news article on microelectronics discusses the scientific challenge the integrated circuit industry will have in the next decade, for designing the complicated microcircuits made possible by advancing miniaturization technology. (HM)

  17. Wafer bonding process for building MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabo, Eric F.; Meiler, Josef; Matthias, Thorsten

    2014-06-01

    The technology for the measurement of colour rendering and colour quality is not new, but many parameters related to this issue are currently changing. A number of standard methods were developed and are used by different specialty areas of the lighting industry. CIE 13.3 has been the accepted standard implemented by many users and used for many years. Light-emitting Diode (LED) technology moves at a rapid pace and, as this lighting source finds wider acceptance, it appears that traditional colour-rendering measurement methods produce inconsistent results. Practical application of various types of LEDs yielded results that challenged conventional thinking regarding colour measurement of light sources. Recent studies have shown that the anatomy and physiology of the human eye is more complex than formerly accepted. Therefore, the development of updated measurement methodology also forces a fresh look at functioning and colour perception of the human eye, especially with regard to LEDs. This paper includes a short description of the history and need for the measurement of colour rendering. Some of the traditional measurement methods are presented and inadequacies are discussed. The latest discoveries regarding the functioning of the human eye and the perception of colour, especially when LEDs are used as light sources, are discussed. The unique properties of LEDs when used in practical applications such as luminaires are highlighted.

  18. Wafer-level fabrication of arrays of glass lens doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passilly, Nicolas; Perrin, Stéphane; Albero, Jorge; Krauter, Johann; Gaiffe, Olivier; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Froehly, Luc; Lullin, Justine; Bargiel, Sylwester; Osten, Wolfgang; Gorecki, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Systems for imaging require to employ high quality optical components in order to dispose of optical aberrations and thus reach sufficient resolution. However, well-known methods to get rid of optical aberrations, such as aspherical profiles or diffractive corrections are not easy to apply to micro-optics. In particular, some of these methods rely on polymers which cannot be associated when such lenses are to be used in integrated devices requiring high temperature process for their further assembly and separation. Among the different approaches, the most common is the lens splitting that consists in dividing the focusing power between two or more optical components. In here, we propose to take advantage of a wafer-level technique, devoted to the generation of glass lenses, which involves thermal reflow in silicon cavities to generate lens doublets. After the convex lens sides are generated, grinding and polishing of both stack sides allow, on the first hand, to form the planar lens backside and, on the other hand, to open the silicon cavity. Nevertheless, silicon frames are then kept and thinned down to form well-controlled and auto-aligned spacers between the lenses. Subsequent accurate vertical assembly of the glass lens arrays is performed by anodic bonding. The latter ensures a high level of alignment both laterally and axially since no additional material is required. Thanks to polishing, the generated lens doublets are then as thin as several hundreds of microns and compatible with micro-opto-electro-systems (MOEMS) technologies since they are only made of glass and silicon. The generated optical module is then robust and provide improved optical performances. Indeed, theoretically, two stacked lenses with similar features and spherical profiles can be almost diffraction limited whereas a single lens characterized by the same numerical aperture than the doublet presents five times higher wavefront error. To demonstrate such assumption, we fabricated glass

  19. Rinsing of wafers after wet processing: Simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chieh-Chun

    In semiconductor manufacturing, a large amount (50 billion gallons for US semiconductor fabrication plants in 2006) of ultrapure water (UPW) is used to rinse wafers after wet chemical processing to remove ionic contaminants on surfaces. Of great concern are the contaminants left in narrow (tens of nm), high-aspect-ratio (5:1 to 20:1) features (trenches, vias, and contact holes). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) stipulates that ionic contaminant levels be reduced to below ˜ 10 10 atoms/cm2. Understanding the bottlenecks in the rinsing process would enable conservation of rinse water usage. A comprehensive process model has been developed on the COMSOL platform to predict the dynamics of rinsing of narrow structures on patterned SiO 2 substrates initially cleaned with NH4OH. The model considers the effect of various mass-transport mechanisms, including convection and diffusion/dispersion, which occur simultaneously with various surface phenomena, such as adsorption and desorption of impurities. The influences of charged species in the bulk and on the surface, and their induced electric field that affect both transport and surface interactions, have been addressed. Modeling results show that the efficacy of rinsing is strongly influenced by the rate of desorption of adsorbed contaminants, mass transfer of contaminants from the mouth of the feature to the bulk liquid, and the trench aspect ratio. Detection of the end point of rinsing is another way to conserve water used for rinsing after wet processing. The applicability of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to monitor rinsing of Si processed in HF with and without copper contaminant was explored. In the first study, the effect of the nature of surface state (flat band, depletion, or accumulation) of silicon on rinsing rate was investigated. The experimental results show that the state of silicon could affect rinsing kinetics through modulation of ion adsorption. In the second

  20. Enhanced capture rate for haze defects in production wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Shulman, Adi; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    Photomask degradation via haze defect formation is an increasing troublesome yield problem in the semiconductor fab. Wafer inspection is often utilized to detect haze defects due to the fact that it can be a bi-product of process control wafer inspection; furthermore, the detection of the haze on the wafer is effectively enhanced due to the multitude of distinct fields being scanned. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel application for enhancing the wafer inspection tool's sensitivity to haze defects even further. In particular, we present results of bright field wafer inspection using the on several photo layers suffering from haze defects. One way in which the enhanced sensitivity can be achieved in inspection tools is by using a double scan of the wafer: one regular scan with the normal recipe and another high sensitivity scan from which only the repeater defects are extracted (the non-repeater defects consist largely of noise which is difficult to filter). Our solution essentially combines the double scan into a single high sensitivity scan whose processing is carried out along two parallel routes (see Fig. 1). Along one route, potential defects follow the standard recipe thresholds to produce a defect map at the nominal sensitivity. Along the alternate route, potential defects are used to extract only field repeater defects which are identified using an optimal repeater algorithm that eliminates "false repeaters". At the end of the scan, the two defect maps are merged into one with optical scan images available for all the merged defects. It is important to note, that there is no throughput hit; in addition, the repeater sensitivity is increased relative to a double scan, due to a novel runtime algorithm implementation whose memory requirements are minimized, thus enabling to search a much larger number of potential defects for repeaters. We evaluated the new application on photo wafers which consisted of both random and haze defects. The evaluation procedure

  1. Optimal mask characterization by Surrogate Wafer Print (SWaP) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Hoellein, Ingo; Peters, Jan Hendrick; Ackmann, Paul; Connolly, Brid; West, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, definition of mask specifications is done completely by the mask user, while characterization of the mask relative to the specifications is done completely by the mask maker. As the challenges of low-k1 imaging continue to grow in scope of designs and in absolute complexity, the inevitable partnership between wafer lithographers and mask makers has strengthened as well. This is reflected in the jointly owned mask facilities and device manufacturers' continued maintenance of fully captive mask shops which foster the closer mask-litho relationships. However, while some device manufacturers have leveraged this to optimize mask specifications before the mask is built and, therefore, improve mask yield and cost, the opportunity for post-fabrication partnering on mask characterization is more apparent and compelling. The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) has been investigating the concept of assessing how a mask images, rather than the mask's physical attributes, as a technically superior and lower-cost method to characterize a mask. The idea of printing a mask under its intended imaging conditions, then characterizing the imaged wafer as a surrogate for traditional mask inspections and measurements represents the ultimate method to characterize a mask's performance, which is most meaningful to the user. Surrogate wafer print (SWaP) is already done as part of leading-edge wafer fab mask qualification to validate defect and dimensional performance. In the past, the prospect of executing this concept has generally been summarily discarded as technically untenable and logistically intractable. The AMTC published a paper at BACUS 2007 successfully demonstrating the performance of SWaP for the characterization of defects as an alternative to traditional mask inspection [1]. It showed that this concept is not only feasible, but, in some cases, desirable. This paper expands on last year's work at AMTC to assess the full implementation of SWaP as an

  2. MEMS probes for on-wafer RF microwave characterization of future microelectronics: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, Jaouad; Arscott, Steve; El Fellahi, Abdelhatif; Haddadi, Kamel; Lasri, Tuami; Boyaval, Christophe; Dambrine, Gilles

    2015-07-01

    This article presents microelectromechanical system (MEMS) ground-signal-ground (GSG) probes based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for on-wafer microwave characterization of radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics. The probe is designed using optimized coplanar waveguide structures with the aim of ensuring a low-contact resistance between the probe and the pads of the device under test (DUT). The probes are batch fabricated using SOI substrates and employ a simple silicon micromachining process. The probes have a pitch of 4.5 µm with miniaturized dimensions for a DUT pad area with a similar size. Electrical (dc) measurements show that the fabricated probe has a low-contact resistance (~0.02 Ω) on gold pads. Excellent extracted RF performances of the probe are observed up to 30 GHz, showing an insertion loss better than 2.2 dB and return loss better than 20 dB over the frequency range. An ageing study shows the probes are capable of forming this dc contact for over 6000 contact cycles. The preliminary result of the repeatability of on-wafer one-port measurements with the miniaturized probe shows a consistent RF performance maintained through several contacts. The data indicates that the proposed MEMS probe is suitable for the high-frequency characterization of integrated nanoscale devices having reduced pad dimensions.

  3. Wafer level fabrication of single cell dispenser chips with integrated electrodes for particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoendube, Jonas; Yusof, Azmi; Kalkandjiev, Kiril; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-02-01

    This work presents the microfabrication and experimental evaluation of a dispenser chip, designed for isolation and printing of single cells by combining impedance sensing and drop-on-demand dispensing. The dispenser chip features 50  ×  55 µm (width × height) microchannels, a droplet generator and microelectrodes for impedance measurements. The chip is fabricated by sandwiching a dry film photopolymer (TMMF) between a silicon and a Pyrex wafer. TMMF has been used to define microfluidic channels, to serve as low temperature (75 °C) bonding adhesive and as etch mask during 300 µm deep HF etching of the Pyrex wafer. Due to the novel fabrication technology involving the dry film resist, it became possible to fabricate facing electrodes at the top and bottom of the channel and to apply electrical impedance sensing for particle detection with improved performance. The presented microchip is capable of dispensing liquid and detecting microparticles via impedance measurement. Single polystyrene particles of 10 µm size could be detected with a mean signal amplitude of 0.39  ±  0.13 V (n=439 ) at particle velocities of up to 9.6 mm s-1 inside the chip.

