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Sample records for voc emission sources

  1. [Status and needs research for on-line monitoring of VOCs emissions from stationary sources].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Gang; Zhong, Qi; Zhao, Jin-Bao; Yang, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Based on atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution control requirements during the twelfth-five year plan and the current status of monitoring and management in the world, instrumental architecture and technical characteristics of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for VOCs emission from stationary sources are investigated and researched. Technological development needs of VOCs emission on-line monitoring techniques for stationary sources in China are proposed from the system sampling pretreatment technology and analytical measurement techniques.

  2. [Anthropogenic VOC emission inventory and contribution from industrial sources in Ningbo].

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Wang, Xue-Song; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Liang; Weng, Yan-Bo; Hu, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Ningbo is an important industrial city in eastern China and is also the economic center in the south wing of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). Recently, the VOC emissions from the local industrial activities and its effects on both the regional air quality and people's health were getting more and more attention. The anthropogenic VOC emission inventory of Ningbo in 2010 was established with collecting comprehensive activity data of anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, the industrial sectors were studied and the significant industries were identified with their contribution quantified. The result shows that the amount of anthropogenic VOC emission in Ningbo in 2010 is 176 kt. Industry, transportation and residential source are the most important VOC anthropogenic sources in Ningbo, which accounted for 62.0%, 17.2% and 15.5% respectively. Synthetic materials manufacturing and refined petroleum products manufacturing are the most important VOC emitting industries, which contributed 18.6% and 13.1% of the total VOC amount respectively, signifying the influence of these two industries to the VOC emissions in Ningbo.

  3. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  4. Short-chain oxygenated VOCs: Emission and uptake by plants and atmospheric sources, sinks, and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Roger; Peñuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have multiple atmospheric implications and play many roles in plant physiology and ecology. Among these VOCs, growing interest is being devoted to a group of short-chain oxygenated VOCs (oxVOCs). Technology improvements such as proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry are facilitating the study of these hydrocarbons and new data regarding these compounds is continuously appearing. Here we review current knowledge of the emissions of these oxVOCs by plants and the factors that control them, and also provide an overview of sources, sinks, and concentrations found in the atmosphere. The oxVOCs reviewed here are formic and acetic acids, acetone, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. In general, because of their water solubility (low gas-liquid partitioning coefficient), the plant-atmosphere exchange is stomatal-dependent, although it can also take place via the cuticle. This exchange is also determined by atmospheric mixing ratios. These compounds have relatively long atmospheric half-lives and reach considerable concentrations in the atmosphere in the range of ppbv. Likewise, under non-stressed conditions plants can emit all of these oxVOCs together at fluxes ranging from 0.2 up to 4.8 μg(C)g -1(leaf dry weight)h -1 and at rates that increase several-fold when under stress. Gaps in our knowledge regarding the processes involved in the synthesis, emission, uptake, and atmospheric reactivity of oxVOCs precludes the clarification of exactly what is conditioning plant-atmosphere exchange—and also when, how, and why this occurs—and these lacunae therefore warrant further research in this field.

  5. Anthropogenic sources of VOC in a football stadium: Assessing human emissions in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Patrick R.; Faber, Peter; Drewnick, Frank; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aerosol composition, carbon dioxide (CO2), and ozone (O3) were made inside Coface Arena in Mainz, Germany (49°59‧3″N, 8°13‧27″E) during a football match on April 20 2012. The VOC measurements were performed with a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). Observed VOCs could be classified into several distinct source categories including (1) human respiration/breath, (2) ozonolysis of skin oils, and (3) cigarette smoke/combustion. In this work, we present a detailed discussion on the scale and potential impacts of VOCs emitted as a result of these sources and their contributions on local and larger scales. Human emissions of VOCs have a negligible contribution to the global atmospheric budget (˜1% or less) for all those quantified in this study. However, fluxes as high as 0.02 g m-2 h-1 and 2 × 10-4 g m-2 h-1, for ethanol and acetone respectively are observed, suggesting the potential for significant impact on local air chemistry and perhaps regional scales. This study suggests that even in outdoor environments, situations exist where VOCs emitted as a result of human presence and activity are an important component of local air chemistry.

  6. VOC emissions of Grey poplar leaves as affected by salt stress and different N sources.

    PubMed

    Teuber, M; Zimmer, I; Kreuzwieser, J; Ache, P; Polle, A; Rennenberg, H; Schnitzler, J-P

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen nutrition and salt stress experiments were performed in a greenhouse with hydroponic-cultured, salt-sensitive Grey poplar (Populus x canescens) plants to study the combined influence of different N sources (either 1 mm NO(3) (-) or NH(4)(+)) and salt (up to 75 mm NaCl) on leaf gas exchange, isoprene biosynthesis and VOC emissions. Net assimilation and transpiration proved to be highly sensitive to salt stress and were reduced by approximately 90% at leaf sodium concentrations higher than 1,800 microg Na g dry weight (dw)(-1). In contrast, emissions of isoprene and oxygenated VOC (i.e. acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and acetone) were unaffected. There was no significant effect of combinations of salt stress and N source, and neither NO(3)(-) or NH(4)(+) influenced the salt stress response in the Grey poplar leaves. Also, transcript levels of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (PcDXR) and isoprene synthase (PcISPS) did not respond to the different N sources and only responded slightly to salt application, although isoprene synthase (PcISPS) activity was negatively affected at least in one of two experiments, despite high isoprene emission rates. A significant salt effect was the strong reduction of leaf dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) content, probably due to restricted availability of photosynthates for DMADP biosynthesis. Further consequences of reduced photosynthetic gas exchange and maintaining VOC emissions are a very high C loss, up to 50%, from VOC emissions related to net CO(2) uptake and a strong increase in leaf internal isoprene concentrations, with maximum mean values up to 6.6 microl x l(-1). Why poplar leaves maintain VOC biosynthesis and emission under salt stress conditions, despite impaired photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, is discussed.

  7. Chemical composition of major VOC emission sources in the Seoul atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Na, Kwangsam; Kim, Yong Pyo; Moon, Il; Moon, Kil-Choo

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a chemical analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for five emission sources in Seoul. The source categories included motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation, paint solvents, natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). These sources were selected because they have been known to emit significant quantities of VOCs in the Seoul area (more than 5% of the total emission inventory). Chemical compositions of the five emission sources are presented for a group of 45 C2-C9 VOCs. Motor vehicle exhaust profiles were developed by conducting an urban tunnel study. These emissions profiles were distinguished from the other emission profiles by a high weight percentage of butanes over seasons and propane in the wintertime. It was found that this is due to the wide use of butane-fueled vehicles. To obtain gasoline vapor profiles, gasoline samples from five major brands for each season were selected. The brands were blended on the basis of the marketshare of these brands in Seoul area. Raoult's law was used to calculate gasoline evaporative compositions based on the liquid gasoline compositions. The measured and estimated gasoline vapor compositions were found to be in good agreement. Vehicle and gasoline evaporation profiles were made over seasons because of the seasonal change in their compositions. Paint solvent emissions profiles were produced based on a product-use survey and sales figures. These profiles are a composite of four major oil-based paints and thinning solvent. The source profile of natural gas was made on a methane-free basis. It was found that Ethane and propane were the most abundant compounds accounting for 95% of the natural gas composition. LPG was largely composed of propane and ethane and the remaining components were minor contributors.

  8. Source identification of VOCs at an urban site of western India: Effect of marathon events and anthropogenic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, L. K.; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Devendra

    2016-03-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a high-resolution proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer at an urban site of Ahmedabad in India during the winter season in 2014. Mixing ratios of VOCs show large diurnal and day-to-day variations. Although strongly influenced by local emissions, periods of higher VOCs were observed during transport from the polluted Indo-Gangetic Plains than those from the cleaner Thar Desert. However with different rates, VOCs decreased exponentially with increasing wind speed. Relative abundance of methanol varied with weather conditions contributing highest and lowest under fog and clear-sky conditions, respectively. Among the compounds reported here, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) contribute to a large fraction (67-85%) with methanol being most abundant (40-58%). In spite of predominant vehicular emissions, diurnal distribution and emission ratios (ERs) of several VOCs indicate the role of biogenic and secondary sources. The ratios of isoprene/benzene and OVOCs/benzene show significant enhancements during daytime suggesting their contributions from biogenic and secondary sources. During marathon and cyclothon events, mixing ratios of VOCs were 2-10 times higher compared to a normal Sunday. The ERs of VOCs estimated using the nighttime data on marathon day are well within the range of values reported for several megacities of the world. The average contributions of primary anthropogenic sources to acetaldehyde, acetone, and isoprene were 44 ± 06%, 45 ± 07%, and 63 ± 12%, respectively. During cloudy condition, the increase in anthropogenic contribution to acetaldehyde (~10%), acetone (9%) and isoprene (30%) is due to reduction in biogenic emissions and secondary formation of these VOCs.

  9. Screening the Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in China Based on Multi-effect Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere have adverse impacts via three main pathways: photochemical ozone formation, secondary organic aerosol production, and direct toxicity to humans. Few studies have integrated these effects to prioritize control measures for VOCs sources. In this study, we developed a multi-effect evaluation methodology based on updated emission inventories and source profiles, which was combined with ozone formation potential (OFP), secondary organic aerosol potential (SOAP), and VOC toxicity data to identify important emission sources and key species. We derived species-specific emission inventories for 152 sources. The OFPs, SOAPs, and toxicity of each source were determined, and the contribution and share of each source to each of these adverse effects was calculated. Weightings were given to the three adverse effects by expert scoring, and the integrated impact was determined. Using 2012 as the base year, solvent usage and industrial process were found to be the most important anthropogenic sources, accounting for 24.2 and 23.1% of the integrated environmental effect, respectively. This was followed by biomass burning, transportation, and fossil fuel combustion, all of which had a similar contribution ranging from 16.7 to 18.6%. The top five industrial sources, including plastic products, rubber products, chemical fiber products, the chemical industry, and oil refining, accounted for nearly 70.0% of industrial emissions. In China, emissions reductions are required for styrene, toluene, ethylene, benzene, and m/p-xylene. The 10 most abundant chemical species contributed 76.5% of the integrated impact. Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong were the five leading provinces when considering the integrated effects. Besides, the chemical mass balance model (CMB) was used to verify the VOCs inventories of 47 cities in China, so as to optimize our evaluation results. We suggest that multi-effect evaluation is necessary to

  10. Trends in selected ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and a comparison to mobile source emission trends in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Trends in ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) are compared to trends in VOC emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles (LDGV) tested on chassis dynamometers and to trends observed in tunnel studies during the same period to understand the impacts of gasoline vehicle emissions on ambient VOC concentrations from 1999 to 2009. Annual median concentrations for most ambient VOCs decreased 40% from 1999 to 2009 in the SoCAB, based on data from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). Annual concentration decreases of most compounds, except 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, are highly correlated with the decrease of acetylene, a marker for tailpipe emissions from LDGV. This indicates that ambient VOC concentration decreases were likely due to tailpipe emission reductions from gasoline vehicles. Air Toxics Monitoring Network data also support this conclusion. Benzene concentration-normalized ratios for most compounds except ethane, propane, isoprene, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were stable even as these compound concentrations decreased significantly from 1999 to 2009. Such stability suggests that the main sources of ambient VOC were still the same from 1999 to 2009. The comparison of trends in dynamometer testing and tunnel studies also shows that tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of tunnel LDGV emissions. The pronounced changes in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane ratios due to the introduction of Phase 3 gasoline also confirm the substantial impact of LDGV emissions on ambient VOCs. Diurnal ambient VOC data also suggest that LDGV tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of ambient VOCs in the SoCAB in 2009. Our conclusion, which is that current inventory models underestimate VOC emissions from mobile sources, is consistent with that of several recent studies of ambient trends in the SoCAB. Our study showed that tailpipe emissions remained a bigger contributor to ambient VOCs than evaporative

  11. Sector-based VOCs emission factors and source profiles for the surface coating industry in the Pearl River Delta region of China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuangmin; Sha, Qing'e; Zheng, Junyu; Yuan, Zibing; Gao, Zongjiang; Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Zhuoyun; Li, Cheng; Huang, Zhijiong

    2017-04-01

    Accurate depiction of VOCs emission characteristics is essential for the formulation of VOCs control strategies. As one of the continuous efforts in improving VOCs emission characterization in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, this study targeted on surface coating industry, the most important VOCs emission sources in the PRD. Sectors in analysis included shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating, plastic surface coating, automobile coating and fabric surface coating. Sector-based field measurement was conducted to characterize VOCs emission factors and source profiles in the PRD. It was found that the raw material-based VOCs emission factors for these six sectors ranged from 0.34 to 0.58kg VOCs per kg of raw materials (kg·kg(-1)) while the emission factors based on the production yield varied from 0.59kg to 13.72t VOCs for each production manufactured. VOCs emission factors of surface coating industry were therefore preferably calculated based on raw materials with low uncertainties. Source profiles differed greatly among different sectors. Aromatic was the largest group for shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating and automobile coating while the oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) were the most abundant in the plastic and fabric surface coating sectors. The major species of aromatic VOCs in each of these six sectors were similar, mainly toluene and m/p-xylene, while the OVOCs varied among the different sectors. VOCs profiles in the three processes of auto industry, i.e., auto coating, auto drying and auto repairing, also showed large variations. The major species in these sectors in the PRD were similar with other places but the proportions of individual compounds were different. Some special components were also detected in the PRD region. This study highlighted the importance of updating local source profiles in a comprehensive and timely manner.

  12. VOCs emission rate estimate for complicated industrial area source using an inverse-dispersion calculation method: A case study on a petroleum refinery in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Lv, Zhaofeng; Yang, Gan; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Yue; Wang, Litao

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to apply an inverse-dispersion calculation method (IDM) to estimate the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the complicated industrial area sources, through a case study on a petroleum refinery in Northern China. The IDM was composed of on-site monitoring of ambient VOCs concentrations and meteorological parameters around the source, calculation of the relationship coefficient γ between the source's emission rate and the ambient VOCs concentration by the ISC3 model, and estimation of the actual VOCs emission rate from the source. Targeting the studied refinery, 10 tests and 8 tests were respectively conducted in March and in June of 2014. The monitoring showed large differences in VOCs concentrations between background and downwind receptors, reaching 59.7 ppbv in March and 248.6 ppbv in June, on average. The VOCs increases at receptors mainly consisted of ethane (3.1%-22.6%), propane (3.8%-11.3%), isobutane (8.5%-10.2%), n-butane (9.9%-13.2%), isopentane (6.1%-12.9%), n-pentane (5.1%-9.7%), propylene (6.1-11.1%) and 1-butylene (1.6%-5.4%). The chemical composition of the VOCs increases in this field monitoring was similar to that of VOCs emissions from China's refineries reported, which revealed that the ambient VOCs increases were predominantly contributed by this refinery. So, we used the ISC3 model to create the relationship coefficient γ for each receptor of each test. In result, the monthly VOCs emissions from this refinery were calculated to be 183.5 ± 89.0 ton in March and 538.3 ± 281.0 ton in June. The estimate in June was greatly higher than in March, chiefly because the higher environmental temperature in summer produced more VOCs emissions from evaporation and fugitive process of the refinery. Finally, the VOCs emission factors (g VOCs/kg crude oil refined) of 0.73 ± 0.34 (in March) and 2.15 ± 1.12 (in June) were deduced for this refinery, being in the same order with previous direct

  13. VOC emissions from wet toner photocopy machines

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, J.L.; Howard, C.L.; Leto, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Indoor air pollution in office buildings affects millions of American workers every day. Potential sources of office indoor air pollution are photocopiers which emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during operation. A photocopier`s toner and dispersant contain heavy-treated naphtha, a mixture consisting primarily of decane, which is known to be toxic to humans. An experimental study was completed to characterize VOC emissions from a photocopier located on campus at the University of Texas at Austin. Experiments were completed to estimate the air turnover rate in the room, the VOC concentration in the room during photocopier operation, and a typical daily concentration profile. Based on these experiments, two emissions models were developed: (1) a mass balance on VOC concentration in the room, and (2) a mass balance on the amount of toner and dispersant used per copy. Room ventilation rate was determined to be approximately 1.5 air exchanges per hour. Photocopier emission rates were measured to be from 2 g/min to 9 g/min based on VOC concentration in the room, and were calculated to be 5.4 g/min based on toner and dispersant consumption. These high emission rates of potentially harmful VOCs indicate a need for implementation of measures to protect the health of those utilizing wet toner photocopy machines on a regular basis.

  14. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    PubMed

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground.

  15. Source Apportionment of VOCs in Edmonton, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Brown, S. G.; Aklilu, Y.; Lyder, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Regional emissions at Edmonton, Alberta, are complex, containing emissions from (1) transportation sources, such as cars, trucks, buses, and rail; (2) industrial sources, such as petroleum refining, light manufacturing, and fugitive emissions from holding tanks or petroleum terminals; and (3) miscellaneous sources, such as biogenic emissions and natural gas use and processing. From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central) and the industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model was used to apportion ambient concentration measurements of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions source categories. Factors of VOCs identified in the final eleven-factor solution include transportation sources (both gasoline and diesel vehicles), industrial sources, a biogenic source, and a natural-gas-related source. Transportation sources accounted for more mass at the Central site than at the East site; this was expected because Central is in a core urban area where transportation emissions are concentrated. Transportation sources accounted for nearly half of the VOC mass at the Central site, but only 6% of the mass at the East site. Encouragingly, mass from transportation sources has declined by about 4% a year in this area; this trend is similar to the decline found throughout the United States, and is likely due to fleet turnover as older, more highly polluting cars are replaced with newer, cleaner cars. In contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more VOC mass at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for most of the total VOC mass observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production

  16. A farm-level model of VOC emission from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent measurements suggest that dairy farms can be a significant emission source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, accurate estimates of farm-level emissions currently do not exist. A preliminary process-based model was developed to estimate VOC emissions from silage on farms and to as...

  17. Response surface modeling-based source contribution analysis and VOC emission control policy assessment in a typical ozone-polluted urban Shunde, China.

    PubMed

    You, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Yun; Jang, Carey; Wang, Shuxiao; Gao, Jian; Lin, Che-Jen; Li, Minhui; Zhu, Zhenghua; Wei, Hao; Yang, Wenwei

    2017-01-01

    To develop a sound ozone (O3) pollution control strategy, it is important to well understand and characterize the source contribution due to the complex chemical and physical formation processes of O3. Using the "Shunde" city as a pilot summer case study, we apply an innovative response surface modeling (RSM) methodology based on the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling simulations to identify the O3 regime and provide dynamic analysis of the precursor contributions to effectively assess the O3 impacts of volatile organic compound (VOC) control strategy. Our results show that Shunde is a typical VOC-limited urban O3 polluted city. The "Jiangmen" city, as the main upper wind area during July 2014, its VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions make up the largest contribution (9.06%). On the contrary, the contribution from local (Shunde) emission is lowest (6.35%) among the seven neighbor regions. The local VOCs industrial source emission has the largest contribution comparing to other precursor emission sectors in Shunde. The results of dynamic source contribution analysis further show that the local NOx control could slightly increase the ground O3 under low (10.00%) and medium (40.00%) reduction ratios, while it could start to turn positive to decrease ground O3 under the high NOx abatement ratio (75.00%). The real-time assessment of O3 impacts from VOCs control strategies in Pearl River Delta (PRD) shows that the joint regional VOCs emission control policy will effectively reduce the ground O3 concentration in Shunde.

  18. VOC Emissions From Decomposing Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. M.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Fierer, N.; Monson, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    The emission of VOCs from the biosphere has a profound effect on the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. Most studies of the flux of reactive carbon from the biosphere have focused on BVOC emissions at leaf and canopy scales with relatively few studies investigating BVOC emissions from soils. Here we present results describing the emissions of a suite of BVOCs from different litter types under different levels of nitrogen availability. To investigate these effects, three biochemically distinct litter types (Deschampsia sp., Acomostylis sp., and Rhododendron sp.) were coarsely ground and incubated in the dark for two months under different nitrogen regimes at optimal conditions for microbial activity. We used proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to monitor BVOC emissions and CO2 production rates throughout the course of the investigation. When different leaf litter types decomposed, they released distinctly different types and quantities of VOCs. However, varying nitrogen availability caused the VOC signature from some litters to change dramatically. We suggest that decomposition of leaf litter could provide a substantive source of reactive carbon to the atmosphere at local and regional scales and hypothesize that nitrogen deposition may play a role in attenuating the release of some reactive species.

  19. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions. Part I: study area description, data set acquisition and qualitative data analysis of the data set.

    PubMed

    Badol, Caroline; Locoge, Nadine; Léonardis, Thierry; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-25

    The global objective of this two part study was (1) to conduct VOC measurements in order to further understand VOC behaviour in an urban area influenced by industrial emissions and (2) to evaluate the role of these specific sources relative to urban sources. In this first paper a thorough descriptive and qualitative analysis is performed. A second article will be devoted to the quantitative analysis using Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) modelling. In the Dunkerque (France) area most industrial sources are situated in the north and the west of the receptor site whereas urban and traffic sources are located in the south and the east. A data set constituted of nearly 330,000 VOC data has been developed from the hourly measurements of 53 VOCs for 1 year from September 2002 to August 2003. It also contains meteorological parameters such as temperature, wind direction and wind speed. Using different graphical methods, the influence of the different sources on the ambient VOC concentrations has been highlighted at different time scales. In this work, the analysis of daily time series for the 53 VOCs shows the influence of traffic exhaust emissions because of the increases at traffic rush hours. Besides, the seasonal evolution of the VOC/acetylene ratio points out the influence of evaporative sources on ambient VOC concentration. Concerning other point sources, the variations of measured VOC concentrations for different wind directions and scatter plots of VOC hourly concentrations highlight the influence of some industrial sources.

  20. Source apportionment of ambient VOCS in Mumbai city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anjali

    Air pollution kills almost half a million Asians every year. Most of this pollution is emitted from buses, trucks, motorcycles and other forms of transport. As Asia's cities continue to expand, the rising number of vehicles has resulted in even greater pollution. Amongst the measures available to control, vehicular emission was engine modification, catalytic converters and fuel modifications. Some of these have led to emissions of some hazardous air pollutants (HAP) like volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOC emission is an area needing attention in air quality management. This paper discusses a study on VOC concentration at major sources like traffic junction, residential area, commercial areas, industrial areas and petrol pumps in Mumbai city. CMB8 Model has been used to apportion VOCs in Mumbai city. It was observed that evaporative emissions dominate in Mumbai. In order to control VOCs in air the management strategy should thus focus on cost effective vapor recovery systems at refueling stations and in vehicles. Effective inspection and maintenance programme can reduce evaporative and exhaust VOC emissions. Modifying certain fuel parameters, like reducing benzene content in petrol will as well reduce VOC content in air. The benzene content in petrol was 3% in the year 2001 in Mumbai. Adulteration also results in high levels of VOCs in air.

  1. GAS-PHASE MASS TRANSFER MODEL FOR PREDICTING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSION RATES FROM INDOOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of the impact of sources on indoor pollutant concentrations and occupant exposure to indoor pollutants requires knowledge of the emission rates from the sources. Emission rates are often determined by chamber testing and the data from the chamber test are fitted to an em...

  2. Assessing HAP and VOC emissions from gasoline service stations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Gas stations are not specifically regulated under the national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) or new source performance standards (NSPS) programs, and it is unlikely that a station would qualify as a major source by emitting 100 tons per year (tpy) or more of any single air pollutant. Determining gas stations` potential to emit VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) may become more important as the focus of the Part 70 program shifts from major sources to area (nonmajor) sources. HAP and VOC emissions from gas stations are generated primarily from four sources: (1) tank filling losses, (2) tank breathing losses, (3) automobile refueling displacement losses, and (4) gasoline spillage during dispensing. Each of these sources is discussed, and emission estimates are listed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Alternative control technology document: Control of VOC emissions from the application of agricultural pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    In many States, some of the ozone nonattainment areas are comprised primarily of agricultural counties where a potentially significant contribution to the ozone may result from area sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emissions. A potential source of VOC emissions in agricultural counties is the release of organic compounds from the application of agricultural pesticides. The report provides technical information that State and local agencies can consider while developing strategies for reducing VOC emissions.

  4. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  5. Determination of Urban VOC Emissions Ratios and Comparison with Inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J.; Goldan, P.; Kuster, W.; Holloway, J.; Williams, E.; Lerner, B.; McKeen, S.; Parrish, D.; Trainer, M.; Fehsenfeld, F.; Kato, S.; Atlas, E.; Baker, A.; Blake, D.

    2006-12-01

    During the NEAQS-ITCT2k4 campaign in New England anthropogenic VOCs and CO were measured downwind from New York City and Boston. The emission ratios of VOCs relative to CO and acetylene were calculated using a method in which the ratio of a VOC with acetylene is plotted versus the photochemical age. The intercept at the photochemical age of zero gives the emission ratio. The so determined emission ratios were compared to other measurement sets, including data from the same location in 2002, canister samples collected inside New York City and Boston, aircraft measurements from Los Angeles in 2002 and the average urban composition of 39 U.S. cities. All the measurements show fairly good agreement. The measured emission ratios also agree well with vehicle exhaust data indicating that a major source of VOCs in urban areas are automobiles. A comparison with an anthropogenic emission inventory shows a rather poor agreement, especially for the C2-C4 alkanes and most oxygenated species. The inventory overestimated toluene for example by almost a factor of three, which caused an air quality forecast model (WRF-CHEM) using this inventory to over-predict the toluene mixing ratio by about a factor of three as well.

  6. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  7. Impact of intentionally introduced sources on indoor VOC levels

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.S.; Otson, R.

    1997-12-31

    The concentrations of 33 target volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured in outdoor air and in indoor air before and after the introduction of dry-cleaned clothes, and consumer products into two suburban homes. Emissions from the household products (air fresheners, furniture polishes, mothballs, and dry-cleaned clothes), showering, and two paints were analyzed to obtain source profiles. There were measurable increases in the 24 h average concentrations for 10 compounds in one house and 8 compounds in the second house after introduction of the sources. A contribution by showering to indoor VOC was not evident although the impact of the other sources and outdoor air could be discerned, based on results for the major constituents of source emissions. Also, contributions by paints, applied three to six weeks prior to the monitoring, to indoor VOC concentrations were evident. The pattern of concentrations indicated that sink effects need to be considered in explaining the indoor concentrations that result when sources are introduced into homes. Quantitative estimates of the relative contributions of the sources to indoor VOC levels were not feasible through the use of chemical mass balance since the number of tracer species detected (up to 6) and that could be used for source apportionment was similar to the number of sources to be apportioned (up to 7).

  8. A mass transfer model for VOC emission from silage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Rotz, C. Alan

    2012-07-01

    Silage has been shown to be an important source of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Measurements have shown that environmental conditions and silage properties strongly influence emission rates, making it difficult to assess the contribution of silage in VOC emission inventories. In this work, we present an analytical convection-diffusion-dispersion model for predicting emission of VOCs from silage. It was necessary to incorporate empirical relationships from wind tunnel trials for the response of mass transfer parameters to surface air velocity and silage porosity. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the effect of temperature on ethanol emission in wind tunnel trials, but it over-predicted alcohol and aldehyde emission measured using a mass balance approach from corn silage samples outdoors and within barns. Mass balance results confirmed that emission is related to gas-phase porosity, but the response to air speed was not clear, which was contrary to wind tunnel results. Mass balance results indicate that alcohol emission from loose silage on farms may approach 50% of the initial mass over six hours, while relative losses of acetaldehyde will be greater.

  9. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  10. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  11. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  12. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires...

  13. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from PVC floor coverings.

    PubMed

    Wiglusz, R; Igielska, B; Sitko, E; Nikel, G; Jarnuszkiewicz, I

    1998-01-01

    In this study 29 PVC floor coverings were tested for emission of vinyl chloride (VC) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A study on the effect of higher temperature on emission of VOCs from newly manufactured PVC flooring was also carried out. The study was conducted in climatic chamber, according to Polish Standard PN-89/Z-04021. GC method was used for analyzing of the compounds emitted. VC was not emitted from any of the floorings tested. Other VOCs were emitted in different concentrations. The influence of temperature on emission was conducted at temperatures of 23 degrees C and 35 degrees C from 2 hrs up to 180 days after introduction of materials in the chamber. The increase of temperature caused increase of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) emission during 24 hrs of experiment. Then the emission was comparable for both temperatures. After 9 days emission of identified and unidentified compounds (TVOC) showed a rapid decay and stayed on very low level during a few months. The study conducted showed that PVC floorings after 10 days of installation in the room should not be source of indoor air contamination.

  14. Biofiltration: An innovative air pollution control technology for VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Leson, G. ); Winer, A.M. )

    1991-08-01

    Biofiltration is a relatively recent air pollution control (APC) technology in which off-gases containing biodegradable volatile organic compounds (VOC) or inorganic air toxics are vented through a biologically active material. This technology has been successfully applied in Germany and The Netherlands in many full-scale applications to control odors, VOC and air toxic emissions from a wide range of industrial and public sector sources. Control efficiencies of more than 90 percent have been achieved for many common air pollutants. Due to lower operating costs, biofiltration can provide significant economic advantages over other APC technologies if applied to off-gases that contain readily biodegradable pollutants in low concentrations. Environmental benefits include low energy requirements and the avoidance of cross media transfer of pollutants. This paper reviews the history and current status of biofiltration, outlines its underlying scientific and engineering principles, and discusses the applicability of biofilters for a wide range of specific emission sources.

  15. Implementation of VOC source reduction practices in a manufactured house and in school classrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Apte, M.G.; Shendell, D.G.; Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.E.R.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed studies of a new manufactured house and four new industrialized relocatable school classrooms were conducted to determine the emission sources of formaldehyde and other VOCs and to identify and implement source reduction practices. Procedures were developed to generate VOC emission factors that allowed reasonably accurate predictions of indoor air VOC concentrations. Based on the identified sources of formaldehyde and other aldehydes, practices were developed to reduce the concentrations of these compounds in new house construction. An alternate ceiling panel reduced formaldehyde concentrations in the classrooms. Overall, the classrooms had relatively low VOC concentrations.

  16. Assessment of VOC emissions from fiberglass-boat manufacturing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, M.B.; Kuo, I.R.

    1990-05-01

    The report presents an assessment of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing. A description of the industry structures is presented, including estimates of the number of facilities, their size, and geographic distribution. The fiberglass boat manufacturing process is described, along with sources and types of VOC emissions. Model plants representative of typical facilities are also described. Estimates of VOC emissions are presented on per plant and national bases. VOC emissions from this industry consist mainly of styrene emission from gel coating and lamination, and acetone or other solvent emissions from clean-up activities. Finally, potential VOC control technologies are evaluated for this industry, including a discussion of technical feasibility. Limited cost data are also presented.

  17. Emission inventory of evaporative emissions of VOCs in four metro cities in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjali; née Som Majumdar, Dipanjali

    2010-01-01

    High concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air of urban areas stress the need for the control of VOC emissions due to the toxic and carcinogenic nature of many VOCs commonly encountered in urban air. Emission inventories are an essential tool in the management of local air quality, which provide a listing of sources of air pollutant emissions within a specific area over a specified period of time. This study intended to provide a level IV emission inventory as par the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) definition for evaporative VOC emissions in the metro cities of India namely Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, and Kolkata. The vehicular evaporative emissions are found to be the largest contributor to the total evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons followed by evaporative losses related to petrol loading and unloading activities. Besides vehicle-related activities, other major sources contributing to evaporative emissions of hydrocarbons are surface coating, dry cleaning, graphical art applications, printing (newspaper and computer), and the use of consumer products. Various specific preventive measures are also recommended for reducing the emissions.

  18. Study of the effect of biogenic VOC emissions on regional ozone production and the implications for VOC or NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect

    Stockwell, W.R.; Kuhn, M.

    1998-12-31

    A key question for the development of air pollution control strategies is whether to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Significant levels of biogenic VOC emissions may greatly limit the effectiveness of VOC control strategies. Concerns have been raised because for many cities it has been suggested that biogenic emissions are a dominate source of VOCs. Biogenic emissions would be expected to contribute an even larger fraction of the VOC emissions on the regional scale than within urban areas. The authors used a new atmospheric chemistry mechanism, the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM), to perform ozone reactivity calculations to investigate the effects of biogenic emissions on the production of photooxidants in the atmosphere. The results show that incremental reactivity of isoprene is about the same as xylene and that the incremental reactivities of d-limonene and a-pinene are near those of toluene.

  19. VOC signatures from North American oil and gas sources (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Hartt, G.; Meinardi, S.; Schroeder, J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2013 UC Irvine has used its whole air sampling (WAS) technique to investigate VOC source signatures from a range of oil and gas sources in North America, including five separate field campaigns at the Alberta oil sands (1 airborne, 4 ground-based); the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill (airborne and ship-based); the 2012 airborne Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) mission over oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma; and the 2013 ground-based Barnett Shale Campaign in Texas. Each campaign has characterized more than 80 individual C1-C10 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes and aromatics. For example, oil sands are an extra-heavy, unconventional crude oil that is blended with diluent in order to flow, and upgraded into synthetic crude oil. The VOC signature at the oil sands mining and upgrading facilities is alkane-rich, and the fuel gas associated with these operations has an i-butane/n-butane ratio similar to that of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In addition to light alkanes, enhanced levels of benzene were observed over US oil and natural gas wells during DC3, likely because of its use in hydrofracking fluid. A series of VOC emission ratios from North American petrochemical sources will be presented and compared, including oil sands, conventional oil and hydrofracking operations.

  20. Odorous VOC emission decay following land application of swine manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A research project was conducted to determine how VOC emissions degrade with time after land application of swine manure slurry, and to determine how VOC emissions are affected by land application method (surface application vs. injection). Swine slurry from a pull-plug barn was applied to researc...

  1. Characterization and measurement of VOC emissions from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing concern in the U.S. regarding the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from farms and their contribution to smog formation near ozone non-attainment areas. The few studies that have measured VOC emissions have identified mixed feed and the exposed silage face as major farm ...

  2. VOC emission rates and emission factors for a sheetfed offset printing shop.

    PubMed

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Javor, M; Keil, C B; Milz, S A

    1995-04-01

    Emission rates were determined during production for a sheetfed offset printing shop by combining the measured concentrations and ventilation rates with mass balance models that characterized the printing space. Air samples were collected simultaneously on charcoal tubes for 12 separate 1-hour periods at 6 locations. Air samples and cleaning solvents were analyzed by gas chromatography for total volatile organic compounds (VOC) and 13 hydrocarbons. The average VOC emission rate was 470 g/hr with a range of 160-1100 g/hr. These values were in good agreement with the amounts of VOC, hexane, toluene, and aromatic C9s determined from estimated solvent usage and measured solvent compositions. Comparison of the emission rates with source activities indicated an emission factor of 30-51 g VOC/press cleaning. Based on the test observations it was estimated that this typical small printing facility was likely to release 1-2 T VOC/year. The methodology also may be useful for the surface coating industry, as emission rates in this study were determined without recourse to a temporary total enclosure and without interfering with worker activities, increasing worker exposure, or increasing safety and explosion hazards.

  3. Anthropogenic VOC speciation in emission inventories: a method for improvement and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; D'angiola, A.; Granier, C.; Monks, P. S.; Law, K.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursor compounds for the formation of ozone and other secondary organic aerosols. Anthropogenic sources of VOCs are dominated by industrial usage and transportation sources, the latter being extremely important in urban areas. Megacities and large urban conglomerations are emission hot spots that exert disproportionately large adverse health effects on the population and surrounding environment, owing to their high population density and concentrated emission sources. Exceedances of ozone air quality standards are a problem in many urban areas. Improvements in the modelling of ozone precursors would benefit our understanding of the impact of changes in emissions and the effect of future legislation on air quality. As many VOCs are extremely reactive in the atmosphere and have high ozone forming potential, improved speciation of VOCs in models could lead to better predictions of ozone levels and secondary organic aerosol formation. Previously, VOC and carbon monoxide (CO) data from urban areas around the world were compared. Significant differences in VOC concentrations were observed, however, when normalized to CO, the VOC-CO ratios were similar for many locations and over time, even as emission reductions were implemented. The largest variation was found in the lighter alkanes due to the use of alternative transportation fuels in various world regions. These ratios were grouped by region and used to develop a new speciation for surface emissions of VOCs, by applying the regional observed VOC-CO ratios to the CO emissions for the urban areas. Urban areas were defined as 150 inhabitants per km2 or greater. Model simulations were performed using the MOZART-4 chemistry transport model to assess the improved speciation of the VOC emissions. The model outputs were compared to urban observational data where available. The impact of the new speciation of the distribution of CO, OH and ozone at the global scale will be

  4. Pilot and Full Scale Measurements of VOC Emissions from Lumber Drying of Inland Northwest Species

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Lamb, Brian K.; Westberg, Halvor; Folk, Richard; Knighton, B; Grimsrud, E

    2004-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are precursors to ground level ozone. Ground level ozone is the major component of photochemical smog, and has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects. These health effects include cancer, heart disease, pneumonia and death. In order to reduce ground level ozone, VOC emissions are being more stringently regulated. One VOC source that may come under regulation is lumber drying. Drying lumber is known to emit VOC into the atmosphere. This research evaluates the validity of VOC emission measurements from a small-scale kiln to approximate VOC emissions from kilns at commercial mills. We also report emission factors for three lumber species commonly harvested in the northwest United States (Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, & grand fir). This work was done with a novel tracer ratio technique at a small laboratory kiln and a large commercial lumber drying facility. The measured emission factors were 0.51 g/kgOD for Douglas-fir, 0.7 g/kgOD for ponderosa pine, and 0.15 g/kgOD for grand fir. Aldehyde emission rates from lumber drying were also measured in some experiments. Results indicate that aldehyde emissions can constitute a significant percentage of the total VOC emissions.

  5. Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Faulkner, D.; Sullivan, D.P.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Russell, M.L.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13-week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings.

  6. SUBSTRATE EFFECTS ON VOC EMISSIONS FROM A LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of two substrates -- a stainless steel plate and a gypsum board -- on the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a latex paint were evaluated by environmental chamber tests. It was found that the amount of VOCs emitted from the painted stainless steel was 2 to...

  7. VOC EMISSIONS FROM AN AIR FRESHENER IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes results of tests, conducted in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) large chamber facility, that investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from one electrical plug-in type air freshener with pine-scented refills. VOCs were measured ...

  8. VOC from Vehicular Evaporation Emissions: Status and Control Strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Man, Hanyang; Tschantz, Michael; Wu, Ye; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2015-12-15

    Vehicular evaporative emissions is an important source of volatile organic carbon (VOC), however, accurate estimation of emission amounts and scientific evaluation of control strategy for these emissions have been neglected outside of the United States. This study provides four kinds of basic emission factors: diurnal, hot soak, permeation, and refueling. Evaporative emissions from the Euro 4 vehicles (1.6 kg/year/car) are about four times those of U.S. vehicles (0.4 kg/year/car). Closing this emissions gap would have a larger impact than the progression from Euro 3 to Euro 6 tailpipe HC emission controls. Even in the first 24 h of parking, China's current reliance upon the European 24 h diurnal standard results in 508 g/vehicle/year emissions, higher than 32 g/vehicle/year from Tier 2 vehicles. The U.S. driving cycle matches Beijing real-world conditions much better on both typical trip length and average speed than current European driving cycles. At least two requirements should be added to the Chinese emissions standards: an onboard refueling vapor recovery to force the canister to be sized sufficiently large, and a 48-h evaporation test requirement to ensure that adequate purging occurs over a shorter drive sequence.

  9. [Characteristics and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the northern suburb of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    An, Jun-lin; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Hong-lei; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Based on the data of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected continuously from 1st Mar, 2011 to 29th Feb, 2012 in the northern suburb of Nanjing, characteristics of their variability, differences of ratios of tracers and source apportionment by principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores (PCA/APCS) were analyzed. The results showed that the total VOCs mixing ratios were 43.52 x 10(-9), which accounted for 45.1% of alkanes, alkenes for 25.3%, alkyne for 7.3%, and aromatics for 22.3%. There was an obviously seasonal variation of VOCs, with the maximum in summer and the minimum in winter. There was an obvious seasonal variation of VOCs component, with highest alkanes in winter, highest alkenes in summer, highest aromatic in spring, and highest alkyne in winter. By using the specific pollutant ratios ( hydrocarbons/acetylene and toluene/benzene) method, it indicated that the observation site was greatly affected by the surrounding industrial areas. Source analysis of VOCs by PCA/APCS mode showed that the sources consisted of industrial production sources, automobile emission sources, combustion sources, industrial production volatilization sources, solvent use sources and biogenic emission sources. In addition, there were seasonal variations. Overall, the sources related to industrial production activities represented 45% - 63% of VOCs, and they were followed by automobile emission sources, which represented 34% - 50%.

  10. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Watson, J.J.; Jones, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds that possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The inventory shows total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of about 110,000 Gg/yr, about 10% lower than global VOC inventories developed by other researchers. The study identifies the U.S. as the largest emitter (21% of the total global VOC), followed by the USSR, China, India, and Japan. Globally, fuel wood combustion and savanna burning were among the largest VOC emission sources, accounting for over 35% of the total global VOC emissions. The production and use of gasoline, refuse disposal activities, and organic chemical and rubber manufacturing were also found to be significant sources of global VOC emissions.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM FIBERGLASS BOAT MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an assessment of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from fiberglass boat manufacturing. Description of the industry structure is presented, including estimates of the number of facilities, their size, and geographic distribution. The fiberglass boat m...

  12. Quantifying VOC emissions for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Lord, David L.

    2013-06-01

    A very important aspect of the Department of Energys (DOEs) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program is regulatory compliance. One of the regulatory compliance issues deals with limiting the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted into the atmosphere from brine wastes when they are discharged to brine holding ponds. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set limits on the amount of VOCs that can be discharged to the atmosphere. Several attempts have been made to quantify the VOC emissions associated with the brine ponds going back to the late 1970s. There are potential issues associated with each of these quantification efforts. Two efforts were made to quantify VOC emissions by analyzing VOC content of brine samples obtained from wells. Efforts to measure air concentrations were mentioned in historical reports but no data have been located to confirm these assertions. A modeling effort was also performed to quantify the VOC emissions. More recently in 2011- 2013, additional brine sampling has been performed to update the VOC emissions estimate. An analysis of the statistical confidence in these results is presented here. Arguably, there are uncertainties associated with each of these efforts. The analysis herein indicates that the upper confidence limit in VOC emissions based on recent brine sampling is very close to the 0.42 ton/MMB limit used historically on the project. Refining this estimate would require considerable investment in additional sampling, analysis, and monitoring. An analysis of the VOC emissions at each site suggests that additional discharges could be made and stay within current regulatory limits.

  13. Contribution of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles toward total VOC emissions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    The features of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles were examined. One potential source of evaporative emissions is mainly the so-called sigh of a fuel tank, which is a function of the daily temperature change and the volume not occupied by fuel. A theoretical equation was proposed for estimating the fuel vapor generation. It reproduced observed features well but underestimated the absolute values obtained in the experimental results. The widely used semi-empirical Reddy equation overestimates the results. The performance of a carbon canister was also evaluated. More than 95% of fuel vapor generation was trapped by the carbon canister. However, the canister worked for only one day because it adsorbed more VOC than that contained in the sigh alone. To estimate the evaporative emissions in the real world, the fuel tank temperature change while a car was parked in an outside car park was monitored and was found to be almost the same as the change in ambient air temperature; no other weather conditions had any effect. According to the findings in this study and data on frequency of car use, the annual amount of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles in Japan was estimated to be 4.6% of the total VOC emissions in Japan, making it the 6th-highest source of VOC.

  14. Temporal variability and sources of VOCs in urban areas of the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Florou, Kalliopi; Psichoudaki, Magda; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-11-01

    During the summer of 2012 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in urban sites, in Athens and Patras, two of the largest cities in Greece. Also, during the winter of 2013, PTR-MS measurements were conducted in the center of the city of Athens. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the VOC measurements to gain insights about their sources. In summer most of the measured VOCs were due to biogenic and traffic emissions. Isoprene, monoterpenes, and several oxygenated VOCs (oVOCs) originated mainly from vegetation either directly or as oxidation products. Isoprene average concentrations in Patras and Athens were 1 and 0.7 ppb respectively, while the monoterpene concentrations were 0.3 and 0.9 ppb respectively. Traffic was the main source of aromatic compounds during summer. For Patras and Athens the average concentrations of benzene were 0.1 and 0.2 ppb, of toluene 0.3 and 0.8 ppb, and of the xylenes 0.3 and 0.7 ppb respectively. Winter measurements in Athens revealed that biomass burning used for residential heating was a major VOC source contributing both aromatic VOCs and biogenic compounds such as monoterpenes. Several episodes related to biomass burning were identified and emission ratios (ERs) and emission factors (EFs) were estimated.

  15. Effects of NO x and VOCs from five emission sources on summer surface O3 over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yu; An, Junling; Li, Jian; Chen, Yong; Li, Ying; Liu, Xingang; Hu, Min

    2014-07-01

    The impacts of emissions from industry, power plant, transportation, residential, and biogenic sources on daily maximum surface ozone (O3DM) over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region in North China in the summer of 2007 were examined in a modeling study. The modeling system consisted of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the photochemical dispersion model, CAMx. The factor separation technique (FST) was used to quantify the effect of individual emission source types and the synergistic interactions among two or more types. Additionally, the effectiveness of emission reduction scenarios was explored. The industry, power plant, and transportation emission source types were found to be the most important in terms of their individual effects on O3DM. The key contributor to high surface O3 was power plant emissions, with a peak individual effect of 40 ppbv in the southwestern BTH area. The individual effect from the biogenic emission category was quite low. The synergistic effects from the combinations of each pair of anthropogenic emission types suppressed O3 formation, while the synergistic effects for combinations of three were favorable for O3 formation when the industrial and power plant emission source types coexisted. The quadruple synergistic effects were positive only with the combination of power plant, transportation, residential, and biogenic sources, while the quintuple synergistic effect showed only minor impacts on O3DM concentrations. A 30% reduction in industrial and transportation sources produced the most effective impacts on O3 concentrations, with a maximum decrease of 20 ppbv. These results suggested that the synergistic impacts among emission source types should be considered when formulating emission control strategies for O3 reduction.

  16. Source contributions to ambient VOCs and CO at a rural site in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Wang, T.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Yu, X. M.; Kwok, Y. H.; Li, Y. S.

    Ambient data on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO) obtained at a rural site in eastern China are analyzed to investigate the nature of emission sources and their relative contributions to ambient concentrations. A principal component analysis (PCA) showed that vehicle emissions and biofuel burning, biomass burning and industrial emissions were the major sources of VOCs and CO at the rural site. The source apportionments were then evaluated using an absolute principal component scores (APCS) technique combined with multiple linear regressions. The results indicated that 71%±5% (average±standard error) of the total VOC emissions were attributed to a combination of vehicle emissions and biofuel burning, and 7%±3% to gasoline evaporation and solvent emissions. Both biomass burning and industrial emissions contributed to 11%±1% and 11%±0.03% of the total VOC emissions, respectively. In addition, vehicle emissions and biomass and biofuel burning accounted for 96%±6% of the total CO emissions at the rural site, of which the biomass burning was responsible for 18%±3%. The results based on PCA/APCS are generally consistent with those from the emission inventory, although a larger relative contribution to CO from biomass burning is indicated from our analysis.

  17. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions. Part II: source contribution assessment using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model.

    PubMed

    Badol, Caroline; Locoge, Nadine; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-25

    In Part I of this study (Badol C, Locoge N, Leonardis T, Gallo JC. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions, Part I: Study area description, data set acquisition and qualitative data analysis of the data set. Sci Total Environ 2007; submitted as companion manuscript.) the study area, acquisition of the one-year data set and qualitative analysis of the data set have been described. In Part II a source profile has been established for each activity present in the study area: 6 profiles (urban heating, solvent use, natural gas leakage, biogenic emissions, gasoline evaporation and vehicle exhaust) have been extracted from literature to characterise urban sources, 7 industrial profiles have been established via canister sampling around industrial plants (hydrocarbon cracking, oil refinery, hydrocarbon storage, lubricant storage, lubricant refinery, surface treatment and metallurgy). The CMB model is briefly described and its implementation is discussed through the selection of source profiles and fitting species. Main results of CMB modellings for the Dunkerque area are presented. (1) The daily evolution of source contributions for the urban wind sector shows that the vehicle exhaust source contribution varies between 40 and 55% and its relative increase at traffic rush hours is hardly perceptible. (2) The relative contribution of vehicle exhaust varies from 55% in winter down to 30% in summer. This decrease is due to the increase of the relative contribution of hydrocarbon storage source reaching up to 20% in summer. (3) The evolution of source contributions with wind directions has confirmed that in urban wind sectors the contribution of vehicle exhaust dominate with around 45-55%. For the other wind sectors that include some industrial plants, the contribution of industrial sources is around 60% and could reach 80% for the sector 280-310 degrees , which corresponds to the most dense

  18. VOC emissions controls for aluminum cold rolling mills

    SciTech Connect

    Genoble, A.L.; Lagoe, D.J.; Wasyluk, W.J.R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a case history of retrofitting VOC emissions controls to two (2) aluminum cold rolling mills at an aluminum sheet complex in central New York. The plant site was located in the northeast ozone transport region, and it was necessary to achieve compliance with VOC emissions limitations. Emissions control equipment included high efficiency filters for VOC mists and a wash oil process for scrubbing VOC vapors. All rolling oil was recovered for reuse on site. A vacuum distillation process was used to separate wash oil from rolling oil. The equipment began operating in mid-1995, and long term results have proven the validity of the recovery concept. Total project costs were $7.2 million for two (2) 60,000 ACFM systems. Project duration from the date of the initial request for equipment price quotations to the first round of stack testing was twenty (20) months. The modular construction of the vacuum distillation equipment simplified field erection and shortened the duration of field work. Stack testing indicated overall VOC collection efficiencies that exceeded regulatory requirements. Initially, problems were experienced with Method 25 stack testing methodology. Final results were confirmed by two (2) independent methods.

