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Sample records for warping extra dimensions

  1. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  2. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  3. Low-scale warped extra dimension and its predilection for multiple top quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon; Wells, James D.

    2010-11-01

    Within warped extra dimension models that explain flavor through geometry, flavor changing neutral current constraints generally force the Kaluza-Klein scale to be above many TeV. This creates tension with a natural electroweak scale. On the other hand, a much lower scale compatible with precision electroweak and flavor changing neutral current constraints is allowed if we decouple the Kaluza-Klein states of Standard Model gauge bosons from light fermions ( c light ≃ c b ≃ 0 .5 bulk mass parameters). The main signature for this approach is four top quark production via the Kaluza-Klein excitations’ strong coupling to top quarks. We study single lepton, like-sign dilepton, and trilepton observables of four-top events at the Large Hadron Collider. The like-sign dilepton signature typically has the largest discovery potential for a strongly coupled right-handed top case ( M KK ˜ 2 - 2 .5 TeV), while single lepton is the better when the left-handed top couples most strongly ( M KK ˜ 2 TeV). We also describe challenging lepton-jet collimation issues in the like-sign dilepton and trilepton channels. An alternative single lepton observable is considered which takes advantage of the many bottom quarks in the final state. Although searches of other particles may compete, we find that four top production via Kaluza-Klein gluons is most promising in a large region of this parameter space.

  4. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE PAGES

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; ...

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS 5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as amore » consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y * of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y *, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  5. Dirac neutrinos with S4 flavor symmetry in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2013-11-01

    We present a warped extra dimension model with the custodial symmetry SU(2×SU(2×U(1×PLR based on the flavor symmetry S4×Z2×Z2', and the neutrinos are taken to be Dirac particles. At leading order, the democratic lepton mixing is derived exactly, and the high-dimensional operators introduce corrections of order λc to all the three lepton mixing angles such that agreement with the experimental data can be achieved. The neutrino mass spectrum is predicted to be of the inverted hierarchy and the second octant of θ23 is preferred. We suggest the modified democratic mixing, which is obtained by permuting the second and the third rows of the democratic mixing matrix, should be a good first order approximation to understanding sizable θ13 and the first octant of θ23. The constraints on the model from the electroweak precision measurements are discussed. Furthermore, we investigate the lepton mixing patterns for all the possible residual symmetries Gν and Gl in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors, respectively. For convenience, we work in the base in which m≡mlml† is diagonal, where ml is the charged lepton mass matrix. It is easy to see that the symmetry transformation matrix Gl, which is determined by the condition Gl†mGl=m, is a diagonal and non-degenerate 3×3 phase matrix. In the case that neutrinos are Majorana particles, the light neutrino mass matrix for DC mixing is of the form mνDC=UDC*diag(m1,m2,m3)UDC†. The symmetry transformations Gi, which satisfy GiTmνDCGi=mνDC, are determined to be G1=+u1u1†-u2u2†-u3u3†, G2=-u1u1†+u2u2†-u3u3† and G3=-u1u1†-u2u2†+u3u3† besides the identity transformation, where ui is the ith column of UDC. They satisfy Gi2=1, GiGj=GjGi=Gk(i≠j≠k). Consequently the symmetry group of the neutrino mass matrix mνDC is the Klein four group K4≅Z2×Z2. Denoting the underlying family symmetry group at high energies as G, then the symmetry transformations Gl and Gi should be the elements of G. In the

  6. Bouncing cosmology from warped extra dimensional scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashmita; Maity, Debaprasad; Paul, Tanmoy; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2017-12-01

    From the perspective of four dimensional effective theory on a two brane warped geometry model, we examine the possibility of "bouncing phenomena"on our visible brane. Our results reveal that the presence of a warped extra dimension lead to a non-singular bounce on the brane scale factor and hence can remove the "big-bang singularity". We also examine the possible parametric regions for which this bouncing is possible.

  7. Editorial: Focus on Extra Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Pomarol, Alex

    2010-07-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have just started. In addition to verifying the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, these experiments will probe a new energy frontier and test extensions of the SM. The existence of extra dimensions is one of the most attractive possibilities for physics beyond the SM. This focus issue contains a collection of articles addressing both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of extra-dimensional models. Focus on Extra Space Dimensions Contents Minimal universal extra dimensions in CalcHEP/CompHEP AseshKrishna Datta, Kyoungchul Kong and Konstantin T Matchev Disordered extra dimensions Karim Benakli Codimension-2 brane-bulk matching: examples from six and ten dimensions Allan Bayntun, C P Burgess and Leo van Nierop Gauge threshold corrections in warped geometry Kiwoon Choi, Ian-Woo Kim and Chang Sub Shin Holographic methods and gauge-Higgs unification in flat extra dimensions Marco Serone Soft-wall stabilization Joan A Cabrer, Gero von Gersdorff and Mariano Quirós Warped five-dimensional models: phenomenological status and experimental prospects Hooman Davoudiasl, Shrihari Gopalakrishna, Eduardo Pontón and José Santiago

  8. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K.A.; Budaev, R.I.; Grobov, A.V.

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ{sub 4} in pure f ( R ) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the 'radion mode' of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ{sub 4}. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure fmore » ( R ) gravity.« less

  9. Method for adjusting warp measurements to a different board dimension

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson; John R. Shelly

    2000-01-01

    Warp in lumber is a common problem that occurs while lumber is being dried. In research or other testing programs, it is sometimes necessary to compare warp of different species or warp caused by different process variables. If lumber dimensions are not the same, then direct comparisons are not possible, and adjusting warp to a common dimension would be desirable so...

  10. Higgs bosons in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Mariano

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with a mass mH≃125 GeV, we review different models where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model electroweak observables provide very strong bounds on the mass of KK modes which motivates extensions to overcome this problem. Two extensions are briefly discussed. One particular extension is based on the deformation of the metric such that it strongly departs from the AdS5 structure in the IR region while it goes asymptotically to AdS5 in the UV brane. This model has the IR brane close to a naked metric singularity (which is outside the physical interval) characteristic of soft-walls constructions. The proximity of the singularity provides a strong wave function renormalization for the Higgs field which suppresses the T and S parameters. The second class of considered extensions are based on the introduction of an extra gauge group in the bulk such that the custodial SU(2)R symmetry is gauged and protects the T parameter. By further enlarging the bulk gauge symmetry one can find models where the Higgs is identified with the fifth component of gauge fields and for which the Higgs potential along with the Higgs mass can be dynamically determined by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism.

  11. Exploring extra dimensions through inflationary tensor modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Sang Hui; Nilles, Hans Peter; Trautner, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Predictions of inflationary schemes can be influenced by the presence of extra dimensions. This could be of particular relevance for the spectrum of gravitational waves in models where the extra dimensions provide a brane-world solution to the hierarchy problem. Apart from models of large as well as exponentially warped extra dimensions, we analyze the size of tensor modes in the Linear Dilaton scheme recently revived in the discussion of the "clockwork mechanism". The results are model dependent, significantly enhanced tensor modes on one side and a suppression on the other. In some cases we are led to a scheme of "remote inflation", where the expansion is driven by energies at a hidden brane. In all cases where tensor modes are enhanced, the requirement of perturbativity of gravity leads to a stringent upper limit on the allowed Hubble rate during inflation.

  12. Inflation from periodic extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a realization of a small field inflation based on string inspired supergravities. In theories accompanying extra dimensions, compactification of them with small radii is required for realistic situations. Since the extra dimension can have a periodicity, there will appear (quasi-)periodic functions under transformations of moduli of the extra dimensions in low energy scales. Such a periodic property can lead to a UV completion of so-called multi-natural inflation model where inflaton potential consists of a sum of multiple sinusoidal functions with a decay constant smaller than the Planck scale. As an illustration, we construct a SUSY breaking model, and then show that such an inflaton potential can be generated by a sum of world sheet instantons in intersecting brane models on extra dimensions containing orbifold. We show also predictions of cosmic observables by numerical analyzes.

  13. Inflation from periodic extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: thigaki@rk.phys.keio.ac.jp, E-mail: y_tatsuta@akane.waseda.jp

    We discuss a realization of a small field inflation based on string inspired supergravities. In theories accompanying extra dimensions, compactification of them with small radii is required for realistic situations. Since the extra dimension can have a periodicity, there will appear (quasi-)periodic functions under transformations of moduli of the extra dimensions in low energy scales. Such a periodic property can lead to a UV completion of so-called multi-natural inflation model where inflaton potential consists of a sum of multiple sinusoidal functions with a decay constant smaller than the Planck scale. As an illustration, we construct a SUSY breaking model, andmore » then show that such an inflaton potential can be generated by a sum of world sheet instantons in intersecting brane models on extra dimensions containing orbifold. We show also predictions of cosmic observables by numerical analyzes.« less

  14. Inflation from extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna J.

    1995-02-01

    A gravity-driven inflation is shown to arise from a simple higher-dimensional universe. In vacuum, the shear of n > 1 contracting dimensions is able to inflate the remaining three spatial dimensions. Said another way, the expansion of the 3-volume is accelerated by the contraction of the n-volume. Upon dimensional reduction, the theory is equivalent to a four-dimensional cosmology with a dynamical Planck mass. A connection can therefore be made to recent examples of inflation powered by a dilaton kinetic energy. Unfortunately, the graceful exit problem encountered in dilaton cosmologies will haunt this cosmology as well.

  15. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  16. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  17. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2018-01-16

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  18. Fermion masses and mixing in general warped extra dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Hamzaoui, Cherif; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    We analyze fermion masses and mixing in a general warped extra dimensional model, where all the Standard Model (SM) fields, including the Higgs, are allowed to propagate in the bulk. In this context, a slightly broken flavor symmetry imposed universally on all fermion fields, without distinction, can generate the full flavor structure of the SM, including quarks, charged leptons and neutrinos. For quarks and charged leptons, the exponential sensitivity of their wave functions to small flavor breaking effects yield hierarchical masses and mixing as it is usual in warped models with fermions in the bulk. In the neutrino sector, the exponential wave-function factors can be flavor blind and thus insensitive to the small flavor symmetry breaking effects, directly linking their masses and mixing angles to the flavor symmetric structure of the five-dimensional neutrino Yukawa couplings. The Higgs must be localized in the bulk and the model is more successful in generalized warped scenarios where the metric background solution is different than five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). We study these features in two simple frameworks, flavor complimentarity and flavor democracy, which provide specific predictions and correlations between quarks and leptons, testable as more precise data in the neutrino sector becomes available.

  19. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currentlymore » probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.« less

  20. Flavour physics and extra-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.

    2018-05-01

    Randall-Sundrum (RS) model of warped extra-dimensions were originally proposed to explain the Planck-weak scale hierarchy. It was soon realised that modifications of the original setup, by introducing the fields in the bulk, has several interesting features. In particular it imbues a rich flavour structure to the fermionic sector thereby offering an understanding of the Yukawa hierarchy problem. This construction is also useful in explaining the recently observed deviations in the decay of the B mesons. We consider two scenarios to this effect : A) Right handed muon fields coupled more to NP that the corresponding muon doublets (unorthodox case). Non-universality exists in the right handed sector. B) Standard scenario with anomalies explained primarily by non-universal couplings to the lepton doublets. Further, we establish correlation with the parameter space consistent with the flavour anomalies in the neutral current sector and obtain predictions for rare K- decay which are likely to be another candle for NP with increased precision. The prediction for rare K- decays are different according to the scenario, thereby serving as a useful discriminatory tool. We also discussthe large flavour violation in the lepton sector and present an example with the implementation of bulk leptonic MFV which is essential to realize the model with low KK scales. Further we consider a radical solution, called GUT RS models, where the RS geometry can work as theory of flavour in the absence of flavour symmetries. In this case the low energy brane corresponds to the GUT scale as a result of which RS is no longer solution to the gauge hierarchy problem. The Kaluza Klein (KK) modes in this setup are naturally heavy due to which the low energy constraints can be easily avoided. We use this framework to discuss the supersymmetric version of the RS model and provide means to test this scenario by considering rare lepton decays like τ → μγ.

  1. WARP

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.

    2017-04-12

    WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed at UC Berkeley to efficiently execute on NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo method, namely, that very few physical and geometrical simplifications are applied. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, neutron flux distributions (in both space and energy), and fission source distributions for time-independent neutron transport problems. It can run in both criticality or fixed source modes, but fixed source mode is currentlymore » not robust, optimized, or maintained in the newest version. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. The goal of developing WARP is to investigate algorithms that can grow into a full-featured, continuous energy, Monte Carlo neutron transport code that is accelerated by running on GPUs. The crux of the effort is to make Monte Carlo calculations faster while producing accurate results. Modern supercomputers are commonly being built with GPU coprocessor cards in their nodes to increase their computational efficiency and performance. GPUs execute efficiently on data-parallel problems, but most CPU codes, including those for Monte Carlo neutral particle transport, are predominantly task-parallel. WARP uses a data-parallel neutron transport algorithm to take advantage of the computing power GPUs offer.« less

  2. Quantum simulation of an extra dimension.

    PubMed

    Boada, O; Celi, A; Latorre, J I; Lewenstein, M

    2012-03-30

    We present a general strategy to simulate a D+1-dimensional quantum system using a D-dimensional one. We analyze in detail a feasible implementation of our scheme using optical lattice technology. The simplest nontrivial realization of a fourth dimension corresponds to the creation of a bi-volume geometry. We also propose single- and many-particle experimental signatures to detect the effects of the extra dimension.

  3. Universal extra dimensions and the graviton portal to dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Mathew Thomas; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Sachdeva, Divya

    2017-10-01

    The Universal Extra Dimension (UED) paradigm is particularly attractive as it not only includes a natural candidate for the Dark Matter particle , but also addresses several issues related to particle physics. Non-observations at the Large Hadron Collider, though, has brought the paradigm into severe tension. However, a particular 5-dimensional UED model emerges from a six dimensional space-time with nested warping. The AdS6 bulk protects both the Higgs mass as well as the UED scale without invoking unnatural parameter values. The graviton excitations in the sixth direction open up new (co-)annihilation channels for the Dark Matter particle, thereby allowing for phenomenological consistency, otherwise denied to the minimal UED scenario. The model leads to unique signatures in both satellite-based experiments as well as the LHC.

  4. Signatures of extra dimensions in gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Andriot, David; Gómez, Gustavo Lucena, E-mail: andriotphysics@gmail.com, E-mail: glucenag@aei.mpg.de

    2017-06-01

    Considering gravitational waves propagating on the most general 4+ N -dimensional space-time, we investigate the effects due to the N extra dimensions on the four-dimensional waves. All wave equations are derived in general and discussed. On Minkowski{sub 4} times an arbitrary Ricci-flat compact manifold, we find: a massless wave with an additional polarization, the breathing mode, and extra waves with high frequencies fixed by Kaluza-Klein masses. We discuss whether these two effects could be observed.

  5. Extra dimensions hypothesis in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, Igor; Boos, Eduard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Perfilov, Maxim; Smolyakov, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the history of the extra dimensions hypothesis and the physics and phenomenology of models with large extra dimensions with an emphasis on the Randall- Sundrum (RS) model with two branes. We argue that the Standard Model extension based on the RS model with two branes is phenomenologically acceptable only if the inter-brane distance is stabilized. Within such an extension of the Standard Model, we study the influence of the infinite Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers of the bulk fields on collider processes. In particular, we discuss the modification of the scalar sector of the theory, the Higgs-radion mixing due to the coupling of the Higgs boson to the radion and its KK tower, and the experimental restrictions on the mass of the radion-dominated states.

  6. Signals for Extra Dimensions at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    A brief overview is presented of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at CLIC, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center of mass energy of 3-5 TeV and an integrated luminosity of order 1 ab{sup -1}. In all cases the search reach for the resulting new physic signatures is found to be in the range of {approx} 15-80 TeV.

  7. Extra dimension searches at hadron colliders to next-to-leading order-QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.

    2007-11-01

    The quantitative impact of NLO-QCD corrections for searches of large and warped extra dimensions at hadron colliders are investigated for the Drell-Yan process. The K-factor for various observables at hadron colliders are presented. Factorisation, renormalisation scale dependence and uncertainties due to various parton distribution functions are studied. Uncertainties arising from the error on experimental data are estimated using the MRST parton distribution functions.

  8. Higgs decay into two photons in a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Juliane; Hörner, Clara; Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias; Novotny, Kristiane; Schmell, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    A detailed five-dimensional calculation of the Higgs-boson decay into two photons is performed in both the minimal and the custodially protected Randall-Sundrum (RS) model, where the Standard Model (SM) fields propagate in the bulk and the scalar sector lives on or near the IR brane. It is explicitly shown that the gauge invariance of the sum of diagrams involving bosonic fields in the SM also applies to the case of these RS scenarios. An exact expression for the amplitude in terms of the five-dimensional (5D) gauge-boson and fermion propagators is presented, which includes the full dependence on the Higgs-boson mass. Closed expressions for the 5D -boson propagators in the minimal and the custodial RS model are derived, which are valid to all orders in . In contrast to the fermion case, the result for the bosonic contributions to the amplitude is insensitive to the details of the localization of the Higgs profile on or near the IR brane. The various RS predictions for the rate of the process are compared with the latest LHC data, and exclusion regions for the RS model parameters are derived.

  9. Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2009-03-01

    Single photons detected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP2 in the years 1997-2000 are reanalysed to investigate the existence of a single extra dimension in a modified ADD scenario with slightly warped large extra dimensions. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 180 and 209 GeV for an integrated luminosity of ˜650 pb-1 agree with the predictions of the Standard Model and allow a limit to be set on graviton emission in one large extra dimension. The limit obtained on the fundamental mass scale M D is 1.69 TeV/ c 2 at 95% CL, with an expected limit of 1.71 TeV/ c 2.

  10. Exploring extra dimensions with scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh; Verostek, Mike

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a pedagogical introduction to the physics of extra dimensions by examining the behavior of scalar fields in three landmark models: the ADD, Randall-Sundrum, and DGP spacetimes. Results of this analysis provide qualitative insights into the corresponding behavior of gravitational fields and elementary particles in each of these models. In these "brane world" models, the familiar four dimensional spacetime of everyday experience is called the brane and is a slice through a higher dimensional spacetime called the bulk. The particles and fields of the standard model are assumed to be confined to the brane, while gravitational fields are assumed to propagate in the bulk. For all three spacetimes, we calculate the spectrum of propagating scalar wave modes and the scalar field produced by a static point source located on the brane. For the ADD and Randall-Sundrum models, at large distances, the field looks like that of a point source in four spacetime dimensions, but at short distances, it crosses over to a form appropriate to the higher dimensional spacetime. For the DGP model, the field has the higher dimensional form at long distances rather than short. The behavior of these scalar fields, derived using only undergraduate level mathematics, closely mirror the results that one would obtain by performing the far more difficult task of analyzing the behavior of gravitational fields in these spacetimes.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as

  12. A Brane Model, Its Ads-DS States and Their Agitated Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Vargas Moniz, Paulo; Zhuk, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    We consider multidimensional gravitational models with a nonlinear scalar curvature term and form fields. It is assumed that the higher dimensional spacetime undergoes a spontaneous compactification to a warped product manifold. Particular attention is paid to models with quadratic scalar curvature terms and a Freund-Rubin-like ansatz for solitonic form fields. It is shown that for certain parameter ranges the extra dimensions are stabilized for any sign of the internal space curvature, the bulk cosmological constant and of the effective four-dimensional cosmological constant. Moreover, the effective cosmological constant can satisfy the observable limit on the dark energy density.

  13. Asymptotical AdS space from nonlinear gravitational models with stabilized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, U.; Moniz, P.; Zhuk, A.

    2002-08-01

    We consider nonlinear gravitational models with a multidimensional warped product geometry. Particular attention is payed to models with quadratic scalar curvature terms. It is shown that for certain parameter ranges, the extra dimensions are stabilized if the internal spaces have a negative constant curvature. In this case, the four-dimensional effective cosmological constant as well as the bulk cosmological constant become negative. As a consequence, the homogeneous and isotropic external space is asymptotically AdS4. The connection between the D-dimensional and the four-dimensional fundamental mass scales sets a restriction on the parameters of the considered nonlinear models.

  14. Search for large extra dimensions in dielectron and diphoton production.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Bantly, J; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A; Cutts, D; Dahl, O I; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Di Loreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Feher, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gartung, P; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gibbard, B; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González Solís, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grudberg, P; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hahn, K S; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoftun, J S; Hou, S; Huang, Y; Ito, A S; Jerger, S A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Klopfenstein, C; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Maciel, A K; Madaras, R J; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Meng, X C; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mincer, A; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Norman, D; Oesch, L; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quintas, P Z; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sculli, J; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shankar, H C; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stevenson, M L; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Streets, K; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thompson, J; Toback, D; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Wirjawan, J V; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zhu, Z H; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2001-02-12

    We report a search for effects of large extra spatial dimensions in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector, using events containing a pair of electrons or photons. The data are in good agreement with the expected background and do not exhibit evidence for large extra dimensions. We set the most restrictive lower limits to date, at the 95% C.L. on the effective Planck scale between 1.0 and 1.4 TeV for several formalisms and numbers of extra dimensions.

  15. Probing large extra dimensions with IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G.; Tabrizi, Zahra, E-mail: arman@ipm.ir, E-mail: orlando@ifi.unicamp.br, E-mail: tabrizi.physics@ipm.ir

    2014-12-01

    In models with Large Extra Dimensions the smallness of neutrino masses can be naturally explained by introducing gauge singlet fermions which propagate in the bulk. The Kaluza-Klein modes of these fermions appear as towers of sterile neutrino states on the brane. We study the phenomenological consequences of this picture for the high energy atmospheric neutrinos. For this purpose we construct a detailed equivalence between a model with large extra dimensions and a (3+n) scenario consisting of three active and n extra sterile neutrino states, which provides a clear intuitive understanding of Kaluza-Klein modes. Finally, we analyze the collected data ofmore » high energy atmospheric neutrinos by IceCube experiment and obtain bounds on the radius of extra dimensions.« less

  16. CKM pattern from localized generations in extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matti, C.

    2006-10-01

    We revisit the issue of the quark masses and mixing angles in the framework of large extra dimension. We consider three identical standard model families resulting from higher-dimensional fields localized on different branes embedded in a large extra dimension. Furthermore we use a decaying profile in the bulk different form previous works. With the Higgs field also localized on a different brane, the hierarchy of masses between the families results from their different positions in the extra space. When the left-handed doublet and the right-handed singlets are localized with different couplings on the branes, we found a set of brane locations in one extra dimension which leads to the correct quark masses and mixing angles with the sufficient strength of CP-violation. We see that the decaying profile of the Higgs field plays a crucial role for producing the hierarchies in a rather natural way.

  17. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; de Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.; Minos Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab's Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1 020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  18. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGES

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  19. Nonlinear multidimensional cosmological models with form fields: Stabilization of extra dimensions and the cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, U.; Moniz, P.; Zhuk, A.

    2003-08-01

    We consider multidimensional gravitational models with a nonlinear scalar curvature term and form fields in the action functional. In our scenario it is assumed that the higher dimensional spacetime undergoes a spontaneous compactification to a warped product manifold. Particular attention is paid to models with quadratic scalar curvature terms and a Freund-Rubin-like ansatz for solitonic form fields. It is shown that for certain parameter ranges the extra dimensions are stabilized. In particular, stabilization is possible for any sign of the internal space curvature, the bulk cosmological constant, and of the effective four-dimensional cosmological constant. Moreover, the effective cosmological constant can satisfy the observable limit on the dark energy density. Finally, we discuss the restrictions on the parameters of the considered nonlinear models and how they follow from the connection between the D-dimensional and the four-dimensional fundamental mass scales.

  20. Deviations from Newton's law in supersymmetric large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callin, P.; Burgess, C. P.

    2006-09-01

    Deviations from Newton's inverse-squared law at the micron length scale are smoking-gun signals for models containing supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLEDs), which have been proposed as approaches for resolving the cosmological constant problem. Just like their non-supersymmetric counterparts, SLED models predict gravity to deviate from the inverse-square law because of the advent of new dimensions at sub-millimeter scales. However SLED models differ from their non-supersymmetric counterparts in three important ways: (i) the size of the extra dimensions is fixed by the observed value of the dark energy density, making it impossible to shorten the range over which new deviations from Newton's law must be seen; (ii) supersymmetry predicts there to be more fields in the extra dimensions than just gravity, implying different types of couplings to matter and the possibility of repulsive as well as attractive interactions; and (iii) the same mechanism which is purported to keep the cosmological constant naturally small also keeps the extra-dimensional moduli effectively massless, leading to deviations from general relativity in the far infrared of the scalar-tensor form. We here explore the deviations from Newton's law which are predicted over micron distances, and show the ways in which they differ and resemble those in the non-supersymmetric case.

  1. A model of mesons in finite extra-dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahkar, Jugal; Choudhury, D. K.; Roy, S.; Bordoloi, N. S.

    2018-05-01

    Recently,problem of stability of H-atom has been reported in extra-finite dimension,and found out that it is stable in extra-finite dimension of size,$R\\leq\\frac{a_0}{4}$,where,$a_0$ is the Bohr radius.Assuming that,the heavy flavoured mesons have also such stability controlled by the scale of coupling constant,we obtain corresponding QCD Bohr radius and it is found to be well within the present theoretical and experimental limit of higher dimension.We then study its consequences in their masses using effective string inspired potential model in higher dimension pursued by us.Within the uncertainty of masses of known Heavy Flavoured mesons the allowed range of extra dimension is $L\\leq10^{-16}m$,which is well below the present theoretical and experimental limit,and far above the Planck length $\\simeq1.5\\times10^{-35}$ m.

  2. Gamma Rays from the Galactic Bulge and Large Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassé, Michel; Paul, Jacques; Bertone, Gianfranco; Sigl, Günter

    2004-03-01

    An intriguing feature of extra dimensions is the possible production of Kaluza Klein gravitons by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung, in the course of core collapse of massive stars, with gravitons then being trapped around the newly born neutron stars and decaying into two gamma rays, making neu­tron stars gamma-ray sources. We strengthen the limits on the radius of compactification of extra dimensions for a small number n of them, or alternatively the fundamental scale of quantum gravity, considering the gamma-ray emission of the whole population of neutron stars sitting in the Galactic bulge, instead of the closest member of this category. For n=1 the constraint on the compactification radius is R<400 μm.

  3. Large extra dimensions, sterile neutrinos and solar neutrino data.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, D O; Mohapatra, R N; Yellin, S J

    2001-07-23

    Solar, atmospheric, and LSND neutrino oscillation results require a light sterile neutrino, nu(B), which can exist in the bulk of extra dimensions. Solar nu(e), confined to the brane, can oscillate in the vacuum to the zero mode of nu(B) and via successive Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein transitions to Kaluza-Klein states of nu(B). This new way to fit solar data is provided by both low and intermediate string scale models. From average rates seen in the three types of solar experiments, the Super-Kamiokande spectrum is predicted with 73% probability, but dips characteristic of the 0.06 mm extra dimension should be seen in the SNO spectrum.

  4. Auto-concealment of supersymmetry in extra dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Howe, Kiel; March-Russell, John; ...

    2015-06-05

    In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with extra dimensions the visible energy in sparticle decays can be significantly reduced and its energy distribution broadened, thus significantly weakening the present collider limits on SUSY. The mechanism applies when the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a bulk state — e.g. a bulk modulino, axino, or gravitino — the size of the extra dimensions ≳ 10 –14 cm, and for a broad variety of visible sparticle spectra. In such cases the lightest ordinary supersymmetric particle (LOSP), necessarily a brane-localised state, decays to the Kaluza-Klein (KK) discretuum of the LSP. This dynamically realises the compression mechanismmore » for hiding SUSY as decays into the more numerous heavier KK LSP states are favored. We find LHC limits on right-handed slepton LOSPs evaporate, while LHC limits on stop LOSPs weaken to ~350 ÷ 410 GeV compared to ~700 GeV for a stop decaying to a massless LSP. Similarly, for the searches we consider, present limits on direct production of degenerate first and second generation squarks drop to ~450 GeV compared to ~800 GeV for a squark decaying to a massless LSP. Auto-concealment typically works for a fundamental gravitational scale of M* ~10 ÷ 100 TeV, a scale sufficiently high that traditional searches for signatures of extra dimensions are mostly avoided. If superpartners are discovered, their prompt, displaced, or stopped decays can also provide new search opportunities for extra dimensions with the potential to reach M* ~10 9 GeV. As a result, this mechanism applies more generally than just SUSY theories, pertaining to any theory where there is a discrete quantum number shared by both brane and bulk sectors.« less

  5. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×10 20 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. Themore » ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Finally, stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.« less

  6. LHC collider phenomenology of minimal universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuria, Jyotiranjan; Datta, AseshKrishna; Debnath, Dipsikha; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the collider phenomenology of the model of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions (MUED) at the Large hadron Collider (LHC). We derive analytical results for all relevant strong pair-production processes of two level 1 Kaluza-Klein partners and use them to validate and correct the existing MUED implementation in the fortran version of the PYTHIA event generator. We also develop a new implementation of the model in the C++ version of PYTHIA. We use our implementations in conjunction with the CHECKMATE package to derive the LHC bounds on MUED from a large number of published experimental analyses from Run 1 at the LHC.

  7. Radiative corrections to masses and couplings in universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres; Kong, Kyoungchul; Wiegand, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Models with an orbifolded universal extra dimension receive important loop-induced corrections to the masses and couplings of Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles. The dominant contributions stem from so-called boundary terms which violate KK number. Previously, only the parts of these boundary terms proportional to ln(Λ R) have been computed, where R is the radius of the extra dimension and Λ is cut-off scale. However, for typical values of Λ R ˜ 10 · · · 50, the logarithms are not particularly large and non-logarithmic contributions may be numerically important. In this paper, these remaining finite terms are computed and their phenomenological impact is discussed. It is shown that the finite terms have a significant impact on the KK mass spectrum. Furthermore, one finds new KK-number violating interactions that do not depend on ln(Λ R) but nevertheless are non-zero. These lead to new production and decay channels for level-2 KK particles at colliders.

  8. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Cosmological branes and macroscopic extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, Andrei O.

    2005-06-01

    The idea of adding extra dimensions to the physical world — thus making the observable universe a timelike surface (or brane) embedded in a higher-dimensional space-time — is briefly reviewed, which is believed to hold serious promise for solving fundamental problems concerning the hierarchy of physical interactions and the cosmological constant. Brane localization of massless gravitons is discussed as a mechanism leading to the effective four-dimensional Einstein gravity theory on the brane in the low-energy limit. It is shown that this mechanism is a corollary of the AdS/CFT correspondence principle well-known from string theory. Inflation and other cosmological evolution scenarios induced by the local and nonlocal structures of the effective action of the gravitational brane are considered, as are the effects that enable the developing gravitational-wave astronomy to be used in the search for extra dimensions. Finally, a new approach to the cosmological constant and cosmological acceleration problems is discussed, which involves variable local and nonlocal gravitational 'constants' arising in the infrared modifications of the Einstein theory that incorporate brane-induced gravity models and models of massive gravitons.

  9. Signals of two universal extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdman, G.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Spehler, D.

    2016-11-01

    Extensions of the standard model with universal extra dimensions are interesting both as phenomenological templates as well as model-building fertile ground. For instance, they are one of the prototypes for theories exhibiting compressed spectra, leading to difficult searches at the LHC since the decay products of new states are soft and immersed in a large standard model background. Here we study the phenomenology at the LHC of theories with two universal extra dimensions. We obtain the current bound by using the production of second level excitations of electroweak gauge bosons decaying to a pair of leptons and study the reach of the LHC Run II in this channel. We also introduce a new channel originating in higher dimensional operators and resulting in the single production of a second level quark excitation. Its subsequent decay into a hard jet and lepton pair resonance would allow the identification of a more model-specific process, unlike the more generic vector resonance signal. We show that the sensitivity of this channel to the compactification scale is very similar to the one obtained using the vector resonance.

  10. Brane-world extra dimensions in light of GW170817

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, Luca; Bolis, Nadia; Vagnozzi, Sunny

    2018-03-01

    The search for extra dimensions is a challenging endeavor to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. The joint detection of gravitational waves (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) signals from the merging of a binary system of compact objects like neutron stars can help constrain the geometry of extra dimensions beyond our 3 +1 spacetime ones. A theoretically well-motivated possibility is that our observable Universe is a 3 +1 -dimensional hypersurface, or brane, embedded in a higher 4 +1 -dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ) spacetime, in which gravity is the only force which propagates through the infinite bulk space, while other forces are confined to the brane. In these types of brane-world models, GW and EM signals between two points on the brane would, in general, travel different paths. This would result in a time lag between the detection of GW and EM signals emitted simultaneously from the same source. We consider the recent near-simultaneous detection of the GW event GW170817 from the LIGO/Virgo collaboration, and its EM counterpart, the short gamma-ray burst GRB170817A detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory Anti-Coincidence Shield spectrometer. Assuming the standard Λ -cold dark matter scenario and performing a likelihood analysis which takes into account astrophysical uncertainties associated to the measured time lag, we set an upper limit of ℓ≲0.535 Mpc at 68% confidence level on the AdS5 radius of curvature ℓ. Although the bound is not competitive with current Solar System constraints, it is the first time that data from a multimessenger GW-EM measurement is used to constrain extra-dimensional models. Thus, our work provides a proof of principle for the possibility of using multimessenger astronomy for probing the geometry of our space-time.

  11. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  12. Nonabelian noncommutative gauge theory via noncommutative extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčo, Branislav; Schupp, Peter; Wess, Julius

    2001-06-01

    The concept of covariant coordinates on noncommutative spaces leads directly to gauge theories with generalized noncommutative gauge fields of the type that arises in string theory with background B-fields. The theory is naturally expressed in terms of cochains in an appropriate cohomology; we discuss how it fits into the framework of projective modules. The equivalence of star products that arise from the background field with and without fluctuations and Kontsevich's formality theorem allow an explicitly construction of a map that relates ordinary gauge theory and noncommutative gauge theory (Seiberg-Witten map). As application we show the exact equality of the Dirac-Born-Infeld action with B-field in the commutative setting and its semi-noncommutative cousin in the intermediate picture. Using noncommutative extra dimensions the construction is extended to noncommutative nonabelian gauge theory for arbitrary gauge groups; an explicit map between abelian and nonabelian gauge fields is given. All constructions are also valid for non-constant B-field, Poisson structure and metric.

  13. 5D perspective on Higgs production at the boundary of a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias; Novotny, Kristiane; Schmell, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive, five-dimensional calculation of Higgs-boson production in gluon fusion is performed for both the minimal and the custodially protected Randall-Sundrum (RS) model, with Standard Model fields propagating in the bulk and the scalar sector confined on or near the IR brane. For the first time, an exact expression for the gg → h amplitude in terms of the five-dimensional fermion propagator is derived, which includes the full dependence on the Higgs-boson mass. Various results in the literature are reconciled and shown to correspond to different incarnations of the RS model, in which the Higgs field is either localized on the IR brane or is described in terms of a narrow bulk state. The results in the two scenarios differ in a qualitative way: the gg → h amplitude is suppressed in models where the scalar sector is localized on the IR brane, while it tends to be enhanced in bulk Higgs models. In both cases, effects of higher-dimensional operators contributing to the gg → h amplitude at tree level are shown to be numerically suppressed under reasonable assumptions. There is no smooth cross-over between the two scenarios, since the effective field-theory description breaks down in the transition region. A detailed phenomenological analysis of Higgs production in various RS scenarios is presented, and for each scenario the regions of parameter space already excluded by LHC data are derived.

  14. Impact of warped extra dimensions on the dipole coefficients in b → sγ transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias; Schmell, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We calculate the electro- and chromomagnetic dipole coefficients C 7 γ,8 g and {tilde{C}}_{7γ, 8g} in the context of the minimal Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with a Higgs sector localized on the IR brane using the five-dimensional (5D) approach, where the coefficients are expressed in terms of integrals over 5D propagators. Since we keep the full dependence on the Yukawa matrices, the integral expressions are formally valid to all orders in v 2/ M KK 2 . In addition we relate our results to the expressions obtained in the Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposed theory and show the consistency in both pictures analytically and numerically, which presents a non-trivial cross-check. In Feynman-'t Hooft gauge, the dominant corrections from virtual KK modes arise from the scalar parts of the W ±-boson penguin diagrams, including the contributions from the scalar component of the 5D gauge-boson field and from the charged Goldstone bosons in the Higgs sector. The size of the KK corrections depends on the parameter y *, which sets the upper bound for the anarchic 5D Yukawa matrices. We find that for y * ≳ 1 the KK corrections are proportional to y ∗ 2 . We discuss the phenomenological implications of our results for the branching ratio Br(overline{B}to {X}_sγ ) , the time-dependent CP asymmetry S K ∗ γ , the direct CP asymmetry A CP b → sγ and the CP asymmetry difference Δ A CP b → sγ . We can derive a lower bound on the first KK gluon resonance of 3 .8 TeV for y * = 3, requiring that at least 10% of the RS parameter space covers the experimental 2 σ error margins. We further discuss the branching ratio Br(overline{B}to {X}_s{l}+{l}-) and compare our predictions for C 7γ,9,10 and {tilde{C}}_{7γ, 9,10} with phenomenological results derived from model-independent analyses.

  15. Hawking radiation from squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes: A window to extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Hideki; Soda, Jiro

    2007-09-15

    We explore the observability of extra dimensions through five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes residing in the Kaluza-Klein spacetime. With the expectation that the Hawking radiation reflects the five-dimensional nature of the squashed horizon, we study the Hawking radiation of a scalar field in the squashed black hole background. As a result, we show that the luminosity of Hawking radiation tells us the size of the extra dimension, namely, the squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes open a window to extra dimensions.

  16. Packing extra mass in compact stellar structures: an interplay between Kalb-Ramond field and extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2018-05-01

    We have derived the Buchdahl's limit for a relativistic star in presence of the Kalb-Ramond field in four as well as in higher dimensions. It turns out that the Buchdahl's limit gets severely affected by the inclusion of the Kalb-Ramond field. In particular, the Kalb-Ramond field in four spacetime dimensions enables one to pack extra mass in any compact stellar structure of a given radius. On the other hand, a completely opposite picture emerges if the Kalb-Ramond field exists in higher dimensions, where the mass content of a compact star is smaller compared to that in general relativity. Implications are discussed.

  17. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    ScienceCinema

    Rubakov, Valery [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, Russia

    2017-12-09

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  18. Extra dimensions: 3D and time in PDF documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  19. Extra dimensions: 3d and time in pdf documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2008-07-01

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  20. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  1. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standardmore » Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.« less

  2. Correlation between UV and IR cutoffs in quantum field theory and large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, J. L.

    1999-04-01

    A recently conjectured relationship between UV and IR cutoffs in an effective field theory without quantum gravity is generalized in the presence of large extra dimensions. Estimates for the corrections to the usual calculation of observables within quantum field theory are used to put very stringent limits, in some cases, on the characteristic scale of the additional compactified dimensions. Implications for the cosmological constant problem are also discussed.

  3. Anisotropic modulus stabilisation: strings at LHC scales with micron-sized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, M.; Burgess, C. P.; Quevedo, F.

    2011-10-01

    We construct flux-stabilised Type IIB string compactifications whose extra dimensions have very different sizes, and use these to describe several types of vacua with a TeV string scale. Because we can access regimes where two dimensions are hierarchically larger than the other four, we find examples where two dimensions are micron-sized while the other four are at the weak scale in addition to more standard examples with all six extra dimensions equally large. Besides providing ultraviolet completeness, the phenomenology of these models is richer than vanilla large-dimensional models in several generic ways: ( i) they are supersymmetric, with supersymmetry broken at sub-eV scales in the bulk but only nonlinearly realised in the Standard Model sector, leading to no MSSM superpartners for ordinary particles and many more bulk missing-energy channels, as in supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED); ( ii) small cycles in the more complicated extra-dimensional geometry allow some KK states to reside at TeV scales even if all six extra dimensions are nominally much larger; ( iii) a rich spectrum of string and KK states at TeV scales; and ( iv) an equally rich spectrum of very light moduli exist having unusually small (but technically natural) masses, with potentially interesting implications for cosmology and astrophysics that nonetheless evade new-force constraints. The hierarchy problem is solved in these models because the extra-dimensional volume is naturally stabilised at exponentially large values: the extra dimensions are Calabi-Yau geometries with a 4D K3 or T 4-fibration over a 2D base, with moduli stabilised within the well-established LARGE-Volume scenario. The new technical step is the use of poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential (which, unlike for simpler models, are likely to be present on K3 or T 4-fibered Calabi-Yau compactifications) to obtain a large hierarchy between the sizes of different dimensions. For several scenarios we identify

  4. Results of searches for extra spatial dimensions in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shmatov, S. V., E-mail: Sergei.Shmatov@cern.ch

    2016-03-15

    An overview of basic results of the CMS experiment that concern searches for signals from extra spatial dimensions in the course of the first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the c.m. proton–proton collision energies of 00000 and 8 TeV is given.

  5. Effects of sterile neutrinos and an extra dimension on big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dukjae; Kusakabe, Motohiko; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2018-02-01

    By assuming the existence of extra-dimensional sterile neutrinos in the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) epoch, we investigate the sterile neutrino (νs) effects on the BBN and constrain some parameters associated with the νs properties. First, for the cosmic expansion rate, we take into account effects of a five-dimensional bulk and intrinsic tension of the brane embedded in the bulk and constrain a key parameter of the extra dimension by using the observational element abundances. Second, effects of the νs traveling on or off the brane are considered. In this model, the effective mixing angle between a νs and an active neutrino depends on energy, which may give rise to a resonance effect on the mixing angle. Consequently, the reaction rate of the νs can be drastically changed during the cosmic evolution. We estimated abundances and temperature of the νs by solving the rate equation as a function of temperature until the sterile neutrino decoupling. We then find that the relic abundance of the νs is drastically enhanced by the extra dimension and maximized for a characteristic resonance energy Eres≳0.01 GeV . Finally, some constraints related to the νs, i.e., mixing angle and mass difference, are discussed in detail with the comparison of our BBN calculations corrected by the extra-dimensional νs to observational data on light element abundances.

  6. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hao; Gu, Bao-Min; Wang, Yong-Qiang

    The future gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. However, if there exist extra dimensions and only GWs can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of GWs and electromagnetic waves (EMWs) are in general different. In this paper, we study null geodesics of GWs and EMWs in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time in the presence of themore » curvature of the universe. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of GW is longer than EMW within equal time. Taking the GW150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as an example, we study how the curvature k and the constant curvature radius l affect the horizon radii of GW and EMW in the de Sitter and Einstein-de Sitter models of the universe. This provides an alternative method for probing extra dimension through future GW observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts.« less

  7. Anisotropic cosmologies in warped DGP braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari-Fard, Malihe

    2009-10-15

    The DGP braneworld scenario explains accelerated expansion of the Universe via leakage of gravity to extra dimensions without any need for dark energy. We study the behavior of homogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies on a warped DGP brane with perfect fluid as a matter source. Taking a conformally flat bulk, we obtain the general solutions of the field equations in an exact parametric form for Bianchi type I space-time with a pressureless fluid. Finally, the behavior of the observationally important parameters like shear, anisotropy, and the deceleration parameter is considered in detail. We find that isotropization can proceed slower in themore » warped DGP model than the generalized Randall-Sundrum II model.« less

  8. Classical geometry to quantum behavior correspondence in a virtual extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, Donatello

    2012-09-01

    In the Lorentz invariant formalism of compact space-time dimensions the assumption of periodic boundary conditions represents a consistent semi-classical quantization condition for relativistic fields. In Dolce (2011) [18] we have shown, for instance, that the ordinary Feynman path integral is obtained from the interference between the classical paths with different winding numbers associated with the cyclic dynamics of the field solutions. By means of the boundary conditions, the kinematical information of interactions can be encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary, see Dolce (2012) [8]. Furthermore, such a purely four-dimensional theory is manifestly dual to an extra-dimensional field theory. The resulting correspondence between extra-dimensional geometrodynamics and ordinary quantum behavior can be interpreted in terms of AdS/CFT correspondence. By applying this approach to a simple Quark-Gluon-Plasma freeze-out model we obtain fundamental analogies with basic aspects of AdS/QCD phenomenology.

  9. Upper limits to submillimetre-range forces from extra space-time dimensions.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua C; Chan, Hilton W; Churnside, Allison B; Gulbis, Eric A; Varney, Michael C M; Price, John C

    2003-02-27

    String theory is the most promising approach to the long-sought unified description of the four forces of nature and the elementary particles, but direct evidence supporting it is lacking. The theory requires six extra spatial dimensions beyond the three that we observe; it is usually supposed that these extra dimensions are curled up into small spaces. This 'compactification' induces 'moduli' fields, which describe the size and shape of the compact dimensions at each point in space-time. These moduli fields generate forces with strengths comparable to gravity, which according to some recent predictions might be detected on length scales of about 100 microm. Here we report a search for gravitational-strength forces using planar oscillators separated by a gap of 108 micro m. No new forces are observed, ruling out a substantial portion of the previously allowed parameter space for the strange and gluon moduli forces, and setting a new upper limit on the range of the string dilaton and radion forces.

  10. Gravitational wave source counts at high redshift and in models with extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    García-Bellido, Juan; Nesseris, Savvas; Trashorras, Manuel, E-mail: juan.garciabellido@uam.es, E-mail: savvas.nesseris@csic.es, E-mail: manuel.trashorras@csic.es

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) source counts have been recently shown to be able to test how gravitational radiation propagates with the distance from the source. Here, we extend this formalism to cosmological scales, i.e. the high redshift regime, and we discuss the complications of applying this methodology to high redshift sources. We also allow for models with compactified extra dimensions like in the Kaluza-Klein model. Furthermore, we also consider the case of intermediate redshifts, i.e. 0 < z ∼< 1, where we show it is possible to find an analytical approximation for the source counts dN / d ( S /more » N ). This can be done in terms of cosmological parameters, such as the matter density Ω {sub m} {sub ,0} of the cosmological constant model or the cosmographic parameters for a general dark energy model. Our analysis is as general as possible, but it depends on two important factors: a source model for the black hole binary mergers and the GW source to galaxy bias. This methodology also allows us to obtain the higher order corrections of the source counts in terms of the signal-to-noise S / N . We then forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining GW physics but also the underlying cosmology by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise with a number of sources ranging from 10 to 500 sources as expected from future detectors. We find that with 500 events it will be possible to provide constraints on the matter density parameter at present Ω {sub m} {sub ,0} on the order of a few percent and with the precision growing fast with the number of events. In the case of extra dimensions we find that depending on the degeneracies of the model, with 500 events it may be possible to provide stringent limits on the existence of the extra dimensions if the aforementioned degeneracies can be broken.« less

  11. Accelerating Universe from Gravitational Leakage into Extra Dimensions: Testing with Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zong-Hong; Alcaniz, Jailson S.

    2005-02-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We test this scenario with high-z Type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry and coworkers and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen and coworkers. A combination of the two databases gives, at a 99% confidence level, Ωm=0.29+0.04-0.02, Ωrc=0.21+/-0.08, and Ωk=-0.36+0.31-0.35, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, zq=0, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than zq=0=0.6 within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, Ωm<0.27, or a closed universe is necessary.