  4. Digital Platform for Wafer-Level MEMS Testing and Characterization Using Electrical Response

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Nuno; Ferreira, Carlos; Alves, Filipe; Cabral, Jorge; Gaspar, João; Monteiro, João; Rocha, Luís

    2016-01-01

    The uniqueness of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, with their multiphysics characteristics, presents some limitations to the borrowed test methods from traditional integrated circuits (IC) manufacturing. Although some improvements have been performed, this specific area still lags behind when compared to the design and manufacturing competencies developed over the last decades by the IC industry. A complete digital solution for fast testing and characterization of inertial sensors with built-in actuation mechanisms is presented in this paper, with a fast, full-wafer test as a leading ambition. The full electrical approach and flexibility of modern hardware design technologies allow a fast adaptation for other physical domains with minimum effort. The digital system encloses a processor and the tailored signal acquisition, processing, control, and actuation hardware control modules, capable of the structure position and response analysis when subjected to controlled actuation signals in real time. The hardware performance, together with the simplicity of the sequential programming on a processor, results in a flexible and powerful tool to evaluate the newest and fastest control algorithms. The system enables measurement of resonant frequency (Fr), quality factor (Q), and pull-in voltage (Vpi) within 1.5 s with repeatability better than 5 ppt (parts per thousand). A full-wafer with 420 devices under test (DUTs) has been evaluated detecting the faulty devices and providing important design specification feedback to the designers. PMID:27657087

  5. CMOS-MEMS Test-Key for Extracting Wafer-Level Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wan-Chun; Hu, Yuh-Chung; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the technologies of mechanical characterization of CMOS-MEMS devices, and presents a robust algorithm for extracting mechanical properties, such as Young’s modulus, and mean stress, through the external electrical circuit behavior of the micro test-key. An approximate analytical solution for the pull-in voltage of bridge-type test-key subjected to electrostatic load and initial stress is derived based on Euler’s beam model and the minimum energy method. Then one can use the aforesaid closed form solution of the pull-in voltage to extract the Young’s modulus and mean stress of the test structures. The test cases include the test-key fabricated by a TSMC 0.18 μm standard CMOS process, and the experimental results refer to Osterberg’s work on the pull-in voltage of single crystal silicone microbridges. The extracted material properties calculated by the present algorithm are valid. Besides, this paper also analyzes the robustness of this algorithm regarding the dimension effects of test-keys. This mechanical properties extracting method is expected to be applicable to the wafer-level testing in micro-device manufacture and compatible with the wafer-level testing in IC industry since the test process is non-destructive. PMID:23235449

  6. Wafer-level packaging with compression-controlled seal ring bonding

    DOEpatents

    Farino, Anthony J

    2013-11-05

    A device may be provided in a sealed package by aligning a seal ring provided on a first surface of a first semiconductor wafer in opposing relationship with a seal ring that is provided on a second surface of a second semiconductor wafer and surrounds a portion of the second wafer that contains the device. Forcible movement of the first and second wafer surfaces toward one another compresses the first and second seal rings against one another. A physical barrier against the movement, other than the first and second seal rings, is provided between the first and second wafer surfaces.

  7. Compressive uniaxially strained silicon on insulator by prestrained wafer bonding and layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Reiche, M.; Scholz, R.; Christiansen, S. H.; Gösele, U.

    2007-06-01

    Wafer level compressive uniaxially strained silicon on insulator is obtained by direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers in cylindrically curved state, followed by thinning one of the wafers using the smart-cut process. The mapping of the wafer bow demonstrates the uniaxial character of the strain induced by the cylindrical bending. The interfacial properties are investigated by infrared transmission imaging, scanning acoustic microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Raman spectroscopy is employed to determine the strain in the thin transferred layer as a function of radius of curvature of the initial bending.

  8. VLSI Implementation of a Bio-inspired Olfactory Spiking Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hung-Yi; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes a VLSI circuit implementing a low power, high-resolution spiking neural network (SNN) with STDP synapses, inspired by mammalian olfactory systems. By representing mitral cell action potential by a step function, the power consumption and the chip area can be reduced. By cooperating sub-threshold oscillation and inhibition, the network outputs can be distinct. This circuit was fabricated using the TSMC 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process. Post-layout simulation results are reported.

  9. A VLSI pipeline design of a fast prime factor DFT on a finite field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Shao, H. M.; Reed, I. S.; Shyu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    A conventional prime factor discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm is used to realize a discrete Fourier-like transform on the finite field, GF(q sub n). A pipeline structure is used to implement this prime factor DFT over GF(q sub n). This algorithm is developed to compute cyclic convolutions of complex numbers and to decode Reed-Solomon codes. Such a pipeline fast prime factor DFT algorithm over GF(q sub n) is regular, simple, expandable, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation. An example illustrating the pipeline aspect of a 30-point transform over GF(q sub n) is presented.

  10. Techniques for Computing the DFT Using the Residue Fermat Number Systems and VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.; Reed, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    The integer complex multiplier and adder over the direct sum of two copies of a finite field is specialized to the direct sum of the rings of integers modulo Fermat numbers. Such multiplications and additions can be used in the implementation of a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of a sequence of complex numbers. The advantage of the present approach is that the number of multiplications needed for the DFT can be reduced substantially over the previous approach. The architectural designs using this approach are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  11. Control of autonomous mobile robots using custom-designed qualitative reasoning VLSI chips and boards

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Pattay, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to provide a qualitative reasoning capability for the real-time control of autonomous mobile robots. The design and operation of these boards are described and an example of application of qualitative reasoning for the autonomous navigation of a mobile robot in a-priori unknown environments is presented. Results concerning consistency and modularity in the development of qualitative reasoning schemes as well as the general applicability of these techniques to robotic control domains are also discussed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  12. A VLSI architecture for performing finite field arithmetic with reduced table look-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new table look-up method for finding the log and antilog of finite field elements has been developed by N. Glover. In his method, the log and antilog of a field element is found by the use of several smaller tables. The method is based on a use of the Chinese Remainder Theorem. The technique often results in a significant reduction in the memory requirements of the problem. A VLSI architecture is developed for a special case of this new algorithm to perform finite field arithmetic including multiplication, division, and the finding of an inverse element in the finite field.

  13. Characterization of Boron Diffusion Phenomena According to the Specific Resistivity of N-Type Si Wafer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Choi, Chel-Jong; Park, Gye-Choon; Yang, O-Bong

    2016-02-01

    This paper is directed to characterize the boron diffusion process according to the specific resistivity of the Si wafer. N-type Si wafers were used with the specific resistivity of 0.5-3.2 omega-cm, 1.0-6.5 omega-cm and 2.0-8.0 omega-cm. The boron tribromide (BBr3) was used as boron source to create the PN junction on N-type Si wafer. The boron diffusion in N-type Si wafer was characterized by sheet resistance of wafer surface, secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements (SIMS) and surface life time analysis. The degree of boron diffusion was depended on the variation in specific resistivity and sheet resistance of the bare N-type Si wafer. The boron diffused N-Si wafer exhibited the average junction depth of 750 nm and boron concentration of 1 x 10(19). N-type Si wafer with the different specific resistance considerably affected the boron diffusion length and life time of Si wafer. It was found that the lifetime of boron diffused wafer was proportional to the sheet resistance and resistivity. However, optimization process may necessary to achieve the high efficiency through the high sheet resistance wafer, because the metallization process control is very sensitive.

  14. Optimization of wafer-back pressure profile in chemical mechanical planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tian-Shiang; Wang, Yao-Chen; Hu, Ian

    2008-11-01

    In chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a rotating wafer is pressed facedown against a rotating pad, while a slurry is dragged into the pad--wafer interface to assist in planarizing the wafer surface. Due to stress concentration, the interfacial contact stress near the wafer edge generally is much higher than that near the wafer center, resulting in spatially nonuniform material removal rate and hence imperfect planarity of the wafer surface. Here, integrating theories of fluid film lubrication and two-dimensional contact mechanics, we calculate the interfacial contact stress and slurry pressure distributions. In particular, the possibility of using a multizone wafer-back pressure profile to improve the contact stress uniformity is examined, by studying a practical case. The numerical results indicate that using a two-zone wafer-back pressure profile with optimized zonal sizes and pressures can increase the ``usable'' wafer surface area by as much as 12%. Using an optimized three- zone wafer-back pressure profile, however, does not much further increase the usable wafer surface area.

  15. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  16. JOINT RIGIDITY ASSESSMENT WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFERS AND ACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Angela C.; Maji, Arup K.

    2010-02-22

    There has been an interest in the development of rapid deployment satellites. In a modular satellite design, different panels of specific functions can be pre-manufactured. The satellite can then be assembled and tested just prior to deployment. Traditional vibration testing is time-consuming and expensive. An alternative test method to evaluate the connection between two plates will be proposed. The method investigated and described employs piezoelectric wafers to induce and sense lamb waves in two aluminum plates, which were joined by steel brackets to form an 'L-Style' joint. Lamb wave behavior and piezoelectric material properties will be discussed; the experimental setup and results will be presented. A set of 4 piezoelectric ceramic wafers were used alternately as source and sensor. The energy transmitted was shown to correlate with a mechanical assessment of the joint, demonstrating that this method of testing is a feasible and reliable way to inspect the rigidity of joints.