  19. Detection and quantification of methane and VOC emissions from oil and gas production operations using remote measurements, Interim report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved understanding of air pollutant emissions from oil and gas production operations is needed. With a steadily increasing number of production sources, the impact of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on regional ozone is potentially significant. As the separation dis...

  20. Contribution of traffic emissions to indoor airborne VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    The contribution of nearby vehicle traffic to indoor airborne volatile organic compound levels and to personal exposures was examined to determine the importance of this source. Indoor and outdoor levels of selected VOCs, aldehydes, ketones, and ethanol were measured at 10 homes in Toronto, on sidewalks near the traffic source, indoors and in the backyards or balconies of apartments (outdoors). Concurrently, air exchange rates were measured at each home with a perfluorocarbon tracer method. All the residences were within 1 km of urban intersections with traffic counts of more than 20,000 vehicles per day. Average concentrations of hexane, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, benzene and propionaldehyde decreased in the order: street level > indoor > outdoor. These compounds occur in vehicle emissions, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 24 to 88 % suggesting that traffic emissions contributed to indoor pollutant level through the process of air exchange. For other compounds different trends were observed. Indoors concentrations were greater than outdoors for ethylacetate, tetrachlorethane, pinene, limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, naphthalene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and ethanol, for example. These compounds are common in consumer products, and the contribution of outdoor to indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 44%. The differences in street and backyard (outdoor) concentrations for some compounds were large due to the presence of nearby vehicles at street level sampling sites, indicating that the impact of traffic on human exposures (pedestrians on sidewalks and occupants of vehicles) is potentially large, compared to the impact of general background urban air pollutants.

  1. Speciated VOC emission inventory and spatial patterns of ozone formation potential in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Shao, Min; Che, Wenwei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhong, Liuju; Zhang, Yuanhang; Streets, David

    2009-11-15

    The Pearl River Delta region (PRD) of China has long suffered from severe ground-level ozone pollution. Knowledge of the sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is essential for ozone chemistry. In this work, a speciated VOC emission inventory was established on the basis of updated emissions and local VOC source profiles. The top 10 species, in terms of ozone formation potentials (OFPs), consisted of isoprene, mp-xylene, toluene, ethylene, propene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 2-methyl-2-butene, 1-butene, and alpha-pinene. These species contributed only 35.9% to VOCs emissions but accounted for 64.1% of the OFP in the region. The spatial patterns of the VOC source inventory agreed well with city-based source apportionment results, especially for vehicle emissions and industry plus VOC product-related emissions. Mapping of the OFPs and measured ozone concentrations indicated that the formation of higher ozone in the south and southeast of the PRD region differed from that in the Conghua area, a remote area in the north of the PRD. We recommend that the priorities for the control of VOC sources include motorcycles, gasoline vehicles, and solvent use because of their larger OFP contributions.

  2. Chamber assessment of formaldehyde and VOC emissions from wood-based panels.

    PubMed

    Brown, S K

    1999-09-01

    Volatile organic emissions from particleboard, medium density fibreboard (MDF) and office furniture have been measured in dynamic environmental chambers, both small and room-sized. Characterisation of product emission properties in small chambers was possible when inter- and intra-sheet variations were considered. Formaldehyde emission factors for all products were approximately double European low-emission specifications and did not decay to the latter for several months. Long-term emission behaviour could not be predicted from short-term measurements. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions were low for the MDF product, higher for particleboard, and highest for laminated office furniture. The compounds emitted differed from those reported in other countries. VOC emissions from the sheet products decreased more quickly than formaldehyde, reaching low levels within two weeks, except for MDF which was found to become a low-level source of hexanal after several months.

  3. Light dependency of VOC emissions from selected Mediterranean plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    The light, temperature and stomatal conductance dependencies of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from ten plant species commonly found in the Mediterranean region were studied using a fully controlled leaf cuvette in the laboratory. At standard conditions of temperature and light (30°C and 1000 μmol m -2 s -1 PAR), low emitting species ( Arbutus unedo, Pinus halepensis, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) emitted between 0.1 and 5.0 μg (C) (total VOCs) g -1 dw h -1, a medium emitter ( Pinus pinea) emitted between 5 and 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1 and high emitters ( Cistus monspeliensis, Lavendula stoechas and Quercus sp.) emitted more than 10 μg (C) g -1 dw h -1. VOC emissions from all of the plant species investigated showed some degree of light dependency, which was distinguishable from temperature dependency. Emissions of all compounds from Quercus sp. were light dependent. Ocimene was one of several monoterpene compounds emitted by P. pinea and was strongly correlated to light. Only a fraction of monoterpene emissions from C. incanus exhibited apparent weak light dependency but emissions from this plant species were strongly correlated to temperature. Data presented here are consistent with past studies, which show that emissions are independent of stomatal conductance. These results may allow more accurate predictions of monoterpene emission fluxes from the Mediterranean region to be made.

  4. Effects of cold temperature and ethanol content on VOC emissions from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle...

  5. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  6. [Source apportionment of VOCs in the northern suburb of Nanjing in summer].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhu, Bin; Gao, Jin-Hui; Li, Yong-Yu; Xia, Li

    2013-12-01

    Hourly concentrations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled in August 2012 in the northern suburb of Nanjing. Emissions of VOCs were analyzed by using PMF (positive matrix factorization) and CPF (conditional probability function). The hourly average mixing ratio of the TVOCs in summer was (33.84 +/- 27.77) x 10(-9), with a bimodal diurnal variation trend. 49.3% of the TVOCs were alkanes, 24.4% were alkenes, 18.5% were aromatics and 7.81% were acetylene. Five sources were identified as summer major contributors to ambient VOCs concentrations by PMF. 33.1% of the total VOCs was attributed to vehicle related emissions, 25.8% to fuel evaporation, 23.2% to industrial emissions, 8.1% to solvent evaporation and 9.7% to plant emissions. For alkanes, vehicle emissions, industrial emissions, fuel and solvent evaporation accounted for 23.7%, 35.3%, 31.3% and 2%, respectively. For alkenes, fuel evaporation accounted for 41.1% , industrial emissions for 18.4%, and vehicle emission for 24.3%. Vehicle emission was the major contributor to aromatics, accounting for 49.2%, followed by solvent evaporation, which accounted for 30.8%.

  7. Biotrickling filtration of complex pharmaceutical VOC emissions along with chloroform.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Philip, Ligy; Murty Bhallamudi, S

    2012-06-01

    Biodegradation of chloroform along with a mixture of VOCs (methanol, ethanol, acetone and toluene) commonly found in pharmaceutical emissions using a biotrickling filter (BTF) was evaluated. The performance of the BTF was evaluated for both steady and transient conditions, for different inlet loading rates (ILR), empty bed residence time (EBRT) and inlet chloroform concentrations. Among the VOCs studied before chloroform feeding, toluene removal was the least, under all the operating conditions. Complete removal of all pollutants was achieved up to a chloroform loading rate of 14.22 g/m(3)/h. Increase in loading rate of chloroform adversely affected the removal efficiency of toluene and declined the overall performance of BTF. The results suggest that biodegradation of VOCs is influenced by the inlet loading rate and complexity of pollutants in the inlet air stream. Results from studies on shock loading and starvation indicated that the system was highly resilient to transient operating conditions.

  8. VOC emission into the atmosphere by trees and leaf litter in Polish forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, V.; Smolewska, M.; Tyszkiewicz, Z.

    2009-04-01

    It is generally recognized at present that the vegetation of continents is the principal source of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the atmosphere. The upper limit of the evaluation of global phytogenic VOC is 1100-1500 Tg/yr (Isidorov, 1990; Guenther et al., 1995). Although these global evaluations showing the place of phytogenic emission among of other VOC sources are important, evaluations for individual countries are also very important. This poster represents the results of the estimation of VOC emission from Polish forests. Calculations took into account the composition and age of forests. According to our estimation, the total VOC emission by the arboreal vegetation differs from 190 to 750 kt/yr, depending of weather conditions in different years. There are only few studies conducted on decaying plant material as a source of atmospheric VOCs, but still they are able to give evidence of the importance of this source. For Polish forests, the litter mass is estimated to be (16-19)106 t/yr. These organic materials undergo decomposition by mesofauna and microorganisms. In these processes volatile organic compounds (VOC) stored in the litter and secondary metabolites of litter-destroying fungi are emitted into the atmosphere. The scale of the phenomenon makes leaf litter an important VOC source in the atmosphere. The filling of numerous gaps in researches of VOC emissions from decomposing leaf litter demands carrying out of long term field experiments in various climatic conditions. In this communication we report also the results of 3.5-year experiment on qualitative and quantitative GC-MS investigations of VOC emitted into the gas phase from leaves litter of some species of deciduous and coniferous trees of Polish forests. Apart from terpenes and their oxygenated derivatives, which are usual in plant tissues, leaf litter intensively emits vast amounts of lower alcohols and carbonyl compounds. We suppose that these volatile substances are products

  9. Oxygenated VOC and monoterpene emissions from a boreal coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Aalto, J.; Kolari, P.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compared with terpenoids, emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from boreal ecosystems have been poorly characterized. We measured ecosystem scale emissions of three oxygenated compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and monoterpenes from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland during the summers 2006-2008. The measurements were conducted using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The contribution of the three oxygenated compounds to the measured total emissions was 40-60 %. The highest oxygenated VOC emissions were those of methanol, comprising 20-30 % of the total, followed by acetone with a share of 10-20 %. The acetaldehyde emissions were 5-10 % of the total. This emission composition will be compared with that obtained from shoot enclosure measurements. Methanol showed deposition during some periods although its overall flux was towards the atmosphere. The monoterpene emissions had a light dependent component, suggesting that part of the emissions originated directly from monoterpene biosynthesis. Diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations in the emissions, along with temperature and light dependencies, will be discussed.

  10. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  11. Liquid Resins With Low VOC Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    titrated with the perchloric acid / peracetic acid solution (Aldrich) until the indicator, 0.1% crystal violet in acetic acid (Aldrich), changed color from...method of reducing styrene emissions from vinyl ester (VE) resins is to replace some or all of the styrene with fatty acid -based monomers. Fatty acid ...renewable resources. VE resins with no more than 20 wt% styrene were prepared using methacrylate terminated lauric acid . The viscosities of these

  12. Determination of VOC emission rates and compositions for offset printing.

    PubMed

    Wadden, R A; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E; Conroy, L M; Keil, C B

    1995-07-01

    The release rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC) as fugitive emissions from offset printing are difficult to quantify, and the compositions are usually not known. Tests were conducted at three offset printing shops that varied in size and by process. In each case, the building shell served as the test "enclosure," and air flow and concentration measurements were made at each air entry and exit point. Emission rates and VOC composition were determined during production for (1) a small shop containing three sheetfed presses and two spirit duplicators (36,700 sheets, 47,240 envelopes and letterheads), (2) a medium-size industrial in-house shop with two webfed and three sheetfed presses, and one spirit duplicator (315,130 total sheets), and (3) one print room of a large commercial concern containing three webfed, heatset operations (1.16 x 10(6) ft) served by catalytic air pollution control devices. Each test consisted of 12 one-hour periods over two days. Air samples were collected simultaneously during each period at 7-14 specified locations within each space. The samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) for total VOC and for 13-19 individual organics. Samples of solvents used at each shop were also analyzed by GC. Average VOC emission rates were 4.7-6.1 kg/day for the small sheetfed printing shop, 0.4-0.9 kg/day for the industrial shop, and 79-82 kg/day for the commercial print room. Emission compositions were similar and included benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and hexane. Comparison of the emission rates with mass balance estimates based on solvent usage and composition were quite consistent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. VOC source identification from personal and residential indoor, outdoor and workplace microenvironment samples in EXPOLIS-Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Jurvelin, J.; Koistinen, K.; Saarela, K.; Jantunen, M.

    Principal component analyses (varimax rotation) were used to identify common sources of 30 target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential outdoor, residential indoor and workplace microenvironment and personal 48-h exposure samples, as a component of the EXPOLIS-Helsinki study. Variability in VOC concentrations in residential outdoor microenvironments was dominated by compounds associated with long-range transport of pollutants, followed by traffic emissions, emissions from trees and product emissions. Variability in VOC concentrations in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) free residential indoor environments was dominated by compounds associated with indoor cleaning products, followed by compounds associated with traffic emissions, long-range transport of pollutants and product emissions. Median indoor/outdoor ratios for compounds typically associated with traffic emissions and long-range transport of pollutants exceeded 1, in some cases quite considerably, indicating substantial indoor source contributions. Changes in the median indoor/outdoor ratios during different seasons reflected different seasonal ventilation patterns as increased ventilation led to dilution of those VOC compounds in the indoor environment that had indoor sources. Variability in workplace VOC concentrations was dominated by compounds associated with traffic emissions followed by product emissions, long-range transport and air fresheners. Variability in VOC concentrations in ETS free personal exposure samples was dominated by compounds associated with traffic emissions, followed by long-range transport, cleaning products and product emissions. VOC sources in personal exposure samples reflected the times spent in different microenvironments, and personal exposure samples were not adequately represented by any one microenvironment, demonstrating the need for personal exposure sampling.

  14. Seasonal variability and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Paris megacity (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudic, Alexia; Gros, Valérie; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Sanchez, Olivier; Sarda-Estève, Roland; Kalogridis, Cerise; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Baisnée, Dominique; Favez, Olivier; Albinet, Alexandre; Sciare, Jean; Bonsang, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of air quality studies at the megacity scale, highly time-resolved volatile organic compound (C2-C8) measurements were performed in downtown Paris (urban background sites) from January to November 2010. This unique dataset included non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and aromatic/oxygenated species (OVOCs) measured by a GC-FID (gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector) and a PTR-MS (proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer), respectively. This study presents the seasonal variability of atmospheric VOCs being monitored in the French megacity and their various associated emission sources. Clear seasonal and diurnal patterns differed from one VOC to another as the result of their different origins and the influence of environmental parameters (solar radiation, temperature). Source apportionment (SA) was comprehensively conducted using a multivariate mathematical receptor modeling. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization tool (US EPA, PMF) was used to apportion and quantify ambient VOC concentrations into six different sources. The modeled source profiles were identified from near-field observations (measurements from three distinct emission sources: inside a highway tunnel, at a fireplace and from a domestic gas flue, hence with a specific focus on road traffic, wood-burning activities and natural gas emissions) and hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The reconstructed VOC sources were cross validated using independent tracers such as inorganic gases (NO, NO2, CO), black carbon (BC) and meteorological data (temperature). The largest contributors to the predicted VOC concentrations were traffic-related activities (including motor vehicle exhaust, 15 % of the total mass on the annual average, and evaporative sources, 10 %), with the remaining emissions from natural gas and background (23 %), solvent use (20 %), wood-burning (18 %) and a biogenic source (15 %). An important finding of

  15. Evaluation of VOC emission measurement methods for paint spray booths.

    PubMed

    Eklund, B M; Nelson, T P

    1995-03-01

    Interest in regulations to control solvent emissions from automotive painting systems is increasing, especially in ozone nonattainment areas. Therefore, an accurate measurement method for VOC emissions from paint spray booths used in the automotive industry is needed to ascertain the efficiency of the spray booth capture and the total emissions. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study evaluating potential VOC sampling and analytical methods used in estimating paint spray booth emissions, and discusses these results relative to other published data. Eight test methods were selected for evaluation. The accuracy of each sampling and analytical method was determined using test atmospheres of known concentration and composition that closely matched the actual exhaust air from paint spray booths. The solvent mixture to generate the test atmospheres contained a large proportion of polar, oxygenated hydrocarbons such as ketones and alcohols. A series of identical tests was performed for each sampling/analytical method with each test atmosphere to assess the precision of the methods. The study identified significant differences among the test methods in terms of accuracy, precision, cost, and complexity.

  16. Estimates of ozone response to various combinations of NO(x) and VOC emission reductions in the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roselle, Shawn J.; Schere, Kenneth L.; Chu, Shao-Hang

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that controls on NO(x) emissions may be necessary, in addition to existing and future Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) controls, for the abatement of ozone (O3) over portions of the United States. This study compares various combinations of anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emission reductions through a series of model simulations. A total of 6 simulations were performed with the Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) for a 9-day period in July 1988. Each simulation reduced anthropogenic NO(x) and VOC emissions across-the-board by different amounts. Maximum O3 concentrations for the period were compared between the simulations. Comparison of the simulations suggests that: (1) NO(x) controls may be more effective than VOC controls in reducing peak O3 over most of the eastern United States; (2) VOC controls are most effective in urban areas having large sources of emissions; (3) NO(x) controls may increase O3 near large point sources; and (4) the benefit gained from increasing the amount of VOC controls may lessen as the amount of NO(x) control is increased. This paper has been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's peer and administrative review policies and approved for presentation and publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  17. VOCs Emissions from Multiple Wood Pellet Types and Concentrations in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia; Ashley, William J.; Bregg, Sandar; Walier, Drew; LeBouf, Ryan; Hopke, Philip K.; Rossner, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Wood pellet storage safety is an important aspect for implementing woody biomass as a renewable energy source. When wood pellets are stored indoors in large quantities (tons) in poorly ventilated spaces in buildings, such as in basements, off-gassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can significantly affect indoor air quality. To determine the emission rates and potential impact of VOC emissions, a series of laboratory and field measurements were conducted using softwood, hardwood, and blended wood pellets manufactured in New York. Evacuated canisters were used to collect air samples from the headspace of drums containing pellets and then in basements and pellet storage areas of homes and small businesses. Multiple peaks were identified during GC/MS and GC/FID analysis, and four primary VOCs were characterized and quantified: methanol, pentane, pentanal, and hexanal. Laboratory results show that total VOCs (TVOCs) concentrations for softwood (SW) were statistically (p < 0.02) higher than blended or hardwood (HW) (SW: 412 ± 25; blended: 203 ± 4; HW: 99 ± 8, ppb). The emission rate from HW was the fastest, followed by blended and SW, respectively. Emissions rates were found to range from 10−1 to 10−5 units, depending upon environmental factors. Field measurements resulted in airborne concentrations ranging from 67 ± 8 to 5000 ± 3000 ppb of TVOCs and 12 to 1500 ppb of aldehydes, with higher concentrations found in a basement with a large fabric bag storage unit after fresh pellet delivery and lower concentrations for aged pellets. These results suggest that large fabric bag storage units resulted in a substantial release of VOCs into the building air. Occupants of the buildings tested discussed concerns about odor and sensory irritation when new pellets were delivered. The sensory response was likely due to the aldehydes. PMID:27022205

  18. Emission and Photochemical Evolution of Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs): from Consumer Products to Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Kacarab, M.; Chen, C. L.; Price, D.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Missing emission sources contribute to potential problems in air quality modeling and human health. Low Vapor Pressure-Volatile Organic Compounds (LVP-VOCs) are widely used in consumer products and currently receive VOC exemptions based on their vapor pressure. However, 58.5 TPD LVP-VOC is estimated to emit in 2020 from consumer products in California based on government and industry inventory data. This work investigates the emission and photochemical evolution of major LVP-VOCs in consumer products to demonstrate LVP-VOC impacts on criteria air pollutants. LVP-VOC emission potential is investigated by offline gravimetric and online headspace tracking pure compounds and consumer product mixtures under ambient relevant conditions. Only 3 of the 14 pure LVP-VOCs were found to be atmospherically unavailable. All target LVP-VOCs are observed to evaporate from tested consumer product mixtures. We found improved thermodynamic parameters to predict LVP-VOC evaporation rate. LVP-VOCs photochemical evolution and their impact on ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation are evaluated by integrating SAPRC-11 modeling with laboratory studies in a 90 m3 dual environmental chamber at UC Riverside/CE-CERT. Simultaneous photooxidation experiments, with and without the LVP-VOC, are conducted in the presence of reactive organic gas (ROG) surrogate representing urban chemical smog. Further, LVP-VOC photochemical evolution pathway is investigated under various atmospheric activity (LVP + H2O2, LVP+NO or LVP+H2O2+NO) in the environmental chamber. Gas phase and particle phase mass spectrometers (SIFT-MS, Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrum and HR-ToF-MS, High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol mass Spectrometer) are applied to monitor the evolution of LVP-VOCs in the controlled atmosphere. The potential of LVP-VOC oxidation into ELVOC is also illustrated. We finally interpret the health risk and environmental concern related to LVP-VOC emission and photoxidation.

  19. Effects of Cold Temperature and Ethanol Content on VOC Emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles.

    PubMed

    George, Ingrid J; Hays, Michael D; Herrington, Jason S; Preston, William; Snow, Richard; Faircloth, James; George, Barbara Jane; Long, Thomas; Baldauf, Richard W

    2015-11-03

    Emissions of speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including mobile source air toxics (MSATs), were measured in vehicle exhaust from three light-duty spark ignition vehicles operating on summer and winter grade gasoline (E0) and ethanol blended (E10 and E85) fuels. Vehicle testing was conducted using a three-phase LA92 driving cycle in a temperature-controlled chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (-7 and 24 °C). The cold start driving phase and cold ambient temperature increased VOC and MSAT emissions up to several orders of magnitude compared to emissions during other vehicle operation phases and warm ambient temperature testing, respectively. As a result, calculated ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were 7 to 21 times greater for the cold starts during cold temperature tests than comparable warm temperature tests. The use of E85 fuel generally led to substantial reductions in hydrocarbons and increases in oxygenates such as ethanol and acetaldehyde compared to E0 and E10 fuels. However, at the same ambient temperature, the VOC emissions from the E0 and E10 fuels and OFPs from all fuels were not significantly different. Cold temperature effects on cold start MSAT emissions varied by individual MSAT compound, but were consistent over a range of modern spark ignition vehicles.

  20. VOC characteristics, emissions and contributions to SOA formation during hazy episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Wu, Fangkun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The pollution processes in Beijing were investigated from 18th October to 6th November 2013 to study the characteristics, SOA formation potential and contributing factors of VOC during hazy episodes. The mean concentrations of VOC were 67.4 ± 33.3 μg m-3 on clear days and have 5-7-fold increase in polluted periods. VOC concentrations rapidly increased at a visibility range of 4-5 km with the rate of 25%/km in alkanes, alkenes and halocarbons and the rate of 45%/km in aromatics. Analysis of the mixing layer height (MLH); wind speed and ratios of benzene/toluene (B/T), ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene (E/X), and isopentane/n-pentane (i/n) under different visibility conditions revealed that the MLH and wind speed were the 2 major factors affecting the variability of VOC during clear days and that local emissions and photochemical reactions were main causes of VOC variation on polluted days. Combined with the fractional aerosol coefficient (FAC) method, the SOA formation potentials of alkanes, alkenes and aromatics were 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3, 1.1 ± 1.0 μg m-3 and 6.5 ± 6.4 μg m-3, respectively. As the visibility deteriorated, the SOA formation potential increased from 2.1 μg m-3 to 13.2 μg m-3, and the fraction of SOA-forming aromatics rapidly increased from 56.3% to 90.1%. Initial sources were resolved by a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Vehicle-related emissions were an important source of VOC at all visibility ranges, accounting for 23%-32%. As visibility declined, emissions from solvents and the chemical industry increased from 13.2% and 6.3% to 34.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Solvents had the greatest SOA formation ability, accounting for 52.5% on average on hazy days, followed by vehicle-related emissions (20.7%).

  1. [Study on the quantitative estimation method for VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks based on tanks 4.0.9d model].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Min-Yan; Zhang, Jian; He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Shao, Xia

    2013-12-01

    VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks is one of the important emission sources in the petrochemical industry. In order to find out the VOCs emission amount of petrochemical storage tanks, Tanks 4.0.9d model is utilized to calculate the VOCs emission from different kinds of storage tanks. VOCs emissions from a horizontal tank, a vertical fixed roof tank, an internal floating roof tank and an external floating roof tank were calculated as an example. The consideration of the site meteorological information, the sealing information, the tank content information and unit conversion by using Tanks 4.0.9d model in China was also discussed. Tanks 4.0.9d model can be used to estimate VOCs emissions from petrochemical storage tanks in China as a simple and highly accurate method.

  2. Influence of tree provenance on biogenic VOC emissions of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäenpää, Minna; Magsarjav, Narantsetseg; Ghimire, Rajendra; Markkanen, Juha-Matti; Heijari, Juha; Vuorinen, Martti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2012-12-01

    Resin-storing plant species such as conifer trees can release substantial amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere under stress circumstances that cause resin flow. Wounding can be induced by animals, pathogens, wind or direct mechanical damage e.g. during harvesting. In atmospheric modelling of biogenic VOCs, actively growing vegetation has been mostly considered as the source of emissions. Root systems and stumps of resin-storing conifer trees could constitute a significant store of resin after tree cutting. Therefore, we assessed the VOC emission rates from the cut surface of Scots pine stumps and estimated the average emission rates for an area with a density of 2000 stumps per ha. The experiment was conducted with trees of one Estonian and three Finnish Scots pine provenances covering a 1200 km gradient at a common garden established in central Finland in 1991. VOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes and less than 0.1% of the total emission was sesquiterpenes. α-Pinene (7-92% of the total emissions) and 3-carene (0-76% of the total emissions) were the dominant monoterpenes. Proportions of α-pinene and camphene were significantly lower and proportions of 3-carene, sabinene, γ-terpinene and terpinolene higher in the southernmost Saaremaa provenance compared to the other provenances. Total terpene emission rates (standardised to +20 °C) from stumps varied from 27 to 1582 mg h-1 m-2 when measured within 2-3 h after tree cutting. Emission rates decreased rapidly to between 2 and 79 mg h-1 m-2 at 50 days after cutting. The estimated daily terpene emission rates on a hectare basis from freshly cut stumps at a cut tree density of 2000 per ha varied depending on provenance. Estimated emission ranges were 100-710 g ha-1 d-1 and 137-970 g ha-1 d-1 in 40 and in 60 year-old forest stands, respectively. Our result suggests that emission directly from stump surfaces could be a significant source of monoterpene emissions for a few weeks after

  3. Impact of air velocity, temperature, humidity, and air on long-term voc emissions from building products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkoff, Peder

    The emissions of two volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern from five building products (BPs) were measured in the field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) up to 250 d. The BPs (VOCs selected on the basis of abundance and low human odor thresholds) were: nylon carpet with latex backing (2-ethylhexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene), PVC flooring (2-ethylhexanol, phenol), floor varnish on pretreated beechwood parquet (butyl acetate, N-methylpyrrolidone), sealant (hexane, dimethyloctanols), and waterborne wall paint on gypsum board (1,2-propandiol, Texanol). Ten different climate conditions were tested: four different air velocities from ca. 1 cm s -1 to ca. 9 cm s -1, three different temperatures (23, 35, and 60°C), two different relative humidities (0% and 50% RH), and pure nitrogen instead of clean air supply. Additionally, two sample specimen and two different batches were compared for repeatability and homogeneity. The VOCs were sampled on Tenax TA and determined by thermal desorption and gas chromatography (FID). Quantification was carried out by individual calibration of each VOC of concern. Concentration/time profiles of the selected VOCs (i.e. their concentration decay curves over time) in a standard room were used for comparison. Primary source emissions were not affected by the air velocity after a few days to any great extent. Both the temperature and relative humidity affected the emission rates, but depended strongly on the type of BP and type of VOC. Secondary (oxidative) source emissions were only observed for the PVC and for dimethyloctanols from the sealant. The time to reach a given concentration (emission rate) appears to be a good approach for future interlaboratory comparisons of BP's VOC emissions.

  4. Speciated OVOC and VOC emission inventories and their implications for reactivity-based ozone control strategy in the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Junyu; Li, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhong, Zhuangmin; Zhong, Liuju; Lin, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The increasing ground-ozone (O3) levels, accompanied by decreasing SO2, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations benefited from air pollution control measures implemented in recent years, initiated a serious challenge to control Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China. Speciated VOC emission inventory is fundamental for estimating Ozone Formation Potentials (OFPs) to identify key reactive VOC species and sources in order to formulate efficient O3 control strategies. With the use of the latest bulk VOC emission inventory and local source profiles, this study developed the PRD regional speciated Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compound (OVOC) and VOC emission inventories to identify the key emission-based and OFP-based VOC sources and species. Results showed that: (1) Methyl alcohol, acetone and ethyl acetate were the major constituents in the OVOC emissions from industrial solvents, household solvents, architectural paints and biogenic sources; (2) from the emission-based perspective, aromatics, alkanes, OVOCs and alkenes made up 39.2%, 28.2%, 15.9% and 10.9% of anthropogenic VOCs; (3) from the OFP-based perspective, aromatics and alkenes become predominant with contributions of 59.4% and 25.8% respectively; (4) ethene, m/p-xylene, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene and other 24 high OFP-contributing species were the key reactive species that contributed to 52% of anthropogenic emissions and up to 80% of OFPs; and (5) industrial solvents, industrial process, gasoline vehicles and motorcycles were major emission sources of these key reactive species. Policy implications for O3 control strategy were discussed. The OFP cap was proposed to regulate VOC control policies in the PRD region due to its flexibility in reducing the overall OFP of VOC emission sources in practice.

  5. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    PubMed

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing.

  6. Impact of multisource VOC emission on in-vehicle air quality: test chamber simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzik, K.; Faber, J.; Goƚda-Kopek, A.; Łomankiewicz, D.

    2016-09-01

    Air quality inside vehicle may be strongly influenced by the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The sources of these compounds may be different. In case of new vehicles VOC mainly originate from off-gassing of interior materials, while in used cars exterior pollution, like exhaust gases, starts to dominate. The aim of this work was to check the influence of multiple VOC sources on concentration of volatile organic compounds emitted from car interior parts. For this purpose material emission tests were performed in 1 m3 emission testing chamber (WKE 1000, Weiss, Germany) at 65 °C, 5% RH and with air exchange. Three different car parts were studied: sun visor, headlining, and handbrake lever cover. It was stated that volatile organic compounds concentration inside test chamber during the test performed with three different parts inside was significantly lower than those being result of addition of the results obtained for parts tested separately. Presented results indicate interactions between different materials and their emissions as well as prove that some of materials acts like sorbents.

  7. Satellite observations of NOx and VOC emissions from fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, P.; Chance, K.; Huang, G.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Miller, C. E.; Nowlan, C. R.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    We present estimates of NOx, formaldehyde, and glyoxal emissions from biomass burning events derived from enhancements measured by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument). Emissions from biomass burning can vary greatly both regionally and from event to event, but previous work has been unable to fully explain this variability. Satellite observations from OMI offer a powerful tool to observe biomass burning events by providing observations globally over a range of environmental conditions that effect emissions of NOx, formaldehyde, and glyoxal. We will expand on previous studies by using OMI measurements to investigate not only the dependence of the emissions of each of these species on fire intensity but also the dependence of the ratios of these species. Fire intensity is quantified by using fire radiative power quantified by the MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) satellite instrument. We also account for variation of emissions and their ratios due to available fuel loading and fire types, which are affected by regional (e.g. biome type) and meteorological (e.g. wind, temperature, rainfall) factors. Furthermore, in individual case studies we will constrain how the chemical processing of primary fire emissions effects the secondary formation of VOCs and ozone by exploiting the temporal and spatial evolution of these interspecies relationships.

  8. Test methods for determining short and long term VOC emissions from latex paint

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, K.; Lao, H.C.; Fortmann, R.; Tichenor, B.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses an evaluation of latex paint (interior, water based) as a source of indoor pollution. A major objective of the research is the development of methods for predicting emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over time. Test specimens of painted gypsumboard are placed in dynamic flow-through test chambers. Samples of the outlet air are collected on Tenax sorbents and thermally desorbed for analysis by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. These tests produce short- and long-term data for latex paint emissions of Texanol, 2-2(-butoxyethoxy)-ethanol, and glycols. Evaluation of the data shows that most of the Texanol emissions occur within the first few days, and emissions of the glycols occur over several months. This behavior may be described by an evaporative mass transfer process that dominates the short-term emissions, while long-term emissions are limited by diffusion processes within the dry paint-gypsumboard.

  9. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  10. VOC source-receptor relationships in Houston during TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchner, Michael; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    During the TRAMP field campaign in August-September 2006, C 2-C 10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured continuously and online at the urban Moody Tower (MT) site. This dataset was compared to corresponding VOC data sets obtained at six sites located in the highly industrialized Houston Ship Channel area (HSC). Receptor modeling was performed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) at all sites. Conditional probability functions (CPF) were used to determine the origin of the polluted air masses in the Houston area. A subdivision into daytime and nighttime was carried out to discriminate photochemical influences. Eight main source categories of industrial, mobile, and biogenic emissions were identified at the urban receptor site, seven and six, respectively, at the different HSC sites. At MT natural gas/crude oil contributed most to the VOC mass (27.4%), followed by liquefied petroleum gas (16.7%), vehicular exhaust (15.3%), fuel evaporation (14.3%), and aromatics (13.4%). Also petrochemical sources from ethylene (4.7%) and propylene (3.6%) play an important role. A minor fraction of the VOC mass can be attributed to biogenic sources mainly from isoprene (4.4%). Based on PMF analyses of different wind sectors, the total VOC mass was estimated to be twofold at MT with wind directions from HSC compared to air from a typical urban sector, for petrochemical compounds more than threefold. Despite the strong impact of air masses influenced by industrial sources at HSC, still about a third of the total mass contributions at MT can be apportioned to other sources, mainly motor vehicles and aromatic solvents. The investigation of diurnal variation in combination with wind directional frequencies revealed the greatest HSC impact at the urban site during the morning, and the least during the evening.

  11. Uncertainty assessment of VOC emissions from paint in The Netherlands using the NUSAP system.

    PubMed

    Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P; Risbey, James S; Ravetz, Jerry

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate an innovative approach to uncertainty assessment known as the NUSAP system, to assess qualitative and quantitative uncertainty for the case of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from paint in The Netherlands. Using expert elicitation, we identified key sources of error, critical assumptions, and bias in the monitoring process. We assessed pedigree and probabilistic uncertainty of all input quantities. We used four pedigree criteria to assess the strength of the knowledge base: proxy representation, empirical basis, methodological rigour and degree of validation. Using Monte Carlo analysis, we assessed sensitivity and propagation of uncertainty. Results for sensitivity and pedigree were combined in a 'NUSAP Diagnostic Diagram', which effectively highlighted the assumption for VOC percentage of imported paint as the weakest spot in the monitoring of VOC emissions. We conclude that NUSAP facilitates systematic scrutinization of method and underlying assumptions and structures creative thinking on sources of error and bias. It provides a means to prioritise uncertainties and focus research efforts on the potentially most problematic parameters and assumptions, at the same time identifying specific weaknesses in the knowledge base. With NUSAP, nuances of meaning about quantities can be conveyed concisely and clearly, to a degree that is not possible with statistic methods only.

  12. Development of a multi-VOC reference material for quality assurance in materials emission testing.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Emission test chamber measurement is necessary to proof building materials as sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results of such measurements are used to evaluate materials and label them according to their potential to emit harmful substances, polluting indoor air. If only labelled materials were installed indoors, this would improve indoor air quality and prevent negative impacts on human health. Because of the complex testing procedure, reference materials for the quality assurance are mandatory. Currently, there is a lack of such materials because most building products show a broad variation of emissions even within one batch. A previous study indicates lacquers, mixed with volatile organic pollutants, as reproducible emission source for a wide range of substances. In the present study, the curing of the lacquer-VOC mixture inside micro-chambers was optimised. Therefore, the humidity and the chamber flow were varied. Typical indoor air pollutants with a wide range of volatilities, for example, styrene, n-hexadecane, dimethyl and dibutyl phthalate were selected. It turned out that, under optimised curing parameters inside the micro-chamber, their emission can be reproduced with variations of less than 10 %. With this, a next important step towards a reference material for emission testing was achieved.

  13. Spatial/temporal variations and source apportionment of VOCs monitored at community scale in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Zhu, Xianlei; Fan, Zhi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile) sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson). Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (p<0.01). Ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene measured at the commercial site were significantly higher than the industrial/mobile sites (p<0.01). Seven VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were significantly different by season (p<0.05), that is, higher in cold seasons than in warm seasons. In addition, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene were significantly higher on weekdays than weekend days (p<0.05). These results are consistent with literature data, indicating the impact of anthropogenic VOC sources on air pollution in Paterson. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was applied for 24-hour integrated VOC measurements in Paterson over one year and identified six contributing factors, including motor vehicle exhausts (20%), solvents uses (19%), industrial emissions (16%), mobile+stationery sources (12%), small shop emissions (11%), and others (22%). Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in

  14. Spatial/Temporal Variations and Source Apportionment of VOCs Monitored at Community Scale in an Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Zhu, Xianlei; Fan, Zhi-hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize spatial/temporal variations of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a community-scale monitoring approach and identify the main sources of concern in Paterson, NJ, an urban area with mixed sources of VOCs. VOC samples were simultaneously collected from three local source-dominated (i.e., commercial, industrial, and mobile) sites in Paterson and one background site in Chester, NJ (located ∼58 km southwest of Paterson). Samples were collected using the EPA TO-15 method from midnight to midnight, one in every sixth day over one year. Among the 60 analyzed VOCs, ten VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were selected to examine their spatial/temporal variations. All of the 10 VOCs in Paterson were significantly higher than the background site (p<0.01). Ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, and p-dichlorobenzene measured at the commercial site were significantly higher than the industrial/mobile sites (p<0.01). Seven VOCs (acetylene, benzene, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, styrene, toluene, and p-dichlorobenzene) were significantly different by season (p<0.05), that is, higher in cold seasons than in warm seasons. In addition, dichloromethane, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene were significantly higher on weekdays than weekend days (p<0.05). These results are consistent with literature data, indicating the impact of anthropogenic VOC sources on air pollution in Paterson. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was applied for 24-hour integrated VOC measurements in Paterson over one year and identified six contributing factors, including motor vehicle exhausts (20%), solvents uses (19%), industrial emissions (16%), mobile+stationery sources (12%), small shop emissions (11%), and others (22%). Additional locational analysis confirmed the identified sources were well matched with point sources located upwind in

  15. Spatially Resolved Emissions of NOx and VOCs and Comparison to Inventories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. R.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Shaw, M.; Purvis, R.; Carslaw, D.; Hewitt, C. N.; Misztal, P. K.; Metzger, S.; Beevers, S.; Goldstein, A. H.; Karl, T.; Davison, B.

    2015-12-01

    Recent trends in ambient concentrations of NOx in the UK (and other European countries) have shown a general decrease over the period 1990 to 2002, followed by largely static concentrations from 2004 - present. This is not in line with the decreases predicted based on bottom up emission inventories and has lead to widespread non-compliance with EU Air Quality Directives. We present a method to quantify the geographic variability of emission of NOx and selected VOCs at a city scale (London) using an aircraft platform. High frequency observations of NOx and VOCs (10 Hz and 2 Hz, respectively) were made using low altitude flights across London and combined with 20 Hz micro-meteorological data to provide an emission flux using the aircraft eddy covariance technique. A continuous wavelet transformation was used to produce instantaneous fluxes along the flight transect and a parameterisation of a backward Lagrangian model used to calculate the flux footprint, attributing emission rates to specific areas in Greater London (see figure). The observed flux was compared to the UK National Atmospheric Emission Inventory (NAEI), which takes a "bottom up" approach to calculating emissions, involving estimates from different source sectors to produce yearly emission estimates. These were then modified using factors specific to each source to reflect the actual month, day and time of the flight, to provide a more meaningful comparison to the observation. A significant underestimation in the inventory NOx was observed ranging from 150-200% in outer London, to 300% in the central area. Potential reasons for this are discussed, including the poor treatment of real world emissions of NOx from diesel vehicles in the inventory. We also compare measurements to the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI), which provides a more explicit treatment of the traffic emissions specific to London and which shows better agreement with the measurements.

  16. Do time-averaged, whole-building, effective volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions depend on the air exchange rate? A statistical analysis of trends for 46 VOCs in U.S. offices.

    PubMed

    Rackes, A; Waring, M S

    2016-08-01

    We used existing data to develop distributions of time-averaged air exchange rates (AER), whole-building 'effective' emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC), and other variables for use in Monte Carlo analyses of U.S. offices. With these, we explored whether long-term VOC emission rates were related to the AER over the sector, as has been observed in the short term for some VOCs in single buildings. We fit and compared two statistical models to the data. In the independent emissions model (IEM), emissions were unaffected by other variables, while in the dependent emissions model (DEM), emissions responded to the AER via coupling through a conceptual boundary layer between the air and a lumped emission source. For 20 of 46 VOCs, the DEM was preferable to the IEM and emission rates, though variable, were higher in buildings with higher AERs. Most oxygenated VOCs and some alkanes were well fit by the DEM, while nearly all aromatics and halocarbons were independent. Trends by vapor pressure suggested multiple mechanisms could be involved. The factors of temperature, relative humidity, and building age were almost never associated with effective emission rates. Our findings suggest that effective emissions in real commercial buildings will be difficult to predict from deterministic experiments or models.

  17. Emission of biogenic VOCs from trees in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C.

    SciTech Connect

    Drewitt, G.; Styen, D.G.; Gillespie, T.; Curren, K.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) are known to participate in the formation of ground level ozone. It is possible that in the areas with high emission rates from local vegetation, biogenic hydrocarbons can be of comparable importance to anthropogenic hydrocarbons in the production of this secondary air pollutant. In order to implement an effective abatement strategy, the relative importance of these biogenic emissions to the atmospheric chemistry of an area must be known. The Lower Fraser Valley located in the southwestern corner of British Columbia experiences episodes of elevated ground level ozone concentrations during the summer under the influence of a stationary high pressure system and characterized by lush coastal rain forest vegetation and extensive agriculture surfaces. During the summer of 1995 a field campaign to determine the emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The emission rate from natural sources in the region was conducted. The mission rate of biogenic hydrocarbons from four tree species, Western Red Cedar (Thuja Plicata), Cottonwood (Populus Balsemifera), Douglass Fir (Pseudotsuga Menziesii) and Hemlock (Tsuga Heterophylla) was measured in the field. It was found that Cottonwood trees emit isoprene at a rate approaching 100 times greater than any of the other three species.

  18. Modeling VOC emissions and air concentrations from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R. ); Drivas, P.J. )

    1993-03-01

    During the two-week period following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) evaporated from the surface of the oil spill and were transported and dispersed throughout the region. To estimate the air concentrations of these VOCs, emissions and dispersion modeling was conducted for each hour during the first two weeks of the spill. A multicomponent evaporative emissions model was developed and applied to the oil spill; the model considered the evaporation of 15 specific compounds, including benzene and toluene. Both mass transfer from the surface of the spill and diffusion through the oil layer were considered in the emissions model. Maximum emissions of toluene were calculated to equal about 20,000 kg/hr, or about 5 g/m[sup 2] hr, at a time of eight hours after the initial oil spill. Meteorological data were acquired from sources and used to estimate hourly-averaged wind velocity over the spill. Air concentrations of specific components were calculated using the ATDL area source diffusion model and the Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model. Maximum hourly-averaged concentrations were predicted not to exceed 10 ppmv for any compound. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Seasonal variation of biogenic VOC emissions above a mixed hardwood forest in northern Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guenther, A.; Spirig, C.; Hansel, A.; Fall, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at a hardwood forest in northern Michigan (UMBS, Prophet research site) over the course of the growing and senescing season. Methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and isoprene were found to be the most abundant biogenic VOCs with maximum fluxes (mixing ratios in ppbv) of 2.0 mg m-2 h-1 (21.0), 1.0 mg m-2 h-1 (2.7), 1.6 mg m-2 h-1 (5.6) and 7.6 mg m-2 h-1 (6), respectively. The emission patterns show distinct seasonal changes and indicate a spring peak for methanol due to rapid leaf expansion and a fall peak for acetone and acetaldehyde most likely attributed to senescing and decaying biomass; isoprene emissions peaked as expected in the summer. We estimate potential source strengths of 8.9 Tg (C) y-1 methanol, 2.7 Tg (C) y-1 acetaldehyde and 7.0 Tg (C) y-1 acetone for deciduous temperate forests, which is a substantial contribution to the global atmospheric VOC budget.

  20. Comparison of VOC and ammonia emissions from individual PVC materials, adhesives and from complete structures.

    PubMed

    Järnström, H; Saarela, K; Kalliokoski, P; Pasanen, A-L

    2008-04-01

    Emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ammonia measured from six PVC materials and four adhesives in the laboratory were compared to the emission rates measured on site from complete structures. Significantly higher specific emission rates (SERs) were generally measured from the complete structures than from individual materials. There were large differences between different PVC materials in their permeability for VOCs originating from the underlying structure. Glycol ethers and esters from adhesives used in the installation contributed to the emissions from the PVC covered structure. Emissions of 2-ethylhexanol and TXIB (2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate) were common. High ammonia SERs were measured from single adhesives but their contribution to the emissions from the complete structure did not appear as obvious as for VOCs. The results indicate that three factors affected the VOC emissions from the PVC flooring on a structure: 1) the permeability of the PVC product for VOCs, 2) the VOC emission from the adhesive used, and 3) the VOC emission from the backside of the PVC product.

  1. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    VOC species from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of 9 gasoline vehicles, 7 diesel vehicles, 5 motorcycles, and 4 gas evaporation samples. The SOA mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were calculated based on the mixing ratio of individual VOC species. The SOA mass yields of gasoline and motorcycle exhaust were similar to the results of the published smog chamber study with the exception of that of diesel exhaust was 20% lower than experimental data (Gordon et al., 2013, 2014a, b). This suggests the requirement for further research on SVOC or LVOC emissions. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of vehicle mileage traveled and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors. The inventory-based vehicular initial emission ratio of OA to CO was 15.6 μg m-3 ppmv-1. The OA production rate reached 22.3 and 42.7 μg m-3 ppmv-1 under high-NOx and low-NOx conditions, respectively. To determine the vehicular contribution to OA pollution, the inventory-based OA formation ratios for vehicles were calculated with a photochemical-age-based parameterization method and compared with the observation-based OA formation ratios in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. The results indicated that VOC emissions from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation only explained 15 and 22% of the total organic aerosols observed in summer and winter, respectively. SOA production only accounted for 25 and 18% of the total vehicular OA formation in summer and winter. VOC emissions from gasoline vehicles contribute 21-38% of vehicular OA formation after 6-24 h of photochemical aging. The results suggest that vehicle emissions are an important contributor to OA pollution in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. However, a large number of OA mass in the atmosphere still cannot be explained in this study. SOA formation contributions from other sources (e.g. coal burning

  2. [Development of biogenic VOC emissions inventory with high temporal and spatial resolution].

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Zhang, Y; Xie, S; Zeng, L

    2001-11-01

    A new method was developed to estimate biogenic VOC emissions with high temporal and spatial resolution by use of Mesoscale Meteorology Modeling System Version5 (MM5). In this method, the isoprene and monoterpene standard emission factors for some types of tree in China were given and the standard VOC emission factors and seasonally average densities of leaf biomass for all types of vegetation were determined. A biogenic VOC emissions inventory in South China was established which could meet the requirement of regional air quality modeling. Total biogenic VOC emissions in a typical summer day were estimated to be 1.12 x 10(4) metric tons in an area of 729 km x 729 km of South China. The results showed the temporal and spatial distributions of biogenic VOC emission rates in this area. The results also showed that the geographical distribution of biogenic VOC emission rates depended on vegetation types and their distributions and the diurnal variation mainly depended on the solar radiation and temperature. The uncertainties of estimating biogenic VOC emissions were also discussed.

  3. Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from tropical plant species in India.

