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  1. Young children in urban areas: Links among neighborhood characteristics, weight status, outdoor play, and television watching

    PubMed Central

    Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; McLanahan, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Although research consistently demonstrates a link between residential context and physical activity for adults and adolescents, less is known about young children’s physical activity. Using data from the U.S. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=1822, 51% male), we explored whether outdoor play and television watching were associated with children’s body mass indexes (BMIs) at age five using OLS regression models, controlling for a wide array of potential confounders, including maternal BMI. We also tested whether subjective and objective neighborhood measures - socioeconomic status (from U.S. Census tract data), type of dwelling, perceived collective efficacy, and interviewer-assessed physical disorder of the immediate environment outside the home -were associated with children’s activities, using negative binomial regression models. Overall, 19% of the sample were overweight (between the 85th and 95th percentiles), and 16% were obese (≥95th percentile). Hours of outdoor play were negatively associated with BMI, and hours of television were positively associated with BMI. Moreover, a ratio of outdoor play to television time was a significant predictor of BMI. Higher maternal perceptions of neighborhood collective efficacy were associated with more hours of outdoor play, fewer hours of television viewing, and more trips to a park or playground. In addition, we found that neighborhood physical disorder was associated with both more outdoor play and more television watching. Finally, contrary to expectations, we found that children living in public housing had significantly more hours of outdoor play and watched more television, than other children. We hypothesize that poorer children may have more unstructured time, which they fill with television time but also with outdoor play time; and that children in public housing may be likely to have access to play areas on the grounds of their housing facilities. PMID:21324574

  2. The Benefits of Watching Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Paul

    The unfounded and sometimes absurd attacks on television have tended to obscure many of the medium's obvious personal, social, and aesthetic benefits. It is easy to watch, and if its content does not always provide viewers with much to think about, television does not ask much of them either: they may eat, sleep, and unwind in front of it,…

  3. Television's Impact on Fantasy Play: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Voort, Tom H.; Valkenburg, Patti M.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research literature on television's influence on children's fantasy play. Notes evidence that television viewing absorbs time that children would otherwise spend in play and that television's influence on play depends on the types of programs watched. Examines whether television viewing influences fantasy play positively or negatively and…

  4. Behavioral correlation with television watching and videogame playing among children in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Said; Eapen, Valsamma; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Mabrouk, Abdelazim

    2014-08-01

    Television viewing and videogame use (TV/VG) appear to be associated with some childhood behavioral problems. There are no studies addressing this problem in the United Arab Emirates. One hundred ninety-seven school children (mean age, 8.7 ± 2.1 years) were assessed. Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) subscale scores and socio-demographic characteristics were compared between children who were involved with TV/VG more than 2 hours/day and those involved less than 2 hours/day (the recommended upper limit by The American Academy of Pediatrics). Thirty-seven percent of children who were involved with TV/VG time of more than 2 hours/day scored significantly higher on CBCL syndrome scales of withdrawn, social problems, attention problems, delinquent behavior, aggressive behavior, internalizing problems, externalizing problems and the CBCL total scores compared with their counterparts. Moreover, these children were younger in birth order and had fewer siblings. After controlling for these confounders using logistic regression, we found that TV/VG time more than 2 hours/day was positively associated with withdrawn (p = 0.008), attention problem (p = 0.037), externalizing problems (p = 0.007), and CBCL total (p = 0.014). Involvement with TV/VG for more than 2 hours/day is associated with more childhood behavioral problems. Counteracting negative effects of the over-involvement with TV/VG in children requires increased parental awareness.

  5. Watching the TV Audience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Peter

    Data were collected for this study of the relationship between television watching and family life via a recording device (C-Box) consisting of a television set and a video camera. Designed for the study, this device was installed in 20 homes for one week to record the viewing area in front of the television set together with information on…

  6. Dynamic accommodative response to different visual stimuli (2D vs 3D) while watching television and while playing Nintendo 3DS console.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sílvia; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accommodative response to the same visual content presented in two dimensions (2D) and stereoscopically in three dimensions (3D) while participants were either watching a television (TV) or Nintendo 3DS console. Twenty-two university students, with a mean age of 20.3 ± 2.0 years (mean ± S.D.), were recruited to participate in the TV experiment and fifteen, with a mean age of 20.1 ± 1.5 years took part in the Nintendo 3DS console study. The accommodative response was measured using a Grand Seiko WAM 5500 autorefractor. In the TV experiment, three conditions were used initially: the film was viewed in 2D mode (TV2D without glasses), the same sequence was watched in 2D whilst shutter-glasses were worn (TV2D with glasses) and the sequence was viewed in 3D mode (TV3D). Measurements were taken for 5 min in each condition, and these sections were sub-divided into ten 30-s segments to examine changes within the film. In addition, the accommodative response to three points of different disparity of one 3D frame was assessed for 30 s. In the Nintendo experiment, two conditions were employed - 2D viewing and stereoscopic 3D viewing. In the TV experiment no statistically significant differences were found between the accommodative response with TV2D without glasses (-0.38 ± 0.32D, mean ± S.D.) and TV3D (-0.37 ± 0.34D). Also, no differences were found between the various segments of the film, or between the accommodative response to different points of one frame (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.015) was found, however, between the TV2D with (-0.32 ± 0.32D) and without glasses (-0.38 ± 0.32D). In the Nintendo experiment the accommodative responses obtained in modes 2D (-2.57 ± 0.30D) and 3D (-2.49 ± 0.28D) were significantly different (paired t-test p = 0.03). The need to use shutter-glasses may affect the accommodative response during the viewing of displays, and the accommodative response when playing