  17. Switchable static friction of piezoelectric composite—silicon wafer contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, D. A.; Fischer, H. R.; Groen, W. A.; van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale surface roughness of piezoelectric fiber composites can be manipulated by applying an electric field to a piezocomposite with a polished surface. In the absence of an applied voltage, the tips of the embedded piezoelectric ceramic fibers are below the surface of the piezocomposite and a silicon wafer counter surface rests solely on the matrix region of the piezocomposite surface. When actuated, the piezoelectric ceramic fibers protrude from the surface and the wafer rests solely on these protrusions. A threefold decrease in engineering static friction coefficient upon actuation of the piezocomposite was observed: from μ* = 1.65 to μ* = 0.50. These experimental results could be linked to the change in contact surface area and roughness using capillary adhesion theory, which relates the adhesive force to the number and size of the contacting asperities for the different surface states.

  18. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-15

    Circuits )Group 23 3 1. Introduction 3 IT. -’iMNOS Memory 3 ITT. ’TRestructurable VLSI-"-’) 4 IV. 4Silicon Processin~g, 4 Computer Systems - Group 28 ,6...1 II I I DIGITAL INTEGRATED CIRCUITS GROUP 23 I. INTRODUCTION Scaling experiments, linking technologies and the development of CMOS design rules are...chips where the on-chip decoding is bypassed. B. Megabit Design The design of a 1-megabit memory chip has been initiated. Several key improvements over

  19. Influence of the bonding front propagation on the wafer stack curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, E.; Bréchet, Y.; Barthelemy, A.; Radu, I.; Pardoen, T.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2014-08-11

    The influence of the dynamics of the direct wafer bonding process on the curvature of the final wafer stack is investigated. An analytical model for the final curvature of the bonded wafers is developed, as a function of the different load components acting during the bonding front propagation, using thin plate theory and considering a strain discontinuity locked at the bonding interface. Experimental profiles are measured for different bonding conditions and wafer thicknesses. A very good agreement with the model prediction is obtained and the influence of the thin air layer trapped in-between the two wafers is demonstrated. The proposed model contributes to further improvement of the bonding process, in particular, for the stacking of layers of electronic devices, which requires a high accuracy of wafer-to-wafer alignment and a very low distortion level.

  20. Technology mapping for hot-carrier reliability enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan; Koren, Israel

    1997-09-01

    As semiconductor devices enter the deep sub-micron era, reliability has become a major issue and challenge in VLSI design. Among all the failure mechanisms, hot-carrier effect is one of those which have the most significant impact on the long-term reliability of high-density VLSI circuits. In this paper, we address the problem of minimizing hot-carrier effect during the technology mapping stage of VLSI logic synthesis. We first present a logic-level hot-carrier model, and then, based on this model, we propose a technology mapping algorithm for hot-carrier effect minimization. The proposed algorithm has been implemented in the framework of the Berkeley logic optimization package SIS. Our results show that an average of 29. 1% decrease in hot-carrier effect can be achieved by carefully choosing logic gates from cell libraries to implement given logic functions for a set of benchmarks. It has also been observed that the best design for hot-carrier effect minimization does not necessarily coincide with the best design for low power, which has long been considered as a rough measure for VLSI reliability.

  1. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  2. 100-GHz Transistors from Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-M.; Dimitrakopoulos, C.; Jenkins, K. A.; Farmer, D. B.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Grill, A.; Avouris, Ph.

    2010-02-01

    The high carrier mobility of graphene has been exploited in field-effect transistors that operate at high frequencies. Transistors were fabricated on epitaxial graphene synthesized on the silicon face of a silicon carbide wafer, achieving a cutoff frequency of 100 gigahertz for a gate length of 240 nanometers. The high-frequency performance of these epitaxial graphene transistors exceeds that of state-of-the-art silicon transistors of the same gate length.

  3. Reticle and wafer CD variation for different dummy pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, GuoXiang; Buergel, Christian; Ackmann, Paul; Staples, Marc; Thamm, Thomas; Lim, Chin Teong; Leschok, Andre; Roling, Stefan; Zhou, Anthony; Gn, Fang Hong; Richter, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Dummy pattern fill is added to a layout of a reticle for the purpose of raising the pattern-density of specific regions. The pattern-density has also an influence on different process-steps which were performed when manufacturing a reticle (e.g. proximity effect of electron beam exposure process, developer, and etch-processes). Although the reticle processes are set up to compensate the influence of the pattern density, dummy pattern can have an influence onto the reticle CD. When the isolated features become "nested" by insertion of dummy pattern, the reticle CD variation is even larger because nested features exacerbate the proximity effect of an electron beam. Another reason is that the etch ratio as well as the develop dynamics during the reticle manufacturing process are slightly dependent on the local pattern-density of pattern. With different dummy pattern around the main feature, the final reticle CD will be changed. Wafer CD of main feature is also dependant on the surrounding patterns which will induce different boundary conditions for wafer exposure. We have investigated three manufacturing sites for a 28nm first-metal layer reticle. Two of them were manufactured with a comparable process using the same advanced reticle binary blank material. For the third site a different reticle blank material with a relatively thin absorber layer thickness was used which was made with a comparable reticle process. The optical proximity correction (OPC) test patterns were designed with two different dummy patterns. The CD differences of the three reticles will be demonstrated for different dummy pattern and will be discussed individually. All three reticles have been exposed and the respective wafer critical dimension through pitch (CDTP) and linearity performance is demonstrated. Also the line-end performance for two dimensional (2D) structures is shown for the three sites of the reticle. The wafer CD difference for CDTP, linearity, and 2D structures are also

  4. Wafer-scale plasmonic and photonic crystal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. C.; Liu, J.-N.; Farhang, A.; Williamson, B.; Black, M.; Wangensteen, T.; Fraser, J.; Petrova, R.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2015-08-01

    200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, metrology, and optical modeling results are reviewed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on 2-D metallic nano-dome and nano-hole arrays (NHA's) as well as 1-D photonic crystal sensors based on a leaky-waveguide mode resonance effect, with potential applications in label free sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). Potential markets include micro-arrays for medical diagnostics, forensic testing, environmental monitoring, and food safety. 1-D and 2-D nanostructures were fabricated on glass, fused silica, and silicon wafers using optical lithography and semiconductor processing techniques. Wafer-scale optical metrology results are compared to FDTD modeling and presented along with application-based performance results, including label-free plasmonic and photonic crystal sensing of both surface binding kinetics and bulk refractive index changes. In addition, SEFS and SERS results are presented for 1-D photonic crystal and 2-D metallic nano-array structures. Normal incidence transmittance results for a 550 nm pitch NHA showed good bulk refractive index sensitivity, however an intensity-based design with 665 nm pitch was chosen for use as a compact, label-free sensor at both 650 and 632.8 nm wavelengths. The optimized NHA sensor gives an SPR shift of about 480 nm per refractive index unit when detecting a series of 0-40% glucose solutions, but according to modeling shows about 10 times greater surface sensitivity when operating at 532 nm. Narrow-band photonic crystal resonance sensors showed quality factors over 200, with reasonable wafer-uniformity in terms of both resonance position and peak height.

  5. Towards reduced impact of EUV mask defectivity on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Van den Heuvel, D.; Pacco, A.; Pollentier, I.; Baudemprez, B.; Jehoul, C.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.

    2014-07-01

    The defectivity challenges of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks, that need to be addressed before production readiness of EUV lithography is assured from the mask perspective, are twofold. First, the EUV-specific defect type relating to the multi-layer (ML) mirror, the so-called ML-defects, require to become more detectable than they are printable. This not only requires proven capability of blank inspection, but also the existence of satisfactory printability mitigation strategies (comprising avoidance, pattern shift methodology, compensation repair). Both these assets need to become available within the mask supply chain, as there is little that can still be done about such residual defects at the wafer fab. In a production phase, finding unexpected printing ML-defects is unacceptable. It is shown how the specific way-of-working in use at imec, starting from the printed wafer, contributes to related learning and identification of remaining gaps, in getting this issue fully dealt with. The second challenge relates to particle contamination during use of the reticle at the wafer fab. Avoiding overlaycritical particles on the backside of NXE3100 reticles is facilitated by the established way-of-working. Minimizing the occurrence of particles "hopping" between reticles via the electrostatic clamp of the scanner (so-called clamp-traveling particles) is a major driver for appropriate mask cleaning. The latter may not have negative impact by frequent use, in view of the highly vulnerable EUV mask stack, and especially for the present "black-border" solution in which the ML is etched away at the image border on the reticle. A lot of effort is spent into monitoring of NXE3100 reticles for particle adders on the pattern side. This is realized by comparing past and present mask defect maps obtained by inspection of printed wafers with subsequent repeater analysis.

  6. Production of Optical Quality Free Standing Diamond Wafer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-19

    Title : Production of Optical Quality Free Standing Diamond Wafer Prime Contractor : Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, Ca 94568...www.onyxoptics.com Program Manager : Helmuth Meissner Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, CA 94568 Email: hmeissner@onyxoptics.com Ph: 925...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, Ca 94568 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  7. Method for making circular tubular channels with two silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.; Hui, W.C.

    1996-11-19

    A two-wafer microcapillary structure is fabricated by depositing boron nitride (BN) or silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) on two separate silicon wafers (e.g., crystal-plane silicon with [100] or [110] crystal orientation). Photolithography is used with a photoresist to create exposed areas in the deposition for plasma etching. A slit entry through to the silicon is created along the path desired for the ultimate microcapillary. Acetone is used to remove the photoresist. An isotropic etch, e.g., such as HF/HNO{sub 3}/CH{sub 3}COOH, then erodes away the silicon through the trench opening in the deposition layer. A channel with a half-circular cross section is then formed in the silicon along the line of the trench in the deposition layer. Wet etching is then used to remove the deposition layer. The two silicon wafers are aligned and then bonded together face-to-face to complete the microcapillary. 11 figs.

  8. Method for making circular tubular channels with two silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.; Hui, Wing C.