    PubMed

    Padhy, P K; Varshney, C K

    2005-06-01

    Foliar emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from common Indian plant species was measured. Dynamic flow enclosure technique was used and the gas samples were collected onto Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges. The Tenax-GC/Carboseive cartridges were attached to the thermal disorber sample injection system and the gas sample was analysed using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID). Fifty-one local plant species were screened, out of which 36 species were found to emit VOC (4 high emitter; 28 moderate emitter; and 4 low-emitter), while in the remaining 15 species no VOC emission was detected or the levels of emission were below detection limit (BDL). VOC emission was found to vary from one species to another. There was a marked seasonal and diurnal variation in VOC emission. The minimum and maximum VOC emission values were < 0.1 and 87 microgg(-1) dry leaf h(-1) in Ficus infectoria and Lantana camara respectively. Out of the 51 plant species studied, 13 species are reported here for the first time. Among the nine tree species (which were selected for detailed study), the highest average hourly emission (9.69+/-8.39 microgg(-1) dry leaf) was observed in Eucalyptus species and the minimum in Syzygium jambolanum (1.89+/-2.48 microgg(-1) dry leaf). An attempt has been made to compare VOC emission from different plant species between present study and the literature (tropical and other regions).

  4. [Estimation of VOC emission from forests in China based on the volume of tree species].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang-feng; Xie, Shao-dong

    2009-10-15

    Applying the volume data of dominant trees from statistics on the national forest resources, volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions of each main tree species in China were estimated based on the light-temperature model put forward by Guenther. China's VOC emission inventory for forest was established, and the space-time and age-class distributions of VOC emission were analyzed. The results show that the total VOC emissions from forests in China are 8565.76 Gg, of which isoprene is 5689.38 Gg (66.42%), monoterpenes is 1343.95 Gg (15.69%), and other VOC is 1532.43 Gg (17.89%). VOC emissions have significant species variation. Quercus is the main species responsible for emission, contributing 45.22% of the total, followed by Picea and Pinus massoniana with 6.34% and 5.22%, respectively. Southwest and Northeast China are the major emission regions. In specific, Yunnan, Sichuan, Heilongjiang, Jilin and Shaanxi are the top five provinces producing the most VOC emissions from forests, and their contributions to the total are 15.09%, 12.58%, 10.35%, 7.49% and 7.37%, respectively. Emissions from these five provinces occupy more than half (52.88%) of the national emissions. Besides, VOC emissions show remarkable seasonal variation. Emissions in summer are the largest, accounting for 56.66% of the annual. Forests of different ages have different emission contribution. Half-mature forests play a key role and contribute 38.84% of the total emission from forests.

  5. VOC Source - Receptor Relationships in Houston during TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchner, M.; Rappenglück, B.

    2009-04-01

    During the TexAQS-II field campaign in August and September 2006, C2 - C10 volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured continuously and online at the urban Moody Tower (MT) site. This data set was compared to corresponding VOC data sets obtained at six sites located in the highly industrialized Houston Ship Channel area (HSC). Receptor modeling was performed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) at all sites. Conditional probability functions were used to determine the origin of the polluted air masses in the Houston area. A subdivision into daytime and nighttime was carried out to discriminate photochemical influences. Eight main source categories of industrial, mobile, and biogenic emissions were identified at the urban receptor site, seven and six, respectively, at the different HSC sites. Amongst these categories, natural gas / crude oil, LPG, and vehicular exhaust contributed most to the total measured VOC mass, followed by fuel evaporation, aromatics, petrochemical sources from ethylene and propylene, and biogenic sources. Based on PMF analyses of different wind sectors, the total VOC mass was estimated to be twofold at MT with wind directions from HSC compared to air from a typical urban sector, for petrochemical compounds more than threefold. Despite the strong impact of air masses influenced by industrial sources at HSC, still a significant fraction of the total mass contributions at MT can be apportioned to other sources, mainly motor vehicles and aromatic solvents. The investigation of diurnal variation in combination with wind directional frequencies revealed the greatest HSC impact at the urban site during the morning, and the least during the evening.

  6. Surface emission determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from a closed industrial waste landfill using a self-designed static flux chamber.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Perales, J F; Roca, F J; Guardino, X

    2014-02-01

    Closed landfills can be a source of VOC and odorous nuisances to their atmospheric surroundings. A self-designed cylindrical air flux chamber was used to measure VOC surface emissions in a closed industrial landfill located in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain. The two main objectives of the study were the evaluation of the performance of the chamber setup in typical measurement conditions and the determination of the emission rates of 60 different VOC from that industrial landfill, generating a valuable database that can be useful in future studies related to industrial landfill management. Triplicate samples were taken in five selected sampling points. VOC were sampled dynamically using multi-sorbent bed tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) connected to SKC AirCheck 2000 pumps. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with a capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry detector. The emission rates of sixty VOC were calculated for each sampling point in an effort to characterize surface emissions. To calculate average, minimum and maximum emission values for each VOC, the results were analyzed by three different methods: Global, Kriging and Tributary area. Global and Tributary area methodologies presented similar values, with total VOC emissions of 237 ± 48 and 222 ± 46 g day(-1), respectively; however, Kriging values were lower, 77 ± 17 gd ay(-1). The main contributors to the total emission rate were aldehydes (nonanal and decanal), acetic acid, ketones (acetone), aromatic hydrocarbons and alcohols. Most aromatic hydrocarbon (except benzene, naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes) and aldehyde emission rates exhibited strong correlations with the rest of VOC of their family, indicating a possible common source of these compounds. B:T ratio obtained from the emission rates of the studied landfill suggested that the factors that regulate aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in the landfill emissions are different from the ones

  7. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs) in environment - sources, potential human health impacts, and current remediation technologies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Binbin; Lei, Chao; Wei, Chaohai; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs), including polychloromethanes, polychloroethanes and polychloroethylenes, are widely used as solvents, degreasing agents and a variety of commercial products. These compounds belong to a group of ubiquitous contaminants that can be found in contaminated soil, air and any kind of fluvial mediums such as groundwater, rivers and lakes. This review presents a summary of the research concerning the production levels and sources of Cl-VOCs, their potential impacts on human health as well as state-of-the-art remediation technologies. Important sources of Cl-VOCs principally include the emissions from industrial processes, the consumption of Cl-VOC-containing products, the disinfection process, as well as improper storage and disposal methods. Human exposure to Cl-VOCs can occur through different routes, including ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact. The toxicological impacts of these compounds have been carefully assessed, and the results demonstrate the potential associations of cancer incidence with exposure to Cl-VOCs. Most Cl-VOCs thus have been listed as priority pollutants by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China, Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. (U.S. EPA) and European Commission (EC), and are under close monitor and strict control. Yet, more efforts will be put into the epidemiological studies for the risk of human exposure to Cl-VOCs and the exposure level measurements in contaminated sites in the future. State-of-the-art remediation technologies for Cl-VOCs employ non-destructive methods and destructive methods (e.g. thermal incineration, phytoremediation, biodegradation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and reductive dechlorination), whose advantages, drawbacks and future developments are thoroughly discussed in the later sections.

  8. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from diesel trucks in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Cao, Xinyue; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Yingzhi; He, Kebin

    2015-02-01

    This paper is the first in our series of papers aimed at understanding the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of vehicles in Beijing by conducting on-board emission measurements. This paper focuses on diesel vehicles. In this work, 18 China III diesel vehicles, including seven light-duty diesel trucks (LDDTs), four medium-duty diesel trucks (MDDTs) and seven heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDTs), were examined when the vehicles were driven on predesigned fixed test routes in Beijing in China using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). Tedlar bag sampling and 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridge sampling were used to collect VOC species, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to analyze these samples. We obtained the VOC emission factors and relative compositions for diesel trucks of different sizes under different driving patterns. In total, 64 VOC species were quantified in this study, including 25 alkanes, four alkenes, 13 aromatics, 13 carbonyls and nine other compounds. The emission factors of the total VOCs based on mileage traveled for HDDTs were higher than those of LDDTs and MDDTs. Carbonyls, aromatics and alkanes were the dominant VOC species. Carbonyls accounted for 42.7%-69.2% of the total VOCs in the three types of tested diesel trucks. The total VOC emission factors of the tested vehicles that were driven on non-highway routes were 1.5-2.0 times higher than those of the vehicles driven on the highway. As for the OFP calculation results, with increased vehicle size, the ozone formation potential presented an increasing trend. Among the VOC components, carbonyls were the primary contributor to OFP. In addition, the OFPs under non-highway driving cycles were 1.3-1.7 times those under highway driving cycles. The results of this study will be helpful in improving our understanding of VOCs emitted from on-road diesel trucks in China.

  9. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles.

  10. Quantitative assessment of industrial VOC emissions in China: Historical trend, spatial distribution, uncertainties, and projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chenghang; Shen, Jiali; Zhang, Yongxin; Huang, Weiwei; Zhu, Xinbo; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Linghong; Gao, Xiang; Cen, Kefa

    2017-02-01

    The temporal trends of industrial volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions was comprehensively summarized for the 2011 to 2013 period, and the projections for 2020 to 2050 for China were set. The results demonstrate that industrial VOC emissions in China increased from 15.3 Tg in 2011 to 29.4 Tg in 2013 at an annual average growth rate of 38.3%. Guangdong (3.45 Tg), Shandong (2.85 Tg), and Jiangsu (2.62 Tg) were the three largest contributors collectively accounting for 30.4% of the national total emissions in 2013. The top three average industrial VOC emissions per square kilometer were Shanghai (247.2 ton/km2), Tianjin (62.8 ton/km2), and Beijing (38.4 ton/km2), which were 12-80 times of the average level in China. The data from the inventory indicate that the use of VOC-containing products, as well as the production and use of VOCs as raw materials, as well as for storage and transportation contributed 75.4%, 10.3%, 9.1%, and 5.2% of the total emissions, respectively. ArcGIS was used to display the remarkable spatial distribution variation by allocating the emission into 1 km × 1 km grid cells with a population as surrogate indexes. Combined with future economic development and population change, as well as implementation of policy and upgrade of control technologies, three scenarios (scenarios A, B, and C) were set to project industrial VOC emissions for the years 2020, 2030, and 2050, which present the industrial VOC emissions in different scenarios and the potential of reducing emissions. Finally, the result shows that the collaborative control policies considerably influenced industrial VOC emissions.

  11. Using Positive Matrix Factorization to Investigate Sources of VOCs in Bakersfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scola, S. E.; Schroeder, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Bakersfield, California consistently ranks among the nation's top three most polluted cities in terms of both ozone and particulate pollution. An important step in developing control strategies for the mitigation of ozone is determining the contribution of various emission sources of ozone precursors, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in Bakersfield. During the SARP 2015 campaign, whole air samples were collected over Bakersfield and other Central Valley emission sources - including oil and natural gas sites and agricultural areas - and analyzed by gas chromatography. To estimate the influence of oil and natural gas sources on air in Bakersfield, the ratio of i-pentane to n-pentane was used. Use of this ratio demonstrated mixed urban and oil and natural gas influences in the Bakersfield samples. To better identify and quantify the contributions of oil and natural gas fields as well as other regional emission sources on Bakersfield air quality, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to whole air samples taken within the planetary boundary layer in the Central Valley. PMF generated three interpretable factors: an urban source, an oil and natural gas source, and an agricultural/biogenically-influenced source. The contribution of each of the three sources on the mixing ratios of C1-C7 alkanes and isoprene was calculated. Of the non-methane VOCs in Bakersfield, it was determined that 45% originated from the oil and natural gas sites, 34% from the agriculture/biogenically-influenced sources, and 21% from urban areas. Furthermore, it was observed that there was a better agreement between PMF results and propane to ethyne ratios than with i-pentane to n-pentane ratios.

  12. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  13. Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua; Qu, Hang; Zhou, Mengyi; Sun, Jin; Gou, Bin

    2015-11-15

    Process-specific emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from petrochemical facilities were investigated in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Source samples were collected from various process units in the petrochemical, basic chemical, and chlorinated chemical plants, and were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. The results showed that propane (19.9%), propene (11.7%), ethane (9.5%) and i-butane (9.2%) were the most abundant species in the petrochemical plant, with propene at much higher levels than in petrochemical profiles measured in other regions. Styrene (15.3%), toluene (10.3%) and 1,3-butadiene (7.5%) were the major species in the basic chemical industry, while halocarbons, especially dichloromethane (15.2%) and chloromethane (7.5%), were substantial in the chlorinated chemical plant. Composite profiles were calculated using a weight-average approach based on the VOC emission strength of various process units. Emission profiles for an entire petrochemical-related industry were found to be process-oriented and should be established considering the differences in VOC emissions from various manufacturing facilities. The VOC source reactivity and carcinogenic risk potential of each process unit were also calculated in this study, suggesting that process operations mainly producing alkenes should be targeted for possible controls with respect to reducing the ozone formation potential, while process units emitting 1,3-butadiene should be under priority control in terms of toxicity. This provides a basis for further measurements of process-specific VOC emissions from the entire petrochemical industry. Meanwhile, more representative samples should be collected to reduce the large uncertainties.

  14. Odorous VOC emissions following land application of swine manure slurry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine manure is often applied to crop land as a fertilizer source. Odor emissions from land-applied swine manure may pose a possible nuisance to downwind populations if not applied with sufficient forethought. A research project was conducted to assess the time decay of odorous volatile organic co...

  15. VOC emissions, evolutions and contributions to SOA formation at a receptor site in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Hu, W. W.; Shao, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, W. T.; Lu, S. H.; Zeng, L. M.; Hu, M.

    2013-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by two online instruments (GC-FID/MS and PTR-MS) at a receptor site on Changdao Island (37.99° N, 120.70° E) in eastern China. Reaction with OH radical dominated chemical losses of most VOC species during the Changdao campaign. A photochemical-age-based parameterization method is used to calculate VOC emission ratios and to quantify the evolution of ambient VOCs. The calculated emission ratios of most hydrocarbons agree well with those obtained from emission inventory data, but determined emission ratios of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) are significantly higher than those from emission inventory data. The photochemical-age-based parameterization method is also used to investigate primary emissions and secondary formation of organic aerosol. The primary emission ratio of organic aerosol (OA) to CO is determined to be 14.9 μg m-3 ppm-1, and secondary organic aeorosols (SOA) are produced at an enhancement ratio of 18.8 μg m-3 ppm-1 to CO after 50 h of photochemical processing in the atmosphere. SOA formation is significantly higher than the level determined from VOC oxidation under both high-NOx (2.0 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO) and low-NOx conditions (6.5 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and higher alkanes (> C10) account for as high as 17.4% of SOA formation, which suggests semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) may be a large contributor to SOA formation during the Changdao campaign. The SOA formation potential of primary VOC emissions determined from field campaigns in Beijing and Pearl River Delta (PRD) is lower than the measured SOA levels reported in the two regions, indicating SOA formation is also beyond explainable by VOC oxidation in the two city clusters.

  16. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-11-01

    As volatile organic compounds (VOCs) significantly affect atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects), emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic VOC emission strengths are important. The aim of this work was to achieve a description of VOC emissions from poorly described tropical vegetation to be compared with the quite well investigated and highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. For this task, common plant species of both ecosystems were investigated. Sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area, which is known for its special diversity in VOC emitting plant species, were chosen. In contrast, little information is currently available regarding emissions of VOCs from tropical tree species at the leaf level. Twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin, i.e. Terra firme, Várzea and Igapó, were screened for emission of VOCs at leaf level with a branch enclosure system. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was quantitatively the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene > limonene > sabinene > β-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes, whereas in the case of plants from the Amazon region no sesquiterpenes were detected probably due to a lack of sensitivity in the measuring systems. On the other hand methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous emissions

  17. Optimizing the emission inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liu, Wen-Tzu; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hourly observations of 56 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) performed by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) at 11 locations across Taiwan were used to evaluate 56 speciated emissions and the resulting simulations of an air quality model. Based on the PAMS observations at two urban sites, emission modification was made for the 56 PAMS species in the model. To further test the applicability of this emission correction approach, the same modified emissions were subject to seven different meteorological conditions and comparison with observations of all the 11 PAMS sites. Originally there was a minimum of only 8 of 56 species showed agreement with observations for the worst of the 11 PAMS sites and 28 of 56 species for the best site. With modified emissions, the number increased to 13-52 species across the 11 PAMS sites, demonstrating that the simple urban based correction procedure has broad applicability. When applying this modification of PAMS emissions to the simulations of other air quality gases, SO2 and NOx showed small changes compared with observations (-0.27% and -2.51%, respectively), while total VOC concentrations showed significant changes (+15.28%) as a result of the adjustment in VOC emissions (+26.7%). Although VOCs are the precursor of ozone, the relatively large changes in VOC did not seem to affect ozone formation to the similar extent, only resulting in the changes of average O3 by 2.9 ppb (+9.41%). It shows that although the emission modification improves individual VOC simulations, the performance in oxidant simulation is still largely unaltered. Although the original U.S. VOC emission profiles can capture the general features of ambient VOCs, further optimization of emissions may still be needed by referencing extensive observations, so that emissions can better fit domestic conditions and accuracy in model simulations can be improved.

  18. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  19. Human health risk evaluation of selected VOC, SVOC and particulate emissions from scented candles.

    PubMed

    Petry, Thomas; Vitale, Danielle; Joachim, Fred J; Smith, Ben; Cruse, Lynn; Mascarenhas, Reuben; Schneider, Scott; Singal, Madhuri

    2014-06-01

    Airborne compounds in the indoor environment arise from a wide variety of sources such as environmental tobacco smoke, heating and cooking, construction materials as well as outdoor sources. To understand the contribution of scented candles to the indoor load of airborne substances and particulate matter, candle emission testing was undertaken in environmentally controlled small and large emission chambers. Candle emission rates, calculated on the basis of measured chamber concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC, SVOC) and particulate matter (PM), were used to predict their respective indoor air concentrations in a standard EU-based dwelling using 2 models: the widely accepted ConsExpo 1-box inhalation model and the recently developed RIFM 2-box indoor air dispersion model. The output from both models has been used to estimate more realistic consumer exposure concentrations of specific chemicals and PM in candle emissions. Potential consumer health risks associated with the candle emissions were characterized by comparing the exposure concentrations with existing indoor or ambient air quality guidelines or, where not existent, to established toxicity thresholds. On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that under normal conditions of use scented candles do not pose known health risks to the consumer.

  20. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) species from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of nine gasoline vehicles, seven diesel vehicles, five motorcycles, and four gas evaporation samples. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were estimated based on the mixing ratio of measured C2-C12 VOC species and inferred carbon number distributions. High aromatic contents were measured in gasoline exhausts and contributed comparatively more SOA yield. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of on-road traffic in Shanghai and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors from previous studies in the cities of China. The inventory-based vehicular organic aerosol (OA) productions to total CO emissions were compared with the observed OA to CO concentrations (ΔOA / ΔCO) in the urban atmosphere. The results indicate that vehicles dominate the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions and OA production, which contributed about 40 and 60 % of OA mass in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. Diesel vehicles, which accounted for less than 20 % of vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT), contribute more than 90 % of vehicular POA emissions and 80-90 % of OA mass derived by vehicles in urban Shanghai. Gasoline exhaust could be an important source of SOA formation. Tightening the limit of aromatic content in gasoline fuel will be helpful to reduce its SOA contribution. Intermediate-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs) in vehicle exhausts greatly contribute to SOA formation in the urban atmosphere of China. However, more experiments need to be conducted to determine the contributions of IVOCs to OA pollution in China.

  1. Characterization of low-VOC latex paints: Volatile organic compound content, VOC and aldehyde emissions, and paint performance. Final report, January 1997--January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, R.; Lao, H.C.; Ng, A.; Roache, N.

    1999-04-01

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as `low-odor,` `low-VOC (volatile organic compound),` or `no-VOC.` Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints and to identify the predominant VOCs and aldehydes in the emissions following application to test substrates. The performance of the paints was evaluated and compared to that of commonly used conventional latex paints by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard methods that measured parameters such as scrubbability, cleanability, and hiding power. The report describes the paints that were tested, the test methods, and the experimental data. Results are presented that can be used to evaluate the low-odor/low-VOC paints as alternatives to conventional latex wall paints that contain and emit higher concentrations of VOCs.

  2. VOC emissions from residential combustion of Southern and mid-European woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Alves, Célia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Tarelho, Luís; Duarte, Márcio; Prozil, Sónia O.; Evtuguin, Dmitry V.; Pio, Casimiro

    2014-02-01

    Emissions of trace gases (carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC)), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from combustion of European beech, Pyrenean oak and black poplar in a domestic woodstove and fireplace were studied. These woods are widely used as biofuel in residential combustion in Southern and mid-European countries. VOCs in the flue gases were collected in Tedlar bags, concentrated in sorbent tubes and analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID). CO2 emissions ranged from 1415 ± 136 to 1879 ± 29 g kg-1 (dry basis). The highest emission factors for CO and THC, 115.8 ± 11.7 and 95.6 24.7 ± 6.3 g kg-1 (dry basis), respectively, were obtained during the combustion of black poplar in the fireplace. European beech presented the lowest CO and THC emission factors for both burning appliances. Significant differences in emissions of VOCs were observed among wood species burnt and combustion devices. In general the highest emission factors were obtained from the combustion of Pyrenean oak in the woodstove. Among the VOCs identified, benzene and related compounds were always the most abundant group, followed by oxygenated compounds and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The amount and the composition of emitted VOCs were strongly affected by the wood composition, the type of burning device and operating conditions. Emission data obtained in this work are useful for modelling the impact of residential wood combustion on air quality and tropospheric ozone formation.

  3. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, W. K.; Blake, D. R.; Cheng, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Fung, K.; Louie, P. K. K.; Park, D.

    2009-06-01

    Vehicle emissions of VOCs were determined in summer and winter of 2003 at the Shing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong. One hundred and ten VOCs were quantified in this study. The average concentration of the total measured VOCs at the inlet and outlet of the tunnel were 81 250 pptv and 117 850 pptv, respectively. Among the 110 compounds analyzed, ethene, ethyne and toluene were the most abundant species in the tunnel. The total measured VOC emission factors ranged from 67 mg veh-1 km-1 to 148 mg veh-1 km-1, with an average of 115 mg veh-1 km-1. The five most abundant VOCs observed in the tunnel were, in decreasing order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These five most abundant species contributed over 38% of the total measured VOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were found to be associated with LPG-fueled taxi. And fair correlations were observed between marker species (ethene, i-pentane, n-nonane, BTEX) with fractions of gasoline-fueled or diesel-fueled vehicles. Moreover, ethene, ethyne, and propene are the key species that were abundant in the tunnel but not in gasoline vapors or LPG. In order to evaluate the ozone formation potential emissions in Hong Kong, the maximum increment reactivity is calculated. It was found that about 568 mg of O3 is induced by per vehicle per kilometer traveled. Among them, ethene, propene and toluene contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  4. The impact of NO x, CO and VOC emissions on the air quality of Zurich airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Gregor; Schäfer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Hoffmann, Herbert; Bauerfeind, Martina; Fleuti, Emanuel; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    To study the impact of emissions at an airport on local air quality, a measurement campaign at the Zurich airport was performed from 30 June 2004 to 15 July 2004. Measurements of NO, NO 2, CO and CO 2 were conducted with open path devices to determine real in-use emission indices of aircraft during idling. Additionally, air samples were taken to analyse the mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Temporal variations of VOC mixing ratios on the airport were investigated, while other air samples were taken in the plume of an aircraft during engine ignition. CO concentrations in the vicinity of the terminals were found to be highly dependent on aircraft movement, whereas NO concentrations were dominated by emissions from ground support vehicles. The measured emission indices for aircraft showed a strong dependence upon engine type. Our work also revealed differences from emission indices published in the emission data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation. Among the VOC, reactive C 2-C 3 alkenes were found in significant amounts in the exhaust of an engine compared to ambient levels. Also, isoprene, a VOC commonly associated with biogenic emissions, was found in the exhaust, however it was not detected in refuelling emissions. The benzene to toluene ratio was used to discriminate exhaust from refuelling emission. In refuelling emissions, a ratio well below 1 was found, while for exhaust this ratio was usually about 1.7.

  5. Cut-induced VOC emissions from agricultural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Davison, B; Brunner, A; Ammann, C; Spirig, C; Jocher, M; Neftel, A

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for fast response measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) has enabled the use of eddy covariance methods to investigate VOC fluxes on the ecosystem scale. In this study PTR-MS flux measurements of VOC were performed over agricultural grassland during and after a cut event. Selected masses detected by the PTR-MS showed fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. They were highest directly after cutting and during the hay drying phase. Simultaneously, significant fluxes of protonated ion masses 73, 81, and 83 were observed. Due to the limited identification of compounds with the PTR-MS technique, GC-MS and GC-FID-PTR-MS techniques were additionally applied. In this way, ion mass 73 could be identified as 2-butanone, mass 81 mainly as (Z)-3-hexenal, and mass 83 mainly as the sum of (Z)-3-hexenol and hexenyl acetates. Hexenal, hexenols, and the hexenyl acetates are mostly related to plant wounding during cutting. It was found that legume plants and forbs emit a higher number of different VOC species than graminoids.

  6. Building materials. VOC emissions, diffusion behaviour and implications from their use.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Leva, Paolo; Barrero-Moreno, Josefa; Kotzias, Dimitrios

    2012-10-01

    Five cement- and five lime-based building materials were examined in an environmental chamber for their emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Typical VOCs were below detection limits, whereas not routinely analysed VOCs, like neopentyl glycol (NPG), dominated the cement-based products emissions, where, after 72 h, it was found to occur, in levels as high as 1400 μg m(-3), accounting for up to 93% of total VOCs. The concentrations of NPG were not considerably changed between the 24 and 72 h of sampling. The permeability of building materials was assessed through experiments with a dual environmental chamber; it was shown that building materials facilitate the diffusion of chemicals through their pores, reaching equilibrium relatively fast (6 h).

  7. Controlling VOC emissions: Plants may choose from several recovery, destruction options

    SciTech Connect

    Cloud, R.

    1996-01-01

    In complying with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), chemical manufacturing plants may choose among several volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions control options. These include recuperative and regenerative thermal oxidation, catalytic oxidation, carbon adsorption, hybrid systems and biofiltration. This article discusses the pros and cons of each of these options, and the applications in which each option may provide the most benefits. Other factors in selecting a VOC control system are also listed.

  8. Net in-cabin emission rates of VOCs and contributions from outside and inside the aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jun; Li, Zheng; Yang, Xudong

    2015-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of the most important types of air pollutants in aircraft cabin. Balancing source intensity of VOCs and ventilation strategies is an essential conducive way to obtain acceptable aircraft cabin environment. This paper intends to develop a simplified model by a case study to estimate the net VOC emission rates of cabin interior, and contributions from outside and inside the aircraft cabin. In-flight continuous measurements of total VOCs (TVOC) in cabin air were made in six domestic flights in March 2013. The results indicate that the concentrations of TVOC mostly ranged from 0.20 mg m-3 to 0.40 mg m-3 in cabin air, which first increased at ascent, and then kept elevated during cruise, and decreased at descent in general. For further ventilation information, carbon dioxide (CO2) in supply air and re-circulated air was simultaneously observed as a ventilation tracer to calculate the bleed air ratios, outside airflow rates and total airflow rates in these flights. And thus, the emission rates derived from cabin interior and contributions of TVOC from bleed air and cabin interior were estimated for the whole flight accordingly. Results indicate that during the cruise phase, TVOC in cabin air mainly came from cabin interiors. However, contributions from outside air also became significant during taxiing on the ground, ascent and descent phases. The simplified model would be useful for developing better control strategies of aircraft cabin air quality.

  9. VOCs and PAHs emissions from creosote-treated wood in a field storage area.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Roca, F J; Perales, J F; Guardino, X; Berenguer, M J

    2008-08-25

    In this study, the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, in this case aromatic hydrocarbons containing one benzene ring and furans) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from wood recently treated with creosote are examined. The VOCs and PAHs were identified and quantified in the gas phase. Additionally, the PAHs were quantified in the particulate phase. Glass multi-sorbent tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen-569) were used to hold the VOCs. The analysis was performed using automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PAHs vapours were collected on XAD-2 resin, and particulate matter was collected on glass fibre filters. The PAHs were analysed using GC/MS. The main components of the vapours released from the creosote-treated wood were naphthalene, toluene, m+p-xylene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, isopropylbenzene, benzene and 2-methylnaphthalene. VOCs emission concentrations ranged from 35 mg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 5 mg m(-3) eight days later. PAHs emission concentrations ranged from 28 microg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 4 microg m(-3) eight days later. The air concentrations of PAHs in particulate matter were composed predominantly of benzo[b+j]fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene. The emission concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 43.5 ng m(-3). Finally, the emission factors of VOCs and PAHs were determined.

  10. Uptake and emission of VOCs near ground level below a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Vlasenko, A.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C.; Makar, P. A.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.; Brown, S.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of the atmosphere/forest canopy exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires insight into deposition, emission, and chemical reactions of VOCs below the canopy. Currently, uncertainties in canopy processes, such as stomatal uptake, deposition, and sub-canopy chemistry, make it difficult to derive biogenic VOC emission inventories from canopy VOC concentration gradients. Between 18 July and 9 August 2009, VOCs were measured with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at 6 heights between 1 and 6 m beneath a 23 m high mixed-forest canopy. Measured VOCs included methanol, isoprene, acetone, methacrolein + methyl vinyl ketone (MACR+MVK), monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. There are pronounced differences in the behaviour of isoprene and its by-products and that of the terpenes. Non-terpene fluxes are predominantly downward. In contrast, the terpene fluxes are significantly upward. A 1-dimensional canopy model was used to compare results to measurements with and without surface deposition of isoprene and MACR+MVK and emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Results suggest deposition velocities of 27 mm s-1 for isoprene and 12 mm s-1 for MACR+MVK and daytime surface emission rates of 63 μg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes. The modelled isoprene surface deposition is approximately 2% of the canopy top isoprene emissions and the modelled emissions of monoterpenes comprise approximately 15 to 27% of the canopy-top monoterpene emissions to the atmosphere. These results suggest that surface monoterpene emissions are significant for forest canopy/atmosphere exchange for this mixed forest location and surface uptake is relatively small for all the species measured in this study.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION AND REDUCTION OF FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS FROM A LOW-VOC LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the measurment and analysis of the patterns of formaldehyde emission from a low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex paint applied to gypsum board, using small environmental chamber tests. The formaldehyde emissions resulted in sharp increase of chamber air...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION AND REDUCTION OF FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS FROM A LOW-VOC LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patterns of formaldehyde emission from a low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex paint applied to gypsum board were measured and analyzed by small environmental chamber tests. It was found that the formaldehyde emissions resulted in sharp increase of chamber air formaldehy...

  13. Source apportionment of VOCs and the contribution to photochemical ozone formation during summer in the typical industrial area in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ping; An, Junlin; Xin, Jinyuan; Wu, Fangkun; Wang, Junxiu; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were continuously observated in a northern suburb of Nanjing, a typical industrial area in the Yangtze River Delta, in a summer observation period from 15th May to 31st August 2013. The average concentration of total VOCs was (34.40 ± 25.20) ppbv, including alkanes (14.98 ± 12.72) ppbv, alkenes (7.35 ± 5.93) ppbv, aromatics (9.06 ± 6.64) ppbv and alkynes (3.02 ± 2.01) ppbv, respectively. Source apportionment via Positive Matrix Factorization was conducted, and six major sources of VOCs were identified. The industry-related sources, including industrial emissions and industrial solvent usage, occupied the highest proportion, accounting for about 51.26% of the VOCs. Vehicular emissions occupied the second highest proportion, accounting for about 34.08%. The rest accounted for about 14.66%, including vegetation emission and liquefied petroleum gas/natural gas usage. Contributions of VOCs to photochemical O3 formation were evaluated by the application of a detailed chemical mechanism model (NCAR MM). Alkenes were the dominant contributors to the O3 photochemical production, followed by aromatics and alkanes. Alkynes had a very small impact on photochemical O3 formation. Based on the outcomes of the source apportionment, a sensitivity analysis of relative O3 reduction efficiency (RORE), under different source removal regimes such as using the reduction of VOCs from 10% to 100% as input, was conducted. The RORE was the highest (~ 20%-40%) when the VOCs from solvent-related sources decreased by 40%. The highest RORE values for vegetation emissions, industrial emissions, vehicle exhaust, and LPG/NG usage were presented in the scenarios of 50%, 80%, 40% and 40%, respectively.

  14. Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas operations in Utah and Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Warneke, C.; Holloway, J. S.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Young, C. J.; Edwards, P.; Brown, S. S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Williams, E. J.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration has reported a sharp increase in domestic oil and natural gas production from "unconventional" reserves (e.g., shale and tight sands) between 2005 and 2012. The recent growth in drilling and fossil fuel production has led to environmental concerns regarding local air quality. Severe wintertime ozone events (greater than 100 ppb ozone) have been observed in Utah's Uintah Basin and Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin, both of which contain large natural gas fields. Raw natural gas is a mixture of approximately 60-95 mole percent methane while the remaining fraction is composed of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other non-hydrocarbon gases. We measured an extensive set of VOCs and other trace gases near two highly active areas of oil and natural gas production in Utah's Uintah Basin and Colorado's Denver-Julesburg Basin in order to characterize primary emissions of VOCs associated with these industrial operations and identify the key VOCs that are precursors for potential ozone formation. UBWOS (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study) was conducted in Uintah County located in northeastern Utah in January-February 2012. Two Colorado studies were conducted at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Weld County in northeastern Colorado in February-March 2011 and July-August 2012 as part of the NACHTT (Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower) and SONNE (Summer Ozone Near Natural gas Emissions) field experiments, respectively. The C2-C6 hydrocarbons were greatly enhanced for all of these studies. For example, the average propane mixing ratio observed during the Utah study was 58 ppb (median = 35 ppb, minimum = 0.8, maximum = 520 ppb propane) compared to urban averages which range between 0.3 and 6.0 ppb propane. We compare the ambient air composition from these studies to urban measurements in order to show that the VOC source signature from oil and natural gas operations is distinct and can be clearly

  15. VOC Measurements in the Northern Colorado Front Range Metropolitan Area: Investigating the Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Emissions on O3 Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeleira, A.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.; Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.

    2015-12-01

    Authors: Ilana Pollock1,2, Jake Zaragoza2, Emily V. Fischer2, Delphine K. Farmer11. Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 2. Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO During summer months, the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado consistently violates the 75 ppbv 8-hour EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ambient ozone (O3), despite continued reduction in anthropogenic emissions. The region has been deemed an O3 non-attainment zone since 2008. Ground-level O3 is produced from photochemical catalytic cycles involving OH radicals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and NOx (NO + NO2). VOC emissions in the NFRMA are dominated by anthropogenic sources and influenced by biogenic and agricultural sources, while NOx emissions are mainly from automobile exhaust. A growing concern in the region is the role of oil and natural gas (ONG) on VOC concentrations and the potential for O3 production. Increases in local VOC emissions will likely cause subsequent increase in local O3 concentrations as PO3 increases in a region that is already affected by high O3episodes. As a part of the SONGNEX 2015 (Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus) campaign, we measured a broad suite of speciated VOCs during two 8-week deployments (March-May 2015, July-September 2015) at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. VOC measurements were made with a custom-online multichannel gas chromatography system (50+ compounds hourly), along with measurements of O3, SO2, NOx, NOy, PAN, CO, CO2, and CH4. We use these data to investigate the role of different VOC sources, and ONG in particular, in contributing to VOC reactivity and thus instantaneous O3 production. Preliminary analysis of the Spring VOC data indicates that VOC reactivity is dominated by light alkanes typical of ONG emissions - specifically propane, consistent with previous winter-time studies. We will use the observed temperature

  16. A Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccot, Stephen D.; Watson, Joel J.; Jones, Julian W.

    1992-06-01

    As part of an effort to assess the potential impacts associated with global climate change, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development is supporting global atmospheric chemistry research by developing global scale estimates of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions (excluding methane). Atmospheric chemistry models require, as one input, an emissions inventory of VOCs. Consequently, a global inventory of anthropogenic VOC emissions has been developed. The inventory includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds which possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The technical approach used to develop this inventory involved four major steps. The first step was to identify the major anthropogenic sources of VOC emissions in the United States and to group these sources into 28 general source groups. Source groups were developed to represent general categories such as "sources associated with oil and natural gas production" and more specific categories such as savanna buming. Emission factors for these source groups were then developed using different techniques and data bases. For example, emission factors for oil and natural gas production were estimated by dividing the United States' emissions from oil and gas production operations by the amount of oil and natural gas produced in the United States. Multiplication of these emission factors by production/consumption statistics for other countries yielded global VOC emission estimates for specific source groups within those countries. The final step in development of the VOC inventory was to distribute emissions into 10° by 10° grid cells using detailed maps of population and industrial activity. The results of this study show total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of

  17. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the evaporative emissions of modern passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tingting; Yue, Xin; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jingnan; Lai, Yitu; He, Liqang; Zhu, Rencheng

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vehicle evaporative emissions contribute substantially to photochemical air pollution. Yet, few studies of the characteristics of VOCs emitted from vehicle evaporative emissions have been published. We investigate the characteristics of 57 VOCs in hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions by applying the Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination unit (SHED) test to three modern passenger cars (one US Tier 2 and two China IV vehicles) using two different types of gasoline. The characteristics of the VOCs from the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions were different due to their different emission mechanisms. In the hot soak emissions, toluene, isopentane/n-pentane, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were dominant species. In the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, isopentane and n-pentane were dominant species. Toluene was the third most dominant component in the 24 h diurnal emissions but decreased by a mass of 42%-80% in the 48 h diurnal emissions. In the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions, alkanes were generally the dominant hydrocarbons, followed by aromatics and olefins. However, owing to different evaporative emission mechanisms, the weight percentages of the aromatic hydrocarbons decreased and the weight percentages of the alkanes increased from the hot soak test to the 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal tests for each vehicle. The dominant contributors to the ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were also different in the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions. The OFPs (g O3/g VOC) of the hot soak emissions were higher than those of the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions. In addition, the combined effect of decreasing the olefin and aromatic contents of gasoline on vehicle evaporative emissions was investigated. The aromatics all decreased substantially in the hot soak, 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, and the total masses of the VOCs and OFPs decreased, with the greatest reduction occurring in

  18. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, , N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2013-09-01

    Emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission strengths are needed to determine the impact of VOC on atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects). The aim of this work was to contribute with measurements of tree species from the poorly described tropical vegetation in direct comparison with the quite well-investigated, highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. VOC emission from sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area were compared with twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin by an emission screening at leaf level using branch enclosures. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. The average loss rates of VOC carbon in relation to the net CO2 assimilation were found below 4% and indicating normal unstressed plant behavior. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a large variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were identified as monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene < limonene < sabinene < ß-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes. In the case of Amazonian plants no sesquiterpenes were detected. However, missing of sesquiterpenes may also be due to a lack of sensitivity of the measuring systems. Furthermore, our screening activities cover only 1% of tree species of such tropical areas as estimated based on recent biodiversity reports. Methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were found to be common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous

  19. VOC emissions of smouldering combustion from Mediterranean wildfires in central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtyugina, Margarita; Calvo, Ana Isabel; Nunes, Teresa; Alves, Célia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Tarelho, Luís; Vicente, Ana; Pio, Casimiro

    2013-01-01

    Emissions of trace gases and C5-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from Mediterranean wildfires occurring in Portugal in summer 2010 were studied. Fire smoke was collected in Tedlar bags and analysed for CO, CO2, total hydrocarbons (THC) and VOCs. The CO, CO2 and THC emission factors (EFs) were 206 ± 79, 1377 ± 142 and 8.1 ± 9 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. VOC emissions from Mediterranean wildfires were reported for the first time. Aromatic hydrocarbons were major components of the identified VOC emissions. Among them, benzene and toluene were dominant compounds with EFs averaging 0.747 ± 0.303 and 0.567 ± 0.422 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. Considerable amounts of oxygenated organic volatile compounds (OVOCs) and isoprenoids were detected. 2-Furaldehyde and hexanal were the most abundant measured OVOCs with EFs of 0.337 ± 0.259 and 0.088 ± 0.039 g kg-1 biomass burned (dry basis), respectively. The isoprenoid emissions were dominated by isoprene (EF = 0.207 ± 0.195 g kg-1 dry biomass burned) and α-pinene (EF = 0.112 ± 0.093 g kg-1 dry biomass burned). Emission data obtained in this work are useful for validating and improving emission inventories, as well for carrying out modelling studies to assess the effects of vegetation fires on air pollution and tropospheric chemistry.

  20. Characterization of VOC Emission from Materials in Vehicular Environment at Varied Temperatures: Correlation Development and Validation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yang, Tao; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    The steady state VOC concentration in automobile cabin is taken as a good indicator to characterize the material emission behaviors and evaluate the vehicular air quality. Most studies in this field focus on experimental investigation while theoretical analysis is lacking. In this paper we firstly develop a simplified physical model to describe the VOC emission from automobile materials, and then derive a theoretical correlation between the steady state cabin VOC concentration (Ca) and temperature (T), which indicates that the logarithm of Ca/T0.75 is in a linear relationship with 1/T. Experiments of chemical emissions in three car cabins at different temperatures (24°C, 29°C, 35°C) were conducted. Eight VOCs specified in the Chinese National Standard GB/T 27630-2011 were taken for analysis. The good agreement between the correlation and experimental results from our tests, as well as the data taken from literature demonstrates the effectiveness of the derived correlation. Further study indicates that the slope and intercept of the correlation follows linear association. With the derived correlation, the steady state cabin VOC concentration different from the test conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be helpful for analyzing temperature-dependent emission phenomena in automobiles and predicting associated health risks.

  1. Characterization of VOC Emission from Materials in Vehicular Environment at Varied Temperatures: Correlation Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yang, Tao; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Lan; Ge, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    The steady state VOC concentration in automobile cabin is taken as a good indicator to characterize the material emission behaviors and evaluate the vehicular air quality. Most studies in this field focus on experimental investigation while theoretical analysis is lacking. In this paper we firstly develop a simplified physical model to describe the VOC emission from automobile materials, and then derive a theoretical correlation between the steady state cabin VOC concentration (Ca) and temperature (T), which indicates that the logarithm of Ca/T0.75 is in a linear relationship with 1/T. Experiments of chemical emissions in three car cabins at different temperatures (24°C, 29°C, 35°C) were conducted. Eight VOCs specified in the Chinese National Standard GB/T 27630–2011 were taken for analysis. The good agreement between the correlation and experimental results from our tests, as well as the data taken from literature demonstrates the effectiveness of the derived correlation. Further study indicates that the slope and intercept of the correlation follows linear association. With the derived correlation, the steady state cabin VOC concentration different from the test conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be helpful for analyzing temperature-dependent emission phenomena in automobiles and predicting associated health risks. PMID:26452146

  2. Control of VOC emissions from a flexographic printing facility using an industrial biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Sempere, F; Martínez-Soria, V; Penya-Roja, J M; Waalkens, A; Gabaldón, C

    2012-01-01

    The study of an industrial unit of biotrickling filter for the treatment of the exhaust gases of a flexographic facility was investigated over a 2-year period with the objective to meet the volatile organic compound (VOC) regulatory emission limits. Increasing the water flow rate from 2 to 40 m(3) h(-1) improved the performance of the process, meeting the VOC regulation when 40 m(3) h(-1) were used. An empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 36 s was used when the inlet air temperature was 18.7 °C, and an EBRT as low as 26 s was set when the inlet temperature was 26.8 °C. During this long-term operation, the pressure drop over the column of the bioreactor was completely controlled avoiding clogging problems and the system could perfectly handle the non-working periods without VOC emission, demonstrating its robustness and feasibility to treat the emission of the flexographic sector.

  3. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from light-duty gasoline vehicles in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinyue; Yao, Zhiliang; Shen, Xianbao; Ye, Yu; Jiang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    This study is the third in a series of three papers aimed at characterizing the VOC emissions of vehicles in Beijing. In this study, 30 light-duty vehicles fueled with gasoline were evaluated using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) as they were driven on a predesigned, fixed test route. All of the tested vehicles were rented from private vehicle owners and spanned regulatory compliance guidelines ranging from Pre-China I to China IV. Alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and some additional species in the exhaust were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Carbonyls were collected on 2,4-dinitrophenyhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Overall, 74 VOC species were detected from the tested vehicles, including 22 alkanes, 6 alkenes, 1 alkyne, 16 aromatics, 3 cyclanes, 10 halohydrocarbons, 12 carbonyls and 4 other compounds. Alkanes, aromatics and carbonyls were the dominant VOCs with weight percentages of approximately 36.4%, 33.1% and 17.4%, respectively. The average VOC emission factors and standard deviations of the Pre-China I, China I, China II, China III and China IV vehicles were 469.3 ± 200.1, 80.7 ± 46.1, 56.8 ± 37.4, 25.6 ± 11.7 and 14.9 ± 8.2 mg/km, respectively, which indicated that the VOC emissions significantly decreased under stricter vehicular emission standards. Driving cycles also influenced the VOC emissions from the tested vehicles. The average VOC emission factors based on the travel distances of the tested vehicles under urban driving cycles were greater than those under highway driving cycles. In addition, we calculated the ozone formation potential (OFP) using the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) method. The results of this study will be helpful for understanding the true emission levels of light-duty gasoline vehicles and will provide information for controlling VOC emissions from vehicles in Beijing, China.

  4. Sources of long-lived atmospheric VOCs at the rural boreal forest site, SMEAR II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Kajos, M. K.; Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Ryyppö, T.; Nieminen, T.; Hakola, H.; Rinne, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a long-term volatile organic compound (VOCs) concentration data set, measured at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland during the years 2006-2011, was analyzed in order to identify source areas and profiles of the observed VOCs. VOC mixing ratios were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Four-day HYSPLIT 4 (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) backward trajectories and the Unmix 6.0 receptor model were used for source area and source composition analysis. Two major forest fire events in Russia took place during the measurement period. The effect of these fires was clearly visible in the trajectory analysis, lending confidence to the method employed with this data set. Elevated volume mixing ratios (VMRs) of non-biogenic VOCs related to forest fires, e.g. acetonitrile and aromatic VOCs, were observed. Ten major source areas for long-lived VOCs (methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene, and toluene) observed at the SMEAR II site were identified. The main source areas for all the targeted VOCs were western Russia, northern Poland, Kaliningrad, and the Baltic countries. Industrial areas in northern continental Europe were also found to be source areas for certain VOCs. Both trajectory and receptor analysis showed that air masses from northern Fennoscandia were less polluted with respect to both the VOCs studied and other trace gases (CO, SO2 and NOx), compared to areas of eastern and western continental Europe, western Russia, and southern Fennoscandia.

  5. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  6. Contrasting responses of silver birch VOC emissions to short- and long-term herbivory.

    PubMed

    Maja, Mengistu M; Kasurinen, Anne; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Klemola, Tero; Holopainen, Toini; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2014-03-01

    There is a need to incorporate the effects of herbivore damage into future models of plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions at leaf or canopy levels. Short-term (a few seconds to 48 h) changes in shoot VOC emissions of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) in response to feeding by geometrid moths (Erannis defoliaria Hübner) were monitored online by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). In addition, two separate field experiments were established to study the effects of long-term foliage herbivory (FH, 30-32 days of feeding by geometrids Agriopis aurantiaria (Clerck) and E. defoliaria in two consecutive years) and bark herbivory (BH, 21 days of feeding by the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) in the first year) on shoot and rhizosphere VOC emissions of three silver birch genotypes (gt14, gt15 and Hausjärvi provenance). Online monitoring of VOCs emitted from foliage damaged by geometrid larvae showed rapid bursts of green leaf volatiles (GLVs) immediately after feeding activity, whereas terpenoid emissions had a tendency to gradually increase during the monitoring period. Long-term FH caused transient increases in total monoterpene (MT) emissions from gt14 and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions from Hausjärvi provenance, mainly in the last experimental season. In the BH experiment, genotype effects were detected, with gt14 trees having significantly higher total MT emissions compared with other genotypes. Only MTs were detected in the rhizosphere samples of both field experiments, but their emission rates were unaffected by genotype or herbivory. The results suggest that silver birch shows a rapid VOC emission response to short-term foliage herbivory, whereas the response to long-term foliage herbivory and bark herbivory is less pronounced and variable at different time points.

  7. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions and SOA-forming potentials in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Xie, Junfei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Yuesi; Grote, Rüdiger; Block, Katja; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Hallquist, Mattias; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs) and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs) from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on the municipal tree census and cuvette BVOC measurements on leaf level, we built an inventory of BVOC emissions, and assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids, and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction ( ˜ 40 %) of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from ˜ 4.8 × 109 g C year-1 in 2005 to ˜ 10.3 × 109 g C year-1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greening, while at the same time the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) decreased by 24 %. Based on the BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation potential in Beijing. Constitutive and stress-induced BVOCs might produce similar amounts of secondary aerosol in Beijing. However, the main contributors of SOA-mass formations originated from anthropogenic sources (> 90 %). This study demonstrates the general importance to include sBVOCs when studying BVOC emissions. Although the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of low-emitting plant species has some potential beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  8. [VOC emission situation and control measures of gas station in China].