  12. AdS and stabilized extra dimensions in multi-dimensional gravitational models with nonlinear scalar curvature terms R-1 and R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Zhuk, Alexander; Bezerra, Valdir B.; Romero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study multi-dimensional gravitational models with scalar curvature nonlinearities of types R-1 and R4. It is assumed that the corresponding higher dimensional spacetime manifolds undergo a spontaneous compactification to manifolds with a warped product structure. Special attention has been paid to the stability of the extra-dimensional factor spaces. It is shown that for certain parameter regions the systems allow for a freezing stabilization of these spaces. In particular, we find for the R-1 model that configurations with stabilized extra dimensions do not provide a late-time acceleration (they are AdS), whereas the solution branch which allows for accelerated expansion (the dS branch) is incompatible with stabilized factor spaces. In the case of the R4 model, we obtain that the stability region in parameter space depends on the total dimension D = dim(M) of the higher dimensional spacetime M. For D > 8 the stability region consists of a single (absolutely stable) sector which is shielded from a conformal singularity (and an antigravity sector beyond it) by a potential barrier of infinite height and width. This sector is smoothly connected with the stability region of a curvature-linear model. For D < 8 an additional (metastable) sector exists which is separated from the conformal singularity by a potential barrier of finite height and width so that systems in this sector are prone to collapse into the conformal singularity. This second sector is not smoothly connected with the first (absolutely stable) one. Several limiting cases and the possibility of inflation are discussed for the R4 model.

  13. Signatures of extra dimensions in gravitational waves from black hole quasinormal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; Chakravarti, Kabir; Bose, Sukanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have derived the evolution equation for gravitational perturbation in four-dimensional spacetime in the presence of a spatial extra dimension. The evolution equation is derived by perturbing the effective gravitational field equations on the four-dimensional spacetime, which inherits nontrivial higher-dimensional effects. Note that this is different from the perturbation of the five-dimensional gravitational field equations that exist in the literature and possess quantitatively new features. The gravitational perturbation has further been decomposed into a purely four-dimensional part and another piece that depends on extra dimensions. The four-dimensional gravitational perturbation now admits massive propagating degrees of freedom, owing to the existence of higher dimensions. We have also studied the influence of these massive propagating modes on the quasinormal mode frequencies, signaling the higher-dimensional nature of the spacetime, and have contrasted these massive modes with the massless modes in general relativity. Surprisingly, it turns out that the massive modes experience damping much smaller than that of the massless modes in general relativity and may even dominate over and above the general relativity contribution if one observes the ringdown phase of a black hole merger event at sufficiently late times. Furthermore, the whole analytical framework has been supplemented by the fully numerical Cauchy evolution problem, as well. In this context, we have shown that, except for minute details, the overall features of the gravitational perturbations are captured both in the Cauchy evolution as well as in the analysis of quasinormal modes. The implications on observations of black holes with LIGO and proposed space missions such as LISA are also discussed.

  14. A discrete classical space-time could require 6 extra-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemant, Philippe; Medale, Marc; Abid, Cherifa

    2018-01-01

    We consider a discrete space-time in which conservation laws are computed in such a way that the density of information is kept bounded. We use a 2D billiard as a toy model to compute the uncertainty propagation in ball positions after every shock and the corresponding loss of phase information. Our main result is the computation of a critical time step above which billiard calculations are no longer deterministic, meaning that a multiverse of distinct billiard histories begins to appear, caused by the lack of information. Then, we highlight unexpected properties of this critical time step and the subsequent exponential evolution of the number of histories with time, to observe that after certain duration all billiard states could become possible final states, independent of initial conditions. We conclude that if our space-time is really a discrete one, one would need to introduce extra-dimensions in order to provide supplementary constraints that specify which history should be played.

  15. Neutrinos in large extra dimensions and short-baseline νe appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela; Li, Ying-Ying; Machado, Camila S.; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2017-11-01

    We show that, in the presence of bulk masses, sterile neutrinos propagating in large extra dimensions (LED) can induce electron-neutrino appearance effects. This is in contrast to what happens in the standard LED scenario, and hence LED models with explicit bulk masses have the potential to address the MiniBooNE and LSND appearance results as well as the reactor and Gallium anomalies. A special feature in our scenario is that the mixing of the first Kaluza-Klein modes to active neutrinos can be suppressed, making the contribution of heavier sterile neutrinos to oscillations relatively more important. We study the implications of this neutrino mass generation mechanism for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments and show that the Short Baseline Neutrino Program at Fermilab will be able to efficiently probe such a scenario. In addition, this framework leads to massive Dirac neutrinos and thus precludes any signal in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  16. Lagrange multiplier and Wess-Zumino variable as extra dimensions in the torus universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, Salman Abarghouei; Dehghani, Mehdi; Monemzadeh, Majid

    2018-01-01

    We study the effect of the simplest geometry which is imposed via the topology of the universe by gauging non-relativistic particle model on torus and 3-torus with the help of symplectic formalism of constrained systems. Also, we obtain generators of gauge transformations for gauged models. Extracting corresponding Poisson structure of existed constraints, we show the effect of the shape of the universe on canonical structure of phase-spaces of models and suggest some phenomenology to prove the topology of the universe and probable non-commutative structure of the space. In addition, we show that the number of extra dimensions in the phase-spaces of gauged embedded models are exactly two. Moreover, in classical form, we talk over modification of Newton's second law in order to study the origin of the terms appeared in the gauged theory.

  17. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  18. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Consideringmore » 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.« less

  19. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Consideringmore » 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.« less

  20. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    DOE PAGES

    Ajello, M.

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Consideringmore » 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.« less

  1. Warped Andromeda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-17

    This image from NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer highlights the Andromeda galaxy older stellar population in blue. A pronounced warp in the disk of the galaxy, the aftermath of a collision with another galaxy, can be seen in the spiral arm.

  2. Neutrinos in large extra dimensions and short-baseline ν e appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Li, Ying -Ying; Machado, Camila S.

    Here, we show that, in the presence of bulk masses, sterile neutrinos propagating in large extra dimensions (LED) can induce electron-neutrino appearance effects. This is in contrast to what happens in the standard LED scenario, and hence LED models with explicit bulk masses have the potential to address the MiniBooNE and LSND appearance results as well as the reactor and Gallium anomalies. A special feature in our scenario is that the mixing of the first Kaluza-Klein modes to active neutrinos can be suppressed, making the contribution of heavier sterile neutrinos to oscillations relatively more important. We study the implications ofmore » this neutrino mass generation mechanism for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments and show that the Short Baseline Neutrino Program at Fermilab will be able to efficiently probe such a scenario. In addition, this framework leads to massive Dirac neutrinos and thus precludes any signal in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.« less

  3. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanccats

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robinmore » boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.« less

  4. Neutrinos in large extra dimensions and short-baseline ν e appearance

    DOE PAGES

    Carena, Marcela; Li, Ying -Ying; Machado, Camila S.; ...

    2017-11-16

    Here, we show that, in the presence of bulk masses, sterile neutrinos propagating in large extra dimensions (LED) can induce electron-neutrino appearance effects. This is in contrast to what happens in the standard LED scenario, and hence LED models with explicit bulk masses have the potential to address the MiniBooNE and LSND appearance results as well as the reactor and Gallium anomalies. A special feature in our scenario is that the mixing of the first Kaluza-Klein modes to active neutrinos can be suppressed, making the contribution of heavier sterile neutrinos to oscillations relatively more important. We study the implications ofmore » this neutrino mass generation mechanism for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments and show that the Short Baseline Neutrino Program at Fermilab will be able to efficiently probe such a scenario. In addition, this framework leads to massive Dirac neutrinos and thus precludes any signal in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.« less

  5. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics aremore » unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.« less

  6. Computational techniques to enable visualizing shapes of objects of extra spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don Vaughn, II

    Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. In order to enable such a capability for ourselves, it is first necessary to devise and implement a computationally tractable method to visualize, explore, and manipulate objects of dimension beyond three on the personal computer. A technology is described in this dissertation to convert a representation of higher dimensional models into a format that may be displayed in realtime on graphics cards available on many off-the-shelf personal computers. As a result, an opportunity has been created to experience the shape of four dimensional objects on the desktop computer. The ultimate goal has been to provide the user a tangible and memorable experience with mathematical models of four dimensional objects such that the user can see the model from any user selected vantage point. By use of a 4D GUI, an arbitrary convex hull or 3D silhouette of the 4D model can be rotated, panned, scrolled, and zoomed until a suitable dimensionally reduced view or Aspect is obtained. The 4D GUI then allows the user to manipulate a 3-flat hyperplane cutting tool to slice the model at an arbitrary orientation and position to extract or "pluck" an embedded 3D slice or "aspect" from the embedding four-space. This plucked 3D aspect can be viewed from all angles via a conventional 3D viewer using three multiple POV viewports, and optionally exported to a third party CAD viewer for further manipulation. Plucking and Manipulating the Aspect provides a tangible experience for the end-user in the same manner as any 3D Computer Aided Design viewing and manipulation tool does for the engineer or a 3D video game provides

  7. Sirepo - Warp

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Robert; Moeller, Paul

    Sirepo is an open source framework for cloud computing. The graphical user interface (GUI) for Sirepo, also known as the client, executes in any HTML5 compliant web browser on any computing platform, including tablets. The client is built in JavaScript, making use of the following open source libraries: Bootstrap, which is fundamental for cross-platform web applications; AngularJS, which provides a model–view–controller (MVC) architecture and GUI components; and D3.js, which provides interactive plots and data-driven transformations. The Sirepo server is built on the following Python technologies: Flask, which is a lightweight framework for web development; Jin-ja, which is a secure andmore » widely used templating language; and Werkzeug, a utility library that is compliant with the WSGI standard. We use Nginx as the HTTP server and proxy, which provides a scalable event-driven architecture. The physics codes supported by Sirepo execute inside a Docker container. One of the codes supported by Sirepo is Warp. Warp is a particle-in-cell (PIC) code de-signed to simulate high-intensity charged particle beams and plasmas in both the electrostatic and electromagnetic regimes, with a wide variety of integrated physics models and diagnostics. At pre-sent, Sirepo supports a small subset of Warp’s capabilities. Warp is open source and is part of the Berkeley Lab Accelerator Simulation Toolkit.« less

  8. `Shut The Front Door!':. Obviating the Challenge of Large-Scale Extra Dimensions and Psychophysical Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    Physics has been slowly and reluctantly beginning to address the role and fundamental basis of the `observer' which has until now also been considered metaphysical and beyond the mandate of empirical rigor. It is suggested that the fundamental premise of the currently dominant view of `Cognitive Theory' - "Mind Equals Brain" is erroneous; and the associated belief that the `Planck scale, `the so-called basement level of reality', as an appropriate arena from which to model psycho-physical bridging is also in error. In this paper we delineate a simple, inexpensive experimental design to `crack the so-called cosmic egg' thereby opening the door to largescale extra dimensions (LSXD) tantamount to the regime of the unified field and thus awareness. The methodology surmounts the quantum uncertainty principle in a manner violating Quantum Electrodynamics, (QED), a cornerstone of modern theoretical physics, by spectrographic analysis of newly theorized Tight-Bound State (TBS) Bohr orbits in `continuous-state' transition frequencies of atomic hydrogen. If one wonders why QED violation in the spectra of atomic hydrogen relates to solving the mind-body (observer) problem; consider this a 1st wrench in a forthcoming tool box of Unified Field Mechanics, UF that will soon enough in retrospect cause the current tools of Classical and Quantum Mechanics to appear as stone axes. Max Planck is credited as the founder of quantum mechanics with his 1900 quantum hypothesis that energy is radiated and absorbed discretely by the formulation, E = hv. Empirically implementing this next paradigm shift utilizing parameters of the long sought associated `new physics' of the 3rd regime (classicalquantum- unified) allows access to LSXD of space; thus pragmatically opening the domain of mental action for the 1st time in history. This rendering constitutes a massive paradigm shift to Unified Field Theory creating a challenge for both the writer and the reader!

  9. R (D(*)) anomalies in light of a nonminimal universal extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Aritra; Shaw, Avirup; Patra, Sunando Kumar

    2018-02-01

    We estimate contributions from Kaluza-Klein excitations of gauge bosons and physical charge scalar for the explanation of the lepton flavor universality violating excess in the ratios R (D ) and R (D*) in 5 dimensional universal extra dimensional scenario with nonvanishing boundary localized terms. This model is conventionally known as nonminimal universal extra dimensional model. We obtain the allowed parameter space in accordance with constraints coming from Bc→τ ν decay, as well as those from the electroweak precision tests.

  10. XD-GRASP: Golden-angle radial MRI with reconstruction of extra motion-state dimensions using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    To develop a novel framework for free-breathing MRI called XD-GRASP, which sorts dynamic data into extra motion-state dimensions using the self-navigation properties of radial imaging and reconstructs the multidimensional dataset using compressed sensing. Radial k-space data are continuously acquired using the golden-angle sampling scheme and sorted into multiple motion-states based on respiratory and/or cardiac motion signals derived directly from the data. The resulting undersampled multidimensional dataset is reconstructed using a compressed sensing approach that exploits sparsity along the new dynamic dimensions. The performance of XD-GRASP is demonstrated for free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) abdominal imaging, two-dimensional (2D) cardiac cine imaging and 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI of the liver, comparing against reconstructions without motion sorting in both healthy volunteers and patients. XD-GRASP separates respiratory motion from cardiac motion in cardiac imaging, and respiratory motion from contrast enhancement in liver DCE-MRI, which improves image quality and reduces motion-blurring artifacts. XD-GRASP represents a new use of sparsity for motion compensation and a novel way to handle motions in the context of a continuous acquisition paradigm. Instead of removing or correcting motion, extra motion-state dimensions are reconstructed, which improves image quality and also offers new physiological information of potential clinical value. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. XD-GRASP: Golden-Angle Radial MRI with Reconstruction of Extra Motion-State Dimensions Using Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a novel framework for free-breathing MRI called XD-GRASP, which sorts dynamic data into extra motion-state dimensions using the self-navigation properties of radial imaging and reconstructs the multidimensional dataset using compressed sensing. Methods Radial k-space data are continuously acquired using the golden-angle sampling scheme and sorted into multiple motion-states based on respiratory and/or cardiac motion signals derived directly from the data. The resulting under-sampled multidimensional dataset is reconstructed using a compressed sensing approach that exploits sparsity along the new dynamic dimensions. The performance of XD-GRASP is demonstrated for free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) abdominal imaging, two-dimensional (2D) cardiac cine imaging and 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI of the liver, comparing against reconstructions without motion sorting in both healthy volunteers and patients. Results XD-GRASP separates respiratory motion from cardiac motion in cardiac imaging, and respiratory motion from contrast enhancement in liver DCE-MRI, which improves image quality and reduces motion-blurring artifacts. Conclusion XD-GRASP represents a new use of sparsity for motion compensation and a novel way to handle motions in the context of a continuous acquisition paradigm. Instead of removing or correcting motion, extra motion-state dimensions are reconstructed, which improves image quality and also offers new physiological information of potential clinical value. PMID:25809847

  12. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A., E-mail: pankov@ictp.it; Serenkova, I. A., E-mail: inna.serenkova@cern.ch; Tsytrinov, A. V., E-mail: tsytrin@gstu.by

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  13. Basal salivary oxytocin level predicts extra- but not intra-personal dimensions of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Koven, Nancy S; Max, Laura K

    2014-06-01

    A wealth of literature suggests that oxytocin is an important mediator of social cognition, but much of the research to date has relied on pharmaceutical administration methods that can raise oxytocin to artificially high levels. The present study builds upon previous work by examining whether basal oxytocin level predicts intra- and extra-personal (i.e., self- and other-focused) elements of emotional intelligence (EI), independent of shared variance with current mood. The sample included 71 healthy young adults (46 women). Assessment measures included the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Version 2.0 (MSCEIT), the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. Peripheral oxytocin levels were examined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from saliva after solid phase extraction. Oxytocin level was unrelated to TMMS scores but was positively associated with performance in the Experiential EI domain of the MSCEIT. However, total mood disturbance was positively related to MSCEIT scores. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that oxytocin level added unique variance to the prediction of MSCEIT performance beyond that of current mood. These results confirm an association between endogenous levels of oxytocin in healthy adults and a subset of EI abilities, including extra-personal emotion recognition and the channeling of emotions to enhance social proficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of sterile neutrino and extra-dimension on big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dukjae; Kusakabe, Motohiko; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2018-04-01

    We study effects of the sterile neutrino in the five-dimensional universe on the big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Since the five-dimensional universe model leads to an additional term in the Friedmann equation and the energy density of the sterile neutrino increases the total energy density, this model can affect the primordial abundance via changing the cosmic expansion rate. The energy density of the sterile neutrino can be determined by a rate equation for production of the sterile neutrino. We show that not only the mixing angle and the mass of the sterile neutrino, but also a resonant effect in the oscillation between sterile and active neutrinos is important to determine a relic abundance of the sterile neutrino. In this study, we also investigate how the sterile neutrino in extra-dimensional model can affect the BBN, and constrain the parameters related to the above properties of the sterile neutrino by using the observational primordial abundances of light elements.

  15. Evaluating warp of 2 by 4s sawn from panels produced through green gluing dimension lumber from small ponderosa pine logs

    Treesearch

    Richard Bergman; William T. Simpson; Chris Turk

    2010-01-01

    Overstocked small-diameter softwood timber in western US forests has created a serious forest health and fire hazard, and the costs of removing this material are high. One way to lower costs is to reduce loss because of warp on lumber sawn from these small logs. Using a green-gluing process, standard 38 by 89-mm (nominal 2 by 4-in.) pieces (2 by 4s) ripped from pressed...

  16. Strong gravitational lensing—a probe for extra dimensions and Kalb-Ramond field

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra, E-mail: sumantac.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: tpssg@iacs.res.in

    2017-07-01

    Strong field gravitational lensing in the context of both higher spacetime dimensions and in presence of Kalb-Ramond field have been studied. After developing proper analytical tools to analyze the problem we consider gravitational lensing in three distinct black hole spacetimes—(a) four dimensional black hole in presence of Kalb-Ramond field, (b) brane world black holes with Kalb-Ramond field and finally (c) black hole solution in f ( T ) gravity. In all the three situations we have depicted the behavior of three observables: the asymptotic position approached by the relativistic images, the angular separation and magnitude difference between the outermost imagesmore » with others packed inner ones, both numerically and analytically. Difference between these scenarios have also been discussed along with possible observational signatures.« less

  17. Perturbative calculations in space-time having extra dimensions: The 6D single axial box anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, M. V. S.; Dallabona, G.; Battistel, O. A.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed investigation about the 6D single axial box anomalous amplitude is presented. The superficial degree of divergence involved, in the one-loop perturbative calculations, is quadratic and the corresponding theory is nonrenormalizable. In spite of this, we show that the phenomenon of anomaly can be clearly characterized in a completely analogous way as that of 4D single axial triangle anomaly. The required calculations are made within the context of a novel calculational strategy where the amplitudes are not modified in intermediary steps. Divergent integrals are, in fact, not really solved. Adequate representations for the internal propagators are adopted according to the degree of divergence involved, so that when the last Feynman rule is taken (integration over the loop momentum) all the dependence on the internal (arbitrary) momenta are placed only in finite integrals. In the divergent structures emerging, no physical parameter is present and such objects are not really integrated. Only very general properties are assumed for such quantities which are universal (all space-time dimensions). The consistency of the perturbative calculations fixes some relations among the divergent integrals so that all the potentially ambiguous terms can be automatically removed. In spite of the absence of ambiguities, the emerging results allow us to give a clear and transparent description of the anomaly. The present investigation confirms the point of view stated by the same prescription for the well-known 2D axial-vector (AV) two-point and 4D single (AVV) and triple (AAA) axial-vector anomalies: the anomalous amplitudes need not be assumed as ambiguous quantities to allow an adequate description of the anomalies. We show also that a surprising, but natural, connection between the coupling of fermions with a pseudoscalar tensor field is found. In addition, we show that the crucial mathematical aspects of the problem are deeply related to a recently arisen controversy

  18. Inflation from higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Hiroshi; Ketov, Sergei V.

    2017-12-01

    We derive the scalar potential in four spacetime dimensions from an eight-dimensional (R +γ R4-2 Λ -F42) gravity model in the presence of the 4-form F4, with the (modified gravity) coupling constant γ and the cosmological constant Λ , by using the flux compactification of four extra dimensions on a 4-sphere with the warp factor. The scalar potential depends upon two scalar fields: the scalaron and the 4-sphere volume modulus. We demonstrate that it gives rise to a viable description of cosmological inflation in the early universe, with the scalaron playing the role of inflaton and the volume modulus to be (almost) stabilized at its minimum. We also speculate about a possibility of embedding our model in eight dimensions into a modified eight-dimensional supergavity that, in its turn, arises from a modified eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  19. Geodesic congruences in warped spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suman; Dasgupta, Anirvan; Kar, Sayan

    2011-04-01

    In this article, we explore the kinematics of timelike geodesic congruences in warped five-dimensional bulk spacetimes, with and without thick or thin branes. Beginning with geodesic flows in the Randall-Sundrum anti-de Sitter geometry without and with branes, we find analytical expressions for the expansion scalar and comment on the effects of including thin branes on its evolution. Later, we move on to congruences in more general warped bulk geometries with a cosmological thick brane and a time-dependent extra dimensional scale. Using analytical expressions for the velocity field, we interpret the expansion, shear and rotation (ESR) along the flows, as functions of the extra dimensional coordinate. The evolution of a cross-sectional area orthogonal to the congruence, as seen from a local observer’s point of view, is also shown graphically. Finally, the Raychaudhuri and geodesic equations in backgrounds with a thick brane are solved numerically in order to figure out the role of initial conditions (prescribed on the ESR) and spacetime curvature on the evolution of the ESR.

  20. Effect of moisture content on warp in hardwood 2 by 6`s for structural use

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson; John W. Forsman

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum), red maple (Acer rubrum), and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) 2 by 6as were dried and evaluated for warp as it affects ability to meet softwood dimension lumber grading rule requirements for warp. In the first part of the study, sugar maple was kiln-dried to three levels of final moisture content: 27%, 19%, and 12%. Warp during kiln...

  1. Black-Hole Solutions to Einstein's Equations in the Presence of Matter and Modifications of Gravitation in Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutéraux, B.

    2010-11-01

    In this thesis, we wish to examine the black-hole solutions of modified gravity theories inspired by String Theory or Cosmology. Namely, these modifications will take the guise of additional gauge and scalar fields for the so-called Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories with an exponential Liouville potential; and of extra spatial dimensions for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theories. The black-hole solutions of EMD theories as well as their integrability are reviewed. One of the main results is that a master equation is obtained in the case of planar horizon topology, which allows to completely integrate the problem for s special relationship between the couplings. We also classify existing solutions. We move on to the study of Gauss-Bonnet black holes, focusing on the six-dimensional case. It is found that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling exposes the Weyl tensor of the horizon to the dynamics, severely restricting the Einstein spaces admissible and effectively lifting some of the degeneracy on the horizon topology. We then turn to the study of the thermodynamic properties of black holes, in General Relativity as well as in EMD theories. For the latter, phase transitions may be found in the canonical ensemble, which resemble the phase transitions for Reissner-Nordström black holes. Generically, we find that the thermodynamic properties (stability, order of phase transitions) depend crucially on the values of the EMD coupling constants. Finally, we interpret our planar EMD solutions holographically as Infra-Red geometries through the AdS/CFT correspondence, taking into account various validity constraints. We also compute AC and DC conductivities as applications to Condensed Matter Systems, and find some properties characteristic of strange metal behaviour.

  2. Lepton-flavor universality limits in warped space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Quirós, Mariano; Salas, Lindber

    2017-10-01

    We explore the limits on lepton-flavor universality (LFU) violation in theories where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In those theories, LFU violation, in fermion interaction with Kaluza-Klein modes of gauge bosons, is provided ab initio when different flavors of fermions are differently localized along the extra dimension. As this fact arises from the mass pattern of quarks and leptons, LFU violation is natural in this class of theories. We analyze the experimental data pointing toward LFU violation, as well as the most relevant electroweak and flavor observables, and the LFU tests in the μ /e and τ /μ sectors. We find agreement with RK(*) and RD(*) data at 95% C.L., provided the third-generation left-handed fermions are composite (0.14

  3. Instability of warped discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doǧan, S.; Nixon, C. J.; King, A. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    Accretion discs are generally warped. If a warp in a disc is too large, the disc can `break' apart into two or more distinct planes, with only tenuous connections between them. Further, if an initially planar disc is subject to a strong differential precession, then it can be torn apart into discrete annuli that precess effectively independently. In previous investigations, torque-balance formulae have been used to predict where and when the disc breaks into distinct parts. In this work, focusing on discs with Keplerian rotation and where the shearing motions driving the radial communication of the warp are damped locally by turbulence (the `diffusive' regime), we investigate the stability of warped discs to determine the precise criterion for an isolated warped disc to break. We find and solve the dispersion relation, which, in general, yields three roots. We provide a comprehensive analysis of this viscous-warp instability and the emergent growth rates and their dependence on disc parameters. The physics of the instability can be understood as a combination of (1) a term that would generally encapsulate the classical Lightman-Eardley instability in planar discs (given by ∂(νΣ)/∂Σ < 0) but is here modified by the warp to include ∂(ν1|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0, and (2) a similar condition acting on the diffusion of the warp amplitude given in simplified form by ∂(ν2|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0. We discuss our findings in the context of discs with an imposed precession, and comment on the implications for different astrophysical systems.

  4. Warp Field Mechanics 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold

    2011-01-01

    This paper will begin with a short review of the Alcubierre warp drive metric and describes how the phenomenon might work based on the original paper. The canonical form of the metric was developed and published in [6] which provided key insight into the field potential and boost for the field which remedied a critical paradox in the original Alcubierre concept of operations. A modified concept of operations based on the canonical form of the metric that remedies the paradox is presented and discussed. The idea of a warp drive in higher dimensional space-time (manifold) will then be briefly considered by comparing the null-like geodesics of the Alcubierre metric to the Chung-Freese metric to illustrate the mathematical role of hyperspace coordinates. The net effect of using a warp drive technology coupled with conventional propulsion systems on an exploration mission will be discussed using the nomenclature of early mission planning. Finally, an overview of the warp field interferometer test bed being implemented in the Advanced Propulsion Physics Laboratory: Eagleworks (APPL:E) at the Johnson Space Center will be detailed. While warp field mechanics has not had a Chicago Pile moment, the tools necessary to detect a modest instance of the phenomenon are near at hand.

  5. The Cartilage Warp Prevention Suture.

    PubMed

    Guyuron, Bahman; Wang, Derek Z; Kurlander, David E

    2018-06-01

    Costal cartilage graft warping can challenge rhinoplasty surgeons and compromise outcomes. We propose a technique, the "warp control suture," for eliminating cartilage warp and examine outcomes in a pilot group. The warp control suture is performed in the following manner: Harvested cartilage is cut to the desired shape and immersed in saline to induce warping. A 4-0 or 5-0 PDS suture, depending the thickness of the cartilage, is passed from convex to concave then concave to convex side several times about 5-6 mm apart, finally tying the suture on the convex side with sufficient tension to straighten the cartilage. First an ex vivo experiment was performed in 10 specimens from 10 different patients. Excess cartilage was sutured and returned to saline for a minimum of 15 min and then assessed for warping compared to cartilage cut in the identical shape also soaked in saline. Then, charts of nine subsequent patients who received the warp control suture on 16 cartilage grafts by the senior author (BG) were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion of study subjects required at least 6 months of follow-up with standard rhinoplasty photographs. Postoperative complications and evidence of warping were recorded. In the ex vivo experiment, none of the 10 segments demonstrated warping after replacement in saline, whereas all the matching segments demonstrated significant additional warping. Clinically, no postoperative warping was observed in any of the nine patients at least 6 months postoperatively. One case of minor infection was observed in an area away from the graft and treated with antibiotics. No warping or other complications were noted. The warp control suture technique presented here effectively straightens warped cartilage graft and prevents additional warping. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online

  6. LittleQuickWarp: an ultrafast image warping tool.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lei; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-02-01

    Warping images into a standard coordinate space is critical for many image computing related tasks. However, for multi-dimensional and high-resolution images, an accurate warping operation itself is often very expensive in terms of computer memory and computational time. For high-throughput image analysis studies such as brain mapping projects, it is desirable to have high performance image warping tools that are compatible with common image analysis pipelines. In this article, we present LittleQuickWarp, a swift and memory efficient tool that boosts 3D image warping performance dramatically and at the same time has high warping quality similar to the widely used thin plate spline (TPS) warping. Compared to the TPS, LittleQuickWarp can improve the warping speed 2-5 times and reduce the memory consumption 6-20 times. We have implemented LittleQuickWarp as an Open Source plug-in program on top of the Vaa3D system (http://vaa3d.org). The source code and a brief tutorial can be found in the Vaa3D plugin source code repository. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Search for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions using dijet angular distributions in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. 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R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. 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    2015-06-01

    A search is presented for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV using dijet angular distributions. The search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected by the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. Dijet angular distributions are found to be in agreement with the perturbative QCD predictions that include electroweak corrections. Limits on the contact interaction scale from a variety of models at next-to-leading order in QCD corrections are obtained. A benchmark model in which only left-handed quarks participate is excluded up to a scale of 9.0 (11.7) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference at 95% confidence level. Lower limits between 5.9 and 8.4 TeV on the scale of virtual graviton exchange are extracted for the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model of extra spatial dimensions.

  8. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb -1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scalemore » parameter M D in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter Λ U. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.« less

  9. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text]. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter [Formula: see text] in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter [Formula: see text]. The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  10. Search for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions using dijet angular distributions in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt s =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-24

    Our search is presented for quark contact interactions and extra spatial dimensions in proton–proton collisions at √s=8TeVusing dijet angular distributions. The search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb -1collected by the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. Dijet angular distributions are found to be in agreement with the perturbative QCD predictions that include electroweak corrections. Limits on the contact interaction scale from a variety of models at next-to-leading order in QCD corrections are obtained. A benchmark model in which only left-handed quarks participate is excluded up to a scale of 9.0 (11.7)TeV formore » destructive (constructive) interference at 95% confidence level. Finally, lower limits between 5.9 and 8.4TeV on the scale of virtual graviton exchange are extracted for the Arkani-Hamed–Dimopoulos–Dvali model of extra spatial dimensions.« less

  11. WarpIV: In situ visualization and analysis of ion accelerator simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean -Luc; ...

    2016-05-09

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analyticsmore » to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. Furthermore, this supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.« less

  12. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-30

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead ofmore » general relativity.« less

  13. Contour-based image warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai H.; Lau, Rynson W.

    1996-09-01

    Image warping concerns about transforming an image from one spatial coordinate to another. It is widely used for the vidual effect of deforming and morphing images in the film industry. A number of warping techniques have been introduced, which are mainly based on the corresponding pair mapping of feature points, feature vectors or feature patches (mostly triangular or quadrilateral). However, very often warping of an image object with an arbitrary shape is required. This requires a warping technique which is based on boundary contour instead of feature points or feature line-vectors. In addition, when feature point or feature vector based techniques are used, approximation of the object boundary by using point or vectors is required. In this case, the matching process of the corresponding pairs will be very time consuming if a fine approximation is required. In this paper, we propose a contour-based warping technique for warping image objects with arbitrary shapes. The novel idea of the new method is the introduction of mathematical morphology to allow a more flexible control of image warping. Two morphological operators are used as contour determinators. The erosion operator is used to warp image contents which are inside a user specified contour while the dilation operation is used to warp image contents which are outside of the contour. This new method is proposed to assist further development of a semi-automatic motion morphing system when accompanied with robust feature extractors such as deformable template or active contour model.

  14. Improving the accuracy of ultrafast ligand-based screening: incorporating lipophilicity into ElectroShape as an extra dimension.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M Stuart; Finn, Paul W; Morris, Garrett M; Richards, W Graham

    2011-08-01

    In a previous paper, we presented the ElectroShape method, which we used to achieve successful ligand-based virtual screening. It extended classical shape-based methods by applying them to the four-dimensional shape of the molecule where partial charge was used as the fourth dimension to capture electrostatic information. This paper extends the approach by using atomic lipophilicity (alogP) as an additional molecular property and validates it using the improved release 2 of the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD). When alogP replaced partial charge, the enrichment results were slightly below those of ElectroShape, though still far better than purely shape-based methods. However, when alogP was added as a complement to partial charge, the resulting five-dimensional enrichments shows a clear improvement in performance. This demonstrates the utility of extending the ElectroShape virtual screening method by adding other atom-based descriptors.

  15. Search for large extra dimensions in final states containing one photon or jet and large missing transverse energy produced in pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-10-31

    We present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E_{T} and either a photon or a jet produced in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II. For gamma+E_{T} and jet+E_{T} candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 and 1.1 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity, respectively, we observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model M_{D} as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model.

  16. Acoustic analysis of warp potential of green ponderosa pine lumber

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; William T. Simpson

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of acoustic analysis as presorting criteria to identify warp-prone boards before kiln drying. Dimension lumber, 38 by 89 mm (nominal 2 by 4 in.) and 2.44 m (8 ft) long, sawn from open-grown small-diameter ponderosa pine trees, was acoustically tested lengthwise at green condition. Three acoustic properties (acoustic speed, rate of...

  17. Time Warp Operating System (TWOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellenot, Steven F.

    1993-01-01

    Designed to support parallel discrete-event simulation, TWOS is complete implementation of Time Warp mechanism - distributed protocol for virtual time synchronization based on process rollback and message annihilation.

  18. Correlation functions of warped CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Xu, Jianfei

    2018-04-01

    Warped conformal field theory (WCFT) is a two dimensional quantum field theory whose local symmetry algebra consists of a Virasoro algebra and a U(1) Kac-Moody algebra. In this paper, we study correlation functions for primary operators in WCFT. Similar to conformal symmetry, warped conformal symmetry is very constraining. The form of the two and three point functions are determined by the global warped conformal symmetry while the four point functions can be determined up to an arbitrary function of the cross ratio. The warped conformal bootstrap equation are constructed by formulating the notion of crossing symmetry. In the large central charge limit, four point functions can be decomposed into global warped conformal blocks, which can be solved exactly. Furthermore, we revisit the scattering problem in warped AdS spacetime (WAdS), and give a prescription on how to match the bulk result to a WCFT retarded Green's function. Our result is consistent with the conjectured holographic dualities between WCFT and WAdS.

  19. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  20. Limits on extra dimensions and new particle production in the exclusive photon and missing energy signature in pp collisions at square root [s]=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Dunietz, I; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Frisch, H J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, K; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Onyisi, P U E; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, A; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2002-12-31

    The exclusive gammaE(T) signal has a small standard model cross section and is thus a channel sensitive to new physics. This signature is predicted by models with a superlight gravitino or with large extra spatial dimensions. We search for such signals at the Collider Detector at Fermilab, using 87 pb(-1) of data at square root [s]=1.8 TeV, and extract 95% C.L. limits on these processes. A limit of 221 GeV is set on the scale |F|(1/2) in supersymmetric models. For 4, 6, and 8 extra dimensions, model-dependent limits on the fundamental mass scale M(D) of 0.55, 0.58, and 0.60 TeV, respectively, are found. We also specify a "pseudo-model-independent" method of comparing the results to theoretical predictions.

  1. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb –1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibilitymore » level. For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.« less

  2. Environmental Dependence of Warps in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Hong Bae; Bae, Hyun Jeong

    2016-12-01

    We determined the warp parameters of 192 warped galaxies which are selected from 340 edge-on galaxies using color images as well as r-band isophotal maps. We derive the local background density (Σ_{n}) to examine the dependence of the warp amplitudes on the galaxy environment. We find a clear trend that strongly warped galaxies are likely to be found in high density regions where tidal interactions are supposed to be frequent. However, the correlation between α_{w} and Σ_{n} is too weak for weakly warped galaxies (α_{w} < 4°) and the cumulative distributions of weakly warped galaxies are not significantly different from those of galaxies with no detectable warps. This suggests that tidal interactions do not play a decisive role in the formation of weak warps.}

  3. Evaluating the warping of laminated particleboard panels

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2004-01-01

    Laminated wood composites have been used widely in the secondary manufacturing processes in the wood panel industries. Warping, which is defined as the out-of-plane deformation of an initially flat panel, is a longstanding problem associated with the use of laminated wood composites. The mechanism of warping is still not fully understood. A new two- dimensional warping...

  4. Warped product space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xinliang; Wong, Willie Wai Yeung

    2018-01-01

    Many classical results in relativity theory concerning spherically symmetric space-times have easy generalizations to warped product space-times, with a two-dimensional Lorentzian base and arbitrary dimensional Riemannian fibers. We first give a systematic presentation of the main geometric constructions, with emphasis on the Kodama vector field and the Hawking energy; the construction is signature independent. This leads to proofs of general Birkhoff-type theorems for warped product manifolds; our theorems in particular apply to situations where the warped product manifold is not necessarily Einstein, and thus can be applied to solutions with matter content in general relativity. Next we specialize to the Lorentzian case and study the propagation of null expansions under the assumption of the dominant energy condition. We prove several non-existence results relating to the Yamabe class of the fibers, in the spirit of the black-hole topology theorem of Hawking–Galloway–Schoen. Finally we discuss the effect of the warped product ansatz on matter models. In particular we construct several cosmological solutions to the Einstein–Euler equations whose spatial geometry is generally not isotropic.

  5. Galactic Warps in Triaxial Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Ann, Hong Bae

    2009-05-01

    We study the behavior of galactic disks in triaxial halos both numerically and analytically to see if warps can be excited and sustained in triaxial potentials. We consider the following two scenarios: (1) galactic disks that are initially tilted relative to the equatorial plane of the halo (for a pedagogical purpose), and (2) tilted infall of dark matter relative to the equatorial plane of the disk and the halo. With numerical simulations of 100,000 disk particles in a fixed halo potential, we find that in triaxial halos, warps can be excited and sustained just as in spherical or axisymmetric halos but they show some oscillatory behavior and even can be transformed to a polar-ring system if the halo has a prolate-like triaxiality. The nonaxisymmetric component of the halo causes the disk to nutate, and the differential nutation between the inner and outer parts of the disk generally makes the magnitude of the warp slightly diminish and fluctuate. We also find that warps are relatively weaker in oblate and oblate-like triaxial halos, and since these halos are the halo configurations of disk galaxies inferred by cosmological simulations, our results are consistent with the fact that most of the observed warps are quite weak. We derive approximate formulae for the torques exerted on the disk by the triaxial halo and the dark matter torus, and with these formulae we successfully describe the behavior of the disks in our simulations. The techniques used in deriving these formulae could be applied for realistic halos with more complex structures.

  6. Atlas warping for brain morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Alexei M. C.; Gee, James C.

    1998-06-01

    In this work, we describe an automated approach to morphometry based on spatial normalizations of the data, and demonstrate its application to the analysis of gender differences in the human corpus callosum. The purpose is to describe a population by a reduced and representative set of variables, from which a prior model can be constructed. Our approach is rooted in the assumption that individual anatomies can be considered as quantitative variations on a common underlying qualitative plane. We can therefore imagine that a given individual's anatomy is a warped version of some referential anatomy, also known as an atlas. The spatial warps which transform a labeled atlas into anatomic alignment with a population yield immediate knowledge about organ size and shape in the group. Furthermore, variation within the set of spatial warps is directly related to the anatomic variation among the subjects. Specifically, the shape statistics--mean and variance of the mappings--for the population can be calculated in a special basis, and an eigendecomposition of the variance performed to identify the most significant modes of shape variation. The results obtained with the corpus callosum study confirm the existence of substantial anatomical differences between males and females, as reported in previous experimental work.

  7. Unraveling strong dynamics with the fifth dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batell, Brian Thomas

    Theories with strong gauge dynamics, such as quantum chromodynamics and technicolor, have evaded analytic solutions despite more than thirty years of efforts on the part of elementary particle theorists. Holography refers to methods inspired by the AdS/CFT correspondence in string theory to understand gauge theories in the nonperturbative regime using extra dimensions. The studies presented in this thesis describe new applications of holography to models of electroweak symmetry breaking and quantum chromodynamics. The four-dimensional holographic description of the Randall-Sundrum model, or warped extra dimension, is a theory of electroweak symmetry breaking with strong gauge dynamics, similar to technicolor or composite Higgs theories. A new tool, the holographic basis, is presented that allows one to quantitatively characterize the mixing between the elementary and composite states in the holographic theory. An exploration of localized gauge fields in the Randall-Sundrum framework is detailed, focusing on both theoretical and phenomenological issues. The holographic dual interpretation of localized gauge bosons is also derived. Bottom-up holographic approaches to quantum chromodynamics, referred to as AdS/QCD, describe the observed properties of mesons reasonably well. In models with a soft infrared wall, Regge trajectories for high radial and spin states can also be obtained. A dynamical soft-wall AdS/QCD model is described, and the implications for top-down string constructions are discussed.

  8. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -ell-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μell = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μell ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μell = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μell > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μell > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  9. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -l-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μl = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μl ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μl = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μl > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μl > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  10. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals. PMID:26602458

  11. Effect of drying temperature on warp and downgrade of 2 by 4's from small-diameter ponderosa pine

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson

    2004-01-01

    Kiln drying at high temperature may reduce warp in dimension lumber sawn from small-diameter trees. In this study, we examined the effect on warp of high drying temperatures in conjunction with top loading immediately after drying and after storage in typical conditions that result in further moisture loss. Eight-foot-long 2- by 4-in. (2 by 4) boards sawn from open-...

  12. Adding an extra dimension to what students see through the light microscope: a lab exercise demonstrating critical analysis for microscopy students.

    PubMed

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate aspects of a problem-based learning approach, envisaging growth not just in two dimensions, but in three dimensions. For some cells, what appears to be pulsatile growth could also be explained by growth at a constant rate up and down in the z-axis. Depending on the diffraction pattern generated by the tip of the cell, this movement in the z-axis could go undetected. This raises the possibility that pulsatile growth seen in some species may be an artifact generated by the limitations of the light microscope. Students were subsequently asked to rate their awareness of the need to think critically about what they see through a microscope, using a scale of 1 (unaware) to 5 (very much aware). Prior to doing the lab exercise, the mean rating was 2.7; this increased to 4.4 after the lab. The students also indicated a likelihood of being more critical in their thinking in other aspects of their biology curriculum.

  13. Warped Disks and Inclined Rings around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Sackett, Penny D.; Briggs, Franklin H.

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; Group photograph; 1. The intergalactic HI supply F. Briggs; 2. Neutral gas infall into NGC 628 J. Kamphuis and F. Briggs; 3. VLA HI observations of the radio galaxy Centaurus A J. M. van der Hulst, J. H. van Gorkom, A. D. Haschick and A. D. Tubbs; 4. A geometric model for the dust-band of Centaurus A R. A. Nicholson, K. Taylor and J. Bland; 5. The circumgalactic ring of gas in Leo S. E. Schneider; 6. Using gas kinematics to measure M/L in elliptical galaxies T. de Zeeuw; 7. Velocity fields of disks in triaxial potentials P. J. Teuben; 8. Modeling the atomic gas in NGC 4278 J. F. Lees; 9. A few statistics from the catalog of polar-ring galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 10. Dynamics of polar rings L. S. Sparke; 11. Mergers and the structure of disk galaxies L. Hernquist; 12. Formation of polar rings H.-W. Rix and N. Katz; 13. Gas-dynamical models of settling disks D. Christodoulou and J. E. Tohline; 14. Evolutionary processes affecting galactic accretion disks T. Steiman-Cameron; 15. Particle simulations of polar rings T. Quinn; 16. A bending instability in prolate stellar systems D. Merritt; 17. The Milky Way: lopsided or barred? K. Kuijken; 18. Merger origin of starburst galaxies L. Hernquist; 19. Warped and flaring HI disks A. Bosma; 20. Behaviour of warps in extended disks F. Briggs and J. Kamphuis; 21. Observational constraints for the explanation of warps E. Battaner, E. Florido, M.-L. Sanchez-Saavedra and M. Prieto; 22. Warps in S0s: observations versus theories G. Galletta; 23. Warps and bulges J. Pitesky; 24. Time evolution of galactic warps P. Hofner and L. S. Sparke; 25. Are warps normal modes? S. Casertano; 26. Disk warping in a slewing potential E. C. Ostriker; 27. Concluding discussion Moderator: K. C. Freeman; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  14. An extra dimension to decision-making in animals: the three-way trade-off between speed, effort per-unit-time and accuracy.

    PubMed

    de Froment, Adrian J; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Levin, Simon A

    2014-12-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  15. An Extra Dimension to Decision-Making in Animals: The Three-way Trade-off between Speed, Effort per-Unit-Time and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    de Froment, Adrian J.; Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  16. SNACC Extras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Mark; Scolnic, D.; Riess, A. G.; Tonry, J. L.; Rodney, S. A.; Rest, A.; Stubbs, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive application of the SuperNovAe Cross-Correlation (SNACC) filters developed by Scolnic et al. (2009) for follow-up identification and redshift of type Ia supernovae in current and upcoming supernovae surveys will itself produce a unique imaging survey. We will present a collection of simulated and actual sources from the initial observing run using the new 4-band SNACC filters with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope to explore the extra potential of this unique data set.

  17. Seamless Warping of Diffusion Tensor Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xuejun; Bansal, Ravi; Plessen, Kerstin J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    To warp diffusion tensor fields accurately, tensors must be reoriented in the space to which the tensors are warped based on both the local deformation field and the orientation of the underlying fibers in the original image. Existing algorithms for warping tensors typically use forward mapping deformations in an attempt to ensure that the local deformations in the warped image remains true to the orientation of the underlying fibers; forward mapping, however, can also create “seams” or gaps and consequently artifacts in the warped image by failing to define accurately the voxels in the template space where the magnitude of the deformation is large (e.g., |Jacobian| > 1). Backward mapping, in contrast, defines voxels in the template space by mapping them back to locations in the original imaging space. Backward mapping allows every voxel in the template space to be defined without the creation of seams, including voxels in which the deformation is extensive. Backward mapping, however, cannot reorient tensors in the template space because information about the directional orientation of fiber tracts is contained in the original, unwarped imaging space only, and backward mapping alone cannot transfer that information to the template space. To combine the advantages of forward and backward mapping, we propose a novel method for the spatial normalization of diffusion tensor (DT) fields that uses a bijection (a bidirectional mapping with one-to-one correspondences between image spaces) to warp DT datasets seamlessly from one imaging space to another. Once the bijection has been achieved and tensors have been correctly relocated to the template space, we can appropriately reorient tensors in the template space using a warping method based on Procrustean estimation. PMID:18334425

  18. Warp-averaging event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Begleiter, H; Porjesz, B

    2001-10-01

    To align the repeated single trials of the event-related potential (ERP) in order to get an improved estimate of the ERP. A new implementation of the dynamic time warping is applied to compute a warp-average of the single trials. The trilinear modeling method is applied to filter the single trials prior to alignment. Alignment is based on normalized signals and their estimated derivatives. These features reduce the misalignment due to aligning the random alpha waves, explaining amplitude differences in latency differences, or the seemingly small amplitudes of some components. Simulations and applications to visually evoked potentials show significant improvement over some commonly used methods. The new implementation of the dynamic time warping can be used to align the major components (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3) of the repeated single trials. The average of the aligned single trials is an improved estimate of the ERP. This could lead to more accurate results in subsequent analysis.

  19. Some causes of warping in plywood and veneered products

    Treesearch

    1966-01-01

    Requests are frequently received by the Forest Products Laboratory to examine warped plywood, veneered table tops, or similar products, to explain the cause of the warping, and if possible to suggest measures to remedy the difficulty.

  20. Galaxy travel via Alcubierre's warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fil'chenkov, M.; Laptev, Yu.

    2017-10-01

    The possibilities of interstellar flights for extraterrestrial civilizations have been considered. A superluminal motion (hypermotion) via M. Alcubierre's warp drive is considered. Parameters of the warp drive have been estimated. The equations of starship geodesics have been solved. The starship velocity has been shown to exceed the speed of light, with the local velocity relative to the deformed space-time being subluminal. Hawking's radiation does not prove to affect the ship interior considerably. Difficulties related to a practical realization of the hypermotion are indicated.

  1. Needle bar for warp knitting machines

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, Adolf; Thumling, Manfred

    1979-01-01

    Needle bar for warp knitting machines with a number of needles individually set into slits of the bar and having shafts cranked to such an extent that the head section of each needle is in alignment with the shaft section accommodated by the slit. Slackening of the needles will thus not influence the needle spacing.