    1996-01-01

    A two-wafer microcapillary structure is fabricated by depositing boron nitride (BN) or silicon nitride (Si.sub.3 N.sub.4) on two separate silicon wafers (e.g., crystal-plane silicon with [100] or [110] crystal orientation). Photolithography is used with a photoresist to create exposed areas in the deposition for plasma etching. A slit entry through to the silicon is created along the path desired for the ultimate microcapillary. Acetone is used to remove the photoresist. An isotropic etch, e.g., such as HF/HNO.sub.3 /CH.sub.3 COOH, then erodes away the silicon through the trench opening in the deposition layer. A channel with a half-circular cross section is then formed in the silicon along the line of the trench in the deposition layer. Wet etching is then used to remove the deposition layer. The two silicon wafers are aligned and then bonded together face-to-face to complete the microcapillary.

  9. Novel analytical methods for the characterization of oral wafers.

    PubMed

    Garsuch, Verena; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2009-09-01

    This study aims at compensating the lack of adequate methods for the characterization of the novel dosage forms buccal wafers by applying recent advanced analytical techniques. Fast-dissolving oral wafers need special methods for assessing their properties in drug development and quality control. For morphologic investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) were used. Differences in the distribution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient within wafers can be depicted by NIR-CI. Film thickness was determined by micrometer screw and coating thickness gauge revealing no significant differences between the obtained values. To distinguish between the mechanical properties of different polymers, tensile test was performed. Suitable methods to predict disintegration behaviour are thermomechanical analysis and contact angle measurement. The determination of drug release was carried out by three different methods. Fibre-optic sensor systems allow an online measurement of the drug release profiles and the thorough analysis even within the first seconds of disintegration and drug dissolution.

  10. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-10-07

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing.

  11. Wafer-scale aluminum plasmonics for fluorescence based biodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Arash; George, Matthew C.; Williamson, Brent; Black, Mike; Wangensteen, Ted; Fraser, James; Petrova, Rumyana; Prestgard, Kent

    2015-08-01

    Moxtek has leveraged existing capabilities in wafer-scale patterning of sub-wavelength wire grid polarizers into the fabrication of 1D and 2D periodic aluminum plasmonic structures. This work will discuss progress in 200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, with detailed emphasis within the realm of microarray based fluorescence detection. Aluminum nanohole arrays in a hexagonal lattice are first numerically investigated. The nanohole array geometry and periodicity are specifically tuned to coincide both with the excitation of the fluorophore Cy3, and to provide a high field enhancement within the nanoholes where labeled biomolecules are captured. This is accomplished through numerical modelling, nanofabrication, SEM imaging, and optical characterization. A 200mm diameter wafer, patterned with the optically optimized nanohole array, is cut into standard 1x3 inch microscope slide pieces and then subsequently printed with various antigens at 9 different concentrations. A sandwich bioassay is then carried out, using the corresponding conjugate antibodies in order to demonstrate specificity. The nanohole array exhibit a 3-4 times total fluorescence enhancement of Cy3, when compared to a leading commercial microarray glass slide.

  12. Wettability investigating on the wet etching textured multicrystalline silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangju; Niu, Yuchao; Zhai, Tongguang; Ma, Yuying; Zhen, Yongtai; Ma, Xiaoyu; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the wettability properties of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si), the different surface structures were fabricated on the as-cut p-type multi-wire slurry sawn mc-Si wafers, such as as-cut, polished and etched in various acid solutions. The contact angles and the XRD spectra of these samples were measured. It was noted that both the surface structures and the use of surfactant, such as Tween 80, made a stronger effect on wettability of the Si wafer. Due to the lipophilic groups of Tween 80 combined with the Si atoms while the hydrophilic groups of it were outward, a lipophilic surface of Si changed into a hydrophilic one and the rougher the surface, the stronger the hydrophily. Thus, it is feasible to add an appropriate surfactant into the etching solution during black-Si wafer fabrication for solar cells. In addition, different crystal plains of Si had different dangling bond density, so that their surface energies were different. A surface with higher surface energy could attract more water atoms and its wettability was better. However, the effect of crystal plain on the surface wettability was much weaker than surface morphology.

  13. Characterization and mitigation of overlay error on silicon wafers with nonuniform stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, T.; Menon, V.; Wong, C.; Felix, N.; Pike, M.; Gluschenkov, O.; Belyansky, M.; Vukkadala, P.; Veeraraghavan, S.; Klein, S.; Hoo, C. H.; Sinha, J.

    2014-03-01

    Process-induced overlay errors are a growing problem in meeting the ever-tightening overlay requirements for integrated circuit production. While uniform process-induced stress is easily corrected, non-uniform stress across the wafer is much more problematic, often resulting in non-correctable overlay errors. Measurements of the wafer geometry of free, unchucked wafers give a powerful method for characterization of such non-uniform stress. We will describe a Patterned Wafer Geometry (PWG) tool, which uses optical methods to measure the geometry of in-process wafers. PWG data can be related to In-Plane Distortion (IPD) of the wafer through the PIR (Predicted IPD Residual) metric. This paper will explore the relationship between the PIR data and measured overlay data on Engineered Stress Monitor (ESM) wafers containing various designed stress variations. The process used to fabricate ESM wafers is quite versatile and can mimic many different stress variation signatures. For this study, ESM wafers were built with strong across-wafer stress variation and another ESM wafer set was built with strong intrafield stress variation. IPD was extensively characterized in two different ways: using standard overlay error metrology and using PWG metrology. Strong correlation is observed between these two independent sets of data, indicating that the PIR metric is able to clearly see wafer distortions. We have taken another step forward by using PIR data from the PWG tool to correct process-induced overlay error by feedforward to the exposure tool, a novel method that we call PWG-FF. We conclude that appropriate wafer geometry measurements of in-process wafers have strong potential to characterize and reduce process-induced overlay errors.

  14. Spacecraft on-board SAR processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Arens, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the on-board SAR processing technology for Eos-type missions. The proposed Eos SAR sensor and flight data system are introduced, and the SAR processing requirements are described. The SAR on-board SAR processor architecture selection is discussed, and a baseline processor architecture using a frequency-domain processor for range correlation and a modular fault-tolerant VLSI time-domain parallel array for azimuth correlation are described. The mass storage and VLSI technologies needed for implementing the proposed SAR processing are assessed. It is shown that acceptable processor power and mass characteristics should be feasible for Eos-type applications. A proposed development strategy for the on-board SAR processor is presented.

  15. Bulk Laser Material Modification: Towards a Kerfless Laser Wafering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBeau, James

    Due to the ever increasing relevance of finer machining control as well as necessary reduction in material waste by large area semiconductor device manufacturers, a novel bulk laser machining method was investigated. Because the cost of silicon and sapphire substrates are limiting to the reduction in cost of devices in both the light emitting diode (LED) and solar industries, and the present substrate wafering process results in >50% waste, the need for an improved ingot wafering technique exists. The focus of this work is the design and understanding of a novel semiconductor wafering technique that utilizes the nonlinear absorption properties of band-gapped materials to achieve bulk (subsurface) morphological changes in matter using highly focused laser light. A method and tool was designed and developed to form controlled damage regions in the bulk of a crystalline sapphire wafer leaving the surfaces unaltered. The controllability of the subsurface damage geometry was investigated, and the effect of numerical aperture of the focusing optic, energy per pulse, wavelength, and number of pulses was characterized for a nanosecond pulse length variable wavelength Nd:YAG OPO laser. A novel model was developed to describe the geometry of laser induced morphological changes in the bulk of semiconducting materials for nanosecond pulse lengths. The beam propagation aspect of the model was based on ray-optics, and the full Keldysh multiphoton photoionization theory in conjuncture with Thornber's and Drude's models for impact ionization were used to describe high fluence laser light absorption and carrier generation ultimately resulting in permanent material modification though strong electron-plasma absorption and plasma melting. Although the electron-plasma description of laser damage formation is usually reserved for extremely short laser pulses (<20 ps), this work shows that it can be adapted for longer pulses of up to tens of nanoseconds. In addition to a model

  16. Fault tolerance through reconfiguration in VLSI and WSI arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, R.; Sami, M.G.; Stefanelli, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the research in fault tolerance. The authors focus in particular on reconfiguration techniques and present their results in the reconfiguration of processing arrays. Contents include: Introduction; Typical Processing Arrays; Failure Mechanisms and Fault Models; Basic Problems of Fault-Tolerance Through Array Configuration; Technologies Supporting Reconfiguration; Testing; Reconfiguration: An Introduction; The Diogenes Approach; Reconfiguration for Linear Arrays; Graph-Theoretical Approaches to Reconfiguration; Local Reconfiguration; Global Reconfiguration Techniques: Row/Column Elimination; Global Mapping: Index Mapping Reconfiguration Techniques; Reconfiguration Based on Request-Acknowledge Local Protocols; Reconfiguration of Multiple-Pipeline Structures; Some Extensions Toward Time-Redundancy; Appendix: Reliability Prediction of Arrays.

  17. A VLSI Architecture for Output Probability Computations of HMM-Based Recognition Systems with Store-Based Block Parallel Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Takagi, Naofumi

    In this paper, a fast and memory-efficient VLSI architecture for output probability computations of continuous Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) is presented. These computations are the most time-consuming part of HMM-based recognition systems. High-speed VLSI architectures with small registers and low-power dissipation are required for the development of mobile embedded systems with capable human interfaces. We demonstrate store-based block parallel processing (StoreBPP) for output probability computations and present a VLSI architecture that supports it. When the number of HMM states is adequate for accurate recognition, compared with conventional stream-based block parallel processing (StreamBPP) architectures, the proposed architecture requires fewer registers and processing elements and less processing time. The processing elements used in the StreamBPP architecture are identical to those used in the StoreBPP architecture. From a VLSI architectural viewpoint, a comparison shows the efficiency of the proposed architecture through efficient use of registers for storing input feature vectors and intermediate results during computation.