    PubMed

    Shen, Min-Jia; Hao, Ji-Ming; Wang, Li-Tao

    2006-08-01

    The emission factor is used to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) emission caused by gas station. After considering the economical, social and population factors, the activity rate was modified, and then the fuel consumption and VOC emission trend in the next 20 years can be predicted. The result shows the VOC emission from gas station in China 2002 was 187.6kt and this number will increase to 1196kt in 2030 if no further control measures will be implemented. And the economic loss caused by gasoline vapor arrived to 0.75 billion RMB in 2002 and will be 4.78 billion RMB in 2030. The cost-benefit approach of the commercially available gasoline vapor recovery technologies in China included Stage I, Stage II and on-board refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) were analyzed, and the result shows introducing these three systems will bring larger reduce of VOC emission, and the combination of them can do a even better job. Compared with Stage II, ORVR is more efficient and cheaper, but it will take long time to implement ORVR. And it will take at least 11 years in China to convert to ORVR above 80%. So Stage II vapor recovery system may be a short term option while ORVR should be treated as the ultimate solution for controlling the vapor emission from gas stations in the future.

  9. Constraints on the sources and impacts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over North America from tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lu

    This dissertation presents the first-ever in-situ tall tower measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. The data span August 2009 through July 2012, and provide new constraints on seasonal and long-term controls on VOC sources and their atmospheric effects. The 200 m sampling height provides a large-scale footprint, while the tall tower location, near the intersection of the main North American ecosystems and at times downwind of the Twin Cities, affords information on natural emissions from some of the most important US landscapes as well as on anthropogenic sources. I interpret the dataset using an atmospheric chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem CTM), with a focus on several key atmospheric VOCs. This dissertation finds that current models underestimate methanol emission rates for younger versus older leaves. This biased seasonality means that the photochemical role for methanol early in the growing season is presently underestimated. A Bayesian inverse analysis of the tall tower observations reveals that the prior estimate of North American anthropogenic acetone sources (based on the US EPA's NEI05 inventory) is accurate to within 20%. However, biogenic acetone emissions from broadleaf trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants are presently underestimated (˜37%), while emissions from needleleaf trees plus secondary production from biogenic precursors are overestimated by a similar amount (˜40%). Model-measurement comparisons imply that isoprene emissions in the immediate vicinity of the tall tower are accurately captured by the MEGANv2.1 biogenic inventory, but that larger-scale regional emissions are underestimated, reflecting the heterogeneous land cover in this transitional landscape. Isoprene emissions play a key role in seasonal shifts between VOC-limited chemistry in the spring and fall and NOx-limited or transitional chemistry in the summer. A Bayesian inverse analysis based on the tall tower measurements suggests that: i) the RETRO

  10. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Ho, W. K.; Blake, D. R.; Cheng, Y.; Li, Y. S.; Ho, S. S. H.; Fung, K.; Louie, P. K. K.; Park, D.

    2009-10-01

    Vehicle emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined at the Shing Mun Tunnel, Hong Kong in summer and winter of 2003. One hundred and ten VOCs were quantified in this study. The average concentration of the total measured VOCs at the inlet and outlet of the tunnel were 81 250 pptv and 117 850 pptv, respectively. Among the 110 compounds, ethene, ethyne and toluene were the most abundant species in the tunnel. The total measured VOC emission factors ranged from 67 mg veh-1 km-1 to 148 mg veh-1 km-1, with an average of 115 mg veh-1 km-1. The five most abundant VOCs observed in the tunnel were, in decreasing order, ethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These five most abundant species contributed over 38% of the total measured VOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were found to be associated with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-fueled taxis. Fair correlations were observed between marker species (ethene, i-pentane, n-nonane, and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes - BTEX) with fractions of gasoline-fueled or diesel-fueled vehicles. Moreover, ethene, ethyne, and propene are the key species that were abundant in the tunnel but not in gasoline vapors or LPG. The ozone formation potential from the VOCs in Hong Kong was evaluated by the maximum increment reactivity (MIR). It was found to be 568 mg of ozone per vehicle per kilometer traveled. Among them, ethene, propene and toluene contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  11. Composition and emissions of VOCs in main- and side-stream smoke of research cigarettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Simone M.; Batterman, S. A.; Jia, Chunrong

    It is well known that mainstream (MS) and sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke contains a vast number of chemical substances. Previous studies have emphasized SS smoke rather than MS smoke to which smokers are exposed, and most have used chamber tests that have several disadvantages such as wall losses. Emissions from standard research cigarettes have been measured, but relatively few constituents have been reported, and only the 1R4F (low nicotine) cigarette type has been tested. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of total, MS and SS smoke emissions for the 1R5F (ultra low nicotine), 2R4F (low nicotine), and 1R3F (standard nicotine) research cigarettes research cigarettes, including emission factors for a number of toxic compounds (e.g., benzene) and tobacco smoke tracers (e.g., 2,5-dimethyl furan). Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) are quantified using a dynamic dilution emission measurement system that is shown to produce accurate, rapid and reproducible results for over 30 VOCs and PM. SS and MS emissions were accurately apportioned based on a mass balance of total emissions. As expected, SS emissions greatly exceeded MS emissions. The ultra low nicotine cigarette had lower emissions of most VOCs compared to low and standard nicotine cigarettes, which had similar emissions. Across the three types of cigarettes, emissions of benzene (296-535 μg cig -1), toluene (541-1003 μg cig -1), styrene (90-162 μg cig -1), 2-dimethyl furan (71-244 μg cig -1), naphthalene (15-18 μg cig -1) and other VOCs were generally comparable to or somewhat higher than literature estimates using chamber tests.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  13. Connecting top down and bottom up methods for characterizing VOC emissions from petrochemical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Fortner, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Torres, V.; Al-Fadhli, F.; McDonald-Buller, E.; Allen, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade, several measurement campaigns in the Houston Galveston Brazoria (HGB) area have uncovered striking differences between emissions of highly reactive volatile organic carbon (HR-VOC) species from industrial facilities reported to regulatory agencies and observed or inferred emissions based on atmospheric data. A review of measurement based emissions estimates in light of recent insights gained from a recent full-scale controlled flare operational measurements(TCEQ Flare Study) will be presented. Links between controlled flare emissions observations and specific types of industrial operations emission will be discussed. Some of the atmospheric measurement datasets are sufficiently complete to compute specific flare combustion characteristics. One such metric, destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) directly informs inventory development by connecting the reported vent gas flow rates to HR-VOC emissions. The impact of the improved emissions estimate on HGB ambient ozone will be discussed. Primary formaldehyde emissions and the potential 'trade-off' between decreasing HR-VOC and increasing black carbon particulate emissions will also be discussed.

  14. Effect of heat waves on VOC emissions from vegetation and urban air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, G.; Kuik, F.; Lauer, A.; Bonn, B.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase carbon storage, storm water control, provision of space for recreation, as well as poverty alleviation. Although these multiple benefits speak positively for urban greening programs, the programs do not take into account how close human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Elevated temperatures together with anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants distinguish the urban system. Urban and sub-urban vegetation responds to ambient changes and reacts with pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen drawbacks of urban greening programs. The potential for emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions to produce ozone has long been recognized. This potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how heat waves affect emissions of VOC from urban vegetation and corresponding ground-level ozone. In this study we use Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in Berlin, Germany during the 2006 heat wave. VOC emissions from vegetation are simulated with MEGAN 2.0 coupled with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during the heat wave period. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas under changing climate and discuss associated tradeoffs.

  15. The emissions of major aromatic VOC as landfill gas from urban landfill sites in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Baek, Sung Ok; Choi, Ye-Jin; Sunwoo, Young; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Hong, J H

    2006-07-01

    In this study, concentrations of major aromatic VOCs were determined from landfill gas (LFG) at a total of five municipal landfill sites in Korea including Nan Ji (NJ), Woon Jung (WJ), Sam Poong (SP), Hoei Chun (HC), and No Hyung (NH). The concentration levels of those VOC were found to be significantly different, mainly as a function of such a parameter as landfill aging. The VOC concentrations measured from the unclosed landfill sites (e.g., WJ) were characterized by exceedingly high values above a few tens of ppm. However, the results of the abandoned site (e.g., SP) were about three orders of magnitude lower than the others so as to merely exceed the typical ambient concentration levels. It was most striking to find a systematic dominance of toluene over other aromatic VOC under most circumstances. The LFG flux values of all aromatic VOC and the four specific major ones (termed as BTEX: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) were also computed for each vent pipe from all study sites using their concentrations and the concurrently determined environmental parameters. The results, if calculated in terms of the average BTEX quantity emitted per vent pipe, showed that the magnitude of their emissions can vary substantially, with the values ranging from 0.05 (SP) to 49.2 kg yr(-1) (WJ in wintertime). The LFG flux values of aromatic VOC, when compared to the contribution of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), were able to explain a constant, but minor, proportion of the LFG carbon budget.

  16. Sensory and chemical characterization of VOC emissions from building products: impact of concentration and air velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, H. N.; Kjaer, U. D.; Nielsen, P. A.; Wolkoff, P.

    The emissions from five commonly used building products were studied in small-scale test chambers over a period of 50 days. The odor intensity was assessed by a sensory panel and the concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern for the indoor air quality were measured. The building products were three floor coverings: PVC, floor varnish on beechwood parquet and nylon carpet on a latex foam backing; an acrylic sealant, and a waterborne wall paint on gypsum board. The impacts of the VOC concentration in the air and the air velocity over the building products on the odor intensity and on the emission rate of VOCs were studied. The emission from each building product was studied under two or three different area-specific ventilation rates, i.e. different ratios of ventilation rate of the test chamber and building product area in the test chamber. The air velocity over the building product samples was adjusted to different levels between 0.1 and 0.3 m s -1. The origin of the emitted VOCs was assessed in order to distinguish between primary and secondary emissions. The results show that it is reasonable after an initial period of up to 14 days to consider the emission rate of VOCs of primary origin from most building products as being independent of the concentration and of the air velocity. However, if the building product surface is sensitive to oxidative degradation, increased air velocity may result in increased secondary emissions. The odor intensity of the emissions from the building products only decayed modestly over time. Consequently, it is recommended to use building products which have a low impact on the perceived air quality from the moment they are applied. The odor indices (i.e. concentration divided by odor threshold) of primary VOCs decayed markedly faster than the corresponding odor intensities. This indicates that the secondary emissions rather than the primary emissions, are likely to affect the perceived air quality in the

  17. On speciation of VOC localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the gas-phase chemical mechanisms successfully used in gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes, such as CBM-Z, RADM2 or SAPRC-07, treat hundreds of VOC as lumped organic species by their chemical characteristics. Most of the model results are compared with total VOC observations, and it is not appropriate to compare lumped VOC simulations to observations even if there are separate VOC observations like Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). While the PAMS Air Quality Model (PAMS-AQM) is developed, separate organic species observed by PAMS without a doubt can be directly compared with model simulations. From the past case study (Chen et al., 2010), it shows a major and very significant finding in that detailed emissions of VOC in the existing emissions database are often in error in Taiwan or other countries due to the fact that the annual VOC emissions are classified into hundreds of species-specific emissions by using the speciation factors following the protocol of the U.S. EPA (AP-42). Based on all PAMS observations from 2006-2007, four base cases with well comparable meteorological simulations were selected for the unified correction for all sources in Taiwan. After the PAMS species emissions are modified, the diurnal patterns and simulation-observation correlation for most of the PAMS species are improved, and the concentration levels are more comparable with those of observations. More expanded case studies also revealed necessary corrections for the PAMS species emissions. Sensitivity analyses for lumped organic species with modified PAMS species emissions are also conducted. After modified PAMS emissions are added into lumped VOC emissions, there is an increase of only 10% of totally VOC emissions. While the sources of the lumped VOC emissions are changed, ozone formation shows no significant change with modified lumped VOC emissions. This helps to support the argument that for ozone simulation, the lumped VOC processes balance out

  18. CAPSTONE REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD TEST METHOD FOR VOC EMISSIONS FROM INTERIOR LATEX PAINT AND ALKYD PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives details of a small-chamber test method developed by the EPA for characterizing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior latex and alkyd paints. Current knowledge about VOC, including hazardous air pollutant, emissions from interior paints generated...

  19. A framework and experimental study of an improved VOC/formaldehyde emission reference for environmental chamber tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhao, Weiping; Zhang, Yinping

    2014-01-01

    Environmental chamber systems are usually employed in the testing of volatile organic compound (VOC) and formaldehyde emissions from building materials. The measurement accuracy of environmental chamber systems can be evaluated by VOC/formaldehyde emission references. However, the available VOC/formaldehyde emission references all have some limitations for applications to various scales of chambers. A framework for designing and using a target VOC/formaldehyde emission references to evaluate the performance of chamber systems for measuring VOC/formaldehyde emissions from building materials is studied. Liquid-inner tube diffusion-film-emission (LIFE) reference is improved in this study to meet the requirements of a target VOC/formaldehyde emission reference, such as reliability, similarity as building materials, efficiency for measurement. Equivalent emission characteristic parameters are designed for a toluene LIFE reference to perform similar to a building material. Chamber test of the LIFE reference is made in a 30 m3 stainless steel ventilated environmental chamber at 23 ± 1 °C and 50 ± 5% relative humidity. The experimental data match the predictions using LIFE emission model as well as building material emission model. The improvement of the LIFE reference enables its application for the evaluation of the performance of all kinds of environmental chambers as a general reference in tests of VOCs/formaldehyde emissions from building materials.

  20. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: compounds, sources, and implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission r...

  1. Ozone reaction with clothing and its initiated VOC emissions in an environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Rai, A C; Guo, B; Lin, C-H; Zhang, J; Pei, J; Chen, Q

    2014-02-01

    Human health is adversely affected by ozone and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced from its reactions in the indoor environment. Hence, it is important to characterize the ozone-initiated reactive chemistry under indoor conditions and study the influence of different factors on these reactions. This investigation studied the ozone reactions with clothing through a series of experiments conducted in an environmental chamber under various conditions. The study found that the ozone reactions with a soiled (human-worn) T-shirt consumed ozone and generated VOCs. The ozone removal rate and deposition velocity for the T-shirt increased with the increasing soiling level and air change rate, decreased at high ozone concentrations, and were relatively unaffected by the humidity. The deposition velocity for the soiled T-shirt ranged from 0.15 to 0.29 cm/s. The ozone-initiated VOC emissions included C6-C10 straight-chain saturated aldehydes, acetone, and 4-OPA (4-oxopentanal). The VOC emissions were generally higher at higher ozone, humidity, soiling of T-shirt, and air change rate. The total molar yield was approximately 0.5 in most cases, which means that for every two moles of ozone removed by the T-shirt surface, one mole of VOCs was produced.

  2. Measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood stains using an electronic balance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Nong, G.; Shaw, C.Y.; Wang, J.

    1999-07-01

    An emissions test method using an electronic balance is introduced for measuring the TVOC emission rates of oil-based wood stains, with a detailed procedure for preparing test specimens. The emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from an artificial wood stain and an oil-based commercial wood stain were determined. Results showed that VOC emissions from both stains included a surface evaporation and an internal diffusion sub-process. With regard to time, the entire emission period could be divided into three periods: (1) an initial evaporation-controlled period that was characterized by a high and fast decaying emission rate, (2) a transition period (following the initial period) in which the emissions transited from an evaporation-controlled to an internal diffusion-controlled process, and (3) an internal diffusion-controlled period that was characterized by a low and slowly decaying emission rate. For the commercial wood stain tested, the length of the initial period was approximately three hours, and about 46% of the emittable VOC mass was emitted during this short period. The transition period was between 3 and 6.5 hours from the start of testing and only accounted for about 4% of VOC mass emitted. The rest (about 50%) of the VOC mass was emitted in the diffusion-controlled period over a long period of time. Comparison between the commercial wood stain and an artificial wood stain suggested that the pigments/solids in the wood stain had significant effect on the time scales and amount of mass emitted during each emission period. The presence of additional VOCs in the commercial wood stain might have also affected the emission profiles. These results are useful for developing better models for predicting the emission rates. The electronic balance method was also compared with those determined from the TVOC concentrations measured at the chamber exhaust (referred to as chamber method). Results show that the two methods agreed well with each

  3. An above-canopy flux network for improving and evaluating biogenic VOC emission models: GLOBal Organic Emissions NETwork (GLOBOENET) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.; Turnipseed, A.; Duhl, T.; Shertz, S.; Karl, T.; Monson, R.; Litvak, M. E.; Jardine, K. J.; Abrell, L.; Geron, C.; Seco, R.

    2009-12-01

    The first estimates of global total biogenic VOC emissions were reported almost 50 years ago. Observations over the following three decades were incorporated into a monthly biogenic VOC emission inventory on a 1 degree by 1 degree grid, called the GEIA natural VOC emission inventory, in the early 1990s and began to be widely used in global chemistry and transport models. Also in the 1990s, regulatory air quality modelers began to routinely include regional biogenic VOC emission inventories using procedures such as BEIS/BEIS2/BEIS3. These approaches are still used today although there have been advances in the past two decades that have improved our understanding of the processes controlling biogenic VOC emissions. Current models, including the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), have integrated some of this information and are being incorporated as on-line components of coupled models. A major limitation in the advancement and evaluation of these models is the lack of suitable observations from representative ecosystems. We have initiated a community activity, called GLOBOENET, to address the need for observations that can be used to improve and evaluate these models. GLOBOENET is enhancing existing flux towers, such as those participating in FLUXNET, by adding biogenic VOC flux measurements to sites that are well characterized and are already measuring fluxes of CO2, water and energy. The biogenic VOC flux measurements are made with a low-cost and low-power Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system that has been evaluated by comparison to a PTRMS eddy covariance system. This presentation will describe the GLOBOENET approach and present some initial results. This includes seasonal and interannual variations at a forested site in Colorado that demonstrates the importance of climate, phenology and stress-induced emissions. Results from additional sites in Arizona, North Carolina, Michigan and New Mexico will also be shown and a strategy for

  4. Observational constraints on biogenic VOC emission model estimates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Chemistry and transport models require accurate estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in order to simulate the atmospheric constituents controlling air quality and climate, such as ozone and particles, and so the uncertainties associated with BVOC estimates may be limiting the development of effective air quality and climate management strategies. BVOC emission models include driving variables and algorithms that span scales from the leaf level to entire landscapes. While considerable effort has been made to improve BVOC emission models in the past decades, there have been relatively few attempts to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimates or to rigorously assess emission modeling approaches. This presentation will summarize the availability of observations that can be used to constrain BVOC emission models including flux measurements (leaf enclosure, above canopy tower, and aircraft platforms) and ambient concentrations of BVOC and their products. Results from studies targeting specific BVOC emission processes (e.g., the response of isoprene emission to drought and the response of monoterpene emissions to bark beetle attack) will be shown and the application of these observations for BVOC model evaluation will be discussed. In addition, the results from multi-scale BVOC emission studies (leaf enclosure, whole canopy flux tower, regional aircraft eddy covariance) will be presented and a approach for incorporating these observations into a community model testbed will be described and used to evaluate regional BVOC emission models.

  5. Ozone Trends Across the United States over a Period of Decreasing NOx and VOC Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, we evaluate ambient ozone trends at urban, suburban, and rural monitoring sites across the United States over a period of decreasing NOx and VOC emissions (1998–2013). We find that decreasing ozone trends generally occur in the summer, in less urbanized areas,...

  6. ECOS E-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database

    SciTech Connect

    Parisien, Lia

    2016-01-31

    This final scientific/technical report on the ECOS e-MATRIX Methane and Volatile Organic Carbon (VOC) Emissions Best Practices Database provides a disclaimer and acknowledgement, table of contents, executive summary, description of project activities, and briefing/technical presentation link.

  7. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission characteristics and control strategies for a petrochemical industrial area in middle Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chia-Hsien; Horng, Jao-Jia

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated VOC emissions from the largest petrochemical industrial district in Taiwan and recommended some control measures to reduce VOC emissions. In addition to the petrochemical industry, the district encompasses a chemical and fiber industry, a plastics industry and a harbor, which together produce more than 95% of the VOC emissions in the area. The sequence of VOC emission was as follows: components (e.g., valves, flanges, and pumps) (47%) > tanks (29%) > stacks (15%) > wastewater treatment facility (6%) > loading (2%) > flares (1%). Other plants producing high-density polyethylene (HDPE), styrene, ethylene glycol (EG), gas oil, and iso-nonyl-alchol (INA) were measured to determine the VOC leaching in the district. The VOC emissions of these 35 plants (90% of all plants) were less than 100 tons/year. About 74% of the tanks were fixed-roof tanks that leached more VOCs than the other types of tanks. To reduce leaching, the components should be checked periodically, and companies should be required to follow the Taiwan EPA regulations. A VOC emission management system was developed in state implementation plans (SIPs) to inspect and reduce emissions in the industrial district.

  8. New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by

  9. Calix[4]arene coated QCM sensors for detection of VOC emissions: Methylene chloride sensing studies.

    PubMed

    Temel, Farabi; Tabakci, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the sensing studies of QCM sensors with coated some calixarene derivatives bearing different functional groups for some selected Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) such as acetone, acetonitrile, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride (MC), N,N-dimethylformamide, 1,4-dioxane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, xylene, methanol, n-hexane and toluene. The initial experiments have revealed that whole the calix[4]arene modified QCM sensors exhibited strongest sensing ability to MC emissions. Thus, the detailed studies were performed for only MC emissions after the determination of relatively more effective calix-coated QCM sensors for MC emissions in aqueous media. The results demonstrated that QCM sensor coated with calix-7 bearing both amino and imidazole groups was most useful sensor for MC emissions with 54.1ppm of detection limit. Moreover, it was understood that cyclic structures, H-bonding capabilities and also good preorganization properties of calixarene derivatives played an important role in VOC sensing processes.

  10. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, T M; Müller, M; Schnitzhofer, R; Karl, T; Graus, M; Bamberger, I; Hörtnagl, L; Brilli, F; Wohlfahrt, G; Hansel, A

    2011-01-20

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H(+) - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m(-2) s(-1), as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m(-2) s(-1) were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  11. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2010-09-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+-water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmol C m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  12. VOC Emission and Deposition Eddy Covariance Fluxes above Grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2010-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  13. Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, T. M.; Müller, M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Karl, T.; Graus, M.; Bamberger, I.; Hörtnagl, L.; Brilli, F.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.

  14. Impacts of biogenic emissions of VOC and NOx on tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin'geng; Han, Zhiwei; Wang, Tijian; Zhang, Renjian

    2008-05-20

    This study is intended to understand and quantify the impacts of biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) on the formation of tropospheric ozone during summertime in eastern China. The model system consists of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) and a tropospheric chemical and transport model (TCTM) with the updated carbon-bond chemical reaction mechanism (CBM-IV). The spatial resolution of the system domain is 30 km x 30 km. The impacts of biogenic emissions are investigated by performing simulations (36 h) with and without biogenic emissions, while anthropogenic emissions are constant. The results indicate that biogenic emissions have remarkable impacts on surface ozone in eastern China. In big cities and their surrounding areas, surface ozone formation tends to be VOC-limited. The increase in ozone concentration by biogenic VOC is generally 5 ppbv or less, but could be more than 10 ppbv or even 30 ppbv in some local places. The impacts of biogenic NO(x) are different or even contrary in different regions, depending on the relative availability of NO(x) and VOC. The surface ozone concentrations reduced or increased by the biogenic NO(x) could be as much as 10 ppbv or 20 ppbv, respectively. The impacts of biogenic emissions on ozone aloft are generally restricted to the boundary layer and generally more obvious during the daytime than during the nighttime. This study is useful for understanding the role of biogenic emissions and for planning strategies for surface ozone abatement in eastern China. Due to limitations of the emission inventories used and the highly non-linear nature of zone formation, however, some uncertainties remain in the results.

  15. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  16. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-01

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.

  17. Organic liquids storage tanks volatile organic compounds (VOCS) emissions dispersion and risk assessment in developing countries: the case of Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Msafiri M

    2006-05-01

    The emission estimation of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from eight organic liquids storage tanks companies in Dar-es-Salaam City Tanzania has been done by using US EPA standard regulatory storage tanks emission model (TANKS 4.9b). Total VOCs atmospheric emission has been established to be 853.20 metric tones/yr. It has been established further that petrol storage tanks contribute about 87% of total VOCs emitted, while tanks for other refined products and crude oil were emitting 10% and 3% of VOCs respectively. Of the eight sources (companies), the highest emission value from a single source was 233,222.94 kg/yr and the lowest single source emission value was 6881.87 kg/yr. The total VOCs emissions estimated for each of the eight sources were found to be higher than the standard level of 40,000 kg/yr per source for minor source according to US EPA except for two sources, which were emitting VOCs below the standard level. The annual emissions per single source for each of the VOCs were found to be below the US EPA emissions standard which is 2,000 kg/yr in all companies except the emission of hexane from company F1 which was slightly higher than the standard. The type of tanks used seems to significantly influence the emission rate. Vertical fixed roof tanks (VFRT) emit a lot more than externally floating roof tanks (EFRT) and internally floating roof tanks (IFRT). The use of IFRT and EFRT should be encouraged especially for storage of petrol which had highest atmospheric emission contribution. Model predicted atmospheric emissions are less than annual losses measured by companies in all the eight sources. It is possible that there are other routes for losses beside atmospheric emissions. It is therefore important that waste reduction efforts in these companies are directed not only to reducing atmospheric emissions, but also prevention of the spillage and leakage of stored liquid and curbing of the frequently reported illegal siphoning of stored products

  18. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  19. Uptake and emission of VOCs near ground level below a mixed forest at Borden, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Vlasenko, A.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C.; Makar, P. A.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.; Brown, S.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding of the atmosphere/forest canopy exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) requires insight into the deposition, emission, and chemical reactions of VOCs below the canopy. Between 18 July and 9 August 2009, VOCs were measured with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at six heights between 1 and 6 m beneath a 23 m high mixed-forest canopy. Measured VOCs included methanol, isoprene, acetone, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MACR + MVK), monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes. There are pronounced differences in the behaviour of isoprene and its by-products and that of the terpenes. Non-terpene mixing ratios increase with height, suggesting predominantly downward fluxes. In contrast, the terpene mixing ratios decrease with height, suggesting upward fluxes. A 1-D canopy model was used to compare results to measurements with and without surface deposition of isoprene and MACR + MVK and emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Results suggest deposition velocities of 2.7 mm s-1 for isoprene and 1.2 mm s-1 for MACR + MVK and daytime surface emission rates of 63 μg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes. The modelled isoprene surface deposition is approximately 2% of the canopy-top isoprene emissions and the modelled emissions of monoterpenes comprise approximately 15 to 27% of the canopy-top monoterpene emissions to the atmosphere. These results suggest that surface monoterpene emissions are significant for forest canopy/atmosphere exchange for this mixed-forest location and surface uptake is relatively small for all the species measured in this study.

  20. Speciated organic VOC and PM emissions from peat burns

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples were acquired from Alligator River (AR) and Pocosin Lakes (PL) National Wildlife Refuges. This dataset is associated with the following publication:George , I., R. Black, J. Walker , C. Geron , J. Aurell , M. Hays , W. Preston, and B. Gullett. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 132: 163-170, (2016).

  1. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Dairy Cows and Their Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Holzinger, R.; Mitloehner, F.; Goldstein, A.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are typically defined as those directly emitted from plants, but approximately 6% of global net primary production is consumed by cattle that carry out enteric fermentation and then emit VOCs that could also be considered biogenic. Current regulatory estimates suggest that dairy cattle in central California emit VOCs at rates comparable to those from passenger vehicles in the region, and thus contribute significantly to the extreme non-attainment of ozone standards there. We report PTR-MS measurements of ammonia and VOCs, and cavity-enhanced-absorption gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measurements of CH4, emitted from dairy cattle in various stages of pregnancy/lactation and their waste. Experiments were conducted in chambers at UC Davis that simulate freestall cow housing conditions. CH4 fluxes ranged from 125-374 lb/cow/year. The compounds with the highest fluxes from '3 cows+waste' treatments were: ammonia (1-18), methanol (0-2.3), acetone+propanal (0.2-0.7), dimethylsulfide (0-0.4), and mass 109 (likely ID = p-cresol; 0-0.3) in lb/cow/year. Mass 60 (likely ID = trimethylamine) and acetic acid were also abundant. There were 10s of additional compounds with detectable, but small, emissions. A few compounds that were likely emitted (i.e. ethanol, formaldehyde, and dimethylamine) were not quantified by the PTR-MS. The total flux for all measured organic gases (TOG = CH4 + PTR-MS VOCs(including acetone+propanal)) averaged 246±45 lb/cow/year for '3 cows+waste' treatments, and was dominated by methane (>98%). TOG flux for 'waste only' treatments averaged 1.1±0.1 lb/cow/year, and was instead dominated by VOC (>84%). The PTR-MS VOCs as a percent of TOG (0.6±0.2%) emitted from '3 cows+waste' treatments in chamber conditions was a factor of 10 smaller than that currently estimated by the California Air Resources Board. In addition, the ozone forming potentials of the most abundant VOCs are only about 10% those of typical combustion or plant

  2. Needle removal by pine sawfly larvae increases branch-level VOC emissions and reduces below-ground emissions of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Rajendra P; Markkanen, Juha M; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2013-05-07

    Climate warming is expected to increase the frequency of insect outbreaks in Boreal conifer forests. We evaluated how needle removal by the larvae of two diprionid sawfly species affects the composition and quantity of VOC emissions from Pinus sylvestris L. saplings. Feeding damage significantly increased the rate of localized VOC emissions from the damaged branch. The emissions of total monoterpenes (MTs) were dominating (96-98% of total VOCs) and increased by14-fold in Neodiprion sertifer-damaged branches and by 16-fold in Diprion pini-damaged branches compared to intact branches. Emissions of δ-3-carene, α-pinene, sabinene, and β-phellandrene were most responsive. Feeding damage by N. sertifer larvae increased the emission rates of total sesquiterpenes by 7-fold (4% of total VOCs) and total green leaf volatiles by 13-fold (<1% of total VOCs). The VOC emissions from N. sertifer larvae constituted nearly 25% of the total branch emissions. N. sertifer feeding in the lower branches induced 4-fold increase in MT emissions in the top crown. Defoliation of Scots pine by D. pini significantly reduced the below-ground emissions of total MTs by approximately 80%. We conclude that defoliators could significantly increase total VOC emissions from the Scots pine canopy including MT emissions from resin storing sawfly larvae.

  3. Characterization of VOC Emissions from Various Components of Dairy Farming and their effect on San Joaquin Valley Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M. M.; Meinardi, S.; Krauter, C.; Blake, D.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley Air Basin in Central California is classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a serious non-attainment area for health-based eight-hour federal ozone (smog) standard (1). In August 2005, the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District issued a report identifying dairies as a main source of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter in the valley (2). Among these compounds, we have found that ethanol, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde are produced in major quantities throughout the San Joaquin valley as by-products of yeast fermentation of silage and photochemical oxidation. These oxygenates, especially ethanol, play an important role in ozone (O3) formation within the valley. Three different types of sampling protocols were employed in order to determine the degree of enhancement of the four oxygenates in the valley air shed, as well as to determine their sources, emission profiles and emission rates. An assessment of the emissions of these oxygenates in the valley was achieved using data obtained on low altitude flights through the valley and from ground level samples collected thoughout the valley. The photochemical production of ozone was calculated for each of the four oxygenates and approximately one hundred other quantified VOCs. Based on the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale and concentrations of each oxygenate in the atmosphere, as much as 20% of O3 production in the valley is from ethanol and its photochemical by-product acetaldehyde. Our findings suggest that improvement to the valley air quality may be obtained by focusing on instituting new silage containment practices and regulations. 1. Lindberg, J. "Analysis of the San Joaquin Valley 2007 Ozone Plan." State of California Air Resources Board. Final Draft Staff Report. 5/30/2007. 2. Crow, D., executive director/APCO. "Air Pollution Control Officer's Determination of VOC Emisison Factors for Dairies." San Joaquin Valley Air

  4. Challenges in using flux chambers to measure ammonia and VOC emissions from open feedlot pen surfaces and retention ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few methodologies currently available to estimate ammonia and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from livestock operations have been adequately validated for accuracy. Flow-through flux chambers and wind tunnels are sometimes used; however, ammonia and VOC flux from pen or pond surfaces are a...

  5. Measured and estimated benzene and volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions at a major U.S. refinery/chemical plant: Comparison and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Daniel; Raun, Loren H

    2015-08-01

    Estimates of emissions for processes and point sources at petroleum refineries and chemical plants provide the foundation for many other environmental evaluations and policy decisions. The most commonly used method, based on emission factors, results in unreliable estimates. More information regarding the actual emissions within a facility is necessary to provide a foundation for improving emission factors and prioritizing which emission factors most need improvement. Identification of which emission factors both perform poorly and introduce the largest error is needed to provide such a prioritization. To address this need, benzene and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions within a major chemical plant/refinery were measured and compared with emission factor estimates. The results of this study indicate estimated emissions were never higher and commonly lower than the measured emissions. At one source location, VOC emissions were found to be largely representative of those measured (i.e., the catalytic reformer), but more often, emissions were significantly underestimated (e.g., up to 448 times greater than estimated at a floating roof tank). The sources with both the largest relative error between the estimate and the measurement and the largest magnitude of emissions in this study were a wastewater treatment process, an aromatics concentration unit and benzene extraction unit process area, and two sets of tanks (sets 7 and 8). Emission factors for these sources are priorities for further evaluation and improvement in this chemical plant/refinery. This study presents empirical data that demonstrate the need to validate and improve emission factors. Emission factors needing improvement are prioritized by identifying those that are weak models and introduce the largest error in magnitude of emissions. The results can also be used to prioritize evaluations of the emissions sources and controls, and any operational conditions or erroneous assumptions that may be

  6. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from oil and natural gas activities: compositional comparison of 13 major shale basins via NOAA airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Aikin, K. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Warneke, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Graus, M.; Tokarek, T. W.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Sueper, D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The recent and unprecedented increase in natural gas production from shale formations is associated with a rise in the production of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including natural gas plant liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, and butanes) and liquid lease condensate (e.g., pentanes, hexanes, aromatics and cycloalkanes). Since 2010, the production of natural gas liquids and the amount of natural gas vented/flared has increased by factors of ~1.28 and 1.57, respectively (U.S. Energy and Information Administration), indicating an increasingly large potential source of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. Emission of VOCs may affect local and regional air quality due to the potential to form tropospheric ozone and organic particles as well as from the release of toxic species such as benzene and toluene. The 2015 Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNex) campaign studied emissions from oil and natural gas activities across the central United States in order to better understand their potential air quality and climate impacts. Here we present VOC measurements from 19 research flights aboard the NOAA WP-3D over 11 shale basins across 8 states. Non-methane hydrocarbons were measured using an improved whole air sampler (iWAS) with post-flight analysis via a custom-built gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The whole air samples are complimented by higher-time resolution measurements of methane (Picarro spectrometer), ethane (Aerodyne spectrometer), and VOCs (H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometer). Preliminary analysis show that the Permian Basin on the New Mexico/Texas border had the highest observed VOC mixing ratios for all basins studied. We will utilize VOC enhancement ratios to compare the composition of methane and VOC emissions for each basin and the associated reactivities of these gases with the hydroxyl radical, OH, as a proxy for potential ozone formation.

  7. Seasonality of monoterpene emission potentials in Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea: Implications for regional VOC emissions modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Trevor; Niinemets, ÜLo; Sabate, Santi; Gracia, Carlos; PeñUelas, Josep

    2009-11-01

    VOC emissions from terrestrial ecosystems provide one of the principal controls over oxidative photochemistry in the lower atmosphere and the resulting air pollution. Such atmospheric processes have strong seasonal cycles. Although similar seasonal cycles in VOC emissions from terrestrial ecosystems have been reported, regional emissions inventories generally omit the effect of seasonality on emissions. We compiled measurement data on seasonal variations in monoterpene emissions potentials for two evergreen species (Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea) and used these data to construct two contrasting seasonal response functions for the inclusion in monoterpene emission models. We included these responses in the Niinemets et al. model and compared simulation results to those of the MEGAN model, both with and without its predicted seasonality. The effect of seasonality on regional monoterpene emissions inventories for European Mediterranean forests dominated by these species was tested for both models, using the GOTILWA+ biosphere model platform. The consideration of seasonality in the Niinemets et al. model reduced total estimated annual monoterpene emissions by up to 65% in some regions, with largest reductions at lower latitudes. The MEGAN model demonstrated a much weaker seasonal response than that in the Niinemets et al. model, and did not capture the between species seasonality differences found in this study. Results suggest that previous regional model inventories based on one fixed emission factor likely overestimate regional emissions, and species-specific expressions of seasonality may be necessary. The consideration of seasonality both largely reduces monoterpene emissions estimates, and changes their expected seasonal distribution.

  8. Improving continuous monitoring of VOC emissions from alternative fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of alternative fertilizers, such as biosolids, to agricultural fields is an environmentally beneficial practice. Biosolids provide producers with a ready source of organic matter and plant nutrients instead of using commercial fertilizers. However, concerns regarding nuisance odors cause...

  9. Effect of VOC emissions from vegetation on urban air quality during hot periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkina, Galina; Kuik, Friderike; Bonn, Boris; Lauer, Axel; Grote, Ruediger; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Programs to plant millions of trees in cities around the world aim at the reduction of summer temperatures, increase of carbon storage, storm water control, and recreational space, as well as at poverty alleviation. These urban greening programs, however, do not take into account how closely human and natural systems are coupled in urban areas. Compared with the surroundings of cities, elevated temperatures together with high anthropogenic emissions of air and water pollutants are quite typical in urban systems. Urban and sub-urban vegetation respond to changes in meteorology and air quality and can react to pollutants. Neglecting this coupling may lead to unforeseen negative effects on air quality resulting from urban greening programs. The potential of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation combined with anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants to produce ozone has long been recognized. This ozone formation potential increases under rising temperatures. Here we investigate how emissions of VOC from urban vegetation affect corresponding ground-level ozone and PM10 concentrations in summer and especially during heat wave periods. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting Model with coupled atmospheric chemistry (WRF-CHEM) to quantify these feedbacks in the Berlin-Brandenburg region, Germany during the two summers of 2006 (heat wave) and 2014 (reference period). VOC emissions from vegetation are calculated by MEGAN 2.0 coupled online with WRF-CHEM. Our preliminary results indicate that the contribution of VOCs from vegetation to ozone formation may increase by more than twofold during heat wave periods. We highlight the importance of the vegetation for urban areas in the context of a changing climate and discuss potential tradeoffs of urban greening programs.

  10. Behavior of VOCs and carbonyl compounds emission from different types of wallpapers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, Arong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-04-17

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m²·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products.

  11. Behavior of VOCs and Carbonyl Compounds Emission from Different Types of Wallpapers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jungyun; Kim, Suejin; Kim, ARong; Lee, Wooseok; Han, Jinseok; Cha, Jun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from three types of commercially available wallpapers (i.e., PVC-coated, paper-backed, natural material-coated) in Korea were evaluated using a 20 L small chamber. A total of 332 products were tested for emission factors, frequencies of occurrence and composition ratios. Toluene and formaldehyde concentrations were below Korean standard values for all products; however, the total VOC (TVOC) concentrations exceeded current standards (4.0 mg/m2·h) for 30 products. The TVOC emission factor for PVC-coated wallpapers, for which polymer materials are used in the manufacturing process, was seven and 16 times higher than those of paper-backed and natural material-coated wallpapers, respectively. The detection frequencies for toluene and formaldehyde were the highest (82.5%) and fourth highest (79.5%), respectively among the 50 target chemical species. The composition ratios for BTEX ranged from 0.3% to 5.1% and unidentified VOCs, which were not qualitatively analyzed using standard gas methods, ranged from 90.2% to 94.8%. Among six carbonyl compounds (acrolein was not detected in any type of wallpaper), acetone had the highest concentrations in PVC-coated (44.6%) and paper-backed (66.6%) wallpapers. Formaldehyde emissions were highest (64.6%) for natural material-coated wallpapers, a result of the formaldehyde-based resin used in the manufacturing process for these products. PMID:24747540

  12. Temporal variation of VOC emission from solvent and water based wood stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Fracchiolla, Roberta; Palmisani, Jolanda; Saracino, Maria Rosaria; Tutino, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Solvent- and water-based wood stains were monitored using a small test emission chamber in order to characterize their emission profiles in terms of Total and individual VOCs. The study of concentration-time profiles of individual VOCs enabled to identify the compounds emitted at higher concentration for each type of stain, to examine their decay curve and finally to estimate the concentration in a reference room. The solvent-based wood stain was characterized by the highest Total VOCs emission level (5.7 mg/m3) that decreased over time more slowly than those related to water-based ones. The same finding was observed for the main detected compounds: Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes, Styrene, alpha-Pinene and Camphene. On the other hand, the highest level of Limonene was emitted by a water-based wood stain. However, the concentration-time profile showed that water-based product was characterized by a remarkable reduction of the time of maximum and minimum emission: Limonene concentration reached the minimum concentration in about half the time compared to the solvent-based product. According to AgBB evaluation scheme, only one of the investigated water-based wood stains can be classified as a low-emitting product whose use may not determine any potential adverse effect on human health.

  13. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser.

  14. Investigation of the emissions and profiles of a wide range of VOCs during the Clean air for London project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rachel; Lidster, Richard; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Lee, James; Hopkins, James; Whalley, Lisa; Lewis, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    The majority of the World's population live in polluted urbanized areas. Poor air quality is shortening life expectancy of people in the UK by an average 7-8 months and costs society around £20 billion per year.[1] Despite this, our understanding of atmospheric processing in urban environments and its effect on air quality is incomplete. Air quality models are used to predict how air quality changes given different concentrations of pollution precursors, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The urban environment of megacities pose a unique challenge for air quality measurements and modelling, due to high population densities, pollution levels and complex infrastructure. For over 60 years the air quality in London has been monitored, however the existing measurements are limited to a small group of compounds. In order to fully understand the chemical and physical processes that occur in London, more intensive and comprehensive measurements should be made. The Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project was conducted to investigate the air quality, in particular the boundary layer pollution, of London. A relatively new technique, comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) [2] was combined with a well-established dual channel GC (DC-GC) [3] system to provide a more comprehensive measurement of VOCs. A total of 78 individual VOCs (36 aliphatics, 19 monoaromatics, 21 oxygenated and 2 halogenated) and 10 groups of VOCs (8 aliphatic, 1 monoaromatic and 1 monoterpene) from C1-C13+ were quantified. Seasonal and diurnal profiles of these VOCs have been found which show the influence of emission source and chemical processing. Including these extra VOCs should enhance the prediction capability of air quality models thus informing policy makers on how to potentially improve air quality in megacities. References 1. House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee, Air Quality: A follow-up report, Ninth Report of session 2012-12. 2. Lidster, R.T., J.F. Hamilton

  15. Emission characteristics of VOCs from three fixed-roof p-xylene liquid storage tanks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chungsying; Huang, Hsiaoyun; Chang, Shenteng; Hsu, Shihchieh

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluates emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) caused by standing loss (L S) and working loss (L W) of three vertical fixed-roof p-xylene (p-X) liquid tanks during 1-year storage and filling operation. The annual net throughput of the tanks reached 70,446 t, resulting in 9,425 kg of p-X vapor emission including 5,046 kg of L S (53.54 %) and 4,379 kg of L W (46.46 %). The estimated L W of AP-42 displayed better agreement with the measured values of a VOC detector than the estimated L S of AP-42. The L S was best correlated with the liquid height of the tanks, while the L W was best correlated with the net throughput of the tanks. As a result, decreasing vapor space volume of the tanks and avoiding high net throughput of the tanks in a high ambient temperature period were considered as effective means to lessen VOC emission from the fixed-roof organic liquid storage tank.

  16. Dynamic relationship between the VOC emissions from a Scots pine stem and the tree water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Chan, Tommy; Aalto, Juho; Kolari, Pasi; Rissanen, Kaisa; Hakola, Hannele; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana

    2013-04-01

    The stems of coniferous trees contain huge storages of oleoresin. The composition of oleoresin depends on e.g. tree species, age, provenance, health status, and environmental conditions. Oleoresin is under pressure in the extensive network of resin ducts in wood and needles. It flows out from a mechanically damaged site to protect the tree by sealing the wounded site. Once in contact with air, volatile parts of oleoresin evaporate, and the residual compounds harden to make a solid protective seal over damaged tissues. The hardening time of the resin depends on evaporation rate of the volatiles which in turn depends on temperature. The storage is also toxic to herbivores and attracts predators that restrict the herbivore damage. Despite abundant knowledge on emissions of volatile isoprenoids from foliage, very little is known about their emissions from woody plant parts. We set up an experiment to measure emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes as well as two oxygenated VOCs, methanol and acetone, from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stem and branches. The measurements were started in early April and continued until mid-June, 2012. Simultaneously, we measured the dynamics of whole stem and xylem diameter changes, stem sap flow rate and foliage transpiration rate. These measurements were used to estimate A) pressure changes inside the living stem tissue and the water conducting xylem, B) the refilling of stem water stores after winter dehydration (the ratio of sap flow at the stem base to water loss by foliage), and C) the increase in tree water transport capacity (the ratio of maximum daily sap flow rate to the diurnal variation in xylem pressure) during spring due to winter embolism refilling and/or the temperature dependent root water uptake capacity. The results show that already very early in spring, significant VOC emissions from pine stem can be detected, and that they exhibit a diurnal cycle similar to that of ambient temperature. During the highest emission

  17. Forecasting of VOC emissions from traffic and industry using classification and regression multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Stojić, Andreja; Maletić, Dimitrije; Stanišić Stojić, Svetlana; Mijić, Zoran; Šoštarić, Andrej

    2015-07-15

    In this study, advanced multivariate methods were applied for VOC source apportionment and subsequent short-term forecast of industrial- and vehicle exhaust-related contributions in Belgrade urban area (Serbia). The VOC concentrations were measured using PTR-MS, together with inorganic gaseous pollutants (NOx, NO, NO2, SO2, and CO), PM10, and meteorological parameters. US EPA Positive Matrix Factorization and Unmix receptor models were applied to the obtained dataset both resolving six source profiles. For the purpose of forecasting industrial- and vehicle exhaust-related source contributions, different multivariate methods were employed in two separate cases, relying on meteorological data, and on meteorological data and concentrations of inorganic gaseous pollutants, respectively. The results indicate that Boosted Decision Trees and Multi-Layer Perceptrons were the best performing methods. According to the results, forecasting accuracy was high (lowest relative error of only 6%), in particular when the forecast was based on both meteorological parameters and concentrations of inorganic gaseous pollutants.

  18. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    attribution. CMB methods have been developed over the past several decades to quantify sources of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and atmospheric particulate matter. These emerging capabilities for making measurements of methane and species coemitted with methane, rapidly, precisely, and at relatively low cost, used together with CMB methods of source attribution can lead to a better understanding of methane emission sources. Application of the CMB approach to source attribution in the Barnett Shale oil and gas production region in Texas demonstrates both the importance of extensive and simultaneous source testing in the region being analyzed and the potential of CMB method to quantify the relative strengths of methane emission sources.

  19. The Amazonian Floodplains, an ecotype with challenging questions on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another factor usually overlooked but very important for the tropical rainforest in Amazonia is regular flooding. According to recent estimates, the total Amazonian floodplain area easily ranges up to 700,000 km^2, including whitewater river floodplains (várzea) blackwater regions (igapó) and further clearwater regions. Regarding the total Amazonian wetlands the area sums up to more than 2.000.000 km^2, i.e. 30% of Amazonia. To survive the flooding periods causing anoxic conditions for the root system of up to several months, vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies. One is to switch over the root metabolism to fermentation, thus producing ethanol as one of the main products. Ethanol is a toxic metabolite which is transported into the leaves by the transpiration stream. From there it can either be directly emitted into the atmosphere, or can be re-metabolized to acetaldehyde and/or acetate. All of these compounds are volatile enough to be partly released into the atmosphere. We observed emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid under root anoxia. Furthermore, plant stress induced by flooding also affected leaf primary physiological processes as well as other VOC emissions such as the release of isoprenoids and other volatiles. For example, Hevea spruceana could be identified as a monoterpene emitting tree species behaving differently upon anoxia depending on the origin, with increasing emissions of the species from igapó and decreasing with the corresponding species from várzea. Contrasting such short term inundations, studies of VOC emissions under long term conditions (2-3 months) did not confirm the ethanol/acetaldehyde emissions, whereas emissions of other VOC species decreased considerably. These results demonstrate that the transfer of our knowledge

  20. Long-term variations in natural, terrestrial VOC emissions: 1000-1990 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, J. C.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-12-01

    Natural vegetation emits large amounts of volatile organic compounds (e.g. monoterpenes and isoprene) into the atmosphere. Estimates of the total global source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the past millennium range between 1050 and 1100 Tg yr-1 (Adams et al. 2001). BVOCs have multiple impacts on atmospheric chemistry, for example they are believed to affect ozone formation, decrease the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and substantially alter the concentrations of tropospheric aerosol in continental regions (Seinfeld et al., 1998). Organic compounds constitute 20-90% of the submicron aerosol mass, depending on location. Most of this contribution is secondary, meaning that the emitted VOCs are oxidized in the atmosphere followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products (Jimenez et al., 2009). BVOCs emitted by vegetation are the dominant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere (Guenther et al., 1995). Estimates on the present-day organic aerosol budgets are improving rapidly, but it is unclear how the organic aerosol fraction has evolved in the past. Such information is, however, needed for accurate estimates on the climate forcing caused by aerosols. Understanding the factors that have governed BVOC emissions in the past is a prerequisite for completing this task. We evaluate the variability of global fluxes of isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes over the last millennium using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) (Guenther et al., 2006). MEGAN estimates the emission activity of BVOCs using meteorological (Air temperature, solar radiation, soil moisture) and landcover (Plant Functional Types (PFTs) and Leaf Area Index (LAI)) inputs. The model is driven off-line using meteorological fields from existing Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) (Jungclaus et al. 2010) millennium simulations, and reconstructions of the global changes PFTs and LAI (Kaplan et al., 2010

  1. Application of CSIA to distinguish between vapor intrusion and indoor sources of VOCs.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas; Kuder, Tomasz; Fiorenza, Stephanie; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Philp, Paul

    2011-07-15

    At buildings with potential for vapor intrusion of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) from the subsurface, the ability to accurately distinguish between vapor intrusion and indoor sources of VOCs is needed to support accurate and efficient vapor intrusion investigations. We have developed a method for application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for this purpose that uses an adsorbent sampler to obtain sufficient sample mass from the air for analysis. Application of this method to five residences near Hill Air Force Base in Utah indicates that subsurface and indoor sources of tricholorethene and tetrachloroethene often exhibit distinct carbon and chlorine isotope ratios. The differences in isotope ratios between indoor and subsurface sources can be used to identify the source of these chemicals when they are present in indoor air.