  2. Analyzing the Pieces of a Warped Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-04

    This image composite shows a warped and magnified view of a galaxy discovered by the Herschel Space Observatory, one of five such galaxies uncovered by the infrared telescope. The galaxy, referred to as SDP 81 is the yellow dot in the left image.

  3. Industrial applications of multiaxial warp knit composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past few years, multiaxial warp knit (MWK) fabrics have made significant inroads into the industrial composites arena. This paper examines the use of MWK fabrics in industrial composite applications. Although the focus is on current applications of MWK fabrics in composites, this paper also discusses the physical properties, advantages and disadvantages of MWK fabrics. The author also offers possibilities for the future of MWK fabrics in the industrial composites arena.

  4. Band warping, band non-parabolicity, and Dirac points in electronic and lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resca, Lorenzo; Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-10-01

    We illustrate at a fundamental level the physical and mathematical origins of band warping and band non-parabolicity in electronic and vibrational structures. We point out a robust presence of pairs of topologically induced Dirac points in a primitive-rectangular lattice using a p-type tight-binding approximation. We analyze two-dimensional primitive-rectangular and square Bravais lattices with implications that are expected to generalize to more complex structures. Band warping is shown to arise at the onset of a singular transition to a crystal lattice with a larger symmetry group, which allows the possibility of irreducible representations of higher dimensions, hence band degeneracy, at special symmetry points in reciprocal space. Band warping is incompatible with a multi-dimensional Taylor series expansion, whereas band non-parabolicities are associated with multi-dimensional Taylor series expansions to all orders. Still band non-parabolicities may merge into band warping at the onset of a larger symmetry group. Remarkably, while still maintaining a clear connection with that merging, band non-parabolicities may produce pairs of conical intersections at relatively low-symmetry points. Apparently, such conical intersections are robustly maintained by global topology requirements, rather than any local symmetry protection. For two p-type tight-binding bands, we find such pairs of conical intersections drifting along the edges of restricted Brillouin zones of primitive-rectangular Bravais lattices as lattice constants vary relatively to each other, until these conical intersections merge into degenerate warped bands at high-symmetry points at the onset of a square lattice. The conical intersections that we found appear to have similar topological characteristics as Dirac points extensively studied in graphene and other topological insulators, even though our conical intersections have none of the symmetry complexity and protection afforded by the latter more

  5. A local model of warped magnetized accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, J. B.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2018-06-01

    We derive expressions for the local ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for a warped astrophysical disc using a warped shearing box formalism. A perturbation expansion of these equations to first order in the warping amplitude leads to a linear theory for the internal local structure of magnetized warped discs in the absence of magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence. In the special case of an external magnetic field oriented normal to the disc surface, these equations are solved semi-analytically via a spectral method. The relatively rapid warp propagation of low-viscosity Keplerian hydrodynamic warped discs is diminished by the presence of a magnetic field. The magnetic tension adds a stiffness to the epicyclic oscillations, detuning the natural frequency from the orbital frequency and thereby removing the resonant forcing of epicyclic modes characteristic of hydrodynamic warped discs. In contrast to a single hydrodynamic resonance, we find a series of Alfvénic-epicyclic modes which may be resonantly forced by the warped geometry at critical values of the orbital shear rate q and magnetic field strength. At these critical points large internal torques are generated and anomalously rapid warp propagation occurs. As our treatment omits MRI turbulence, these results are of greatest applicability to strongly magnetized discs.

  6. Characterization of multiaxial warp knit composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Hasko, Gregory H.; Cano, Roberto J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to characterize the mechanical behavior and damage tolerance of two multiaxial warp knit fabrics to determine the acceptability of these fabrics for high performance composite applications. The tests performed included compression, tension, open hole compression, compression after impact and compression-compression fatigue. Tests were performed on as-fabricated fabrics and on multi-layer fabrics that were stitched together with either carbon or Kevlar stitching yarn. Results of processing studies for vacuum impregnation with Hercules 3501-6 epoxy resin and pressure impregnation with Dow Tactix 138/H41 epoxy resin and British Petroleum BP E905L epoxy resin are presented.

  7. Using acoustic analysis to presort warp-prone ponderosa pine 2 by 4s before kiln-drying

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; William T. Simpson

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of acoustic analysis as presorting criteria to identify warp-prone boards before kiln-drying. Dimension lumber, 38 by 89 mm (nominal 2 by 4 in.) and 2.44 m (8 it) long, sawn from open-grown small-diameter ponderosa pine trees, was acoustically tested lengthwise at green condition. Three acoustic properties (acoustic speed, rate of...

  8. Language comprehension warps the mirror neuron system.

    PubMed

    Zarr, Noah; Ferguson, Ryan; Glenberg, Arthur M

    2013-01-01

    Is the mirror neuron system (MNS) used in language understanding? According to embodied accounts of language comprehension, understanding sentences describing actions makes use of neural mechanisms of action control, including the MNS. Consequently, repeatedly comprehending sentences describing similar actions should induce adaptation of the MNS thereby warping its use in other cognitive processes such as action recognition and prediction. To test this prediction, participants read blocks of multiple sentences where each sentence in the block described transfer of objects in a direction away or toward the reader. Following each block, adaptation was measured by having participants predict the end-point of videotaped actions. The adapting sentences disrupted prediction of actions in the same direction, but (a) only for videos of biological motion, and (b) only when the effector implied by the language (e.g., the hand) matched the videos. These findings are signatures of the MNS.

  9. Soft hairy warped black hole entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumiller, Daniel; Hacker, Philip; Merbis, Wout

    2018-02-01

    We reconsider warped black hole solutions in topologically massive gravity and find novel boundary conditions that allow for soft hairy excitations on the horizon. To compute the associated symmetry algebra we develop a general framework to compute asymptotic symmetries in any Chern-Simons-like theory of gravity. We use this to show that the near horizon symmetry algebra consists of two u (1) current algebras and recover the surprisingly simple entropy formula S = 2 π( J 0 + + J 0 - ), where J 0 ± are zero mode charges of the current algebras. This provides the first example of a locally non-maximally symmetric configuration exhibiting this entropy law and thus non-trivial evidence for its universality.

  10. Warped unification, proton stability, and dark matter.

    PubMed

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Servant, Géraldine

    2004-12-03

    We show that solving the problem of baryon-number violation in nonsupersymmetric grand unified theories (GUT's) in warped higher-dimensional spacetime can lead to a stable Kaluza-Klein particle. This exotic particle has gauge quantum numbers of a right-handed neutrino, but carries fractional baryon number and is related to the top quark within the higher-dimensional GUT. A combination of baryon number and SU(3) color ensures its stability. Its relic density can easily be of the right value for masses in the 10 GeV-few TeV range. An exciting aspect of these models is that the entire parameter space will be tested at near future dark matter direct detection experiments. Other exotic GUT partners of the top quark are also light and can be produced at high energy colliders with distinctive signatures.

  11. Language comprehension warps the mirror neuron system

    PubMed Central

    Zarr, Noah; Ferguson, Ryan; Glenberg, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Is the mirror neuron system (MNS) used in language understanding? According to embodied accounts of language comprehension, understanding sentences describing actions makes use of neural mechanisms of action control, including the MNS. Consequently, repeatedly comprehending sentences describing similar actions should induce adaptation of the MNS thereby warping its use in other cognitive processes such as action recognition and prediction. To test this prediction, participants read blocks of multiple sentences where each sentence in the block described transfer of objects in a direction away or toward the reader. Following each block, adaptation was measured by having participants predict the end-point of videotaped actions. The adapting sentences disrupted prediction of actions in the same direction, but (a) only for videos of biological motion, and (b) only when the effector implied by the language (e.g., the hand) matched the videos. These findings are signatures of the MNS. PMID:24381553

  12. Some examples of image warping for low vision prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Loshin, David S.

    1988-01-01

    NASA has developed an image processor, the Programmable Remapper, for certain functions in machine vision. The Remapper performs a highly arbitrary geometric warping of an image at video rate. It might ultimately be shrunk to a size and cost that could allow its use in a low-vision prosthesis. Coordinate warpings have been developed for retinitis pigmentosa (tunnel vision) and for maculapathy (loss of central field) that are intended to make best use of the patient's remaining viable retina. The rationales and mathematics are presented for some warpings that we will try in clinical studies using the Remapper's prototype.

  13. Mechanical properties of 3D printed warped membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Xiao, Kechao; Weaver, James C.; Vlassak, Joost J.; Nelson, David R.

    2015-03-01

    We explore how a frozen background metric affects the mechanical properties of solid planar membranes. Our focus is a special class of ``warped membranes'' with a preferred random height profile characterized by random Gaussian variables h (q) in Fourier space with zero mean and variance < | h (q) | 2 > q-m . It has been shown theoretically that in the linear response regime, this quenched random disorder increases the effective bending rigidity, while the Young's and shear moduli are reduced. Compared to flat plates of the same thickness t, the bending rigidity of warped membranes is increased by a factor hv / t while the in-plane elastic moduli are reduced by t /hv , where hv =√{< | h (x) | 2 > } describes the frozen height fluctuations. Interestingly, hv is system size dependent for warped membranes characterized with m > 2 . We present experimental tests of these predictions, using warped membranes prepared via high resolution 3D printing.

  14. Namaste (counterbalancing) technique: Overcoming warping in costal cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Kapil S.; Bachhav, Manoj; Shrotriya, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Indian noses are broader and lack projection as compared to other populations, hence very often need augmentation, that too by large volume. Costal cartilage remains the material of choice in large volume augmentations and repair of complex primary and secondary nasal deformities. One major disadvantage of costal cartilage grafts (CCG) which offsets all other advantages is the tendency to warp and become distorted over a period of time. We propose a simple technique to overcome this menace of warping. Materials and Methods: We present the data of 51 patients of rhinoplasty done using CCG with counterbalancing technique over a period of 4 years. Results: No evidence of warping was found in any patient up to a maximum follow-up period of 4 years. Conclusion: Counterbalancing is a useful technique to overcome the problem of warping. It gives liberty to utilize even unbalanced cartilage safely to provide desired shape and use the cartilage without any wastage. PMID:26424973

  15. Namaste (counterbalancing) technique: Overcoming warping in costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kapil S; Bachhav, Manoj; Shrotriya, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    Indian noses are broader and lack projection as compared to other populations, hence very often need augmentation, that too by large volume. Costal cartilage remains the material of choice in large volume augmentations and repair of complex primary and secondary nasal deformities. One major disadvantage of costal cartilage grafts (CCG) which offsets all other advantages is the tendency to warp and become distorted over a period of time. We propose a simple technique to overcome this menace of warping. We present the data of 51 patients of rhinoplasty done using CCG with counterbalancing technique over a period of 4 years. No evidence of warping was found in any patient up to a maximum follow-up period of 4 years. Counterbalancing is a useful technique to overcome the problem of warping. It gives liberty to utilize even unbalanced cartilage safely to provide desired shape and use the cartilage without any wastage.

  16. Formation and Maintenance of Galactic Warps in Triaxial Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, M. W.; Kim, S. S.; Ann, H. B.

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the self-gravitating disk in a fixed axisymmetric halo with a torus of late cosmic infall that is tilted relative to the initial disk. This is an extension to the study by Shen & Sellwood (2006). We find that the magnitude of the warp is suppressed by a factor of ˜ 2 when the halo is moderately oblate while the magnitude of the warp periodically oscillates when the halo is moderately prolate.

  17. Time Warp Operating System, Version 2.5.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellenot, Steven F.; Gieselman, John S.; Hawley, Lawrence R.; Peterson, Judy; Presley, Matthew T.; Reiher, Peter L.; Springer, Paul L.; Tupman, John R.; Wedel, John J., Jr.; Wieland, Frederick P.; hide

    1993-01-01

    Time Warp Operating System, TWOS, is special purpose computer program designed to support parallel simulation of discrete events. Complete implementation of Time Warp software mechanism, which implements distributed protocol for virtual synchronization based on rollback of processes and annihilation of messages. Supports simulations and other computations in which both virtual time and dynamic load balancing used. Program utilizes underlying resources of operating system. Written in C programming language.

  18. Movie denoising by average of warped lines.

    PubMed

    Bertalmío, Marcelo; Caselles, Vicent; Pardo, Alvaro

    2007-09-01

    Here, we present an efficient method for movie denoising that does not require any motion estimation. The method is based on the well-known fact that averaging several realizations of a random variable reduces the variance. For each pixel to be denoised, we look for close similar samples along the level surface passing through it. With these similar samples, we estimate the denoised pixel. The method to find close similar samples is done via warping lines in spatiotemporal neighborhoods. For that end, we present an algorithm based on a method for epipolar line matching in stereo pairs which has per-line complexity O (N), where N is the number of columns in the image. In this way, when applied to the image sequence, our algorithm is computationally efficient, having a complexity of the order of the total number of pixels. Furthermore, we show that the presented method is unsupervised and is adapted to denoise image sequences with an additive white noise while respecting the visual details on the movie frames. We have also experimented with other types of noise with satisfactory results.

  19. Warping Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Curvature Effect on Sensing Properties: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakina, S. H.; Johari, Zaharah; Auzar, Zuriana; Alias, N. Ezaila; Mohamad, Azam; Zakaria, N. Aini

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the interaction between gas molecules and warped armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) using Extended-Huckel Theory. There are two types of warping known as inward and upward. The sensing properties including binding energy, charge transfer and sensitivity were examined for both warped AGNR cases for 3m+1 configuration and were compared with previous work. Through simulation, it was found that a substantial increase in binding energy by more than 50% was achieved when warped at a higher angle. It is also showed that there was a significant difference in sensitivity for both warping cases when reacting with O2 and NH3 molecules. Interestingly, the ability of the inward warped in sensing O2 and NH3 considerably increases upon warping angle. By applying back gate bias, this shows that current conductivity of the inward warped is twice as high as the upward warped AGNR.

  20. Frame Shift/warp Compensation for the ARID Robot System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latino, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    The Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID) is a system aimed at automating the tedious task of inspecting orbiter radiator panels. The ARID must have the ability to aim a camera accurately at the desired inspection points, which are in the order of 13,000. The ideal inspection points are known; however, the panel may be relocated due to inaccurate parking and warpage. A method of determining the mathematical description of a translated as well as a warped surface by accurate measurement of only a few points on this surface is developed here. The method uses a linear warp model whose effect is superimposed on the rigid body translation. Due to the angles involved, small angle approximations are possible, which greatly reduces the computational complexity. Given an accurate linear warp model, all the desired translation and warp parameters can be obtained by knowledge of the ideal locations of four fiducial points and the corresponding measurements of these points on the actual radiator surface. The method uses three of the fiducials to define a plane and the fourth to define the warp. Given this information, it is possible to determine a transformation that will enable the ARID system to translate any desired inspection point on the ideal surface to its corresponding value on the actual surface.

  1. Warped document image correction method based on heterogeneous registration strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lijing; Zhan, Guoliang; Peng, Quanyao; Li, Yang; Li, Yifan

    2013-03-01

    With the popularity of digital camera and the application requirement of digitalized document images, using digital cameras to digitalize document images has become an irresistible trend. However, the warping of the document surface impacts on the quality of the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system seriously. To improve the warped document image's vision quality and the OCR rate, this paper proposed a warped document image correction method based on heterogeneous registration strategies. This method mosaics two warped images of the same document from different viewpoints. Firstly, two feature points are selected from one image. Then the two feature points are registered in the other image base on heterogeneous registration strategies. At last, image mosaics are done for the two images, and the best mosaiced image is selected by OCR recognition results. As a result, for the best mosaiced image, the distortions are mostly removed and the OCR results are improved markedly. Experimental results show that the proposed method can resolve the issue of warped document image correction more effectively.

  2. The Modified Dynamics is Conducive to Galactic Warp Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brada, Rafael; Milgrom, Mordehai

    2000-03-01

    There is an effect in the modified dynamics that is conducive to the formation of warps. Because of the nonlinearity of the theory, the internal dynamics of a galaxy is affected by a perturber over and above possible tidal effects. For example, a relatively distant and light companion or the mean influence of a parent cluster, with negligible tidal effects, could still produce a significant warp in the outer part of a galactic disk. We present results of numerical calculations for simplified models that show, for instance, that a satellite with the (baryonic) mass and distance of the Magellanic Clouds can distort the axisymmetric field of the Milky Way enough to produce a warp of the magnitude (and position) observed. Details of the warp geometry remain to be explained; we use a static configuration that can produce only warps with a straight line of nodes. In more realistic simulations, one must reckon with the motion of the perturbing body, which sometimes occurs on timescales not much longer than the response time of the disk.

  3. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  4. Extra Pay for Extra Duties, 1967-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    The practice of adding supplements to teachers' salaries for the guidance of pupil-participating extracurricular activities is widely used. To meet the demand for information on "extra pay for extra duties," a comprehensive study was made, including extra pay for extra duties of both athletic and nonathletic activities. Included are only those…

  5. Modulus stabilization in a non-flat warped braneworld scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Indrani; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2017-05-01

    The stability of the modular field in a warped brane world scenario has been a subject of interest for a long time. Goldberger and Wise (GW) proposed a mechanism to achieve this by invoking a massive scalar field in the bulk space-time neglecting the back-reaction. In this work, we examine the possibility of stabilizing the modulus without bringing about any external scalar field. We show that instead of flat 3-branes as considered in Randall-Sundrum (RS) warped braneworld model, if one considers a more generalized version of warped geometry with de Sitter 3-brane, then the brane vacuum energy automatically leads to a modulus potential with a metastable minimum. Our result further reveals that in this scenario the gauge hierarchy problem can also be resolved for an appropriate choice of the brane's cosmological constant.

  6. Some Examples Of Image Warping For Low Vision Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Loshin, David S.

    1988-08-01

    NASA and Texas Instruments have developed an image processor, the Programmable Remapper 1, for certain functions in machine vision. The Remapper performs a highly arbitrary geometric warping of an image at video rate. It might ultimately be shrunk to a size and cost that could allow its use in a low-vision prosthesis. We have developed coordinate warpings for retinitis pigmentosa (tunnel vision) and for maculapathy (loss of central field) that are intended to make best use of the patient's remaining viable retina. The rationales and mathematics are presented for some warpings that we will try in clinical studies using the Remapper's prototype. (Recorded video imagery was shown at the conference for the maculapathy remapping.

  7. Aspects of warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jia-Ju; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Zhong, De-Liang

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we apply the thermodynamics method to investigate the holographic pictures for the BTZ black hole, the spacelike and the null warped black holes in three-dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG). Even though there are higher derivative terms in these theories, the thermodynamics method is still effective. It gives consistent results with the ones obtained by using asymptotical symmetry group (ASG) analysis. In doing the ASG analysis we develop a brute-force realization of the Barnich-Brandt-Compere formalism with Mathematica code, which also allows us to calculate the masses and the angular momenta of the black holes. In particular, we propose the warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence in the new massive gravity, which states that quantum gravity in the warped spacetime could holographically dual to a two-dimensional CFT with {c_R}={c_L}=24 /{Gm{β^2√{{2( {21-4{β^2}} )}}}}.

  8. VME rollback hardware for time warp multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, Michael J.; Buzzell, Calvin A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the research effort is to develop and demonstrate innovative hardware to implement specific rollback and timing functions required for efficient queue management and precision timekeeping in multiprocessor discrete event simulations. The previously completed phase 1 effort demonstrated the technical feasibility of building hardware modules which eliminate the state saving overhead of the Time Warp paradigm used in distributed simulations on multiprocessor systems. The current phase 2 effort will build multiple pre-production rollback hardware modules integrated with a network of Sun workstations, and the integrated system will be tested by executing a Time Warp simulation. The rollback hardware will be designed to interface with the greatest number of multiprocessor systems possible. The authors believe that the rollback hardware will provide for significant speedup of large scale discrete event simulation problems and allow multiprocessors using Time Warp to dramatically increase performance.

  9. Design of a reading test for low vision image warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loshin, David S.; Wensveen, Janice; Juday, Richard D.; Barton, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    NASA and the University of Houston College of Optometry are examining the efficacy of image warping as a possible prosthesis for at least two forms of low vision - maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. Before incurring the expense of reducing the concept to practice, one would wish to have confidence that a worthwhile improvement in visual function would result. NASA's Programmable Remapper (PR) can warp an input image onto arbitrary geometric coordinate systems at full video rate, and it has recently been upgraded to accept computer-generated video text. We have integrated the Remapper with an SRI eye tracker to simulate visual malfunction in normal observers. A reading performance test has been developed to determine if the proposed warpings yield an increase in visual function; i.e., reading speed. We will describe the preliminary experimental results of this reading test with a simulated central field defect with and without remapped images.

  10. Human low vision image warping - Channel matching considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Smith, Alan T.; Loshin, David S.

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the possibility that a video image may productively be warped prior to presentation to a low vision patient. This could form part of a prosthesis for certain field defects. We have done preliminary quantitative studies on some notions that may be valid in calculating the image warpings. We hope the results will help make best use of time to be spent with human subjects, by guiding the selection of parameters and their range to be investigated. We liken a warping optimization to opening the largest number of spatial channels between the pixels of an input imager and resolution cells in the visual system. Some important effects are not quantified that will require human evaluation, such as local 'squashing' of the image, taken as the ratio of eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the transformation. The results indicate that the method shows quantitative promise. These results have identified some geometric transformations to evaluate further with human subjects.

  11. A Natural Extension of Standard Warped Higher-Dimensional Compactifications: Theory and Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungwoo

    Warped higher-dimensional compactifications with "bulk'' standard model, or their AdS/CFT dual as the purely 4D scenario of Higgs compositeness and partial compositeness, offer an elegant approach to resolving the electroweak hierarchy problem as well as the origins of flavor structure. However, low-energy electroweak/flavor/CP constraints and the absence of non-standard physics at LHC Run 1 suggest that a "little hierarchy problem'' remains, and that the new physics underlying naturalness may lie out of LHC reach. Assuming this to be the case, we show that there is a simple and natural extension of the minimal warped model in the Randall-Sundrum framework, in which matter, gauge and gravitational fields propagate modestly different degrees into the IR of the warped dimension, resulting in rich and striking consequences for the LHC (and beyond). The LHC-accessible part of the new physics is AdS/CFT dual to the mechanism of "vectorlike confinement'', with TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge and gravitational fields dual to spin-0,1,2 composites. Unlike the minimal warped model, these low-lying excitations have predominantly flavor-blind and flavor/CP-safe interactions with the standard model. In addition, the usual leading decay modes of the lightest KK gauge bosons into top and Higgs bosons are suppressed. This effect permits erstwhile subdominant channels to become significant. These include flavor-universal decays to all pairs of SM fermions, and a novel channel--decay to a radion and a SM gauge boson, followed by radion decay to a pair of SM gauge bosons. We present a detailed phenomenological study of the latter cascade decay processes. Remarkably, this scenario also predicts small deviations from flavor-blindness originating from virtual effects of Higgs/top compositeness at O(10) TeV, with subdominant resonance decays into a pair of Higgs/top-rich final states, giving the LHC an early "preview'' of the nature of the resolution of the hierarchy

  12. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS 3

    DOE PAGES

    Compere, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-02

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS 3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS 3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS 3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS 3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS 3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetriesmore » are also consistent alternatives. Next, we study the phase space of these theories when propagating modes are included. We show that, as long as one can define a conserved symplectic form without introducing instabilities, the Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetries can be extended to the entire (linearised) phase space. In conclusion, this implies that, at least at semi-classical level, consistent theories of gravity in warped AdS 3 are described by a two-dimensional conformal field theory, as long as stability is not an issue.« less

  13. Warps and intra-cavity kinematics in transition disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, S.

    2017-07-01

    The inferrence of radial gaps in the "transition disk" stage of protoplanetary disk evolution motivates questions on their origin, and possible link to planet formation. This talk presented recent observations of cavities in transition disks. Here we report on the aspects related to the observations of warps, and on the structure and kinematics of the residual gas inside TD cavities.

  14. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS 3

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS 3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS 3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS 3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS 3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS 3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetriesmore » are also consistent alternatives. Next, we study the phase space of these theories when propagating modes are included. We show that, as long as one can define a conserved symplectic form without introducing instabilities, the Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetries can be extended to the entire (linearised) phase space. In conclusion, this implies that, at least at semi-classical level, consistent theories of gravity in warped AdS 3 are described by a two-dimensional conformal field theory, as long as stability is not an issue.« less

  15. 10. View of Draper darby chain loom from warp beam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Draper darby chain loom from warp beam end, patent date 1913, made by Drpaer Corporation, Hopedale, Massachusetts. Acquired ca. 1941. Note Draper-Northrop name on automatic spindle changer. - Riverdale Cotton Mill, Corner of Middle & Lower Streets, Valley, Chambers County, AL

  16. z -Weyl gravity in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Taeyoon; Oh, Phillial, E-mail: dpproject@skku.edu, E-mail: ploh@skku.edu

    We consider higher dimensional gravity in which the four dimensional spacetime and extra dimensions are not treated on an equal footing. The anisotropy is implemented in the ADM decomposition of higher dimensional metric by requiring the foliation preserving diffeomorphism invariance adapted to the extra dimensions, thus keeping the general covariance only for the four dimensional spacetime. The conformally invariant gravity can be constructed with an extra (Weyl) scalar field and a real parameter z which describes the degree of anisotropy of conformal transformation between the spacetime and extra dimensional metrics. In the zero mode effective 4D action, it reduces tomore » four-dimensional scalar-tensor theory coupled with nonlinear sigma model described by extra dimensional metrics. There are no restrictions on the value of z at the classical level and possible applications to the cosmological constant problem with a specific choice of z are discussed.« less

  17. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-04-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale ℓ cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on ℓ by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 105 BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure ℓ down to ℓ=0.33μm for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to ℓ=1.5μm due to strong degeneracies between ℓ and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on ℓ from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.141601]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  18. Video, An Extra Dimension to the Study of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouman, Lenny

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on advantages of video as a tool in teaching literature in a foreign language class. Emphasizes that use of visual aids, such as video, can help the reader overcome his limitations in comprehending vocabulary meanings and context of sentences and lists two ways in which a film version of a story can be presented: in nonstop viewing or in…

  19. Object Orientated Simulation on Transputer Arrays Using Time Warp

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Transputer based Machines, Grenoble, Sept 14-16 1987, Ed. Traian Muntean. [ 3 ] Muntean T., "PARX operating system kernal; application to Minix ", Esprit P1085...Simulation 3 Time Warp Simulation 8 3.1 Rollback Mechanism ........ ............................. 8 3.2 Simulation Outp,,t...23 4.3.* Importan Noc .......... ............................ 23 5 Low Level Operations 24 • 3 IIiI 5.1 Global Virtual Timne Estimiation

  20. Warps, grids and curvature in triple vector bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flari, Magdalini K.; Mackenzie, Kirill

    2018-06-01

    A triple vector bundle is a cube of vector bundle structures which commute in the (strict) categorical sense. A grid in a triple vector bundle is a collection of sections of each bundle structure with certain linearity properties. A grid provides two routes around each face of the triple vector bundle, and six routes from the base manifold to the total manifold; the warps measure the lack of commutativity of these routes. In this paper we first prove that the sum of the warps in a triple vector bundle is zero. The proof we give is intrinsic and, we believe, clearer than the proof using decompositions given earlier by one of us. We apply this result to the triple tangent bundle T^3M of a manifold and deduce (as earlier) the Jacobi identity. We further apply the result to the triple vector bundle T^2A for a vector bundle A using a connection in A to define a grid in T^2A . In this case the curvature emerges from the warp theorem.

  1. A new beam theory using first-order warping functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ie, C. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Due to a certain type of loading and geometrical boundary conditions, each beam will respond differently depending on its geometrical form of the cross section and its material definition. As an example, consider an isotropic rectangular beam under pure bending. Plane sections perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the beam will remain plane and perpendicular to the deformed axis after deformation. However, due to the Poisson effect, particles in the planes will move relative to each other resulting in a form of anticlastic deformation. In other words, even in pure bending of an isotropic beam, each cross section will deform in the plane. If the material of the beam above is replaced by a generally anisotropic material, then the cross sections will not only deform in the plane, but also out of plane. Hence, in general, both in-plane deformation and out-of-plane warping will exist and depend on the geometrical form and material definition of the cross sections and also on the loadings. For the purpose of explanation, an analogy is made. The geometrical forms of the bodies of each individual are unique. Hence, different sizes of clothes are needed. Finding the sizes of clothes for individuals is like determining the warping functions in beams. A new beam theory using first-order warping functions is introduced. Numerical examples will be presented for an isotropic beam with rectangular cross section. The theory can be extended for composite beams.

  2. Lepton-flavor universality violation in R K and {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} from warped space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Quirós, Mariano; Salas, Lindber

    2017-07-01

    Some anomalies in the processes b → sℓℓ ( ℓ = μ, e) and b\\to cℓ {\\overline{ν}}_{ℓ } ( ℓ = τ, μ, e), in particular in the observables R K and {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} , have been found by the BaBar, LHCb and Belle collaborations, leading to a possible lepton flavor universality violation. If these anomalies were confirmed they would inevitably lead to physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper we try to accommodate the present anomalies in an extra dimensional theory, solving the naturalness problem of the Standard Model by means of a warped metric with a strong conformality violation near the infra-red brane. The R K anomaly can be accommodated provided that the left-handed bottom quark and muon lepton have some degree of compositeness in the dual theory. The theory is consistent with all electroweak and flavor observables, and with all direct searches of Kaluza-Klein electroweak gauge bosons and gluons. The fermion spectrum, and fermion mixing angles, can be reproduced by mostly elementary right-handed bottom quarks, and tau and muon leptons. Moreover the {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} anomaly requires a strong degree of compositeness for the left-handed tau leptons, which turns out to be in tension with experimental data on the {g}_{τ_L}^Z coupling, possibly unless some degree of fine-tuning is introduced in the fixing of the CKM matrix.

  3. Evaluation of the Intel iWarp parallel processor for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hine, Butler P., III; Fong, Terrence W.

    1993-01-01

    The potential of a DARPA-sponsored advanced processor, the Intel iWarp, for use in future SSF Data Management Systems (DMS) upgrades is evaluated through integration into the Ames DMS testbed and applications testing. The iWarp is a distributed, parallel computing system well suited for high performance computing applications such as matrix operations and image processing. The system architecture is modular, supports systolic and message-based computation, and is capable of providing massive computational power in a low-cost, low-power package. As a consequence, the iWarp offers significant potential for advanced space-based computing. This research seeks to determine the iWarp's suitability as a processing device for space missions. In particular, the project focuses on evaluating the ease of integrating the iWarp into the SSF DMS baseline architecture and the iWarp's ability to support computationally stressing applications representative of SSF tasks.

  4. Formation of Warped Disks by Galactic Flyby Encounters. I. Stellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonghwan H.; Peirani, Sebastien; Kim, Sungsoo; Ann, Hong Bae; An, Sung-Ho; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Warped disks are almost ubiquitous among spiral galaxies. Here we revisit and test the "flyby scenario" of warp formation, in which impulsive encounters between galaxies are responsible for warped disks. Based on N-body simulations, we investigate the morphological and kinematical evolution of the stellar component of disks when galaxies undergo flyby interactions with adjacent dark matter halos. We find that the so-called "S"-shaped warps can be excited by flybys and sustained for even up to a few billion years, and that this scenario provides a cohesive explanation for several key observations. We show that disk warp properties are governed primarily by the following three parameters: (1) the impact parameter, i.e., the minimum distance between two halos; (2) the mass ratio between two halos; and (3) the incident angle of the flyby perturber. The warp angle is tied up with all three parameters, yet the warp lifetime is particularly sensitive to the incident angle of the perturber. Interestingly, the modeled S-shaped warps are often non-symmetric depending on the incident angle. We speculate that the puzzling U- and L-shaped warps are geometrically superimposed S-types produced by successive flybys with different incident angles, including multiple interactions with a satellite on a highly elongated orbit.

  5. Watershed regressions for pesticides (warp) models for predicting atrazine concentrations in Corn Belt streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) models, previously developed for atrazine at the national scale, are improved for application to the United States (U.S.) Corn Belt region by developing region-specific models that include watershed characteristics that are influential in predicting atrazine concentration statistics within the Corn Belt. WARP models for the Corn Belt (WARP-CB) were developed for annual maximum moving-average (14-, 21-, 30-, 60-, and 90-day durations) and annual 95th-percentile atrazine concentrations in streams of the Corn Belt region. The WARP-CB models accounted for 53 to 62% of the variability in the various concentration statistics among the model-development sites. Model predictions were within a factor of 5 of the observed concentration statistic for over 90% of the model-development sites. The WARP-CB residuals and uncertainty are lower than those of the National WARP model for the same sites. Although atrazine-use intensity is the most important explanatory variable in the National WARP models, it is not a significant variable in the WARP-CB models. The WARP-CB models provide improved predictions for Corn Belt streams draining watersheds with atrazine-use intensities of 17 kg/km2 of watershed area or greater.

  6. Traces of warping subsided tectonic blocks on Miranda, Enceladus, Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    Icy satellites of the outer Solar system have very large range of sizes - from kilometers to thousands of kilometers. Bodies less than 400-500 km across have normally irregular shapes , often presenting simple Plato's polyhedrons woven by standing inertiagravity waves (see an accompanying abstract of Kochemasov). Larger bodies with enhanced gravity normally are rounded off and have globular shapes but far from ideal spheres. This is due to warping action of inertia-gravity waves of various wavelengths origin of which is related to body movements in elliptical keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations (alternating accelerations cause periodically changing forces acting upon a body what means oscillations of its spheres in form of standing warping waves). The fundamental wave 1 and its first overtone wave 2 produce ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy - two segmental structure and tectonic sectoring superimposed on this dichotomy. Two kinds of tectonic blocks (segments and sectors) are formed: uplifted (+) and subsided (-). Uplifting means increasing planetary radius of blocks, subsiding - decreasing radius (as a sequence subsiding blocks diminishing their surfaces must be warped, folded, wrinkled; uplifting blocks increasing their surfaces tend to be deeply cracked, fallen apart). To level changing angular momenta of blocks subsided areas are filled with denser material than uplifted ones (one of the best examples is Earth with its oceanic basins filled with dense basalts and uplifted continents built of less dense on average andesitic material). Icy satellites follow the same rule. Their warped surfaces show differing chemistries or structures of constructive materials. Uplifted blocks are normally built with light (by color and density) water ice. Subsided blocks - depressions, "seas', "lakes", coronas - by somewhat denser material differing in color from water ice (very sharply - Iapetus, moderately - Europa, slightly - many saturnian satellites). A very

  7. Performance of resin transfer molded multiaxial warp knit composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Hasko, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Composite materials that are subjected to complex loads have traditionally been fabricated with multidirectionally oriented prepreg tape materials. Some of the problems associated with this type of construction include low delamination resistance, poor out-of-plane strength, and labor intensive fabrication processes. Textile reinforced composites with through-the-thickness reinforcement have the potential to solve some of these problems. Recently, a relatively new class of noncrimp fabrics designated as multiaxial warp knits have been developed to minimize some of the high cost and damage tolerance concerns. Multiple stacks of warp knit fabrics can be knitted or stitched together to reduce layup labor cost. The through-the-thickness reinforcement can provide significant improvements in damage tolerance and out-of-plane strength. Multilayer knitted/stitched preforms, in conjunction with resin transfer molding (RTM), offer potential for significant cost savings in fabrication of primary aircraft structures. The objectives of this investigation were to conduct RTM processing studies and to characterize the mechanical behavior of composites reinforced with three multiaxial warp knit fabrics. The three fabrics investigated were produced by Hexcel and Milliken in the United States, and Saerbeck in Germany. Two resin systems, British Petroleum E9O5L and 3M PR 500, were characterized for RTM processing. The performance of Hexcel and Milliken quasi-isotropic knitted fabrics are compared to conventional prepreg tape laminates. The performance of the Saerbeck fabric is compared to uniweave wing skin layups being investigated by Douglas Aircraft Company in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program. Tests conducted include tension, open hole tension, compression, open hole compression, and compression after impact. The effects of fabric defects, such as misaligned fibers and gaps between tows, on material performance are also discussed. Estimated material and labor

  8. Warping and tearing of misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric supermassive black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, K.; Sohn, B.W.; Jung, T.

    2015-07-01

    We study the warping and tearing of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on an eccentric orbit. The circumbinary disk is significantly misaligned with the binary orbital plane, and is subject to the time-dependent tidal torques. In principle, such a disk is warped and precesses, and is torn into mutually misaligned rings in the region, where the tidal precession torques are stronger than the local viscous torques. We derive the tidal-warp and tearing radii of the misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries. We find that in disks with the viscosity parameter α larger than amore » critical value depending on the disk aspect ratio, the disk warping appears outside the tearing radius. This condition is expressed for small amplitude warps as α > √H/(3r) for H/r∼<0.1, where H is the disk scale height. If α < √H/(3r), only the disk tearing occurs because the tidal warp radius is inside the tearing radius, where most of disk material is likely to rapidly accrete onto SMBHs. In warped and torn disks, both the tidal-warp and the tearing radii most strongly depend on the binary semi-major axis, although they also mildly depend on the other orbital and disk parameters. This strong dependence enables us to estimate the semi-major axis, once the tidal warp or tearing radius is determined observationally: for the tidal warp radius of 0.1 pc, the semi-major axis is estimated to be ∼10{sup −2} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙} black hole with typical orbital and disk parameters. We also briefly discuss the possibility that central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are supermassive black hole binaries.« less

  9. TWOS - TIME WARP OPERATING SYSTEM, VERSION 2.5.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellenot, S. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Time Warp Operating System (TWOS) is a special-purpose operating system designed to support parallel discrete-event simulation. TWOS is a complete implementation of the Time Warp mechanism, a distributed protocol for virtual time synchronization based on process rollback and message annihilation. Version 2.5.1 supports simulations and other computations using both virtual time and dynamic load balancing; it does not support general time-sharing or multi-process jobs using conventional message synchronization and communication. The program utilizes the underlying operating system's resources. TWOS runs a single simulation at a time, executing it concurrently on as many processors of a distributed system as are allocated. The simulation needs only to be decomposed into objects (logical processes) that interact through time-stamped messages. TWOS provides transparent synchronization. The user does not have to add any more special logic to aid in synchronization, nor give any synchronization advice, nor even understand much about how the Time Warp mechanism works. The Time Warp Simulator (TWSIM) subdirectory contains a sequential simulation engine that is interface compatible with TWOS. This means that an application designer and programmer who wish to use TWOS can prototype code on TWSIM on a single processor and/or workstation before having to deal with the complexity of working on a distributed system. TWSIM also provides statistics about the application which may be helpful for determining the correctness of an application and for achieving good performance on TWOS. Version 2.5.1 has an updated interface that is not compatible with 2.0. The program's user manual assists the simulation programmer in the design, coding, and implementation of discrete-event simulations running on TWOS. The manual also includes a practical user's guide to the TWOS application benchmark, Colliding Pucks. TWOS supports simulations written in the C programming language. It is designed

  10. DISK AROUND STAR MAY BE WARPED BY UNSEEN PLANET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided strong evidence for the existence of a roughly Jupiter-sized planet orbiting the star Beta Pictoris. Detailed Hubble images of the inner region of the 200-billion mile diameter dust disk encircling the star reveal an unexpected warp. Researchers say the warp can be best explained as caused by the gravitational pull of an unseen planet. The suspected planet would dwell within a five-billion mile wide clear zone in the center of the disk. This zone has long been suspected of harboring planets that swept it clear of debris, but the Hubble discovery provides more definitive evidence that a planet is there. (Alternative theories suggest the clear zone is empty because it is too warm for ice particles to exist.) 'We were surprised to find that the innermost region of the disk is orbiting in a different plane from the rest of the disk,' says Chris Burrows (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, and the European Space Agency) who is presenting his results at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in San Antonio, Texas. As he analyzed Hubble images, taken in January 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, Burrows discovered an unusual bulge in the nearly edge-on disk, which was mirrored on the other side of the star. 'Such a warp cannot last for very long,' says Burrows. 'This means that something is still twisting the disk and keeping out of a basic flat shape.' 'The presence of the warp is strong though indirect evidence for the existence of planets in this system. If Beta Pictoris had a solar system like ours, it would produce a warp like the one we see.' Burrows concludes, 'The Beta Pictoris system seems to contain at least one planet not too dissimilar from Jupiter in size and orbit. Rocky planets like Earth might circle Beta Pictoris as well. However, there is no evidence for these yet. Any planet will be at least a billion- times fainter than the star, and presently impossible to view directly

  11. Brane-world motion in compact dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Brian; Levin, Janna; Parikh, Maulik

    2011-08-01

    The topology of extra dimensions can break global Lorentz invariance, singling out a globally preferred frame even in flat spacetime. Through experiments that probe global topology, an observer can determine her state of motion with respect to the preferred frame. This scenario is realized if we live on a brane universe moving through a flat space with compact extra dimensions. We identify three experimental effects due to the motion of our universe that one could potentially detect using gravitational probes. One of these relates to the peculiar properties of the twin paradox in multiply-connected spacetimes. Another relies on the fact that the Kaluza-Klein modes of any bulk field are sensitive to boundary conditions. A third concerns the modification to the Newtonian potential on a moving brane. Remarkably, we find that even small extra dimensions are detectable by brane observers if the brane is moving sufficiently fast. Communicated by P R L V Moniz

  12. Asymptotically spacelike warped anti-de Sitter spacetimes in generalized minimal massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we show that warped AdS3 black hole spacetime is a solution of the generalized minimal massive gravity (GMMG) and introduce suitable boundary conditions for asymptotically warped AdS3 spacetimes. Then we find the Killing vector fields such that transformations generated by them preserve the considered boundary conditions. We calculate the conserved charges which correspond to the obtained Killing vector fields and show that the algebra of the asymptotic conserved charges is given as the semi direct product of the Virasoro algebra with U(1) current algebra. We use a particular Sugawara construction to reconstruct the conformal algebra. Thus, we are allowed to use the Cardy formula to calculate the entropy of the warped black hole. We demonstrate that the gravitational entropy of the warped black hole exactly coincides with what we obtain via Cardy’s formula. As we expect, the warped Cardy formula also gives us exactly the same result as we obtain from the usual Cardy’s formula. We calculate mass and angular momentum of the warped black hole and then check that obtained mass, angular momentum and entropy to satisfy the first law of the black hole mechanics. According to the results of this paper we believe that the dual theory of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of GMMG is a warped CFT.

  13. Warped conformal field theory as lower spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Diego M.; Rollier, Blaise

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional Warped Conformal Field Theories (WCFTs) may represent the simplest examples of field theories without Lorentz invariance that can be described holographically. As such they constitute a natural window into holography in non-AdS space-times, including the near horizon geometry of generic extremal black holes. It is shown in this paper that WCFTs posses a type of boost symmetry. Using this insight, we discuss how to couple these theories to background geometry. This geometry is not Riemannian. We call it Warped Geometry and it turns out to be a variant of a Newton-Cartan structure with additional scaling symmetries. With this formalism the equivalent of Weyl invariance in these theories is presented and we write two explicit examples of WCFTs. These are free fermionic theories. Lastly we present a systematic description of the holographic duals of WCFTs. It is argued that the minimal setup is not Einstein gravity but an SL (2, R) × U (1) Chern-Simons Theory, which we call Lower Spin Gravity. This point of view makes manifest the definition of boundary for these non-AdS geometries. This case represents the first step towards understanding a fully invariant formalism for WN field theories and their holographic duals.

  14. Modifications to holographic entanglement entropy in warped CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Wen, Qiang; Xu, Jianfei

    2017-02-01

    In [1] it was observed that asymptotic boundary conditions play an important role in the study of holographic entanglement beyond AdS/CFT. In particular, the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal must be modified for warped AdS3 (WAdS3) with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In this paper, we consider AdS3 and WAdS3 with Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions. The conjectured holographic duals are warped conformal field theories (WCFTs), featuring a Virasoro-Kac-Moody algebra. We provide a holographic calculation of the entanglement entropy and Rényi entropy using AdS3/WCFT and WAdS3/WCFT dualities. Our bulk results are consistent with the WCFT results derived by Castro-Hofman-Iqbal using the Rindler method. Comparing with [1], we explicitly show that the holographic entanglement entropy is indeed affected by boundary conditions. Both results differ from the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, indicating new relations between spacetime geometry and quantum entanglement for holographic dualities beyond AdS/CFT.

  15. Time warp operating system version 2.7 internals manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Time Warp Operating System (TWOS) is an implementation of the Time Warp synchronization method proposed by David Jefferson. In addition, it serves as an actual platform for running discrete event simulations. The code comprising TWOS can be divided into several different sections. TWOS typically relies on an existing operating system to furnish some very basic services. This existing operating system is referred to as the Base OS. The existing operating system varies depending on the hardware TWOS is running on. It is Unix on the Sun workstations, Chrysalis or Mach on the Butterfly, and Mercury on the Mark 3 Hypercube. The base OS could be an entirely new operating system, written to meet the special needs of TWOS, but, to this point, existing systems have been used instead. The base OS's used for TWOS on various platforms are not discussed in detail in this manual, as they are well covered in their own manuals. Appendix G discusses the interface between one such OS, Mach, and TWOS.

  16. Automatic view synthesis by image-domain-warping.

    PubMed

    Stefanoski, Nikolce; Wang, Oliver; Lang, Manuel; Greisen, Pierre; Heinzle, Simon; Smolic, Aljosa

    2013-09-01

    Today, stereoscopic 3D (S3D) cinema is already mainstream, and almost all new display devices for the home support S3D content. S3D distribution infrastructure to the home is already established partly in the form of 3D Blu-ray discs, video on demand services, or television channels. The necessity to wear glasses is, however, often considered as an obstacle, which hinders broader acceptance of this technology in the home. Multiviewautostereoscopic displays enable a glasses free perception of S3D content for several observers simultaneously, and support head motion parallax in a limited range. To support multiviewautostereoscopic displays in an already established S3D distribution infrastructure, a synthesis of new views from S3D video is needed. In this paper, a view synthesis method based on image-domain-warping (IDW) is presented that automatically synthesizes new views directly from S3D video and functions completely. IDW relies on an automatic and robust estimation of sparse disparities and image saliency information, and enforces target disparities in synthesized images using an image warping framework. Two configurations of the view synthesizer in the scope of a transmission and view synthesis framework are analyzed and evaluated. A transmission and view synthesis system that uses IDW is recently submitted to MPEG's call for proposals on 3D video technology, where it is ranked among the four best performing proposals.

  17. Watershed regressions for pesticides (WARP) for predicting atrazine concentration in Corn Belt streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The 95-percent prediction intervals are well within a factor of 10 above and below the predicted concentration statistic. WARP-CB model predictions were within a factor of 5 of the observed concentration statistic for over 90 percent of the model-development sites. The WARP-CB residuals and uncertainty are lower than those of the National WARP model for the same sites. The WARP-CB models provide improved predictions of the probability of exceeding a specified criterion or benchmark for Corn Belt streams draining watersheds with high atrazine use intensities; however, National WARP models should be used for Corn Belt streams where atrazine use intensities are less than 17 kg/km2 of watershed area.

  18. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) models for predicting stream concentrations of multiple pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Crawford, Charles G.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Watershed Regressions for Pesticides for multiple pesticides (WARP-MP) are statistical models developed to predict concentration statistics for a wide range of pesticides in unmonitored streams. The WARP-MP models use the national atrazine WARP models in conjunction with an adjustment factor for each additional pesticide. The WARP-MP models perform best for pesticides with application timing and methods similar to those used with atrazine. For other pesticides, WARP-MP models tend to overpredict concentration statistics for the model development sites. For WARP and WARP-MP, the less-than-ideal sampling frequency for the model development sites leads to underestimation of the shorter-duration concentration; hence, the WARP models tend to underpredict 4- and 21-d maximum moving-average concentrations, with median errors ranging from 9 to 38% As a result of this sampling bias, pesticides that performed well with the model development sites are expected to have predictions that are biased low for these shorter-duration concentration statistics. The overprediction by WARP-MP apparent for some of the pesticides is variably offset by underestimation of the model development concentration statistics. Of the 112 pesticides used in the WARP-MP application to stream segments nationwide, 25 were predicted to have concentration statistics with a 50% or greater probability of exceeding one or more aquatic life benchmarks in one or more stream segments. Geographically, many of the modeled streams in the Corn Belt Region were predicted to have one or more pesticides that exceeded an aquatic life benchmark during 2009, indicating the potential vulnerability of streams in this region.