  18. The optimization of FA/O barrier slurry with respect to removal rate selectivity on patterned Cu wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2016-02-01

    Because the polishing of different materials is required in barrier chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes, the development of a kind of barrier slurry with improved removal rate selectivity for Cu/barrier/TEOS would reduce erosion and dishing defects on patterned Cu wafers. In this study, we developed a new benzotriazole-free barrier slurry named FA/O barrier slurry, containing 20 mL/L of the chelating agent FA/O, 5 mL/L surfactant, and a 1:5 concentration of abrasive particles. By controlling the polishing slurry ingredients, the removal rate of different materials could be controlled. For process integration considerations, the effect of the FA/O barrier slurry on the dielectric layer of the patterned Cu wafer was investigated. After CMP processing by the FA/O barrier slurry, the characteristics of the dielectric material were tested. The results showed that the dielectric characteristics met demands for industrial production. The current leakage was of pA scale. The resistance and capacitance were 2.4 kω and 2.3 pF, respectively. The dishing and erosion defects were both below 30 nm in size. CMP-processed wafers using this barrier slurry could meet industrial production demands. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. F2012202094), and the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226).

  19. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Daix, N. Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  20. Sensor-based driving of a car with fuzzy inferencing VLSI chips and boards

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses the sensor-based driving of a car in a-priori unknown environments using ``human-like`` reasoning schemes. The schemes are implemented on custom-designed VLSI fuzzy inferencing boards and are used to investigate two control modes for driving a car on the basis of very sparse and imprecise range data. In the first mode, the car navigates fully autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver`s aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up, slow down, stop, or back up depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor channels to perceive the environment. Sample results are presented which illustrate the feasibility of developing autonomous navigation systems and robust safety enhancing driver`s aid using the new fuzzy inferencing VLSI hardware and ``human-like`` reasoning schemes.

  1. Digital-Analog-Hybrid Neural Simulator: A Design-Aid For Custom-VLSI Neurochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moopenn, Alexander W.; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Duong, Tuan A.

    1989-05-01

    A high speed neural network simulator and its use for the dynamics and performance analysis of feedback neural architectures are described. The simulator is based on a semi-parallel, analog-digital hybrid architecture which utilizes digital memories to store synaptic weights and analog hardware for high speed computation. A breadboard system with 8-bit gray scale synapses, designed and built at JPL, is successfully serving as a valuable design test-bed for the development of fully parallel, analog, custom VLSI neurochips, currently underway at JPL. The breadboard hybrid simulator indeed allows a detailed evaluation of hardware potential and limitations in implementing full analog operations in such chips. As an example, the paper presents an analysis of the stability and convergence behavior of a feedback neural network applied to the "Concentrator Assignment Problem" in combinatorial optimization, as studied on the analog-digital hybrid simulator. This has already resulted in a VLSI custom design of a fully parallel, analog neuroprocessor with a powerful "analog prompting" feature, for the high-speed, multiparameter optimization function.

  2. VLSI floorplan repair using dynamic white-space management, constraint graphs, and linear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorwerk, Kristoffer; Kennings, Andrew; Anjos, Miguel

    2008-06-01

    In VLSI layout, floorplanning refers to the task of placing macrocells on a chip without overlap while minimizing design objectives such as timing, congestion, and wire length. Experienced VLSI designers have traditionally been able to produce more efficient floorplans than automated methods. However, with the increasing complexity of modern circuits, manual design flows have become infeasible. An efficient top-down strategy for overlap removal which repairs overlaps in floorplans produced by placement algorithms or rough floorplanning methodologies is presented in this article. The algorithmic framework proposed incorporates a novel geometric shifting technique coupled with topological constraint graphs and linear programming within a top-down flow. The effectiveness of this framework is quantified across a broad range of floorplans produced by multiple tools. The method succeeds in producing valid placements in almost all cases; moreover, compared with leading methods, it requires only one-fifth of the run-time and produces placements with 4-13% less wire length and up to 43% less cell movement.

  3. Parallel algorithms for placement and routing in VLSI design. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brouwer, Randall Jay

    1991-01-01

    The computational requirements for high quality synthesis, analysis, and verification of very large scale integration (VLSI) designs have rapidly increased with the fast growing complexity of these designs. Research in the past has focused on the development of heuristic algorithms, special purpose hardware accelerators, or parallel algorithms for the numerous design tasks to decrease the time required for solution. Two new parallel algorithms are proposed for two VLSI synthesis tasks, standard cell placement and global routing. The first algorithm, a parallel algorithm for global routing, uses hierarchical techniques to decompose the routing problem into independent routing subproblems that are solved in parallel. Results are then presented which compare the routing quality to the results of other published global routers and which evaluate the speedups attained. The second algorithm, a parallel algorithm for cell placement and global routing, hierarchically integrates a quadrisection placement algorithm, a bisection placement algorithm, and the previous global routing algorithm. Unique partitioning techniques are used to decompose the various stages of the algorithm into independent tasks which can be evaluated in parallel. Finally, results are presented which evaluate the various algorithm alternatives and compare the algorithm performance to other placement programs. Measurements are presented on the parallel speedups available.

  4. Indium Zinc Oxide Mediated Wafer Bonding for III-V/Si Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamboli, Adele C.; Essig, Stephanie; Horowitz, Kelsey A. W.; Woodhouse, Michael; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Norman, Andrew G.; Steiner, Myles A.; Stradins, Paul

    2015-06-14

    Silicon-based tandem solar cells are desirable as a high efficiency, economically viable approach to one sun or low concentration photovoltaics. We present an approach to wafer bonded III-V/Si solar cells using amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) as an interlayer. We investigate the impact of a heavily doped III-V contact layer on the electrical and optical properties of bonded test samples, including the predicted impact on tandem cell performance. We present economic modeling which indicates that the path to commercial viability for bonded cells includes developing low-cost III-V growth and reducing constraints on material smoothness. If these challenges can be surmounted, bonded tandems on Si can be cost-competitive with incumbent PV technologies, especially in low concentration, single axis tracking systems.

  5. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication

    PubMed Central

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80–100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes. PMID:28145513

  6. Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors in Lamb Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2012-07-01

    Recent advancements in sensors and information technologies have resulted in new methods for structural health monitoring (SHM) of the performance and deterioration of structures. The enabling element is the piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS). This paper presents an introduction to PWAS transducers and their applications in Lamb wave-based SHM. We begin by reviewing the fundamentals of piezoelectric intelligent materials. Then, the mechanism of using PWAS transducers as Lamb wave transmitters and receivers is presented. PWAS interact with the host structure through the shear-lag model. Lamb wave mode tuning can be achieved by judicious combination of PWAS dimensions, frequency value, and Lamb mode characteristics. Finally, use of PWAS Lamb wave SHM for damage detection on plate-like aluminum structures is addressed. Examples of using PWAS phased array scanning, quantitative crack detection with array imaging, and quantitative corrosion detection are given.

  7. A high aspect ratio silicon-fin FinFET fabricated upon SOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Yue-Gie; Liao, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Mu-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Zhou, Bin; Gu, Haoshuang; Li, Deshi; Zou, Xuecheng

    2016-12-01

    Three dimensional (3-D) FinFET devices with an ultra-high Si-fin aspect ratio (Height/Width = 82.9 nm/8.6 nm) have been developed after integrating a 14 Å nitrided gate oxide upon the silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers through an advanced CMOS logic platform. The drive current (ION), off current (IOFF), subthreshold swing (SS), drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and transistor gate delay of 30 nm gate length (Lg) of FinFETs illustrate the promising device performance. The TCAD simulations demonstrate that both threshold voltage (Vth) and off current can be adjusted appropriately through the full silicidation (FUSI) of CoSi2 gate engineering. Moreover, the drive currents of n- and p-channel FinFETs are able to be further enhanced once applying the raised Source/Drain (S/D) approach technology for reducing the S/D resistance drastically.

  8. Wafer scale millimeter-wave integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene in high data rate communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibpour, Omid; He, Zhongxia Simon; Strupinski, Wlodek; Rorsman, Niklas; Zirath, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the demand for high data rate wireless communications has increased dramatically, which requires larger bandwidth to sustain multi-user accessibility and quality of services. This can be achieved at millimeter wave frequencies. Graphene is a promising material for the development of millimeter-wave electronics because of its outstanding electron transport properties. Up to now, due to the lack of high quality material and process technology, the operating frequency of demonstrated circuits has been far below the potential of graphene. Here, we present monolithic integrated circuits based on epitaxial graphene operating at unprecedented high frequencies (80–100 GHz). The demonstrated circuits are capable of encoding/decoding of multi-gigabit-per-second information into/from the amplitude or phase of the carrier signal. The developed fabrication process is scalable to large wafer sizes.

  9. Evolution of the MOS transistor - From conception to VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Chih-Tang

    1988-10-01

    Historical developments of the MOSFET during the last 60 years are reviewed, from the 1928 patent disclosures of the field-effect conductivity modulation concept and the semiconductor triode structures proposed by Lilienfeld to the 1947 Shockley-originated efforts which led to the laboratory demonstration of the modern silicon MOSFET in 1960. A survey is then made of the milestones of the past 30 years leading to the latest submicron silicon logic CMOS and BICMOS (bipolar-junction transistor CMOS combined) arrays and the three-dimensional and ferroelectric extensions of Dennard's one-transistor DRAM cell. The status of the submicron lithographic technologies is summarized. Future trends of memory cell density and logic gate speed are projected. Comparisons of the switching speed of the silicon MOSFET with that of silicon bipolar and GaAs FETs are reviewed.