  2. Controlling VOC and air toxic emissions from aircraft refinishing facilities -- A new approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J.

    1997-12-31

    Preliminary studies conducted by the EPA and Air Force indicate that significant cost reductions are achievable by reducing booth exhaust flow rates via recirculation. Based on these results, the EPA and the US Marine Corps launched a full scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified at the Barstow MCLB to encompass recirculation and other ventilation system optimization strategies. Additionally, the booth exhaust streams were vented to an innovative VOC emission control device that has extremely low operating costs. The paper describes this full-scale demonstration program in which booth exhaust flow rates were safely reduced from 143,000 cfm to 44,000 cfm. This program (completed in September, 1996) encompassed several innovative elements, including: Permanent installation of split-flow/recirculation ventilation in 3 high production paint booths. Use of Variable Frequency Drive Fans to continually reduce booth flow rates to the lowest level while maintaining compliance with OSHA mandates. Integration of an innovative monitoring system using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) to continuously monitor/speciate organic compound concentrations in recirculation ducts and ensure safe system operation. Installation of an ambient temperature emission control system that oxidizes the exhaust stream VOCs and is capable of instantaneous startup/shutdown operations; this is ideal for the Barstow MCLB high production operation. The ventilation systems were tested extensively to ensure a safe and efficient working environment; these test results indicate that recirculation and other system modifications successfully reduced flow rates to achieve low cost emission control. Results of a detailed economic analysis are also presented which demonstrate that ventilation system modification costs are quickly recovered from the installation/operation of a smaller VOC emission control device.

  3. On-road emission characteristics of VOCs from rural vehicles and their ozone formation potential in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Wu, Bobo; Shen, Xianbao; Cao, Xinyue; Jiang, Xi; Ye, Yu; He, Kebin

    2015-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of papers aimed at understanding volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from motor vehicles in Beijing using on-board emission measurements, focusing specifically on rural vehicles (RVs). In this work, 13 RVs, including 6 different 3-wheel (3-W) RVs and 7 different 4-wheel (4-W) RVs, were examined using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS) as the vehicles were driven on predesigned fixed test routes in rural areas of Beijing. Overall, 50 VOC species were quantified in this study, including 18 alkanes, 5 alkenes, 11 aromatics, 13 carbonyls and 3 other compounds. The average emission factor (EF) of the total VOCs for the 4-W RVs based on the distance traveled was 326.2 ± 129.3 mg/km, which is 2.5 times greater than that of the 3-W RVs. However, the VOC emissions for the 3-W RVs had higher EFs based on their CO2 emissions due to the different fuel economies of the two types of RVs. Formaldehyde, toluene, acetaldehyde, m-xylene, p-xylene, isopentane, benzene, ethylbenzene, n-pentane, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane and butenal were the dominant VOC species from the RVs, accounting for an average of 68.6% of the total VOC emissions. Overall, the RVs had high proportions of aromatics and carbonyls. The ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were 670.6 ± 227.2 and 1454.1 ± 643.0 mg O3/km for the 3-W and 4-W RVs, respectively, and approximately 60%-70% of the OFP resulted from carbonyls. We estimated that the 3-W and 4-W RVs accounted for approximately 50% and 10%, respectively, of the total OFP caused by diesel vehicles (including diesel trucks and RVs) in Beijing in 2012. Thus, more attention should be given to VOC emissions and their impact on ozone formation.

  4. VOC and particulate emissions from commercial cigarettes: analysis of 2,5-DMF as an ETS tracer.

    PubMed

    Charles, Simone M; Jia, Chunrong; Batterman, Stuart A; Godwin, Christopher

    2008-02-15

    Emissions of particulate matter (PM) and a broad suite of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in total, main-stream (MS) and side-stream (SS) smoke emissions are measured for six types of commercial cigarettes. The suitability of 2,5-dimethyl furan (DMF) as a tracer for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is investigated using laboratory results and a field study of 47 residences. Over 30 VOCs were characterized in cigarette smoke, including several that have not been reported previously. "regular tar", "low tar", menthol, and nonmenthol cigarettes showed only minor differences in PM and VOC emissions. When total emissions are considered, PM emissions averaged 18 +/- 2 mg cigarette(-1) and VOC emissions averaged 3644 +/- 160 mg cigarette(-1). DMF appears to satisfy all requirements for a tracer, namely, uniqueness, detectability, similar emission factors across tobacco products (211 +/- 16 microg cigarette(-1)), consistent proportions to other ETS compounds, and behavior similar to other ETS components in relevant environments. On the basis of field study results, DMF more reliably indicated smoking status than occupant-completed questionnaires, and cigarette smoking was responsible for significant fractions of benzene (50%), styrene (49%), and other VOCs in the smoker's homes.

  5. Effects of long-term and short-term warming on VOC emissions from a Subarctic heath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valolahti, Hanna; Faubert, Patrick; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2013-04-01

    It is predicted that the temperature increase during the next 100 years will be highest in the high latitudes. Temperature is also the main factor affecting the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by plants. In the Subarctic, the VOC emissions appear to be even more sensitive to temperature changes than in temperate systems, probably because the plant species are adapted to colder climate. The arctic ecosystems are very sensitive to any disturbances, and therefore it is important to study climate change effects and predict future responses in these areas. Long-term climate change experiment with elevated temperature and litter addition treatments has been running on a subarctic heath in Abisko, North Sweden since 1999. Five treatments (1. unmanipulated control, 2. long-term warming, 3. short-term warming, 4. litter addition and 5. litter addition + warming) are replicated in six blocks. In 2010, eight vegetation-soil-chamber-based VOC collection campaigns were made. VOCs were collected into adsorbent cartridges, which were analyzed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Point quadrant analysis was used to investigate the species composition in the different treatments, and the vegetation data was used as an explaining factor for the different VOC emission profiles between treatments. Elevated temperature significantly increased the total VOC emission from the subarctic heath. Most significant effects were found for the emissions of isoprene and sesquiterpenes. The short-term and long-term temperature treatments differed for the emissions of total terpenoids. According to these results, elevated temperature has both long- and short term effects on VOC-emissions. In the short term, direct temperature effect increases VOC-emissions. In the long term, indirect effects via vegetation changes dominate. After the release into the atmosphere, the lifetime of VOCs is from seconds to days. They participate in secondary organic aerosol formation

  6. Compilation of a source profile database for hydrocarbon and OVOC emissions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua

    2016-10-01

    Source profiles are essential for quantifying the role of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in air pollution. This study compiled a database of VOC source profiles in China, with 75 species drawn from five major categories: transportation, solvent use, biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, and industrial processes. Source profiles were updated for diesel vehicles, biomass burning, and residential coal burning by measuring both hydrocarbons and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), while other source profiles were derived from the available literature. The OVOCs contributed 53.8% of total VOCs in the profiles of heavy - duty diesel vehicle exhaust and 12.4%-46.3% in biomass and residential coal burning, which indicated the importance of primary OVOCs emissions from combustion-related sources. Taking the national emission inventory from 2008 as an example, we established an approach for assigning source profiles to develop a speciation-specific VOC and OVOC emission inventory. The results showed that aromatics contributed 30% of the total 26 Tg VOCs, followed by alkanes (24%), alkenes (19%) and OVOCs (12%). Aromatics (7.9 Tg) were much higher than in previous results (1.1 Tg and 3.4 Tg), while OVOCs (3.1 Tg) were comparable with the 3.3 Tg and 4.3 Tg reported in studies using profiles from the US. The current emission inventories were built based on emission factors from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements, and therefore the proportions from OVOC emissions was neglected, leading to up to 30% underestimation of total VOC emissions. As a result, there is a need to deploy appropriate emission factors and source profiles that include OVOC measurements to reduce the uncertainty of estimated emissions and chemical reactivity potential.

  7. Volatile organic compounds in the Pearl River Delta: Identification of source regions and recommendations for emission-oriented monitoring strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zibing; Zhong, Liuju; Lau, Alexis Kai Hon; Yu, Jian Zhen; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2013-09-01

    For the purpose of systematically characterizing the ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) levels and their emission sources in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China, a grid study with VOC samples simultaneously taken at 84 sites over the PRD was conducted in summer and winter of 2008 and 2009. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to identify the major VOC contributing sources and their temporal and spatial variations. Nine sources were identified, with gasoline exhaust, industrial emission and LPG leakage & propellant emission the top three significant sources. They accounted for 23%, 16% and 13% of the ambient VOC levels, respectively. Control measures should be therefore targeted on mitigating the VOC emissions from the traffic-related and industrial-related sources. The total VOC level did not show strong increase from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. during all the four sampling campaigns, which may result from stronger wind and higher mixing height at 10 a.m. Three hotspot areas with significant VOC contributions were identified by source apportionment analysis: (1) the Pearl River Estuary; (2) an area from Central Dongguan to North Shenzhen; and (3) the Zhuhai-Zhongshan-Jiangmen area. For better characterizing the roles of VOC and NOx in producing the secondary pollutants and to identify specific sources emitting excessive concentrations of precursors, the emission-oriented Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS) network is recommended to be established in the PRD. Three PAMS networks are suggested in correspondence to the three identified hotspot areas.

  8. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16

    land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  9. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from Pulp Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, Alexander A.; Gutsol, Alexander; Kennedy, Lawrence A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Korobtsev, Sergey V.; Shiryaevsky, Valery L.; Medvedev, Dmitry

    2004-07-28

    Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program various plasma technologies were evaluated under project FWP 49885 ''Experimental Assessment of Low-Temperature Plasma Technologies for Treating Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Pulp Mills and Wood Products Plants''. The heterogeneous pulsed corona discharge was chosen as the best non-equilibrium plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. The technology for removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from gas emissions with conditions typical of the exhausts of the paper industry by means of pulsed corona plasma techniques presented in this work. For the compounds of interest in this study (methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfide and ? -pinene), high removal efficiencies were obtained with power levels competitive with the present technologies for the VOCs removal. Laboratory experiments were made using installation with the average power up to 20 W. Pilot plant prepared for on-site test has average plasma power up to 6.4 kW. The model of the Pilot Plant operation is presented.

  10. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  11. Global emissions of terpenoid VOCs from terrestrial vegetation in the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Acosta Navarro, J C; Smolander, S; Struthers, H; Zorita, E; Ekman, A M L; Kaplan, J O; Guenther, A; Arneth, A; Riipinen, I

    2014-06-16

    We investigated the millennial variability (1000 A.D.-2000 A.D.) of global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene, and sesquiterpene, and Lund-Potsdam-Jena-General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission trends were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have significant short-term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr(-1) (13% and 19% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively), and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr(-1)(15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr(-1)(10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr(-1) (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr(-1)(10% and 4% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  12. Global emissions of terpenoid VOCs from terrestrial vegetation in the last millennium

    PubMed Central

    Acosta Navarro, J C; Smolander, S; Struthers, H; Zorita, E; Ekman, A M L; Kaplan, J O; Guenther, A; Arneth, A; Riipinen, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the millennial variability (1000 A.D.–2000 A.D.) of global biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene, and sesquiterpene, and Lund-Potsdam-Jena-General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission trends were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have significant short-term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr−1 (13% and 19% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively), and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr−1(15% and 20% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr−1(10% and 6% higher than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr−1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr−1(10% and 4% higher than during 1750–1850 and 1000–1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation. PMID:25866703

  13. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  14. Concentration, ozone formation potential and source analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a thermal power station centralized area: A study in Shuozhou, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yulong; Peng, Lin; Li, Rumei; Li, Yinghui; Li, Lijuan; Bai, Huiling

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from two sampling sites (HB and XB) in a power station centralized area, in Shuozhou city, China, were sampled by stainless steel canisters and measured by gas chromatography-mass selective detection/flame ionization detection (GC-MSD/FID) in the spring and autumn of 2014. The concentration of VOCs was higher in the autumn (HB, 96.87 μg/m(3); XB, 58.94 μg/m(3)) than in the spring (HB, 41.49 μg/m(3); XB, 43.46 μg/m(3)), as lower wind speed in the autumn could lead to pollutant accumulation, especially at HB, which is a new urban area surrounded by residential areas and a transportation hub. Alkanes were the dominant group at both HB and XB in both sampling periods, but the contribution of aromatic pollutants at HB in the autumn was much higher than that of the other alkanes (11.16-19.55%). Compared to other cities, BTEX pollution in Shuozhou was among the lowest levels in the world. Because of the high levels of aromatic pollutants, the ozone formation potential increased significantly at HB in the autumn. Using the ratio analyses to identify the age of the air masses and analyze the sources, the results showed that the atmospheric VOCs at XB were strongly influenced by the remote sources of coal combustion, while at HB in the spring and autumn were affected by the remote sources of coal combustion and local sources of vehicle emission, respectively. Source analysis conducted using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model at Shuozhou showed that coal combustion and vehicle emissions made the two largest contributions (29.98% and 21.25%, respectively) to atmospheric VOCs. With further economic restructuring, the influence of vehicle emissions on the air quality should become more significant, indicating that controlling vehicle emissions is key to reducing the air pollution.

  15. Associations between immune function in yearling beef cattle and airborne emissions of sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and VOCs from oil and natural gas facilities.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Daniel G; Waldner, Cheryl L; Wickstrom, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers assessed the associations between airborne emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the structure and function of the immune system of yearling beef cattle in 27 herds during spring 2002. They evaluated the immune systems of these animals by enumerating B lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte subtypes (CD4, CD8, gammadelta, and WC1) in peripheral circulation and by measuring systemic antibody production in response to vaccination. Researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using air-quality data from passive monitors installed in pastures and wintering areas. They estimated the mean exposure of each animal over the 6-month period before the start of sample collection. The researchers used mixed models, which adjusted for clustering by herd and accounted for known risk factors, to examine potential associations between exposure to airborne sulfur dioxide, VOCs (measured as concentrations of benzene and toluene) and hydrogen sulfide, as well as proximity to emission sources (well-site density), and the immune system outcomes. Increasing exposure to VOCs measured as toluene was associated with significant CD4 T lymphocytopenia. The number of CD4 T lymphocytes was 30% lower in cattle exposed to VOCs measured as toluene in the highest quartile (> 0.823 microg/m3) than in cattle exposed in the lowest quartile (< 0.406 microg/m3).

  16. Biogenic voc emissions development and its impacts on regional o3 in PRD, china

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuemei; Shuping, Situ; Guenther, Alex; Chen, Fei; Wu, Zhiyong

    2010-05-01

    The new Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) has been coupled with WRF-Chem to investigate the influence of biogenic violate organic carbon (BVOC ) emissions on the regional distribution of O3 and SOA concentration in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. MEGAN first estimate an emission factor which represents the net above-canopy emission rate expected at optimal conditions, and use a number of environmental correction factor based on photosynthetically activated radiation (PAR) and leaf temperature to adjust the emission rate due to deviations from optimal conditions. Total emissions are the sum of emissions estimated for each plant functional type (PFT) in a given grid cell. Our model simulations estimated showed: (1) Total annual BVOCs emissions were 339.01× 106 kg, which is 40.68% of annual AVOCs emissions and 28.91% of total VOCs emission in PRD in 2006. Isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and OVOCs contributed about 31.94%, 39.23%, 3.27% and 25.56% of the estimated total annual emissions respectively. α- pinene and β- pinene were the major components in monoterpene, which contributed 28.09% and 26.98% to the total annual monoterpene emissions respectively;β-caryophyllene andα-farnesene were two important sesquiterpene, and they contributed to 22.31% and 18.76% of the annual sesquiterpene emissions.(2) BVOCs emissions have large variations in their spatial distributions, which were mainly resulted from the differences in the geographical distribution of vegetation. Their emission amounts were larger in the places where urbanization were relative lower and plants distributions were higher.(3) Emissions of terpenoids had significant annual and diurnal variations and the largest emission rate occurred at 13:00 local time while the amount of emission in summer is the largest.(4) There were significant terpenoids emission rate (≥1.21.2 kg km-2h-1) in the remote areas in PRD region where the emissions of AVOCs were low, and

  17. Source proximity and meteorological effects on residential outdoor VOCs in urban areas: Results from the Houston and Los Angeles RIOPA studies.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jaymin; Weisel, Clifford P; Morandi, Maria T; Stock, Thomas H

    2016-12-15

    Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured outside homes in Houston, TX and Los Angeles, CA were characterized by the effects of source proximity and meteorological factors. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene (BTEX), methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE), tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were examined. Multiple stepwise regression analysis converged the best-fit models with predictors from meteorological conditions and the proximity to specific point, area, and mobile sources on the residential outdoor VOC concentrations. Negative associations of wind speed with concentrations demonstrated the effect of dilution by high wind speed. Atmospheric stability increase was associated with concentration increase. Petrochemical source proximity was a significant predictor for BTEX and MTBE concentrations in Houston. Ethylbenzene and xylene source proximity was a significant predictor in Los Angeles. Close proximity to area sources such as scrap metal recycling or dry cleaning facilities increased the MTBE, PCE, and CCl4 concentrations in Houston and Los Angeles. Models for ethylbenzene, m,p-xylene, and MTBE in Houston, and benzene in Los Angeles explained that for the median values of the meteorological factors, homes closest to influential highways would have concentrations that were 1.7-2.2 fold higher than those furthest from these mobile emission sources. If the median distance to sources were used in the models, the VOC concentrations varied 1.7 to 6.6 fold as the meteorological conditions varied over the observed range. These results highlight that each urban area is unique and localized sources need to be carefully evaluated to understand potential contributions to VOC air concentrations near residences, which influence baseline indoor air concentrations and personal exposures. Results of this study could assist in the appropriate design of monitoring networks for community-level sampling. They

  18. Light-duty vehicle PM and VOC speciated emissions at differing ambient temperatues with ethanol blend gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the rise in the use of ethanol-blend gasoline in the U.S., interest is increasing in how these fuel blends affect PM and VOC emissions. EPA conducted a study characterizing emissions from two flex-fuel and one non-flex-fueled light-duty vehicles operated on a chassis dynamom...

  19. StreamVOC--A Deterministic Source-Apportionment Model to Estimate Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in Rivers and Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asher, William E.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the construction and verification of the model, StreamVOC, that estimates (1) the time- and position-dependent concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in rivers and streams as well as (2) the source apportionment (SA) of those concentrations. The model considers how different types of sources and loss processes can act together to yield a given observed VOC concentration. Reasons for interest in the relative and absolute contributions of different sources to contaminant concentrations include the need to apportion: (1) the origins for an observed contamination, and (2) the associated human and ecosystem risks. For VOCs, sources of interest include the atmosphere (by absorption), as well as point and nonpoint inflows of VOC-containing water. Loss processes of interest include volatilization to the atmosphere, degradation, and outflows of VOC-containing water from the stream to local ground water. This report presents the details of StreamVOC and compares model output with measured concentrations for eight VOCs found in the Aberjona River at Winchester, Massachusetts. Input data for the model were obtained during a synoptic study of the stream system conducted July 11-13, 2001, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The input data included a variety of basic stream characteristics (for example, flows, temperature, and VOC concentrations). The StreamVOC concentration results agreed moderately well with the measured concentration data for several VOCs and provided compound-dependent SA estimates as a function of longitudinal distance down the river. For many VOCs, the quality of the agreement between the model-simulated and measured concentrations could be improved by simple adjustments of the model input parameters. In general, this study illustrated: (1) the considerable difficulty of quantifying correctly the locations and magnitudes of ground-water-related sources of

  20. Reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications -- Canam Steel Corporation Point of Rocks, MD case study

    SciTech Connect

    Monfet, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The reduction of VOC emissions from metal dip coating applications is not an environmental constraint, it is an economic opportunity. This case study shows how the industry can reap economic benefits from VOC reductions while improving air quality. The Canam Steel Corporation plant located in Point of Rocks, MD operates dip tanks for primer application on fabricated steel joists and joist girders. This process is presently subject to a regulation that limits the paint VOC content to 3.5 pounds per gallon of coating less water. As a result of the high paint viscosity associated with that regulation, the paint thickness of the dipped steel is thicker than the customers` specifications. Most of the VOC emissions can therefore be associated with the excess of paint applied to the products rather than to the required thickness of the coating. The higher paint usage rate has more than environmental consequences, it increases the cost of the applied coating. The project is to reduce the paint usage by controlling the viscosity of the coating in the tank. Experimental results as well as actual mass balance calculations show that using a higher VOC content paint would reduce the overall VOC emissions. The author explained the project to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) Air and Radiation Management Administration. First, the MDE agreed to develop a new RACT determination for fabricated steel dipping operations. The new regulation would limit the amount of VOC than can be emitted to dip coat a ton of fabricated steel. Second, the MDE agreed to allow experimentation of the higher VOC content paint as a pilot project for the new regulation. This paper demonstrates the need for a RACT determination specific to fabricated steel dipping operations.

  1. Large decrease of VOC emissions of Switzerland's car fleet during the past decade: results from a highway tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmler, Konrad; Bugmann, Stefan; Buchmann, Brigitte; Reimann, Stefan; Staehelin, Johannes

    The emissions of 14 C 4-C 8 VOC species from road traffic have been measured in a highway tunnel (Gubristtunnel) near Zurich, Switzerland in 2002. The investigated traffic situation corresponds to highway driving with an average speed of 90 km h -1 and hot engine conditions. The comparison with measurements in the same tunnel performed in 1993 indicates that the emission factors of the individual hydrocarbons decreased on average by 80% in the 9 years between both investigations. This improvement can mainly be explained by the nearly complete elimination of non-catalyst gasoline-fuelled cars from the Swiss car fleet in the past decade. The relative emission strengths of the quantified individual VOCs were similar in 1993 and 2002. The emission factors reported in this study are the lowest reported from on-road vehicle emission measurements so far, indicating the efficient technology of modern car fleets with respect to VOC emissions. The emission factors derived from the tunnel study are compared to modelled emission factors based on dynamometric test measurements on Swiss passenger cars. The employed model is the Handbuch für Emissionsfaktoren des Strassenverkehrs; version 1.2 (Umweltbundesamt Berlin and INFRAS AG Bern, 1999). A good agreement between the modelled and measured emissions was found for the investigated traffic situation, indicating that the development of the VOC emissions during the last decade is well understood on the basis of the fleet composition and the dynamometric test measurements. The observed VOC emission reduction corresponds to a traffic situation, where an optimal exhaust gas catalyst performance can be expected. Factors leading to a somewhat less beneficial influence of the catalytic converter technique in other relevant driving situations are therefore additionally discussed.

  2. On-line field measurements of VOC emissions from a spruce tree at SMEAR Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Noe, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated VOC emissions from a Norway spruce tree (Picea abies) in a hemi-boreal mixed forest in September and October 2012, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry techniques, applied in a dynamic branch enclosure system that was automatically operated with an electrical compressor. Parallel to BVOC measurements a vast amount of atmospheric (CO2, CH4, H2O, CO, particles) and meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, photosynthetic active radiation, wind speed and direction, precipitation) parameters were measured in the ambient atmosphere and inside the cuvette enclosure (temperature, relative humidity, O3). Prior to the measuring period, an innovatory experimental setup was built at Järvselja forest station, in order to accomplish the detection of BVOC and minimize sampling losses. Therefore, a new inlet line, consisting of 19.4m of heated and isolated glass tube was constructed. The new inlet system applied, allowed the on-line detection and calculation of sesquiterpene (SQT) emission rates for the first time in a hemi-boreal forest site. It total, 12 atmospheric relevant BVOCs were continuously monitored for a three week period and the emission rates were derived. Along with diurnal profiles and continuous timeless, some interesting observations showed the possibility of ozone effect on SQT emissions, the possibility of radiation effect on MT emissions, the higher induced emissions due to mechanical stress and the possibility for a valid intercomparison between different spruce trees located in mountain Kleiner Feldberg (Germany) and in Järvseja forest station (Estonia).

  3. Analysis of available ambient and stationary source HAP sampling results to verify emission rate estimates for sources in Ambos Nogales

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, B.; Fernandez, C.; Oliver, B.; Dickson, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) is funding a project to develop comprehensive hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions inventories for the cross-border communities of Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. Ambient VOC and PAH data were collected in downtown Nogales, Sonora in July 1994 by the ADEQ. This paper addresses the analysis of the ambient HAP data performed by the project team. The ambient HAP data evaluation will serve as a cross-check of the accuracy of the RAP emission estimates developed for each source type included in the HAP emissions inventory. The data show that benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene (BTXE) and aldehydes are the dominant volatile organic compound (VOC) HAPs in the ambient air. The quantity of BTXE in the ambient air, and ratio of these compounds to each other, implies that mobile sources are the principal source of BTXE in Nogales, Sonora. Significant levels of olefinic VOCs were also detected. Ambient test data also indicate ethane, propane, butane, pentane are the predominant VOC species in the ambient air. Liquified petroleum gas (LPG) cylinders are the probable source of these VOCs. Almost all residential and commercial cooking performed in Nogales, Sonora is done from LPG cylinders containing a mixture of propane (primarily) and butane. These cylinders are ubiquitous, and many are equipped with potentially leaky valves. VOC and VOC HAP test protocols are currently being developed by the Mexican National Institute of Ecology for these cylinders and associated cooking ranges. Periodic open burning of municipal solid waste (MSW) is performed at a site located on the border in Nogales, Sonora. Ambient VOC HAP data collected in July 1994 during both MSW burning periods and {open_quotes}no burn{close_quotes} periods is being evaluated to determine if the contribution of open burning to the ambient HAP burden can be estimated for both particulate and VOC HAPs from the ambient data. 7 refs.

  4. Emission and Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as Observed at T3: Contrast of the Dry and Wet Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McKinney, K. A.; Watson, T. B.; Springston, S. R.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Kim, S.; Shilling, J. E.; Guenther, A. B.; Yee, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wernis, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Manzi, A. O.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests are vigorous emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) year round. Despite the small seasonal variation expected for tropical rainforests, converging evidence has shown that, among other factors, there can be considerable differences between the wet and dry seasons in leaf coverage, species composition, leaf-level photosynthetic photo flux, and ozone and NOx levels, which are important controlling factors of VOC emission and chemistry. There have been, however, a limited number of studies on the seasonality of VOC concentrations over tropical rainforests. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/5 Experiment, two-month continuous measurements of VOC compounds were carried out using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) at the T3 site in both the wet and dry seasons of 2014. During the dry season most biogenic VOC species and their oxidation products exhibited increased concentration. For some species, the diel pattern was also different between the two seasons. Implications of the seasonality of the emission and chemistry of biogenic VOCs, in particular isoprene and terpenes, are discussed.

  5. RERANKING OF AREA SOURCES IN LIGHT OF SEASONAL/ REGIONAL EMISSION FACTORS AND STATE/LOCAL NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an effort to provide a better understanding of air pollution area sources and their emissions, to prioritize their importance as emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and to identify sources for which better emission estimation methodologies a...

  6. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from wood furniture--estimation of emission rate by passive flux sampler].

    PubMed

    Jinno, Hideto; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate aldehydes and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission from furniture, which may cause hazardous influence on human being such as sick building/sick house syndrome. In this study, VOCs emitted from six kinds of wood furniture, including three set of dining tables and three beds, were analyzed by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOCs (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the simulation model with volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table and one bed. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in two sets of dining tables and two beds. These results revealed that VOC emissions from wood furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative five areas of furniture unit were evaluated by passive sampling method using flux sampler and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates predicted by flux passive sampler were 10-106% (formaldehyde) and 8-141% (TVOC) of the data measured using large chamber test, respectively.

  7. First Airborne PTR-ToF-MS Measurements of VOCs in a Biomass Burning Plume: Primary Emissions and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Mikoviny, Tomas; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert; Weinheimer, Andrew; Fried, Alan; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-04-01

    The NASA DISCOVER-AQ mission saw the first airborne deployment of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The newly developed instrument records full mass spectra at 10 Hz and resolves pure hydrocarbons from their oxygenated isobars (e.g. isoprene and furan). Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at high spatio-temporal resolution (0.1 s or 10 m) improve our capabilities in characterizing primary emissions from fires and in studying chemical transformations in aging plumes. A biomass-burning plume from a forest understory fire was intercepted by the NASA P-3B near Dublin, GA, USA on September 29, 2013. VOCs were measured at high time resolution along with CO, CO2, NOx, O3, HCHO, aerosols and other air quality and meteorological parameters. Repeated measurements in the immediate proximity of the fire were used to determine VOC emission ratios and their temporal variations. Repeated longitudinal and transversal plume transects were carried out to study plume aging within the first hour of emission. We will discuss the observed OH-NOx-VOC chemistry (including O3 formation), the observed changes in the elemental composition of VOCs (e.g. O:C ratios) and the observed formation of SOA.

  8. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid m...

  9. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources. Final report, March 1988-September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.J.; Probert, J.A.; Piccot, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    The report describes a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. The inventory, one input to atmospheric chemistry models required to estimate the global atmospheric concentration of ozone, is part of an assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with global climate change. Study results show total global anthropogenic emissions of about 121 million short tons of VOCs per year. The U.S. is the largest emitter with 21% of the total. Globally, fuelwood combustion and savanna burning are the largest sources, together accounting for over 35% of global VOC emissions. The approach used to develop the inventory involved: (1) identifying the major anthropogenic sources of VOC emissions in the U.S. and grouping them into categories; (2) developing emission factors by dividing the U.S. emissions by the amount of production or consumption of the related commodity in the U.S.; (3) multiplying the U.S. emission factors by production/consumption statistics for other countries to yield global VOC emission estimates; and (4) geographically distributing the emissions.

  10. Composition of gaseous organic carbon during ECOCEM in Beirut, Lebanon: new observational constraints for VOC anthropogenic emission evaluation in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Thérèse; Borbon, Agnès; Afif, Charbel; Sauvage, Stéphane; Leonardis, Thierry; Gaimoz, Cécile; Locoge, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    The relative importance of eastern Mediterranean emissions is suspected to be largely underestimated compared to other regions worldwide. Here we use detailed speciated measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to evaluate the spatial heterogeneity of VOC urban emission composition and the consistency of regional and global emission inventories downscaled to Lebanon (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, EMEP; Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project, ACCMIP; and MACCity, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate and megaCITY Zoom for the Environment). The assessment was conducted through the comparison of the emission ratios (ERs) extracted from the emission inventories to the ones obtained from the hourly observations collected at a suburban site in Beirut, Lebanon, during summer and winter ECOCEM (Emissions and Chemistry of Organic Carbon in the Eastern Mediterranean) campaigns. The observed ERs were calculated using two independent methods. ER values from both methods agree very well and are comparable to the ones of the road transport sector from near-field measurements for more than 80 % of the species. There is no significant seasonality in ER for more than 90 % of the species, unlike the seasonality usually observed in other cities worldwide. Regardless of the season, ERs agree within a factor of 2 between Beirut and other representative cities worldwide, except for the unburned fuel fraction and ethane. ERs of aromatics (except benzene) are higher in Beirut compared to northern post-industrialized countries and even the Middle Eastern city Mecca. The comparison of the observed ER to the ones extracted from the ACCMIP and MACCity global emission inventories suggests that the overall speciation of anthropogenic sources for major hydrocarbons that act as ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors in ACCMIP is better represented than other species. The comparison of the specific road transport ERs, relative

  11. Reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure using soybean peroxidase and peroxides.

    PubMed

    Parker, David B; Cai, Lingshuang; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Hales, Kristin E; Spiehs, Mindy J; Woodbury, Bryan L; Atkin, Audrey L; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Patefield, Krista D

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the optimum application rates of soybean peroxidase (SBP) plus peroxide (SBPP) for reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure. Industrial-grade SBP was applied in combination with liquid hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or powdered calcium peroxide (CaO(2)) to standard phenolic solutions and swine manure, and emissions were measured in a wind tunnel. The primary odorant in the untreated manure was 4-methylphenol, which accounted for 68-81% of the odor activity value. At the optimum application rate of SBPP (50 g L(-1)), 4-methylphenol emissions were reduced from the swine manure by 62% (H(2)O(2)) and 98% (CaO(2)) after 24h (P<0.0001). The CaO(2) had a longer residence time, remaining effective for 48 h with 92% reduction in emission rates (P<0.0001), while H(2)O(2) was similar to the control at 48 h (P=0.28).

  12. Emissions of selected VOC from forests: First results on measurements needed for improvement and validation of emission models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigner, D.; Steinbrecher, R.; Rappenglück, B.; Gasche, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Lindinger, Ch.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play a crucial role in the formation of photo-oxidants and particles through the diverse BVOC degradation pathways. Yet, current estimations about temporal and spatial BVOC emissions, including the specific BVOC mix are rather vague. This project addresses this issue by: the determination of (a) BVOC net emission rates and (b) primary emissions of BVOCs from the trees and soils. Measurement campaigns were carried out at the Waldstein site in the Fichtelgebirge in 2001 and 2002. Primary emissions of isoprenoids from the soil and from twigs of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) and stand fluxes of isoprenoids were quantified by means of REA-technique with in situ GC-FID analysis and GC-MS analysis in the laboratory. Moreover, REA-samples obtained by the system were analysed by a PTR-MS. A critical value when using the REA approach is the Businger-Oncley parameter b. For this canopy type a b value of 0.39 (threshold velocity w_o = 0.6) was determined. The PTR-MS data show clear diurnal variations of ambient air mixing ratios of VOC such as isoprene and monoterpenes, but also of oxygenated VOCs such as carbonyls and alcohols and methylvinylketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MAK), products from isoprene degradation. Four selected trees (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) were intensively screened for primary BVOC emission rates. Most abundant species are b-pinene/sabinene and camphene. They show typical diurnal patterns with high emissions during daytime. Soil emissions of NO reached 250 nmol N m-2 s-1 at soil temperatures (in 3 cm depth) of 13^oC and at a relative air humidity of 60%. Ambient air mixing ratios near the soil surface of NO reached values of up to 0.7 ppb. NO_2 and ozone mixing ratios varied between 0.1 to 1.5 ppb and 10 to 37 ppb, respectively. As expected nitrogen oxide emissions rates tend to increase with increasing surface temperature. Isoprenoid emission from the soil was low and in general near the detection limit

  13. Estimating methane emissions from biological and fossil-fuel sources in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seongeun; Cui, Xinguang; Blake, Donald R.; Miller, Ben; Montzka, Stephen A.; Andrews, Arlyn; Guha, Abhinav; Martien, Philip; Bambha, Ray P.; LaFranchi, Brian; Michelsen, Hope A.; Clements, Craig B.; Glaize, Pierre; Fischer, Marc L.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first sector-specific analysis of methane (CH4) emissions from the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) using CH4 and volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements from six sites during September - December 2015. We apply a hierarchical Bayesian inversion to separate the biological from fossil-fuel (natural gas and petroleum) sources using the measurements of CH4 and selected VOCs, a source-specific 1 km CH4 emission model, and an atmospheric transport model. We estimate that SFBA CH4 emissions are 166-289 Gg CH4/yr (at 95% confidence), 1.3-2.3 times higher than a recent inventory with much of the underestimation from landfill. Including the VOCs, 82 ± 27% of total posterior median CH4 emissions are biological and 17 ± 3% fossil fuel, where landfill and natural gas dominate the biological and fossil-fuel CH4 of prior emissions, respectively.

  14. Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Zhang, J.; Lusztyk, E.; Magee, R.J.

    1998-12-31

    VOC emission profile is an important parameter to describe the building materials and consumer products for their impact on indoor air quality (IAQ). Emission profiles are dependent on the test conditions. It is therefore very important to standardize testing conditions in order to compare emission factors and decay constants reported by various testing laboratories. Standard chamber test conditions (Chamber temperature of 23 C, relative humidity of 50 %, air change rate of 1 ACH, and specimen loading ratio of 0.4 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) have been proposed for using small environment chamber (0.05 m{sup 3}) by an international consortium research program led by the Institute for Research in Construction, NRCC. VOC emissions (excluding formaldehyde) from three building materials, a particleboard, a carpet with rubber backing and a vinyl floor tile were measured under above defined test conditions. Samples of the chamber air were collected using multi-sorbent tubes during the chamber tests, and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) GC/FID. GC peaks were identified using TD/GC/MS. Major VOCs emitted were solvents, aldehydes, C10-and C15-terpenes for the particleboard, alkanes, alkenes and 4-phenyl cyclohexene for the carpet. VOC emissions from vinyl floor tile were dominated by a mixture of two alkyl propanoates, which eluted late (at about 230 C) on GC column. Total VOCs in the chamber air reached at 1100, 210 and 2400 m g/m3 for the particleboard, carpet and vinyl floor tile respectively. The analytical variation was around 5 to 10 % judged by a number of duplicates analyzed during the tests. First order exponential decay model and power law decay model were used to describe the emission factor decay from 12 h after the start of dynamic chamber tests. The power law model was found to better fit the experimental data than the first order decay model.

  15. Emission characteristics of VOCs emitted from consumer and commercial products and their ozone formation potential.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Son, Youn-Suk; Choi, In-Young; Park, Seong-Ryong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several consumer and commercial products (body wash, dishwashing detergent, air freshener, windshield washer fluid, lubricant, hair spray, and insecticide) were studied and compared. The spray products were found to emit the highest amount of VOCs (~96 wt%). In contrast, the body wash products showed the lowest VOC contents (~1.6 wt%). In the spray products, 21.6-96.4 % of the VOCs were propane, iso-butane, and n-butane, which are the components of liquefied petroleum gas. Monoterpene (C10H16) was the dominant component of the VOCs in the non-spray products (e.g., body wash, 53-88 %). In particular, methanol was present with the highest amount of VOCs in windshield washer fluid products. In terms of the number of carbon, the windshield washer fluids, lubricants, insecticides, and hair sprays comprised >95 % of the VOCs in the range C2-C5. The VOCs in the range C6-C10 were predominantly found in the body wash products. The dishwashing detergents and air fresheners contained diverse VOCs from C2 to C11. Besides comprising hazardous VOCs, VOCs from consumer products were also ozone precursors. The ozone formation potential of the consumer and commercial spray products was estimated to be higher than those of liquid and gel materials. In particular, the hair sprays showed the highest ozone formation potential.

  16. Surface application of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide for reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure slurry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare topical and fully mixed treatments of soybean peroxidase and calcium peroxide (SBP/CaO2) for reducing odorous volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from swine manure slurry. The five treatments consisted of a control, the fully mixed ...

  17. Light-Duty GDI Vehicle PM and VOC Speciated Emissions at Differing Ambient Temperatures with Ethanol Blend Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the rise in the use of ethanol-blend gasoline in the US and more manufacturers implementing gasoline direct injection (GDI) technologies, interest is increasing in how these fuel blends affect PM and VOC emissions in GDI technology vehicles. EPA conducted a study characteri...

  18. On-Road Measurement of Vehichle VOC Emission Measurements During the 2003 Mexico City Metropolitan Area Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knighton, W. B.; Rogers, T.; Grimsrud, E.; Herndon, S.; Allwine, E.; Lamb, B.; Velasco, E.; Westberg, H.

    2004-12-01

    In the spring of 2003 (April 1-May 5), a multinational team of experts conducted an intensive, five-week field campaign in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The overall goal of this effort was to contribute to the understanding of the air quality problem in megacities. As part of the campaign the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory was equipped with state-of-the-art analytical instruments and deployed for measuring a variety of vehicle emissions in real time including CO2, NO2, NH3, HCHO, VOC's and volatile (at 600 °C) aerosol. The on-road measurement of vehicle VOC emissions were performed using a commercial version of the IONICON PTR-MS modified to operate onboard the mobile lab platform. A summary of the PTR-MS results from these and supporting laboratory experiments will be presented and discussed. In particular, selected chase events will be presented to illustrate the utility of the PTR-MS technique for characterizing vehicle VOC emission profiles in real time. VOC emission profiles for different vehicle engine types which include gasoline, diesel and compressed natural gas will be discussed and compared to the measurements from other high time response instruments deployed on the Aerodyne mobile van.

  19. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  20. ESTIMATION OF THE RATE OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM SOLVENT-BASED INDOOR COATING MATERIALS BASED ON PRODUCT FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two computational methods are proposed for estimation of the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from solvent-based indoor coating materials based on the knowledge of product formulation. The first method utilizes two previously developed mass transfer models with ...

  1. National survey of MTBE and other VOCs in community drinking-water sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clawges, Rick M.; Rowe, Barbara L.; Zogorski, John S.

    2001-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is added to gasoline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase the octane level and to reduce carbon monoxide and ozone levels in the air. The chemical properties and widespread use of MTBE can result in contamination of private and public drinking-water sources. MTBE contamination is a concern in drinking water because of the compound's low taste and odor threshold and potential human-health effects.

  2. VOC and carbonyl emissions from carpets: a comparative study using four types of environmental chambers.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Leva, Paolo; Kotzias, Dimitrios

    2008-04-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls from carpets of different type (wool, synthetic) over a time period of three days at 23 degrees C, at 45% relative humidity, 0.5 air change rate and a loading factor of 0.4 m(2) m(-3) were measured. The experiments were carried out at four different environmental chambers (volumes of 0.02/0.28/0.45/30 m(3)). For TVOCs, maximum concentrations up to 2300 microg m(-3) (for carpet with synthetic backing) were found. Aromatic compounds e.g. benzene, toluene, the xylenes and styrene are emitted in relatively low concentrations, while for 4-phenylcyclohexene and 2, 2-butoxyethoxy-ethanol concentrations up to 170 and 320 microg m(-3), respectively, were measured. In all experiments, emission rates reached the maximum value within few hours from the beginning of the experiment. The emission rates of TVOCs from the same type of carpet measured with various types of chambers (0.02/0.28/0.45/30 m(3)), exhibited differences of up to 75%. Chamber concentrations of carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone and propanale) are of a few microg m(-3). Acetone and formaldehyde reach concentrations up to 15 and 10 microg m(-3), respectively.

  3. Characterizing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus Shale Regions via Aircraft Observations During SENEX 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Dumas, M.; Hughes, D.; Jaksich, A.; Hatch, C. D.; Graus, M.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J.; Trainer, M.; Aikin, K.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Wolfe, G. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 SENEX (Southeast Nexus) field campaign took place in June and July 2013 with to ascertain how the interaction of natural and anthropogenic emissions influence climate change and air quality throughout the southeastern United States. Five of the research flights utilizing the NOAA WP-3D aircraft focused on areas of intensive oil and natural gas production from various shale plays. These areas included the Haynesville shale in eastern Texas and western Louisiana, the Fayetteville shale in northern Arkansas, and the Marcellus shale in western Pennsylvania. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2013 report, (1) the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale collectively account for approximately 75% of the dry shale gas produced in the U.S., and (2) shale gas is expected to provide the largest source of growth in the U.S. natural gas supply over the next few decades. Depending on the particular shale formation, raw natural gas can contain significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons in the form of natural gas liquids (e.g., ethane, propane, butanes) and natural gas condensate (e.g., pentanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics). Trace gases including methane, aromatics, formaldehyde, other oxygenated VOCs, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides were measured by multiple instruments aboard the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft. Up to 72 whole air samples (WAS) were collected in flight and analyzed in the field post-flight for a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Whole air samples provide a detailed chemical snapshot that can be combined with higher time-resolved measurements in order to provide a more comprehensive chemical analysis. In this presentation, we will compare the emissions composition of the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale plays to investigate the relative importance of primary VOC emissions on the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone, oxygenated VOCs, and secondary

  4. Relationship between VOC and NOx emissions and chemical production of tropospheric ozone in the Aburrá Valley (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Toro, María Victoria; Cremades, Lázaro V; Calbó, Josep

    2006-10-01

    Relationship between volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions and the chemical production of tropospheric ozone is studied through mathematical simulation. The study is applied to the Aburrá Valley, in the Colombian Andes, which is a practically unknown area from the point of view of ozone formation. The model used for this application is the European modelling of atmospheric constituents (EUMAC) zooming model (EZM) which consists of a mesoscale prognostic model (MEMO, mesoscale meteorological model) and a chemical reaction model (MUSE, multiscale for the atmospheric dispersion of reactive species), coupled to the chemical mechanism EMEP (European monitoring and evaluation program). The analysis is performed for a real episode that was characterized by high ozone production and that happened during the 23rd and 24th December, 1999 in Medellín (Colombia). From this real scenario, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out in order to assess the influence of VOC and NOx amounts on ozone production and to extract some conclusions for future ozone abatement policies in Andean regions. As far as ozone air quality is concerned, it is shown that in order to keep current levels the emphasis must be put to avoid increasing NOx emissions, or alternatively, to augment VOC emissions in order to have a high VOC/NOx ratio.

  5. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  6. Reduction of VOC emission from natural flours filled biodegradable bio-composites for automobile interior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Lee, Byoung-Ho; Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Yun, Ju-Ho; Yoo, Seung-Eul; Sohn, Jong Ryeul

    2011-03-15

    Various experiments, such as the thermal extract (TE) method, field and emission cell (FLEC) method and 20 L small chamber, were performed to examine the total volatile organic compound (TVOC) emissions from bio-composites. The TVOC of neat poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was ranged from 0.26 mg/m(2)h to 4.11 mg/m(2)h with increasing temperature. For both PLA bio-composites with pineapple flour and destarched cassava flour, the temperature increased from 0.30 mg/m(2)h to 3.72 mg/m(2)h and from 0.19 mg/m(2)h to 8.74 mg/m(2)h, respectively. The TVOC emission factors of all samples increased gradually with increasing temperature. Above 70°C, both PLA-P and PLA-C composites had higher TVOC emission factors than neat PLA due to the rapid emission of natural volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as furfural (2-furancarboxyaldehyde). PLA composites containing 30 wt% flour had high 1,4-dioxane reduction ability, >50%. The TVOC of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was emitted rapidly from 50 °C to 90 °C due to succinic acid from the pyrolysis of PBS. The TVOC emission factors of PLA bio-composite and PBS bio-composites were reduced using the bake-out method (temperature at 70 °C and baking time 5h). The initial TVOC emission factors of the PLA and PBS bio-composites with pineapple flour and destarched cassava flour were reduced by the baking treatment using FLEC. The TVOC factors from PLA and PBS decreased until 5 days and were commonly maintained a relatively constant value after 5 days using 20L small chamber. The decrease in TVOC emission showed a similar trend to that of the TE and FLEC method. This method confirmed the beneficial effect of the baking treatment effect for polypropylene and linear density polyethylene (LDPE).

  7. Ozone trends across the United States over a period of decreasing NOx and VOC emissions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Heather; Reff, Adam; Wells, Benjamin; Xing, Jia; Frank, Neil

    2015-01-06

    In this work, we evaluate ambient ozone trends at urban, suburban, and rural monitoring sites across the United States over a period of decreasing NOx and VOC emissions (1998-2013). We find that decreasing ozone trends generally occur in the summer, in less urbanized areas, and at the upper end of the ozone distribution. Conversely, increasing ozone trends generally occur in the winter, in more urbanized areas, and at the lower end of the ozone distribution. The 95(th) percentile ozone concentrations decreased at urban, suburban, and rural monitors by 1-2 ppb/yr in the summer and 0.5-1 ppb/yr in the winter. In the summer, there are both increasing and decreasing trends in fifth percentile ozone concentrations of less than 0.5 ppb/yr at urban and suburban monitors, while fifth percentile ozone concentrations at rural monitors decreased by up to 1 ppb/yr. In the winter, fifth percentile ozone concentrations generally increased by 0.1-1 ppb/yr. These results demonstrate the large scale success of U.S. control strategies targeted at decreasing peak ozone concentrations. In addition, they indicate that as anthropogenic NOx emissions have decreased, the ozone distribution has been compressed, leading to less spatial and temporal variability.