  19. Compacted dimensions and singular plasmonic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pendry, J B; Huidobro, Paloma Arroyo; Luo, Yu; Galiffi, Emanuele

    2017-11-17

    In advanced field theories, there can be more than four dimensions to space, the excess dimensions described as compacted and unobservable on everyday length scales. We report a simple model, unconnected to field theory, for a compacted dimension realized in a metallic metasurface periodically structured in the form of a grating comprising a series of singularities. An extra dimension of the grating is hidden, and the surface plasmon excitations, though localized at the surface, are characterized by three wave vectors rather than the two of typical two-dimensional metal grating. We propose an experimental realization in a doped graphene layer. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Compacted dimensions and singular plasmonic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendry, J. B.; Huidobro, Paloma Arroyo; Luo, Yu; Galiffi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    In advanced field theories, there can be more than four dimensions to space, the excess dimensions described as compacted and unobservable on everyday length scales. We report a simple model, unconnected to field theory, for a compacted dimension realized in a metallic metasurface periodically structured in the form of a grating comprising a series of singularities. An extra dimension of the grating is hidden, and the surface plasmon excitations, though localized at the surface, are characterized by three wave vectors rather than the two of typical two-dimensional metal grating. We propose an experimental realization in a doped graphene layer.

  1. [Biometric identification method for ECG based on the piecewise linear representation (PLR) and dynamic time warping (DTW)].

    PubMed

    Yang, Licai; Shen, Jun; Bao, Shudi; Wei, Shoushui

    2013-10-01

    To treat the problem of identification performance and the complexity of the algorithm, we proposed a piecewise linear representation and dynamic time warping (PLR-DTW) method for ECG biometric identification. Firstly we detected R peaks to get the heartbeats after denoising preprocessing. Then we used the PLR method to keep important information of an ECG signal segment while reducing the data dimension at the same time. The improved DTW method was used for similarity measurements between the test data and the templates. The performance evaluation was carried out on the two ECG databases: PTB and MIT-BIH. The analystic results showed that compared to the discrete wavelet transform method, the proposed PLR-DTW method achieved a higher accuracy rate which is nearly 8% of rising, and saved about 30% operation time, and this demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a better performance.

  2. Applications of warped geometries: From cosmology to cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. M.

    This thesis describes several interrelated projects furthering the study of branes on warped geometries in string theory. First, we consider the non-perturbative interaction between D3 and D7 branes which stabilizes the overall volume in braneworld compactification scenarios. This interaction might offer stable nonsupersymmetric vacua which would naturally break supersymmetry if occupied by D3 branes. We derive the equations for the nonsupersymmetric vacua of the D3-brane and analyze them in the case of two particular 7-brane embeddings at the bottom of the warped deformed conifold. These geometries have negative dark energy. Stability of these models is possible but not generic. Further, we reevaluate brane/flux annihilation in a warped throat with one stabilized Kahler modulus. We find that depending on the relative size of various fluxes three things can occur: the decay process proceeds unhindered, the D3-branes are forbidden to decay classically, or the entire space decompactifies. Additionally, we show that the Kahler modulus receives a contribution from the collective 3-brane tension allowing significant changes in the compactified volume during the transition. Next, furthering the effort to describe cold atoms using AdS/CFT, we construct charged asymptotically Schrodinger black hole solutions of IIB supergravity. We begin by obtaining a closed-form expression for the null Melvin twist of many type IIB backgrounds and identify the resulting five-dimensional effective action. We use these results to demonstrate that the near-horizon physics and thermodynamics of asymptotically Schrodinger black holes obtained in this way are essentially inherited from their AdS progenitors, and verify that they admit zero-temperature extremal limits with AdS2 near-horizon geometries. Finally, in an effort to understand rotating nonrelativistic systems we use the null Melvin twist technology on a charged rotating AdS black hole and discover a type of Godel space-time. We

  3. LHC signals for singlet neutrinos from a natural warped seesaw mechanism. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Du, Peizhi; Hong, Sungwoo

    2018-04-01

    A natural seesaw mechanism for obtaining the observed size of SM neutrino masses can arise in a warped extra-dimensional/composite Higgs framework. In a previous paper, we initiated the study of signals at the LHC for the associated ˜TeV mass SM singlet neutrinos, within a canonical model of S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B-L (LR) symmetry in the composite sector, as motivated by consistency with the EW precision tests. Here, we investigate LHC signals in a different region of parameter space for the same model, where production of singlet neutrinos can occur from particles beyond those in the usual LR models. Specifically, we assume that the composite (B -L ) gauge boson is lighter than all the others in the EW sector. We show that the composite (B -L ) gauge boson can acquire a significant coupling to light quarks simply via mixing with elementary hypercharge gauge boson. Thus, the singlet neutrino can be pair-produced via decays of the(B -L ) gauge boson, without a charged current counterpart. Furthermore, there is no decay for the (B -L ) gauge boson directly into dibosons, unlike for the usual case of WR± and Z'. Independently of the above extension of the EW sector, we analyze production of singlet neutrinos in decays of composite partners of S U (2 )L doublet leptons, which are absent in the usual LR models. In turn, these doublet leptons can be produced in composite WL decays. We show that the 4 -5 σ signal can be achieved for both cases described above for the following spectrum with 3000 fb-1 luminosity: 2-2.5 TeV composite gauge bosons, 1 TeV composite doublet lepton (for the second case) and 500-750 GeV singlet neutrino.

  4. Casimir force in Randall-Sundrum models with q+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail; Saad, Nasser

    2008-09-01

    We evaluate the Casimir force between two parallel plates in Randall-Sundrum (RS) scenarios extended by q compact dimensions. After giving exact expressions for one extra compact dimension (6D RS model), we generalize to an arbitrary number of compact dimensions. We present the complete calculation for both the two-brane scenario (RSI model) and the one-brane scenario (RSII model) using the method of summing over the modes. We investigate the effects of extra dimensions on the magnitude and sign of the force, and comment on limits for the size and number of the extra dimensions.

  5. Automatic classification of killer whale vocalizations using dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith C; Miller, Patrick J O

    2007-08-01

    A set of killer whale sounds from Marineland were recently classified automatically [Brown et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, EL34-EL40 (2006)] into call types using dynamic time warping (DTW), multidimensional scaling, and kmeans clustering to give near-perfect agreement with a perceptual classification. Here the effectiveness of four DTW algorithms on a larger and much more challenging set of calls by Northern Resident whales will be examined, with each call consisting of two independently modulated pitch contours and having considerable overlap in contours for several of the perceptual call types. Classification results are given for each of the four algorithms for the low frequency contour (LFC), the high frequency contour (HFC), their derivatives, and weighted sums of the distances corresponding to LFC with HFC, LFC with its derivative, and HFC with its derivative. The best agreement with the perceptual classification was 90% attained by the Sakoe-Chiba algorithm for the low frequency contours alone.

  6. Emergent gravity from a mass deformation in warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Gherghetta, Tony; Peloso, Marco; Poppitz, Erich

    2005-11-15

    We consider a deformation of five-dimensional warped gravity with bulk and boundary mass terms to quadratic order in the action. We show that massless zero modes occur for special choices of the masses. The tensor zero mode is a smooth deformation of the Randall-Sundrum graviton wave function and can be localized anywhere in the bulk. There is also a vector zero mode with similar localization properties, which is decoupled from conserved sources at tree level. Interestingly, there are no scalar modes, and the model is ghost-free at the linearized level. When the tensor zero mode is localized near the IRmore » brane, the dual interpretation is a composite graviton describing an emergent (induced) theory of gravity at the IR scale. In this case Newton's law of gravity changes to a new power law below the millimeter scale, with an exponent that can even be irrational.« less

  7. The effect of warp tension on the colour of jacquard fabric made with different weaves structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnoub, A.; Kadi, N.; Holmudd, O.; Peterson, J.; Skrifvars, M.

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of warp tension on fabric colour for several types of weaves structures, and found a relationship between them. The image analyse technique used to determine the proportion of yarns colour appearance, the advantage of this techniques is the rapidity and reliability. The woven fabric samples are consisting of a polyester warp yarn with continuous filaments and density of 33 end/cm, a polypropylene weft yarn with a density of 24 pick/cm, and the warp tension ranged between 12-22 cN/tex. The experimental results demonstrated the effect of the warp tension on the colour of fabric, and this effect is related to several factors, where the large proportion of warp appearance leads to larger effect on fabric colour. The difference in the value of colour differences ΔEcmc is larger is in the range 16 to 20 cN/tex of warp tension. Using statistical methods, a mathematical model to calculate the amount of the colour difference ΔEcmc caused by the change in warp tension had been proposed.

  8. Point-based warping with optimized weighting factors of displacement vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pielot, Ranier; Scholz, Michael; Obermayer, Klaus; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Hess, Andreas

    2000-06-01

    The accurate comparison of inter-individual 3D image brain datasets requires non-affine transformation techniques (warping) to reduce geometric variations. Constrained by the biological prerequisites we use in this study a landmark-based warping method with weighted sums of displacement vectors, which is enhanced by an optimization process. Furthermore, we investigate fast automatic procedures for determining landmarks to improve the practicability of 3D warping. This combined approach was tested on 3D autoradiographs of Gerbil brains. The autoradiographs were obtained after injecting a non-metabolized radioactive glucose derivative into the Gerbil thereby visualizing neuronal activity in the brain. Afterwards the brain was processed with standard autoradiographical methods. The landmark-generator computes corresponding reference points simultaneously within a given number of datasets by Monte-Carlo-techniques. The warping function is a distance weighted exponential function with a landmark- specific weighting factor. These weighting factors are optimized by a computational evolution strategy. The warping quality is quantified by several coefficients (correlation coefficient, overlap-index, and registration error). The described approach combines a highly suitable procedure to automatically detect landmarks in autoradiographical brain images and an enhanced point-based warping technique, optimizing the local weighting factors. This optimization process significantly improves the similarity between the warped and the target dataset.

  9. LHC signals for singlet neutrinos from a natural warped seesaw mechanism. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Du, Peizhi; Hong, Sungwoo

    2018-04-01

    Recently, it was shown in K. Agashe et al. [Phys. Rev. D 94, 013001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.013001] that a straightforward implementation of the type I seesaw mechanism in a warped extra dimensional framework is in reality a natural realization of "inverse" seesaw; i.e., the Standard Model (SM) neutrino mass is dominantly generated by exchange of pseudo-Dirac TeV-mass SM singlet neutrinos. By the AdS /CFT correspondence, this scenario is dual to these singlet particles being composites of some new strong dynamics, along with the SM Higgs boson (and possibly the top quark), with the rest of the SM particles being mostly elementary. We study signals from production of these heavy neutrinos at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We focus on the scenario where the strong sector has a global S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )X symmetry; such a left-right (LR) structure being motivated by consistency with the electroweak (EW) precision tests. The singlet neutrinos are charged under S U (2 )R×U (1 )X symmetry, thus can be produced from WR± exchange, as in four-dimensional LR symmetric models. However, the direct coupling of light quarks to WR± is negligible, due to WR± also being composite (cf. four-dimensional LR models); nonetheless, a sizable coupling can be induced by mixings among the various types of W± bosons. Furthermore, WR± decays dominantly into the singlet and composite partner of charged lepton (cf. SM lepton itself in four-dimensional LR model). This heavy charged lepton, in turn, decays into SM lepton, plus Z /Higgs , thus the latter can be used for extra identification of the signal. For a benchmark scenario with WR± of mass 2 TeV and singlet neutrino of mass 750 GeV, we find that, in both the dilepton +dijet +Higgs and trilepton +Higgs channels, significant evidence can be seen at the 14 TeV LHC for an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1 and that even discovery is possible with slightly more luminosity.

  10. SPACE WARPS - I. Crowdsourcing the discovery of gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Philip J.; Verma, Aprajita; More, Anupreeta; Davis, Christopher P.; More, Surhud; Kapadia, Amit; Parrish, Michael; Snyder, Chris; Wilcox, Julianne; Baeten, Elisabeth; Macmillan, Christine; Cornen, Claude; Baumer, Michael; Simpson, Edwin; Lintott, Chris J.; Miller, David; Paget, Edward; Simpson, Robert; Smith, Arfon M.; Küng, Rafael; Saha, Prasenjit; Collett, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    We describe SPACE WARPS, a novel gravitational lens discovery service that yields samples of high purity and completeness through crowdsourced visual inspection. Carefully produced colour composite images are displayed to volunteers via a web-based classification interface, which records their estimates of the positions of candidate lensed features. Images of simulated lenses, as well as real images which lack lenses, are inserted into the image stream at random intervals; this training set is used to give the volunteers instantaneous feedback on their performance, as well as to calibrate a model of the system that provides dynamical updates to the probability that a classified image contains a lens. Low-probability systems are retired from the site periodically, concentrating the sample towards a set of lens candidates. Having divided 160 deg2 of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey imaging into some 430 000 overlapping 82 by 82 arcsec tiles and displaying them on the site, we were joined by around 37 000 volunteers who contributed 11 million image classifications over the course of eight months. This stage 1 search reduced the sample to 3381 images containing candidates; these were then refined in stage 2 to yield a sample that we expect to be over 90 per cent complete and 30 per cent pure, based on our analysis of the volunteers performance on training images. We comment on the scalability of the SPACE WARPS system to the wide field survey era, based on our projection that searches of 105 images could be performed by a crowd of 105 volunteers in 6 d.

  11. Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1): Wideband Advanced Recorder and Processor (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terry; Kessler, John

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Earth Orbitor 1 (EO1) Wideband Advanced Recorder and Processor (WARP) is presented in viewgraph form. The WARP is a spacecraft component that receives, stores, and processes high rate science data and its associated ancillary data from multispectral detectors, hyperspectral detectors, and an atmospheric corrector, and then transmits the data via an X-band or S-band transmitter to the ground station. The WARP project goals are: (1) Pathfinder for next generation LANDSAT mission; (2) Flight prove architectures and technologies; and (3) Identify future technology needs.

  12. Innovative monitoring of 3D warp interlock fabric during forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, C.; Jerkovic, I.; Wang, P.; Boussu, F.; Koncar, V.; Soulat, D.; Grancaric, A. M.; Pineau, P.

    2017-10-01

    The final geometry of 3D warp interlock fabric needs to be check during the 3D forming step to ensure the right locations of warp and weft yarns inside the final structure. Thus, a new monitoring approach has been proposed based on sensor yarns located in the fabric thickness. To ensure the accuracy of measurements, the observation of the surface deformation of the 3D warp interlock fabric has been joined to the sensor yarns measurements. At the end, it has been revealed a good correlation between strain measurement done globally by camera and locally performed by sensor yarns.

  13. Embedding of the brane into six dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2002-10-01

    Embedding of the brane metric into Euclidean (2+4)-space is found. Brane geometry can be visualized as the surface of the hypersphere in six dimensions which ``radius'' is governed by the cosmological constant. Minkowski space in this picture is placed on the intersection of this surface with the plane formed by the extra space-like and time-like coordinates.

  14. Extra osseous primary Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Asad; Muhammad, Agha Taj; Soomro, Abdul Ghani; Siddiqui, Akmal Jamal

    2010-01-01

    The case of 20 years old boy with an extra osseous Ewing's sarcoma is described. He was initially diagnosed as a case of infiltrative malignant tumour of left suprarenal gland on the basis of preoperative workup but postoperative biopsy of surgically excised specimen confirmed Extra-osseous Ewing's Sarcoma (EES) suprarenal gland with no evidence of malignancy on skeletal scintiscan, bone marrow aspirate and histopathology Suprarenal location of primary EES is unknown and probably has not been reported in literature. We report a unique case of EES.

  15. Evaluating the effects of concrete pavement curling and warping on ride quality.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-09-01

    Construction of a jointed concrete pavement on US 34 near Greeley, Colorado in 2012 led to an investigation of slab curling : and warping that appeared to be contributing to undesirable levels of pavement roughness. Specifically, the westbound lanes ...

  16. Curl and Warp Analysis of the LTPP SPS-2 Site in Arizona : TechBrief

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-05-01

    Variability in the roughness levels of jointed Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements can often be observed over short periods of time. This study demonstrated specialized analyses for quantifying the effect of curl and warp on the roughness of joi...

  17. Velocity renormalization in graphene: The role of trigonal warping and electron-phonon coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, B. S.; Gökçek, N.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the combined effects of trigonal warping and electron-phonon interactions on the renormalization of the Fermi velocity in graphene. We present an analytical solution to the associated Fröhlich Hamiltonian describing the interaction of doubly degenerate-optical phonon modes of graphene with electrons in the presence of trigonal warp within the framework of Lee-Low-Pines theory. On the basis of our model, it is analytically shown that in addition to its renormalization, Fermi velocity exhibits strong anisotropy due to the trigonal warping. It is also found that in the regime where the trigonal warp starts, distortion of energy bands emerges due to electron-phonon coupling, and the bands exhibit strong anisotropy.

  18. Quantum tunneling and quasinormal modes in the spacetime of the Alcubierre warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, Kimet; Sakallı, İzzet; Övgün, Ali

    2018-01-01

    In a seminal paper, Alcubierre showed that Einstein's theory of general relativity appears to allow a super-luminal motion. In the present study, we use a recent eternal-warp-drive solution found by Alcubierre to study the effect of Hawking radiation upon an observer located within the warp drive in the framework of the quantum tunneling method. We find the same expression for the Hawking temperatures associated with the tunneling of both massive vector and scalar particles, and show this expression to be proportional to the velocity of the warp drive. On the other hand, since the discovery of gravitational waves, the quasinormal modes (QNMs) of black holes have also been extensively studied. With this purpose in mind, we perform a QNM analysis of massive scalar field perturbations in the background of the eternal-Alcubierre-warp-drive spacetime. Our analytical analysis shows that massive scalar perturbations lead to stable QNMs.

  19. Virtual time and time warp on the JPL hypercube. [operating system implementation for distributed simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, David; Beckman, Brian

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of virtual time and its implementation in the Time Warp Operating System at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Virtual time is a distributed synchronization paradigm that is appropriate for distributed simulation, database concurrency control, real time systems, and coordination of replicated processes. The Time Warp Operating System is targeted toward the distributed simulation application and runs on a 32-node JPL Mark II Hypercube.

  20. HUBBLE PHOTOGRAPHS WARPED GALAXY AS CAMERA PASSES MILESTONE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured an image of an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disk and showing how colliding galaxies spawn the formation of new generations of stars. The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our own Milky Way, appear flat when viewed edge-on. This month's Hubble Heritage image of ESO 510-G13 shows a galaxy that, by contrast, has an unusual twisted disk structure, first seen in ground-based photographs obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, roughly 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the structure of ESO 510-G13 are visible because the interstellar dust clouds that trace its disk are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge. The strong warping of the disk indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently undergone a collision with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort the structures of the galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge together in a process that takes millions of years. Eventually the disturbances will die out, and ESO 510-G13 will become a normal-appearing single galaxy. In the outer regions of ESO 510-G13, especially on the right-hand side of the image, we see that the twisted disk contains not only dark dust, but also bright clouds of blue stars. This shows that hot, young stars are being formed in the disk. Astronomers believe that the formation of new stars may be triggered by collisions between galaxies, as their interstellar clouds smash together and are compressed. The Heritage Team used Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty spiral arms, the bright bulge, and the blue star-forming regions. During the

  1. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  2. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Harper, Liam D; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners' perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: 'importance of extra-time', 'rule changes', 'efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision', 'nutritional timing', 'future research directions', 'preparatory modulations' and 'recovery'. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses, acute injury risk, recovery

  3. Weaving and bonding method to prevent warp and fill distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method to prevent fiber distortion in textile materials employed in a modified weaving process. In a first embodiment, a tacifier in powder form is applied to the yarn and melted while on the fabric. Cool air is then supplied after the tacifier has melted to expedite the solidification of the tacifier. In a second embodiment, a solution form of a tacifier is used by dissolving the tacifier into a solvent that has a high evaporation rate. The solution is then sprayed onto the fabric or fill yarn as each fill yarn is inserted into a shed of the fabric. A third embodiment applies the tacifier in a liquid form that has not been dissolved in a solvent. That is, the tacifier is melted and is sprayed as a liquid onto the fabric or fill yarn as it is being extracted from a fill yarn spool prior to the fill yarn being inserted into the shed of the fabric. A fourth embodiment employs adhesive yarns contained as an integral part of the warp or fill yarn. Additional tacifier material is not required because a matrix is used as the tacifier. The matrix is then locally melted using heating elements on clamping bars or take-up rollers, is cooled, if necessary, and solidified.

  4. Substructures In Protostellar Discs: Spirals, Gaps (And Warps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    The advent of high resolution imaging of protostellar discs, both in the sub-mm (thanks to ALMA) and in the near infrared, has radically changed our understanding of the evolution of such discs and of the planet formation process occuring within them. While in the past disc were modeled as simplified, axi-symmetric structures, often characterized by simple radial power-law for density and temperature, we now need more advanced modeling, able to describe the substructures observed. Such modeling needs to take into account both the gas component, that dominates the dynamics and the line emission, and the dust, which is responsible for the continuum mm band emission. Here, I review several aspects of such modeling. I will discuss the theory and some hydrodynamical simulations describing: (a) spiral density waves, for example induced by gravitational instabilities in young and massive discs; (b) gaps induced by the presence of a forming planet in the disc, with particular emphasis on the spectacular case of HL Tau, that we have recently successfully modeled; (c) warps, which are expected to develop in circumbinary discs, or in discs where a planet has been put on a very inclined orbit.

  5. On Closed Timelike Curves and Warped Brane World Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagter, Reinoud Jan

    2013-09-01

    At first glance, it seems possible to construct in general relativity theory causality violating solutions. The most striking one is the Gott spacetime. Two cosmic strings, approaching each other with high velocity, could produce closed timelike curves. It was quickly recognized that this solution violates physical boundary conditions. The effective one particle generator becomes hyperbolic, so the center of mass is tachyonic. On a 5-dimensional warped spacetime, it seems possible to get an elliptic generator, so no obstruction is encountered and the velocity of the center of mass of the effective particle has an overlap with the Gott region. So a CTC could, in principle, be constructed. However, from the effective 4D field equations on the brane, which are influenced by the projection of the bulk Weyl tensor on the brane, it follows that no asymptotic conical space time is found, so no angle deficit as in the 4D counterpart model. This could also explain why we do not observe cosmic strings.

  6. Restoring warped document images through 3D shape modeling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chew Lim; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zheng; Xia, Tao

    2006-02-01

    Scanning a document page from a thick bound volume often results in two kinds of distortions in the scanned image, i.e., shade along the "spine" of the book and warping in the shade area. In this paper, we propose an efficient restoration method based on the discovery of the 3D shape of a book surface from the shading information in a scanned document image. From a technical point of view, this shape from shading (SFS) problem in real-world environments is characterized by 1) a proximal and moving light source, 2) Lambertian reflection, 3) nonuniform albedo distribution, and 4) document skew. Taking all these factors into account, we first build practical models (consisting of a 3D geometric model and a 3D optical model) for the practical scanning conditions to reconstruct the 3D shape of the book surface. We next restore the scanned document image using this shape based on deshading and dewarping models. Finally, we evaluate the restoration results by comparing our estimated surface shape with the real shape as well as the OCR performance on original and restored document images. The results show that the geometric and photometric distortions are mostly removed and the OCR results are improved markedly.

  7. Models of gravitational lens candidates from Space Warps CFHTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küng, Rafael; Saha, Prasenjit; Ferreras, Ignacio; Baeten, Elisabeth; Coles, Jonathan; Cornen, Claude; Macmillan, Christine; Marshall, Phil; More, Anupreeta; Oswald, Lucy; Verma, Aprajita; Wilcox, Julianne K.

    2018-03-01

    We report modelling follow-up of recently discovered gravitational-lens candidates in the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Lens modelling was done by a small group of specially interested volunteers from the Space Warps citizen-science community who originally found the candidate lenses. Models are categorized according to seven diagnostics indicating (a) the image morphology and how clear or indistinct it is, (b) whether the mass map and synthetic lensed image appear to be plausible, and (c) how the lens-model mass compares with the stellar mass and the abundance-matched halo mass. The lensing masses range from ˜1011 to >1013 M⊙. Preliminary estimates of the stellar masses show a smaller spread in stellar mass (except for two lenses): a factor of a few below or above ˜1011 M⊙. Therefore, we expect the stellar-to-total mass fraction to decline sharply as lensing mass increases. The most massive system with a convincing model is J1434+522 (SW 05). The two low-mass outliers are J0206-095 (SW 19) and J2217+015 (SW 42); if these two are indeed lenses, they probe an interesting regime of very low star formation efficiency. Some improvements to the modelling software (SpaghettiLens), and discussion of strategies regarding scaling to future surveys with more and frequent discoveries, are included.

  8. LHC signals from cascade decays of warped vector resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh S.; Collins, Jack H.; Du, Peizhi

    Recently (arXiv:1608.00526), a new framework for warped higher-dimensional compactifications with “bulk” standard model (SM) was proposed: in addition to the UV (Planck scale) and IR (a couple of TeV) branes, there is an intermediate brane, taken to be around 10TeV. The SM matter and Higgs fields propagate from the UV brane down to this intermediate brane only, while gauge and gravity fields propagate in the entire bulk. Such a configuration renders the lightest gauge Kaluza-Klein (KK) states within LHC reach, simultaneously satisfying flavor and CP constraints. In addition, the usual leading decay modes of the lightest KK gauge bosons intomore » top and Higgs bosons are suppressed. This effect permits erstwhile subdominant channels to become significant. These include flavor-universal decays to SM fermions and Higgs bosons, and a novel channel — decay to a radion and a SM gauge boson, followed by radion decay to a pair of SM gauge bosons. In this work, we first delineate the parameter space where the above mentioned cascade decay of gauge KK particles dominates, and thereby can be the discovery mode at the LHC. We then perform a detailed analysis of the LHC signals from this model, finding that 300/fb suffices for evidence of KK-gluon in tri-jet, jet + di-photon and jet + di-boson channels. However, KK photon in photon + di-jet, and KK-W in leptonic W + di-jet require 3000/fb. The crucial feature of this decay chain is a “double” resonance, i.e. 3-particle and 2-particle invariant mass peaks, corresponding to the KK gauge boson and the radion respectively.« less

  9. LHC signals from cascade decays of warped vector resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh S.; Collins, Jack H.; Du, Peizhi; ...

    2017-05-15

    Recently (arXiv:1608.00526), a new framework for warped higher-dimensional compactifications with “bulk” standard model (SM) was proposed: in addition to the UV (Planck scale) and IR (a couple of TeV) branes, there is an intermediate brane, taken to be around 10TeV. The SM matter and Higgs fields propagate from the UV brane down to this intermediate brane only, while gauge and gravity fields propagate in the entire bulk. Such a configuration renders the lightest gauge Kaluza-Klein (KK) states within LHC reach, simultaneously satisfying flavor and CP constraints. In addition, the usual leading decay modes of the lightest KK gauge bosons intomore » top and Higgs bosons are suppressed. This effect permits erstwhile subdominant channels to become significant. These include flavor-universal decays to SM fermions and Higgs bosons, and a novel channel — decay to a radion and a SM gauge boson, followed by radion decay to a pair of SM gauge bosons. In this work, we first delineate the parameter space where the above mentioned cascade decay of gauge KK particles dominates, and thereby can be the discovery mode at the LHC. We then perform a detailed analysis of the LHC signals from this model, finding that 300/fb suffices for evidence of KK-gluon in tri-jet, jet + di-photon and jet + di-boson channels. However, KK photon in photon + di-jet, and KK-W in leptonic W + di-jet require 3000/fb. The crucial feature of this decay chain is a “double” resonance, i.e. 3-particle and 2-particle invariant mass peaks, corresponding to the KK gauge boson and the radion respectively.« less

  10. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  11. Geometry of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds of cosymplectic manifolds and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Akram; Ozel, Cenap

    It is known from [K. Yano and M. Kon, Structures on Manifolds (World Scientific, 1984)] that the integration of the Laplacian of a smooth function defined on a compact orientable Riemannian manifold without boundary vanishes with respect to the volume element. In this paper, we find out the some potential applications of this notion, and study the concept of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds in cosymplectic manifolds as a generalization of contact CR-warped product submanifolds. Then, we prove the existence of warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds by their characterizations, and give an example supporting to this idea. Further, we obtain an interesting inequality in terms of the second fundamental form and the scalar curvature using Gauss equation and then, derive some applications of it with considering the equality case. We provide many trivial results for the warped product pointwise semi-slant submanifolds in cosymplectic space forms in various mathematical and physical terms such as Hessian, Hamiltonian and kinetic energy, and generalize the triviality results for contact CR-warped products as well.

  12. SPACE WARPS- II. New gravitational lens candidates from the CFHTLS discovered through citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Anupreeta; Verma, Aprajita; Marshall, Philip J.; More, Surhud; Baeten, Elisabeth; Wilcox, Julianne; Macmillan, Christine; Cornen, Claude; Kapadia, Amit; Parrish, Michael; Snyder, Chris; Davis, Christopher P.; Gavazzi, Raphael; Lintott, Chris J.; Simpson, Robert; Miller, David; Smith, Arfon M.; Paget, Edward; Saha, Prasenjit; Küng, Rafael; Collett, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 29 promising (and 59 total) new lens candidates from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) based on about 11 million classifications performed by citizen scientists as part of the first SPACE WARPS lens search. The goal of the blind lens search was to identify lens candidates missed by robots (the RINGFINDER on galaxy scales and ARCFINDER on group/cluster scales) which had been previously used to mine the CFHTLS for lenses. We compare some properties of the samples detected by these algorithms to the SPACE WARPS sample and find them to be broadly similar. The image separation distribution calculated from the SPACE WARPS sample shows that previous constraints on the average density profile of lens galaxies are robust. SPACE WARPS recovers about 65 per cent of known lenses, while the new candidates show a richer variety compared to those found by the two robots. This detection rate could be increased to 80 per cent by only using classifications performed by expert volunteers (albeit at the cost of a lower purity), indicating that the training and performance calibration of the citizen scientists is very important for the success of SPACE WARPS. In this work we present the SIMCT pipeline, used for generating in situ a sample of realistic simulated lensed images. This training sample, along with the false positives identified during the search, has a legacy value for testing future lens-finding algorithms. We make the pipeline and the training set publicly available.

  13. Effects of Disk Warping on the Inclination Evolution of Star-Disk-Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanazzi, J. J.; Lai, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that circumstellar disks in young stellar binaries may be driven into misalignement with their host stars due to secular gravitational interactions between the star, disk and the binary companion. The disk in such systems is twisted/warped due to the gravitational torques from the oblate central star and the external companion. We calculate the disk warp profile, taking into account of bending wave propagation and viscosity in the disk. We show that for typical protostellar disk parameters, the disk warp is small, thereby justifying the "flat-disk" approximation adopted in previous theoretical studies. However, the viscous dissipation associated with the small disk warp/twist tends to drive the disk toward alignment with the binary or the central star. We calculate the relevant timescales for the alignment. We find the alignment is effective for sufficiently cold disks with strong external torques, especially for systems with rapidly rotating stars, but is ineffective for the majority of star-disk-binary systems. Viscous warp driven alignment may be necessary to account for the observed spin-orbit alignment in multi-planet systems if these systems are accompanied by an inclined binary companion.

  14. Effects of disc warping on the inclination evolution of star-disc-binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanazzi, J. J.; Lai, Dong

    2018-07-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that circumstellar discs in young stellar binaries may be driven into misalignement with their host stars due to the secular gravitational interactions between the star, disc, and the binary companion. The disc in such systems is twisted/warped due to the gravitational torques from the oblate central star and the external companion. We calculate the disc warp profile, taking into account the bending wave propagation and viscosity in the disc. We show that for typical protostellar disc parameters, the disc warp is small, thereby justifying the `flat-disc' approximation adopted in previous theoretical studies. However, the viscous dissipation associated with the small disc warp/twist tends to drive the disc towards alignment with the binary or the central star. We calculate the relevant time-scales for the alignment. We find that the alignment is effective for sufficiently cold discs with strong external torques, especially for systems with rapidly rotating stars, but is ineffective for the majority of the star-disc-binary systems. Viscous warp-driven alignment may be necessary to account for the observed spin-orbit alignment in multiplanet systems if these systems are accompanied by an inclined binary companion.

  15. Experimental Investigation About Stamping Behaviour of 3D Warp Interlock Composite Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Clément; Wang, Peng; Boussu, François; Soulat, Damien

    2014-10-01

    Forming of continuous fibre reinforcements and thermoplastic resin commingled prepregs can be performed at room temperature due to its similar textile structure. The "cool" forming stage is better controlled and more economical. The increase of temperature and the resin consolidation phases after the forming can be carried out under the isothermal condition thanks to a closed system. It can avoid the manufacturing defects easily experienced in the non-isothermal thermoforming, in particular the wrinkling [1]. Glass/Polypropylene commingled yarns have been woven inside different three-dimensional (3D) warp interlock fabrics and then formed using a double-curved shape stamping tool. The present study investigates the in-plane and through-thickness behaviour of the 3D warp interlock fibrous reinforcements during forming with a hemispherical punch. Experimental data allow analysing the forming behaviour in the warp and weft directions and on the influence of warp interlock architectures. The results point out that the layer to layer warp interlock preform has a better stamping behaviour, in particular no forming defects and good homogeneity in thickness.

  16. Theory of Band Warping and its Effects on Thermoelectronic Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian; Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Transport properties of materials depend upon features of band structures near extrema in the BZ. Such features are generally described in terms of quadratic expansions and effective masses. Such expansions, however, are permissible only under strict conditions that are sometimes violated by materials. Suggestive terms such as ``band warping'' have been used to refer to such situations and ad hoc methods have been developed to treat them. We develop a generally applicable theory, based on radial expansions, and a corresponding definition of angular effective mass which also accounts for effects of band non-parabolicity and anisotropy. Further, we develop precise procedures to evaluate band warping quantitatively and as an example we analyze the warping features of valence bands in silicon using first-principles calculations and we compare those with semi-empirical models. We use our theory to generalize derivations of transport coefficients for cases of either single or multiple electronic bands, with either quadratically expansible or warped energy surfaces. We introduce the transport-equivalent ellipsoid and illustrate the drastic effects that band warping can induce on thermoelectric properties using multi-band models. Vitreous State Laboratory and Samsung's GRO program.

  17. Equatorial Cross-Cutting Ripples on Titan - Regularly Warped Subsiding Methane Plains, not Eolian Dunes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    probable. Very regular cross-cutting wavy forms hundred and thousand kilometers long have a spacing between ridges or grooves about 1-2 km (?) (PIA03555, PIA03566, PIA03567, PIA03568 ) or 10-20 km (PIA08454) -so called "cat scratches". The most long and wide ridge-groove system observed up to now (PIA08454 - a swath 6150 km long, 1120 km wide, almost a half length of the great planetary circle!) has the ridge-to-ridge spacing about 10-20 km; a width of ridges and grooves is nearly equal with variations to both sides; ridges are more bright, grooves are more dark; intersections of the ridge-groove systems creates chains of roundish features ("craters") of characteristic size (Fig. 3, 4). Observed wavy systems resemble dunes only at the first glance but actually are deformations of the ice-methane crust by very fine inertia-gravity waves aroused by the satellite movement in non-round elliptical keplerian orbit [3]. This movement with periodically changing accelerations arouse inertia-gravity forces and waves warping any celestial body notwithstanding its size, mass, density, chemical composition or physical state. In rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these warping waves have a stationary character and 4 cross-cutting directions- ortho- and diagonal - producing uplifted (+), subsided (-) and neutral (0) tectonic blocks. Wavelengths are different but tied as harmonics. The fundamental wave1 produces ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy -two segments (2πR-structure), the first harmonics wave2 produces tectonic sectors (πR-structures) [1]. This structurization is adorned by individual for any body waves whose lengths are inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: higher frequency - smaller waves and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger waves. These waves produce tectonic granules. There is a row of increasing granule sizes strictly tied to orbital frequencies: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1. In this row Titan with its orbital

  18. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  19. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/politicalmore » frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.« less

  20. Trigonal warping and photo-induced effects on zone boundary phonon in monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, D.

    2018-05-01

    We have reported the electronic band structure of monolayer graphene when the combined effects arising from the trigonal warp and highest zone-boundary phonons having A1 g symmetry with Haldane interaction which induced photo-irradiation effect. On the basis of our model, we have introduced a diagonalization to solve the associated Fröhlich Hamiltonian. We have examined that, a trigonal warping effect is introduced on the K and K ' points, leading to a dynamical band gap in the graphene electronic band spectrum due to the electron-A1 g phonon interaction and Haldane mass interaction. Additionally, the bands exhibited an anisotropy at this point. It is also found that, photo-irradiation effect is quite smaller than the trigonal warp effects in the graphene electronic band spectrum. In spite of this, controllability of the photo induced effects by the Haldane mass will have extensive implications in the graphene.

  1. Surface charge conductivity of a topological insulator in a magnetic field: The effect of hexagonal warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akzyanov, R. S.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the influence of hexagonal warping on the transport properties of topological insulators. We study the charge conductivity within Kubo formalism in the first Born approximation using low-energy expansion of the Hamiltonian near the Dirac point. The effects of disorder, magnetic field, and chemical-potential value are analyzed in detail. We find that the presence of hexagonal warping significantly affects the conductivity of the topological insulator. In particular, it gives rise to the growth of the longitudinal conductivity with the increase of the disorder and anisotropic anomalous in-plane magnetoresistance. Hexagonal warping also affects the quantum anomalous Hall effect and anomalous out-of-plane magnetoresistance. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data.

  2. WARP: Weight Associative Rule Processor. A dedicated VLSI fuzzy logic megacell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagni, A.; Poluzzi, R.; Rizzotto, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    During the last five years Fuzzy Logic has gained enormous popularity in the academic and industrial worlds. The success of this new methodology has led the microelectronics industry to create a new class of machines, called Fuzzy Machines, to overcome the limitations of traditional computing systems when utilized as Fuzzy Systems. This paper gives an overview of the methods by which Fuzzy Logic data structures are represented in the machines (each with its own advantages and inefficiencies). Next, the paper introduces WARP (Weight Associative Rule Processor) which is a dedicated VLSI megacell allowing the realization of a fuzzy controller suitable for a wide range of applications. WARP represents an innovative approach to VLSI Fuzzy controllers by utilizing different types of data structures for characterizing the membership functions during the various stages of the Fuzzy processing. WARP dedicated architecture has been designed in order to achieve high performance by exploiting the computational advantages offered by the different data representations.

  3. Stability of warped AdS3 vacua of topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Esole, Mboyo; Guica, Monica

    2009-10-01

    AdS3 vacua of topologically massive gravity (TMG) have been shown to be perturbatively unstable for all values of the coupling constant except the chiral point μl = 1. We study the possibility that the warped vacua of TMG, which exist for all values of μ, are stable under linearized perturbations. In this paper, we show that spacelike warped AdS3 vacua with Compère-Detournay boundary conditions are indeed stable in the range μl>3. This is precisely the range in which black hole solutions arise as discrete identifications of the warped AdS3 vacuum. The situation somewhat resembles chiral gravity: although negative energy modes do exist, they are all excluded by the boundary conditions, and the perturbative spectrum solely consists of boundary (pure large gauge) gravitons.

  4. A method to generate soft shadows using a layered depth image and warping.

    PubMed

    Im, Yeon-Ho; Han, Chang-Young; Kim, Lee-Sup

    2005-01-01

    We present an image-based method for propagating area light illumination through a Layered Depth Image (LDI) to generate soft shadows from opaque and nonrefractive transparent objects. In our approach, using the depth peeling technique, we render an LDI from a reference light sample on a planar light source. Light illumination of all pixels in an LDI is then determined for all the other sample points via warping, an image-based rendering technique, which approximates ray tracing in our method. We use an image-warping equation and McMillan's warp ordering algorithm to find the intersections between rays and polygons and to find the order of intersections. Experiments for opaque and nonrefractive transparent objects are presented. Results indicate our approach generates soft shadows fast and effectively. Advantages and disadvantages of the proposed method are also discussed.

  5. Design of a reading test for low-vision image warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loshin, David S.; Wensveen, Janice; Juday, Richard D.; Barton, R. Shane

    1993-08-01

    NASA and the University of Houston College of Optometry are examining the efficacy of image warping as a possible prosthesis for at least two forms of low vision -- maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. Before incurring the expense of reducing the concept to practice, one would wish to have confidence that a worthwhile improvement in visual function would result. NASA's Programmable Remapper (PR) can warp an input image onto arbitrary geometric coordinate systems at full video rate, and it has recently been upgraded to accept computer- generated video text. We have integrated the Remapper with an SRI eye tracker to simulate visual malfunction in normal observers. A reading performance test has been developed to determine if the proposed warpings yield an increase in visual function; i.e., reading speed. We describe the preliminary experimental results of this reading test with a simulated central field defect with and without remapped images.

  6. Trigonal warping induced unusual spin texture and strong spin polarization in graphene with the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Da-Shuai; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Pan, Hui; Yao, Yugui

    2018-02-01

    We study the electronic and scattering properties of graphene with moderate Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The Rashba SOC in graphene tends to distort the band structure and gives rise to a trigonally warped Fermi surface. For electrons at a pronouncedly warped Fermi surface, the spin direction exhibits a staircase profile as a function of the momentum, making an unusual spin texture. We also study the spin-resolved scattering on a Rashba barrier and find that the trigonal warping is essential for producing spin polarization of the transmitted current. Particularly, both the direction and strength of the spin polarization can be controlled by kinds of electric methods. Our work unveils that not only SOC but also the geometry of the Fermi surface is important for generating spin polarization.

  7. The Midplane of the Main Asteroid Belt and Its Warps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambioni, Saverio; Malhotra, Renu

    2017-10-01

    It has been recognized for a long time that the orbital planes of asteroids are surprisingly highly dispersed about the mean plane of the solar system, and likely memorialize dynamical events over the ancient history of the solar system. But how well do we know the mean plane of the asteroid belt? Since the time of the first measurements of their mean plane (Plummer 1916; Shor & Yagudina 1991), the number of known main belt asteroids (MBAs) has dramatically increased; the large size of this population now allows measuring its mean plane at much higher accuracy than in previous studies and also allows to compare it with theoretical expectations. The theoretically expected mean plane is defined by the forced solution of the secular perturbation theory for the inclinations and nodes (e.g., Murray & Dermott 1999); this forced plane varies with semi-major axis. We measure the mean plane by analyzing the observational data and we compare it with the theoretical prediction. Our observationally nearly complete sample consists of 89,216 numbered, non-collisional family asteroids of absolute magnitude below 15.5. For the population as a whole, we find that the mean plane differs significantly from previous measurements: the mean plane’s inclination is I = 0.929 (+0.042, -0.042) degrees and its longitude of ascending node is Ω = 87.60 (+2.58, -2.58) degrees. When measured in small semi-major axis bins between 2.15 and 3.25 AU, the mean plane is found to be largely consistent with secular perturbation theory predictions, deviating not more than (1-2)-σ from the theoretically expected values. A warp near the inner edge, due to the ν16 secular resonance, is visible in the data. Our analysis reveals the way to a novel method for the computation of the free or “proper” inclinations of the MBAs, by computing asteroid inclinations relative to the measured mean plane at that location in semi-major axis.This study used the catalogs of osculating elements for the minor planets

  8. Killing-Yano forms and Killing tensors on a warped space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtouš, Pavel; KubizÅák, David; Kolář, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We formulate several criteria under which the symmetries associated with the Killing and Killing-Yano tensors on the base space can be lifted to the symmetries of the full warped geometry. The procedure is explicitly illustrated on several examples, providing new prototypes of spacetimes admitting such tensors. In particular, we study a warped product of two Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes and show that it gives rise to a new class of highly symmetric vacuum (with a cosmological constant) black hole solutions that inherit many of the properties of the Kerr-NUT-(A)dS geometry.

  9. Technical Note: The impact of deformable image registration methods on dose warping.

    PubMed

    Qin, An; Liang, Jian; Han, Xiao; O'Connell, Nicolette; Yan, Di

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical-relevant discrepancy between doses warped by pure image based deformable image registration (IM-DIR) and by biomechanical model based DIR (BM-DIR) on intensity-homogeneous organs. Ten patients (5Head&Neck, 5Prostate) were included. A research DIR tool (ADMRIE_v1.12) was utilized for IM-DIR. After IM-DIR, BM-DIR was carried out for organs (parotids, bladder, and rectum) which often encompass sharp dose gradient. Briefly, high-quality tetrahedron meshes were generated and deformable vector fields (DVF) from IM-DIR were interpolated to the surface nodes of the volume meshes as boundary condition. Then, a FEM solver (ABAQUS_v6.14) was used to simulate the displacement of internal nodes, which were then interpolated to image-voxel grids to get the more physically plausible DVF. Both geometrical and subsequent dose warping discrepancies were quantified between the two DIR methods. Target registration discrepancy(TRD) was evaluated to show the geometry difference. The re-calculated doses on second CT were warped to the pre-treatment CT via two DIR. Clinical-relevant dose parameters and γ passing rate were compared between two types of warped dose. The correlation was evaluated between parotid shrinkage and TRD/dose discrepancy. The parotid shrunk to 75.7% ± 9% of its pre-treatment volume and the percentage of volume with TRD>1.5 mm) was 6.5% ± 4.7%. The normalized mean-dose difference (NMDD) of IM-DIR and BM-DIR was -0.8% ± 1.5%, with range (-4.7% to 1.5%). 2 mm/2% passing rate was 99.0% ± 1.4%. A moderate correlation was found between parotid shrinkage and TRD and NMDD. The bladder had a NMDD of -9.9% ± 9.7%, with BM-DIR warped dose systematically higher. Only minor deviation was observed for rectum NMDD (0.5% ± 1.1%). Impact of DIR method on treatment dose warping is patient and organ-specific. Generally, intensity-homogeneous organs, which undergo larger deformation/shrinkage during

  10. Warped Linear Prediction of Physical Model Excitations with Applications in Audio Compression and Instrument Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Alexis; Fukudome, Kimitoshi

    2004-12-01

    A sound recording of a plucked string instrument is encoded and resynthesized using two stages of prediction. In the first stage of prediction, a simple physical model of a plucked string is estimated and the instrument excitation is obtained. The second stage of prediction compensates for the simplicity of the model in the first stage by encoding either the instrument excitation or the model error using warped linear prediction. These two methods of compensation are compared with each other, and to the case of single-stage warped linear prediction, adjustments are introduced, and their applications to instrument synthesis and MPEG4's audio compression within the structured audio format are discussed.

  11. Constraints on wrapped Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation in a warped throat

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mukohyama, Shinji; Kinoshita, Shunichiro, E-mail: tkobayashi@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: mukoyama@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: kinoshita@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-01-15

    We derive constraints on the tensor to scalar ratio and on the background charge of the warped throat for Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation driven by D5- and D7-branes wrapped over cycles of the throat. It is shown that background charge well beyond the known maximal value is required in most cases for Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation to generate cosmological observables compatible with the WMAP3 (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 3) data. Most of the results derived in this paper are insensitive to the details of the inflaton potential, and could be applied to generic warped throats.