  10. Energy aware VLSI architectures for mobile video applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Tarek Khaled

    The increased concern for energy aware system design has kept pace with current practices among circuit and system engineers like never before. The big thrusts for this concern are the excessive heat generation and the corresponding expensive cooling techniques, the devices reliability problems due to increased temperatures, and most importantly, the incapability of battery technology to supply systems with the anticipated amounts of energy, especially for portable devices. Multimedia applications, which are data-intensive applications, play a chief role in the wireless revolution, and the key requirements for the success of systems supporting multimedia applications will be suitable transmission/storage bandwidths and system power consumption. In this work, these two issues are addressed. A new DCT-based Algorithm, Coefficient Elimination, is proposed and implemented with three DCT architectures: NEDA, Direct-DCT, and LP-DCT. Simulation results show that this algorithm can reduce the DCT energy dissipation by 26--60%. In addition, new algorithms, Dynamic Profiling, are proposed for Low Bit-Rate video coding. Unlike many of the available LBR techniques, this technique is suitable for mobile devices with reduced sources such as computing power and energy resources. These algorithms not only outperform coarse quantization technique, but also result in a low energy implementation of the decoder where IQ-IDCT operations are replaced by simple buffer accessing operation.

  11. Laser-assisted removal of particles on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecke, G.; Röhr, E.; Heyns, M. M.

    1999-04-01

    Laser cleaning is one of the new promising dry cleaning techniques considered by semiconductor companies to replace wet cleans in the near future. A dry laser cleaning tool was tested that uses an inert gas jet to remove particles lifted off by the action of a DUV excimer laser. A model was developed to simulate the cleaning process and analyze the influence of experimental parameters on laser cleaning efficiency. The best cleaning efficiencies obtained with 1.0 μm SiO2, ˜0.3 μm Si3N4, and 0.3 μm SiO2 particles deposited on Si wafers were 84±8%, 33±4%, and 12±7%, respectively. This is in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations showing the existence of a size threshold for the removal of nonabsorbing particles by dry laser cleaning. Among the process parameters tested to optimize the process efficiency, fluence showed the highest influence on removal efficiency, before the number of laser pulses and the laser repetition rate. The use of high fluences was limited by the damaging of the wafer surface, which was not homogeneous on a macroscopic scale. The optimum number of laser pulses per unit area depended on the type of particle. The laser repetition rate had no significant influence on cleaning efficiency and can be used to reduce process time. The influence of capillary condensation on the process was demonstrated by the higher removal efficiency of 0.3 μm SiO2 and Si3N4 particles, 88±6% and 78%, respectively, upon exposure of wafers to air saturated with moisture prior to laser processing. This was attributed to the explosive evaporation of capillary condensed water, similar to the mechanism proposed for liquid assisted laser cleaning.

  12. Addressable Inverter Matrix Tests Integrated-Circuit Wafer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing elements indirectly through shift register reduces number of test probes. With aid of new technique, complex test structure on silicon wafer tested with relatively small number of test probes. Conserves silicon area by reduction of area devoted to pads. Allows thorough evaluation of test structure characteristics and of manufacturing process parameters. Test structure consists of shift register and matrix of inverter/transmission-gate cells connected to two-by-ten array of probe pads. Entire pattern contained in square area having only 1.6-millimeter sides. Shift register is conventional static CMOS device using inverters and transmission gates in master/slave D flip-flop configuration.

  13. Characterization of wafer charging mechanisms and oxide survival prediction methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszek, W.; Dixon, W.; Vella, M.; Messick, C.; Reno, S.; Shideler, J.

    1994-04-01

    Unipolar, EEPROM-based peak potential sensors and current sensors have been used to characterize the I-V relationship of charging transients which devices normally experience during the course of ion implantation. The results indicate that the charging sources may appear to behave like current-sources or voltage-sources, depending on the impedance of the load. This behavior may be understood in terms of plasma concepts. The ability to empirically characterize the I-V characteristics of charging sources using the CHARM-2 monitor wafers opens the way for prediction of failure rates of oxides subjected to specific processes, if the oxide Q{sub bd} distributions are known.

  14. Comparison of floating gate neural network memory cells in standard VLSI CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Durfee, D A; Shoucair, F S

    1992-01-01

    Several floating gate MOSFET structures, for potential use as analog memory elements in neural networks, have been fabricated in a standard 2 mum double-polysilicon CMOS process. Their physical and programming characteristics are compared with each other and with similar structures reported in the literature. None of the circuits under consideration require special fabrication techniques. The criteria used to determine the structure most suitable for neural network memory applications include the symmetry of charging and discharging characteristics, programming voltage magnitudes, the area required, and the effectiveness of geometric field enhancement techniques. This work provides a layout for an analog neural network memory based on previously unexplored criteria and results. The authors have found that the best designs (a) use the poly1 to poly2 oxide for injection; (b) need not utilize ;field enhancement' techniques; (c) use poly1 to diffusion oxide for a coupling capacitor; and (d) size capacitor ratios to provide a wide range of possible programming voltages.

  15. Design criteria of low-power low-noise charge amplifiers in VLSI bipolar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuccio, G.; Fasoli, L.; Sampietro, M.

    1997-10-01

    The criteria underlying the design of low-noise front-end integrated electronics for radiation and particle detectors have been determined, taking into account the limits in the allowable power dissipation. The analysis specifically treats integrated amplifiers employing silicon bipolar transistors, whose performance has been studied to highlight the ultimate noise limit and the roles of the front-end device parameters such as the current gain, the base spreading resistance, the junction and diffusion capacitances, the transition frequency, and the device geometry. The relationships existing among the power dissipated in the front-end stage, the noise performance, and the characteristic of signal processing are derived.

  16. Bulk CMOS VLSI Technology Studies. Part 4. Design of a CMOS Microsequencer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    microcontroller including suggestions to modify the present microsequencer so that it fits into a redesigned microcontroller . I would like to acknowledge the...53 CHAPTER 4. FUNCTIONAL TESTING OF TIE MICROSEQUENCER... 64 CHAPTER S. A NEXT GENERATION MICROCONTROLLER ............ 69 APPENDIX A. FUNCTIONAL...at the end of the code to chock if the output becomes zero. 69 CHAPTER 5 A NEXT GENERATION MICROCONTROLLER The miorosequencer chip discussed so far

  17. Selected applications of photothermal and photoluminescence heterodyne techniques for process control in silicon wafer manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, Andreas; Kerstan, Michael; Lundt, Holger; Huber, Anton; Helmreich, Dieter; Geiler, Hans-Dieter; Karge, Harald; Wagner, Matthias

    1997-02-01

    Two noncontact laser-based heterodyne techniques, photothermal heterodyne (PTH) and photoluminescence heterodyne (PLH), are introduced and applied to processing and quality control in silicon wafer manufacturing. The crystallographic characteristics of process-induced defects in silicon wafers are suitable for the application of PTH and PLH techniques, which are demonstrated on selected examples from different steps of silicon wafer production. Both PLH and PTH techniques meet the demand for nondestructive and on-line-suitable measurement in the semiconductor industry.

  18. Ambient condition laser writing of graphene structures on polycrystalline SiC thin film deposited on Si wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Tsu, Raphael

    2013-02-18

    We report laser induced local conversion of polycrystalline SiC thin-films grown on Si wafers into multi-layer graphene, a process compatible with the Si based microelectronic technologies. The conversion can be achieved using a 532 nm CW laser with as little as 10 mW power, yielding {approx}1 {mu}m graphene discs without any mask. The conversion conditions are found to vary with the crystallinity of the film. More interestingly, the internal structure of the graphene disc, probed by Raman imaging, can be tuned with varying the film and illumination parameters, resembling either the fundamental or doughnut mode of a laser beam.

  19. Ambient condition laser writing of graphene structures on polycrystalline SiC thin film deposited on Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Tsu, Raphael

    2013-02-01

    We report laser induced local conversion of polycrystalline SiC thin-films grown on Si wafers into multi-layer graphene, a process compatible with the Si based microelectronic technologies. The conversion can be achieved using a 532 nm CW laser with as little as 10 mW power, yielding ˜1 μm graphene discs without any mask. The conversion conditions are found to vary with the crystallinity of the film. More interestingly, the internal structure of the graphene disc, probed by Raman imaging, can be tuned with varying the film and illumination parameters, resembling either the fundamental or doughnut mode of a laser beam.

  20. Optical characterization of double-side-textured silicon wafer based on photonic nanostructures for thin-wafer crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Furuta, Daichi; Aonuma, Osamu; Takahashi, Isao; Hoshi, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Usami, Noritaka

    2017-04-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers have found extensive use in photovoltaic applications. In this regard, to enable advanced light manipulation in thin-wafer c-Si solar cells, we demonstrate the fabrication of double-side-textured Si wafers composed of a front-surface photonic nanotexture fabricated with quantum dot arrays and a rear-surface microtexture. The addition of the rear-surface microtexture to a Si wafer with the front-surface photonic nanotexture increases the wafer’s optical absorption in the near-infrared region, thus enabling enhanced light trapping. Excitation spectroscopy reveals that the photoluminescence intensity in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture is higher than that in the Si wafer without the rear-surface microtexture, thus indicating an increase in true optical absorption in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture. Our results indicate that the double-sided textures, i.e., the front-surface photonic nanotexture and rear-surface microtexture, can effectively reduce the surface reflection loss and provide enhanced light trapping, respectively.

  1. Fabrication of micro-nano composite textured surface for slurry sawn mc-Si wafers cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y. C.; liu, Z.; Ren, X. K.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, H. T.; Jiang, Y. S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to enhance the PV efficiency of the cell made from slurry sawn (SS) mc-Si wafers, using a Ag-assisted electroless etching (AgNO3+HF+H2O2) combined with an auxiliary etching (HF+HNO3) the RENA textured SS mc-Si wafers (called as RENA wafers) were further textured (nano pores were formed on the original micro pits) to change into micro-nano composite textured wafers (called as MN-RENA wafers). The solar cells made from the MN-RENA wafers had a better PV efficiency than that of RENA wafers. This is mainly attributed to the higher light-trapping of the micro-nano composite texture. The nano size texture enhanced the light-trap of wafer surface and, at the same time, the micro size texture maintained the light-trap uniformity of different gains of RENA wafer. However, there still exist a potential for optimization, such as, the SiNx passviation coating should be improved to be deposited more uniformly in order to passivate the bottom of pits better and to reduce the reflectance of the obtuse tips of pits.