  8. UV photochemistry of carboxylic acids at the air-sea boundary: A relevant source of glyoxal and other oxygenated VOC in the marine atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, R.; Tinel, L.; Gonzalez, L.; Ciuraru, R.; Bernard, F.; George, C.; Volkamer, R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemistry plays an important role in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) degradation, but the mechanisms that convert DOC into volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain poorly understood. We irradiated carboxylic acids (C7-C9) on a simulated ocean surface with UV light (<320 nm) in a photochemical flow reactor and transferred the VOC products into a dark ozone reactor. Glyoxal was detected as a secondary product from heptanoic, octanoic, and nonanoic acid (NA) films, but not from octanol. Primary glyoxal emissions were not observed, nor was glyoxal formed in the absence of ozone. Addition of a photosensitizer had no noticeable effect. The concurrent detection of heptanal in the NA system suggests that the ozonolysis of 2-nonenal is the primary chemical mechanism that produces glyoxal. This source can potentially sustain tens of parts per trillion by volume (pptv) glyoxal over oceans, and helps to explain why glyoxal fluxes in marine air are directed from the atmosphere into the ocean.

  9. Effect of habitat and age on variations in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, R. A.; Owen, S.; Duckham, S. C.; Boissard, C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    A dynamic branch enclosure was used to measure emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under field conditions from two common native Mediterranean species, Quercus ilex and Pinus pinea. In addition to α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, limonene and cineole, a suite of lesser known compounds were tentatively identified including cis- and trans-ocimene, cis- and trans-linalool oxide and sabinaketone. Emissions of isoprene from Quercus ilex were insignificant in comparison to those of the monoterpenes and were not detected from Pinus pinea. Variability in emission rates between two habitats, the forest and the dunes, were assessed for Quercus ilex. Temperature sensitivities of emissions and total summed emission rates from Quercus ilex were clearly related to environmental conditions. Emission rates from Pinus pinea showed great variability, but differences between normalised mean emission rates from mature forest and young plantation trees may be significant. Existing emission rate models were found to inadequately describe the observed data.

  10. LOW-VOC COATINGS FOR AUTOMOBILE REFINISHING USING NOVEL POLYMER RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coating operations release a significant portion of the non-mobile source, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air. The U.S. EPA's Emissions Characterization and Prevention Branch has formulated novel low-VOC coatings for the automotive refinishing sector that reduce VOC l...

  11. A rapid and accurate method, ventilated chamber C-history method, of measuring the emission characteristic parameters of formaldehyde/VOCs in building materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-10-15

    The indoor pollution caused by formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building materials poses an adverse effect on people's health. It is necessary to understand and control the behaviors of the emission sources. Based on detailed mass transfer analysis on the emission process in a ventilated chamber, this paper proposes a novel method of measuring the three emission characteristic parameters, i.e., the initial emittable concentration, the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient. A linear correlation between the logarithm of dimensionless concentration and time is derived. The three parameters can then be calculated from the intercept and slope of the correlation. Compared with the closed chamber C-history method, the test is performed under ventilated condition thus some commonly-used measurement instruments (e.g., GC/MS, HPLC) can be applied. While compared with other methods, the present method can rapidly and accurately measure the three parameters, with experimental time less than 12h and R(2) ranging from 0.96 to 0.99 for the cases studied. Independent experiment was carried out to validate the developed method, and good agreement was observed between the simulations based on the determined parameters and experiments. The present method should prove useful for quick characterization of formaldehyde/VOC emissions from indoor materials.

  12. Efficient control of odors and VOC emissions via activated carbon technology.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Farhana; Kim, James; Huang, Ruey; Nu, Huong Ton; Lorenzo, Vlad

    2014-07-01

    This research study was undertaken to enhance the efficiency and economy of carbon scrubbers in controlling odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the wastewater collection and treatment facilities of the Bureau of Sanitation, City of Los Angeles. The butane activity and hydrogen sulfide breakthrough capacity of activated carbon were assessed. Air streams were measured for odorous gases and VOCs and removal efficiency (RE) determined. Carbon towers showed average to excellent removal of odorous compounds, VOCs, and siloxanes; whereas, wet scrubbers demonstrated good removal of odorous compounds but low to negative removal of VOCs. It was observed that the relative humidity and empty bed contact time are one of the most important operating parameters of carbon towers impacting the pollutant RE. Regular monitoring of activated carbon and VOCs has resulted in useful information on carbon change-out frequency, packing recommendations, and means to improve performance of carbon towers.

  13. The indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) characteristics and source identification in a new university campus in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Liu, Junjie; Pei, Jingjing

    2017-02-02

    This study investigates the VOCs constituents and concentration levels on a new university campus, where all of the buildings including classrooms and student dormitories were newly built and decorated within one year. Investigated indoor environments, include dormitories, classrooms and the library. About 30 dormitory buildings with different furniture loading ratio were measured. The characteristics of the indoor VOCs species are analysed and possible sources are identified. The VOCs are analysed with GC-MS method. It was found that the average TVOC concentration can reach up to 2.44 mg/m3. Alkenes were the most abundant VOCs in dormitory rooms, contribute to 86.5% of the total VOCs concentration. Concentration of the ?-Pinene is the highest among the alkenes. Unlike the dormitory rooms, there is almost no room with TVOC concentration above 0.6 mg/m3 in classroom and library buildings. Formaldehyde concentration in the dormitory rooms increased about 23.7% after the installation of furniture, and the highest level reached 0.068 mg/m3. Ammonia released from the building anti-freeze material results to an average indoor concentration of 0.28 mg/m3, which is 100% over- the threshold, and should be seriously considered. Further experiments were conducted to analyse the source of the ?-Pinene and some alkanes in dormitory rooms. The results showed that the ?-Pinene mainly comes from the bed boards while the wardrobes are the main sources of alkanes. The contribution of the pinewood bed boards to the ?-Pinene and TVOC concentration can reach up to above 90%. The same type rooms are sampled 1 year later and the decay rate of ?-Pinene is quite high close to 100% which almost cannot be detected in the sampled rooms. Implication Statement Analysis of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in newly built campus buildings in China identified the specific constituents of indoor VOCs contaminants exposed to Chinese college students. The main detected substance includes

  14. Temperature and moisture effect on spore emission in the fungal biofiltration of hydrophobic VOCs.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, Alberto; Salgado-Ísmodes, Vanida; Pino, Miguel; Hernández, Sergio; Revah, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature and moisture on the elimination capacity (EC), CO(2) production and spore emission by Fusarium solani was studied in biofilters packed with vermiculite and fed with n- pentane. Three temperatures (15, 25 and 35°C) were tested and the highest average EC (64 g m(-3) h(-1)) and lower emission of spores (2.0 × 10(3) CFU m(-3) air) were obtained at 25°C. The effect of moisture content of the packing material indicates that the highest EC (65 g m(-3) h(-1)) was obtained at 50 % moisture. However, lowest emission (1.3 × 10(3) CFU m(-3) air) was obtained at 80 % moisture. Furthermore, the results show that a slight decrease in spore emission was found with increasing moisture content. In all cases, the depletion of the nitrogen source in the biofilter induced the sporulation, a decay of the EC and increased spore emission.

  15. Investigating Sources and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Harley, R. A.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are regulated both as primary air pollutants and as precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol and tropospheric ozone. The San Joaquin Valley, a non-attainment area for ozone and PM2.5, contains a variety of point, area, and mobile VOC sources that contribute to both primary and secondary pollution. Using ambient measurements of over 100 different VOCs and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOCs) made at multiple field sites, we assess the magnitude and importance of various VOC sources in the San Joaquin Valley. Hourly measurements were made during the spring and summer of 2010 via in-situ gas chromatography in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment and also at a rural site located 100 km north of Bakersfield. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel during the summer of 2010. Measurements include a broad array of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs ranging in size from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, including many compounds with functional groups or substituents (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). Using statistical methods of source apportionment, covariance, source receptor modeling, and air parcel back trajectories, we assess the impact of various sources on observed VOC concentrations at our field sites in the San Joaquin Valley. Prevalent sources include gasoline and diesel-vehicle exhaust, petroleum extraction/refining, biogenic emissions from agricultural crops and natural vegetation, and emissions from dairy operations and animal husbandry. We use measurements of fresh motor vehicle emissions from the Caldecott tunnel to constrain apportionment of gasoline and diesel-related VOCs and IVOCs in the San Joaquin Valley. Initial results from Bakersfield show substantial influence from local anthropogenic VOC sources, but there is evidence for transport of emissions from both anthropogenic and biogenic

  16. Real-world vehicle emissions and VOCs profile in the Taipei tunnel located at Taiwan Taipei area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Mei-Yin; Hsieh, Chu-Chin; Wu, Tsung-Cheng; Chang, Len-Fu W.

    An in situ field experiment was conducted in a highway road tunnel in the Taipei City to determine the motor vehicle emission factors (EF) of different kinds of air pollution species. These are carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO x), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and VOCs species. About 56 species of VOCs were sampled by canister sampler and followed by the GC-MS analyzing. Furthermore, the tunnel-drafting rate was determined by SF 6 tracer method. The EF for the highway vehicles determined from this experiment are 3.64, 0.90, 0.44 and 0.24 gm km -1 veh -1 for CO, NO x, NMHC and the totally measured VOCs, respectively. A comparison of the EFs from the road tunnel experiment to the estimates by the USEPA MOBILE5b (M5b) and the modified Taiwan EPA MOBILE-TAIWAN2.0 (MT2.0) provides a first-hand evaluation of the model characteristics. M5b and MT2.0 both tend to underpredict CO by 10% and 20%, respectively. While M5b overpredicts NO x and NMHC by 40% and 20%, respectively; MT2.0 has fairly good predictions for these two species. From the GC-MS analysis of the canister samples, it was found that the most abundant species from the traffic-emitted VOCs in Taipei road tunnel are toluene, ethene and 1,2,4-trimethyl-benzene (1,2,4-TMB) by the weight basis. However, ethene, acetylene and toluene are the most abundant in VOCs based on volume. The VOCs' weight composition in terms of the carbon bond classification is 28% by the paraffins, 33% by the olefins and 39% by the aromatics, respectively. In order to evaluate the ozone formation potential from the typical road emission in Taipei area, the maximum increment reactivity is calculated. It was found that about 1015 mg of O 3 is induced by per vehicle per kilometer traveled emission. Among them, ethene, 1,2,4-TMB and propene from the road vehicle's emission contribute most to the ozone-formation reactivity.

  17. Comparison of models for describing measured VOC emissions from wood-based panels under dynamic chamber test condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J P; Zhang, J S; Shaw, C Y

    2001-08-01

    Measured emission factors are the experimental data used to represent emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from testing materials under dynamic chamber test conditions. A simple empirical model that describes the measured emission factors will be very useful for practical purposes. In this study, a power law model was compared with a widely used first-order exponential decay model in their ability to describe measured emission factors of wood-based panel materials. It was demonstrated that the power law model is a better choice than the first-order model for describing emission characteristics for short-term (less than 100 h) experimental data. The power law model was also more superior in predicting long-term (up to 900 h) emission factors.

  18. Characterization of VOC and formaldehyde emissions from a wood based panel: results from an inter-laboratory comparison.

    PubMed

    Yrieix, Christophe; Dulaurent, Alina; Laffargue, Caroline; Maupetit, François; Pacary, Tiphaine; Uhde, Erik

    2010-04-01

    Six European laboratories used the emission test chamber method (EN ISO 16000-9) for the determination of VOC and formaldehyde emissions from a wood based panel (particleboard). The tested panel was conditioned without wrapping over 28 d at 23 degrees C and 50% RH before shipping to each participating laboratory. Emission chamber testing was carried out with air sampling after 3 and 28 d. Main VOCs (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, pentanal, hexanal) and TVOC were analysed according to ISO 16000-6 and main aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, pentanal, hexanal) were specifically analysed according to ISO 16000-3. Results indicated that relative standard deviations of reproducibility after 28 testing days are between 27.5% and 45.5% for VOC concentrations ranging from 5.9 to 38.6 microg m(-3) and between 17.1% and 23.8% for aldehyde concentrations ranging from 5.5 to 57.6 microg m(-3). Formaldehyde results showed standard deviation of only 17.4% for a mean concentration of 57.6 microg m(-3) after 28 testing days. In general, results are similar to recent inter-laboratory comparison studies even if wood based panels can be considered as heterogeneous materials.

  19. Development of a methodology examining the behaviours of VOCs source apportionment with micro-meteorology analysis in an urban and industrial area.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Delbarre, Hervé; Sauvage, Stéphane; Léonardis, Thierry; Fourmentin, Marc; Augustin, Patrick; Locoge, Nadine

    2012-03-01

    During summer 2009, online measurements of 25 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from C6 to C10 as well as micro-meteorological parameters were simultaneously performed in the industrial city of Dunkerque. With the obtained data set, we developed a methodology to examine how the contributions of different source categories depend on atmospheric turbulences, and the results provided identification of emission modes. Eight factors were resolved by using Positive Matrix Factorization model and three of them were associated with mixed sources. The observed behaviours of contributions with turbulences lead to attribute some factors with sources at ground level, and some other factors with sources in the upper part of surface layer. The impact of vertical turbulence on the pollutant dispersion is also affected by the distance between sources and receptor site.

  20. Source apportionment of VOCs in the Los Angeles area using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven G.; Frankel, Anna; Hafner, Hilary R.

    Eight 3-h speciated hydrocarbon measurements were collected daily by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) as part of the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) program during the summers of 2001-03 at two sites in the Los Angeles air basin, Azusa and Hawthorne. Over 30 hydrocarbons from over 500 samples at Azusa and 600 samples at Hawthorne were subsequently analyzed using the multivariate receptor model positive matrix factorization (PMF). At Azusa and Hawthorne, five and six factors were identified, respectively, with a good comparison between predicted and measured mass. At Azusa, evaporative emissions (a median of 31% of the total mass), motor vehicle exhaust (22%), liquid/unburned gasoline (27%), coatings (17%), and biogenic emissions (3%) factors were identified. Factors identified at Hawthorne were evaporative emissions (a median of 34% of the total mass), motor vehicle exhaust (24%), industrial process losses (15%), natural gas (13%), liquid/unburned gasoline (13%), and biogenic emissions (1%). Together, the median contribution from mobile source-related factors (exhaust, evaporative emissions, and liquid/unburned gasoline) was 80% and 71% at Azusa and Hawthorne, respectively, similar to previous source apportionment results using the chemical mass balance (CMB) model. There is a difference in the distribution among mobile source factors compared to the CMB work, with an increase in the contribution from evaporative emissions, though the cause (changes in emissions or differences between models) is unknown.

  1. Mapping methane emission sources over California based on airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guha, A.; Peischl, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Jonsson, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) has created a need to accurately characterize the emission sources of various greenhouse gases (GHGs) and verify the existing state GHG inventory. Methane (CH4) is a major GHG with a global warming potential of 20 times that of CO2 and currently constitutes about 6% of the total statewide GHG emissions on a CO2 equivalent basis. Some of the major methane sources in the state are area sources where methane is biologically produced (e.g. dairies, landfills and waste treatment plants) making bottom-up estimation of emissions a complex process. Other potential sources include fugitive emissions from oil extraction processes and natural gas distribution network, emissions from which are not well-quantified. The lack of adequate field measurement data to verify the inventory and provide independently generated estimates further contributes to the overall uncertainty in the CH4 inventory. In order to gain a better perspective of spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, a real-time measurement instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) was installed in a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements during eight unique flights which covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. The coincident VOC measurements, obtained through a high frequency proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS), aid in CH4 source identification. High mixing ratios of CH4 (> 2000 ppb) are observed consistently in all the flight transects above the Central Valley. These high levels of CH4 are accompanied by high levels of methanol which is an important

  2. Volatile organic compound emissions from unconventional natural gas production: Source signatures and air quality impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, Robert F.

    Advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past two decades have allowed access to previously unrecoverable reservoirs of natural gas and led to an increase in natural gas production. Intensive unconventional natural gas extraction has led to concerns about impacts on air quality. Unconventional natural gas production has the potential to emit vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. Many VOCs can be toxic, can produce ground-level ozone or secondary organic aerosols, and can impact climate. This dissertation presents the results of experiments designed to validate VOC measurement techniques, to quantify VOC emission rates from natural gas sources, to identify source signatures specific to natural gas emissions, and to quantify the impacts of these emissions on potential ozone formation and human health. Measurement campaigns were conducted in two natural gas production regions: the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado and the Marcellus Shale region surrounding Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An informal measurement intercomparison validated the canister sampling methodology used throughout this dissertation for the measurement of oxygenated VOCs. Mixing ratios of many VOCs measured during both campaigns were similar to or higher than those observed in polluted cities. Fluxes of natural gas-associated VOCs in Colorado ranged from 1.5-3 times industry estimates. Similar emission ratios relative to propane were observed for C2-C6 alkanes in both regions, and an isopentane:n-pentane ratio ≈1 was identified as a unique tracer for natural gas emissions. Source apportionment estimates indicated that natural gas emissions were responsible for the majority of C2-C8 alkanes observed in each region, but accounted for a small proportion of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Natural gas emissions in both regions accounted for approximately 20% of hydroxyl radical reactivity, which could hinder federal ozone standard

  3. Evaluation of the Industrial Point Source Emission Inventory for the Houston Ship Channel Area Using Ship-Based, High-Time-Resolution Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Frost, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (PIT-MS) was used to characterize several large (>100 ppbv) industrial volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes in the Houston, Texas Ship Channel observed from the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) field campaign. Because the ship was sampling close to numerous large emission sources, many of the observed plumes were highly transient making the PIT-MS, with its high time resolution and continuous full mass scan capability, a very useful tool for VOC characterization of the plumes. Plume compositions are compared to the TexAQS2K6 Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Point Source Emission Inventory for individual aromatic compounds; oxygenated VOCs and other selected industrial VOCs observed by PIT-MS. In many cases, we do not find good agreement between the measured plume composition and the VOC speciation in the emissions inventory. These observations are not surprising, as previous research has shown that emission fluxes of individual VOCs may be underestimated by as much as 1-2 orders of magnitude in inventories for the Houston area. In many cases, PIT-MS measurements show clear evidence of industrial emissions not previously identified by the Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) method. The frequent lack of correlation between large VOC enhancements and enhancements in SO2, NOx and CO suggests large, non-combustion sources of VOCs.

  4. Bidirectional Interaction between Phyllospheric Microbiotas and Plant Volatile Emissions.

    PubMed

    Farré-Armengol, Gerard; Filella, Iolanda; Llusia, Joan; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-10-01

    Due to their antimicrobial effects and their potential role as carbon sources, plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions play significant roles in determining the characteristics of the microbial communities that can establish on plant surfaces. Furthermore, epiphytic microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, can affect plant VOC emissions in different ways: by producing and emitting their own VOCs, which are added to and mixed with the plant VOC blend; by affecting plant physiology and modifying the production and emission of VOCs; and by metabolizing the VOCs emitted by the plant. The study of the interactions between plant VOC emissions and phyllospheric microbiotas is thus of great interest and deserves more attention.

  5. Investigation of the effects of temperature and sludge characteristics on odors and VOC emissions during the drying process of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenjie; Li, Lin; Liu, Junxin

    2015-01-01

    Sludge drying is a necessary step for sludge disposal. In this study, sludge was collected from two wastewater treatment plants, and dried at different temperatures in the laboratory. The emission of odor and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) during the sludge drying process were determined by an online odor monitoring system. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in off-gas were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that sludge with 30% moisture content could be obtained in 51 minutes under drying temperature 100 °C but only within 27 minutes under 150 °C. Concentration of odor, TVOCs, sulfur-containing compounds (SCCs), and amines were changed with drying temperature and sludge sources. The maximum concentration of odor, TVOCs, SCCs, and amines were 503.13 ppm, 3.01 ppm, 8.15 ppm, and 11.27 ppm, respectively, at drying temperature 100 °C. These values reached 1,250.79, 8.10, 53.51, and 37.80 ppm when sludge dried at 150 °C. Odor concentration had a close relationship with emission of SCCs, amines, and TVOCs. The main VOCs released were benzene series and organic acid. Potential migration of substances in sludge was examined via analysis of off-gas and condensate, aiming to provide scientific data for effective sludge treatment and off-gas control.

  6. Using growth and decline factors to project VOC emissions from oil and gas production.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Whitney; Harper, Kiera; Barickman, Patrick; Delaney, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Projecting future-year emission inventories in the oil and gas sector is complicated by the fact that there is a life cycle to the amount of production from individual wells and thus from well fields in aggregate. Here we present a method to account for that fact in support of regulatory policy development. This approach also has application to air quality modeling inventories by adding a second tier of refinement to the projection methodology. Currently, modeling studies account for the future decrease in emissions due to new regulations based on the year those regulations are scheduled to take effect. The addition of a year-by-year accounting of production decline provides a more accurate picture of emissions from older, uncontrolled sources. This proof of concept approach is focused solely on oil production; however, it could be used for the activity and components of natural gas production to compile a complete inventory for a given area.

  7. Ozone Formation Potentials from Different Anthropogenic Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Luo, D.; Croes, B.

    2010-12-01

    Different volatile organic compounds (VOC) exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the relative ozone formation potentials (source reactivities) of different anthropogenic VOC emission source categories in California’s South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach combined emission speciation profiles for total organic gases (TOG) with maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for VOC species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analyses involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities for 58 VOC emission categories in SoCAB derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well (R2 = ~0.9). Both approaches revealed the two emissions source types with the highest TOG reactivity were mobile sources and managed forest burning. Also, a reactivity-based TOG emission inventory for SoCAB in 2005 was produced by combining the source reactivities from both approaches with TOG emissions from anthropogenic source categories. The top five reactivity-based source categories are: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipments, consumer products, light-duty trucks, and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that farming operations (mainly from animal waste) was one of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. Compared to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, the reactivity-based TOG emission inventory more appropriately represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources, and highlights those sources that should be targeted for future regulations.

  8. Emission rates of C 8-C 15 VOCs from seaweed and sand in the inter-tidal zone at Mace Head, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartin, J. H.; Halsall, C. J.; Hayward, S.; Hewitt, C. N.

    Emission fluxes for a range of C 8-C 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined from the seaweed Fucus spiralis (spiral wrack) and an adjacent sand surface during low tide on the coastline of Mace Head, Ireland. These two surface types, assessed using dynamic flux chamber systems, are typical of the Mace Head inter-tidal zone. A range of n-alkanes and oxygenates were routinely identified in the measurement of chamber air. Examination of the odd/even n-alkane ratios and use of the carbon preference index (CPI) suggested a biogenic source for these compounds (CPIs >2 in for all samples). Fluxes of n-pentadecane, the most predominant n-alkane, ranged from 0.2 to 5.1 μg m -2 h -1 (0.9-24 nmol m -2 h -1), while oxygenates such as nonanal and decanal had fluxes ranging from <0.1 to 4.4 μg m -2 h -1 (<0.1-31 nmol m -2 h -1) and <0.1 to 4.6 μg m -2 h -1 (<0.1-30 nmol m -2 h -1), respectively. Seaweed emission rates for n-pentadecane were correlated with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) ( rs=0.94) while emissions from sand showed correlation with temperature ( rs=0.85). This suggests a possible biochemical route controlling the release of n-pentadecane from spiral wrack, and temperature-driven volatilisation from sand. Volatilisation from residual seawater trapped in the sand may explain the comparable flux of both n-alkanes and oxygenates from this surface. Unlike the n-alkanes, oxygenate fluxes from sand correlate with PAR, suggesting a photodependent production from organic carbon residues present in seawater. Comparison with previous flux estimates from coastal seawater indicates that the two source types ( Fucus spiralis and bare sand) are significant but not dominant sources of these VOCs.

  9. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  10. Biological anoxic treatment of O₂-free VOC emissions from the petrochemical industry: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Raúl; Souza, Theo S O; Glittmann, Lina; Pérez, Rebeca; Quijano, Guillermo

    2013-09-15

    An innovative biofiltration technology based on anoxic biodegradation was proposed in this work for the treatment of inert VOC-laden emissions from the petrochemical industry. Anoxic biofiltration does not require conventional O2 supply to mineralize VOCs, which increases process safety and allows for the reuse of the residual gas for inertization purposes in plant. The potential of this technology was evaluated in a biotrickling filter using toluene as a model VOC at loads of 3, 5, 12 and 34 g m(-3)h(-1) (corresponding to empty bed residence times of 16, 8, 4 and 1.3 min) with a maximum elimination capacity of ∼3 g m(-3)h(-1). However, significant differences in the nature and number of metabolites accumulated at each toluene load tested were observed, o- and p-cresol being detected only at 34 g m(-3)h(-1), while benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and phenol were detected at lower loads. A complete toluene removal was maintained after increasing the inlet toluene concentration from 0.5 to 1 g m(-3) (which entailed a loading rate increase from 3 to 6 g m(-3)h(-1)), indicating that the system was limited by mass transfer rather than by biological activity. A high bacterial diversity was observed, the predominant phyla being Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria.

  11. VOC Control: Current practices and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, E.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One of the most formidable challenges posed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is the search for efficient and economical control strategies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are precursors to ground-level ozone, a major component in the formation of smog. Under the CAAA, thousands of currently unregulated sources will be required to reduce or eliminate VOC emissions. In addition, sources that are currently regulated may seek to evaluate alternative VOC control strategies to meet stricter regulatory requirements such as the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements in Title III of the CAAA. Because of the increasing attention being given to VOC control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Center for Waste Reduction Technologies (CWRT) initiated a study of VOC control technologies and regulatory initiatives. A key objective of the project was to identify and describe existing VOC control technologies and air regulations, as well as emerging technologies and forthcoming regulations. That work is the basis for this article.

  12. 78 FR 25185 - Delegation of New Source Performance Standards and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Industry... X X X X CCC (Reserved) DDD Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) X X X X Emissions from the Polymer...) DDD Volatile Organic X X Compounds (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry. EEE... Manufacturing Industry. CCC (Reserved) DDD Volatile Organic X X X Compounds (VOC) Emissions from the...

  13. Reduction of VOC emissions by a membrane-based gas absorption process.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Xu, Jun; Wang, Lianjun; Li, Jiansheng; Sun, Xiuyun

    2009-01-01

    A membrane-based gas absorption (MGA) process was evaluated for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on C6H6/N2 mixture. The absorption of C6H6 from a C6H6/N2 mixture was investigated using a hydrophobic polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor and the aqueous solution of N-formyl morpholine (NFM) as absorbent. The effects of various factors on the overall mass transfer coefficient was investigated. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of C6H6 could reach 99.5% in present studied system. A mathematical model based on resistance-in-series concept was presented to predict the value of overall mass transfer coefficient. The average error between the predicted and experimental values is 7.9%. In addition, conventional packed columns for VOCs removal was also evaluated for comparison.

  14. A Real-Time Fast-Flow Tube Study of VOC and Particulate Emissions from Electronic, Potentially Reduced-Harm, Conventional, and Reference Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Blair, Sandra L; Epstein, Scott A; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Staimer, Norbert

    Tobacco-free electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), which are currently not regulated by the FDA, have become widespread as a "safe" form of smoking. One approach to evaluate the potential toxicity of e-cigarettes and other types of potentially "reduced-harm" cigarettes is to compare their emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including reactive organic electrophillic compounds such as acrolein, and particulate matter to those of conventional and reference cigarettes. Our newly designed fast-flow tube system enabled us to analyze VOC composition and particle number concentration in real-time by promptly diluting puffs of mainstream smoke obtained from different brands of combustion cigarettes and e-cigarettes. A proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTRMS) was used to analyze real-time cigarette VOC emissions with a 1 s time resolution. Particles were detected with a condensation particle counter (CPC). This technique offers real-time analysis of VOCs and particles in each puff without sample aging and does not require any sample pretreatment or extra handling. Several important determining factors in VOC and particle concentration were investigated: (1) puff frequency; (2) puff number; (3) tar content; (4) filter type. Results indicate that electronic cigarettes are not free from acrolein and acetaldehyde emissions and produce comparable particle number concentrations to those of combustion cigarettes, more specifically to the 1R5F reference cigarette. Unlike conventional cigarettes, which emit different amounts of particles and VOCs each puff, there was no significant puff dependence in the e-cigarette emissions. Charcoal filter cigarettes did not fully prevent the emission of acrolein and other VOCs.

  15. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  16. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, M. J.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio. This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM) in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the

  17. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M.; Lei, W. F.; Molina, M. J.; Molina, L. T.

    2008-08-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio. This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM) in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the

  18. Applicability of gasoline containing ethanol as Thailand's alternative fuel to curb toxic VOC pollutants from automobile emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Shing Tet; Muttamara, S.; Laortanakul, Preecha

    Emission rates of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were measured in a fleet of 16 in-use vehicles. The test was performed on a chassis dynamometer incorporated with Bangkok Driving Cycle test mode. Three different test fuels: unleaded gasoline, gasoline blended with 10% ethanol (E10) and gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15) were used to determine the different compositions of exhaust emissions from various vehicles. The effects of ethanol content fuels on emissions were tested by three types of vehicles: cars with no catalytic converter installation, cars with three-way catalytic converter and cars with dual-bed catalytic converter. The test result showed wide variations in the average emission rates with different mileages, fuel types and catalytic converters (benzene: 3.33-56.48 mg/km, toluene: 8.62-124.66 mg/km, m-xylene: 2.97-51.65 mg/km, formaldehyde: 20.82-477.57 mg/km and acetaldehyde: 9.46-219.86 mg/km). There was a modest reduction in emission rate of benzene, toluene and m-xylene in cars using E10 and E15 fuels. Use of ethanol fuels, however, leads to increased formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emission rates. Our analysis revealed that alternative fuels and technologies give significant reduction in toxic VOC pollutants from automobile emission—particularly car with dual-bed catalytic converter using E10 fuel.

  19. Effect of resin content and substrate on the emission of BTEX and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this work is to explore the effect of resin content and the effect of substrate on the emission of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint. Four low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints include paints A (20% acrylic), B (30% acrylic), C (20% polyvinyl acetate), and D (30% polyvinyl acetate) were painted on stainless steel specimen for the study of resin effect. Green calcium silicate, green cement, and stainless steel were painted with paints A and C for the study of substrate effect. Concentrations of the VOCs in the chamber decreased with the elapsed time. Both resin type and resin quantity in paint had effects on VOC emissions. Paints with acrylic resin emitted less BTEX and carbonyls than paints with polyvinyl acetate resin. However, the effects of resin quantity varied with VOCs. Porous substrates were observed to interact more strongly with paints than inert substrates. Both green calcium silicate and green cement substrates have strong power of adsorption of VOCs from wall paints, namely toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, methacrolein, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde. Some compounds like toluene, formaldehyde, and butyaldehyde were desorbed very slowly from green calcium silicate and green cement substrates.

  20. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  1. A novel method to quantify the emission and conversion of VOCs in the smoking of electronic cigarettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    An analytical technique was developed for the quantitation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in three different forms of electronic cigarette (EC): solution, vapor, and aerosol. Through the application of the mass change tracking (MCT) approach, the consumed amount of the solution was measured to track the conversion of targets between the different phases. The concentration of aerosol plus vapor (A&V) decreased exponentially (559 to 129 g m-3) with increasing puff velocity (0.05 to 1 L min-1). A strong correlation existed between sampling volume and consumed solution mass (R2 = 0.9972 ± 0.0021 (n = 4)). In the EC solution, acetic acid was considerably high (25.8 μg mL-1), along with trace quantities of some VOCs (methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, propionic acid, and i-butyric acid: 0.24 ± 0.15 μg mL-1 (n = 4)). In the aerosol samples, many VOCs (n-butyraldehyde, n-butyl acetate, benzene, xylene, styrene, n-valeric acid, and n-hexanoic acid) were newly produced (138 ± 250 μg m-3). In general, the solution-to-aerosol (S/A) conversion was significant: e.g., 1,540% for i-butyric acid. The emission rates of all targets computed based on their mass in aerosol/ consumed solution (ng mL-1) were from 30.1 (p-xylene) to 398 (methyl ethyl ketone), while those of carboxyls were much higher from 166 (acetic acid) to 5,850 (i-butyric acid).

  2. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-09

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

  3. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions characterization during the flow-back phase of a hydraulically refractured well in the Uintah Basin, Utah using mobile PTR-MS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, F.; Warneke, C.; Brown, S. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Helleis, F.; Kofler, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Orphal, J.; Petron, G.; Roberts, J. M.; Zahn, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing improvements in advanced technologies for crude oil and natural gas extraction from unconventional reserves, such as directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, have greatly increased the production of fossil fuels within recent years. The latest forecasts even estimate an enhancement of 56% in total natural gas production due to increased development of shale gas, tight gas and offshore natural gas resources from 2012 to 2040 with the largest contribution from shale formations [US EIA: Annual Energy Outlook 2014]. During the field intensive 'Energy and Environment - Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS)', measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made using proton-transfer-reactions mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) at the ground site Horse Pool and using a mobile laboratory in the Uintah Basin, Utah, which is a region well known for intense fossil fuel production. A reworked gas well in the Red Wash fields was sampled regularly within two weeks performing mobile laboratory measurements downwind of the well site. The well had been recently hydraulically refractured at that time and waste water was collected into an open flow-back pond. Very high mixing ratios of aromatic hydrocarbons (C6-C13) up to the ppm range were observed coming from condensate and flow-back reservoirs. The measurements are used to determine sources of specific VOC emissions originating from the different parts of the well site and mass spectra are used to classify the air composition in contrast to samples taken at the Horse Pool field site and crude oil samples from South Louisiana. Enhancement ratios and time series of measured peak values for aromatics showed no clear trend, which indicates changes in emissions with operations at the site.

  4. Predicting the accumulation of harmful metabolic byproducts during the treatment of VOC emissions in suspended growth bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bordel, S; Muñoz, R; Diaz, L F; Villaverde, S

    2007-08-15

    A predicting model is proposed to evaluate metabolic byproducts accumulation and process performance in suspended growth reactors treating air emissions contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The model presented integrates a multistep kinetic model and a general mechanistic model describing bioreactor operation. This integrated model is based on general equations modeling, both mass transport and the mechanisms underlying pollutant biotransformation and byproducts accumulation, and can be applied to a wide range of operating conditions (VOC substrate, O2, and nutrients limitation). The model was tested for predicting benzyl alcohol (BA) accumulation in a chemostat reactor treating toluene. BA accumulates in Pseudomonas putida F1 cultures degrading toluene as a result of methyl monooxygenation reaction parallel to the main TOD degradation pathway. The operational conditions leading to BA accumulation are evaluated through simulations assays. Simulation results indicate that BA accumulation occurs when other substrates rather than toluene are limiting. Therefore, operation under toluene limitation is highly recommended to ensure not only the detoxification goals but also to avoid potential mutagenic effects of BA over the microbial culture.

  5. The reduction of formaldehyde and VOCs emission from wood-based flooring by green adhesive using cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sumin

    2010-10-15

    To discuss the reduction of formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from engineered flooring, cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL)-formaldehyde (CF) resin and CF/PVAc resin were applied for the maple face of the veneer bonding on plywood. The CF resin was used to replace urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and VOC emissions from the adhesives used between the plywoods and fancy veneers. For the CF/PVAc resins, 5, 10, 20 or 30% of PVAc was added to the CF resin. The CF/PVAc resins showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The standard formaldehyde emission test and a VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions, respectively, from the engineered floorings. The CF resin and CF/PVAc resin systems with UV coating satisfied the E(1) and E(0) grades of the Korean Standard. TVOC emission was slightly increased by the PVAc addition.

  6. VOC emission-reduction study at the Hill Air Force Base Building 515 painting facility. Final report, Dec 88-Feb 90

    SciTech Connect

    Aver, J.; Hyde, C.

    1990-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop safe and cost effective strategies for controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) emission from Air Force painting facilities. To this end, a series of sampling and analysis tests were conducted to measure hazardous constituent compound concentrations in a typical crossdraft Air Force paint booth during painting; pollutant emission rates were simultaneously measured. Particulate, isocyanate, and VOC emission rates were measured in booth exhaust; concentration profiles of these constituents within the booth were determined during painting. The results of these tests indicate that significant pollutant stratification occurs in the crossdraft booth during painting. Based on these results, a cost effective means of controlling VOC emissions was developed in which the exhaust from the zone of the booth having the highest VOC concentrations is passed to an emission control device. The remainder is vented to the outside. This flow reduction/control technology requires the installation of a split flow ventilation system, which separates the exhaust from the high concentration zone from the remainder of the exhaust.

  7. Motor vehicle emission factors of NMHC, CO, NO{sub x} and VOCs pattern in photochemical reactions inside the tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.H.; Hsu, Y.C.; Chen, H.W.; Lin, W.Y.

    1998-12-31

    Motor vehicle emission factors of CO, NO{sub x} and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) were measured inside the Chung-Cheng Tunnel of Kaohsiung in Taiwan. The results were compared with the corresponding values calculated by Mobile Taiwan-1.0 and Mobile-5b models. Concentrations of individual hydrocarbon species were also determined, and reactivity of organic species from motor vehicles calculated through use of MIR scale. Results show that the average emission factors of CO, NMHC, and NO{sub x} inside the Chung-Cheng Tunnel were 6.25, 1.51, and 1.02g/veh-km, respectively. The error range of the emission factors was 45%. Concentrations of isopentane, 2-methylpentane, benzene and toluene are the dominant species. Emission factors predicted by Mobile Taiwan-1.0 were much higher than those actually measured. However, values predicted by Mobile-5b did closely match the observed data. The MIR/VOCs ratios found inside the Tunnel differ significantly from those reported for Fort McHenry Tunnel and Tuscarora Tunnel, which is probably due to difference in driving patterns and fuel compositions.

  8. Flooding effects on plant physiology and VOC emissions from Amazonian tree species from two different flooding environments: Varzea and Igapo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho Nunez, A.; Knothe, N.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Schebeske, G.; Ciccioli, P.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2009-04-01

    A land area of 300.000 km² in the Amazon basin is subjected to a continuous flooding pulse, being flooded for 210 days a-1 on an average (Junk et al. 1993). To survive the flooding period vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies to mitigate the produced stress due to root anoxia. One of the strategies is fermentation of sucrose in the roots to comply with the energy demand under anoxia. The resulting toxic metabolite ethanol is transported through the transpiration stream to the leaves and can be directly emitted into the atmosphere or converted to acetaldehyde and/or acetate, still volatile enough to be partly released. We investigated short-term and long-term flooding effects on physiology and VOC emission by plant species from várzea and igapó and observed ethanol and acetaldehyde emissions from the várzea species Vatairea guianensis after one day of flooding, which decreased considerably within the next three days. The same species from igapó showed no acetaldehyde emission and much lower emission rates of ethanol, than the várzea species. In contrast Hevea spruceana from both várzea and igapó showed no ethanol or acetaldehyde emissions. After long term flooding (2 months) we did not find any emissions of acetaldehyde or ethanol from all plant species investigated. However, isoprene and monoterpene emissions were clearly affected, showing a significant decrease. Carbon dioxide assimilation was not affected by short term flooding, but declined after two months root anoxia in the case of Hevea spruceana.

  9. [Study on control and management for industrial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Nei, Lei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from industrial sources account for a large percent of total anthropogenic VOCs. In this paper, VOCs emission characterization, control technologies and management were discussed. VOCs from industrial emissions were characterized by high intensity, wide range and uneven distribution, which focused on Bejing-Tianjin Joint Belt, Shangdong Peninsula, Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta. The current technologies for VOCs treatment include adsorption, catalytic combustion, bio-degradation and others, which were applied in petrochemical, oil vapor recovery, shipbuilding, printing, pharmaceutical, feather manufacturing and so on. The scarcity of related regulations/standards plus ineffective supervision make the VOCs management difficult. Therefore, it is suggested that VOCs treatment be firstly performed from key areas and industries, and then carried out step by step. By establishing of actual reducing amount control system and more detailed VOCs emission standards and regulations, applying practical technologies together with demonstration projects, and setting up VOCs emission registration and classification-related-charge system, VOCs could be reduced effectively.

  10. Other Production Emissions Sources- September 2012 Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a presentation on other production emissions sources, presented at the Stakeholder Workshop on Natural Gas in the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Sinks on Thursday September, 13, 2012.

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines â¥100 HP (Except Gasoline and Rich Burn LPG), Stationary SI Landfill/Digester Gas Engines, and Stationary Emergency Engines >25 HP 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines â¥100 HP (Except Gasoline and Rich Burn LPG), Stationary SI Landfill/Digester Gas Engines, and Stationary Emergency Engines >25 HP 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines â¥100 HP (Except Gasoline and Rich Burn LPG), Stationary SI Landfill/Digester Gas Engines, and Stationary Emergency Engines >25 HP 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines â¥100 HP (Except Gasoline and Rich Burn LPG), Stationary SI Landfill/Digester Gas Engines, and Stationary Emergency Engines >25 HP 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - NOX, CO, and VOC Emission Standards for Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines ≥100 HP (Except...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Combustion Engines Pt. 60, Subpt. JJJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 60—NOX, CO, and VOC Emission... Stationary Non-Emergency SI Engines â¥100 HP (Except Gasoline and Rich Burn LPG), Stationary SI Landfill/Digester Gas Engines, and Stationary Emergency Engines >25 HP 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part...

  16. Mobile source hazardous air pollutant emissions in the Seattle-Tacoma urban area. Report for February 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mangino, J.; Jones, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes mobile source hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions in the Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, urban area. Included in this inventory are mobile source emissions from both on-road (e.g., highway vehicles) and non-road (e.g., agricultural equipment) mobile sources. These mobile source emission estimates, summarized in this paper, were developed based on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and activity level data from the Seattle-Tacoma 1990 base year State Implementation Plan (SIP) emission inventory. The contribution of mobile source HAP emissions was compared to that of stationary area sources in the Seattle-Tacoma area. Mobile sources contributed about 83% of the benzene, 74% of the formaldehyde, and 88% of the 1,3-butadiene emissions.

  17. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air: How chemistry affects the interpretation of positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Shao, Min; de Gouw, Joost; Parrish, David D.; Lu, Sihua; Wang, Ming; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Qian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Jianbo; Hu, Min

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured online at an urban site in Beijing in August-September 2010. Diurnal variations of various VOC species indicate that VOCs concentrations were influenced by photochemical removal with OH radicals for reactive species and secondary formation for oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was applied to characterize VOCs chemistry. A large part of the variability in concentrations of both hydrocarbons and OVOCs was explained by this method. The determined emission ratios of hydrocarbons to acetylene agreed within a factor of two between 2005 and 2010 measurements. However, large differences were found for emission ratios of some alkanes and C8 aromatics between Beijing and northeastern United States secondary formation from anthropogenic VOCs generally contributed higher percentages to concentrations of reactive aldehydes than those of inert ketones and alcohols. Anthropogenic primary emissions accounted for the majority of ketones and alcohols concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was also used to identify emission sources from this VOCs data set. The four resolved factors were three anthropogenic factors and a biogenic factor. However, the anthropogenic factors are attributed here to a common source at different stages of photochemical processing rather than three independent sources. Anthropogenic and biogenic sources of VOCs concentrations were not separated completely in PMF. This study indicates that photochemistry of VOCs in the atmosphere complicates the information about separated sources that can be extracted from PMF and the influence of photochemical processing must be carefully considered in the interpretation of source apportionment studies based upon PMF.

  18. Characteristics and reactivity of volatile organic compounds from non-coal emission sources in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiusheng; Yan, Yulong; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Yiqiang; Chen, Laiguo; Wang, Yuhang

    2015-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled from non-coal emission sources including fuel refueling, solvent use, industrial and commercial activities in China, and 62 target species were determined by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD). Based on the results, source profiles were developed and discussed from the aspects of composition characteristics, potential tracers, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) diagnostic ratios and chemical reactivity. Compared with vehicle exhausts and liquid fuels, the major components in refueling emissions of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline and diesel were alkenes and alkanes. Oppositely, aromatics were the most abundant group in emissions from auto-painting, book binding and plastic producing. Three groups contributed nearly equally in printing and commercial cooking emissions. Acetone in medical producing, chloroform and tetrachloroethylene in wet- and dry-cleaning, as well as TEX in plastic producing etc. were good tracers for the respective sources. BTEX ratios showed that some but not all VOCs sources could be distinguished by B/T, B/E and B/X ratios, while T/E, T/X and E/X ratios were not suitable as diagnostic indicators of different sources. The following reactivity analysis indicated that emissions from gasoline refueling, commercial cooking, auto painting and plastic producing had high atmospheric reactivity, and should be controlled emphatically to prevent ozone pollution, especially when there were large amounts of emissions for them.

  19. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, R; De Araujos Morais, J; Carre, J; Bayard, R; Chovelon, J M; Gourdon, R

    2011-11-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

  20. Emissions of biogenic VOC from forest ecosystems in central Europe: estimation and comparison with anthropogenic emission inventory.

    PubMed

    Zemankova, Katerina; Brechler, Josef

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a method of estimating emission fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) based on the approach proposed by Guenther et al. (1995) and the high-resolution Corine land-cover 2000 database (1x1km resolution). The computed emission fluxes for the Czech Republic (selected for analysis as being representative of a heavily cultivated, central European country) are compared with anthropogenic emissions, both for the entire country and for individual administrative regions. In some regions, BVOC emissions are as high as anthropogenic emissions; however, in most regions the BVOC emissions are approximately 50% of the anthropogenic emissions. The yearly course of BVOC emissions (represented by monoterpenes and isoprene) is presented, along with the spatial distribution of annual mean values. Differences in emission distributions during winter (January) and summer (June) are also considered.

  1. Global comparison of VOC and CO observations in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Monks, Paul S.; Plass-Duelmer, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Speciated volatile organic compound (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Marylebone Road site in central London from 1998 through 2008 are presented. Long-term trends show statistically significant decreases for all the VOCs considered, ranging from -3% to -26% per year. Carbon monoxide decreased by -12% per year over the measurement period. The VOC trends observed at the kerbside site in London showed greater rates of decline relative to trends from monitoring sites in rural England (Harwell) and a remote high-altitude site (Hohenpeissenberg), which showed decreases for individual VOCs from -2% to -13% per year. Over the same 1998 through 2008 period VOC to CO ratios for London remained steady, an indication that emissions reduction measures affected the measured compounds equally. Relative trends comparing VOC to CO ratios between Marylebone Road and Hohenpeissenberg showed greater similarities than absolute trends, indicating that emissions reductions measures in urban areas are reflected by regional background locations. A comparison of VOC mixing ratios and VOC to CO ratios was undertaken for London and other global cities. Carbon monoxide and VOCs (alkanes greater than C 5, alkenes, and aromatics) were found to be strongly correlated (>0.8) in the Annex I countries, whereas only ethene and ethyne were strongly correlated with CO in the non-Annex I countries. The correlation results indicate significant emissions from traffic-related sources in Annex I countries, and a much larger influence of other sources, such as industry and LPG-related sources in non-Annex I countries. Yearly benzene to ethyne ratios for London from 2000 to 2008 ranged from 0.17 to 0.29 and compared well with previous results from US cities and three global megacities.

  2. Biofiltration control of VOC and air toxic emissions: n-Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    n-Butane and benzene vapors are routinely observed in urban atmospheres. Their presence in urban airsheds is of concern because of their ozone production potential as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and/or potential toxicity. Also, these saturated hydrocarbons are representative of airborne aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Separate laboratory studies have been conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) from airstreams using treated compost biofilters. The removal efficiencies were found to exceed 90% for a conditioned biofilter medium and pollutant low concentrations (< 25 ppm) and zeroth order kinetics at higher concentrations (> 100 ppm), whereas benzene vapor elimination followed zeroth order kinetics at concentrations up to 200 ppm. The maximum n-butane and benzene elimination capacities observed for the compost biofilters and conditions employed were 25 and 70 g pollutant m{sup -3} h{sup -1}, respectively. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Biomass Combustion - Emission Ratios, OH Reactivities and SOA Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, W. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldan, P. D.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Veres, P. R.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple instruments including a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), a proton ion trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS), a negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (NI-PT-CIMS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) acquired data from 77 burns of various biomass fuels conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Sciences Laboratory (FSL) in Missoula, MT in February 2009. We compare VOC measurements of oxygenates, aromatics and biogenics from the various instruments as well as from the various fuel types collected in southeastern and southwestern regions of the United States. The relative contribution of the combustion species to the total reactivity with the OH radical is calculated and compared to ambient air reactivity in various locations. Total reactivity for measured species in these fires occasionally exceeded 1000 sec-1 with the majority of this reactivity due to alkenes. In addition, we investigate the relative contribution of the combustion species to the potential for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Measurements of several compounds not previously reported in various urban ambient air measurement campaigns such as pyrazole (C3H4N2), pyrrole (C4H5N), benzofuran (C8H6O) and 2-furanaldehyde (C5H4O2), which are highly reactive with OH, will be presented.