  12. Add Another Dimension to Your Life: With a Bonus Recipe for Making Tesseracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen

    2007-01-01

    A cube is a solid in three dimensions, with three mutually perpendicular right angles evident at the vertices. In this article, the author describes how to create a four-dimensional cube. Before searching this extra dimension, she first reviews what people know about zero, one, two, and three dimensions, and certain shapes in each of these. She…

  13. Kinematical Modeling of WARPS in the H i Disks of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Tohline, Joel E.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    1993-10-01

    In order to gain an appreciation for the general structure of warped gas layers in galaxies, we have constructed kinematical, tilted-ring models of 21 galaxies for which detailed H I observations already exist in the literature. In this paper we present results for the 15 normal spiral galaxies of this sample that are not viewed edge-on. A comparison between our models and tilted-ring models of the same galaxies previously constructed by other authors shows that there is generally good agreement. We make an attempt to unify the notation of diff&rent authors who have published radio observations and/or kinematical models of individual galaxies in this sample. We also suggest how, in future work of this nature, model parameters should be presented and referenced in order to maintain a reasonable degree of consistency in the literature. When viewed in the perspective of dynamical models, a twisted warped gas layer can be understood as arising from orbiting gas which is in the process of settling to a preferred orientation in the nonspherical, gravitational potential well of the galaxy. Hence, detailed kinematical modeling of a specific galaxy disk can provide not only information regarding the orientation and structure of its warp but also information about the shape (whether oblate or prolate) of the dark halo in which the disk is embedded. By examining a large number of galaxies in a consistent manner, we have deduced some general characteristics of warped disks that have heretofore gone unnoticed. We have also identified uniqueness problems that can arise in this type of modeling procedure which can considerably cloud one's ability to completely decipher an individual disk's structure. For 14 out of 15 spiral galaxies modeled here, we have been able to determine the local kinematical structure of the warp. Gas layers do not appear to warp more than ˜40° out of the plane defined by the central disk of the galaxy, but they can twist through angles as large as ˜170

  14. Black holes with gravitational hair in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalon, Andres; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1 D-14476 Golm; Canfora, Fabrizio

    2011-10-15

    A new class of vacuum black holes for the most general gravity theory leading to second order field equations in the metric in even dimensions is presented. These space-times are locally anti-de Sitter in the asymptotic region, and are characterized by a continuous parameter that does not enter in the conserve charges, nor it can be reabsorbed by a coordinate transformation: it is therefore a purely gravitational hair. The black holes are constructed as a warped product of a two-dimensional space-time, which resembles the r-t plane of the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, times a warp factor multiplying the metric of amore » D-2-dimensional Euclidean base manifold, which is restricted by a scalar equation. It is shown that all the Noether charges vanish. Furthermore, this is consistent with the Euclidean action approach: even though the black hole has a finite temperature, both the entropy and the mass vanish. Interesting examples of base manifolds are given in eight dimensions which are products of Thurston geometries, giving then a nontrivial topology to the black hole horizon. The possibility of introducing a torsional hair for these solutions is also discussed.« less

  15. The warped disk of Centaurus A in the near-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, A. C.; Graham, James R.; Frogel, Jay A.

    1993-01-01

    We present infrared images of Cen A (NGC 5128) in the J, H, and K bands. The infrared morphology is primarily determined by the presence of a thin absorptive warped disk. By integrating the light of the underlying prolate galaxy through such a disk, we construct models which we compare with infrared and X-ray data. The geometry of the warped disk needed to fit the IR data is consistent with a warped disk which has evolved as a result of differential precession in a prolate potential. The disk has an inclination, with respect to the principal axis of the underlying elliptical galaxy, that is higher at larger radii than in the inner region. A scenario is proposed where a small gas-rich galaxy infalling under the force of dynamical friction is tidally stripped. Stripping occurs at different times during its infall. The orientation of the resulting gas disk depends upon the angular momentum of the infalling galaxy. We find that the resulting precession angle of the disk is well described by the precession model, but that the inclination angle may vary as a function of radius. We propose an orbit for the infalling galaxy that is consistent with the geometry of the warped disk needed to fit our infrared data, and rotation observed in the outer part of the galaxy.

  16. A Concurrent Implementation of the Cascade-Correlation Algorithm, Using the Time Warp Operating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the method in which the Cascade-Correlation algorithm was parallelized in such a way that it could be run using the Time Warp Operating System (TWOS). TWOS is a special purpose operating system designed to run parellel discrete event simulations with maximum efficiency on parallel or distributed computers.

  17. Equatorial Cross-Cutting Ripples on Titan - Regularly Warped Subsiding Methane Plains, not Eolian Dunes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    probable. Very regular cross-cutting wavy forms hundred and thousand kilometers long have a spacing between ridges or grooves about 1-2 km (?) (PIA03555, PIA03566, PIA03567, PIA03568 ) or 10-20 km (PIA08454) -so called "cat scratches". The most long and wide ridge-groove system observed up to now (PIA08454 - a swath 6150 km long, 1120 km wide, almost a half length of the great planetary circle!) has the ridge-to-ridge spacing about 10-20 km; a width of ridges and grooves is nearly equal with variations to both sides; ridges are more bright, grooves are more dark; intersections of the ridge-groove systems creates chains of roundish features ("craters") of characteristic size (Fig. 3, 4). Observed wavy systems resemble dunes only at the first glance but actually are deformations of the ice-methane crust by very fine inertia-gravity waves aroused by the satellite movement in non-round elliptical keplerian orbit [3]. This movement with periodically changing accelerations arouse inertia-gravity forces and waves warping any celestial body notwithstanding its size, mass, density, chemical composition or physical state. In rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these warping waves have a stationary character and 4 cross-cutting directions- ortho- and diagonal - producing uplifted (+), subsided (-) and neutral (0) tectonic blocks. Wavelengths are different but tied as harmonics. The fundamental wave1 produces ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy -two segments (2πR-structure), the first harmonics wave2 produces tectonic sectors (πR-structures) [1]. This structurization is adorned by individual for any body waves whose lengths are inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: higher frequency - smaller waves and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger waves. These waves produce tectonic granules. There is a row of increasing granule sizes strictly tied to orbital frequencies: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1. In this row Titan with its orbital

  18. Application of Out-of-Plane Warping to Control Rotor Blade Twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanWeddingen, Yannick; Bauchau, Olivier; Kottapalli, Sesi; Ozbay, Serkan; Mehrotra, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing study is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a blade actuation system to dynamically change the twist, and/or the camber, of an airfoil section and, consequently, alter the in-flight aerodynamic loading on the blade for efficient flight control. The required analytical and finite element tools are under development to enable an accurate and comprehensive aeroelastic assessment of the current Full-Blade Warping and 3D Warping Actuated Trailing Edge Flap concepts. The feasibility of the current concepts for swashplateless rotors and higher harmonic blade control is also being investigated. In particular, the aim is to complete the following objectives, some of which have been completed (as noted below) and others that are currently ongoing: i) Develop a Vlasov finite element model and validate against the ABAQUS shell models (completed). ii) Implement the 3D warping actuation concept within the comprehensive analysis code DYMORE. iii) Perform preliminary aeroelastic simulations of blades using DYMORE with 3D warping actuation: a) Investigate the blade behavior under 1 per/rev actuation. Determine whether sufficient twist can be generated and sustained to achieve primary blade control. b) Investigate the behavior of a trailing edge flap configuration under higher harmonic excitations. Determine how much twist can be obtained at the harmonics 2-5 per/rev. iv) Determine actuator specifications such as the power required, load and displacements, and identify the stress and strain distributions in the actuated blades. In general, the completion of Item ii) above will give an additional research capability in rotorcraft dynamics analyses, i.e., the capability to calculate the rotor blade twist due to warping, something that is not currently available in any of the existing comprehensive rotorcraft analyses.

  19. Extra-pair copulation and extra-range movements in Flammulated Owls

    Treesearch

    Richard T. Reynolds; Brian D. Linkhart

    1990-01-01

    We report an extra-pair copulation (EPC) in the Flammulated Owl (Otus flammeolus), the first in strigiforms, and document 21 cases of extra-range movements (ERMs) in this species. Extra-range movements occurred throughout nesting with both sexes participating: males anytime during nesting and females only after their young fledged. Males appear to make ERMs to...

  20. Status report on the 'Merging' of the Electron-Cloud Code POSINST with the 3-D Accelerator PIC CODE WARP

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Azevedo, A.W.

    2004-04-19

    We have integrated the electron-cloud code POSINST [1] with WARP [2]--a 3-D parallel Particle-In-Cell accelerator code developed for Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion--so that the two can interoperate. Both codes are run in the same process, communicate through a Python interpreter (already used in WARP), and share certain key arrays (so far, particle positions and velocities). Currently, POSINST provides primary and secondary sources of electrons, beam bunch kicks, a particle mover, and diagnostics. WARP provides the field solvers and diagnostics. Secondary emission routines are provided by the Tech-X package CMEE.

  1. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Liam D.; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners’ perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: ‘importance of extra-time’, ‘rule changes’, ‘efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision’, ‘nutritional timing’, ‘future research directions’, ‘preparatory modulations’ and ‘recovery’. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses

  2. Bulk stabilization, the extra-dimensional Higgs portal and missing energy in Higgs events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Ross; Burgess, C. P.

    2013-05-01

    To solve the hierarchy problem, extra-dimensional models must explain why the new dimensions stabilize to the right size, and the known mechanisms for doing so require bulk scalars that couple to the branes. Because of these couplings the energetics of dimensional stabilization competes with the energetics of the Higgs vacuum, with potentially observable effects. These effects are particularly strong for one or two extra dimensions because the bulk-Higgs couplings can then be super-renormalizable or dimensionless. Experimental reach for such extra-dimensional Higgs `portals' are stronger than for gravitational couplings because they are less suppressed at low-energies. We compute how Higgs-bulk coupling through such a portal with two extra dimensions back-reacts onto properties of the Higgs boson. When the KK mass is smaller than the Higgs mass, mixing with KK modes results in an invisible Higgs decay width, missing-energy signals at high-energy colliders, and new mechanisms of energy loss in stars and supernovae. Astrophysical bounds turn out to be complementary to collider measurements, with observable LHC signals allowed by existing constraints. We comment on the changes to the Higgs mass-coupling relationship caused by Higgs-bulk mixing, and how the resulting modifications to the running of Higgs couplings alter vacuum-stability and triviality bounds.

  3. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  4. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Kupperman, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  5. Object-based warping: an illusory distortion of space within objects.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Timothy J; Chun, Marvin M

    2010-12-01

    Visual objects are high-level primitives that are fundamental to numerous perceptual functions, such as guidance of attention. We report that objects warp visual perception of space in such a way that spatial distances within objects appear to be larger than spatial distances in ground regions. When two dots were placed inside a rectangular object, they appeared farther apart from one another than two dots with identical spacing outside of the object. To investigate whether this effect was object based, we measured the distortion while manipulating the structure surrounding the dots. Object displays were constructed with a single object, multiple objects, a partially occluded object, and an illusory object. Nonobject displays were constructed to be comparable to object displays in low-level visual attributes. In all cases, the object displays resulted in a more powerful distortion of spatial perception than comparable non-object-based displays. These results suggest that perception of space within objects is warped.

  6. Analysis of the typical small watershed of warping dams in the sand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Yang, Ji Shan; Sun, Wei Ying; Shen, Sha Sha

    2018-06-01

    Coarse sediment with a particle size greater than 0.05mm is the main deposit of riverbed in the lower Yellow River, the Loess Plateau is one of the concentrated source of coarse sediment, warping dam is one of the important engineering measures for gully control. Jiuyuangou basin is a typical small basin in the first sub region of hilly-gullied loess region, twenty warping dams in Jiuyuangou basin was selected as research object, samples of sediment along the main line of dam from upper, middle to lower reaches of dam fields and samples of undisturbed soil in slope of dam control basin were taken to carry out particle gradation analysis, in the hope of clearing reducing capacity on coarse sediment of different types of warping dam through the experimental data. The results show that the undisturbed soil in slope of dam control basin has characteristics of standard loess, the particle size are mainly distributed in 0.025 0.05mm, and the 0.05mm particle size of Jiuyuangou basinof loess is an obvious boundary; Particle size of sediment in 15 warping dam of Jiuyuangou basin are mainly distributed in 0.031 0.05mm with the dam tail is greater than dam front in general. The separation effect of horizontal pipe drainage is better than shaft drainage for which particle size greater than 0.05mm, notch dam is for particle size between 0.025 0.1 mm, and fill dam is for particle size between 0.016 0.1 mm, they all have a certain function in the sediment sorting.

  7. New methods in WARP, a particle-in-cell code for space-charge dominated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D., LLNL

    1998-01-12

    The current U.S. approach for a driver for inertial confinement fusion power production is a heavy-ion induction accelerator; high-current beams of heavy ions are focused onto the fusion target. The space-charge of the high-current beams affects the behavior more strongly than does the temperature (the beams are described as being ``space-charge dominated``) and the beams behave like non-neutral plasmas. The particle simulation code WARP has been developed and used to study the transport and acceleration of space-charge dominated ion beams in a wide range of applications, from basic beam physics studies, to ongoing experiments, to fusion driver concepts. WARP combinesmore » aspects of a particle simulation code and an accelerator code; it uses multi-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques and has a rich mechanism for specifying the lattice of externally applied fields. There are both two- and three-dimensional versions, the former including axisymmetric (r-z) and transverse slice (x-y) models. WARP includes a number of novel techniques and capabilities that both enhance its performance and make it applicable to a wide range of problems. Some of these have been described elsewhere. Several recent developments will be discussed in this paper. A transverse slice model has been implemented with the novel capability of including bends, allowing more rapid simulation while retaining essential physics. An interface using Python as the interpreter layer instead of Basis has been developed. A parallel version of WARP has been developed using Python.« less

  8. EXTraS: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tiengo, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Watson, M.; Haberl, F.; Wilms, J.

    2017-10-01

    The EXTraS project extracted all temporal domain information buried in the whole database collected by the EPIC cameras onboard the XMM-Newton mission. This included a search and characterisation of variability, both periodic and aperiodic, in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than eight orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux, as well as a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Phenomenological classification of variable sources, based on X-ray and multiwavelength information, has also been performed. All results and products of EXTraS are made available to the scientific community through a web public data archive. A dedicated science gateway will allow scientists to apply EXTraS pipelines on new observations. EXTraS is the most comprehensive analysis of variability, on the largest ever sample of soft X-ray sources. The resulting archive and tools disclose an enormous scientific discovery space to the community, with applications ranging from the search for rare events to population studies, with impact on the study of virtually all astrophysical source classes. EXTraS, funded within the EU/FP7 framework, is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).

  9. Particle collisions near a three-dimensional warped AdS black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bécar, Ramón; González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we consider the warped AdS3 black hole solution of topologically massive gravity with a negative cosmological constant, and we study the possibility that it acts as a particle accelerator by analyzing the energy in the center of mass (CM) frame of two colliding particles in the vicinity of its horizon, which is known as the Bañnados, Silk and West (BSW) process. Mainly, we show that the critical angular momentum (L_c) of the particle decreases when the warping parameter(ν ) increases. Also, we show that despite the particle with L_c being able to exist for certain values of the conserved energy outside the horizon, it will never reach the event horizon; therefore, the black hole cannot act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high CM energy on the event horizon. However, such a particle could also exist inside the outer horizon, with the BSW process being possible on the inner horizon. On the other hand, for the extremal warped AdS3 black hole, the particle with L_c and energy E could exist outside the event horizon and, the CM energy blows up on the event horizon if its conserved energy fulfills the condition E2>(ν 2+3)l2/3(ν ^{2-1)}, with the BSW process being possible.

  10. An inner warp in the DoAr 44 T Tauri transition disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon; Avenhaus, Henning; Pérez, Sebastián; Navarro, Víctor; Cárcamo, Miguel; Marino, Sebastián; Cieza, Lucas; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alarcón, Felipe; Zurlo, Alice; Osses, Axel; Rannou, Fernando R.; Román, Pablo E.; Barraza, Marcelo

    2018-07-01

    Optical/IR images of transition discs (TDs) have revealed deep intensity decrements in the rings of HAeBes HD 142527 and HD 100453 that can be interpreted as shadowing from sharply tilted inner discs, such that the outer discs are directly exposed to stellar light. Here we report similar dips in SPHERE+IRDIS differential polarized imaging (DPI) of T Tauri DoAr 44. With a fairly axially symmetric ring in the sub-mm radio continuum, DoAr 44 is likely also a warped system. We constrain the warp geometry by comparing radiative transfer predictions with the DPI data in H band (Qϕ(H)) and with a re-processing of archival 336 GHz ALMA observations. The observed DPI shadows have coincident radio counterparts, but the intensity drops are much deeper in Qϕ(H) (˜88 per cent), compared to the shallow drops at 336 GHz (˜24 per cent). Radiative transfer predictions with an inner disc tilt of ˜30 ± 5 deg approximately account for the observations. ALMA long-baseline observations should allow the observation of the warped gas kinematics inside the cavity of DoAr 44.

  11. Combined approach of shell and shear-warp rendering for efficient volume visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Alexandre X.; Rocha, Leonardo M.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2003-05-01

    In Medical Imaging, shell rendering (SR) and shear-warp rendering (SWR) are two ultra-fast and effective methods for volume visualization. We have previously shown that, typically, SWR can be on the average 1.38 times faster than SR, but it requires from 2 to 8 times more memory space than SR. In this paper, we propose an extension of the compact shell data structure utilized in SR to allow shear-warp factorization of the viewing matrix in order to obtain speed up gains for SR, without paying the high storage price of SWR. The new approach is called shear-warp shell rendering (SWSR). The paper describes the methods, points out their major differences in the computational aspects, and presents a comparative analysis of them in terms of speed, storage, and image quality. The experiments involve hard and fuzzy boundaries of 10 different objects of various sizes, shapes, and topologies, rendered on a 1GHz Pentium-III PC with 512MB RAM, utilizing surface and volume rendering strategies. The results indicate that SWSR offers the best speed and storage characteristics compromise among these methods. We also show that SWSR improves the rendition quality over SR, and provides renditions similar to those produced by SWR.

  12. Adaptive space warping to enhance passive haptics in an arthroscopy surgical simulator.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Jonas; Tuchschmid, Stefan; Harders, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Passive haptics, also known as tactile augmentation, denotes the use of a physical counterpart to a virtual environment to provide tactile feedback. Employing passive haptics can result in more realistic touch sensations than those from active force feedback, especially for rigid contacts. However, changes in the virtual environment would necessitate modifications of the physical counterparts. In recent work space warping has been proposed as one solution to overcome this limitation. In this technique virtual space is distorted such that a variety of virtual models can be mapped onto one single physical object. In this paper, we propose as an extension adaptive space warping; we show how this technique can be employed in a mixed-reality surgical training simulator in order to map different virtual patients onto one physical anatomical model. We developed methods to warp different organ geometries onto one physical mock-up, to handle different mechanical behaviors of the virtual patients, and to allow interactive modifications of the virtual structures, while the physical counterparts remain unchanged. Various practical examples underline the wide applicability of our approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first practical usage of such a technique in the specific context of interactive medical training.

  13. An inner warp in the DoAr 44 T Tauri transition disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon; Avenhaus, Henning; Pérez, Sebastián; Navarro, Víctor; Cárcamo, Miguel; Marino, Sebastián; Cieza, Lucas; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alarcón, Felipe; Zurlo, Alice; Osses, Axel; Rannou, Fernando R.; Román, Pablo E.; Barraza, Marcelo

    2018-04-01

    Optical/IR images of transition disks (TDs) have revealed deep intensity decrements in the rings of HAeBes HD 142527 and HD 100453, that can be interpreted as shadowing from sharply tilted inner disks, such that the outer disks are directly exposed to stellar light. Here we report similar dips in SPHERE+IRDIS differential polarized imaging (DPI) of TTauri DoAr 44. With a fairly axially symmetric ring in the sub mm radio continuum, DoAr 44 is likely also a warped system. We constrain the warp geometry by comparing radiative transfer predictions with the DPI data in H band (Qϕ(H)) and with a re-processing of archival 336 GHz ALMA observations. The observed DPI shadows have coincident radio counterparts, but the intensity drops are much deeper in Qϕ(H) (˜88%), compared to the shallow drops at 336 GHz (˜24%). Radiative transfer predictions with an inner disk tilt of ˜30 ± 5 deg approximately account for the observations. ALMA long-baseline observations should allow the observation of the warped gas kinematics inside the cavity of DoAr 44.

  14. Classification of motor activities through derivative dynamic time warping applied on accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Muscillo, Rossana; Conforto, Silvia; Schmid, Maurizio; Caselli, Paolo; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2007-01-01

    In the context of tele-monitoring, great interest is presently devoted to physical activity, mainly of elderly or people with disabilities. In this context, many researchers studied the recognition of activities of daily living by using accelerometers. The present work proposes a novel algorithm for activity recognition that considers the variability in movement speed, by using dynamic programming. This objective is realized by means of a matching and recognition technique that determines the distance between the signal input and a set of previously defined templates. Two different approaches are here presented, one based on Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and the other based on the Derivative Dynamic Time Warping (DDTW). The algorithm was applied to the recognition of gait, climbing and descending stairs, using a biaxial accelerometer placed on the shin. The results on DDTW, obtained by using only one sensor channel on the shin showed an average recognition score of 95%, higher than the values obtained with DTW (around 85%). Both DTW and DDTW consistently show higher classification rate than classical Linear Time Warping (LTW).

  15. Doing without dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, C. B.

    1986-03-01

    The author discusses the concept of dimensions of a physical quantity, and the relationship between derived units (expressed in terms of their base units) and the dimensions of the derived quantities. He calls for the replacement of 'dimensions' by base units in the GCE A-level syllabus and provides some recommendations to GCE examining boards.

  16. Scalar production in association with a Z boson at the LHC and ILC: The mixed Higgs-radion case of warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Andrei; Moreau, Grégory; Richard, François

    2017-07-01

    The radion scalar field might be the lightest new particle predicted by extradimensional extensions of the standard model. It could thus lead to the first signatures of new physics at the LHC collider. We perform a complete study of the radion production in association with the Z gauge boson in the custodially protected warped model with a brane-localized Higgs boson addressing the gauge hierarchy problem. Radion-Higgs mixing effects are present. Such a radion production receives possibly resonant contributions from the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Z boson as well as the extra neutral gauge boson (Z'). All the exchange and mixing effects induced by those heavy bosons are taken into account in the radion coupling and rate calculations. The investigation of the considered radion production at the LHC allows us to be sensitive to some parts of the parameter space but only the ILC program at high luminosity would cover most of the theoretically allowed parameter space via the studied reaction. Complementary tests of the same theoretical parameters can be realized through the high accuracy measurements of the Higgs couplings at the ILC. The generic sensitivity limits on the rates discussed for the LHC and ILC potential reach can be applied to the searches for other (light) exotic scalar bosons.

  17. The analysis of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor with hierarchical warping functions and finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dechao; Deng, Zhongmin; Wang, Xingwei

    2001-08-01

    In the present paper, a series of hierarchical warping functions is developed to analyze the static and dynamic problems of thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotors composed of several layers with single closed cell. This method is the development and extension of the traditional constrained warping theory of thin walled metallic beams, which had been proved very successful since 1940s. The warping distribution along the perimeter of each layer is expanded into a series of successively corrective warping functions with the traditional warping function caused by free torsion or free bending as the first term, and is assumed to be piecewise linear along the thickness direction of layers. The governing equations are derived based upon the variational principle of minimum potential energy for static analysis and Rayleigh Quotient for free vibration analysis. Then the hierarchical finite element method is introduced to form a numerical algorithm. Both static and natural vibration problems of sample box beams are analyzed with the present method to show the main mechanical behavior of the thin walled composite laminated helicopter rotor.

  18. Registration of prone and supine CT colonography scans using correlation optimized warping and canonical correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Jiamin; Petrick, Nicholas; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), a patient will be scanned twice—Once supine and once prone—to improve the sensitivity for polyp detection. To assist radiologists in CTC reading, in this paper we propose an automated method for colon registration from supine and prone CTC scans. Methods: We propose a new colon centerline registration method for prone and supine CTC scans using correlation optimized warping (COW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based on the anatomical structure of the colon. Four anatomical salient points on the colon are first automatically distinguished. Then correlation optimized warping is applied to the segments defined by the anatomical landmarks to improve the global registration based on local correlation of segments. The COW method was modified by embedding canonical correlation analysis to allow multiple features along the colon centerline to be used in our implementation. Results: We tested the COW algorithm on a CTC data set of 39 patients with 39 polyps (19 training and 20 test cases) to verify the effectiveness of the proposed COW registration method. Experimental results on the test set show that the COW method significantly reduces the average estimation error in a polyp location between supine and prone scans by 67.6%, from 46.27±52.97 to 14.98 mm±11.41 mm, compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline algorithm (p<0.01). Conclusions: The proposed COW algorithm is more accurate for the colon centerline registration compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline method and the dynamic time warping method. Comparison results showed that the feature combination of z-coordinate and curvature achieved lowest registration error compared to the other feature combinations used by COW. The proposed method is tolerant to centerline errors because anatomical landmarks help prevent the propagation of errors across the entire colon centerline. PMID:20095272

  19. Registration of prone and supine CT colonography scans using correlation optimized warping and canonical correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shijun; Yao Jianhua; Liu Jiamin

    Purpose: In computed tomographic colonography (CTC), a patient will be scanned twice--Once supine and once prone--to improve the sensitivity for polyp detection. To assist radiologists in CTC reading, in this paper we propose an automated method for colon registration from supine and prone CTC scans. Methods: We propose a new colon centerline registration method for prone and supine CTC scans using correlation optimized warping (COW) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based on the anatomical structure of the colon. Four anatomical salient points on the colon are first automatically distinguished. Then correlation optimized warping is applied to the segments defined bymore » the anatomical landmarks to improve the global registration based on local correlation of segments. The COW method was modified by embedding canonical correlation analysis to allow multiple features along the colon centerline to be used in our implementation. Results: We tested the COW algorithm on a CTC data set of 39 patients with 39 polyps (19 training and 20 test cases) to verify the effectiveness of the proposed COW registration method. Experimental results on the test set show that the COW method significantly reduces the average estimation error in a polyp location between supine and prone scans by 67.6%, from 46.27{+-}52.97 to 14.98 mm{+-}11.41 mm, compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline algorithm (p<0.01). Conclusions: The proposed COW algorithm is more accurate for the colon centerline registration compared to the normalized distance along the colon centerline method and the dynamic time warping method. Comparison results showed that the feature combination of z-coordinate and curvature achieved lowest registration error compared to the other feature combinations used by COW. The proposed method is tolerant to centerline errors because anatomical landmarks help prevent the propagation of errors across the entire colon centerline.« less

  20. 3D temporal subtraction on multislice CT images using nonlinear warping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takayuki; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Kawashita, Ikuo; Kim, Hyounseop; Itai, Yoshinori; Awai, Kazuo; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    The detection of very subtle lesions and/or lesions overlapped with vessels on CT images is a time consuming and difficult task for radiologists. In this study, we have developed a 3D temporal subtraction method to enhance interval changes between previous and current multislice CT images based on a nonlinear image warping technique. Our method provides a subtraction CT image which is obtained by subtraction of a previous CT image from a current CT image. Reduction of misregistration artifacts is important in the temporal subtraction method. Therefore, our computerized method includes global and local image matching techniques for accurate registration of current and previous CT images. For global image matching, we selected the corresponding previous section image for each current section image by using 2D cross-correlation between a blurred low-resolution current CT image and a blurred previous CT image. For local image matching, we applied the 3D template matching technique with translation and rotation of volumes of interests (VOIs) which were selected in the current and the previous CT images. The local shift vector for each VOI pair was determined when the cross-correlation value became the maximum in the 3D template matching. The local shift vectors at all voxels were determined by interpolation of shift vectors of VOIs, and then the previous CT image was nonlinearly warped according to the shift vector for each voxel. Finally, the warped previous CT image was subtracted from the current CT image. The 3D temporal subtraction method was applied to 19 clinical cases. The normal background structures such as vessels, ribs, and heart were removed without large misregistration artifacts. Thus, interval changes due to lung diseases were clearly enhanced as white shadows on subtraction CT images.

  1. Using "Flatland 2: Sphereland" to Help Teach Motion and Multiple Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Seth; Johnson, Dano; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 1884 book Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions,1 written by Edwin Abbott, has captured the interest of numerous generations, and has also been used in schools to help students learn and think about the concept of dimension in a creative, fun way. In 2007, a film was released called "Flatland: The Movie,"2 and over one million students have watched it worldwide, primarily in mathematics classes. Since then, a sequel to the "Flatland" movie was released in 2012, entitled "Flatland 2: Sphereland."3 A primary goal of this sequel is to expand the use of the movie beyond mathematics classes and into physics classes because a central premise to "Sphereland" is the notion of warped space. This latest movie provides an engaging and interesting visual way for students to think about both dimension and motion through warped space. In addition, basic motion concepts such as speed and acceleration can be studied by students in introductory physics classes, for instance, by using frame-by-frame analysis of various scenes in the movie.

  2. InterFace: A software package for face image warping, averaging, and principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robin S S; Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A Mike

    2017-12-01

    We describe InterFace, a software package for research in face recognition. The package supports image warping, reshaping, averaging of multiple face images, and morphing between faces. It also supports principal components analysis (PCA) of face images, along with tools for exploring the "face space" produced by PCA. The package uses a simple graphical user interface, allowing users to perform these sophisticated image manipulations without any need for programming knowledge. The program is available for download in the form of an app, which requires that users also have access to the (freely available) MATLAB Runtime environment.

  3. Ring Structure and Warp of NGC 5907: Interaction with Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Zhongyuan; Brinks, Elias; Chen, Jiansheng; Burstein, David; Su, Hongjun; Byun, Yong-ik; Deng, Licai; Deng, Zugan; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Zhaoji; Li, Yong; Lin, Weipeng; Ma, Feng; Sun, Wei-hsin; Wills, Beverley; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Wu, Hong; Xia, Xiaoyang; Xu, Wen; Xue, Suijian; Yan, Haojing; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Jin; Zou, Zhenlong

    1998-09-01

    The edge-on, nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5907 has long been used as the prototype of a ``noninteracting'' warped galaxy. We report here the discovery of two interactions with companion dwarf galaxies that substantially change this picture. First, a faint ring structure is discovered around this galaxy that is likely due to the tidal disruption of a companion dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The ring is elliptical in shape with the center of NGC 5907 close to one of the ring's foci. This suggests that the ring material is in orbit around NGC 5907. No gaseous component to the ring has been detected either with deep Hα images or in Very Large Array H I 21 cm line maps. The visible material in the ring has an integrated luminosity <=108 Lsolar, and its brightest part has a color R-I~0.9. All of these properties are consistent with the ring being a tidally disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Second, we find that NGC 5907 has a dwarf companion galaxy, PGC 54419, which is projected to be only 36.9 kpc from the center of NGC 5907, close in radial velocity (ΔV=45 km s-1) to the giant spiral galaxy. This dwarf is seen at the tip of the H I warp and in the direction of the warp. Hence, NGC 5907 can no longer be considered noninteracting but is obviously interacting with its dwarf companions much as the Milky Way interacts with its dwarf galaxies. These results, coupled with the finding by others that dwarf galaxies tend to be found around giant galaxies, suggest that tidal interaction with companions, even if containing a mere 1% of the mass of the parent galaxy, might be sufficient to excite the warps found in the disks of many large spiral galaxies. Partially based on observations taken with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated by a cooperative agreement with Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. Cough Recognition Based on Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients and Dynamic Time Warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunmei; Liu, Baojun; Li, Ping

    Cough recognition provides important clinical information for the treatment of many respiratory diseases, but the assessment of cough frequency over a long period of time remains unsatisfied for either clinical or research purpose. In this paper, according to the advantage of dynamic time warping (DTW) and the characteristic of cough recognition, an attempt is made to adapt DTW as the recognition algorithm for cough recognition. The process of cough recognition based on mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) and DTW is introduced. Experiment results of testing samples from 3 subjects show that acceptable performances of cough recognition are obtained by DTW with a small training set.

  5. Towards multi-field D-brane inflation in a warped throat

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Heng-Yu; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Koyama, Kazuya

    2010-11-01

    We study the inflationary dynamics in a model of slow-roll inflation in warped throat. Inflation is realized by the motion of a D-brane along the radial direction of the throat, and at later stages instabilities develop in the angular directions. We closely investigate both the single field potential relevant for the slow-roll phase, and the full multi-field one including the angular modes which becomes important at later stages. We study the main features of the instability process, discussing its possible consequences and identifying the vacua towards which the angular modes are driven.

  6. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; ...

    2015-12-31

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  7. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  8. The impact of emerging technology on nursing care: warp speed ahead.

    PubMed

    Huston, Carol

    2013-05-31

    While myriad forces are changing the face of contemporary healthcare, one could argue that nothing will change the way nursing is practiced more than current advances in technology. Indeed, technology is changing the world at warp speed and nowhere is this more evident than in healthcare settings. This article identifies seven emerging technologies that will change the practice of nursing; three skill sets nurses will need to develop to acquire, use, and integrate these emerging technologies; and four challenges nurse leaders will face in integrating this new technology.

  9. General gauge mediation in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrie, Moritz; Russo, Rodolfo

    2010-08-01

    We use the ''general gauge mediation'' (GGM) formalism to describe a five-dimensional setup with an S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We first consider a model independent supersymmetry breaking hidden sector on one boundary and generic chiral matter on another. Using the definition of GGM, the effects of the hidden sector are contained in a set of global symmetry current correlator functions and is mediated through the bulk. We find the gaugino, sfermion and hyperscalar mass formulas for minimal and generalized messengers in different regimes of a large, small and intermediate extra dimension. Then we use the five-dimensional GGM formalism to constructmore » a model in which an SU(5) Intriligator, Seiberg and Shih (ISS) model is located on the hidden boundary. We weakly gauge a global symmetry of the ISS model and associate it with the bulk vector superfield. Compared to four-dimensional GGM, there is a natural way to adjust the gaugino versus sfermion mass ratio by a factor (Ml){sup 2}, where M is a characteristic mass scale of the supersymmetry breaking sector and l is the length of the extra dimension.« less

  10. The effect of tooling design parameters on web-warping in the flexible roll forming of UHSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jingsi; Rolfe, Bernard; Mendiguren, Joseba; Galdos, Lander; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    To reduce weight and improve passenger safety there is an increased need in the automotive industry to use Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) for structural and crash components. However, the application of UHSS is restricted by their limited formability and the difficulty of forming them in conventional processes. An alternative method of manufacturing structural auto body parts from UHSS is the flexible roll forming process which can accommodate materials with high strength and limited ductility in the production of complex and weight-optimised components. However, one major concern in the flexible roll forming is web-warping, which is the height deviation of the profile web area. This paper investigates, using a numerical model, the effect on web-warping with respect to various forming methods. The results demonstrate that different forming methods lead to different amount of web-warping in terms of forming the product with identical geometry.

  11. Technical guidance for the development of a solid state image sensor for human low vision image warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderspiegel, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This report surveys different technologies and approaches to realize sensors for image warping. The goal is to study the feasibility, technical aspects, and limitations of making an electronic camera with special geometries which implements certain transformations for image warping. This work was inspired by the research done by Dr. Juday at NASA Johnson Space Center on image warping. The study has looked into different solid-state technologies to fabricate image sensors. It is found that among the available technologies, CMOS is preferred over CCD technology. CMOS provides more flexibility to design different functions into the sensor, is more widely available, and is a lower cost solution. By using an architecture with row and column decoders one has the added flexibility of addressing the pixels at random, or read out only part of the image.

  12. The effect of tooling design parameters on web-warping in the flexible roll forming of UHSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jingsi; Weiss, Matthias; Rolfe, Bernard

    To reduce weight and improve passenger safety there is an increased need in the automotive industry to use Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) for structural and crash components. However, the application of UHSS is restricted by their limited formability and the difficulty of forming them in conventional processes. An alternative method of manufacturing structural auto body parts from UHSS is the flexible roll forming process which can accommodate materials with high strength and limited ductility in the production of complex and weight-optimised components. However, one major concern in the flexible roll forming is web-warping, which is the height deviation ofmore » the profile web area. This paper investigates, using a numerical model, the effect on web-warping with respect to various forming methods. The results demonstrate that different forming methods lead to different amount of web-warping in terms of forming the product with identical geometry.« less

  13. Investigating Cultural Evolution Using Phylogenetic Analysis: The Origins and Descent of the Southeast Asian Tradition of Warp Ikat Weaving

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    The warp ikat method of making decorated textiles is one of the most geographically widespread in southeast Asia, being used by Austronesian peoples in Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines, and Daic peoples on the Asian mainland. In this study a dataset consisting of the decorative characters of 36 of these warp ikat weaving traditions is investigated using Bayesian and Neighbornet techniques, and the results are used to construct a phylogenetic tree and taxonomy for warp ikat weaving in southeast Asia. The results and analysis show that these diverse traditions have a common ancestor amongst neolithic cultures the Asian mainland, and parallels exist between the patterns of textile weaving descent and linguistic phylogeny for the Austronesian group. Ancestral state analysis is used to reconstruct some of the features of the ancestral weaving tradition. The widely held theory that weaving motifs originated in the late Bronze Age Dong-Son culture is shown to be inconsistent with the data. PMID:23272211

  14. Dimensions of Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Roe L., Ed.; And Others

    Roe L. Johns and J. Alan Thomas survey the problem of educational need; and Kern Alexander considers the implications of the dimensions of educational need for school financing. Dimensions of need in the following areas are defined: early childhood and basic elementary and secondary education, by William P. McLure; educational programs for…

  15. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  16. Warp-X: A new exascale computing platform for beam–plasma simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vay, J. -L.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; ...

    2018-01-31

    Turning the current experimental plasma accelerator state-of-the-art from a promising technology into mainstream scientific tools depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Project, a team from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in collaboration with teams from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is developing a new plasma accelerator simulation tool that will harness the power of future exascale supercomputers for high-performance modeling of plasma accelerators. We present the various components of the codes such asmore » the new Particle-In-Cell Scalable Application Resource (PICSAR) and the redesigned adaptive mesh refinement library AMReX, which are combined with redesigned elements of the Warp code, in the new WarpX software. Lastly, the code structure, status, early examples of applications and plans are discussed.« less

  17. Geometry and supersymmetry of heterotic warped flux AdS backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2015-07-01

    We classify the geometries of the most general warped, flux AdS backgrounds of heterotic supergravity up to two loop order in sigma model perturbation theory. We show under some mild assumptions that there are no AdS n backgrounds with n ≠ 3. Moreover the warp factor of AdS3 backgrounds is constant, the geometry is a product AdS 3 × M 7 and such solutions preserve, 2, 4, 6 and 8 supersymmetries. The geometry of M 7 has been specified in all cases. For 2 supersymmetries, it has been found that M 7 admits a suitably restricted G 2 structure. For 4 supersymmetries, M 7 has an SU(3) structure and can be described locally as a circle fibration over a 6-dimensional KT manifold. For 6 and 8 supersymmetries, M 7 has an SU(2) structure and can be described locally as a S 3 fibration over a 4-dimensional manifold which either has an anti-self dual Weyl tensor or a hyper-Kähler structure, respectively. We also demonstrate a new Lichnerowicz type theorem in the presence of α' corrections.

  18. Warp-X: A new exascale computing platform for beam–plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J. -L.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.

    Turning the current experimental plasma accelerator state-of-the-art from a promising technology into mainstream scientific tools depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Project, a team from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in collaboration with teams from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is developing a new plasma accelerator simulation tool that will harness the power of future exascale supercomputers for high-performance modeling of plasma accelerators. We present the various components of the codes such asmore » the new Particle-In-Cell Scalable Application Resource (PICSAR) and the redesigned adaptive mesh refinement library AMReX, which are combined with redesigned elements of the Warp code, in the new WarpX software. Lastly, the code structure, status, early examples of applications and plans are discussed.« less

  19. A nonlinear theory for spinning anisotropic beams using restrained warping functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ie, C. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear theory is developed for spinning anisotropic beams having arbitrary cross sections. An assumed displacement field is developed using the standard 3D kinematics relations to describe the global beam behavior supplemented with an additional field that represents the local deformation within the cross section and warping out of the cross section plane. It is assumed that the magnitude of this additional field is directly proportional to the local stress resultants. In order to take into account the effects of boundary conditions, a restraining function is introduced. This function plays the role of reducing the amount of free warping deformation throughout the field due to the restraint of the cross section(s) at the end(s) of the beam, e.g., in the case of a cantilever beam. Using a developed ordering scheme, the nonlinear strains are calculated to the third order. The FEM is developed using the weak form variational formulation. Preliminary interesting numerical results have been obtained that indicate the role of the restraining function in the case of a cantilever beam with circular cross section. These results are for the cases of a tip displacement (static) and free vibration studies for both isotropic and anisotropic materials with varied fiber orientations.

  20. Automated identification of ERP peaks through Dynamic Time Warping: an application to developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Assecondi, Sara; Bianchi, A M; Hallez, H; Staelens, S; Casarotto, S; Lemahieu, I; Chiarenza, G A

    2009-10-01

    This article proposes a method to automatically identify and label event-related potential (ERP) components with high accuracy and precision. We present a framework, referred to as peak-picking Dynamic Time Warping (ppDTW), where a priori knowledge about the ERPs under investigation is used to define a reference signal. We developed a combination of peak-picking and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) that makes the temporal intervals for peak-picking adaptive on the basis of the morphology of the data. We tested the procedure on experimental data recorded from a control group and from children diagnosed with developmental dyslexia. We compared our results with the traditional peak-picking. We demonstrated that our method achieves better performance than peak-picking, with an overall precision, recall and F-score of 93%, 86% and 89%, respectively, versus 93%, 80% and 85% achieved by peak-picking. We showed that our hybrid method outperforms peak-picking, when dealing with data involving several peaks of interest. The proposed method can reliably identify and label ERP components in challenging event-related recordings, thus assisting the clinician in an objective assessment of amplitudes and latencies of peaks of clinical interest.

  1. Warped frequency transform analysis of ultrasonic guided waves in long bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, L.; Baravelli, E.; Xu, K.; Ta, D.; Speciale, N.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2010-03-01

    Long bones can be seen as irregular hollow tubes, in which, for a given excitation frequency, many ultrasonic Guided Waves (GWs) can propagate. The analysis of GWs is potential to reflect more information on both geometry and material properties of the bone than any other method (such as dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or quantitative computed tomography), and can be used in the assessment of osteoporosis and in the evaluation of fracture healing. In this study, time frequency representations (TFRs) were used to gain insights into the expected behavior of GWs in bones. To this aim, we implemented a dedicated Warped Frequency Transform (WFT) which decomposes the spectrotemporal components of the different propagating modes by selecting an appropriate warping map to reshape the frequency axis. The map can be designed once the GWs group velocity dispersion curves can be predicted. To this purpose, the bone is considered as a hollow cylinder with inner and outer diameter of 16.6 and 24.7 mm, respectively, and linear poroelastic material properties in agreement with the low level of stresses induced by the waves. Timetransient events obtained experimentally, via a piezoelectric ultrasonic set-up applied to bovine tibiae, are analyzed. The results show that WFT limits interference patterns which appear with others TFRs (such as scalograms or warpograms) and produces a sparse representation suitable for characterization purposes. In particular, the mode-frequency combinations propagating with minimal losses are identified.

  2. FPGA Implementation of the Coupled Filtering Method and the Affine Warping Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Liang, Tianzhu; Mok, Philip K T; Yu, Weichuan

    2017-07-01

    In ultrasound image analysis, the speckle tracking methods are widely applied to study the elasticity of body tissue. However, "feature-motion decorrelation" still remains as a challenge for the speckle tracking methods. Recently, a coupled filtering method and an affine warping method were proposed to accurately estimate strain values, when the tissue deformation is large. The major drawback of these methods is the high computational complexity. Even the graphics processing unit (GPU)-based program requires a long time to finish the analysis. In this paper, we propose field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based implementations of both methods for further acceleration. The capability of FPGAs on handling different image processing components in these methods is discussed. A fast and memory-saving image warping approach is proposed. The algorithms are reformulated to build a highly efficient pipeline on FPGA. The final implementations on a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA are at least 13 times faster than the GPU implementation on the NVIDIA graphic card (GeForce GTX 580).

  3. Warping an atlas derived from serial histology to 5 high-resolution MRIs.

    PubMed

    Tullo, Stephanie; Devenyi, Gabriel A; Patel, Raihaan; Park, Min Tae M; Collins, D Louis; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2018-06-19

    Previous work from our group demonstrated the use of multiple input atlases to a modified multi-atlas framework (MAGeT-Brain) to improve subject-based segmentation accuracy. Currently, segmentation of the striatum, globus pallidus and thalamus are generated from a single high-resolution and -contrast MRI atlas derived from annotated serial histological sections. Here, we warp this atlas to five high-resolution MRI templates to create five de novo atlases. The overall goal of this work is to use these newly warped atlases as input to MAGeT-Brain in an effort to consolidate and improve the workflow presented in previous manuscripts from our group, allowing for simultaneous multi-structure segmentation. The work presented details the methodology used for the creation of the atlases using a technique previously proposed, where atlas labels are modified to mimic the intensity and contrast profile of MRI to facilitate atlas-to-template nonlinear transformation estimation. Dice's Kappa metric was used to demonstrate high quality registration and segmentation accuracy of the atlases. The final atlases are available at https://github.com/CobraLab/atlases/tree/master/5-atlas-subcortical.

  4. Life in extra dimensions of database world or penetration of NoSQL in HEP community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Evans, D.; Metson, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent buzzword in IT world is NoSQL. Major players, such as Facebook, Yahoo, Google, etc. are widely adopted different “NoSQL” solutions for their needs. Horizontal scalability, flexible data model and management of big data volumes are only a few advantages of NoSQL. In CMS experiment we use several of them in production environment. Here, we present CMS projects based on NoSQL solutions, their strengths and weaknesses as well as our experience with those tools and their coexistence with standard RDBMS solutions in our applications.

  5. Dimension from covariance matrices.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L; Byers, J M

    2017-02-01

    We describe a method to estimate embedding dimension from a time series. This method includes an estimate of the probability that the dimension estimate is valid. Such validity estimates are not common in algorithms for calculating the properties of dynamical systems. The algorithm described here compares the eigenvalues of covariance matrices created from an embedded signal to the eigenvalues for a covariance matrix of a Gaussian random process with the same dimension and number of points. A statistical test gives the probability that the eigenvalues for the embedded signal did not come from the Gaussian random process.

  6. Polyhedra and Higher Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Describes the definition and characteristics of a regular polyhedron, tessellation, and pseudopolyhedra with diagrams. Discusses the nature of simplex, hypercube, and cross-polytope in the fourth dimension and beyond. (YP)

  7. Extra-oral Appliances in Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Almuzian, Mohammed; Alharbi, Fahad; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Extra-oral appliances are used in orthodontics to apply forces to the jaws, dentition or both and the popularity of these appliances is cyclical. Although the use of retraction headgear for the management of Class II malocclusion has declined over the last 20 years with the refinement of non-compliance approaches, including temporary anchorage devices, headgear still has a useful role in orthodontics. The use of protraction headgear has increased as more evidence of its effectiveness for the treatment of Class lIl malocclusion has become available. This paper describes the mechanics and contemporary uses of headgear in orthodontics for primary care dentists and specialist orthodontists. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Extra-oral appliances have specific uses in orthodontic biomechanics. Clinicians using retraction headgear and protraction headgear should be familiar with their clinical indications, the potential problems and how these can be avoided.

  8. Origin of extra chromosome in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriyama, S; Niikawa, N

    1984-01-01

    Five live-born infants with Patau syndrome were studied for the nondisjunctional origin of the extra chromosome. Transmission modes of chromosomes 13 from parents to a child were determined using both QFQ- and RFA-heteromorphisms as markers, and the origin was ascertained in all of the patients. The extra chromosome had originated in nondisjunction at the maternal first meiotic division in two patients, at the maternal second meiosis in other two, and at the paternal first meiosis in the remaining one. Summarizing the results of the present study, together with those of the previous studies on a liveborn and abortuses with trisomy 13, nondisjunction at the maternal and the paternal meiosis occurred in this trisomy in the ratio of 14:3. This ratio is not statistically different from that inferred from the previous studies for Down syndrome. These findings suggest that there may be a fundamental mechanism common to the occurrence of nondisjunction in the acrocentric trisomies.