  2. Improved quality control of silicon wafers using novel off-line air pocket image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Sanna, M. Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Air pockets (APK) occur randomly in Czochralski (Cz) grown silicon (Si) crystals and may become included in wafers after slicing and polishing. Previously the only APK of interest were those that intersected the front surface of the wafer and therefore directly impacted device yield. However mobile and other electronics have placed new demands on wafers to be internally APK-free for reasons of thermal management and packaging yield. We present a novel, recently patented, APK image processing technique and demonstrate the use of that technique, off-line, to improve quality control during wafer manufacturing.

  3. Critical dimension control using ultrashort laser for improving wafer critical dimension uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avizemer, Dan; Sharoni, Ofir; Oshemkov, Sergey; Cohen, Avi; Dayan, Asaf; Khurana, Ranjan; Kewley, Dave

    2015-07-01

    Requirements for control of critical dimension (CD) become more demanding as the integrated circuit (IC) feature size specifications become tighter and tighter. Critical dimension control, also known as CDC, is a well-known laser-based process in the IC industry that has proven to be robust, repeatable, and efficient in adjusting wafer CD uniformity (CDU) [Proc. SPIE 6152, 615225 (2006)]. The process involves locally and selectively attenuating the deep ultraviolet light which goes through the photomask to the wafer. The input data for the CDC process in the wafer fab is typically taken from wafer CDU data, which is measured by metrology tools such as wafer-critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM), wafer optical scatterometry, or wafer level CD (WLCD). The CD correction process uses the CDU data in order to create an attenuation correction contour, which is later applied by the in-situ ultrashort laser system of the CDC to locally change the transmission of the photomask. The ultrashort pulsed laser system creates small, partially scattered, Shade-In-Elements (also known as pixels) by focusing the laser beam inside the quartz bulk of the photomask. This results in the formation of a localized, intravolume, quartz modified area, which has a different refractive index than the quartz bulk itself. The CDC process flow for improving wafer CDU in a wafer fab with detailed explanations of the shading elements formation inside the quartz by the ultrashort pulsed laser is reviewed.

  4. How accurate are rapid prototyped (RP) final orthognathic surgical wafers? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shqaidef, Abedalrahman; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Khambay, Balvinder S

    2014-09-01

    Computer packages have been introduced to simulate the movements of the jaw in three dimensions to facilitate planning of treatment. After final 3-dimensional virtual planning, a rapid prototype wafer can be manufactured and used in theatre. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of rapid prototyping of virtual wafers derived from laser scanned dental models using CAD/CAM software. Upper and lower plaster models from 10 orthognathic patients, the articulated models, and the conventional wafers were scanned. The virtual wafers were made from CAD/CAM software, and printed on a stereolithographic printer. We also scanned the articulated models with rapid prototype wafers in place. The validity of the final rapid prototype wafer was measured by the accuracy with which upper and lower models related to one another. The absolute mean error of the rapid prototype wafer when aligned with the dental models was 0.94 (0.09) mm. The absolute distance of the 2 models articulated by conventional and rapid prototype wafers ranged from 0.04 - 1.73mm. The rapid prototype wafers were able to orientate the upper and lower dental models with an absolute mean error of 0.94 (0.09) mm, but it ranged from 0.04-1.73mm.

  5. Growth of Catalyst-Free Epitaxial InAs Nanowires on Si Wafers Using Metallic Masks.

    PubMed

    Soo, M Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-07-13

    Development of heteroepitaxy growth of catalyst-free vertical III-V nanowires on Si wafers is highly desirable for future nanoscale Si-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, a proof-of-concept approach is developed for catalyst-free heteroepitaxy growth of InAs nanowires on Si wafers. Before the growth of InAs nanowires, a Si-compatible metallic film with a thickness of several tens of nanometers was predeposited on a Si wafer and then annealed to form nanosize openings so as to obtain a metallic mask. These nano-openings exposed the surface of the Si wafer, which allowed subsequent nucleation and growth of epitaxial InAs nanowires directly on the surface of the Si wafer. The small size of the nano-openings limits the lateral growth of the nanostructures but promotes their axial growth. Through this approach, catalyst-free InAs nanowires were grown on both Si (111) and (001) wafers successfully at different growth temperatures. In particular, ultralong defect-free InAs nanowires with the wurtzite structure were grown the Si (111) wafers at 550 °C using the Ni mask. This study offers a simple, cost-effective, and scalable method to grow catalyst-free III-V nanowires on Si wafers. The simplicity of the approach opens a new avenue for the growth and integration of catalyst-free high-quality heteroepitaxial III-V nanowires on Si wafers.

  6. Temperature switching waves in a silicon wafer on lamp-based heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharov, Vladimir V.; Kurenya, Alexey L.; Rudakov, Valery I.; Prigara, Valeriya P.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of a silicon wafer thermally heated up under a bistable regime in a lamp-based reactor are simulated with regard to an optical non-gomogeneity as a nucleus of a high-temperature phase. The optical non-gomogeneity is represented by a doped layer region on the surface of the wafer imposed by radiation. It is shown that under these conditions temperature switching waves are formed in the wafer. Experimental verification of propagating the switching waves of temperature is obtained at the silicon wafer transition derived from the lower-temperature state to its upper-temperature state and the velocity of the waves is evaluated.

  7. Measuring the thickness profiles of wafers to subnanometer resolution using Fabry-Perot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrant, David I.; Arkwright, John W.; Fairman, Philip S.; Netterfield, Roger P

    2007-05-20

    The resolution of an angle-scanning technique for measuring transparent optical wafers is analyzed, and it is shown both theoretically and experimentally that subnanometer resolution can be readily achieved. Data are acquired simultaneously over the whole area of the wafer, producing two-dimensional thickness variation maps in as little as 10 s.Repeatabilities of 0.07 nm have been demonstrated, and wafers of up to100 mm diameter have been measured, with1 mm or better spatial resolution. A technique for compensating wafer and system aberrations is incorporated and analyzed.

  8. Wafer-level hermetic thermo-compression bonding using electroplated gold sealing frame planarized by fly-cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farisi, Muhammad Salman Al; Hirano, Hideki; Frömel, Jörg; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel wafer-level hermetic packaging technology for heterogeneous device integration is presented. Hermetic sealing is achieved by low-temperature thermo-compression bonding using electroplated Au micro-sealing frame planarized by single-point diamond fly-cutting. The proposed technology has significant advantages compared to other established processes in terms of integration of micro-structured wafer, vacuum encapsulation and electrical interconnection, which can be achieved at the same time. Furthermore, the technology is also achievable for a bonding frame width as narrow as 30 μm, giving it an advantage from a geometry perspective, and bonding temperatures as low as 300 °C, making it advantageous for temperature-sensitive devices. Outgassing in vacuum sealed cavities is studied and a cavity pressure below 500 Pa is achieved by introducing annealing steps prior to bonding. The pressure of the sealed cavity is measured by zero-balance method utilizing diaphragm-structured bonding test devices. The leak rate into the packages is determined by long-term sealed cavity pressure measurement for 1500 h to be less than 2.0× {{10}-14} Pa m3s-1. In addition, the bonding shear strength is also evaluated to be higher than 100 MPa.

  9. Dual-Side Wafer Processing and Resonant Tunneling Transistor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, J.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Reno, J.L.; Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.

    1999-07-20

    We describe dual-side wafer processing and its application to resonant tunneling transistors in a planar configuration. The fabrication technique utilizes a novel flip-chip, wafer thinning process called epoxy-bond and stop-etch (EBASE) process, where the substrate material is removed by selective wet etching and stopped at an etch-stop layer. This EBASE method results in a semiconductor epitaxial layer that is typically less than a micron thick and has a mirror-finish, allowing backside gates to be placed in close proximity to frontside gates. Utilizing this technique, a resonant tunneling transistor--the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)--can be fabricated in a fully planar configuration, where the tunneling between two selectively-contacted 2DEGs in GaAs or InGaAs quantum wells is modulated by surface Schottky gate. Low temperature electrical characterization yields source-drain I-V curves with a gate-tunable negative differential resistance.

  10. UV/Ozone Cleaning For Organics Removal On Silicon Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafonte, Leo; Chiu, Rafael

    1984-06-01

    The feasibility for using a combination of ultraviolet light and ozone - UV/Ozone Cleaning - for organics removal and photoresist residue cleaning from silicon semiconductor wafers was investigated. The process generates a highly oxidative atmosphere that is specific for removing trace organic residues. Product of the reactions are carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, stable inorganic materials such as oxide coatings remain unaffected. UV/Ozone exposure of silicon causes formation of a thin layer of silicon oxide that tends to retard further oxidation of the silicon. Based on the expected photochemistry o," this process, specific enhancements to accelerate the cleaning rates were tested. The enhancements involved the use of both gas phase and liquio phase additives, and comparative rates of removal were determined. The technique was tested on several photoresists, potential organic residues, and common solvent systems. The photoresists studies were primarily positive resists and were tested at several levels of ion implantation. The results of the testing suggests that the highest potential applications of UV/Ozone Cleaning in the processing of semiconductor wafers include: a) Removal of solvent residues and process contaminants. b) A pre-process step to insure cleanliness by removal of residual organic or airborne organic contaminants. c) As a post-process step to insure cleanliness or to remove trace organics.