  4. Biomass Burning Contributions to Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the Harvest Season in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a fundamental role in the tropospheric chemistry as key precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and many VOC species have an adverse impact on human health. Therefore, VOCs are of great concern. Biomass burning, which is recognized as an important source of VOCs in China, has a significant effect on air pollution and climate change. Recent studies have reported some source profiles of VOCs emitted from biomass burning in China, and emission inventories have also been developed to estimate the biomass burning emissions. Nevertheless, very little is known about the emission characteristics of biomass burning, nor its contributions to ambient VOCs. This work presents the results from a continuous measurement of 108 VOC compounds by an online GC-MS/FID system at a receptor site in Beijing from October 1-14, 2014. Several biomass burning plumes were identified by extremely high level of acetonitrile, which is an excellent signature of biomass burning. The emission ratios of six VOCs species relative to acetonitrile were determined by enhancement ratio method. The contributions of biomass burning to ambient VOCs were also explored. Results show that the mixing ratios of ambient VOCs in biomass burning days were over twice as that in non-burning days. And biomass burning accounted for 25.1% (benzene), 24.6% (toluene), 18.8% (acetone), 24.9% (MEK), 29.4% (MVK), and 18.2% (n-hexanal) of the ambient mixing ratios, respectively. PMF analysis indicated that the contributions of biomass burning to VOCs increased from 5.5% to 12.7% on average in biomass burning days, which revealed that the high level of ambient VOCs in Beijing during this period can be partly attributed to extensive biomass burning. Our study will be helpful to better understand biomass burning emissions in China, as well as to explore the contributions of biomass burning to haze formation in the harvest season.

  5. Development of biotrickling filters to treat sulfur and VOC emissions. Phase II. Quarterly report No. 2, 31 December 1996-31 March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-29

    The Phase II project was initiated on September 30, 1996. The goal of this SBIR project is to develop a cost-effective, efficient biological treatment system, a biotrickiing filter, to treat air emissions of significance to the Navy. These emissions include odors from oily bilge holding tanks, and point sources of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) such as paint spray booths. Biotrickling filters are similar to scrubbers, but rely on microorganisms on the packing surface to remove and degrade the contaminants. Phase I work identified microbial cultures capable of degrading and growing on air pollutants of importance to the Navy. Greater than 98 percent hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan removal efficiencies were demonstrated for odor applications, and 90 percent VOC (toluene, xylene, MEK, and n-butyl acetate) removal efficiencies were demonstrated for paint-spray booth applications. In addition, three different biomass support packing materials were screened. The objectives of Phase II are to: (1) develop a method to control biofilm growth; (2) establish the full-scale system pressure drop characteristics; (3) establish the effective treatment range; (4) perform overall mass balances and confirm transformation to benign products; (5) demonstrate the technology in the field at a Navy site; and (6) prepare a final report detailing the results and conclusions of the Phase II effort, including an economic analysis.

  6. Waterpipe smoke: source of toxic and carcinogenic VOCs, phenols and heavy metals?

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jens; Müller, Frederic D; Schmidt, Roman; Luch, Andreas; Schulz, Thomas G

    2015-11-01

    The use of the waterpipe, a traditional aid for the consumption of tobacco, has spread worldwide and is steadily increasing especially among the youth. On the other hand, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the composition of mainstream waterpipe smoke and the toxicological risks associated with this kind of smoking habit. Using a standardized machine smoking protocol, mainstream waterpipe smoke was generated and further analyzed for twelve volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and eight phenolic compounds by applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection, respectively. Additionally, seventeen elements were analyzed in waterpipe tobacco and charcoal prior to and after smoking, applying inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to assess the maximum exposure of these elements. For the first time ever, we have been able to show that waterpipe mainstream smoke contains high levels of the human carcinogen benzene. Compared with cigarette smoke yields, the levels were 6.2-fold higher, thus representing a significant health hazard for the waterpipe smoker. Furthermore, we found that waterpipe mainstream smoke contains considerable amounts of catechol, hydroquinone and phenol, each of which causing some health concern at least. The analysis of waterpipe tobacco and charcoal revealed that both matrices contained considerable amounts of the toxic elements nickel, cadmium, lead and chromium. Altogether, the data on VOCs, phenols and elements presented in this study clearly point to the health hazards associated with the consumption of tobacco using waterpipes.

  7. Characterization of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions at Sites of Oil Sands Extraction and Upgrading in northern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J.; Simpson, I. J.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The crude oil reserves in Canada's oil sands are second only to Saudi Arabia, holding roughly 173 billion barrels of oil in the form of bitumen, an unconventional crude oil which does not flow and cannot be pumped without heating or dilution. Oil sands deposits are ultimately used to make the same petroleum products as conventional forms of crude oil, though more processing is required. Hydrocarbons are the basis of oil, coal and natural gas and are an important class of gases emitted into the atmosphere during oil production, particularly because of their effects on air quality and human health. However, they have only recently begun to be independently assessed in the oil sands regions. As part of the 2008 ARCTAS airborne mission, whole air samples were collected in the boundary layer above the surface mining operations of northern Alberta. Gas chromatography analysis revealed enhanced concentrations of 53 VOCs (C2 to C10) over the mining region. When compared to local background levels, the measured concentrations were enhanced up to 1.1-400 times for these compounds. To more fully characterize emissions, ground-based studies were conducted in summer 2010 and winter 2011 in the oil sands mining and upgrading areas. The data from the 200 ground-based samples revealed enhancements in the concentration of 65 VOCs. These compounds were elevated up to 1.1-3000 times above background concentrations and include C2-C8 alkanes, C1-C5 alkyl nitrates, C2-C4 alkenes and potentially toxic aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes.

  8. Control of industrial VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions by catalytic incineration. volume 5. catalytic incinerator performance at industrial site c-3. Final report, May 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Blacksmith, J.R.; Randall, J.L.

    1984-07-01

    The report is part of a two-phase EPA effort to assess the performance, suitability, and costs of various technologies to control emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In Phase 1, information was assembled from the literature on the use and cost of using catalytic incineration for VOC control. Results included: (1) a review of current and developing catalytic incineration technology, (2) an assessment of the overall performance of catalytic incinerators, (3) a review of applications where catalytic incinerators are used, (4) a comparative analysis of catalytic incineration with other competing VOC controls, (5) an examination of available methods for emission testing catalytic incinerators, and (6) an assessment of the need for additional performance test data. Phase 2 was a test program designed to increase the catalytic incinerator performance data base. It resulted in reports documenting the performance of eight catalytic incinerators at six industrial sites. The incinerators were used to control VOC emissions from solvent evaporation processes at can coating, coil coating, magnet wire, and graphic arts printing plants. Performance was measured at several process conditions at each site. Incinerator performance was characterized in terms of destruction efficiency, outlet solvent concentration, and energy usage. Design and operating data were collected. This report preseents test resultls and data evaluation for the testing conducted at the third test site, which involved the testing of two catalytic incinerators at Plant C-3, a graphic arts printing establishment.

  9. [Investigation on emission properties of biogenic VOCs of landscape plants in Shenzhen].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ai-Kui; Li, Nan; Guenther, Alex; Greenberg, Jim; Baker, Brad; Graessli, Michael; Bai, Jian-Hui

    2011-12-01

    Isoprene and monoterpene emissions were characterized using flow and enclosure sampling method and GC-MS in USA for 158 species of plants growing in Shenzhen, China. This survey was designed to include all of the dominant plants within the Shenzhen region as well as unique plants such as Cycads. These are the first measurements in a subtropical Asian metropolis. Substantial isoprene emissions were observed from thirty-one species, including Caryota mitis, Adenanthera pavonina var. microsperma, Mangifera indica and Excoecoria agalloch. Monoterpene emissions were observed from fifty-two species, including Passiflora edulis, Bambusa glaucescens cv. silverstripe as well as some primitive and rare Cycadaceae and Cyatheaceae plants. For the first time some of red plants have been measured, most of them have the ability of releasing terpene. These results will be used to develop biogenic emission model estimates for Shenzhen and the surrounding region that can be used as inputs for regional air quality models.

  10. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  11. Global dataset of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, C.; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, A.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-04-01

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980-2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg (C) yr-1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2%. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of up to ±17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for a sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene inventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene, α-pinene and group of monoterpenes showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements at sites located in tropical forests in the Amazon and Malaysia. The model was able to capture the seasonal variation of isoprene emissions in the Amazon forest.

  12. Reconciling bottom-up, top-down, and direct measurements of biogenic VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A.; Karl, T.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Barkley, M.; Palmer, P.; Muller, J. F.; Stavrakov, T.; Millet, D.

    2007-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic compound (BVOC) emissions vary considerably on spatial scales ranging from a few meters to thousands of kilometers and temporal scales ranging from seconds to years. Accurate estimates of BVOC emissions are required for many regional air quality modeling studies and global earth system investigations. We compare results from bottom-up estimates, using The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), with top-down estimates, based on satellite and in-situ concentration distributions, and direct flux measurements. We describe examples of both agreement and disagreement in U.S., tropical forest and other landscapes and discuss potential explanations for differences that can exceed a factor of 2. Future measurement and modeling needs are outlined and specific activities are proposed to improve efforts to reconcile these approaches and understand the controlling processes.

  13. Root anoxia effects on physiology and emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) under short- and long-term inundation of trees from Amazonian floodplains.

    PubMed

    Bracho-Nunez, Araceli; Knothe, Nina Maria; Costa, Wallace R; Maria Astrid, Liberato R; Kleiss, Betina; Rottenberger, Stefanie; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another stress factor, usually overlooked but very important for the Amazon region, is flooding. We studied the exchange of VOCs in relation to CO2 exchange and transpiration of 8 common tree species from the Amazonian floodplain forest grown up from seeds using a dynamic enclosure system. Analysis of volatile organics was performed by PTR-MS fast online measurements. Our study confirmed emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde at the beginning of root anoxia after inundation, especially in less anoxia adapted species such as Vatairea guianensis, but not for Hevea spruceana probably due to a better adapted metabolism. In contrast to short-term inundation, long-term flooding of the root system did not result in any emission of ethanol or/and acetaldehyde. Emission of other VOCs, such as isoprenoids, acetone, and methanol exhibited distinct behavior related to the origin (igapó or várzea type of floodplain) of the tree species. Also physiological activities exhibited different response patterns for trees from igapó or várzea. In general, isoprenoid emissions increased within the course of some days of short-term flooding. After a long period of waterlogging, VOC emissions decreased considerably, along with photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance. However, even under long-term testing conditions, two tree species did not show any significant decrease or increase in photosynthesis. In order to understand ecophysiological advantages of the different responses we need field investigations with adult tree species.

  14. Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site

    SciTech Connect

    Chiriac, R.; De Araujos Morais, J.; Carre, J.; Bayard, R.; Chovelon, J.M.; Gourdon, R.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon

  15. PARAMETERS IMPACTING THE EMISSIONS OF SELECTED VOCS FROM THE TONER FOR A SPECIFIC PHOTOCOPIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement of emissions--using a laboratory thermal desorption apparatus--from a number of nominally identical photocopier toners (manufactured for use in a specific model copier) when the toners were heated to fuser temperature (180-200?C). The o...

  16. Reducing odorous VOC emissions from swine manure using soybean peroxidase and peroxides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air emissions from swine production facilities can cause odor nuisance issues. Peroxidase enzymes have been used to treat phenolic compounds in industrial wastewaters, but little is known about their efficacy for treating swine manure. The objective of the research was to determine the optimum app...

  17. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as volatile organic compounds (VOC)) emissions by at... sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95 percent... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as volatile organic compounds (VOC)) emissions by at... sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95 percent... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture...

  20. Health evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood and wood-based materials.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L K; Larsen, A; Mølhave, L; Hansen, M K; Knudsen, B

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a method for evaluation of material emissions. The study was based on chemical analysis of emissions from 23 materials representing solid wood and wood-based materials commonly used in furniture, interior furnishings, and building products in Denmark in the 1990s. The authors used the emission chamber testing method to examine the selected materials with a qualitative screening and quantitative determination of volatile organic compounds. The authors evaluated the toxicological effects of all substances identified with chamber testing. Lowest concentration of interest and standard room concentrations were assessed, and the authors calculated an S-value for each wood and wood-based material. The authors identified 144 different chemical substances with the screening analyses, and a total of 84 individual substances were quantified with chamber measurements. The irritative effects dominated at low exposure levels; therefore, the lowest concentration of interest and the S-value were based predominantly on these effects. The S-values were very low for solid ash, oak, and beech. For solid spruce and pine, the determining substances for size of the S-value were delta3-carene, alpha-pinene, and limonene. For the surface-treated wood materials, the S-value reflected the emitted substances from the surface treatment.

  1. Biogenic VOC and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone are short-lived contributors to radiative forcing that can drive relatively rapid changes in climate. They are not emitted into the atmosphere but are formed from precursors including biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) that are emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. BVOC can also impact longer-lived climate-relevant compounds by acting as a sink for the oxidants that remove moderately reactive gases such as methane and by being a source of carbon dioxide. Emissions of BVOC are highly temperature sensitive, and some also respond to light, and so there is a potential feedback coupling between climate and BVOC emissions. Another potential feedback is associated with the water cycle since SOA can influence precipitation by serving as cloud condensation nuclei and because VOC emissions are sensitive to water availability. Anthropogenic air pollutants add to the complexity of this coupled system by enhancing the production of ozone and SOA from BVOC. The role of BVOC in the land-atmosphere-climate system and potential feedback couplings is conceptually clear but developing an accurate quantitative representation is challenging. Our current understanding of the role of BVOC in the climate system and potential feedback couplings will be presented and the major uncertainties will be discussed. Advances in observations for constraining models, including long-term measurements and recent multi-scale studies, will be presented and priorities for continued advances will be discussed.

  2. [Countermeasures for priority control of toxic VOC pollution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Li, Li-Na; Yang, Chang-Qing; Hao, Zheng-Ping; Sun, Han-Kun; Li, Yao

    2011-12-01

    VOC pollution is worsening, not only affects the environment, air quality, but also directly harm human health, and Chinese relevant departments need to improve control measures. U. S. toxic air pollutants (HAPs) control system was studied, and Chinese environment countermeasures were proposed based on pollution features. U. S. recognized sources of hazardous air pollutants in the Clean Air Act (CAA), and reduced their emissions by industrial regulations and regional policies. In urban areas, VOC occupied a great part of toxic air and were controlled as a major project in U. S. Due to relatively weak management and technical base, China should screen some VOC components for priority pollutant control. The feature of Chinese VOC pollution was described as complex components, industry sources widely distributed, strong regional characteristics and processes, and gradual development of regional pollution. It was suggested to carry out investigation assessment activities, enhance cumulative risk assessment and environmental impact assessment management, and strengthen emergency risk prevention.

  3. Anthropogenic and biogenic influence on VOC fluxes at an urban background site in Helsinki, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantala, Pekka; Järvi, Leena; Taipale, Risto; Laurila, Terhi K.; Patokoski, Johanna; Kajos, Maija K.; Kurppa, Mona; Haapanala, Sami; Siivola, Erkki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Rinne, Janne

    2016-07-01

    We measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) at an urban background site near the city centre of Helsinki, Finland, northern Europe. The VOC and CO2 measurements were obtained between January 2013 and September 2014 whereas for CO a shorter measurement campaign in April-May 2014 was conducted. Both anthropogenic and biogenic sources were identified for VOCs in the study. Strong correlations between VOC fluxes and CO fluxes and traffic rates indicated anthropogenic source of many VOCs. The VOC with the highest emission rate to the atmosphere was methanol, which originated mostly from traffic and other anthropogenic sources. The traffic was also a major source for aromatic compounds in all seasons whereas isoprene was mostly emitted from biogenic sources during summer. Some amount of traffic-related isoprene emissions were detected during other seasons but this might have also been an instrumental contamination from cycloalkane products. Generally, the observed VOC fluxes were found to be small in comparison with previous urban VOC flux studies. However, the differences were probably caused by lower anthropogenic activities as the CO2 fluxes were also relatively small at the site.

  4. Overview of VOC emissions and chemistry from PTR-TOF-MS measurements during the SusKat-ABC campaign: high acetaldehyde, isoprene and isocyanic acid in wintertime air of the Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Sinha, Vinayak; Kumar, Vinod; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Panday, Arnico; Mahata, Khadak S.; Rupakheti, Dipesh; Kathayat, Bhogendra; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    = 60.051), which can photochemically produce isocyanic acid in the atmosphere, are reported in this study along with nitromethane (a tracer for diesel exhaust), which has only recently been detected in ambient studies. Two distinct periods were selected during the campaign for detailed analysis: the first was associated with high wintertime emissions of biogenic isoprene and the second with elevated levels of ambient acetonitrile, benzene and isocyanic acid from biomass burning activities. Emissions from biomass burning and biomass co-fired brick kilns were found to be the dominant sources for compounds such as propyne, propene, benzene and propanenitrile, which correlated strongly with acetonitrile (r2 > 0.7), a chemical tracer for biomass burning. The calculated total VOC OH reactivity was dominated by acetaldehyde (24.0 %), isoprene (20.2 %) and propene (18.7 %), while oxygenated VOCs and isoprene collectively contributed to more than 68 % of the total ozone production potential. Based on known secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and measured ambient concentrations in the Kathmandu Valley, the relative SOA production potential of VOCs were benzene > naphthalene > toluene > xylenes > monoterpenes > trimethylbenzenes > styrene > isoprene. The first ambient measurements from any site in South Asia of compounds with significant health effects such as isocyanic acid, formamide, acetamide, naphthalene and nitromethane have been reported in this study. Our results suggest that mitigation of intense wintertime biomass burning activities, in particular point sources such biomass co-fired brick kilns, would be important to reduce the emission and formation of toxic VOCs (such as benzene and isocyanic acid) in the Kathmandu Valley.

  5. Overview of VOC emissions and chemistry from PTR-TOF-MS measurements during the SusKat-ABC campaign: high acetaldehyde, isoprene and isocyanic acid in wintertime air of the Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, C.; Sinha, V.; Kumar, V.; Rupakheti, M.; Panday, A.; Mahata, K. S.; Rupakheti, D.; Kathayat, B.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    acid in the atmosphere, are reported in this study along with nitromethane (a tracer for diesel exhaust) which has only recently been detected in ambient studies. Two distinct periods were selected during the campaign for detailed analysis: the first was associated with high wintertime emissions of biogenic isoprene, and the second with elevated levels of ambient acetonitrile, benzene and isocyanic acid from biomass burning activities. Emissions from biomass burning and biomass co-fired brick kilns were found to be the dominant sources for compounds such as propyne, propene, benzene and propanenitrile which correlated strongly with acetonitrile (r2 > 0.7), a chemical tracer for biomass burning. The calculated total VOC OH reactivity was dominated by acetaldehyde (24.0 %), isoprene (20.2 %) and propene (18.7 %), while oxygenated VOCs and isoprene collectively contributed to more than 68 % of the total ozone production potential. Based on known SOA yields and measured ambient concentrations in the Kathmandu Valley, the relative SOA production potential of VOCs were: benzene > naphthalene > toluene > xylenes > monoterpenes > trimethyl-benzenes > styrene > isoprene. The first ambient measurements from any site in South Asia of compounds with significant health effects such as isocyanic acid, formamide, acetamide, naphthalene and nitromethane have been reported in this study. Our results suggest that mitigation of intense wintertime biomass burning activities, in particular point sources such biomass co-fired brick kilns, would be important to reduce the emission and formation of toxic VOCs (such as benzene and isocyanic acid) in the Kathmandu Valley and improve its air quality.

  6. Mitigating ammonia and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from poultry houses using vegetative environmental buffers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expansion of the poultry industry due to the growing demand of livestock products is putting considerable stress on the atmospheric environment and is also a public health concern. While many regulators and researchers identify land-applied poultry manure as a source of air pollutants, less is k...

  7. Effects of climate change on volatile organic compound emissions from soil and litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Fierer, N.

    2012-12-01

    Our knowledge of the variability and magnitude of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from soil and litter is relatively limited compared to what we know about VOC emissions from terrestrial plants. With climate change expecting to alter plant community composition, nitrogen (N) deposition rates, mean annual temperatures, and precipitation patterns, it is unknown how production and consumption of VOCs from litter and soil will respond. We spent the last four years quantifying VOC emissions from soil and litter, comparing VOC emissions to CO2 emissions, and identifying the biotic and abiotic controls on emission rates with both lab and field experiments using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In all studies, methanol was the dominant VOC flux. VOC emissions were not driven by abiotic processes, as microbial sources accounted for 78% to 99% of the total VOC emissions from decomposing litter. Litter chemistry was correlated with the types of VOCs emitted and the net emissions of carbon as VOCs was found to be up to 88% of that emitted as CO2 suggesting that VOCs likely represent an important component of the carbon cycle in many terrestrial systems. Nitrogen additions drastically reduced VOC emissions from litter to near zero, though it is still not understood whether this was due to an increase in consumption or a decrease in production. Finally, field and lab experiments show that temperature and moisture are both important controls of certain VOC emissions from soils, but that the effects of these factors on VOC emissions are not necessarily equivalent to their effects on CO2 emissions. Together, these series of studies are moving us toward a predictive understanding of VOC emissions from soil and litter with the ultimate goal of incorporating these VOC emissions into global models of terrestrial VOC dynamics.

  8. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  9. Appropriate VOC Emission Limits for the Proposed Pilot Coating Equipment in Maplewood

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  10. Averaging Times for Compliance With VOC Emission Limits - SIP Revision Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  11. TV picture-tube manufacturer uses regenerative catalytic oxidizer to reduce VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Toshiba Display Services, a television picture-tube manufacturer in Horseheads, NY, recently was able to meet stringent state regulations to reduce emissions from two of its film applications lines by installing a regenerative catalytic oxidation system. Toshiba officials initially evaluated several technologies to control volatile organic compounds. After deciding that oxidation was the best technology for its facility, the company invited a number of suppliers to submit proposals. Because all of the oxidation technologies considered by Toshiba had the capability to achieve the destruction and removal efficiency requirement, the company combined the second and third decision elements and conducted an in-depth comparison of the initial capital and ongoing operating costs for each proposal. Officials narrowed the field to two systems--the lowest-cost regenerative thermal oxidation system on the market and a regenerative catalytic oxidation system. The company selected St. Louis, Mo.-based Monsanto Enviro-Chem Systems Inc., to install its DynaCycle{reg_sign} regenerative catalytic oxidation system, marking the first Dyna-Cycle installation in a US television picture-tube facility.

  12. Simultaneous assessments of occurrence, ecological, human health, and organoleptic hazards for 77 VOCs in typical drinking water sources from 5 major river basins, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xichao; Luo, Qian; Wang, Donghong; Gao, Jijun; Wei, Zi; Wang, Zijian; Zhou, Huaidong; Mazumder, Asit

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the growing public awareness on the safety and aesthetics in water sources, more attention has been given to the adverse effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on aquatic organisms and human beings. In this study, 77 target VOCs (including 54 common VOCs, 13 carbonyl compounds, and 10 taste and odor compounds) were detected in typical drinking water sources from 5 major river basins (the Yangtze, the Huaihe, the Yellow, the Haihe and the Liaohe River basins) and their occurrences were characterized. The ecological, human health, and olfactory assessments were performed to assess the major hazards in source water. The investigation showed that there existed potential ecological risks (1.30 × 10 ≤ RQtotals ≤ 8.99 × 10) but little human health risks (6.84 × 10(-7) ≤ RQtotals ≤ 4.24 × 10(-4)) by VOCs, while that odor problems occurred extensively. The priority contaminants in drinking water sources of China were also listed based on the present assessment criteria.

  13. Characterization of odorous charge and photochemical reactivity of VOC emissions from a full-scale food waste treatment plant in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhe; Liu, Jianguo; Song, Mingying; Wang, Xiaowei; Ren, Lianhai; Kong, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Food waste treatment plants (FWTPs) are usually associated with odorous nuisance and health risks, which are partially caused by volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. This study investigated the VOC emissions from a selected full-scale FWTP in China. The feedstock used in this plant was mainly collected from local restaurants. For a year, the FWTP was closely monitored on specific days in each season. Four major indoor treatment units of the plant, including the storage room, sorting/crushing room, hydrothermal hydrolysis unit, and aerobic fermentation unit, were chosen as the monitoring locations. The highest mean concentration of total VOC emissions was observed in the aerobic fermentation unit at 21,748.2-31,283.3 μg/m3, followed by the hydrothermal hydrolysis unit at 10,798.1-23,144.4 μg/m3. The detected VOC families included biogenic compounds (oxygenated compounds, hydrocarbons, terpenes, and organosulfur compounds) and abiogenic compounds (aromatic hydrocarbons and halocarbons). Oxygenated compounds, particularly alcohols, were the most abundant compounds in all samples. With the use of odor index analysis and principal components analysis, the hydrothermal hydrolysis and aerobic fermentation units were clearly distinguished from the pre-treatment units, as characterized by their higher contributions to odorous nuisance. Methanthiol was the dominant odorant in the hydrothermal hydrolysis unit, whereas aldehyde was the dominant odorant in the aerobic fermentation unit. Terpenes, specifically limonene, had the highest level of propylene equivalent concentration during the monitoring periods. This concentration can contribute to the increase in the atmospheric reactivity and ozone formation potential in the surrounding air.

  14. Effect of bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) attack on bark VOC emissions of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Rajendra P.; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Blomqvist, Minna; Holopainen, Toini; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2016-02-01

    Climate warming driven storms are evident causes for an outbreak of the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) resulting in the serious destruction of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests in northern Europe. Conifer species are major sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the boreal zone. Climate relevant BVOC emissions are expected to increase when conifer trees defend against bark beetle attack by monoterpene (MT)-rich resin flow. In this study, BVOC emission rates from the bark surface of beetle-attacked and non-attacked spruce trees were measured from two outbreak areas, Iitti and Lahti in southern Finland, and from one control site at Kuopio in central Finland. Beetle attack increased emissions of total MTs 20-fold at Iitti compared to Kuopio, but decreased the emissions of several sesquiterpenes (SQTs) at Iitti. At the Lahti site, the emission rate of α-pinene was positively correlated with mean trap catch of bark beetles. The responsive individual MTs were tricyclene, α-pinene, camphene, myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole and bornyl acetate in both of the outbreak areas. Our results suggest that bark beetle outbreaks affect local BVOC emissions from conifer forests dominated by Norway spruce. Therefore, the impacts of insect outbreaks are worth of consideration to global BVOC emission models.

  15. Analysis of mobile source air toxics (MSATs)–Near-Road VOC and carbonyl concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures to mobile source air toxics (MSATs) have been associated with numerous adverse health effects. While thousands of air toxic compounds are emitted from mobile sources, a subset of compounds are considered high priority due to their significant contribution to cancer and...

  16. Jovian S emission: Model of radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, B. P.

    1994-04-01

    A physical model of the radiation source and an excitation mechanism have been suggested for the S component in Jupiter's sporadic radio emission. The model provides a unique explanation for most of the interrelated phenomena observed, allowing a consistent interpretation of the emission cone structure, behavior of the integrated radio spectrum, occurrence probability of S bursts, location and size of the radiation source, and fine structure of the dynamic spectra. The mechanism responsible for the S bursts is also discussed in connection with the L type emission. Relations are traced between parameters of the radio emission and geometry of the Io flux tube. Fluctuations in the current amplitude through the tube are estimated, along with the refractive index value and mass density of the plasma near the radiation source.

  17. Evaluation of Mobile Source Emissions and Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, Timothy Ryan

    Mobile sources contribute significantly to air pollution problems. Relevant pollutants include numerous gaseous and particle-phase species that can affect human health, ecosystems, and climate. Accurate inventories of emissions from these sources are needed to help understand possible adverse impacts, and to develop effective air quality management strategies. Unfortunately large uncertainties persist in the understanding of mobile source emissions, and how these emissions are changing over time. This dissertation aims to evaluate long-term trends in mobile source emissions in the United States, and to make detailed measurements of emissions from present-day fleets of on-road vehicles operating in California. Long-term trends in mobile source emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States were investigated through development of a fuel-based emission inventory. Annual emissions from on- and off-road gasoline and diesel engines were quantified for the years 1996-2006. Diesel engines were found to be the dominant mobile source of NOx and PM2.5, and on-road diesel vehicles were identified as the single largest anthropogenic source of NOx emissions in the United States as of 2005. The importance of diesel engines as a source of exhaust particulate matter emissions has led to the recent introduction of advanced emission control technologies in the United States, such as diesel particle filters (DPF), which have been required since 2007 for all new on-road heavy-duty (HD) diesel engines. In addition to national requirements for the use of such control devices on new engines, California has mandated accelerated clean-up of statewide emissions from older in-use diesel engines. The plume capture method was further applied to measure emissions from a more diverse population of trucks observed at the Caldecott tunnel in summer 2010. Emissions from hundreds of individual trucks were measured, and emission factor distributions were

  18. Flameless thermal destruction of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, H.M.

    1997-04-01

    A new technology controls volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions with high destruction efficiencies. This article describes the technology developed by Thermatrix, Inc. of San Jose, CA. The field proven flameless thermal oxidation (FTO) is capable of destroying over 99.99 percent of a wide range of organic air pollution. Topics covered include FTO technology, high destruction efficiencies, VOCs in wastewater from chemical manufacturing; refinery fugitive emissions.

  19. Controlling NOx emission from industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.K.; Nueffer, W.; Grano, D.; Khan, S.; Staudt, J.E.; Jozewicz, W.

    2005-07-01

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx Budget Program, and the NOx SIP Call rulemakings. In addition to these regulations, the recent Interstate Air Quality Rulemaking proposal and other bills in the Congress are focusing on additional reductions of NOx. Industrial combustion sources accounted for about 18016 of NOx emissions in the United States in 2000 and constituted the second largest emitting source category within stationary sources, only behind electric utility sources. Based on these data, reduction of NOx emissions from industrial combustion sources is an important consideration in efforts undertaken to address the environmental concerns associated with NOx. This paper discusses primary and secondary NOx control technologies applicable to various major categories of industrial sources. The sources considered in this paper include large boilers, furnaces and fired heaters, combustion turbines, large IC engines, and cement kilns. For each source category considered in this paper, primary NOx controls are discussed first, followed by a discussion of secondary NOx controls.

  20. Characterization of VOC sources in an urban area based on PTR-MS measurements and receptor modelling.

    PubMed

    Stojić, A; Stojić, S Stanišić; Šoštarić, A; Ilić, L; Mijić, Z; Rajšić, S

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds were measured by the use of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, together with NO x , NO, NO2, SO2, CO and PM10 and meteorological parameters in an urban area of Belgrade during winter 2014. The multivariate receptor model US EPA Unmix was applied to the obtained dataset resolving six source profiles, which can be attributed to traffic-related emissions, gasoline evaporation/oil refineries, petrochemical industry/biogenic emissions, aged plumes, solid-fuel burning and local laboratories. Besides the vehicle exhaust, accounting for 27.6 % of the total mixing ratios, industrial emissions, which are present in three out of six resolved profiles, exert a significant impact on air quality in the urban area. The major contribution of regional and long-range transport was determined for source profiles associated with petrochemical industry/biogenic emissions (40 %) and gasoline evaporation/oil refineries (29 %) using trajectory sector analysis. The concentration-weighted trajectory model was applied with the aim of resolving the spatial distribution of potential distant sources, and the results indicated that emission sources from neighbouring countries, as well as from Slovakia, Greece, Poland and Scandinavian countries, significantly contribute to the observed concentrations.

  1. Leaf-Level Controls Over Emissions of Methanol and 2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol, Oxygenated VOC With Different Production Mechanisms and Solubilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P. C.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

    2002-12-01

    Oxygenated VOC fluxes were investigated in leaves of deciduous trees and grasses, and needles of conifers, using a temperature-controlled leaf cuvette and a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Two alcohols, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and methanol, emitted by these plants, illustrate two contrasting patterns of oxygenated VOC emissions. MBO is restricted to a small section of the genus Pinus, and is maximal in mature needles. Methanol production appears to be ubiquitous among higher plants, associated with demethylation of pectin during cell wall maturation, and emissions are therefore maximal during rapid leaf growth, decreasing in mature leaves. Although emissions of both compounds respond to variation in leaf temperature and incident light, the nature of the control is quite different. Production and emission of MBO are tightly coupled, and leaf pools are small. Light and temperature affect emissions directly through their effect on production which ceases rapidly in the dark. Effects of light and temperature on production of methanol are unknown, although emissions, and presumably production, continue through the night at reduced rates. Effects of light and temperature on methanol emission are indirect, through their effects on stomatal conductance and evapotranspiration. Data will be presented to justify a conceptual model in which methanol released in the demethylation of pectin partitions into the gas and liquid phase according to Henry's Law. Gas phase methanol is then emitted through the stomata. However, methanol emissions correlate more strongly with rates of evapotranspiration than with stomatal conductance, suggesting that much of the methanol is released from the dissolved pool along with the transpiration stream. At night, when stomatal conductance is low, and assuming constant production, gas phase concentrations increase, and the size of the aqueous pool increases in response. This aqueous pool then empties rapidly upon stomatal opening

  2. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs - CSIA Protocol for Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Vapor Intrusion Version 2 Investigations July 2014 13 4.0 DATA INTERPRETATION The measured isotope ratios for the subsurface samples and for...Results for Single Isotope If two isotope ratios are analyzed, the data interpretation is as follows (Figure 5): Indoor Source Range CSIA...GUIDANCE DOCUMENT Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs

  3. Monitoring by Control Technique - Compliant (Low/No VOC/HAP) Inks and Coatings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Compliant (Low/No VOC/HAP) Inks and Coatings control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  4. Analysis of Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATS)–Near-Road VOC and CarbonylConcentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation examines data from a year-long study of measured near-road mobile source air toxic (MSAT) concentrations and compares these data with modeled 2005 National Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) results. Field study measurements were collected during a field campaign in ...

  5. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  6. VOCs and OVOCs distribution and control policy implications in Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Peter K. K.; Ho, Josephine W. K.; Tsang, Roy C. W.; Blake, Donald R.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen; Yuan, Zibing; Wang, Xinming; Shao, Min; Zhong, Liuju

    2013-09-01

    Ambient air measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were conducted and characterised during a two-year grid study in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of southern China. The present grid study pioneered the systematic investigation of the nature and characteristics of complex VOC and OVOC sources at a regional scale. The largest contributing VOCs, accounting over 80% of the total VOCs mixing ratio, were toluene, ethane, ethyne, propane, ethene, butane, benzene, pentane, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Sub-regional VOC spatial characteristics were identified, namely: i) relatively fresh pollutants, consistent with elevated vehicular and industrial activities, around the PRD estuary; and ii) a concentration gradient with higher mixing ratios of VOCs in the west as compared with the eastern part of PRD. Based on alkyl nitrate aging determination, a high hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration favoured fast hydrocarbon reactions and formation of locally produced ozone. The photochemical reactivity analysis showed aromatic hydrocarbons and alkenes together consisted of around 80% of the ozone formation potential (OFP) among the key VOCs. We also found that the OFP from OVOCs should not be neglected since their OFP contribution was more than one-third of that from VOCs alone. These findings support the choice of current air pollution control policy which focuses on vehicular sources but warrants further controls. Industrial emissions and VOCs emitted by solvents should be the next targets for ground-level ozone abatement.

  7. Source apportionment of stack emissions from research and development facilities using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-12-01

    Research and development (R&D) facility emissions are difficult to characterize due to their variable processes, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified between 9 and 11 source-related factors contributing to stack emissions, depending on the building. Similar factors between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions; other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not all four. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit.

  8. Calendar Year 2016 Stationary Source Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Evelo, Stacie

    2017-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque (COA) Environmental Health Department Air Quality Program has issued stationary source permits and registrations the Department of Energy/Sandia Field Office for operations at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. This emission inventory report meets the annual reporting compliance requirements for calendar year (CY) 2016 as required by the COA.

  9. Synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchro-Compton theory to real compact radio sources, the question of a self-Compton origin of the X-rays in radio-loud quasars and active galactic nuclei, and the phenomenology of superluminal motion are discussed in a review of research concerning synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources. After examining the basic synchro-Compton theory of ideal sources, applications of the theory to real sources is discussed. It is concluded that the Compton problem and total energy requirements are not substantially mitigated by considering source structures more complicated than the multiple, uniform-component model used by most investigators. Also, alternatives to the standard model of superluminal motion are discussed, focusing on the assumptions usually made when interpreting superluminal sources.

  10. Pilot-scale testing of renewable biocatalyst for swine manure treatment and mitigation of odorous VOCs, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Devin L.; Koziel, Jacek A.; Bruning, Kelsey; Parker, David B.

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive control of odors, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with swine production is a critical need. A pilot-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate surface-applied soybean peroxidase (SBP) and calcium peroxide (CaO2) as a manure additive to mitigate emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) including dimethyl disulfide/methanethiol (DMDS/MT), dimethyl trisulfide, n-butyric acid, valeric acid, isovaleric acid, p-cresol, indole, and skatole. The secondary impact on emissions of NH3, H2S, and GHG was also measured. The SBP was tested at four treatments (2.28-45.7 kg/m2 manure) with CaO2 (4.2% by weight of SBP) over 137 days. Significant reductions in VOC emissions were observed: DMDS/MT (36.2%-84.7%), p-cresol (53.1%-89.5%), and skatole (63.2%-92.5%). There was a corresponding significant reduction in NH3 (14.6%-67.6%), and significant increases in the greenhouse gases CH4 (32.7%-232%) and CO2 (20.8%-124%). The remaining emissions (including N2O) were not statistically different. At a cost relative to 0.8% of a marketed hog it appears that SBP/CaO2 treatment could be a promising option at the lowest (2.28 kg/m2) treatment rate for reducing odorous gas and NH3 emissions at swine operations, and field-scale testing is warranted.

  11. Source emission-pattern polynomial representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo; De Villa, Francisco

    1990-12-01

    A method to obtain accurate thickness data to characterize the emission patterns of evaporation sources is described. Thickness data is obtained through digital image processing algorithms applied to the monochromatic transmission bands digitized from a set of multilayer Fabry-Perot filters deposited on large flat circular substrates. These computer image-processed taper-thickness patterns are reduced to orthonormal polynomial series expansions in two steps, using Tschebyshev and associated Legendre polynomials. The circular glass substrates employed to characterize each type of evaporation source are kept stationary during the evaporation process of evaporation of each layer to obtain the specific thickness distribution for each type of source.

  12. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy facilities in central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two central Califor...

  13. [Emission control way of volatile organic compounds in industry].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Zhang, Guo-Ning; Wei, Yu-Xia; Zou, Lan; Zhang, Ming-Hui

    2011-12-01

    Due to the volatile nature, the way of controlling way of VOCs was different from other atmospheric pollutants. By analyzing the emission characteristics of VOCs, four kinds of control way were proposed, which were the source control, organized emission control, fugitive emission control and the total amount control, and the control modes of each control way were also analyzed and compared.

  14. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  15. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-01-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1–10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core–shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ∼50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission. PMID:26212857

  16. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang B; Akselrod, Gleb M; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2015-07-27

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1-10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core-shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ∼50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission.

  17. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-07-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1-10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core-shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ~50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission.

  18. Characterization of emissions sources in the California-Mexico Border Region during Cal-Mex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Lei, W.; Li, G.; Bei, N.; Barrera, H.; Tejeda, D.; Molina, L. T.; Cal-Mex 2010 Emissions Team

    2010-12-01

    The California-Mexico border region provides an opportunity to evaluate the characteristics of the emission processes in rapidly expanding urban areas where intensive international trade and commerce activities occur. Intense anthropogenic activities, biomass burning, as well as biological and geological sources significantly contribute to high concentration levels of particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), air toxics, and ozone observed in the California-US Baja California-Mexico border region. The continued efforts by Mexico and US for improving and updating the emissions inventories in the sister cities of San Diego-Tijuana and Calexico-Mexicali has helped to understand the emission processes in the border region. In addition, the recent Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign included a series of measurements aimed at characterizing the emissions from major sources in the California-Mexico border region. In this work we will present our analyzes of the data obtained during Cal-Mex 2010 for the characterization of the emission sources and their use for the evaluation of the recent emissions inventories for the Mexican cities of Tijuana and Mexicali. The developed emissions inventories will be implemented in concurrent air quality modeling efforts for understanding the physical and chemical transformations of air pollutants in the California-Mexico border region and their impacts.

  19. Ethanol emission from loose corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage and silage-containing feed on dairy farms have recently been identified as a source of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In this work, we present measurements of ethanol (a dominant silage VOC) emission from loose corn silage samples made using a wind tunnel system. Flux of ethanol f...

  20. Overview of VOC emissions and chemistry from PTR-TOF-MS measurements during the SusKat-ABC campaign: high acetaldehyde, ketene, isoprene and isocyanic acid in wintertime air of the Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, C.; Sinha, V.; Kumar, V.; Rupakheti, M.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K.; Rupakheti, D.; Kathayat, B.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    During SusKat-ABC (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley-Atmospheric Brown Clouds) field campaign conducted in the winter of 2012-2013, a comprehensive study was carried out to characterize the chemical composition of ambient Kathmandu air for speciated VOCs by deploying a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS), the first time to be deployed in South Asia. Due to its high mass resolution (m/Δm > 4200) and temporal resolution (1 minute), 71 ion peaks were detected in the PTR-TOF-MS mass scan data, highlighting the chemical complexity of ambient air in the Valley. Of the 71, 38 species were found to have campaign average concentrations > 200 ppt and were identified based on their spectral characteristics, ambient diel profiles and correlation with specific emission tracers. Distinct diel profiles were observed for the nominal isobaric compounds isoprene (m/z=69.070) and furan (m/z=69.033). Comparison with several sites elsewhere in the world showed mixing ratios of acetaldehyde (~ 9 ppb), acetonitrile (~1 ppb) and isoprene (~ 1 ppb) to be among the highest measured anywhere in the world. Two "new" ambient compounds namely, methanamide (m/z = 46.029) and acetamide (m/z=60.051) which can photochemically produce isocyanic acid in the atmosphere, are reported in this study alongwith nitromethane (a tracer for diesel exhaust) and ketene (a very reactive compound). Two distinct periods were identified during the campaign based on high daytime biogenic emissions of isoprene even in winter and biomass fired brick kiln emissions of acetonitrile, benzene and isocyanic acid. Biomass burning and biomass fired brick kiln emissions were found to be the dominant source for compounds such as propyne, propene, benzene and propanenitrile which correlated strongly with biomass burning tracer acetonitrile (r2 > 0.7). The calculated total VOC OH reactivity was dominated by acetaldehyde (20.1%), ketene (ethenone) (17.1%), isoprene (16.8 %) and

  1. Do vehicular emissions dominate the source of C6-C8 aromatics in the megacity Shanghai of eastern China?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Wang, Qian; Chen, Jianmin; Chen, Changhong; Huang, Cheng; Qiao, Liping; Lou, Shengrong; Lu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to i-pentane, the indicator of vehicular emissions, were employed to apportion the vehicular and non-vehicular contributions to reactive species in urban Shanghai. Two kinds of tunnel experiments, one tunnel with more than 90% light duty gasoline vehicles and the other with more than 60% light duty diesel vehicles, were carried out to study the characteristic ratios of vehicle-related emissions from December 2009 to January 2010. Based on the experiments, the characteristic ratios of C6-C8 aromatics to i-pentane of vehicular emissions were 0.53 ± 0.08 (benzene), 0.70 ± 0.12 (toluene), 0.41 ± 0.09 (m,p-xylenes), 0.16 ± 0.04 (o-xylene), 0.023 ± 0.011 (styrene), and 0.15 ± 0.02 (ethylbenzene), respectively. The source apportionment results showed that around 23.3% of C6-C8 aromatics in urban Shanghai were from vehicular emissions, which meant that the non-vehicular emissions had more importance. These findings suggested that emission control of non-vehicular sources, i.e. industrial emissions, should also receive attention in addition to the control of vehicle-related emissions in Shanghai. The chemical removal of VOCs during the transport from emissions to the receptor site had a large impact on the apportionment results. Generally, the overestimation of vehicular contributions would occur when the VOC reaction rate constant with OH radicals (kOH) was larger than that of the vehicular indicator, while for species with smaller kOH than the vehicular indicator, the vehicular contribution would be underestimated by the method of characteristic ratios.

  2. Total OH reactivity study from VOC photochemical oxidation in the SAPHIR chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Hohaus, T.; Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wahner, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that hydroxyl radicals (OH) act as a dominant reactive species in the degradation of VOCs in the atmosphere. In recent field studies, directly measured total OH reactivity often showed poor agreement with OH reactivity calculated from VOC measurements (e.g. Nölscher et al., 2013; Lu et al., 2012a). This "missing OH reactivity" is attributed to unaccounted biogenic VOC emissions and/or oxidation products. The comparison of total OH reactivity being directly measured and calculated from single component measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products gives us a further understanding on the source of unmeasured reactive species in the atmosphere. This allows also the determination of the magnitude of the contribution of primary VOC emissions and their oxidation products to the missing OH reactivity. A series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, to explore in detail the photochemical degradation of VOCs (isoprene, ß-pinene, limonene, and D6-benzene) by OH. The total OH reactivity was determined from the measurement of VOCs and their oxidation products by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) with a GC/MS/FID system, and directly measured by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) at the same time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements showed an increase of missing OH reactivity in the presence of oxidation products of VOCs, indicating a strong contribution to missing OH reactivity from uncharacterized oxidation products.

  3. Hydrocarbon emissions and characterization of methane sources in the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, J. E.; Townsend-Small, A.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    As energy demand and costs continue to rise worldwide, so does the development of energy from natural gas. The United States in particular has expanded its natural gas industry, becoming one of the world's top gas producing countries. The Barnett Shale of northern Texas is one of the most developed and productive natural gas shale plays in the United States. However, emissions from the many oil and gas system components in the region have not been fully characterized. An extensive list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured from 120 whole air canisters collected throughout the Barnett shale in October 2013. Known methane sources were targeted and included oil and natural gas well pads, compressor stations, distribution pipelines and city gates, cattle feedlots and landfills. C1-C5 alkanes were elevated throughout the region and were similar to or greater than concentrations in major U.S. cities. The VOC source signature for oil and gas operations was distinguished from biogenic sources. Average ethane content relative to methane was calculated for each of the source types, and ranged from 0.7 to 12.8%. For the whole region, the ethane content was 7.2±6.1%, illustrating the high variability and effect of the various hydrocarbon sources on the local air.

  4. Krakow conference on low emissions sources: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.L.; Butcher, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Krakow Conference on Low Emission Sources presented the information produced and analytical tools developed in the first phase of the Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. This phase included: field testing to provide quantitative data on missions and efficiencies as well as on opportunities for building energy conservation; engineering analysis to determine the costs of implementing pollution control; and incentives analysis to identify actions required to create a market for equipment, fuels, and services needed to reduce pollution. Collectively, these Proceedings contain reports that summarize the above phase one information, present the status of energy system management in Krakow, provide information on financing pollution control projects in Krakow and elsewhere, and highlight the capabilities and technologies of Polish and American companies that are working to reduce pollution from low emission sources. It is intended that the US reader will find in these Proceedings useful results and plans for control of pollution from low emission sources that are representative of heating systems in central and Eastern Europe. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Study of the dispersion of VOCs emitted by a municipal solid waste landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, Rodica; Carré, Jean; Perrodin, Yves; Vaillant, Hervé; Gasso, Santiago; Miele, Philippe

    The dispersion of VOCs emitted by a municipal solid waste landfill was studied for a period of over one year. Sixteen VOCs were monitored: linear alkanes from C 7 to C 11, BTEX, trimethylbenzene, trichlorethylene, tetrachlorethylene, α and β-pinenes, limonene. The analytical procedure was first comprised of static long-term sampling of about 2 months using radial diffusion Radiello tubes containing activated carbon, followed by extraction by solvent ( i.e. CS 2) and GC/MS analysis. The results were initially analysed on the basis of the total concentration of the quantified VOCs, then by examining the concentrations of certain selected compounds. The influence of different parameters such as operating conditions, meteorological conditions and site morphology was highlighted on the basis of total VOC concentrations. In order to study the VOC's dispersion more closely, 5 compounds were chosen: toluene, benzene, limonene, and the sum trichlorethylene + tetrachlorethylene, as a "marker", to verify the origin of the VOCs emitted. The results showed that the main source of VOCs is the open cell and lead to different hypotheses on interferences from neighbouring sources and to the proposal of solutions to limit the emission of VOCs and their dispersion. To our knowledge, this type of study has not been accomplished until this day.