  9. Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Apollo Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Apollo Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) spacesuits, which supported launch and reentry and extra-vehicular activity. This program was NASA's first attempt to develop a new suit design from requirements and concepts. Mr. Thomas will chronicle the challenges, developments, struggles, and solutions that culminated in the system that allowed the first human exploration of the Moon and deep space (outside low-Earth orbit). Apollo pressure suit designs allowed the heroic repair of the Skylab space station and supported the first U.S. and Russian spacecraft docking during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Mr. Thomas will also discuss the IEVA suits' successes and challenges associated with the IEVA developments of the 1960s.

  10. The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Drake, Frank

    2011-02-13

    Modern history of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence is reviewed. The history of radio searches is discussed, as well as the major advances that have occurred in radio searches and prospects for new instruments and search strategies. Recent recognition that searches for optical and infrared signals make sense, and the reasons for this are described, as well as the equipment and special detection methods used in optical searches. The long-range future of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) is discussed in the context of the history of rapid change, on the cosmic and even the human time scale, of the paradigms guiding SETI searches. This suggests that SETI searches be conducted with a very open mind.

  11. A Comparison of Hyperelastic Warping of PET Images with Tagged MRI for the Analysis of Cardiac Deformation

    DOE PAGES

    Veress, Alexander I.; Klein, Gregory; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he objectives of the following research were to evaluate the utility of a deformable image registration technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle through the analysis of clinical, gated PE image datasets. wo normal human male subjects were sequentially imaged with PE and tagged MRI imaging. Strain predictions were made for systolic contraction using warping analyses of the PE images and HARP based strain analyses of the MRI images. Coefficient of determination R 2 values were computed for the comparison of circumferential and radial strain predictions produced by each methodology. here was good correspondence between the methodologies, with R 2 values of 0.78 for the radial strains of both hearts and from an R 2 = 0.81 and R 2 = 0.83 for the circumferential strains. he strain predictions were not statistically different ( P ≤ 0.01 ) . A series of sensitivity results indicated that the methodology was relatively insensitive to alterations in image intensity, random image noise, and alterations in fiber structure. his study demonstrated that warping was able to provide strain predictions of systolic contraction of the LV consistent with those provided by tagged MRI Warping.« less

  12. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  13. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  14. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  15. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  16. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  17. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Predicting Annual Maximum and Annual Maximum Moving-Average Concentrations of Atrazine in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Regression models were developed for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average concentrations of atrazine in streams using the Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) methodology developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The current effort builds on the original WARP models, which were based on the annual mean and selected percentiles of the annual frequency distribution of atrazine concentrations. Estimates of annual maximum and annual maximum moving-average concentrations for selected durations are needed to characterize the levels of atrazine and other pesticides for comparison to specific water-quality benchmarks for evaluation of potential concerns regarding human health or aquatic life. Separate regression models were derived for the annual maximum and annual maximum 21-day, 60-day, and 90-day moving-average concentrations. Development of the regression models used the same explanatory variables, transformations, model development data, model validation data, and regression methods as those used in the original development of WARP. The models accounted for 72 to 75 percent of the variability in the concentration statistics among the 112 sampling sites used for model development. Predicted concentration statistics from the four models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentration statistics for most of the model development and validation sites. Overall, performance of the models for the development and validation sites supports the application of the WARP models for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentration in streams and provides a framework to interpret the predictions in terms of uncertainty. For streams with inadequate direct measurements of atrazine concentrations, the WARP model predictions for the annual maximum and the annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentrations can be used to characterize

  18. Tensorial dynamic time warping with articulation index representation for efficient audio-template learning.

    PubMed

    Le, Long N; Jones, Douglas L

    2018-03-01

    Audio classification techniques often depend on the availability of a large labeled training dataset for successful performance. However, in many application domains of audio classification (e.g., wildlife monitoring), obtaining labeled data is still a costly and laborious process. Motivated by this observation, a technique is proposed to efficiently learn a clean template from a few labeled, but likely corrupted (by noise and interferences), data samples. This learning can be done efficiently via tensorial dynamic time warping on the articulation index-based time-frequency representations of audio data. The learned template can then be used in audio classification following the standard template-based approach. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms both (1) the recurrent neural network approach and (2) the state-of-the-art in the template-based approach on a wildlife detection application with few training samples.

  19. Motion data classification on the basis of dynamic time warping with a cloud point distance measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switonski, Adam; Josinski, Henryk; Zghidi, Hafedh; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the problem of classification of model free motion data. The nearest neighbors classifier which is based on comparison performed by Dynamic Time Warping transform with cloud point distance measure is proposed. The classification utilizes both specific gait features reflected by a movements of subsequent skeleton joints and anthropometric data. To validate proposed approach human gait identification challenge problem is taken into consideration. The motion capture database containing data of 30 different humans collected in Human Motion Laboratory of Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology is used. The achieved results are satisfactory, the obtained accuracy of human recognition exceeds 90%. What is more, the applied cloud point distance measure does not depend on calibration process of motion capture system which results in reliable validation.

  20. Improving naturalness in warped models with a heavy bulk Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrer, Joan A.; von Gersdorff, Gero; Quirós, Mariano

    2011-08-01

    A standard-model-like Higgs boson should be light in order to comply with electroweak precision measurements from LEP. We consider five-dimensional warped models—with a deformation of the metric in the IR region—as UV completions of the standard model with a heavy Higgs boson. Provided the Higgs boson propagates in the five-dimensional bulk the Kaluza Klein (KK) modes of the gauge bosons can compensate for the Higgs boson contribution to oblique parameters while their masses lie within the range of the LHC. The little hierarchy between KK scale and Higgs mass essentially disappears and the naturalness of the model greatly improves with respect to the Anti-de Sitter (Randall-Sundrum) model. In fact the fine-tuning is better than 10% for all values of the Higgs boson mass.

  1. Prediction of regulatory gene pairs using dynamic time warping and gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andy C; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Lu, Ming-Da; Tseng, Vincent S; Shih, Timothy K

    2014-01-01

    Selecting informative genes is the most important task for data analysis on microarray gene expression data. In this work, we aim at identifying regulatory gene pairs from microarray gene expression data. However, microarray data often contain multiple missing expression values. Missing value imputation is thus needed before further processing for regulatory gene pairs becomes possible. We develop a novel approach to first impute missing values in microarray time series data by combining k-Nearest Neighbour (KNN), Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Gene Ontology (GO). After missing values are imputed, we then perform gene regulation prediction based on our proposed DTW-GO distance measurement of gene pairs. Experimental results show that our approach is more accurate when compared with existing missing value imputation methods on real microarray data sets. Furthermore, our approach can also discover more regulatory gene pairs that are known in the literature than other methods.

  2. Observation of antiphase coherent phonons in the warped Dirac cone of Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golias, E.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this Rapid Communication we investigate the coupling between excited electrons and phonons in the highly anisotropic electronic structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Te3 . Using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we are able to identify the emergence and ultrafast temporal evolution of the longitudinal-optical A1 g coherent-phonon mode in Bi2Te3 . We observe an antiphase behavior in the onset of the coherent-phonon oscillations between the Γ K ¯ and the Γ M ¯ high-symmetry directions that is consistent with warping. The qualitative agreement between our density-functional theory calculations and the experimental results reveals the critical role of the anisotropic coupling between Dirac fermions and phonon modes in the topological insulator Bi2Te3 .

  3. Uncertainty evaluation of thickness and warp of a silicon wafer measured by a spectrally resolved interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praba Drijarkara, Agustinus; Gergiso Gebrie, Tadesse; Lee, Jae Yong; Kang, Chu-Shik

    2018-06-01

    Evaluation of uncertainty of thickness and gravity-compensated warp of a silicon wafer measured by a spectrally resolved interferometer is presented. The evaluation is performed in a rigorous manner, by analysing the propagation of uncertainty from the input quantities through all the steps of measurement functions, in accordance with the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. In the evaluation, correlation between input quantities as well as uncertainty attributed to thermal effect, which were not included in earlier publications, are taken into account. The temperature dependence of the group refractive index of silicon was found to be nonlinear and varies widely within a wafer and also between different wafers. The uncertainty evaluation described here can be applied to other spectral interferometry applications based on similar principles.

  4. Electronic Structure of ABC-stacked Multilayer Graphene and Trigonal Warping:A First Principles Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelgel, Celal

    2016-04-01

    We present an extensive density functional theory (DFT) based investigation of the electronic structures of ABC-stacked N-layer graphene. It is found that for such systems the dispersion relations of the highest valence and the lowest conduction bands near the K point in the Brillouin zone are characterised by a mixture of cubic, parabolic, and linear behaviours. When the number of graphene layers is increased to more than three, the separation between the valence and conduction bands decreases up until they touch each other. For five and six layer samples these bands show flat behaviour close to the K point. We note that all states in the vicinity of the Fermi energy are surface states originated from the top and/or bottom surface of all the systems considered. For the trilayer system, N = 3, pronounced trigonal warping of the bands slightly above the Fermi level is directly obtained from DFT calculations.

  5. Latency as a region contrast: Measuring ERP latency differences with Dynamic Time Warping.

    PubMed

    Zoumpoulaki, A; Alsufyani, A; Filetti, M; Brammer, M; Bowman, H

    2015-12-01

    Methods for measuring onset latency contrasts are evaluated against a new method utilizing the dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm. This new method allows latency to be measured across a region instead of single point. We use computer simulations to compare the methods' power and Type I error rates under different scenarios. We perform per-participant analysis for different signal-to-noise ratios and two sizes of window (broad vs. narrow). In addition, the methods are tested in combination with single-participant and jackknife average waveforms for different effect sizes, at the group level. DTW performs better than the other methods, being less sensitive to noise as well as to placement and width of the window selected. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  6. Elliptical-like orbits on a warped spandex fabric: A theoretical/experimental undergraduate research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Chad A.; Weller, Dannyl

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the elliptical-like orbits of a marble rolling on a warped spandex fabric. We arrive at an expression describing the angular separation between successive apocenters, or equivalently successive pericenters, in both the small and large slope regimes. We find that a minimal angular separation of ˜197° is predicted for orbits with small radial distances when the surface is void of a central mass. We then show that for small radii and large central masses, when the orbiting marble is deep within the well, the angular separation between successive apocenters transitions to values greater than 360°. We lastly compare these expressions to those describing elliptical-like orbits about a static, spherically symmetric massive object in the presence of a constant vacuum energy, as described by general relativity.

  7. A Dynamic Time Warping Approach to Real-Time Activity Recognition for Food Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cuong; Plötz, Thomas; Olivier, Patrick

    We present a dynamic time warping based activity recognition system for the analysis of low-level food preparation activities. Accelerometers embedded into kitchen utensils provide continuous sensor data streams while people are using them for cooking. The recognition framework analyzes frames of contiguous sensor readings in real-time with low latency. It thereby adapts to the idiosyncrasies of utensil use by automatically maintaining a template database. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the classification approach by a number of real-world practical experiments on a publically available dataset. The adaptive system shows superior performance compared to a static recognizer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the generalization capabilities of the system by gradually reducing the amount of training samples. The system achieves excellent classification results even if only a small number of training samples is available, which is especially relevant for real-world scenarios.

  8. Degree-Pruning Dynamic Programming Approaches to Central Time Series Minimizing Dynamic Time Warping Distance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Hongbo; Yu, Hong; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-06-28

    The central time series crystallizes the common patterns of the set it represents. In this paper, we propose a global constrained degree-pruning dynamic programming (g(dp)²) approach to obtain the central time series through minimizing dynamic time warping (DTW) distance between two time series. The DTW matching path theory with global constraints is proved theoretically for our degree-pruning strategy, which is helpful to reduce the time complexity and computational cost. Our approach can achieve the optimal solution between two time series. An approximate method to the central time series of multiple time series [called as m_g(dp)²] is presented based on DTW barycenter averaging and our g(dp)² approach by considering hierarchically merging strategy. As illustrated by the experimental results, our approaches provide better within-group sum of squares and robustness than other relevant algorithms.

  9. Perfect transmission at oblique incidence by trigonal warping in graphene P-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Yang, Wen

    2018-01-01

    We develop an analytical mode-matching technique for the tight-binding model to describe electron transport across graphene P-N junctions. This method shares the simplicity of the conventional mode-matching technique for the low-energy continuum model and the accuracy of the tight-binding model over a wide range of energies. It further reveals an interesting phenomenon on a sharp P-N junction: the disappearance of the well-known Klein tunneling (i.e., perfect transmission) at normal incidence and the appearance of perfect transmission at oblique incidence due to trigonal warping at energies beyond the linear Dirac regime. We show that this phenomenon arises from the conservation of a generalized pseudospin in the tight-binding model. We expect this effect to be experimentally observable in graphene and other Dirac fermions systems, such as the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators.

  10. The use of cross-section warping functions in composite rotor blade analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    During the contracted period, our research was concentrated into three areas. The first was the development of an accurate and a computationally efficient method for predicting the cross-section warping functions in an arbitrary cross-section composed of isotropic and/or anisotropic materials. The second area of research was the development of a general higher-order one-dimensional theory for anisotropic beams. The third area of research was the development of an analytical model for assessing the extension-bend-twist coupling behavior of nonhomogeneous anisotropic beams with initial twist. In the remaining six chapters of this report, the three different research areas and associated sub-research areas are covered independently including separate introductions, theoretical developments, numerical results, and references.

  11. 23 CFR 635.120 - Changes and extra work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.120 Changes and extra work. (a) Following authorization to proceed with a project, all major changes in the plans and contract provisions and all major extra... to what constitutes a non-major change and non-major extra work. (c) Changes in contract time, as...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered by...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 8 - Extra work and changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra work and changes. Sec. 8 Section 8 Shipping... Sec. 8 Extra work and changes. (a) At any time after the award of an original job order and during the time the work thereunder is being performed, additional or extra work or changes in the work covered by...

  14. Primary Education in Vietnam: Extra Classes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Tran Thu; Harpham, Trudy

    2005-01-01

    Extra classes are increasingly observed in both developed and developing countries. In Vietnam, a country where education reforms are at their height, extra classes are proliferating and have become a concern to society and the government. Although the government has banned extra classes that are independent of school administration, teachers…

  15. Perceptual dimensions differentiate emotions.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Lisa A; MacInnis, Deborah J; Weiss, Allen M

    2015-08-26

    Individuals often describe objects in their world in terms of perceptual dimensions that span a variety of modalities; the visual (e.g., brightness: dark-bright), the auditory (e.g., loudness: quiet-loud), the gustatory (e.g., taste: sour-sweet), the tactile (e.g., hardness: soft vs. hard) and the kinaesthetic (e.g., speed: slow-fast). We ask whether individuals use perceptual dimensions to differentiate emotions from one another. Participants in two studies (one where respondents reported on abstract emotion concepts and a second where they reported on specific emotion episodes) rated the extent to which features anchoring 29 perceptual dimensions (e.g., temperature, texture and taste) are associated with 8 emotions (anger, fear, sadness, guilt, contentment, gratitude, pride and excitement). Results revealed that in both studies perceptual dimensions differentiate positive from negative emotions and high arousal from low arousal emotions. They also differentiate among emotions that are similar in arousal and valence (e.g., high arousal negative emotions such as anger and fear). Specific features that anchor particular perceptual dimensions (e.g., hot vs. cold) are also differentially associated with emotions.

  16. Keck/NIRC2 Imaging of the Warped, Asymmetric Debris Disk Around HD 32297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Debes, John; Plavchan, Peter; Kuchner, Marc; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Wilner, David; Andrews, Sean; Kraus, Adam; Dahm, Scott; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present Keck/NIRC2 Ks band high-contrast coronagraphic imaging of the luminous debris disk around the nearby, young A star HD 32297 resolved at a projected separation of r = 0.3-2.5 arcse (approx 35-280 AU). The disk is highly warped to the north and exhibits a complex, "wavy" surface brightness profile interior to r approx 110 AU, where the peaks/plateaus in the profiles are shifted between the NE and SW disk lobes. The SW side of the disk is 50 - 100% brighter at r = 35 - 80 AU, and the location of its peak brightness roughly coincides with the disk's mm emission peak. Spectral energy distribution modeling suggests that HD 32297 has at least two dust populations that may originate from two separate belts likely at different locations, possibly at distances coinciding with the surface brightness peaks. A disk model for a single dust belt including a phase function with two components and a 5-10 AU pericenter offset explains the disk's warped structure and reproduces some of the surface brightness profile's shape (e.g. the overall "wavy" profile, the SB peak/plateau shifts) but more poorly reproduces the disk's brightness asymmetry. Although there may be alternate explanations, agreement between the SW disk brightness peak and disk's peak mm emission is consistent with an overdensity of very small, sub-blowout-sized dust and large, 0.1-1 mm-sized grains at approx 45 AU tracing the same parent population of planetesimals. New near-IR and submm observations may be able to clarify whether even more complex grain scattering properties or dynamical sculpting by an unseen planet are required to explain HD 32297's disk structure.

  17. Keck/NIRC2 Imaging of the Warped, Asymmetric Debris Disk Around HD 32297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Debes, John; Plavchan, Peter; Kuchner, Marc; Jang, Condell, Hannah; Wilner, David; Andrews, Sean; Dahm, Scott; Robitaille,Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present Keck/NIRC2 K(sub s) band high-contrast coronagraphic imaging of the luminous debris disk around the nearby, young A star HD 32297 resolved at a projected separation of r = 0.3 - 2.5" (approx equals 35 - 280 AU). The disk is highly warped to the north and exhibits a complex, "wavy" surface brightness profile interior to r approx equals 110 AU, where the peaks/plateaus in the profiles are shifted between the NE and SW disk lobes. The SW side of the disk is 50 - 100% brighter at r = 35 - 80 AU, and the location of its peak brightness roughly coincides with the disk's mm emission peak. Spectral energy distribution modeling suggests that HD 32297 has at least two dust populations that may originate from two separate belts likely at different locations, possibly at distances coinciding with the surface brightness peaks. A disk model fur a single dust belt including a phase function with two components and a 5 - 10 AU pericenter offset explains the disk's warped structure and reproduces some of the surface brightness profile's shape (e.g. the overall "wavy" profile, the SB peak/plateau shifts) but more poorly reproduces the disk's brightness asymmetry and the profile at wider separations (r > 110 AU). Although there may be a1ternate explanations, agreement between the SW disk brightness peak and disk's peak rom emission is consistent with an overdensity of very small, sub-blowout-sized dust and large, 0.1 - 1 mm-sized grains at approx equal 45 AU tracing the same parent population of planetesimals. New near-IR and submm observations may be able to clarify whether even more complex grain scattering properties or dynamical sculpting by an unseen planet are required to explain HD 32297's disk structure.

  18. Analysis of warping deformation modes using higher order ANCF beam element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Grzegorz; Shabana, Ahmed A.

    2016-02-01

    Most classical beam theories assume that the beam cross section remains a rigid surface under an arbitrary loading condition. However, in the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) continuum-based beams, this assumption can be relaxed allowing for capturing deformation modes that couple the cross-section deformation and beam bending, torsion, and/or elongation. The deformation modes captured by ANCF finite elements depend on the interpolating polynomials used. The most widely used spatial ANCF beam element employs linear approximation in the transverse direction, thereby restricting the cross section deformation and leading to locking problems. The objective of this investigation is to examine the behavior of a higher order ANCF beam element that includes quadratic interpolation in the transverse directions. This higher order element allows capturing warping and non-uniform stretching distribution. Furthermore, this higher order element allows for increasing the degree of continuity at the element interface. It is shown in this paper that the higher order ANCF beam element can be used effectively to capture warping and eliminate Poisson locking that characterizes lower order ANCF finite elements. It is also shown that increasing the degree of continuity requires a special attention in order to have acceptable results. Because higher order elements can be more computationally expensive than the lower order elements, the use of reduced integration for evaluating the stress forces and the use of explicit and implicit numerical integrations to solve the nonlinear dynamic equations of motion are investigated in this paper. It is shown that the use of some of these integration methods can be very effective in reducing the CPU time without adversely affecting the solution accuracy.

  19. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  20. Selective Attention to Perceptual Dimensions and Switching between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-01-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure…

  1. Dimensions of Dialect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evertts, Eldonna L., Ed.

    This collection of articles discusses social dialects, the problems that dialects cause the disadvantaged, and how these problems can be overcome in curriculum planning and classroom practice. Articles are (1) "English: New Dimensions and New Demands" by Muriel Crosby, (2) "A Checklist of Significant Features for Discriminating Social Dialects" by…

  2. Counseling: The Spiritual Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mary Thomas, Ed.; Miranti, Judith G., Ed.

    Although spirituality is gaining increased interest in counseling, counselors are reluctant to incorporate the spiritual dimension into their practice. This text explores spirituality in counseling so as to encourage counselors to consider their own spirituality and to facilitate the enhancement of spiritual wellness for their clients. The…

  3. Dimensions of Educational Worldview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. H.; Thompson, B.

    The study was conducted to gain insight into the nature and structure of educators' education-related attitudes and beliefs. Subjects included both education students and teachers. The subjects completed two instruments (Kerlinger's Educational Scale VII and the Educational Philosophy Index). Results suggest that more than two dimensions are…

  4. Physics in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertel, Erminald

    2013-01-01

    Due to progress in nanotechnology high-quality quantum wires can nowadays be fabricated. The behavior of particles in one dimension differs significantly from that in three-dimensional (3D) systems, yet the physics of such low-dimensional systems is generally not very well represented in standard undergraduate or graduate curricula. For instance,…

  5. The 'little extra' that alleviates suffering.

    PubMed

    Arman, Maria; Rehnsfeldt, Arne

    2007-05-01

    Nursing, or caring science, is mainly concerned with developing knowledge of what constitutes ideal, good health care for patients as whole persons, and how to achieve this. The aim of this study was to find clinical empirical indications of good ethical care and to investigate the substance of ideal nursing care in praxis. A hermeneutic method was employed in this clinical study, assuming the theoretical perspective of caritative caring and ethics of the understanding of life. The data consisted of two Socratic dialogues: one with nurses and one with nursing students, and interviews with two former patients. The empirical data are first described from a phenomenological approach. Observations of caregivers offering 'the little extra' were taken to confirm that patients were 'being seen', not from the perspective of an ideal nursing model, but from that of interaction as a fellow human being. The study provides clinical evidence that, as an ontological response to suffering, 'symbolic acts' such as giving the 'little extra' may work to bridge gaps in human interaction. The fact that 'little things' have the power to preserve dignity and make patients feel they are valued offers hope. Witnessing benevolent acts also paves the way for both patients and caregivers to increase their understanding of life.

  6. Extra-pair copulations in Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Daniel; Sedinger, James S.

    1990-01-01

    Monogamy is the primary mating system among waterfowl, but extra-pair copulations (EPCs) have been documented in at least 39 species (McKinney et al. 1983). Extra-pair copulations occur in most Holarctic species of dabbling ducks (Anas spp.), but have been recorded in only three species of geese: Lesser Snow Geese, Chen caerulescens caerulescens (Mineau and Cooke 1979a), Ross’ Geese, C. rossii (J. Ryder in McKinney et al. 1984), and Greater White-fronted Geese, Anser albifrons frontalis (C.R. Ely, pers. comm.).In colonial Lesser Snow Geese, the close proximity of nesting conspecifics may enable males to pursue EPCs as a secondary reproductive strategy (Mineau and Cooke, 1979a, 1979b). Copulatory behavior of other geese has not been studied in sufficient detail to permit comparison with Lesser Sone Geese. Here we report on timing and rates of pair copulations (PCs) and EPCs, and describe behaviors associated with EPCs in colonially nesting Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans).

  7. Heavy and extra heavy hydrocarbons in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, L.G.; Gallango, O.E.

    1993-02-01

    Most of Venezuela's giant accumulations of heavier thatn 22[degrees] API hydrocarbons, are located in the more stable flanks of the Maracaibo and Eastern Venezuela basins, at depths shallower than 2400 meters. The reservoir rocks are unconsolidated fluviodeltaic Neogene sands, transgressive over large regional Oligocene unconformities. There are also large volumes accumulated along the mountainous and more active flanks, either in Neogene alluvial sediments or in Cretaceous and older fractured rocks. These accumulations, located near present day erosion surfaces, are subjected to meteoric water influx. Extensive research carried out by the affiliates of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., and other institutions duringmore » the past ten years, has shown tha the main cause of degradation is the action of microorganisms brought in by meteoric water influx and, to less extent, the washing of lighter hydrocarbon fractions by either connate or meteric water. These studies have also shown that most of the heavy and extra-heavy hydrocarbons are the result of biodegradation of low maturity crudes generated from Cretaceous rocks, rich in marine organic matter, which started its generation during the Paleogene. The heavy and extra-heavy hydrocarbons, bitumen included, so far discovered in Venezuela, add up to 1.5 [times] 10[sup 12] bbl in place. This figure includes proved, probable and possible volumes, and the expectancy of additional hydrocarbons of this kind to be discovered yet is of 0.1 [times] 10[sup 12] bbl in place.« less

  8. Dimensions of caring: a qualitative analysis of nurses' stories.

    PubMed

    Hudacek, Sharon S

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study is to describe dimensions of caring as they relate to and clarify the practice of professional nursing. Nurses are unique caregivers, and their work at the bedside and in the community matters. What nurses do as they care for patients is multi-dimensional, complex, and essential. Two hundred stories written by nurses were analyzed using Giorgi's methodology for existential phenomenology. Their stories indicate that nursing goes far beyond technical skills. Seven dimensions of caring that define professional nursing practice were found: caring, compassion, spirituality, community outreach, providing comfort, crisis intervention, and going the extra distance. The nurses' stories demonstrate that the dimensions of caring that define professional nursing practice are universal. Documentation of nurse's stories facilitates reflective and thoughtful practice, while clarifying the essential components of nursing.

  9. Cultural dimensions of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  10. Tensor sufficient dimension reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenxuan; Xing, Xin; Suslick, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Tensor is a multiway array. With the rapid development of science and technology in the past decades, large amount of tensor observations are routinely collected, processed, and stored in many scientific researches and commercial activities nowadays. The colorimetric sensor array (CSA) data is such an example. Driven by the need to address data analysis challenges that arise in CSA data, we propose a tensor dimension reduction model, a model assuming the nonlinear dependence between a response and a projection of all the tensor predictors. The tensor dimension reduction models are estimated in a sequential iterative fashion. The proposed method is applied to a CSA data collected for 150 pathogenic bacteria coming from 10 bacterial species and 14 bacteria from one control species. Empirical performance demonstrates that our proposed method can greatly improve the sensitivity and specificity of the CSA technique. PMID:26594304

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in cadaver dogs with metallic vertebral implants at 3 Tesla: evaluation of the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John F; Archambault, Nicholas S; Mankin, Joseph M; Wall, Corey R; Thompson, James A; Padua, Abraham; Purdy, David; Kerwin, Sharon C

    2013-11-15

    Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Postoperative complications are common after spinal implantation procedures, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) would be the ideal modality to image these patients. Unfortunately, the implants cause artifacts that can render MRI nondiagnostic. The WARP-turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence has been developed to mitigate artifacts caused by metal. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of the WARP-TSE sequence in canine cadaver specimens after implantation with metallic vertebral implants. Magnetic field strength, implant type, and MRI acquisition technique all play a role in the severity of susceptibility artifacts. The WARP-TSE sequence uses increased bandwidth, view angle tilting, and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal artifact correction) to correct for susceptibility artifact. The WARP-TSE technique has outperformed conventional techniques in patients, after total hip arthroplasty. However, published reports of its application in subjects with vertebral column implants are lacking. Ex vivo anterior stabilization of the atlantoaxial joint was performed on 6 adult small breed (<8 kg) cadaver dogs using stainless steel screws and polymethylmethacrylate. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery MRI was performed using conventional pulse sequences and WARP-TSE sequences at 3 T. Images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Images made with the WARP-TSE sequence had smaller susceptibility artifacts and superior spinal cord margin depiction. WARP-TSE sequences reduced the length over which susceptibility artifacts caused spinal cord margin depiction interference by 24.9% to 71.5% with scan times of approximately 12 to 16 minutes. The WARP-TSE sequence is a viable option for evaluating the vertebral column after implantation with stainless steel implants. N/A.

  12. A parallel approximate string matching under Levenshtein distance on graphics processing units using warp-shuffle operations

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ThienLuan; Oh, Seung-Rohk

    2017-01-01

    Approximate string matching with k-differences has a number of practical applications, ranging from pattern recognition to computational biology. This paper proposes an efficient memory-access algorithm for parallel approximate string matching with k-differences on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). In the proposed algorithm, all threads in the same GPUs warp share data using warp-shuffle operation instead of accessing the shared memory. Moreover, we implement the proposed algorithm by exploiting the memory structure of GPUs to optimize its performance. Experiment results for real DNA packages revealed that the performance of the proposed algorithm and its implementation archived up to 122.64 and 1.53 times compared to that of sequential algorithm on CPU and previous parallel approximate string matching algorithm on GPUs, respectively. PMID:29016700

  13. Semi-automated Anatomical Labeling and Inter-subject Warping of High-Density Intracranial Recording Electrodes in Electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Liberty S; Chang, David L; Lee, Morgan B; Chang, Edward F

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we introduce img_pipe, our open source python package for preprocessing of imaging data for use in intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) and intracranial stereo-EEG analyses. The process of electrode localization, labeling, and warping for use in ECoG currently varies widely across laboratories, and it is usually performed with custom, lab-specific code. This python package aims to provide a standardized interface for these procedures, as well as code to plot and display results on 3D cortical surface meshes. It gives the user an easy interface to create anatomically labeled electrodes that can also be warped to an atlas brain, starting with only a preoperative T1 MRI scan and a postoperative CT scan. We describe the full capabilities of our imaging pipeline and present a step-by-step protocol for users.

  14. Semi-automated Anatomical Labeling and Inter-subject Warping of High-Density Intracranial Recording Electrodes in Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Liberty S.; Chang, David L.; Lee, Morgan B.; Chang, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we introduce img_pipe, our open source python package for preprocessing of imaging data for use in intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) and intracranial stereo-EEG analyses. The process of electrode localization, labeling, and warping for use in ECoG currently varies widely across laboratories, and it is usually performed with custom, lab-specific code. This python package aims to provide a standardized interface for these procedures, as well as code to plot and display results on 3D cortical surface meshes. It gives the user an easy interface to create anatomically labeled electrodes that can also be warped to an atlas brain, starting with only a preoperative T1 MRI scan and a postoperative CT scan. We describe the full capabilities of our imaging pipeline and present a step-by-step protocol for users. PMID:29163118

  15. MyDTW - Dynamic Time Warping program for stratigraphical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Sergey; Paelike, Heiko

    2017-04-01

    One of the general tasks in many geological disciplines is matching of one time or space signal to another. It can be classical correlation between two cores or cross-sections in sedimentology or marine geology. For example, tuning a paleoclimatic signal to a target curve, driven by variations in the astronomical parameters, is a powerful technique to construct accurate time scales. However, these methods can be rather time-consuming and can take ours of routine work even with the help of special semi-automatic software. Therefore, different approaches to automate the processes have been developed during last decades. Some of them are based on classical statistical cross-correlations such as the 'Correlator' after Olea [1]. Another ones use modern ideas of dynamic programming. A good example is as an algorithm developed by Lisiecki and Lisiecki [2] or dynamic time warping based algorithm after Pälike [3]. We introduce here an algorithm and computer program, which are also stemmed from the Dynamic Time Warping algorithm class. Unlike the algorithm of Lisiecki and Lisiecki, MyDTW does not lean on a set of penalties to follow geological logics, but on a special internal structure and specific constrains. It differs also from [3] in basic ideas of implementation and constrains design. The algorithm is implemented as a computer program with a graphical user interface using Free Pascal and Lazarus IDE and available for Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Examples with synthetic and real data are demonstrated. Program is available for free download at http://www.marum.de/Sergey_Kotov.html . References: 1. Olea, R.A. Expert systems for automated correlation and interpretation of wireline logs // Math Geol (1994) 26: 879. doi:10.1007/BF02083420 2. Lisiecki L. and Lisiecki P. Application of dynamic programming to the correlation of paleoclimate records // Paleoceanography (2002), Volume 17, Issue 4, pp. 1-1, CiteID 1049, doi: 10.1029/2001PA000733 3. Pälike, H. Extending the

  16. Serrated kiln sticks and top load substantially reduce warp in southern pine studs dried at 240°F

    Treesearch

    Peter Koch

    1974-01-01

    Sharply toothed aluminum kiln sticks pressed into 2 by 4's cut from veneer cores, with a clamping force of 50 to 200 pounds per stick-pair per stud, significantly reduced warp from that observed in matched studs stacked on smooth sticks with a top load of 10 pounds per stick-pair per stud. When dried in 24 hours to an average MC of 8.1 percent (standard deviation...

  17. Serrated kiln sticks and top load substantially reduce warp in southern pine studs dried at 240°F

    Treesearch

    P. Koch

    1974-01-01

    Sharply toothed luminum kiln sticks pressed into 2 by 4's cut from veneer cores, willi a clamping force of 50 to 200 pounds per stick-pair per stud, significantly reduced warp from that observed in matched studs stacked on smooth sticks with a top load of 10 pounds per stick-pair per stud. When dried in 24 hours to an average MC of 8.1 percent (standard deviation...

  18. WarpEngine, a Flexible Platform for Distributed Computing Implemented in the VEGA Program and Specially Targeted for Virtual Screening Studies.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Alessandro; Mazzolari, Angelica; Vistoli, Giulio

    2018-05-21

    The manuscript describes WarpEngine, a novel platform implemented within the VEGA ZZ suite of software for performing distributed simulations both in local and wide area networks. Despite being tailored for structure-based virtual screening campaigns, WarpEngine possesses the required flexibility to carry out distributed calculations utilizing various pieces of software, which can be easily encapsulated within this platform without changing their source codes. WarpEngine takes advantages of all cheminformatics features implemented in the VEGA ZZ program as well as of its largely customizable scripting architecture thus allowing an efficient distribution of various time-demanding simulations. To offer an example of the WarpEngine potentials, the manuscript includes a set of virtual screening campaigns based on the ACE data set of the DUD-E collections using PLANTS as the docking application. Benchmarking analyses revealed a satisfactory linearity of the WarpEngine performances, the speed-up values being roughly equal to the number of utilized cores. Again, the computed scalability values emphasized that a vast majority (i.e., >90%) of the performed simulations benefit from the distributed platform presented here. WarpEngine can be freely downloaded along with the VEGA ZZ program at www.vegazz.net .

  19. Performance and accuracy of criticality calculations performed using WARP – A framework for continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.; Radnović, Nikola

    In this companion paper to "Algorithmic Choices in WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs" (doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039), the WARP Monte Carlo neutron transport framework for graphics processing units (GPUs) is benchmarked against production-level central processing unit (CPU) Monte Carlo neutron transport codes for both performance and accuracy. We compare neutron flux spectra, multiplication factors, runtimes, speedup factors, and costs of various GPU and CPU platforms running either WARP, Serpent 2.1.24, or MCNP 6.1. WARP compares well with the results of the production-level codes, and it is shown that on the newestmore » hardware considered, GPU platforms running WARP are between 0.8 to 7.6 times as fast as CPU platforms running production codes. Also, the GPU platforms running WARP were between 15% and 50% as expensive to purchase and between 80% to 90% as expensive to operate as equivalent CPU platforms performing at an equal simulation rate.« less

  20. Performance and accuracy of criticality calculations performed using WARP – A framework for continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.; Radnović, Nikola; ...

    2017-05-01

    In this companion paper to "Algorithmic Choices in WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs" (doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039), the WARP Monte Carlo neutron transport framework for graphics processing units (GPUs) is benchmarked against production-level central processing unit (CPU) Monte Carlo neutron transport codes for both performance and accuracy. We compare neutron flux spectra, multiplication factors, runtimes, speedup factors, and costs of various GPU and CPU platforms running either WARP, Serpent 2.1.24, or MCNP 6.1. WARP compares well with the results of the production-level codes, and it is shown that on the newestmore » hardware considered, GPU platforms running WARP are between 0.8 to 7.6 times as fast as CPU platforms running production codes. Also, the GPU platforms running WARP were between 15% and 50% as expensive to purchase and between 80% to 90% as expensive to operate as equivalent CPU platforms performing at an equal simulation rate.« less

  1. A Robust In-Situ Warp-Correction Algorithm For VISAR Streak Camera Data at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Labaria, George R.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam pulsed laser system for high-energy-density physics experiments. Sophisticated diagnostics have been designed around key performance metrics to achieve ignition. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is the primary diagnostic for measuring the timing of shocks induced into an ignition capsule. The VISAR system utilizes three streak cameras; these streak cameras are inherently nonlinear and require warp corrections to remove these nonlinear effects. A detailed calibration procedure has been developed with National Security Technologies (NSTec) and applied to the camera correction analysis in production. However,more » the camera nonlinearities drift over time, affecting the performance of this method. An in-situ fiber array is used to inject a comb of pulses to generate a calibration correction in order to meet the timing accuracy requirements of VISAR. We develop a robust algorithm for the analysis of the comb calibration images to generate the warp correction that is then applied to the data images. Our algorithm utilizes the method of thin-plate splines (TPS) to model the complex nonlinear distortions in the streak camera data. In this paper, we focus on the theory and implementation of the TPS warp-correction algorithm for the use in a production environment.« less

  2. A robust in-situ warp-correction algorithm for VISAR streak camera data at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaria, George R.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam pulsed laser system for high energy density physics experiments. Sophisticated diagnostics have been designed around key performance metrics to achieve ignition. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is the primary diagnostic for measuring the timing of shocks induced into an ignition capsule. The VISAR system utilizes three streak cameras; these streak cameras are inherently nonlinear and require warp corrections to remove these nonlinear effects. A detailed calibration procedure has been developed with National Security Technologies (NSTec) and applied to the camera correction analysis in production. However, the camera nonlinearities drift over time affecting the performance of this method. An in-situ fiber array is used to inject a comb of pulses to generate a calibration correction in order to meet the timing accuracy requirements of VISAR. We develop a robust algorithm for the analysis of the comb calibration images to generate the warp correction that is then applied to the data images. Our algorithm utilizes the method of thin-plate splines (TPS) to model the complex nonlinear distortions in the streak camera data. In this paper, we focus on the theory and implementation of the TPS warp-correction algorithm for the use in a production environment.

  3. CLUSTERING OF INTERICTAL SPIKES BY DYNAMIC TIME WARPING AND AFFINITY PROPAGATION

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jin, Jing; Dauwels, Justin; Cash, Sydney S.; Westover, M. Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is often associated with the presence of spikes in electroencephalograms (EEGs). The spike waveforms vary vastly among epilepsy patients, and also for the same patient across time. In order to develop semi-automated and automated methods for detecting spikes, it is crucial to obtain a better understanding of the various spike shapes. In this paper, we develop several approaches to extract exemplars of spikes. We generate spike exemplars by applying clustering algorithms to a database of spikes from 12 patients. As similarity measures for clustering, we consider the Euclidean distance and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). We assess two clustering algorithms, namely, K-means clustering and affinity propagation. The clustering methods are compared based on the mean squared error, and the similarity measures are assessed based on the number of generated spike clusters. Affinity propagation with DTW is shown to be the best combination for clustering epileptic spikes, since it generates fewer spike templates and does not require to pre-specify the number of spike templates. PMID:29527130

  4. Attention during natural vision warps semantic representation across the human brain.

    PubMed

    Çukur, Tolga; Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G; Gallant, Jack L

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about how attention changes the cortical representation of sensory information in humans. On the basis of neurophysiological evidence, we hypothesized that attention causes tuning changes to expand the representation of attended stimuli at the cost of unattended stimuli. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure how semantic representation changed during visual search for different object categories in natural movies. We found that many voxels across occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal cortex shifted their tuning toward the attended category. These tuning shifts expanded the representation of the attended category and of semantically related, but unattended, categories, and compressed the representation of categories that were semantically dissimilar to the target. Attentional warping of semantic representation occurred even when the attended category was not present in the movie; thus, the effect was not a target-detection artifact. These results suggest that attention dynamically alters visual representation to optimize processing of behaviorally relevant objects during natural vision.

  5. Attention During Natural Vision Warps Semantic Representation Across the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Çukur, Tolga; Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G.; Gallant, Jack L.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how attention changes the cortical representation of sensory information in humans. Based on neurophysiological evidence, we hypothesized that attention causes tuning changes to expand the representation of attended stimuli at the cost of unattended stimuli. To investigate this issue we used functional MRI (fMRI) to measure how semantic representation changes when searching for different object categories in natural movies. We find that many voxels across occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal cortex shift their tuning toward the attended category. These tuning shifts expand the representation of the attended category and of semantically-related but unattended categories, and compress the representation of categories semantically-dissimilar to the target. Attentional warping of semantic representation occurs even when the attended category is not present in the movie, thus the effect is not a target-detection artifact. These results suggest that attention dynamically alters visual representation to optimize processing of behaviorally relevant objects during natural vision. PMID:23603707

  6. Warps and waves in the stellar discs of the Auriga cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Facundo A.; White, Simon D. M.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Marinacci, Federico; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed an oscillating asymmetry in the vertical structure of the Milky Way's disc. Here, we analyse 16 high-resolution, fully cosmological simulations of the evolution of individual Milky Way-sized galaxies, carried out with the magnetohydrodynamic code AREPO. At redshift zero, about 70 per cent of our galactic discs show strong vertical patterns, with amplitudes that can exceed 2 kpc. Half of these are typical 'integral sign' warps. The rest are oscillations similar to those observed in the Milky Way. Such structures are thus expected to be common. The associated mean vertical motions can be as large as 30 km s-1. Cold disc gas typically follows the vertical patterns seen in the stars. These perturbations have a variety of causes: close encounters with satellites, distant fly-bys of massive objects, accretion of misaligned cold gas from halo infall or from mergers. Tidally induced vertical patterns can be identified in both young and old stellar populations, whereas those originating from cold gas accretion are seen mainly in the younger populations. Galaxies with regular or at most weakly perturbed discs are usually, but not always, free from recent interactions with massive companions, although we have one case where an equilibrium compact disc reforms after a merger.

  7. Revealing Asymmetries in the HD 181327 Debris Disk: A Recent Massive Collision or Interstellar Medium Warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Schneider, Glenn; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Debes, John H.; Grady, Carol A.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kuchner, Marc J.

    2014-07-01

    New multi-roll coronagraphic images of the HD 181327 debris disk obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the debris ring in its entirety at high signal-to-noise ratio and unprecedented spatial resolution. We present and apply a new multi-roll image processing routine to identify and further remove quasi-static point-spread function-subtraction residuals and quantify systematic uncertainties. We also use a new iterative image deprojection technique to constrain the true disk geometry and aggressively remove any surface brightness asymmetries that can be explained without invoking dust density enhancements/deficits. The measured empirical scattering phase function for the disk is more forward scattering than previously thought and is not well-fit by a Henyey-Greenstein function. The empirical scattering phase function varies with stellocentric distance, consistent with the expected radiation pressured-induced size segregation exterior to the belt. Within the belt, the empirical scattering phase function contradicts unperturbed debris ring models, suggesting the presence of an unseen planet. The radial profile of the flux density is degenerate with a radially varying scattering phase function; therefore estimates of the ring's true width and edge slope may be highly uncertain. We detect large scale asymmetries in the disk, consistent with either the recent catastrophic disruption of a body with mass >1% the mass of Pluto, or disk warping due to strong interactions with the interstellar medium.

  8. Decoding with limited neural data: a mixture of time-warped trajectory models for directional reaches.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Elaine A; Perreault, Eric J; Körding, Konrad P

    2012-06-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices promise to allow paralyzed patients to perform the necessary functions of everyday life. However, to allow patients to use such tools it is necessary to decode their intent from neural signals such as electromyograms (EMGs). Because these signals are noisy, state of the art decoders integrate information over time. One systematic way of doing this is by taking into account the natural evolution of the state of the body--by using a so-called trajectory model. Here we use two insights about movements to enhance our trajectory model: (1) at any given time, there is a small set of likely movement targets, potentially identified by gaze; (2) reaches are produced at varying speeds. We decoded natural reaching movements using EMGs of muscles that might be available from an individual with spinal cord injury. Target estimates found from tracking eye movements were incorporated into the trajectory model, while a mixture model accounted for the inherent uncertainty in these estimates. Warping the trajectory model in time using a continuous estimate of the reach speed enabled accurate decoding of faster reaches. We found that the choice of richer trajectory models, such as those incorporating target or speed, improves decoding particularly when there is a small number of EMGs available.

  9. Impact of Sensor Misplacement on Dynamic Time Warping Based Human Activity Recognition using Wearable Computers.

    PubMed

    Kale, Nimish; Lee, Jaeseong; Lotfian, Reza; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2012-10-01

    Daily living activity monitoring is important for early detection of the onset of many diseases and for improving quality of life especially in elderly. A wireless wearable network of inertial sensor nodes can be used to observe daily motions. Continuous stream of data generated by these sensor networks can be used to recognize the movements of interest. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) is a widely used signal processing method for time-series pattern matching because of its robustness to variations in time and speed as opposed to other template matching methods. Despite this flexibility, for the application of activity recognition, DTW can only find the similarity between the template of a movement and the incoming samples, when the location and orientation of the sensor remains unchanged. Due to this restriction, small sensor misplacements can lead to a decrease in the classification accuracy. In this work, we adopt DTW distance as a feature for real-time detection of human daily activities like sit to stand in the presence of sensor misplacement. To measure this performance of DTW, we need to create a large number of sensor configurations while the sensors are rotated or misplaced. Creating a large number of closely spaced sensors is impractical. To address this problem, we use the marker based optical motion capture system and generate simulated inertial sensor data for different locations and orientations on the body. We study the performance of the DTW under these conditions to determine the worst-case sensor location variations that the algorithm can accommodate.

  10. Combined Dynamic Time Warping with Multiple Sensors for 3D Gesture Recognition

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems, which closely integrate physical systems and humans, can be applied to a wider range of applications through user movement analysis. In three-dimensional (3D) gesture recognition, multiple sensors are required to recognize various natural gestures. Several studies have been undertaken in the field of gesture recognition; however, gesture recognition was conducted based on data captured from various independent sensors, which rendered the capture and combination of real-time data complicated. In this study, a 3D gesture recognition method using combined information obtained from multiple sensors is proposed. The proposed method can robustly perform gesture recognition regardless of a user’s location and movement directions by providing viewpoint-weighted values and/or motion-weighted values. In the proposed method, the viewpoint-weighted dynamic time warping with multiple sensors has enhanced performance by preventing joint measurement errors and noise due to sensor measurement tolerance, which has resulted in the enhancement of recognition performance by comparing multiple joint sequences effectively. PMID:28817094

  11. Learning a Mahalanobis Distance-Based Dynamic Time Warping Measure for Multivariate Time Series Classification.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jiangyuan; Liu, Meizhu; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Gao, Huijun

    2016-06-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets broadly exist in numerous fields, including health care, multimedia, finance, and biometrics. How to classify MTS accurately has become a hot research topic since it is an important element in many computer vision and pattern recognition applications. In this paper, we propose a Mahalanobis distance-based dynamic time warping (DTW) measure for MTS classification. The Mahalanobis distance builds an accurate relationship between each variable and its corresponding category. It is utilized to calculate the local distance between vectors in MTS. Then we use DTW to align those MTS which are out of synchronization or with different lengths. After that, how to learn an accurate Mahalanobis distance function becomes another key problem. This paper establishes a LogDet divergence-based metric learning with triplet constraint model which can learn Mahalanobis matrix with high precision and robustness. Furthermore, the proposed method is applied on nine MTS datasets selected from the University of California, Irvine machine learning repository and Robert T. Olszewski's homepage, and the results demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed approach.