  11. Deposition and removal of sodium contamination on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, I.; Tardif, F.; Derrien, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper investigations are performed in order to understand the source of sodium contamination in clean-room environments and to find different cleaning processes able to limit or suppress sodium deposition. In a clean-room environment, the human being has been identified as one of the major sources of sodium. The airborne sodium contamination is essentially transmitted in particle form. In order to limit sodium deposition from the air, the wafers awaiting subsequent processing need to be stored in a protective box or placed far from the human environment and should not be left for much more than 1 week in a class 1 clean room. Also, wet chemistries could cause sodium contamination on wafers particularly during the deionized water rinse. In order to limit the possible contamination, the sodium deposition mechanisms have been studied: they show the typical characteristics of Langmuir adsorption. Temperature and ionic concentration are both parameters which influence the deposition. In water, sodium deposition can be avoided by introducing acid or alkaline solutions or increasing the temperature: it can be drastically reduced by adding traces of HCl (0.01%). Finally, other cleaning chemistries such as SC1 (NH4 OH-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 0.25:1:5 proportion, SC2 (HCl-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 1:1:5 proportion, 0.1% HF and SPM (H2 SO4 -H2 O2 ) in 3:1 proportion reduce the contamination as well.

  12. Thin-film resistance thermometers on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Kenneth G; Ripple, Dean C; Kimes, William A

    2009-04-01

    We have fabricated Pt thin-film resistors directly sputtered on silicon substrates to evaluate their use as resistance thermal detectors (RTDs). This technique was chosen to achieve more accurate temperature measurements of large silicon wafers during semiconductor processing. High-purity (0.999 968 mass fraction) platinum was sputter deposited on silicon test coupons using titanium and zirconium bond coats. These test coupons were annealed, and four-point resistance specimens were prepared for thermal evaluation. Their response was compared with calibrated platinum-palladium thermocouples in a tube furnace. We evaluated the effects of furnace atmosphere, thin-film thickness, bond coats, annealing temperature and peak thermal excursion of the Pt thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was performed to evaluate the effect of impurities on the thermal resistance coefficient, α. We present typical resistance versus temperature curves, hysteresis plots versus temperature and an analysis of the causes of uncertainties in the measurement of seven test coupons. We conclude that sputtered thin-film platinum resistors on silicon wafers can yield temperature measurements with uncertainties of less than 1 °C, k = 1 up to 600 °C. This is comparable to or better than commercially available techniques.

  13. Process Performance of Optima XEx Single Wafer High Energy Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. H.; Yoon, Jongyoon; Kondratenko, S.; David, J.; Rubin, L. M.; Jang, I. S.; Cha, J. C.; Joo, Y. H.; Lee, A. B.; Jin, S. W.

    2011-01-07

    To meet the process requirements for well formation in future CMOS memory production, high energy implanters require more robust angle, dose, and energy control while maintaining high productivity. The Optima XEx high energy implanter meets these requirements by integrating a traditional LINAC beamline with a robust single wafer handling system. To achieve beam angle control, Optima XEx can control both the horizontal and vertical beam angles to within 0.1 degrees using advanced beam angle measurement and correction. Accurate energy calibration and energy trim functions accelerate process matching by eliminating energy calibration errors. The large volume process chamber and UDC (upstream dose control) using faraday cups outside of the process chamber precisely control implant dose regardless of any chamber pressure increase due to PR (photoresist) outgassing. An optimized RF LINAC accelerator improves reliability and enables singly charged phosphorus and boron energies up to 1200 keV and 1500 keV respectively with higher beam currents. A new single wafer endstation combined with increased beam performance leads to overall increased productivity. We report on the advanced performance of Optima XEx observed during tool installation and volume production at an advanced memory fab.

  14. A thermal microprobe fabricated with wafer-stage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxia; Zhang, Yanwei; Blaser, Juliana; Sriram, T. S.; Enver, Ahsan; Marcus, R. B.

    1998-05-01

    A thermal microprobe has been designed and built for high resolution temperature sensing. The thermal sensor is a thin-film thermocouple junction at the tip of an atomic force microprobe (AFM) silicon probe needle. Only wafer-stage processing steps are used for the fabrication. For high resolution temperature sensing it is essential that the junction be confined to a short distance at the AFM tip. This confinement is achieved by a controlled photoresist coating process. Experiment prototypes have been made with an Au/Pd junction confined to within 0.5 μm of the tip, with the two metals separated elsewhere by a thin insulating oxide layer. Processing begins with double-polished, n-type, 4 in. diameter, 300-μm-thick silicon wafers. Atomically sharp probe tips are formed by a combination of dry and wet chemical etching, and oxidation sharpening. The metal layers are sputtering deposited and the cantilevers are released by a combination of KOH and dry etching. A resistively heated calibration device was made for temperature calibration of the thermal microprobe over the temperature range 25-110 °C. Over this range the thermal outputs of two microprobes are 4.5 and 5.6 μV/K and is linear. Thermal and topographical images are also obtained from a heated tungsten thin film fuse.

  15. Video-rate fuzzy Golay processor for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Steinvorth, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The fuzzy Golay transformation is a novel approach for gray-level image processing. Fuzzy-set theory is used to modify the binary image processing techniques developed by M. J. Golay to permit direct gray-level image processing without thresholding. The comparison between gray-level pixels is accomplished with the Pixel Closeness Value (PCV) while comparison between gray-level neighborhoods uses the Neighborhood Closeness Value (NCV). Feature extraction is done by comparing the gray-level image neighborhood to a subset of the fourteen Golay neighborhoods using the NCV function. The Fuzzy Golay Processor (FGP) is an architecture designed to implement the fuzzy Golay transformation. The design of the FGP has been optimized to permit a successful implementation in Wafer Scale Integration (WSI). A system containing four FGPs is capable of performing thirty fuzzy Golay transformations per second on a 256 by 256 eight-bit pixel image. Such a system could fit on a four-inch wafer with enough redundant dies to allow a 30% die yield. The required dies are four Input-Output Modules (IOM) and 56 Neighborhood Evaluation Modules (NEM).

  16. Residual stress in silicon wafer using IR polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhijia; Wang, Pin; Asundi, Anand

    2008-09-01

    The infrared phase shift polariscope (IR-PSP) is a full-field optical technique for stress analysis in Silicon wafers. Phase shift polariscope is preferred to a conventional polariscope, as it can provide quantitative information of the normal stress difference and the shear stress in the specimen. The method is based on the principles of photoelasticity, in which stresses induces temporary birefringence in materials which can be quantitatively analyzed using a phase shift polariscope. Compared to other stress analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction or laser scanning, infrared photoelastic stress analysis provides full-field information with high resolution and in near real time. As the semiconductor fabrication is advancing, larger wafers, thinner films and more compact packages are being manufactured. This results in a growing demand of process control. Residual stress exist in silicon during semiconductor fabrication and these stresses may make cell processing difficult or even cause the failure of the silicon. Reducing these stresses would improve manufacturability and reliability. Therefore stress analysis is essential to trace the root cause of the stresses. The polariscope images are processed using MATLAB and four-step phase shifting method to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding the residual stress of the sample. The system is calibrated using four-point bend specimen and then the residual stress distribution in a MEMS sample is shown.

  17. A comparison of VLSI architectures for time and transform domain decoding of Reed-Solomon codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Deutsch, L. J.; Satorius, E. H.; Reed, I. S.

    1988-01-01

    It is well known that the Euclidean algorithm or its equivalent, continued fractions, can be used to find the error locator polynomial needed to decode a Reed-Solomon (RS) code. It is shown that this algorithm can be used for both time and transform domain decoding by replacing its initial conditions with the Forney syndromes and the erasure locator polynomial. By this means both the errata locator polynomial and the errate evaluator polynomial can be obtained with the Euclidean algorithm. With these ideas, both time and transform domain Reed-Solomon decoders for correcting errors and erasures are simplified and compared. As a consequence, the architectures of Reed-Solomon decoders for correcting both errors and erasures can be made more modular, regular, simple, and naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  18. A configurable realtime DWT-based neural data compression and communication VLSI system for wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Kamboh, Awais M; Mason, Andrew J

    2014-04-30

    This paper presents the design of a complete multi-channel neural recording compression and communication system for wireless implants that addresses the challenging simultaneous requirements for low power, high bandwidth and error-free communication. The compression engine implements discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and run length encoding schemes and offers a practical data compression solution that faithfully preserves neural information. The communication engine encodes data and commands separately into custom-designed packet structures utilizing a protocol capable of error handling. VLSI hardware implementation of these functions, within the design constraints of a 32-channel neural compression implant, is presented. Designed in 0.13μm CMOS, the core of the neural compression and communication chip occupies only 1.21mm(2) and consumes 800μW of power (25μW per channel at 26KS/s) demonstrating an effective solution for intra-cortical neural interfaces.

  19. A system for the functional testing and simulation of custom and semicustom VLSI chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, E. M.; Deutsch, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A system for the functional testing and simulation of custom and semicustom very large scale integrated (VLSI) chips that are designed using the integrated UNIX-based computer-aided design (CAD) system is described. The testing and simulation system consists of two parts. One of these is a special purpose hardware device that is capable of controlling the digital imputs and outputs on a custom chip. This device, the Digital Microcircuit Functionality Tester (DMFT) system, can be operated by itself or in conjunction with the VAX host computer on the CAD system. The DMFT is integrated into a microprobe station so that these signals can be injected or read from nodes inside the chip, as well as at the pins. The second part of the system is a software package that is installed on the VAX. This software package, logic, includes a full-screen editor for developing chip test sequences and drivers for both the DMFT and the esim logic simulator.

  20. An Integrated Unix-based CAD System for the Design and Testing of Custom VLSI Chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer aided design (CAD) system that is being used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the design of custom and semicustom very large scale integrated (VLSI) chips is described. The system consists of a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX computer with the UNIX operating system and a collection of software tools for the layout, simulation, and verification of microcircuits. Most of these tools were written by the academic community and are, therefore, available to JPL at little or no cost. Some small pieces of software have been written in-house in order to make all the tools interact with each other with a minimal amount of effort on the part of the designer.