  6. Detailed gas and diesel vehicle emissions: PTR-MS measurements of real-time VOC profiles and comprehensive characterization of primary emissions for IVOC, SVOC, and LVOC by gas chromatography with vacuum ultra-violet ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, G.; Frodin, B.; Zhao, Y.; Franklin, J. P.; Cross, E. S.; Saleh, R.; Saliba, G.; Lambe, A. T.; Sardar, S.; Maldonado, H.; Russell, L. M.; Kroll, J. H.; Robinson, A. L.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past fifteen years US vehicle emissions standards have dramatically improved, with the goal of reducing urban air pollution. Recent studies demonstrate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to be the dominant contributor to urban organic aerosol, but controversy remains regarding the contributions of different vehicle types to SOA. Increased potency for SOA formation from non methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from newer vehicles that meet tighter emission standards has also been observed. Both speciation and temporal resolution of vehicular emissions are critical for predicting SOA formation. The relative importance of diesel and gasoline emissions to SOA formation depends critically on speciation. Experiments were conducted at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory to better understand SOA formation for low, ultra-low, super ultra-low and partial zero emission vehicles (LEV, ULEV, SULEV, PZEV). Exhaust was sampled on filters and adsorbent tubes to measure intermediate-, semi-, and low-volatility NMHC (IVOC, SVOC, LVOC). A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) measured volatile organics (VOC) emissions with high time-resolution. Analysis of filters and adsorbent tubes using gas chromatography with vacuum-ultra-violet ionization mass spectrometry provided unprecedented characterization of emissions according to degree of branching, number of cyclic rings, aromaticity, and molecular weight. ULEV vehicles show the composition distributions of primary particulate emissions peak for compounds in the SVOC range. PZEV vehicle emissions peak in the IVOC range. Diesel vehicles have up to ten times higher emissions than gasoline vehicles; their distributions have significant IVOC levels and peak in the SVOC/LVOC range. Our measurements are used to predict potential SOA formation by vehicle standard class and the relative SOA formation for diesel and gasoline vehicles. PTR-MS measurement show VOC emissions after cold start occur almost entirely

  7. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE DIFFUSION HYPOTHESIS IN THE THEORY OF POROUS MEDIA VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) SOURCES AND SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper proposes three alternative, diffusion-limited mathematical models to account for volatile organic compound (VOC) interactions with indoor sinks, using the linear isotherm model as a reference point. (NOTE: Recent reports by both the U.S. EPA and a study committee of the...

  8. Air exchange rates and migration of VOCs in basements and residences

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liuliu; Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Rowe, Zachary; Chin, Jo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Basements can influence indoor air quality by affecting air exchange rates (AERs) and by the presence of emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other pollutants. We characterized VOC levels, AERs and interzonal flows between basements and occupied spaces in 74 residences in Detroit, Michigan. Flows were measured using a steady-state multi-tracer system, and 7-day VOC measurements were collected using passive samplers in both living areas and basements. A walkthrough survey/inspection was conducted in each residence. AERs in residences and basements averaged 0.51 and 1.52 h−1, respectively, and had strong and opposite seasonal trends, e.g., AERs were highest in residences during the summer, and highest in basements during the winter. Air flows from basements to occupied spaces also varied seasonally. VOC concentration distributions were right-skewed, e.g., 90th percentile benzene, toluene, naphthalene and limonene concentrations were 4.0, 19.1, 20.3 and 51.0 μg m−3, respectively; maximum concentrations were 54, 888, 1117 and 134 μg m−3. Identified VOC sources in basements included solvents, household cleaners, air fresheners, smoking, and gasoline-powered equipment. The number and type of potential VOC sources found in basements are significant and problematic, and may warrant advisories regarding the storage and use of potentially strong VOCs sources in basements. PMID:25601281

  9. The urban atmosphere as a non-point source for the transport of MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCS) to shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Thomson, N.R.; Johnson, R.L.; Baehr, A.L.; Zogorski, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration and dispersion (including molecular diffusion) can transport volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from urban air into shallow groundwater. The gasoline additive methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is of special interest because of its (1) current levels in some urban air, (2) strong partitioning from air into water, (3) resistance to degradation, (4) use as an octane-booster since the 1970s, (5) rapidly increasing use in the 1990s to reduce CO and O3 in urban air, and (6) its frequent detection rat lOW microgram per liter levels in shallow urban groundwater in Denver, New England, and elsewhere. Numerical simulations were conducted using a l-D model domain set in medium sand (depth to water table = 5 m) to provide a test of whether MTBE and other atmospheric VOCs could move to shallow groundwater within the 10-15 y time frame over which MTBE has now been used in large amounts. Degradation and sorption were assumed negligible. In case 1 (no infiltration, steady atmospheric source), 10 y was not long enough to permit significant VOC movement by diffusion into shallow groundwater. Case 2 considered a steady atmospheric source plus 36 cm/y of net infiltration; groundwater at 2 m below the water table became nearly saturated with atmospheric levels of VOC within 5 y. Case 3 was similar to case 2, but considered the source to be seasonal being 'on' for only 5 of 12 months each year, as with the use of MTBE during the winter fuel-oxygenate season; groundwater at 2 m below the water table became equilibrated with 5/12 of the 'source-on' concentration within 5 y. Cases 4 and 5 added an evapotranspiration (ET) loss of 36 cm/y, resulting in no net recharge. Case 4 took the ET from the surface, and case 5 took the ET from the capillary fringe at a depth of 3.5 m. Net VOC mass transfer to shallow groundwater after 5 y was less for both cases 4 and 5 than for case 3. However, it was significantly greater for cases 4 and 5 than for case 1, even though cases 1, 4, add 5 were

  10. NMHC emissions from Asia: sources and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, T.; Blake, D. R.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Chan, J. C.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Takigawa, M.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Recent rapid industrialization and economic growth in Asia changed the industrial structure, land use, and people's lifestyle resulting in a dramatic change in the amount and composition of the gas emissions from Asia. Because emissions can be transported very rapidly once convected to the free troposphere, Asian emissions can affect both local and regional air quality and climate. To access the impact of changing emission from Asia, an airborne observation campaign PEACE (the Pacific Exploration of Asian Continental Emission) phase-A and B were conducted in January and April - May 2002, respectively, sponsored by NASDA (National Space Development Agency of Japan). The concentrations of NMHCs (nonmethanehydrocarbons) and halocarbons were obtained by whole air sampling and subsequent gas chromatography analyses in the laboratory. Quantified onboard the aircraft were CO, CO2, O3, NO, NO2, NOy, H2O, SO2, aerosols, and condensation nuclei. The experiment was conducted in the vicinity of Japan and PEACE-A and B represent the local winter and spring weather conditions. The trace gas distributions in the lower troposphere were often influenced by local pollution (i.e. from Japan, Korea) while those of the long-range transport (i.e. from Europe) were occasionally seen in the upper troposphere. This is confirmed by the airmass age estimation using the ratios of short-lived gases (i.e. C2H4) vs. more stable compounds (i.e. CO). Emissions from China were distinguished using data obtained from ground-based sampling and measurements. Transport from China was seen both in the lower troposphere and upper troposphere. Some case studies on source identification will be discussed.

  11. IMPROVING EMISSIONS ESTIMATES WITH COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, DATABASE EXPANSION, AND COMPREHENSIVE VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an EPA investigation of techniques to improve methods for estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from area sources. Using the automobile refinishing industry for a detailed area source case study, an emission estimation method is being developed...

  12. Toward a Quantitative Assessment of the Influence of Regional Emission Sources on Ozone Production in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Wolfe, D. E.; Tevlin, A.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Fischer, E. V.; Brown, S. S.; Angevine, W. M.; Edwards, P.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Photochemical ozone production results from the oxidation and reaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO). As with many US urban regions, ozone levels observed in the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Region of Colorado are influenced by urban emissions of NOx and VOCs. Despite nationwide decreases in these urban emissions, the Front Range of Colorado is one of the few US locations where ozone is currently increasing. It has also recently gone out of compliance with national ambient air quality standards for ozone during summer months. High ozone in Colorado may result from a number of factors, including long-range transport from Asia, increased influence of biomass burning, population increases, or increased emissions from oil and gas activities. The Front Range is home to the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin, which has recently been experiencing a rise in oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity associated with the increase in non-conventional drilling techniques. The VOC and NOx emissions from O&NG activity in close proximity to the urban area may uniquely influence ozone in this region. This presentation will focus on using reactive nitrogen (NOx, NOy) and ozone measurements from a tall (300 m) tower to study the influence of local emissions on Front Range ozone. The tower is located between the D-J Basin and agricultural areas to the north and the Denver metro area to the south. In-situ reactive nitrogen and ozone measurements were collected using a custom Cavity Ring-Down instrument. Additional CH4, CO, and NH3 measurements from the tower serve as tracers for O&NG, urban, and agricultural emissions. Concurrently measured aircraft data is used to confirm the relationships between the tracer species. This presentation will discuss methods for determining the contributions of different emission sources to Front Range ozone, with a focus on differentiating the influence of urban and O&NG sources.

  13. Endocrine disrupting chemical emissions from combustion sources: diesel particulate emissions and domestic waste open burn emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sukh; Gullett, Brian; Striebich, Richard; Klosterman, Joy; Contreras, Jesse; DeVito, Michael

    Emissions of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from combustion sources are poorly characterized due to the large number of compounds present in the emissions, the complexity of the analytical separations required, and the uncertainty regarding identification of chemicals with endocrine effects. In this work, multidimensional gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) was used to characterize emissions from both controlled (diesel engine) and uncontrolled (open burning of domestic waste) combustion sources. The results of this study suggest that, by using MDGC-MS, one can resolve a much greater percentage of the chromatogram and identify about 84% of these resolved compounds. This increase in resolution helped to identify and quantify various classes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the combustion emissions that had not been identified previously. Significant emissions (when compared to industrial sources) of known EDCs, dioctyl phthalate (over ˜2,500,000 kg year -1) and bisphenol A (over ˜75,000 kg year -1) were estimated from uncontrolled domestic waste burning. Emissions of several suspected EDCs (oxygenated PAHs) were observed in both diesel soot and the uncontrolled domestic waste burn samples. The emission rates of known and suspected EDCs estimated in this study suggest that combustion emissions need to be characterized for EDCs to further assess its importance as a source of EDC exposure.

  14. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  15. Use of On-Site GC/MS Analysis to Distinguish between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    exposure to VOC through VI at sites with contaminated soil or groundwater. In response to these concerns, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency...Presence of Volatile Chemicals: VI is a potential concern at sites with soil or groundwater impacted by volatile chemicals. Corrective action...Screening Criteria: For sites with volatile chemicals in soil or groundwater, most regulatory guidance provides conservative screening criteria for

  16. Using Vapor Phase Tomography to Measure the Spatial Distribution of Vapor Concentrations and Flux for Vadose-zone VOC Sources

    PubMed Central

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated site in Tucson, AZ, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor-phase tomography (VPT) for characterizing the distribution of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) in the vadose zone. A soil vapor extraction (SVE) system has been in operation at the site since 2007. Vapor concentration and vacuum pressure were measured at four different depths in each of four monitoring wells surrounding the extraction well. The test provided a 3D characterization of local vapor concentrations under induced-gradient conditions. Permeability data obtained from analysis of borehole logs were combined with the vapor-concentration data to determine VOC mass flux within the test domain. A region of higher mass flux was identified in the deepest interval of the S-SW section of the domain, indicating the possible location of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results are consistent with the TCE-concentration distribution obtained from sediment coring conducted at the site. In contrast, the results of a standard soil gas survey did not indicate the presence of a zone with greater contaminant mass. These results indicate that the VPT test provided a robust characterization of VOC concentration and flux distribution at the site. PMID:25835545

  17. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uinta Basin, Utah: point sources compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas wells using dry-gas collection, which means dehydration happens at the well, were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. Another large source was the flowback pond near a recently hydraulically re-fractured gas well. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas wells showed that wet gas collection wells compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool and that oil wells compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil wells on average emit heavier compounds than gas wells. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  18. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  19. Source characteristics of Jovian hectometric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Direct confirmation that low-frequency Jovian hectometric (HOM) radio emissions centered near 0 deg central meridian longitude consist of distinct, oppositely polarized northern and southern beams has been achieved using data from the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. Distinct northern and southern beams were observed in the frequency range from approximately 300 kHz to 1 MHz for at least eight Jovian rotations during the Ulysses inbound pass at distances from 100 to 40 R(sub j). The radiation from the two magnetic hemispheres was measured from different Jovigraphic longitudes and magnetic (or centrifugal) latitudes. Observed temporal variations in the radio intensities, with time scales on the order of 30 min, may result either from longitudinal variations of the HOM sources or from longitudinal density variations in the Io plasma torus. Using the URAP direction-finding capabilities and assuming a tilted dipole planetary magnetic field model, the three-dimensional HOM source locations, the L shell through these source locations, and the beam opening angles were independently deduced. The HOM sources were found to originate at approximately 3 R(sub j) and on low L shells (L approximately 4 to 6), with beam opening angles ranging from 10 to 50 deg.

  20. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  1. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  2. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Sindelarova, Katerina; Guenther, Alex

    2016-08-01

    As formaldehyde (HCHO) is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the global scale over 2005-2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM) in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top-down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s) inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top-down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5) and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES). The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 %) in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top-down fire fluxes (30-50 %) are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010), bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011), and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009), whereas generally increased fluxes

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... puncture sealant application spray booth Reduce spray booth HAP (measured as VOC) emissions by at least 95... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  6. DEVELOPING A NO-VOC WOOD TOPCOAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports an evaluation of a new low-VOC (volatile organic compound) wood coating technology, its performance characteristics, and its application and emissions testing. The low-VOC wood coating selected for the project was a two-component, water-based epoxy coating. Poly...

  7. [Evaluation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from household products by small chamber test method].

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto; Obama, Tomoko; Miyagawa, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Jun; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Tokunaga, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Identification and removal/replacement of sources of indoor air pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, are most effective measures to reduce indoor chemical exposures. For instance, formaldehyde emissions from building materials have been successfully decreased by the restrictions on interior finishing materials under the amended Building Standard Low in Japan. This study was performed to estimate quantitatively influence of household products on indoor air quality. VOC emissions were investigated for 51 products including interior materials, bedclothes, stationeries, toys and printed matters by the small chamber test method (JIS A 1901) under the standard conditions of 28 degrees C, 50% relative humidity and 0.5 times/h ventilation. Total VOC (TVOC) emissions from the tablecloth and gloves, both of which were made of polyvinyl chloride, showed the highest emission rates; over 2000 microg/(m2 x h) after 1 day, and then rapidly decreased to less than 500 microg/(m2 x h) in a week. Among stationeries/toys for schoolchildren and infants, jigsaw puzzle and play mat exhibited higher TVOC emission rates (38 and 24 microg/(m2 x h) after 1 day, respectively). As for VOCs emitted from printed matters, high boiling-point compounds (higher than that of n-tridecane) were typically identified along with toluene, xylenes and ethylbenzene. These results revealed that VOC emissions from household products may influence significantly indoor air quality.

  8. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. I: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions tests data at two triethylene glycol units to provide data for comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. (NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas indu...

  9. GLYCOL DEHYDRATOR BTEX AND VOC EMISSIONS TESTING RESULTS AT TWO UNITS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA VOL. II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the collection of emissions test data st two triethylene glycol units to provide data for the comparison to GRI-GLYCalc, a computer program developed to estimate emissions from glycol dehydrators. [NOTE: Glycol dehydrators are used in the natural gas i...

  10. VOC concentration in Taiwan's household drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H W; Chiang, T F; Lo, I I; Lai, J S; Chan, C C; Wang, J D

    1997-12-03

    The objective of this study is to analyze volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in Taiwan's drinking water supply. Focusing on Taiwan's three major metropolitan areas--Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung (in the north, middle and south, respectively)--171 samples were taken from tap water and 68 from boiled water. Tests showed VOC concentrations were highest in Kaohsiung. This is due to different water sources and methods of treatment. Except for bromoform, trihalomethane (THM) concentrations were highest. Detection rates of toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane were slightly higher than other VOC compounds. VOC concentrations decreased significantly after water was boiled. THMs had a removal rate from 61% to 82%. The authors conclude that the three metropolitan areas contain significantly different levels of VOCs and that boiling can significantly reduce the presence of VOCs. Other sources of pollution that contaminate drinking water such as industrial plants and gas stations must be further investigated.

  11. Impacts of seasonal and regional variability in biogenic VOC emissions on surface ozone in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    SciTech Connect

    Situ, S.; Guenther, Alex B.; Wang, X. J.; Jiang, X.; Turnipseed, A.; Wu, Z.; Bai, J.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-05

    In this study, the BVOC emissions in November 2010 over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China have been estimated by the latest version of a Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission model (MEGAN v2.1). The evaluation of MEGAN performance at a representative forest site within this region indicates MEGAN can estimate BVOC emissions reasonably well in this region except overestimating isoprene emission in autumn for reasons that are discussed in this manuscript. Along with the output from MEGAN, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to estimate the impacts of BVOC emissions on surface ozone in the PRD region. The results show BVOC emissions increase the daytime ozone peak by *3 ppb on average, and the max hourly impacts of BVOC emissions on the daytime ozone peak is 24.8 ppb. Surface ozone mixing ratios in the central area of Guangzhou- Foshan and the western Jiangmen are most sensitive to BVOC emissions BVOCs from outside and central PRD influence the central area of Guangzhou-Foshan and the western Jiangmen significantly while BVOCs from rural PRD mainly influence the western Jiangmen. The impacts of BVOC emissions on surface ozone differ in different PRD cities, and the impact varies in different seasons. Foshan and Jiangmen being most affected in autumn, result in 6.0 ppb and 5.5 ppb increases in surface ozone concentrations, while Guangzhou and Huizhou become more affected in summer. Three additional experiments concerning the sensitivity of surface ozone to MEGAN input variables show that surface ozone is more sensitive to landcover change, followed by emission factors and meteorology.

  12. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  13. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  14. Evaluation of low-VOC latex paints

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Fortmann, R.C.; Roache, N.F.; Lao, H.C.

    1999-11-01

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that the VOC contents of all four paints are considerably lower than those of conventional latex paints. Low-VOC emissions were confirmed by small chamber emission tests. However, sigificant emissions of several aldehydes, especially formaldehyde, were detected from two of the paints. ASTM methods were used to evaluate the hiding power, scrubbability, washability, dry to touch, and yellowing index. The results indicated that one of the low-VOC paints tested showed performance equivalent or superior to that of a widely used conventional latex paint used as a control. It was concluded that low-VOC latex paint can be a viable option to replace conventional latex paints for prevention of indoor air pollution. However, paints marketed as low-VOC may still have significant emissions of some individual VOCs, and some may not have performance characteristics matching those of conventional latex paints.

  15. Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-08-19

    Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

  16. Emissions of volatile organic compounds during the decomposition of plant litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Christopher M.; Monson, Russell K.; Fierer, Noah

    2010-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted during plant litter decomposition, and such VOCs can have wide-ranging impacts on atmospheric chemistry, terrestrial biogeochemistry, and soil ecology. However, we currently have a limited understanding of the relative importance of biotic versus abiotic sources of these VOCs and whether distinct types of litter emit different types and quantities of VOCs during decomposition. We analyzed VOCs emitted by microbes or by abiotic mechanisms during the decomposition of litter from 12 plant species in a laboratory experiment using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Net emissions from litter with active microbial populations (non-sterile litters) were between 0 and 11 times higher than emissions from sterile controls over a 20-d incubation period, suggesting that abiotic sources of VOCs are generally less important than biotic sources. In all cases, the sterile and non-sterile litter treatments emitted different types of VOCs, with methanol being the dominant VOC emitted from litters during microbial decomposition, accounting for 78 to 99% of the net emissions. We also found that the types of VOCs released during biotic decomposition differed in a predictable manner among litter types with VOC profiles also changing as decomposition progressed over time. These results show the importance of incorporating both the biotic decomposition of litter and the species-dependent differences in terrestrial vegetation into global VOC emission models.

  17. EVALUATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of four commercially available low-VOC (volatile organic compound) latex paints as substitutes for conventional latex paints by assessing both their emission characteristics and their performance as coatings. Bulk analysis indicated that ...

  18. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  19. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  20. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  1. 40 CFR 60.562-2 - Standards: Equipment leaks of VOC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from the Polymer Manufacturing Industry § 60.562-2 Standards... determination of equivalency for any means of emission limitation that achieves a reduction in emissions of VOC at least equivalent to the reduction in emissions of VOC achieved by the controls required in...

  2. Constraining Emission Models of Luminous Blazar Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Stawarz, Lukasz; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Many luminous blazars which are associated with quasar-type active galactic nuclei display broad-band spectra characterized by a large luminosity ratio of their high-energy ({gamma}-ray) and low-energy (synchrotron) spectral components. This large ratio, reaching values up to 100, challenges the standard synchrotron self-Compton models by means of substantial departures from the minimum power condition. Luminous blazars have also typically very hard X-ray spectra, and those in turn seem to challenge hadronic scenarios for the high energy blazar emission. As shown in this paper, no such problems are faced by the models which involve Comptonization of radiation provided by a broad-line-region, or dusty molecular torus. The lack or weakness of bulk Compton and Klein-Nishina features indicated by the presently available data favors production of {gamma}-rays via up-scattering of infrared photons from hot dust. This implies that the blazar emission zone is located at parsec-scale distances from the nucleus, and as such is possibly associated with the extended, quasi-stationary reconfinement shocks formed in relativistic outflows. This scenario predicts characteristic timescales for flux changes in luminous blazars to be days/weeks, consistent with the variability patterns observed in such systems at infrared, optical and {gamma}-ray frequencies. We also propose that the parsec-scale blazar activity can be occasionally accompanied by dissipative events taking place at sub-parsec distances and powered by internal shocks and/or reconnection of magnetic fields. These could account for the multiwavelength intra-day flares occasionally observed in powerful blazars sources.

  3. Manipulation of VOC emissions with methyl jasmonate and carrageenan in the evergreen conifer Pinus sylvestris and evergreen broadleaf Quercus ilex.

    PubMed

    Semiz, G; Blande, J D; Heijari, J; Işik, K; Niinemets, U; Holopainen, J K

    2012-03-01

    Plant defence can be induced by exposing plants to the plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) or its volatile ester, methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Carrageenans (Carr) - sulphated D-galactans extracted from red algae - can also induce plant defences. In this study, the effects of exogenous MeJA and Carr application (concentration 300 and 12.7 μmol, respectively) on volatile emissions from two widespread evergreen woody species, Pinus sylvestris (nine Turkish and one Finnish provenance) and Quercus ilex (Italian provenance) were investigated. We collected headspace samples from seedlings and analysed the quality and quantity of volatile compounds emitted by treated and control plants. In total, 19 monoterpenes, 10 sesquiterpenes, 10 green leaf volatiles (GLVs) and two aromatic compounds were emitted by P. sylvestris from all the provenances studied. Foliar MeJA application clearly affected the volatile profiles of trees from all the provenances. Effects of Carr were genotype specific. In Q. ilex, emissions of sesquiterpenes, GLVs and the homoterpene (E)-DMNT were all induced by MeJA application. However, emissions of most constitutively emitted monoterpenes were significantly reduced. Carr application also led to a significant reduction in monoterpene emissions, but without corresponding increases in other emissions. Our results indicate that exogenously applied MeJA and Carr can both significantly modify the volatile profiles of P. sylvestris and Q. ilex, but also that there are important provenance- and species-specific differences in the overall degree of elicitation and compositions of elicited compounds.

  4. Road-network-Based spatial allocation of on-road mobile source emissions in the Pearl River Delta region, China, and comparisons with population-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Che, Wenwei; Wang, Xuemei; Louie, Peter; Zhong, Liuju

    2009-12-01

    Gridded air pollutant emission inventories are prerequisites for using air quality models to assess air pollution control strategies and predict air quality. A precise gridded emission inventory will help improve the accuracy of air quality simulation. Mobile source emissions are one of the major contributors to volatile organic compound (VOC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) pollutants, the precursors of ozone formation. However, because of the complexity of road networks and variations in traffic flows at different road types and locations, spatial allocation of emissions from mobile sources into grid cells is challenging. This paper proposes a new methodological framework, named as "the road-network-based approach," for spatially allocating regional mobile source emission inventories. The new approach utilizes the Geographic Information System (GIS)-based road network information and road-types-based traffic flow data to provide spatial surrogates for allocating Pearl River Delta (PRD) regional mobile source emission inventories. The results show that the new approach provides reasonable spatial distributions of mobile source emissions, and the distributions are in good agreement with PRD regional on-road emission line sources. Comparisons between using the population-based and the new road-network-based approaches are made. The air quality modeling results indicate that the new approach can obviously improve model predictions with increasing accuracy in mobile source emission allocations. Means of choosing appropriate approaches for spatially allocating regional mobile source emissions are discussed.

  5. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  6. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-21

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for "green" buildings and the use of "environmentally friendly" products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m³, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates. PMID:28117727

  8. Comparison of emissions from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Nelson, D. D.; Trimborn, A. M.; Dunlea, E.; Knighton, W. B.; Mendoza, A.; Allen, D. T.; Kolb, C. E.; Molina, M. J.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to estimate due to the large number of parameters affecting the emissions variability within and across vehicles types. The MCMA-2003 Campaign in Mexico City has showed the utility of using a mobile laboratory to sample and characterize specific classes of motor vehicles to better quantify their emissions characteristics as a function of their driving cycles. The technique clearly identifies "high emitter" vehicles via individual exhaust plumes, and also provides fleet average emission rates. We have applied this technique to Mexicali during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program (BORAQIP) for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005. We analyze the variability of measured emission ratios for emitted NOx, CO, specific VOCs, NH3, and some primary fine particle components and properties by deploying a mobile laboratory in roadside stationary sampling, chase and fleet average operational sampling modes. The measurements reflect various driving modes characteristic of the urban fleets. The observed variability for all measured gases and particle emission ratios is greater for the chase and roadside stationary sampling than for fleet average measurements. The fleet average sampling mode captured the effects of traffic conditions on the measured on-road emission ratios, allowing the use of fuel-based emission ratios to assess the validity of traditional "bottom-up" emissions inventories. Using the measured on-road emission ratios, we estimate CO and NOx mobile emissions of 175±62 and 10.4±1.3 metric tons/day, respectively, for the gasoline vehicle fleet in Mexicali. Comparisons with similar on-road emissions data from Mexico City indicated that fleet average NO emission ratios were around 20% higher in Mexicali than in Mexico City

  9. Comparison of emission ratios from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.

    2008-04-01

    Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to estimate due to the large number of parameters affecting the emissions variability within and across vehicles types. The MCMA-2003 Campaign in Mexico City has showed the utility of using a mobile laboratory to sample and characterize specific classes of motor vehicles to better quantify their emissions characteristics as a function of their driving cycles. The technique clearly identifies "high emitter" vehicles via individual exhaust plumes, and also provides fleet average emission rates. We have applied this technique to Mexicali during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005. In this paper we analyze the variability of measured emission ratios for emitted NOx, CO, specific VOCs, NH3, and some primary fine particle components and properties obtained during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005 by deploying a mobile laboratory in roadside stationary sampling, chase and fleet average operational sampling modes. The measurements reflect various driving modes characteristic of the urban fleets. The observed variability for all measured gases and particle emission ratios is greater for the chase and roadside stationary sampling than for fleet average measurements. The fleet average sampling mode captured the effects of traffic conditions on the measured on-road emission ratios, allowing the use of fuel-based emission ratios to assess the validity of traditional "bottom-up" emissions inventories. Using the measured on-road emission ratios, we estimate CO and NOx mobile emissions of 175±62 and 10.4±1.3 metric tons/day, respectively, for the gasoline vehicle fleet in Mexicali. Comparisons with similar on-road emissions data

  10. Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindelarova, K.; Granier, C.; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, A.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

    2014-09-01

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission data set of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980-2010. This data set, developed under the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project (MACC), is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg (C) yr-1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2%. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of up to ±17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for a sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene inventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the data sets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene, α-pinene and group of monoterpenes showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements at sites located in tropical forests in the Amazon and Malaysia. The model was able to capture the seasonal variation of isoprene emissions in the Amazon forest.

  11. Compost spreading in Mediterranean shrubland indirectly increases biogenic emissions by promoting growth of VOC-emitting plant parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Romain; Lavoir, Anne-Violette; Ormeño, Elena; Mouillot, Florent; Greff, Stéphane; Lecareux, Caroline; Staudt, Michael; Fernandez, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effect of sewage sludge compost spreading on plant growth and leaf terpene emissions and content of Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis and Cistus albidus in a Mediterranean shrubland. Measurements were performed during 3 consecutive summers on 2 different plots treated in 2002 or 2007 with 50 or 100 tons of compost per hectare, corresponding to observations carried out 2 months to 7 years after spreading. A slight nutrient enrichment of soil and leaves ( R. officinalis and C. albidus) was observed, especially for phosphorous. Terpene emissions were not affected by compost spreading, although they tended to increase on treated plots after 6 and 7 years for R. officinalis and C. albidus respectively. Terpene content was not affected by any compost treatment. Leaf and stem growth were significantly enhanced by compost spreading after 2 and/or 7 years in all species with little difference between doses. Total leaf biomass on the last growth units was increased by more than 50% in C. albidus and more than 90% in Q. coccifera. The results suggest that compost spreading in Meditteranean shrublands has no or little direct effect on leaf terpene emissions, but indirectly leads to their increase through leaf biomass enhancement. Simulation of terpene emissions at stand level revealed an increase of terpene fluxes ranging between 6 and 13%, depending on the plant species. Overall, compost spreading was assessed to result in an emission rate of 1.1 kg ha -1 y -1 for a typical Q. coccifera shrubland, but can reach 2.6 kg ha -1 y -1 for a typical R. officinalis shrubland.

  12. RESEARCH ON EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION OF POP'S FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chapter summarizes EPA's research on emissions and control of persistent organic pollutants (POPS) from combustion sources, with emphasis on source characterization and measurement, formation and destruction mechanisms, formation prevention, and flue gas cleaning. Laboratory exp...

  13. The fractionation factors of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios for VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, some of which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic. VOCs in ambient air originate from many sources, including vehicle exhausts, gasoline evaporation, solvent use, natural gas emissions, and industrial processes, and undergo intricate chemical reactions in the atmosphere. To develop efficient air pollution remediation strategies, it is important to clearly identify the emission sources and elucidate the reaction mechanisms in the atmosphere. Recently, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of VOCs in some sources and ambient air have been measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). In this study, we measured δ13C and stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of atmospheric VOCs by using the gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with a thermal desorption instrument (TD-GC/TC/IRMS). The wider δD differences between sources were found in comparison with the δ13C studies. Therefore, determining δD values of VOCs in ambient air is potentially useful in identifying VOC sources and their reactive behavior in the atmosphere. However, to elucidate the sources and behavior of atmospheric VOCs more accurately, isotopic fractionation during atmospheric reaction must be considered. In this study, we determined isotopic fractionation of the δ13C and δD values for the atmospheric some VOCs under irradiation conditions. As the results, δ13C for target all VOCs and δD for most VOCs were increasing after irradiation. But, the δD values for both benzene and toluene tended to decrease as irradiation time increased. We also estimated the fractionation factors for benzene and toluene, 1.27 and 1.05, respectively, which differed from values determined in previous studies. In summary, we were able to identify an inverse isotope effect for the δD values of benzene and toluene

  14. Comparison of seasonal phenol and p-cresol emissions from ground-level area sources in a dairy operation in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Borhan, M S; Capareda, S; Mukhtar, S; Faulkner, W B; McGee, R; Parnell, C B

    2012-04-01

    Although there are more than 200 odor-causing volatile organic compounds (VOCs), phenol and p-cresol are two prominent odor-causing VOCs found downwind from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The VOC emissions from cattle and dairy production are difficult to quantify accurately because of their low concentrations, spatial variability, and limitations of available instruments. To quantify VOCs, a protocol following US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method TO-14A has been established based on the isolation flux chamber method and a portable gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a purge-and-trap system. The general objective of this research was to quantify phenol and p-cresol emission rates (ERs) from different ground-level area sources (GLASs) in a free-stall dairy during summer and winter seasons using this protocol. Two-week-long sampling campaigns were conducted in a dairy operation in central Texas. Twenty-nine air samples were collected during winter and 37 samples were collected during summer from six specifically delineated GLASs (barn, loafing pen, lagoon, settling basin, silage pile, and walkway) at the free-stall dairy. Thirteen VOCs were identified during the sampling period and the GC was calibrated for phenol and p-cresol, the primary odorous VOCs identified. The overall calculated ERs for phenol and p-cresol were 2656 +/- 728 and 763 +/- 212 mg hd(-1) day(-1), respectively, during winter. Overall phenol and p-cresol ERs were calculated to be 1183 +/- 361 and 551 +/- 214 mg hd(-1) day(-1), respectively, during summer. In general, overall phenol and p-cresol ERs during winter were about 2.3 and 1.4 times, respectively, higher than those during summer.

  15. Unspeciated Organic Emissions From Combustion Sources And Their Influence On The Secondary Organic Aerosol Budget In The United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, S.; Gordon, T.; Hennigan, C. J.; Pye, H. O.; Donahue, N. M.; Adams, P. J.; Robinson, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Combustion sources are a major source of organic emissions and therefore a potentially important source for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere. Although speciated organic emissions from combustion sources are considered in models to form SOA, a large fraction of the organics are unspeciated. In this work, we analyze data from numerous smog chamber experiments, which photo-oxidized dilute emissions from different combustion sources (on-road gasoline vehicles, aircraft, on-road diesel vehicles, wood burning and open biomass burning), to determine the contribution that unspeciated emissions make to SOA formation. An SOA model based on speciated organics is able to explain, on average, 8-31% of the SOA measured in the experiments. We hypothesize that the remainder results from the gas-phase oxidation of unspeciated emissions, which account on average for 25-75% of the non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. Using the SOA data, we develop, for the first time, source-specific parameterizations to model SOA from unspeciated emissions; all sources seem to have median SOA yields similar to large n-alkanes (C12+). To assess the influence of unspeciated emissions on SOA formation regionally, we use the parameterization to predict SOA production in the United States. Using emissions data collected during the smog chamber experiments and data available in literature, we build a gross inventory for unspeciated emissions in the United States. We discover that unspeciated organics might be included in the current generation of SOA models but misallocated in terms of its SOA potential. The top six combustion sources (on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, open biomass and wood burning) emit 2.61 Tg yr-1 of unspeciated emissions (20% of US anthropogenic VOC emissions from combustion sources) and are estimated to form a minimum of 0.68 Tg yr-1 of SOA; the estimate is a third of the biogenic SOA produced in the US. We predict that accounting for

  16. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  17. Emission inventory of non-methane volatile organic compounds from anthropogenic sources in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Goel, Anju; Gupta, Divya; Kumar, Atul; Mishra, Arabinda; Kundu, Seema; Chatani, Satoru; Klimont, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a new inventory of NMVOC emissions from anthropogenic sources in India for the year 2010. The main new element of this inventory, compared to previous work for India, is the use of new and more detailed data on solvent use sectors and oil production and distribution system. The results are presented at the national and state level for major sectors and VOC species. Finally, the annual emissions were spatially distributed at a fine resolution of 36 × 36 km2 using detailed spatial information. The total anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in India in 2010 were estimated at 9.81 Tg which is in the range of the estimates made in most other studies. The majority of emissions (60%) originated from residential combustion of biomass for cooking. Solvent use sectors and oil production and distribution contributed about 20% followed by transport (12%) and open burning of agricultural residues (7%). Specie-wise distribution shows highest contribution from alkenes and alkynes (38%), followed by alkanes (22%), and aromatics (16%).

  18. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents such as this to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with epichlorohydrin. Its intended audience includes Federal, State and local air pollution personnel and others interested in locating potential emitters of epichlorohydrin in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. This document presents information on 1) the types of sources that may emit epichlorohydrin; 2) process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources; and 3) available emissions information indicating the potential for epichlorohydrin release into the air from each operation.

  19. Area Source Emission Measurements Using EPA OTM 10

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of air pollutant emissions from area and non-point sources is an emerging environmental concern. Due to the spatial extent and non-homogenous nature of these sources, assessment of fugitive emissions using point sampling techniques can be difficult. To help address th...

  20. Source sampling of particulate matter emissions from cotton harvesting - System field testing and emission factor development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission factors are used in the air pollution regulatory process to quantify the mass of pollutants emitted from a source. Accurate emission factors must be used in the air pollution regulatory process to ensure fair and appropriate regulation for all sources. Agricultural sources, including cotton...

  1. Statistics of Isolated Emission Sources in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, C.; Hanuschik, R.

    The strong emission lines in cataclysmic variables are the primary source of information on physical parameters of and the accretion process in these systems. Many examples show that the lines are composed not only from (symmetrical) disc emission, but that additional contribution is provided by isolated, i.e. asymmetric emission sources, distorting the original line profile. In this paper, we study the distribution of these additional components with several system parameters.

  2. Registration for the Hanford Site: Sources of radioactive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    This Registration Application serves to renew the registration for all Hanford Site sources of radioactive air emissions routinely reported to the State of Washington Department of Health (DOH). The current registration expires on August 15, 1993. The Application is submitted pursuant to the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246--247, and is consistent with guidance provided by DOH for renewal. The Application subdivides the Hanford Site into six major production, processing or research areas. Those six areas are in the 100 Area, 200 East Area, 200 West Area, 300 Area, 400 Area, and 600 Area. Each major group of point sources within the six areas listed above is represented by a Source Registration for Radioactive Air Emissions form. Annual emissions. for the sources are listed in the ``Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site,`` published annually. It is a requirement that the following Statement of Compliance be provided: ``The radioactive air emissions from the above sources do meet the emissions standards contained in Chapter 173-480-040 WAC, Ambient Air Quality Standards and Emissions Limits for Radionuclides. As the Statement of Compliance pertains to this submittal, the phrase ``above sources`` is to be understood as meaning the combined air emissions from all sources registered by this submittal.

  3. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25-30 % of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60 % of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5 % (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58 % of all diesel BC in Russia.

  4. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25–30% of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60% of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5% (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58% of all diesel BC in Russia.

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Humans Indoors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaochen; Misztal, Pawel K; Nazaroff, William W; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-12-06

    Research on the sources of indoor airborne chemicals has traditionally focused on outdoor air, building materials, furnishings, and activities such as smoking, cooking, and cleaning. Relatively little research has examined the direct role of occupant emissions, even though this source clearly contributes to indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and influences indoor chemistry. In this work, we quantify occupant-related gaseous VOC emissions in a university classroom using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Time-resolved concentrations of VOCs in room air and supply air were measured continuously during occupied and unoccupied periods. The emission factor for each human-emitted VOC was determined by dividing the occupant-associated source rate by the corresponding occupancy. Among the most abundant species detected were compounds associated with personal care products. Also prominent were human metabolic emissions, such as isoprene, methanol, acetone, and acetic acid. Additional sources included human skin oil oxidation by ozone, producing compounds such as 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO). By mass, human-emitted VOCs were the dominant source (57%) during occupied periods in a well-ventilated classroom, with ventilation supply air the second most important (35%), and indoor nonoccupant emissions the least (8%). The total occupant-associated VOC emission factor was 6.3 mg h(-1) per person.

  6. The Sensitivity of U.S. Surface Ozone Formation to NOx, and VOCs as Viewed from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Sillman, Sanford; Retscher, Christian; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Martin, Randall V.; Celarier, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated variations in the sensitivity of surface ozone formation in summer to precursor species concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) as inferred from the ratio of tropospheric columns of formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The data indicate that ozone formation became: 1. more sensitive to NO(x) over most of the U.S, from 2005 to 2007 because of substantial decreases in NO(x) emissions primarily from stationary sources, and 2. more sensitive to NO(x) with increasing temperature, in part because emissions of highly reactive, biogenic isoprene increase with temperature, thus increasing the total VOC reactivity. Based on our interpretation of the data, current strategies implemented to reduce unhealthy levels of surface ozone should focus more on reducing NO(x) emissions, except in some downtown areas which have historically benefited from reductions in VOC emissions.

  7. World Calibration Center for VOC (WCC-VOC), a new Facility for the WMO-GAW-Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.-

    2002-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are recognized to be important precursors of tropospheric ozone as well as other oxidants and organic aerosols. In order to design effective control measures for the reduction of photooxidants, photochemical processes have to be understood and the sources of the precursors known. Reliable and representative measurements of VOCs are necessary to describe the anthropogenic and biogenic sources, to follow the photochemical degradation of VOCs in the troposphere. Measurement of VOCs is of key importance for the understanding of tropospheric chemistry. Tropospheric VOCs have been one of the recommended measurements to be made within the GAW programme. The purpose will be to monitor their atmospheric abundance, to characterize the various compounds with regard to anthropogenic and biogenic sources and to evaluate their role in the tropospheric ozone formation process. An international WMO/GAW panel of experts for VOC measurements developed the rational and objectives for this GAW activity and recommended the configuration and required activities of the WCC-VOC. In reflection of the complexity of VOC measurements and the current status of measurement technology, a "staged" approach was adopted. Stage 1 measurements: C2-C9 hydrocarbons, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and monocyclics. (The WCC-VOC operates currently under this mode). Stage 2 measurements: C10-C14 hydrocarbons, including higher homologs of the Stage 1 set as well as biogenic hydrocarbon compounds. Stage 3 measurements: Oxygenated VOCs, including alcohols, carbonyls, carboxylic acids. The Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centre (QA/SAC) Germany currently has established the World Calibration Centre for VOC (WCC-VOC). The WCC-VOC has operated in the research mode und has become operational recently. From now on, the WCC-VOC conducts one round-robin calibration audit per year at all global stations that measure VOCs and assists other stations in setting up VOC

  8. Guidance for State Rules for Optional Federally-Enforceable Emissions Limits Based on Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Use

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. Odor and VOC Emissions from Pan Frying of Mackerel at Three Stages: Raw, Well-Done, and Charred

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong-Hyeon; Szulejko, Jan E.; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Won

    2014-01-01

    Many classes of odorants and volatile organic compounds that are deleterious to our wellbeing can be emitted from diverse cooking activities. Once emitted, they can persist in our living space for varying durations. In this study, various volatile organic compounds released prior to and during the pan frying of fish (mackerel) were analyzed at three different cooking stages (stage 1 = raw (R), stage 2 = well-done (W), and stage 3 = overcooked/charred (O)). Generally, most volatile organic compounds recorded their highest concentration levels at stage 3 (O), e.g., 465 (trimethylamine) and 106 ppb (acetic acid). In contrast, at stage 2 (W), the lowest volatile organic compounds emissions were observed. The overall results of this study confirm that trimethylamine is identified as the strongest odorous compound, especially prior to cooking (stage 1 (R)) and during overcooking leading to charring (stage 3 (O)). As there is a paucity of research effort to measure odor intensities from pan frying of mackerel, this study will provide valuable information regarding the management of indoor air quality. PMID:25405596

  10. Odor and VOC emissions from pan frying of mackerel at three stages: raw, well-done, and charred.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Hyeon; Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Won

    2014-11-14

    Many classes of odorants and volatile organic compounds that are deleterious to our wellbeing can be emitted from diverse cooking activities. Once emitted, they can persist in our living space for varying durations. In this study, various volatile organic compounds released prior to and during the pan frying of fish (mackerel) were analyzed at three different cooking stages (stage 1 = raw (R), stage 2 = well-done (W), and stage 3 = overcooked/charred (O)). Generally, most volatile organic compounds recorded their highest concentration levels at stage 3 (O), e.g., 465 (trimethylamine) and 106 ppb (acetic acid). In contrast, at stage 2 (W), the lowest volatile organic compounds emissions were observed. The overall results of this study confirm that trimethylamine is identified as the strongest odorous compound, especially prior to cooking (stage 1 (R)) and during overcooking leading to charring (stage 3 (O)). As there is a paucity of research effort to measure odor intensities from pan frying of mackerel, this study will provide valuable information regarding the management of indoor air quality.

  11. Indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment in a multistorey shopping mall by high-spatial-resolution monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    PubMed

    Amodio, M; Dambruoso, P R; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Gennaro, L; Loiotile, A Demarinis; Marzocca, A; Stasi, F; Trizio, L; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess indoor air quality (IAQ), two 1-week monitoring campaigns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were performed in different areas of a multistorey shopping mall. High-spatial-resolution monitoring was conducted at 32 indoor sites located in two storehouses and in different departments of a supermarket. At the same time, VOC concentrations were monitored in the mall and parking lot area as well as outdoors. VOC were sampled at 48-h periods using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption. The samples were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data analysis and chromatic maps indicated that the two storehouses had the highest VOC concentrations consisting principally of terpenes. These higher TVOC concentrations could be a result of the low efficiency of the air exchange and intake systems, as well as the large quantity of articles stored in these small spaces. Instead, inside the supermarket, the food department was the most critical area for VOC concentrations. To identify potential emission sources in this department, a continuous VOC analyzer was used. The findings indicated that the highest total VOC concentrations were present during cleaning activities and that these activities were carried out frequently in the food department. The study highlights the importance of conducting both high-spatial-resolution monitoring and high-temporal-resolution monitoring. The former was able to identify critical issues in environments with a complex emission scenario while the latter was useful in interpreting the dynamics of each emission source.

  12. [Evaluation and selection of VOCs treatment technologies in packaging and printing industry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Lin; Wang, Jun-Hui; Zhu, Chun-Lei; Nie, Lei; Hao, Zheng-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in urban air pollution. Activities of industries including the packaging and printing industries are regarded as the major sources. How to select the suitable treating techniques is the major problem for emission control. In this article, based on the VOCs emission characteristics of the packaging and printing industry and the existing treatment technologies, using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model, an evaluation system for VOCs selection was established and all the technologies used for treatment were assessed. It showed that the priority selection was in the following order: Carbon Fiber Adsorption-Desorption > Granular Carbon Adsorption-Desorption > Thermal Combustion > Regenerative Combustion > Catalytic combustion > Rotary adsorption-concentration and combustion > Granular Carbon adsorption-concentration and combustion. Carbon Fiber Adsorption-Desorption was selected as the best available technology due to its highest weight among those technologies.

  13. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    in the environment (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [USEPA], 2008). Differences in the isotopic ratio measured in organic contaminants present in... environmental samples can be used to 1) distinguish between different sources of the contaminants , and 2) understand biodegradation and other...isotopic ratio measured in organic contaminants present in environmental samples can be used to: 1) distinguish between different sources of the

  14. 40 CFR 60.634 - Alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Leaks of VOC From Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants. § 60.634 Alternative means of emission... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved under... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved...

  15. 40 CFR 60.634 - Alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Equipment Leaks of VOC From Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants § 60.634 Alternative means of emission... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved under... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved...

  16. 40 CFR 60.634 - Alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Equipment Leaks of VOC From Onshore Natural Gas Processing Plants. § 60.634 Alternative means of emission... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved under... a reduction in VOC emissions at least equivalent to the reduction in VOC emissions achieved...

  17. Characterization of emissions from combustion sources: controlled studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes Session I papers (given at the EPA Workshop on Characterization of Contaminant Emissions from Indoor Sources, Chapel Hill, NC, May 1985) that illustrate the progress made to date on characterizing indoor-combustion emissions from unvented space heaters, gas appliances, and sidestream cigarette smoke. The state of knowledge of such emissions and their controllability is summarized by four general statements: (1) Unvented gas-fired appliances are important sources of indoor CO and NOx, but not of organic emissions; (2) Important combustion sources of indoor organics, include smoking and possibly kerosene heaters; (3) The extent of the problems of leakage from vented appliances is simply not known; (4) Indoor combustion sources do not appear to present major problems with controllability, if source removal is an acceptable alternative. From an engineering standpoint, the most-challenging issue is burner design changes for unvented appliances.

  18. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    standardization with NIST-traceable radon sources. These results are for application of naturally-occurring radon as a tracer of soil vapor...standardization with NIST-traceable radon sources. These results are for application of naturally-occurring radon as a tracer of soil vapor intrusion, but are...tracer of soil vapor intrusion, but are not intended for evaluation of radon hazards. Results corrected to in situ pressure as noted above Note

  19. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  20. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; ...

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. Amore » well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.« less

  1. A small, lightweight multipollutant sensor system for ground-mobile and aerial emission sampling from open area sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaochi; Aurell, Johanna; Mitchell, William; Tabor, Dennis; Gullett, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Characterizing highly dynamic, transient, and vertically lofted emissions from open area sources poses unique measurement challenges. This study developed and applied a multipollutant sensor and time-integrated sampler system for use on mobile applications such as vehicles, tethered balloons (aerostats) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to determine emission factors. The system is particularly applicable to open area sources, such as forest fires, due to its light weight (3.5 kg), compact size (6.75 L), and internal power supply. The sensor system, termed "Kolibri", consists of sensors measuring CO2 and CO, and samplers for particulate matter (PM) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Kolibri is controlled by a microcontroller which can record and transfer data in real time through a radio module. Selection of the sensors was based on laboratory testing for accuracy, response delay and