  12. Combined Dynamic Time Warping with Multiple Sensors for 3D Gesture Recognition.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo-Rim; Kim, TaeYong

    2017-08-17

    Cyber-physical systems, which closely integrate physical systems and humans, can be applied to a wider range of applications through user movement analysis. In three-dimensional (3D) gesture recognition, multiple sensors are required to recognize various natural gestures. Several studies have been undertaken in the field of gesture recognition; however, gesture recognition was conducted based on data captured from various independent sensors, which rendered the capture and combination of real-time data complicated. In this study, a 3D gesture recognition method using combined information obtained from multiple sensors is proposed. The proposed method can robustly perform gesture recognition regardless of a user's location and movement directions by providing viewpoint-weighted values and/or motion-weighted values. In the proposed method, the viewpoint-weighted dynamic time warping with multiple sensors has enhanced performance by preventing joint measurement errors and noise due to sensor measurement tolerance, which has resulted in the enhancement of recognition performance by comparing multiple joint sequences effectively.

  13. Dynamic time warping-based averaging framework for functional near-infrared spectroscopy brain imaging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Najafizadeh, Laleh

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem related to the averaging procedure in functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) brain imaging studies. Typically, to reduce noise and to empower the signal strength associated with task-induced activities, recorded signals (e.g., in response to repeated stimuli or from a group of individuals) are averaged through a point-by-point conventional averaging technique. However, due to the existence of variable latencies in recorded activities, the use of the conventional averaging technique can lead to inaccuracies and loss of information in the averaged signal, which may result in inaccurate conclusions about the functionality of the brain. To improve the averaging accuracy in the presence of variable latencies, we present an averaging framework that employs dynamic time warping (DTW) to account for the temporal variation in the alignment of fNIRS signals to be averaged. As a proof of concept, we focus on the problem of localizing task-induced active brain regions. The framework is extensively tested on experimental data (obtained from both block design and event-related design experiments) as well as on simulated data. In all cases, it is shown that the DTW-based averaging technique outperforms the conventional-based averaging technique in estimating the location of task-induced active regions in the brain, suggesting that such advanced averaging methods should be employed in fNIRS brain imaging studies.

  14. Revealing Asymmetries in the HD181327 Debris Disk: A Recent Massive Collision or Interstellar Medium Warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Schneider, Glenn; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Debes, John H.; Grady, Carol A.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kuchner, Marc J.

    2014-01-01

    New multi-roll coronagraphic images of the HD181327 debris disk obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the debris ring in its entirety at high signal-to-noise ratio and unprecedented spatial resolution. We present and apply a new multi-roll image processing routine to identify and further remove quasi-static point-spread function-subtraction residuals and quantify systematic uncertainties. We also use a new iterative image deprojection technique to constrain the true disk geometry and aggressively remove any surface brightness asymmetries that can be explained without invoking dust density enhancements/ deficits. The measured empirical scattering phase function for the disk is more forward scattering than previously thought and is not well-fit by a Henyey-Greenstein function. The empirical scattering phase function varies with stellocentric distance, consistent with the expected radiation pressured-induced size segregation exterior to the belt. Within the belt, the empirical scattering phase function contradicts unperturbed debris ring models, suggesting the presence of an unseen planet. The radial profile of the flux density is degenerate with a radially varying scattering phase function; therefore estimates of the ring's true width and edge slope may be highly uncertain.We detect large scale asymmetries in the disk, consistent with either the recent catastrophic disruption of a body with mass greater than 1% the mass of Pluto, or disk warping due to strong interactions with the interstellar medium.

  15. Revealing asymmetries in the HD 181327 debris disk: A recent massive collision or interstellar medium warping

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Schneider, Glenn

    New multi-roll coronagraphic images of the HD 181327 debris disk obtained using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope reveal the debris ring in its entirety at high signal-to-noise ratio and unprecedented spatial resolution. We present and apply a new multi-roll image processing routine to identify and further remove quasi-static point-spread function-subtraction residuals and quantify systematic uncertainties. We also use a new iterative image deprojection technique to constrain the true disk geometry and aggressively remove any surface brightness asymmetries that can be explained without invoking dust density enhancements/deficits. The measured empirical scattering phase function for themore » disk is more forward scattering than previously thought and is not well-fit by a Henyey-Greenstein function. The empirical scattering phase function varies with stellocentric distance, consistent with the expected radiation pressured-induced size segregation exterior to the belt. Within the belt, the empirical scattering phase function contradicts unperturbed debris ring models, suggesting the presence of an unseen planet. The radial profile of the flux density is degenerate with a radially varying scattering phase function; therefore estimates of the ring's true width and edge slope may be highly uncertain. We detect large scale asymmetries in the disk, consistent with either the recent catastrophic disruption of a body with mass >1% the mass of Pluto, or disk warping due to strong interactions with the interstellar medium.« less

  16. Incremental fuzzy C medoids clustering of time series data using dynamic time warping distance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongli; Chen, Jingli; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Zhizhong; Chao, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Clustering time series data is of great significance since it could extract meaningful statistics and other characteristics. Especially in biomedical engineering, outstanding clustering algorithms for time series may help improve the health level of people. Considering data scale and time shifts of time series, in this paper, we introduce two incremental fuzzy clustering algorithms based on a Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) distance. For recruiting Single-Pass and Online patterns, our algorithms could handle large-scale time series data by splitting it into a set of chunks which are processed sequentially. Besides, our algorithms select DTW to measure distance of pair-wise time series and encourage higher clustering accuracy because DTW could determine an optimal match between any two time series by stretching or compressing segments of temporal data. Our new algorithms are compared to some existing prominent incremental fuzzy clustering algorithms on 12 benchmark time series datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed approaches could yield high quality clusters and were better than all the competitors in terms of clustering accuracy.

  17. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The designmore » of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.« less

  18. Incremental fuzzy C medoids clustering of time series data using dynamic time warping distance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingli; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Zhizhong; Chao, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Clustering time series data is of great significance since it could extract meaningful statistics and other characteristics. Especially in biomedical engineering, outstanding clustering algorithms for time series may help improve the health level of people. Considering data scale and time shifts of time series, in this paper, we introduce two incremental fuzzy clustering algorithms based on a Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) distance. For recruiting Single-Pass and Online patterns, our algorithms could handle large-scale time series data by splitting it into a set of chunks which are processed sequentially. Besides, our algorithms select DTW to measure distance of pair-wise time series and encourage higher clustering accuracy because DTW could determine an optimal match between any two time series by stretching or compressing segments of temporal data. Our new algorithms are compared to some existing prominent incremental fuzzy clustering algorithms on 12 benchmark time series datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed approaches could yield high quality clusters and were better than all the competitors in terms of clustering accuracy. PMID:29795600

  19. Dynamic time warping and machine learning for signal quality assessment of pulsatile signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Clifford, G D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we describe a beat-by-beat method for assessing the clinical utility of pulsatile waveforms, primarily recorded from cardiovascular blood volume or pressure changes, concentrating on the photoplethysmogram (PPG). Physiological blood flow is nonstationary, with pulses changing in height, width and morphology due to changes in heart rate, cardiac output, sensor type and hardware or software pre-processing requirements. Moreover, considerable inter-individual and sensor-location variability exists. Simple template matching methods are therefore inappropriate, and a patient-specific adaptive initialization is therefore required. We introduce dynamic time warping to stretch each beat to match a running template and combine it with several other features related to signal quality, including correlation and the percentage of the beat that appeared to be clipped. The features were then presented to a multi-layer perceptron neural network to learn the relationships between the parameters in the presence of good- and bad-quality pulses. An expert-labeled database of 1055 segments of PPG, each 6 s long, recorded from 104 separate critical care admissions during both normal and verified arrhythmic events, was used to train and test our algorithms. An accuracy of 97.5% on the training set and 95.2% on test set was found. The algorithm could be deployed as a stand-alone signal quality assessment algorithm for vetting the clinical utility of PPG traces or any similar quasi-periodic signal.

  20. A Dynamic Time Warping based covariance function for Gaussian Processes signature identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silversides, Katherine L.; Melkumyan, Arman

    2016-11-01

    Modelling stratiform deposits requires a detailed knowledge of the stratigraphic boundaries. In Banded Iron Formation (BIF) hosted ores of the Hamersley Group in Western Australia these boundaries are often identified using marker shales. Both Gaussian Processes (GP) and Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) have been previously proposed as methods to automatically identify marker shales in natural gamma logs. However, each method has different advantages and disadvantages. We propose a DTW based covariance function for the GP that combines the flexibility of the DTW with the probabilistic framework of the GP. The three methods are tested and compared on their ability to identify two natural gamma signatures from a Marra Mamba type iron ore deposit. These tests show that while all three methods can identify boundaries, the GP with the DTW covariance function combines and balances the strengths and weaknesses of the individual methods. This method identifies more positive signatures than the GP with the standard covariance function, and has a higher accuracy for identified signatures than the DTW. The combined method can handle larger variations in the signature without requiring multiple libraries, has a probabilistic output and does not require manual cut-off selections.

  1. Combining point context and dynamic time warping for online gesture recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xia; Li, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Previous gesture recognition methods usually focused on recognizing gestures after the entire gesture sequences were obtained. However, in many practical applications, a system has to identify gestures before they end to give instant feedback. We present an online gesture recognition approach that can realize early recognition of unfinished gestures with low latency. First, a curvature buffer-based point context (CBPC) descriptor is proposed to extract the shape feature of a gesture trajectory. The CBPC descriptor is a complete descriptor with a simple computation, and thus has its superiority in online scenarios. Then, we introduce an online windowed dynamic time warping algorithm to realize online matching between the ongoing gesture and the template gestures. In the algorithm, computational complexity is effectively decreased by adding a sliding window to the accumulative distance matrix. Lastly, the experiments are conducted on the Australian sign language data set and the Kinect hand gesture (KHG) data set. Results show that the proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art methods especially when gesture information is incomplete.

  2. Dynamic edge warping - An experimental system for recovering disparity maps in weakly constrained systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, K. L.; Wuescher, D. M.; Sarkar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic edge warping (DEW), a technique for recovering reasonably accurate disparity maps from uncalibrated stereo image pairs, is presented. No precise knowledge of the epipolar camera geometry is assumed. The technique is embedded in a system including structural stereopsis on the front end and robust estimation in digital photogrammetry on the other for the purpose of self-calibrating stereo image pairs. Once the relative camera orientation is known, the epipolar geometry is computed and the system can use this information to refine its representation of the object space. Such a system will find application in the autonomous extraction of terrain maps from stereo aerial photographs, for which camera position and orientation are unknown a priori, and for online autonomous calibration maintenance for robotic vision applications, in which the cameras are subject to vibration and other physical disturbances after calibration. This work thus forms a component of an intelligent system that begins with a pair of images and, having only vague knowledge of the conditions under which they were acquired, produces an accurate, dense, relative depth map. The resulting disparity map can also be used directly in some high-level applications involving qualitative scene analysis, spatial reasoning, and perceptual organization of the object space. The system as a whole substitutes high-level information and constraints for precise geometric knowledge in driving and constraining the early correspondence process.

  3. [Christian dimension of suffering].

    PubMed

    Kubik, K

    1999-01-01

    Human existence is marked by imperfection, whose expression--among other things--is suffering. The problem of answering the question about the meaning of suffering for human life in its entirety is of great significance in philosophy and theology. In the Old Testament it meant God's punishment for the evil done by man. In Christianity this bleak notion of suffering has found a new dimension--suffering is creative, redemptive in character; it enables a man to surpass his limits. The understanding of suffering and its sense has a profound meaning in building a suitable attitude of a sick person towards his own weakness.

  4. Dimensions of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Madanes, C; Haley, J

    1977-08-01

    This article is a description of different approaches to therapy with a family orientation. There are general categories of family therpay which had their origins in individual therapy, such as the approaches based upon psychodynamic theory, those derived from experiential procedures, and the behavioral approaches. There are also family therapies which have not developed from individual therapy, such as the extended family system approach and the communication school of family therapy. The different therapy approaches are described within a set of dimensions which characterize most therapy. Such dimensions include whether the past or present is emphasized, whether the therapist uses interpretation or directives, whether the approach is in terms of growth or specific problems, whether hierarchy is a concern, and whether the unit is an individual, two people, three people, or a wider network. Illustrations of the different family therapy approaches are given in terms of the kinds of information that would interest the therapist of each school and the kinds of actions he or she would take to bring about change.

  5. Dimensions of E-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Badrul H.

    2002-01-01

    Considers factors that must be weighed in creating effective electronic learning environments and presents a basic framework for Web-based or electronic learning. Highlights include the institutional dimension; the pedagogical dimension; technological dimension; interface design; evaluation; management; resource support; and ethical…

  6. Girls and war: an extra vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Black, M

    1998-01-01

    It is no longer possible to consider the raping of girls as an isolated atrocity of war. In Uganda, guerrilla forces have kidnapped 6000-10,000 children and have forced the "most desirable" girls to become "wives" of warlords. Girls who manage to escape are deeply traumatized and suffer ill health as well as possible social ostracism. In refugee camps, recognition that adolescent girls face special risks of rape and of engaging in the informal prostitution that may expose them to HIV/AIDS has led to the introduction of new measures to increase female security. Families in refugee camps in Burundi and Somalia protect female honor by submitting their daughters to very early marriage, which also abuses the girls' rights. Girls conscripted to military groups are forced to transport materials, cook, or help loot villages. In conditions of war, even girls who remain at home protected by their families must assume extra responsibilities, especially if men go off to fight leaving women with the agricultural and livestock burdens. Girls will be the first children withdrawn from school to help keep the household afloat. Girls and women are also expected to tend those wounded by the very war that destroys the health care services that are vital to meet women's reproductive needs. Efforts are being made to identify rape as a specific war crime, and these efforts should be extended to the kidnapping and forced recruitment of children into combat roles. Moral codes must be reestablished, even if they are only nominal at present.

  7. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females’ alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females’ within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases. PMID:25346331

  8. Quantifying inbreeding avoidance through extra-pair reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Germain, Ryan R; Duthie, A Bradley; Losdat, Sylvain; Wolak, Matthew E; Nietlisbach, Pirmin

    2015-01-01

    Extra-pair reproduction is widely hypothesized to allow females to avoid inbreeding with related socially paired males. Consequently, numerous field studies have tested the key predictions that extra-pair offspring are less inbred than females' alternative within-pair offspring, and that the probability of extra-pair reproduction increases with a female's relatedness to her socially paired male. However, such studies rarely measure inbreeding or relatedness sufficiently precisely to detect subtle effects, or consider biases stemming from failure to observe inbred offspring that die during early development. Analyses of multigenerational song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) pedigree data showed that most females had opportunity to increase or decrease the coefficient of inbreeding of their offspring through extra-pair reproduction with neighboring males. In practice, observed extra-pair offspring had lower inbreeding coefficients than females' within-pair offspring on average, while the probability of extra-pair reproduction increased substantially with the coefficient of kinship between a female and her socially paired male. However, simulations showed that such effects could simply reflect bias stemming from inbreeding depression in early offspring survival. The null hypothesis that extra-pair reproduction is random with respect to kinship therefore cannot be definitively rejected in song sparrows, and existing general evidence that females avoid inbreeding through extra-pair reproduction requires reevaluation given such biases. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from damage...

  10. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth net-like...

  11. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of one variety (except when more than one variety is printed on... apples are also free from injury caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, smooth net-like...

  12. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from damage...

  13. 7 CFR 51.300 - U.S. Extra Fancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.300 U.S. Extra Fancy. “U.S. Extra Fancy” consists of apples of..., scab, freezing injury, visible water core, and broken skins. The apples are also free from injury... rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, disease, insects, or other means. The apples are free from damage...

  14. 20 CFR 332.4 - Restrictions in extra service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions in extra service. 332.4 Section 332.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT MILEAGE OR WORK RESTRICTIONS AND STAND-BY OR LAY-OVER RULES § 332.4 Restrictions in extra...

  15. Exploring the Contribution of Extra Credit in Marketing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matt; DeLong, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This study advances the literature on the incidence, attitudes and motivations to complete extra credit assignments. Behavioral feedback from 59 marketing instructors and 43 Principles of Marketing students aligned with reported incidence rates of offering and completing extra credit assignments, respectively. This was followed with open-ended…

  16. Black holes in many dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider: testing critical string theory.

    PubMed

    Hewett, JoAnne L; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G

    2005-12-31

    We consider black hole production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a generic scenario with many extra dimensions where the standard model fields are confined to a brane. With approximately 20 dimensions the hierarchy problem is shown to be naturally solved without the need for large compactification radii. We find that in such a scenario the properties of black holes can be used to determine the number of extra dimensions, . In particular, we demonstrate that measurements of the decay distributions of such black holes at the LHC can determine if is significantly larger than 6 or 7 with high confidence and thus can probe one of the critical properties of string theory compactifications.

  17. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  18. Correlation dimension of financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, correlation dimension is applied to financial data analysis. We calculate the correlation dimensions of some real market data and find that the dimensions are significantly smaller than those of the simulation data based on geometric Brownian motion. Based on the analysis of the Chinese and US stock market data, the main results are as follows. First, by calculating three data sets for the Chinese and US market, we find that large market volatility leads to a significant decrease in the dimensions. Second, based on 5-min stock price data, we find that the Chinese market dimension is significantly larger than the US market; this shows a significant difference between the two markets for high frequency data. Third, we randomly extract stocks from a stock set and calculate the correlation dimensions, and find that the average value of these dimensions is close to the dimension of the original set. In addition, we analyse the intuitional meaning of the relevant dimensions used in this paper, which are directly related to the average degree of the financial threshold network. The dimension measures the speed of the average degree that varies with the threshold value. A smaller dimension means that the rate of change is slower.

  19. Gait phenotypes in paediatric hereditary spastic paraplegia revealed by dynamic time warping analysis and random forests

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Gonzalo, Juan Andrés; Rodríguez-Andonaegui, Irene; López-López, Javier; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    The Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias (HSP) are a group of heterogeneous disorders with a wide spectrum of underlying neural pathology, and hence HSP patients express a variety of gait abnormalities. Classification of these phenotypes may help in monitoring disease progression and personalizing therapies. This is currently managed by measuring values of some kinematic and spatio-temporal parameters at certain moments during the gait cycle, either in the doctor´s surgery room or after very precise measurements produced by instrumental gait analysis (IGA). These methods, however, do not provide information about the whole structure of the gait cycle. Classification of the similarities among time series of IGA measured values of sagittal joint positions throughout the whole gait cycle can be achieved by hierarchical clustering analysis based on multivariate dynamic time warping (DTW). Random forests can estimate which are the most important isolated parameters to predict the classification revealed by DTW, since clinicians need to refer to them in their daily practice. We acquired time series of pelvic, hip, knee, ankle and forefoot sagittal angular positions from 26 HSP and 33 healthy children with an optokinetic IGA system. DTW revealed six gait patterns with different degrees of impairment of walking speed, cadence and gait cycle distribution and related with patient’s age, sex, GMFCS stage, concurrence of polyneuropathy and abnormal visual evoked potentials or corpus callosum. The most important parameters to differentiate patterns were mean pelvic tilt and hip flexion at initial contact. Longer time of support, decreased values of hip extension and increased knee flexion at initial contact can differentiate the mildest, near to normal HSP gait phenotype and the normal healthy one. Increased values of knee flexion at initial contact and delayed peak of knee flexion are important factors to distinguish GMFCS stages I from II-III and concurrence of polyneuropathy

  20. Word spotting for handwritten documents using Chamfer Distance and Dynamic Time Warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saabni, Raid M.; El-Sana, Jihad A.

    2011-01-01

    A large amount of handwritten historical documents are located in libraries around the world. The desire to access, search, and explore these documents paves the way for a new age of knowledge sharing and promotes collaboration and understanding between human societies. Currently, the indexes for these documents are generated manually, which is very tedious and time consuming. Results produced by state of the art techniques, for converting complete images of handwritten documents into textual representations, are not yet sufficient. Therefore, word-spotting methods have been developed to archive and index images of handwritten documents in order to enable efficient searching within documents. In this paper, we present a new matching algorithm to be used in word-spotting tasks for historical Arabic documents. We present a novel algorithm based on the Chamfer Distance to compute the similarity between shapes of word-parts. Matching results are used to cluster images of Arabic word-parts into different classes using the Nearest Neighbor rule. To compute the distance between two word-part images, the algorithm subdivides each image into equal-sized slices (windows). A modified version of the Chamfer Distance, incorporating geometric gradient features and distance transform data, is used as a similarity distance between the different slices. Finally, the Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) algorithm is used to measure the distance between two images of word-parts. By using the DTW we enabled our system to cluster similar word-parts, even though they are transformed non-linearly due to the nature of handwriting. We tested our implementation of the presented methods using various documents in different writing styles, taken from Juma'a Al Majid Center - Dubai, and obtained encouraging results.

  1. Dynamic Time Warping compared to established methods for validation of musculoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Martin; Welke, Bastian; Seehaus, Frank; Hurschler, Christof; Schwarze, Michael

    2017-04-11

    By means of Multi-Body musculoskeletal simulation, important variables such as internal joint forces and moments can be estimated which cannot be measured directly. Validation can ensued by qualitative or by quantitative methods. Especially when comparing time-dependent signals, many methods do not perform well and validation is often limited to qualitative approaches. The aim of the present study was to investigate the capabilities of the Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) algorithm for comparing time series, which can quantify phase as well as amplitude errors. We contrast the sensitivity of DTW with other established metrics: the Pearson correlation coefficient, cross-correlation, the metric according to Geers, RMSE and normalized RMSE. This study is based on two data sets, where one data set represents direct validation and the other represents indirect validation. Direct validation was performed in the context of clinical gait-analysis on trans-femoral amputees fitted with a 6 component force-moment sensor. Measured forces and moments from amputees' socket-prosthesis are compared to simulated forces and moments. Indirect validation was performed in the context of surface EMG measurements on a cohort of healthy subjects with measurements taken of seven muscles of the leg, which were compared to simulated muscle activations. Regarding direct validation, a positive linear relation between results of RMSE and nRMSE to DTW can be seen. For indirect validation, a negative linear relation exists between Pearson correlation and cross-correlation. We propose the DTW algorithm for use in both direct and indirect quantitative validation as it correlates well with methods that are most suitable for one of the tasks. However, in DV it should be used together with methods resulting in a dimensional error value, in order to be able to interpret results more comprehensible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A tilted and warped inner accretion disc around a spinning black hole: an analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chandrachur; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2017-08-01

    Inner accretion disc around a black hole provides a rare, natural probe to understand the fundamental physics of the strong gravity regime. A possible tilt of such a disc, with respect to the black hole spin equator, is important. This is because such a tilt affects the observed spectral and timing properties of the disc X-ray emission via Lense-Thirring precession, which could be used to test the theoretical predictions regarding the strong gravity. Here, we analytically solve the steady, warped accretion disc equation of Scheurer and Feiler, and find an expression of the radial profile of the disc tilt angle. In our exact solution, considering a prograde disc around a slowly spinning black hole, we include the inner part of the disc, which was not done earlier in this formalism. Such a solution is timely, as a tilted inner disc has recently been inferred from X-ray spectral and timing features of the accreting black hole H1743-322. Our tilt angle radial profile expression includes observationally measurable parameters, such as black hole mass and Kerr parameter, and the disc inner edge tilt angle Win, and hence can be ideal to confront observations. Our solution shows that the disc tilt angle in 10-100 gravitational radii is a significant fraction of the disc outer edge tilt angle, even for Win = 0. Moreover, tilt angle radial profiles have humps in ˜10-1000 gravitational radii for some sets of parameter values, which should have implications for observed X-ray features.

  3. Groundwater similarity across a watershed derived from time-warped and flow-corrected time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderer, M.; McGlynn, B. L.; van Meerveld, H. J.

    2017-05-01

    Information about catchment-scale groundwater dynamics is necessary to understand how catchments store and release water and why water quantity and quality varies in streams. However, groundwater level monitoring is often restricted to a limited number of sites. Knowledge of the factors that determine similarity between monitoring sites can be used to predict catchment-scale groundwater storage and connectivity of different runoff source areas. We used distance-based and correlation-based similarity measures to quantify the spatial and temporal differences in shallow groundwater similarity for 51 monitoring sites in a Swiss prealpine catchment. The 41 months long time series were preprocessed using Dynamic Time-Warping and a Flow-corrected Time Transformation to account for small timing differences and bias toward low-flow periods. The mean distance-based groundwater similarity was correlated to topographic indices, such as upslope contributing area, topographic wetness index, and local slope. Correlation-based similarity was less related to landscape position but instead revealed differences between seasons. Analysis of variance and partial Mantel tests showed that landscape position, represented by the topographic wetness index, explained 52% of the variability in mean distance-based groundwater similarity, while spatial distance, represented by the Euclidean distance, explained only 5%. The variability in distance-based similarity and correlation-based similarity between groundwater and streamflow time series was significantly larger for midslope locations than for other landscape positions. This suggests that groundwater dynamics at these midslope sites, which are important to understand runoff source areas and hydrological connectivity at the catchment scale, are most difficult to predict.

  4. Titan's radar images: cross-cutting ripples are dunes or warping surface waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    The radar mapping of the Titan's surface (Cassini SC) covering by wide mainly latitudinal strips an important portion of the satellite discovered one persisting pattern related to the dark smooth plains. They are rippled by very regular cross-cutting wavy forms hundred and thousand kilometers long with spacing between ridges or grooves about 1-2 km (PIA03555, PIA03566, PIA03567, PIA03568 ) or 10-20 km (PIA08454)-so called "cat scratches". Some important characteristics of this pattern are: 1) it affects very vast expanses of dark smooth material (low-lying terrains of planetary scale) presumably consisting of frozen methane; it penetrates, in not so evident form, onto islands of light icy material (bright terrain) and normally curve them around. 2) it consists of intersecting (cross-cutting) ridge-groove structures not destroying each other under intersection; radar can fix at least two structure directions. 3) the most long and wide ridge-groove system observed up to now (PIA08454 - a swath 6150 km long , 1120 km wide, almost a half length of the great planetary circle !) has ridge-to-ridge spacing about 10-20 km. 4) a width of ridges and grooves is nearly equal with variations to both sides. 5) ridges are more bright, grooves are more dark. 6) intersections of the ridge-groove systems creates chains of roundish features ("craters") of characteristic size. Observed wavy systems resemble dunes only at the first glance but actually are deformations of the ice-methane crust by very fine inertia-gravity waves aroused by the satellite movement in non-round elliptical keplerian orbit. This movement with periodically changing accelerations arouse inertia-gravity forces and waves warping any celestial body notwithstanding its size, mass, density, chemical composition or physical state. In rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these warping waves have a stationary character and 4 cross-cutting directions- ortho- and diagonal - producing uplifted (+), subsided (-) and

  5. Limits on the Time Evolution of Space Dimensions from Newton's Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Forough

    Limits are imposed upon the possible rate of change of extra spatial dimensions in a decrumpling model Universe with time variable spatial dimensions (TVSD) by considering the time variation of (1+3)-dimensional Newton's constant. Previous studies on the time variation of (1+3)-dimensional Newton's constant in TVSD theory had not include the effects of the volume of the extra dimensions and the effects of the surface area of the unit sphere in D-space dimensions. Our main result is that the absolute value of the present rate of change of spatial dimensions to be less than about 10-14 yr-1. Our results would appear to provide a prima facie case for ruling the TVSD model out. We show that based on observational bounds on the present variation of Newton's constant, one would have to conclude that the spatial dimension of the Universe when the Universe was "at the Planck scale" to be less than or equal to 3.09. If the dimension of space when the Universe was "at the Planck scale" is constrained to be fractional and very close to 3, then the whole edifice of TVSD model loses credibility.

  6. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Osipov YuYu; Spichkov, A N; Filipenkov, S N

    1998-01-01

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha' (ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  7. Metabolic assessments during extra-vehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Yu. Yu.; Spichkov, A. N.; Filipenkov, S. N.

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) has a significant role during extended space flights. It demonstrates that humans can survive and perform useful work outside the Orbital Space Stations (OSS) while wearing protective space suits (SS). When the International Space Station 'Alpha'(ISSA) is fully operational, EVA assembly, installation, maintenance and repair operations will become an everyday repetitive work activity in space. It needs new ergonomic evaluation of the work/rest schedule for an increasing of the labor amount per EVA hour. The metabolism assessment is a helpful method to control the productivity of the EVA astronaut and to optimize the work/rest regime. Three following methods were used in Russia to estimate real-time metabolic rates during EVA: 1. Oxygen consumption, computed from the pressure drop in a high pressure bottle per unit time (with actual thermodynamic oxygen properties under high pressure and oxygen leakage taken into account). 2. Carbon dioxide production, computed from CO 2 concentration at the contaminant control cartridge and gas flow rate in the life support subsystem closed loop (nominal mode) or gas leakage in the SS open loop (emergency mode). 3. Heat removal, computed from the difference between the temperatures of coolant water or gas and its flow rate in a unit of time (with assumed humidity and wet oxygen state taken into account). Comparison of heat removal values with metabolic rates enables us to determine the thermal balance during an operative medical control of EVA at "Salyut-6", "Salyut-7" and "Mir" OSS. Complex analysis of metabolism, body temperature and heat rate supports a differential diagnosis between emotional and thermal components of stress during EVA. It gives a prognosis of human homeostasis during EVA. Available information has been acquired into an EVA data base which is an effective tool for ergonomical optimization.

  8. On supersymmetric AdS6 solutions in 10 and 11 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2017-12-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth, supersymmetric, warped AdS 6 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space in D = 11 and (massive) IIA supergravities. In IIB supergravity we show that if such AdS 6 solutions exist, then the NSNS and RR 3-form fluxes must be linearly independent and certain spinor bilinears must be appropriately restricted. Moreover we demonstrate that the internal space admits an so(3) action which leaves all the fields invariant and for smooth solutions the principal orbits must have co-dimension two. We also describe the topology and geometry of internal spaces that admit such a so(3) action and show that there are no solutions for which the internal space has topology F × S 2, where F is an oriented surface.

  9. WARP3D-Release 10.8: Dynamic Nonlinear Analysis of Solids using a Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppenhoefer, Kyle C.; Gullerud, Arne S.; Ruggieri, Claudio; Dodds, Robert H., Jr.; Healy, Brian E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes theoretical background material and commands necessary to use the WARP3D finite element code. WARP3D is under continuing development as a research code for the solution of very large-scale, 3-D solid models subjected to static and dynamic loads. Specific features in the code oriented toward the investigation of ductile fracture in metals include a robust finite strain formulation, a general J-integral computation facility (with inertia, face loading), an element extinction facility to model crack growth, nonlinear material models including viscoplastic effects, and the Gurson-Tver-gaard dilatant plasticity model for void growth. The nonlinear, dynamic equilibrium equations are solved using an incremental-iterative, implicit formulation with full Newton iterations to eliminate residual nodal forces. The history integration of the nonlinear equations of motion is accomplished with Newmarks Beta method. A central feature of WARP3D involves the use of a linear-preconditioned conjugate gradient (LPCG) solver implemented in an element-by-element format to replace a conventional direct linear equation solver. This software architecture dramatically reduces both the memory requirements and CPU time for very large, nonlinear solid models since formation of the assembled (dynamic) stiffness matrix is avoided. Analyses thus exhibit the numerical stability for large time (load) steps provided by the implicit formulation coupled with the low memory requirements characteristic of an explicit code. In addition to the much lower memory requirements of the LPCG solver, the CPU time required for solution of the linear equations during each Newton iteration is generally one-half or less of the CPU time required for a traditional direct solver. All other computational aspects of the code (element stiffnesses, element strains, stress updating, element internal forces) are implemented in the element-by- element, blocked architecture. This greatly improves

  10. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recastmore » in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.« less

  11. Physics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    With modern microelectronics moving towards smaller and smaller length scales on the (sub-) nm scale, quantum effects (apart from band structure and band gaps) have begun to play an increasingly important role. This especially concerns dimensional confinement to 2D (high electron mobility transistors and integer/fractional quantum Hall effect physics, graphene and topological insulators) and 1D (with electrical connections eventually reaching the quantum limit). Recent developments in the above-mentioned areas have revealed that the properties of electron systems become increasingly exotic as one progresses from the 3D case into lower dimensions. As compared to 2D electron systems, much less experimental progress has been achieved in the field of 1D electron systems. The main reason for the lack of experimental results in this field is related to the difficulty of realizing 1D electron systems. Atom chains created in quantum mechanical break junction set-ups are too short to exhibit the typically 1D signatures. As an alternative, atomic chains can be produced on crystal surfaces, either via assembling them one-by-one using a scanning tunnelling microscope or via self-assembly. The drawback of the latter systems is that the atomic chains are not truly 1D since they are coupled to the underlying crystal and sometimes even to the neighbouring chains. In retrospect, this coupling turns out to be an absolute necessity in the experiment since true 1D systems are disordered at any non-zero temperature [1]. The coupling to the crystal and/or neighbouring chains shifts the phase transition, for example, a Peierls instability, to a non-zero temperature and thus allows experiments to be performed in the ordered state. Here, we want to emphasize that the electronic properties of the 1D electron system are fundamentally different from its 2D and 3D counterparts. The Fermi liquid theory, which is applicable to 2D and 3D electron systems, breaks down spectacularly in the 1D case

  12. Electrons in one dimension

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, K.-F.; Pepper, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a summary of the current status of the study of the transport of electrons confined to one dimension in very low disorder GaAs–AlGaAs heterostructures. By means of suitably located gates and application of a voltage to ‘electrostatically squeeze’ the electronic wave functions, it is possible to produce a controllable size quantization and a transition from two-dimensional transport. If the length of the electron channel is sufficiently short, then transport is ballistic and the quantized subbands each have a conductance equal to the fundamental quantum value 2e2/h, where the factor of 2 arises from the spin degeneracy. This mode of conduction is discussed, and it is shown that a number of many-body effects can be observed. These effects are discussed as in the spin-incoherent regime, which is entered when the separation of the electrons is increased and the exchange energy is less than kT. Finally, results are presented in the regime where the confinement potential is decreased and the electron configuration relaxes to minimize the electron–electron repulsion to move towards a two-dimensional array. It is shown that the ground state is no longer a line determined by the size quantization alone, but becomes two distinct rows arising from minimization of the electrostatic energy and is the precursor of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice. PMID:20123751

  13. Selective attention to perceptual dimensions and switching between dimensions.

    PubMed

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-02-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure (Garner's Interference, GI) is indicated by poorer performance in the filtering condition (when this dimension varies) as compared with baseline (when it is fixed). Switching between perceptual dimensions is usually studied with the task switching paradigm. In the present experiments, attention switching was manipulated by using single-task blocks and blocks in which participants switched between tasks or dimensions in reaction to task cues, and attention to dimensions was assessed by including a third, never-relevant dimension that was either fixed or varied randomly. In Experiments 1 (long cue-target interval, CTI) and 2 (short CTI), the tasks involved shape and color and the never-relevant dimension (texture) was chosen to be separable from them. In Experiments 3 (long CTI) and 4 (short CTI), the tasks involved shape and brightness and the never-relevant dimension, saturation, was chosen to be separable from shape and integral with brightness. Task switching did not generate GI but a short CTI did. Thus, switching and filtering generally do not compete over central limited resources unless under tight time pressure. Experiment 3 shows GI in the brightness task but not in the shape task, suggesting that participants switched their attention between brightness and shape when they switched tasks. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. [Intra and extra-familiar sexual abuse].

    PubMed

    Taveira, Francisco; Frazão, Sofia; Dias, Ricardo; Matos, Eduarda; Magalhães, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The sexual abuse of a child or young person constitutes a major social and public health problem and there is recent evidence that intra-familial (IF) sexual abuses are more serious in their consequences than extra-familial (EF). However, there are no studies on this phenomenon in Portugal. Thus, the aim of the present study is to contribute to a better characterization of these types of abuses and to identify possible differences between IF and EF cases. A retrospective study was preformed based on medico-legal reports related to victims below the age of 18, suspected of being sexually abused (n = 764), corresponding to 67% of the total of observed sexual crimes. Results revealed that 34.9% of the abuses are IF and they show statistically significant differences when compared to EF cases. These are due to the following factors found in IF situations: a) lower victim age; b) closeness between victim and abuser; c) abusers with a higher rate of previous sexual abuse; d) sexual practices of reduced physical intrusion; e) decreased physical violence but increased emotional violence; f) greater delay between last abuse and the forensic exam; g) reduced number of injuries or biological evidence (none in the great majority of the cases). Results point out the existence of several characteristics in IF abuse that have been identified as factors that influence the severity of the abuse consequences. Among them are: a) lower victim age; b) greater proximity to the abuser; c) increased amount of emotional violence. These factors account for the reduced visibility of this kind of cases and therefore explain their delayed disclosure and diagnosis. The association of this fact with the reduced intrusiveness of this sort of practice and the consequent decrease in number of injuries and other evidence leads to a marked reduction of the number of cases where evidence of the abuse can be found by physical examination alone. The above aspects underlie the need of using different

  15. Cultural Dimensions of Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    perceptual and behavioral dimensions of the human terrain of any military or military-supported mission. Its principal missions are curriculum design...CULTURAL DIMENSIONS OF MILITARY TRAINING A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff... Dimensions of Military Training 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) LTC Acasandrei Nicolae, Romania

  16. Overdose of Rogaine Extra Strength for Men topical minoxidil preparation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, S E; Epstein, S K

    1999-01-01

    Minoxidil is a potent arterial vasodilator used in the treatment of hypertension. A side effect, hypertrichosis, has prompted the marketing of a topical preparation, Rogaine, for the treatment of male-pattern baldness. Recently, a 5% solution of minoxidil became available over-the-counter as Rogaine Extra Strength For Men Hair Regrowth Treatment. We describe an oral overdose of minoxidil 3 g as the Rogaine Extra Strength preparation. Toxicity manifested as profound hypotension, requiring vasopressor support, intubation, prolonged tachycardia, and fluid overload with pleural effusions, requiring several days of therapy with furosemide. This is the largest reported ingestion of minoxidil and the first reported overdose of the extra strength 5% solution.

  17. Alternatives to an elementary Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Grojean, Christophe; Terning, John

    2016-10-01

    Strongly coupled and extra-dimensional models of electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed. Models examined include warped extra dimensions, bulk Higgs, "little" Higgs, dilaton Higgs, composite Higgs, twin Higgs, quantum critical Higgs, and "fat" SUSY Higgs. Also discussed are current bounds and future LHC searches for this class of models.

  18. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  19. Similarity recognition of online data curves based on dynamic spatial time warping for the estimation of lithium-ion battery capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Laifa; Lu, Chen; Noktehdan, Azadeh

    2015-10-01

    Battery capacity estimation is a significant recent challenge given the complex physical and chemical processes that occur within batteries and the restrictions on the accessibility of capacity degradation data. In this study, we describe an approach called dynamic spatial time warping, which is used to determine the similarities of two arbitrary curves. Unlike classical dynamic time warping methods, this approach can maintain the invariance of curve similarity to the rotations and translations of curves, which is vital in curve similarity search. Moreover, it utilizes the online charging or discharging data that are easily collected and do not require special assumptions. The accuracy of this approach is verified using NASA battery datasets. Results suggest that the proposed approach provides a highly accurate means of estimating battery capacity at less time cost than traditional dynamic time warping methods do for different individuals and under various operating conditions.

  20. Instantaneous and Frequency-Warped Signal Processing Techniques for Auditory Source Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Avery Li-Chun

    This thesis summarizes several contributions to the areas of signal processing and auditory source separation. The philosophy of Frequency-Warped Signal Processing is introduced as a means for separating the AM and FM contributions to the bandwidth of a complex-valued, frequency-varying sinusoid p (n), transforming it into a signal with slowly-varying parameters. This transformation facilitates the removal of p (n) from an additive mixture while minimizing the amount of damage done to other signal components. The average winding rate of a complex-valued phasor is explored as an estimate of the instantaneous frequency. Theorems are provided showing the robustness of this measure. To implement frequency tracking, a Frequency-Locked Loop algorithm is introduced which uses the complex winding error to update its frequency estimate. The input signal is dynamically demodulated and filtered to extract the envelope. This envelope may then be remodulated to reconstruct the target partial, which may be subtracted from the original signal mixture to yield a new, quickly-adapting form of notch filtering. Enhancements to the basic tracker are made which, under certain conditions, attain the Cramer -Rao bound for the instantaneous frequency estimate. To improve tracking, the novel idea of Harmonic -Locked Loop tracking, using N harmonically constrained trackers, is introduced for tracking signals, such as voices and certain musical instruments. The estimated fundamental frequency is computed from a maximum-likelihood weighting of the N tracking estimates, making it highly robust. The result is that harmonic signals, such as voices, can be isolated from complex mixtures in the presence of other spectrally overlapping signals. Additionally, since phase information is preserved, the resynthesized harmonic signals may be removed from the original mixtures with relatively little damage to the residual signal. Finally, a new methodology is given for designing linear-phase FIR filters

  1. Snow cover detection algorithm using dynamic time warping method and reflectances of MODIS solar spectrum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyeong-sang; Choi, Sungwon; Seo, Minji; Lee, Chang suk; Seong, Noh-hun; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-10-01

    Snow cover is biggest single component of cryosphere. The Snow is covering the ground in the Northern Hemisphere approximately 50% in winter season and is one of climate factors that affects Earth's energy budget because it has higher reflectance than other land types. Also, snow cover has an important role about hydrological modeling and water resource management. For this reason, accurate detection of snow cover acts as an essential element for regional water resource management. Snow cover detection using satellite-based data have some advantages such as obtaining wide spatial range data and time-series observations periodically. In the case of snow cover detection using satellite data, the discrimination of snow and cloud is very important. Typically, Misclassified cloud and snow pixel can lead directly to error factor for retrieval of satellite-based surface products. However, classification of snow and cloud is difficult because cloud and snow have similar optical characteristics and are composed of water or ice. But cloud and snow has different reflectance in 1.5 1.7 μm wavelength because cloud has lower grain size and moisture content than snow. So, cloud and snow shows difference reflectance patterns change according to wavelength. Therefore, in this study, we perform algorithm for classifying snow cover and cloud with satellite-based data using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) method which is one of commonly used pattern analysis such as speech and fingerprint recognitions and reflectance spectral library of snow and cloud. Reflectance spectral library is constructed in advance using MOD21km (MODIS Level1 swath 1km) data that their reflectance is six channels including 3 (0.466μm), 4 (0.554μm), 1 (0.647μm), 2 (0.857μm), 26 (1.382μm) and 6 (1.629μm). We validate our result using MODIS RGB image and MOD10 L2 swath (MODIS swath snow cover product). And we use PA (Producer's Accuracy), UA (User's Accuracy) and CI (Comparison Index) as validation criteria

  2. 7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, IN SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT IS $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) Russian and Gemini Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian and Gemini spacesuits. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach compared to exclusively intra-vehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.

  4. The effect of fabric structure on the mechanical properties of warp knitted surgical mesh for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mirjavan, Mohammad; Asayesh, Azita; Asgharian Jeddi, Ali Asghar

    2017-02-01

    Surgical mesh is being used for healing hernia, pelvic organ prolapse, skull injuries and urinary incontinence. In this research the effect of fabric structure on the mechanical properties of warp knitted surgical meshes in comparison to abdominal fascia has been investigated. For this purpose, warp knitted surgical mesh with five different structures (Tricot, Pin-hole-net, quasi-Sandfly, Sandfly and quasi-Marquissite) were produced using polypropylene monofilament. Thereafter, their mechanical properties such as uniaxial tensile behavior in various directions (wale-wise (90°), course-wise (0°) and diagonal (45°)), bending resistance and crease recovery were analyzed. The meshes demonstrated different elastic modulus in various directions, which can be attributed to the pore shape (pore angle) and underlap angle in the structure of mesh. Except Pin-hole-net mesh, other produced meshes exhibited better level of orthotropy in comparison to abdominal fascia. The most flexible mesh in both wale-wise and course-wise directions was quasi-Sandfly and thereafter quasi-Marquissite. Tricot and Pin-hole-net manifested the highest crease recovery in wale-wise and coursewise directions respectively. The most desirable mesh in terms of porosity was quasi-Marquissite mesh. Overall, the quasi-Marquissite mesh was selected as the most suitable surgical mesh considering all advantages and disadvantages of each produced mesh in this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A constitutive model for the warp-weft coupled non-linear behavior of knitted biomedical textiles.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, Mark S; Reddy, Daya; Bowles, Hellmut C; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Zilla, Peter; Franz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Knitted textiles have been used in medical applications due to their high flexibility and low tendency to fray. Their mechanics have, however, received limited attention. A constitutive model for soft tissue using a strain energy function was extended, by including shear and increasing the number and order of coefficients, to represent the non-linear warp-weft coupled mechanics of coarse textile knits under uniaxial tension. The constitutive relationship was implemented in a commercial finite element package. The model and its implementation were verified and validated for uniaxial tension and simple shear using patch tests and physical test data of uniaxial tensile tests of four very different knitted fabric structures. A genetic algorithm with step-wise increase in resolution and linear reduction in range of the search space was developed for the optimization of the fabric model coefficients. The numerically predicted stress-strain curves exhibited non-linear stiffening characteristic for fabrics. For three fabrics, the predicted mechanics correlated well with physical data, at least in one principal direction (warp or weft), and moderately in the other direction. The model exhibited limitations in approximating the linear elastic behavior of the fourth fabric. With proposals to address this limitation and to incorporate time-dependent changes in the fabric mechanics associated with tissue ingrowth, the constitutive model offers a tool for the design of tissue regenerative knit textile implants. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ACCRETION KINEMATICS THROUGH THE WARPED TRANSITION DISK IN HD 142527 FROM RESOLVED CO(6–5) OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Casassus, S.; Marino, S.; Pérez, S.

    2015-10-01

    The finding of residual gas in the large central cavity of the HD 142527 disk motivates questions regarding the origin of its non-Keplerian kinematics and possible connections with planet formation. We aim to understand the physical structure that underlies the intra-cavity gaseous flows, guided by new molecular-line data in CO(6–5) with unprecedented angular resolutions. Given the warped structure inferred from the identification of scattered-light shadows cast on the outer disk, the kinematics are consistent, to first order, with axisymmetric accretion onto the inner disk occurring at all azimuths. A steady-state accretion profile, fixed at the stellar accretion rate, explains themore » depth of the cavity as traced in CO isotopologues. The abrupt warp and evidence for near free-fall radial flows in HD 142527 resemble theoretical models for disk tearing, which could be driven by the reported low-mass companion, whose orbit may be contained in the plane of the inner disk. The companion’s high inclination with respect to the massive outer disk could drive Kozai oscillations over long timescales; high-eccentricity periods may perhaps account for the large cavity. While shadowing by the tilted disk could imprint an azimuthal modulation in the molecular-line maps, further observations are required to ascertain the significance of azimuthal structure in the density field inside the cavity of HD 142527.« less

  7. Dimensions of temperament: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Lorr, M; Stefic, E C

    1976-01-01

    The TDOT recast into a single stimulus format was administered to 150 college Ss. A factor analysis of the items followed by an analysis of item clusters that define each factor indicated the presence of 14 dimensions. Of the 10 bipolar scales of the TDOT, 3 were confirmed as independent dimensions, and 5 were confirmed in part or split into unipolar factors.

  8. String universality in ten dimensions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Taylor, Washington; Dewolfe, Oliver

    2010-08-13

    We show that the N=1 supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups U(1){496} and E{8}×U(1){248} are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and Abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  9. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  10. The Hidden Dimensions of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Bruce

    1982-01-01

    Describes an art program for preschool children that includes four social dimensions of art in order to heighten aesthetic perception, improve artistic creativity, and nurture self-esteem. The social dimensions are children having power, children acting on norms legitimate in their own eyes, children functioning "nonestrangedly," and children…

  11. Extra-Pair Mating and Evolution of Cooperative Neighbourhoods

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Sigrunn; Jørgensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A striking but unexplained pattern in biology is the promiscuous mating behaviour in socially monogamous species. Although females commonly solicit extra-pair copulations, the adaptive reason has remained elusive. We use evolutionary modelling of breeding ecology to show that females benefit because extra-pair paternity incentivizes males to shift focus from a single brood towards the entire neighbourhood, as they are likely to have offspring there. Male-male cooperation towards public goods and dear enemy effects of reduced territorial aggression evolve from selfish interests, and lead to safer and more productive neighbourhoods. The mechanism provides adaptive explanations for the common empirical observations that females engage in extra-pair copulations, that neighbours dominate as extra-pair sires, and that extra-pair mating correlates with predation mortality and breeding density. The models predict cooperative behaviours at breeding sites where males cooperate more towards public goods than females. Where maternity certainty makes females care for offspring at home, paternity uncertainty and a potential for offspring in several broods make males invest in communal benefits and public goods. The models further predict that benefits of extra-pair mating affect whole nests or neighbourhoods, and that cuckolding males are often cuckolded themselves. Derived from ecological mechanisms, these new perspectives point towards the evolution of sociality in birds, with relevance also for mammals and primates including humans. PMID:24987839

  12. Demographic mechanisms of inbreeding adjustment through extra-pair reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Duthie, A Bradley; Wolak, Matthew E; Arcese, Peter

    2015-07-01

    One hypothesis explaining extra-pair reproduction is that socially monogamous females mate with extra-pair males to adjust the coefficient of inbreeding (f) of extra-pair offspring (EPO) relative to that of within-pair offspring (WPO) they would produce with their socially paired male. Such adjustment of offspring f requires non-random extra-pair reproduction with respect to relatedness, which is in turn often assumed to require some mechanism of explicit pre-copulatory or post-copulatory kin discrimination. We propose three demographic processes that could potentially cause mean f to differ between individual females' EPO and WPO given random extra-pair reproduction with available males without necessarily requiring explicit kin discrimination. Specifically, such a difference could arise if social pairings formed non-randomly with respect to relatedness or persisted non-randomly with respect to relatedness, or if the distribution of relatedness between females and their sets of potential mates changed during the period through which social pairings persisted. We used comprehensive pedigree and pairing data from free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to quantify these three processes and hence investigate how individual females could adjust mean offspring f through instantaneously random extra-pair reproduction. Female song sparrows tended to form social pairings with unrelated or distantly related males slightly less frequently than expected given random pairing within the defined set of available males. Furthermore, social pairings between more closely related mates tended to be more likely to persist across years than social pairings between less closely related mates. However, these effects were small and the mean relatedness between females and their sets of potential extra-pair males did not change substantially across the years through which social pairings persisted. Our framework and analyses illustrate how demographic and social structuring within

  13. A Review on Dimension Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanyuan; Zhu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Summary Summarizing the effect of many covariates through a few linear combinations is an effective way of reducing covariate dimension and is the backbone of (sufficient) dimension reduction. Because the replacement of high-dimensional covariates by low-dimensional linear combinations is performed with a minimum assumption on the specific regression form, it enjoys attractive advantages as well as encounters unique challenges in comparison with the variable selection approach. We review the current literature of dimension reduction with an emphasis on the two most popular models, where the dimension reduction affects the conditional distribution and the conditional mean, respectively. We discuss various estimation and inference procedures in different levels of detail, with the intention of focusing on their underneath idea instead of technicalities. We also discuss some unsolved problems in this area for potential future research. PMID:23794782

  14. Fourier dimension of random images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Fredrik

    2016-10-01

    Given a compact set of real numbers, a random C^{m + α}-diffeomorphism is constructed such that the image of any measure concentrated on the set and satisfying a certain condition involving a real number s, almost surely has Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α). This is used to show that every Borel subset of the real numbers of Hausdorff dimension s is C^{m + α}-equivalent to a set of Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α ). In particular every Borel set is diffeomorphic to a Salem set, and the Fourier dimension is not invariant under Cm-diffeomorphisms for any m.

  15. Learning to Change: New Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Change involves thoughts, emotions, values, and actions but thought gets the most attention. Learning to change necessitates an integration of rational and nonrational ways of knowing. Nonrational ways and human care are important dimensions of the learning process. (SK)

  16. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, Gary; Lourenço, Ana Mónica

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used tomore » propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4

  17. High-resolution and high-throughput multichannel Fourier transform spectrometer with two-dimensional interferogram warping compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Furukawa, H.

    2018-04-01

    The resolution of multichannel Fourier transform (McFT) spectroscopy is insufficient for many applications despite its extreme advantage of high throughput. We propose an improved configuration to realise both performance using a two-dimensional area sensor. For the spectral resolution, we obtained the interferogram of a larger optical path difference by shifting the area sensor without altering any optical components. The non-linear phase error of the interferometer was successfully corrected using a phase-compensation calculation. Warping compensation was also applied to realise a higher throughput to accumulate the signal between vertical pixels. Our approach significantly improved the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio by factors of 1.7 and 34, respectively. This high-resolution and high-sensitivity McFT spectrometer will be useful for detecting weak light signals such as those in non-invasive diagnosis.

  18. A robust semi-parametric warping estimator of the survivor function with an application to two-group comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Alan D

    2018-01-01

    In this note, we develop a new and novel semi-parametric estimator of the survival curve that is comparable to the product-limit estimator under very relaxed assumptions. The estimator is based on a beta parametrization that warps the empirical distribution of the observed censored and uncensored data. The parameters are obtained using a pseudo-maximum likelihood approach adjusting the survival curve accounting for the censored observations. In the univariate setting, the new estimator tends to better extend the range of the survival estimation given a high degree of censoring. However, the key feature of this paper is that we develop a new two-group semi-parametric exact permutation test for comparing survival curves that is generally superior to the classic log-rank and Wilcoxon tests and provides the best global power across a variety of alternatives. The new test is readily extended to the k group setting. PMID:26988931

  19. The Role of Extra-Credit Assignments in the Teaching of World Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, David

    2011-01-01

    The granting of extra credit is a hotly debated topic in all fields of education. Teachers are reluctant to offer extra credit for fear of inflating grades, but students are persistent in their demands for extra-credit points to which they have become accustomed. This article considers extra-credit assignments in the teaching of world languages.…

  20. Warping of a computerized 3-D atlas to match brain image volumes for quantitative neuroanatomical and functional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Alan C.; Dai, Weiqian; Collins, D. Louis; Neelin, Peter; Marrett, Sean

    1991-06-01

    We describe the implementation, experience and preliminary results obtained with a 3-D computerized brain atlas for topographical and functional analysis of brain sub-regions. A volume-of-interest (VOI) atlas was produced by manual contouring on 64 adjacent 2 mm-thick MRI slices to yield 60 brain structures in each hemisphere which could be adjusted, originally by global affine transformation or local interactive adjustments, to match individual MRI datasets. We have now added a non-linear deformation (warp) capability (Bookstein, 1989) into the procedure for fitting the atlas to the brain data. Specific target points are identified in both atlas and MRI spaces which define a continuous 3-D warp transformation that maps the atlas on to the individual brain image. The procedure was used to fit MRI brain image volumes from 16 young normal volunteers. Regional volume and positional variability were determined, the latter in such a way as to assess the extent to which previous linear models of brain anatomical variability fail to account for the true variation among normal individuals. Using a linear model for atlas deformation yielded 3-D fits of the MRI data which, when pooled across subjects and brain regions, left a residual mis-match of 6 - 7 mm as compared to the non-linear model. The results indicate a substantial component of morphometric variability is not accounted for by linear scaling. This has profound implications for applications which employ stereotactic coordinate systems which map individual brains into a common reference frame: quantitative neuroradiology, stereotactic neurosurgery and cognitive mapping of normal brain function with PET. In the latter case, the combination of a non-linear deformation algorithm would allow for accurate measurement of individual anatomic variations and the inclusion of such variations in inter-subject averaging methodologies used for cognitive mapping with PET.

  1. Hydrocarbon ices in extra-red TNOs and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, C. M.; Barucci, M.; Emery, J. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Merlin, F.; Perna, D.

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the reddest trans-neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs - those belonging to the RR taxon. The RR class contains more than ¼ of the population of TNOs for which photometric colors are available, including a variety of dynamically different objects. The available data cover the spectral range from 0.3 to 2.2 μm. Previous work investigated possible relations between spectral characteristics and other physical and dynamical parameters. The distribution of ices on TNOs has been analyzed as a function of the object absolute magnitude, taxonomy and dynamical class. In a sample of 76 objects for which visible and near-IR spectroscopic measurements are available, CH3OH ice was detected only on three objects belonging to the RR taxonomic class (5145 Pholus, 55638 2002 VE95 and 90377 Sedna). These three objects are among the reddest, they belong to different dynamical classes, and they have different dimensions. However, all three have similar compositions with Sedna showing a more significant heterogeneity in the kind of hydrocarbon ices found on its surface than the others. To further investigate the presence of hydrocarbon ices, and in particular CH3OH, as part of the composition of the RR taxon we used Spitzer IRAC data available for a subgroup of nine objects. Both methanol and methane have a strong absorption at 3.6 μm, the first of the Spitzer IRAC channels, and a much higher albedo at the following channel at 4.5 μm. This albedo pattern is characteristic of some hydrocarbon ices and is very different from H2O ice that shows instead very low albedos at both channels. Our technique makes use of a large database of models including H2O, CH3OH, CH4, and N 2 ices combined with tholins, amorphous carbon, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, serpentine and olivine in different combinations of relative abundances and grain sizes. We automatically extract the models that match the observations at all color wavelengths therefore obtaining for each

  2. Higuchi Dimension of Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Ahammer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    There exist several methods for calculating the fractal dimension of objects represented as 2D digital images. For example, Box counting, Minkowski dilation or Fourier analysis can be employed. However, there appear to be some limitations. It is not possible to calculate only the fractal dimension of an irregular region of interest in an image or to perform the calculations in a particular direction along a line on an arbitrary angle through the image. The calculations must be made for the whole image. In this paper, a new method to overcome these limitations is proposed. 2D images are appropriately prepared in order to apply 1D signal analyses, originally developed to investigate nonlinear time series. The Higuchi dimension of these 1D signals is calculated using Higuchi's algorithm, and it is shown that both regions of interests and directional dependencies can be evaluated independently of the whole picture. A thorough validation of the proposed technique and a comparison of the new method to the Fourier dimension, a common two dimensional method for digital images, are given. The main result is that Higuchi's algorithm allows a direction dependent as well as direction independent analysis. Actual values for the fractal dimensions are reliable and an effective treatment of regions of interests is possible. Moreover, the proposed method is not restricted to Higuchi's algorithm, as any 1D method of analysis, can be applied. PMID:21931854

  3. Personality dimensions of opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Vukov, M; Baba-Milkic, N; Lecic, D; Mijalkovic, S; Marinkovic, J

    1995-02-01

    A survey of 80 opiate addicts included in a detoxification program was conducted at the Institute on Addictions in Belgrade. In addition to a dependence diagnosis and mental disorders based on DSM-III-R, we applied a Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) that measures the 3 major personality dimensions: novelty-seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA) and reward dependence (RD). When compared with a control group (a sample of Yugoslav undergraduate students), the opiate addicts demonstrate significantly high NS dimension as well as significant divergences of HA and RD subscales. The surveyed opiate addicts demonstrate a high percentage of personality disorders specifically in cluster B. The personality dimensions of opiate addicts showed certain temperament traits, such as: impulsiveness, shyness with strangers, fear of uncertainty and dependence. NS, HA and RD determined by temperament specifics may be an etiological factor in forming of a personality disorder, an affective disorder as well as of a drug choice.

  4. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitationsmore » of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.« less

  5. Haemorrhoids and joint hypermobility: a new extra-articular association.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Uqba N; Bird, Howard A

    2013-04-01

    An association has been demonstrated between haemorrhoids and joint hypermobility. Reasons for this are discussed. Many performing artists are hypermobile and the extra-articular features of joint hypermobility should not be forgotten or underestimated as a potential constraint upon performance.

  6. The "Seattle Times Extra:" An Investment in Content, Not Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondarook, Nina

    1995-01-01

    Describes the strategies used to develop the "Seattle Times Extra," an online bulletin board service, and outlines some of the challenges that the introduction of this two-way computerized medium brought to the company and the newspaper. Discussion includes issues of competition, content development, technical support, finances, marketing, union…

  7. 29 CFR 541.604 - Minimum guarantee plus extras.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.604 Minimum guarantee plus extras. (a) An employer may provide... commission on sales. An exempt employee also may receive a percentage of the sales or profits of the employer...

  8. The Extra Strand of the Maori Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Georgina

    2011-01-01

    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Putaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an "extra strand" covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that…

  9. CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CANAL EMERGES FROM EAST SIDE OF MTR BUILDING. "EXTRA" LENGTH WAS TO STORE SPENT FUEL THAT WOULD ACCUMULATE BEFORE THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT WAS READY TO PROCESS IT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1659. Unknown Photographer, 3/9/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Extra-Curricular Inequality. Research Brief. Edition 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton Trust, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Research Briefing analyses Office for National Statistics data and finds children from the most advantaged households benefit from significantly more spending on extra-curricular activities and private tutoring than their poorer peers. The brief also includes the Trust's annual polling on private tuition and new polling on parents and…

  11. Are Extra Classes the Success behind High Performance and Marks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santhi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Extra classes have been a fixture in the educational system in India. They pre-date all existing educational programmes and examinations. Yet more recently the justification and reasons for the maintenance of these classes have been called into question. There have been unsubstantiated claims that in some cases the classes have been…

  12. Acute abdomen in children due to extra-abdominal causes.

    PubMed

    Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Gardikis, Stefanos; Cassimos, Dimitrios; Kambouri, Katerina; Tsalkidou, Evanthia; Deftereos, Savas; Chatzimichael, Athanasios

    2008-06-01

    Acute abdominal pain in children is a common cause for referral to the emergency room and for subsequent hospitalization to pediatric medical or surgical departments. There are rare occasions when the abdominal pain is derived from extra-abdominal organs or systems. The aim of the present study was to establish the most common extra-abdominal causes of acute abdominal pain. The notes of all children (1 month-14 years of age) examined for acute abdominal pain in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department of Alexandroupolis District University Hospital in January 2001-December 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, and laboratory findings were recorded, as well as the final diagnosis and outcome. Of a total number of 28 124 children who were brought to the A&E department, in 1731 the main complaint was acute abdominal pain. In 51 children their symptoms had an extra-abdominal cause, the most frequent being pneumonia (n = 15), tonsillitis (n = 10), otitis media (n = 9), and acute leukemia (n = 5). Both abdominal and extra-abdominal causes should be considered by a pediatrician who is confronted with a child with acute abdominal pain.

  13. Female bluethroats enhance offspring immunocompetence through extra-pair copulations.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, A; Andersen, V; Sunding, C; Lifjeld, J T

    2000-07-20

    Female birds frequently copulate with extra-pair males, but the adaptive value of this behaviour is poorly understood. Some studies have suggested that 'good genes' may be involved, where females seek to have their eggs fertilized by high-quality males without receiving any material benefits from them. Nevertheless, it remains to be shown that a genetic benefit is passed on to offspring. Here we report that nestling bluethroats, Luscinia svecica, sired by extra-pair males had a higher T-cell-mediated immune response than their maternal half-siblings raised in the same nest. The difference could not be attributed to nestling body mass, sex or hatching order, but may be an effect of paternal genotype. Extra-pair young were also more immunocompetent than their paternal half-sibs raised in the genetic father's own nest, which indicates an additional effect of maternal genotype. Our results are consistent with the idea that females engage in extra-pair copulations to obtain compatible viability genes, rather than 'good genes' per se.

  14. Estimating the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Minh, Hoang Van; Giang, Kim Bao; Liem, Nguyen Thanh; Palmer, Michael; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Duong, Le Bach

    2015-01-01

    Disability is shown to be both a cause and a consequence of poverty. However, relatively little research has investigated the economic cost of living with a disability. This study reports the results of a study on the extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam in 2011. The study was carried out in eight cities/provinces in Vietnam, including Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh cities (two major metropolitan in Vietnam) and six provinces from each of the six socio-economic regions in Vietnam. Costs are estimated using the standard of living approach whereby the difference in incomes between people with disability and those without disability for a given standard of living serves as a proxy for the cost of living with disability. The extra cost of living with disability in Vietnam accounted for about 8.8-9.5% of annual household income, or valued about US$200-218. Communication difficulty was shown to result in highest additional cost of living with disability and self-care difficulty was shown to lead to the lowest levels of extra of living cost. The extra cost of living with disability increased as people had more severe impairment. Interventions to promote the economic security of livelihood for people with disabilities are needed.

  15. Extra-Curricular Activities and Academic Performance in Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Alos, Francisco; Alcala, Rocio; Pino, Maria-Jose; Herruzo, Javier; Ruiz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we study the possible influence of extra-curricular activities (study-related and/or sports) on academic performance of first- and second-year pupils in "Educacion Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO)" [N.T. seventh- and eighth-graders]. Method: We randomly selected 12 schools in the city (9 public and 3 private), and…

  16. Extra-team Connections for Knowledge Transfer between Staff Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties…

  17. 8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. LESLIE WICKMAN, EVA (EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITIES) SPECIALIST, GETTING OUT OF SPACE SUIT AFTER TESTING IN NEUTRAL BUOYANCY TANK. AVERAGE COST OF SUIT $1,000,000. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. Life Story Work: Optional Extra or Fundamental Entitlement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwool, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In Aotearoa New Zealand the importance of life story books is outlined in the policy of our statutory care and protection agency Child, Youth and Family. Many children in care do not have access to such a resource, however, suggesting that social workers view this as an optional extra or "nice to have" rather than integral to good…

  19. Renal Extra Skeletal Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Sisakhti, Afshin Molaei; Parvin, Vahid Abdol Mohammadi; Sadraei, Amin; Adib, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Primary mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the Kidney is an extremely rare entity and very few cases have been reported in literature. We report a 22-year-old male with a right renal mass; after radical nephrectomy, pathologic examination revealed primary extra skeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

  20. Extra-articular manifestations of seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sahatciu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Rexhepi, Mjellma

    2010-02-01

    Although considered a "joint disease," rheumatoid arthritis is associated with the involvement of extra-articular manifestations. The aim of the study is the investigation and comparison of frequency and type of extra-articular manifestations in a well defined community based cohort of patients with seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. Using the ACR (1987) criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, patients have been classified into the 2nd and 3rd functional class (ARA). The studied group consisted of 125 seronegative patients with titters lower than 1:64 as defined by Rose-Waaler test, whereas the control group consisted of 125 seropositive patients with titters of 1:64 or higher. All patients were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49,96), with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb=6,41). In order to present the findings of the study, the structure, prevalence, arithmetic mean (Xb), standard deviation (SB), variation quotient (QV%) and variation interval (Rmax-Rmin) have been used. Probability level has been expressed by p<0,01 and p<0,05. Correlation between the number of extra-articular manifestations and duration of the disease has been calculated by means of Pearson linear correlation. Higher presence of diffuse lung fibrosis, central and peripheral nervous system damages have been confirmed in the seropositive group, and osteoporosis in the seronegative; however, no statistical difference has been found. In extra-articular manifestations, "rheumatoid core" in the seropositive subset (chi2=4,80, p<0,05) presented significant statistical difference. Rheumatoid nodules were more frequent in seropositive subset (12%:16%), in both sexes; however, they were not of significant statistical difference. Neuropathy and lung diseases were also frequently present in seropositive group, but no statistical difference has been found regarding the statistical difference. Longer duration of the disease resulted in an increase of the number of extra

  1. Extra-tropical Cyclones and Windstorms in Seasonal Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Befort, Daniel J.; Weisheimer, Antje; Knight, Jeff; Thornton, Hazel; Roberts, Julia; Hermanson, Leon

    2015-04-01

    Severe damages and large insured losses over Europe related to natural phenomena are mostly caused by extra-tropical cyclones and their related windstorm fields. Thus, an adequate representation of these events in seasonal prediction systems and reliable forecasts up to a season in advance would be of high value for society and economy. In this study, state-of-the-art seasonal forecast prediction systems are analysed (ECMWF, UK Met Office) regarding the general climatological representation and the seasonal prediction of extra-tropical cyclones and windstorms during the core winter season (DJF) with a lead time of up to four months. Two different algorithms are used to identify cyclones and windstorm events in these datasets. Firstly, we apply a cyclone identification and tracking algorithm based on the Laplacian of MSLP and secondly, we use an objective wind field tracking algorithm to identify and track continuous areas of extreme high wind speeds (cf. Leckebusch et al., 2008), which can be related to extra-tropical winter cyclones. Thus, for the first time, we can analyse the forecast of severe wind events near to the surface caused by extra-tropical cyclones. First results suggest a successful validation of the spatial climatological distributions of wind storm and cyclone occurrence in the seasonal forecast systems in comparison with reanalysis data (ECMWF-ERA40 & ERAInterim) in general. However, large biases are found for some areas. The skill of the seasonal forecast systems in simulating the year-to-year variability of the frequency of severe windstorm events and cyclones is investigated using the ranked probability skill score. Positive skill is found over large parts of the Northern Hemisphere as well as for the most intense extra-tropical cyclones and its related wind fields.

  2. The structure of common psychiatric symptoms: how many dimensions of neurosis?

    PubMed

    Ormel, J; Oldehinkel, A J; Goldberg, D P; Hodiamont, P P; Wilmink, F W; Bridges, K

    1995-05-01

    In order to replicate and elaborate the two-dimensional model of depression and anxiety underlying the structure of common psychiatric symptoms proposed by Goldberg et al. (1987), we carried out latent trait analyses on PSE symptom data of the original Manchester study and two recent Dutch studies. We used the same analytical strategy as Goldberg et al. to facilitate comparison with the earlier work. It was found that a more comprehensive set of common psychiatric symptoms caused an extra, third dimension to emerge, so that the earlier anxiety dimension became split between a specific anxiety axis characterized by situational and phobic anxiety and avoidance, and a non-specific anxiety axis characterized by free-floating anxiety, various symptoms relating to tension, irritability and restlessness. It is argued that three dimensions are sufficient to account for the covariance between common psychiatric symptoms. A fairly consistent correlation between the non-specific anxiety and the depression dimension was found across sites, as well as independence of the specific anxiety dimension from the other two dimensions. Furthermore, the depression dimension was robust with similar symptom profiles across samples, but there appeared to be local differences in the structure of anxiety symptoms.

  3. A Neo-Cognitive Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, E. M.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Mahoney and Lyddon's review of constructivism in previous article by focusing on developments emerged from work with Neo-Cognitive Psychotherapy that add new and necessary dimension to issues of agency and constructivism. Presents neo-cognitive view of thought and discusses the evolution of understanding. (NB)

  4. Dimensions of Temperament: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorr, Maurice; Stefic, Edward C.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to examine the dimensionality of the Thorndike Dimensions of Temperament (TDOT) when administered in a single stimulus form; and (b) to test a set of hypotheses relative to the constructs measured in the TDOT. (Author/RK)

  5. Dimensions of the Composing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Aviva

    As a by-product of a study concerning how university level writers develop new genres of discourse, a study was undertaken to examine what factors or dimensions affect the composing process of university writers. Six undergraduate students at Carleton University in Ottawa participated, making available to researchers information about how they…

  6. Charged polymers in high dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, Yacov

    1990-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of charged polymers with either homogeneously distributed frozen charges or with mobile charges has been performed in four and five space dimensions. The results are consistent with the renormalization-group predictions and contradict the predictions of Flory-type theory. Introduction of charge mobility does not modify the behavior of the polymers.

  7. The Dimensions of Residential Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Douglas S.; Denton, Nancy A.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates 20 potential indicators of residential segregation using census data on Hispanics, Blacks, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites in 60 U.S. metropolitan areas. Factor-analyzes the results to select a single best indicator for each of five dimensions of residential segregation. Contains 69 references and 22 statistical formulas. (SV)

  8. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the…

  9. THE DIMENSIONS OF COMPOSITION ANNOTATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCOLLY, WILLIAM

    ENGLISH TEACHER ANNOTATIONS WERE STUDIED TO DETERMINE THE DIMENSIONS AND PROPERTIES OF THE ENTIRE SYSTEM FOR WRITING CORRECTIONS AND CRITICISMS ON COMPOSITIONS. FOUR SETS OF COMPOSITIONS WERE WRITTEN BY STUDENTS IN GRADES 9 THROUGH 13. TYPESCRIPTS OF THE COMPOSITIONS WERE ANNOTATED BY CLASSROOM ENGLISH TEACHERS. THEN, 32 ENGLISH TEACHERS JUDGED…

  10. Dimension independence in exterior algebra.

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, M

    1995-01-01

    The identities between homogeneous expressions in rank 1 vectors and rank n - 1 covectors in a Grassmann-Cayley algebra of rank n, in which one set occurs multilinearly, are shown to represent a set of dimension-independent identities. The theorem yields an infinite set of nontrivial geometric identities from a given identity. PMID:11607520

  11. The Visuospatial Dimension of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors suggest that writing should be conceived of not only as a verbal activity but also as a visuospatial activity, in which writers process and construct visuospatial mental representations. After briefly describing research on visuospatial cognition, they look at how cognitive researchers have investigated the visuospatial dimension of…

  12. The Hidden Dimensions of Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Discusses methods of evaluating commercial online databases and provides examples that illustrate their hidden dimensions. Topics addressed include size, including the number of records or the number of titles; the number of years covered; and the frequency of updates. Comparisons of Readers' Guide Abstracts and Magazine Article Summaries are…

  13. Investigation of a Creativity Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Richard T.

    This thesis provides evidence for the existence of a creativity dimension containing figural and verbal subfactors which is independent of intelligence and marginally related to school achievement. The original data of Wallach and Kogan, as well as the data from the Ward, Cropley and Maslany and Wallach and Wing studies were reanalyzed using…

  14. Missing Dimensions of Mathematics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Emphasizes how to express the breadth of mathematics itself. Addresses other missing dimensions which make mathematics attractive to a larger number of students by making it appear less isolated and more tied to thoughts and experiences that students find familiar and congenial. (ASK)

  15. A 5 Micron of beta Pictoris B at a Sub-Jupiter Projected Separation: Evidence for a Misalignment Between the Planet and the Inner, Warped Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam; Kuchner, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present and analyze a new M' detection of the young exoplanet Beta Pictoris b from 2008 VLT/NaCo data at a separation of approx. = 4 AU and a high signal-to-noise rereduction of L' data taken in December 2Q09. Based on our orbital analysis, the planet's orbit is viewed almost perfectly edge-on (i approx. 89 degrees) and has a Saturn-like semimajor axis of 9.50AU(+3.93 AU)/-(1.7AU) . Intriguingly, the planet's orbit is aligned with the major axis of the outer disk (Omega approx.31 degrees) but probably misaligned with the warp/inclined disk at 80 AU often cited as a signpost for the planet's existence. Our results motivate new studies to clarify how Beta Pic b sculpts debris disk structures and whether a second planet is required to explain the warp/inclined disk

  16. A review on models for count data with extra zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamri, Nik Sarah Nik; Zamzuri, Zamira Hasanah

    2017-04-01

    Typically, the zero inflated models are usually used in modelling count data with excess zeros. The existence of the extra zeros could be structural zeros or random which occur by chance. These types of data are commonly found in various disciplines such as finance, insurance, biomedical, econometrical, ecology, and health sciences. As found in the literature, the most popular zero inflated models used are zero inflated Poisson and zero inflated negative binomial. Recently, more complex models have been developed to account for overdispersion and unobserved heterogeneity. In addition, more extended distributions are also considered in modelling data with this feature. In this paper, we review related literature, provide a recent development and summary on models for count data with extra zeros.

  17. Monitoring for Extra-Intestinal Cancers in IBD.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes, H; Kane, S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated an increased risk for extra-intestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, mainly from treatment modalities. Prominent cancers that are related to IBD treatment include the following: lymphoproliferative disorders associated with thiopurine use, hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma primarily in younger male patients on thiopurines and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents, non-melanoma skin cancers in patients treated with thiopurines and anti-TNF agents, and melanomas in patients who are on monotherapy with anti-TNF agents. In addition, women with IBD may have higher rates of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer. The focus of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview on extra-intestinal cancers in IBD patients and how to monitor for these malignancies.

  18. Extra-skeletal Ewing's sarcoma of the submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Agir, Hakan; Brasch, Helen D; Tan, Swee T

    2007-01-01

    Extra-skeletal Ewing's sarcoma (EES) is an uncommon malignancy, especially in the head and neck region that may arise in various extra-osseous tissues. We report a 22-year-old male with an EES of the submandibular gland, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been described previously. The patient who underwent combined treatment with surgical resection and chemo-irradiation was disease free for 22 months but succumbed to multi-organ metastases 14 months later. This case highlights the combined diagnostic role of immunohistochemical, cytogenetic and radiological evaluation of EES. EES is an aggressive cancer that requires multidisciplinary management with wide surgical excision and adjunctive chemo-irradiation for the best outcome.

  19. Minimizing the extra-oral time in autogeneous tooth transplantation: use of computer-aided rapid prototyping (CARP) as a duplicate model tooth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jong; Kim, Euiseong

    2012-08-01

    The maintenance of the healthy periodontal ligament cells of the root surface of donor tooth and intimate surface contact between the donor tooth and the recipient bone are the key factors for successful tooth transplantation. In order to achieve these purposes, a duplicated donor tooth model can be utilized to reduce the extra-oral time using the computer-aided rapid prototyping (CARP) technique. Briefly, a three-dimensional digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image with the real dimensions of the donor tooth was obtained from a computed tomography (CT), and a life-sized resin tooth model was fabricated. Dimensional errors between real tooth, 3D CT image model and CARP model were calculated. And extra-oral time was recorded during the autotransplantation of the teeth. The average extra-oral time was 7 min 25 sec with the range of immediate to 25 min in cases which extra-oral root canal treatments were not performed while it was 9 min 15 sec when extra-oral root canal treatments were performed. The average radiographic distance between the root surface and the alveolar bone was 1.17 mm and 1.35 mm at mesial cervix and apex; they were 0.98 mm and 1.26 mm at the distal cervix and apex. When the dimensional errors between real tooth, 3D CT image model and CARP model were measured in cadavers, the average of absolute error was 0.291 mm between real teeth and CARP model. These data indicate that CARP may be of value in minimizing the extra-oral time and the gap between the donor tooth and the recipient alveolar bone in tooth transplantation.

  20. 17. NBS TOOL ROOM. MISCELLANEOUS TOOLS USED DURING EXTRA VEHICULAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. NBS TOOL ROOM. MISCELLANEOUS TOOLS USED DURING EXTRA VEHICULAR ACTIVITY (EVA) MISSIONS AND NBS TRAINING. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT THE TOOLS ARE: SHUTTLE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM (STS) PORTABLE FOOT RESTRAINT (PFR), ESSEX WRENCH, SOCKET WRENCH, SAFETY TETHER REEL (LEFT REAR), MINI WORKSTATION (CENTER REAR), TETHERS (FRONT CENTER), HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE (HST) POWER TOOL (FRONT RIGHT), HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE & PORTABLE FOOT RESTRAINT (REAR RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Primary extra-skeletal Ewing's sarcoma mimicking a disc protrusion.

    PubMed

    Ruelle, A; Boccardo, M

    1987-07-01

    One of the rarest cases of primary epidural neoplasm is a soft tissue sarcoma histologically similar to Ewing's sarcoma of the bone. In the literature only eleven cases of such an extra-skeletal Ewing's sarcoma have been described. The authors report an additional case presenting as a disc protrusion in a young male. The authors include some diagnostic, prognostic and nosologic remarks about this condition.

  2. Critical gravity in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Pope, C N

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This "critical" theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical "new massive gravity" with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  3. Nonlinear Filtering in High Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-02

    portion of this thesis deals with controlling the distance between conditional distributions in high dimension, we present a few elementary lemmas that...ergodicity. 14 Chapter 2 Preliminaries This chapter is devoted to introducing some elementary concepts and facts in prob- ability theory that will be...measurable space (E,E) to R̄ := [−∞,+∞], or a subset of it, is E-measurable it if is measurable relative to E and the Borel σ- algebra on R̄. We write

  4. [Prosthetic bilateral laparoscopic hernioplasty. Extra-peritoneal approach].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Castoro, C; Zaninotto, G; Comandella, M G; Polo, R; Nolli, M L; Ancona, E

    1997-03-01

    The use of prosthetic mesh in inguinal hernia repairs is becoming increasingly popular. In recent years different laparoscopic procedures for prosthetic repair of inguinal hernias have been developed. The authors describe their initial experience with a totally extra-peritoneal prosthetic approach in laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. From November 1993 to May 1994, ten consecutive patients with bilateral primary inguinal hernias underwent laparoscopic repair under general anesthesia. A totally extra-peritoneal approach has been performed beginning through a 2 centimeter vertical midline sub-umbilical incision. Two additional trocars have been inserted on the midline: a 10/12 mm one halfway between the umbilicus and the pubis and 5 mm one 2 cm above the pubis. Average operative time was 141 minutes. Two cases were converted to traditional open Stoppa procedure because of holes made in the peritoneum during blunt dissection of the hernia sac. In the remaining 8 cases a polypropylene mesh of about 8 cm in height and 13 cm in length have been placed on each hernia site. No major complications have been observed and recovery was quick in all cases. In conclusion we think that laparoscopic hernia repair through a totally extra-peritoneal approach is technically feasible for general surgeons trained in laparoscopic surgery. Nevertheless the operation in costly and the patient's benefit in terms of rapid recovery, complications and recurrences has not yet been demonstrated in controlled prospective trials.

  5. Extra-Anatomic Revascularization of Extensive Coral Reef Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gaggiano, Andrea; Kasemi, Holta; Monti, Andrea; Laurito, Antonella; Maselli, Mauro; Manzo, Paola; Quaglino, Simone; Tavolini, Valeria

    2017-10-01

    Coral reef aorta (CRA) is a rare, potential lethal disease of the visceral aorta as it can cause visceral and renal infarction. Various surgical approaches have been proposed for the CRA treatment. The purpose of this article is to report different extensive extra-anatomic CRA treatment modalities tailored on the patients' clinical and anatomic presentation. From April 2006 to October 2012, 4 symptomatic patients with extensive CRA were treated at our department. Extra-anatomic aortic revascularization with selective visceral vessels clamping was performed in all cases. Technical success was 100%. No perioperative death was registered. All patients remained asymptomatic during the follow-up period (62, 49, 25, and 94 months, respectively), with bypasses and target vessels patency. The extra-anatomic bypass with selective visceral vessels clamping reduces the aortic occlusion time and the risk of organ ischemia. All approaches available should be considered on a case-by-case basis and in high-volume centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  7. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Matthew R; Salem, Mohamed M; Gross, Bradley A; Reddy, Arra S; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle.

  8. Extra-team connections for knowledge transfer between staff teams

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties between staff members based in different site teams) as potential channels for knowledge sharing. Data come from a cross-sectional study of afterschool childcare staff implementing a health promotion program at 20 urban sites of the Young Men's Christian Association of Greater Boston. We conducted a sociometric social network analysis and attempted a census of 91 program staff members. We surveyed 80 individuals, and included 73 coordinators and general staff, who lead and support implementation, respectively, in this study. A multiple linear regression model demonstrated a positive relationship between extra-team connections (β = 3.41, P < 0.0001) and skill receipt, a measure of knowledge transfer. We also found that intra-team connections (within-team ties between staff members) were also positively related to skill receipt. Connections between teams appear to support knowledge transfer in this network, but likely require greater active facilitation, perhaps via organizational changes. Further research on extra-team connections and knowledge transfer in low-resource, high turnover environments is needed. PMID:19528313

  9. Ovulation and extra-ovarian origin of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Gurrea-Soteras, Marta; Sumi, Natalia; Joo, Won Duk; Holmberg, Jennie C.; Craveiro, Vinicius; Alvero, Ayesha B.; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The mortality rate of ovarian cancer remains high due to late diagnosis and recurrence. A fundamental step toward improving detection and treatment of this lethal disease is to understand its origin. A growing number of studies have revealed that ovarian cancer can develop from multiple extra-ovarian origins, including fallopian tube, gastrointestinal tract, cervix and endometriosis. However, the mechanism leading to their ovarian localization is not understood. We utilized in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to recapitulate the process of extra-ovarian malignant cells migrating to the ovaries and forming tumors. We provided experimental evidence to support that ovulation, by disrupting the ovarian surface epithelium and releasing chemokines/cytokines, promotes the migration and adhesion of malignant cells to the ovary. We identified the granulosa cell-secreted SDF-1 as a main chemoattractant that recruits malignant cells towards the ovary. Our findings revealed a potential molecular mechanism of how the extra-ovarian cells can be attracted by the ovary, migrate to and form tumors in the ovary. Our data also supports the association between increased ovulation and the risk of ovarian cancer. Understanding this association will lead us to the development of more specific markers for early detection and better prevention strategies. PMID:25135607

  10. The writer independent online handwriting recognition system frog on hand and cluster generative statistical dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Claus; Burkhardt, Hans

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we give a comprehensive description of our writer-independent online handwriting recognition system frog on hand. The focus of this work concerns the presentation of the classification/training approach, which we call cluster generative statistical dynamic time warping (CSDTW). CSDTW is a general, scalable, HMM-based method for variable-sized, sequential data that holistically combines cluster analysis and statistical sequence modeling. It can handle general classification problems that rely on this sequential type of data, e.g., speech recognition, genome processing, robotics, etc. Contrary to previous attempts, clustering and statistical sequence modeling are embedded in a single feature space and use a closely related distance measure. We show character recognition experiments of frog on hand using CSDTW on the UNIPEN online handwriting database. The recognition accuracy is significantly higher than reported results of other handwriting recognition systems. Finally, we describe the real-time implementation of frog on hand on a Linux Compaq iPAQ embedded device.

  11. Evolution of Warped Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Roles of Feeding at the Outer Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the alignment processes of spinning black holes and their surrounding warped accretion disks in a frame of two different types of feeding at the outer boundaries. We consider (1) fixed flows in which gas is continually fed with a preferred angular momentum, and (2) free flows in which there is no gas supply and the disks diffuse freely at their outer edges. As expected, we find that for the cases of fixed flows the black hole disk systems always align on timescales of several 106 yr, irrespective of the initial inclinations. If the initial inclination angles are larger than π/2, the black hole accretion transits from retrograde to prograde fashion, and the accreted mass onto the black holes during these two phases is comparable. On the other hand, for the cases of free flows, both alignments and anti-alignments can occur, depending on the initial inclinations and the ratios of the angular momentum of the disks to that of the black holes. In such cases, the disks will be consumed within timescales of 106 yr by black holes accreting at the Eddington limit. We propose that there is a close connection between the black hole spin and the lifetime for which the feeding persists, which determines the observable episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei. We conclude that careful inclusion of the disk feeding at the outer boundaries is crucial for modeling the evolution of the black hole spin.

  12. Neutrino oscillations from warped flavor symmetry: Predictions for long baseline experiments T2K, NOvA, and DUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, Pedro; Chuliá, Salvador Centelles; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-05-01

    Here we study the pattern of neutrino oscillations emerging from a previously proposed warped standard model construction incorporating Δ (27 ) flavor symmetry [J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 007, 10.1007/JHEP01(2016)007]. In addition to a complete description of fermion masses, the model predicts the lepton mixing matrix in terms of two parameters. The good measurement of θ13 makes these two parameters tightly correlated, leading to an approximate one-parameter description of neutrino oscillations. We find secondary minima for the C P phase absent in the general unconstrained oscillation scenario and determine the fourfold degenerate sharp correlation between the physical C P phase δC P and the atmospheric mixing angle θ23. This implies that maximal θ23 correlates with maximal leptonic C P violation. We perform a realistic estimate of the total neutrino and antineutrino event numbers expected at long baseline oscillation experiments T2K, NOvA, and the upcoming DUNE proposal. We show how an improved knowledge of the C P phase will probe the model in a significant way.

  13. An image warping technique for rodent brain MRI-histology registration based on thin-plate splines with landmark optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yutong; Uberti, Mariano; Dou, Huanyu; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.; Boska, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    Coregistration of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histology provides validation of disease biomarker and pathobiology studies. Although thin-plate splines are widely used in such image registration, point landmark selection is error prone and often time-consuming. We present a technique to optimize landmark selection for thin-plate splines and demonstrate its usefulness in warping rodent brain MRI to histological sections. In this technique, contours are drawn on the corresponding MRI slices and images of histological sections. The landmarks are extracted from the contours by equal spacing then optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of the landmark displacement and contour curvature. The technique was validated using simulation data and brain MRI-histology coregistration in a murine model of HIV-1 encephalitis. Registration error was quantified by calculating target registration error (TRE). The TRE of approximately 8 pixels for 20-80 landmarks without optimization was stable at different landmark numbers. The optimized results were more accurate at low landmark numbers (TRE of approximately 2 pixels for 50 landmarks), while the accuracy decreased (TRE approximately 8 pixels for larger numbers of landmarks (70- 80). The results demonstrated that registration accuracy decreases with the increasing landmark numbers offering more confidence in MRI-histology registration using thin-plate splines.

  14. Warped AdS 6 × S 2 in Type IIB supergravity III. Global solutions with seven-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hoker, Eric; Gutperle, Michael; Uhlemann, Christoph F.

    2017-11-01

    We extend our previous construction of global solutions to Type IIB super-gravity that are invariant under the superalgebra F(4) and are realized on a spacetime of the form AdS 6 × S 2 warped over a Riemann surface Σ by allowing the supergravity fields to have non-trivial SL(2, ℝ) monodromy at isolated punctures on Σ. We obtain explicit solutions for the case where Σ is a disc, and the monodromy generators are parabolic elements of SL(2, ℝ) physically corresponding to the monodromy allowed in Type IIB string theory. On the boundary of Σ the solutions exhibit singularities at isolated points which correspond to semi-infinite five-branes, as is familiar from the global solutions without monodromy. In the interior of Σ, the solutions are everywhere regular, except at the punctures where SL(2, ℝ) monodromy resides and which physically correspond to the locations of [ p, q] seven-branes. The solutions have a compelling physical interpretation corresponding to fully localized five-brane intersections with additional seven-branes, and provide candidate holographic duals to the five-dimensional superconformal field theories realized on such intersections.

  15. How the 'warped' relationships between nurses' emotions, attitudes, social support and perceived organizational conditions impact customer orientation.

    PubMed

    Gountas, Sandra; Gountas, John

    2016-02-01

    Much research focuses on organizational culture and its impact on customer orientation or emotional states and their impact on job satisfaction and well-being. This study aims to combine the complex roles of nurses' emotion states and job satisfaction in a model that identifies the effects of standards for service delivery (organizational culture), supervisor and co-worker support and the development of customer orientation. A previous study examined the relationships between nurses' personal resources, job satisfaction and customer orientation. This study examines how these variables relate to organizational standards and social support. A cross-sectional survey using a self-completion questionnaire with validated, existing scales to measure standards for service delivery, supervisor and co-worker support, job satisfaction, empathic concern, emotional exhaustion and customer orientation. Nurses (159) completed the questionnaire in 2010. The data were analysed using WarpPLS, a structural equation modelling software package. The results indicate that the final model fits the data well and explains 84% of the variance in customer orientation. The findings show the importance of standard for service delivery (organizational culture), supervisor and co-worker support on customer orientation. Nurses' personal resources interact with these, particularly supervisor and co-worker support, to develop staff job satisfaction and empathy. The need for support mechanisms in stressful times is discussed. We propose that training in compassion and empathy would help leaders to model desirable attributes that contribute towards customer orientation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Similarity measure and topology evolution of foreign exchange markets using dynamic time warping method: Evidence from minimal spanning tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang-Jin; Xie, Chi; Han, Feng; Sun, Bo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we employ a dynamic time warping method to study the topology of similarity networks among 35 major currencies in international foreign exchange (FX) markets, measured by the minimal spanning tree (MST) approach, which is expected to overcome the synchronous restriction of the Pearson correlation coefficient. In the empirical process, firstly, we subdivide the analysis period from June 2005 to May 2011 into three sub-periods: before, during, and after the US sub-prime crisis. Secondly, we choose NZD (New Zealand dollar) as the numeraire and then, analyze the topology evolution of FX markets in terms of the structure changes of MSTs during the above periods. We also present the hierarchical tree associated with the MST to study the currency clusters in each sub-period. Our results confirm that USD and EUR are the predominant world currencies. But USD gradually loses the most central position while EUR acts as a stable center in the MST passing through the crisis. Furthermore, an interesting finding is that, after the crisis, SGD (Singapore dollar) becomes a new center currency for the network.

  17. Classification of biosensor time series using dynamic time warping: applications in screening cancer cells with characteristic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shesh N; Trainor, Patrick J; Khosravi, Farhad; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    The development of biosensors that produce time series data will facilitate improvements in biomedical diagnostics and in personalized medicine. The time series produced by these devices often contains characteristic features arising from biochemical interactions between the sample and the sensor. To use such characteristic features for determining sample class, similarity-based classifiers can be utilized. However, the construction of such classifiers is complicated by the variability in the time domains of such series that renders the traditional distance metrics such as Euclidean distance ineffective in distinguishing between biological variance and time domain variance. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is a sequence alignment algorithm that can be used to align two or more series to facilitate quantifying similarity. In this article, we evaluated the performance of DTW distance-based similarity classifiers for classifying time series that mimics electrical signals produced by nanotube biosensors. Simulation studies demonstrated the positive performance of such classifiers in discriminating between time series containing characteristic features that are obscured by noise in the intensity and time domains. We then applied a DTW distance-based k -nearest neighbors classifier to distinguish the presence/absence of mesenchymal biomarker in cancer cells in buffy coats in a blinded test. Using a train-test approach, we find that the classifier had high sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (81.8%) in differentiating between EpCAM-positive MCF7 cells spiked in buffy coats and those in plain buffy coats.

  18. Automated recognition of bird song elements from continuous recordings using dynamic time warping and hidden Markov models: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kogan, J A; Margoliash, D

    1998-04-01

    The performance of two techniques is compared for automated recognition of bird song units from continuous recordings. The advantages and limitations of dynamic time warping (DTW) and hidden Markov models (HMMs) are evaluated on a large database of male songs of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea), which have different types of vocalizations and have been recorded under different laboratory conditions. Depending on the quality of recordings and complexity of song, the DTW-based technique gives excellent to satisfactory performance. Under challenging conditions such as noisy recordings or presence of confusing short-duration calls, good performance of the DTW-based technique requires careful selection of templates that may demand expert knowledge. Because HMMs are trained, equivalent or even better performance of HMMs can be achieved based only on segmentation and labeling of constituent vocalizations, albeit with many more training examples than DTW templates. One weakness in HMM performance is the misclassification of short-duration vocalizations or song units with more variable structure (e.g., some calls, and syllables of plastic songs). To address these and other limitations, new approaches for analyzing bird vocalizations are discussed.

  19. Implementing a citizen's DWI reporting program using the Extra Eyes model

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-09-01

    This manual is a guide for law enforcement agencies and community organizations in creating and implementing a citizens DWI reporting program in their communities modeling the Operation Extra Eyes program. Extra Eyes is a program that engages volu...

  20. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation-associated infections: implication of extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli clones.

    PubMed

    Messika, Jonathan; Clermont, Olivier; Landraud, Luce; Schmidt, Matthieu; Aubry, Alexandra; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Fernandes, Romain; Combes, Alain; Denamur, Erick; Ricard, Jean-Damien

    2017-08-01

    Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a promising life-saving technique for critically ill patients. Bacterial infection is a frequent complication, and Escherichia coli the predominant causative pathogen, but little is known about the characteristics of E. coli strains in these infections. We therefore conducted a retrospective study of 33 E. coli strains responsible for 33 ECMO-related infections, in 30 subjects. Antimicrobial susceptibility, phylotyping, O-typing, clonal relatedness determination and the screening for four virulence factor genes were conducted. Polymicrobial infections were evidenced in 61.6 % of episodes, irrespective of E. coli characteristics. Extra-intestinal pathogenic strains represented the large majority (69.7 %) of all E. coli isolates. Their advantageous genetic background may explain their predominance in this context. The potential for targeted digestive decontamination should be investigated in these patients for whom infectious complications are a heavy burden.