  7. Should I Let My Child Watch Television?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharadwaj, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    While the prevalence of autism has been increasing globally, there is a search for the causative factors behind the rise. The point of view presented here examines the possibility of children brought up in social deprivation and watching television being at higher risk for developing autistic symptoms. The association is evident in the clinical…

  8. Television watching and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Keum, N N; Chan, A T; Fuchs, C S; Wu, K; Giovannucci, E L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged TV watching, a major sedentary behaviour, is associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes and may involve in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 31 065 men with ⩾1 endoscopy in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1988–2008) to evaluate sitting while watching TV and its joint influence with leisure-time physical activity on risk of colorectal adenoma. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Prolonged sitting while watching TV was significantly associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma (n=4280), and adjusting for physical activity or a potential mediator body mass index did not change the estimates. The ORs (95% CIs) across categories of TV watching (0–6, 7–13, 14–20, and 21+ h per week) were 1.00 (referent), 1.09 (1.01–1.17), 1.16 (1.06–1.27), and 1.10 (0.97–1.25) (OR per 14-h per week increment=1.11; 95% CI: 1.04–1.18; Ptrend=0.001). Compared with the least sedentary (0–6 h per week of TV) and most physically active (highest quintile) men, the most sedentary (14+ h per week) and least active (lowest quintile) men had a significant increased risk of adenoma (OR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.05–1.49), particularly for high-risk adenoma. Conclusions: Prolonged TV viewing is associated with modest increased risk of colorectal adenoma independent of leisure-time physical activity and minimally mediated by obesity. PMID:25590667

  9. What Children Talk About While They Watch Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel

    This study explored what children talk about when they watch television as a means of learning more about how and why children verbally encode information. Preschool and third-grade children watched four animated television programs that varied in amount of dialog (one high-dialog, two moderate, and one no-dialog). Their comments while viewing…

  10. Is watching television a realistic leisure option for people with dementia?

    PubMed

    Gústafsdóttir, Margrét

    2015-01-01

    Watching television is a common leisure activity, not least among older people. However, watching television may become difficult when it is disturbed by symptoms of dementia. A total of 284 questionnaires were handed out to relatives of people with dementia in Iceland, in the Memory Clinic of the University Hospital and in specialized units for people with dementia (6 day-care units and 8 units within nursing homes). The response rate was just below 58%. Watching television was shown to play a less important role in the course of the daily life of people with dementia as soon as the symptoms of the disease became evident, and it increasingly became less relevant. So, this previous leisure activity left an ever-growing void of time to fill. However, watching television may provide an important social context for contact and togetherness during the progress of the disease, as watching television with someone close to them was important for the individuals with dementia. It is not a viable option for people with dementia to watch television on their own, but they may enjoy watching television while sharing this activity with a person close to them. This may even provide quality time.

  11. Television Games Preschool Children Play: Patterns, Themes and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Navita Cummings; McCain, Thomas A.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of relationship of television content to preschool children's play based on observations at day care center reveals that television is source of content in play; television-facilitated games are not "new"; developmental differences exist in use of television content in play; use of television content in play has positive consequences.…

  12. Naturally Occurring Changes in Time Spent Watching Television Are Inversely Related to Frequency of Physical Activity during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Lytle, Leslie A.

    2006-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between changes in time spent watching television and playing video games with frequency of leisure-time physical activity across a 2-year period among adolescent boys and girls (N=4594). Latent growth modelling indicated that a decrease in time spent watching television was associated with…

  13. TV watching, soap opera and happiness.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Argyle, M

    1993-09-01

    One hundred and fourteen subjects reported the amount of time they spent watching television in general, and soap opera in particular. They also completed scales measuring happiness and other personality variables, such as extraversion and cooperativeness. In the multiple regression analysis, having controlled for the demographic variables, watching TV was related to unhappiness, whereas watching soap opera was related to happiness. Discriminant analysis showed that females, higher happiness and extraversion distinguished regular soap watchers (who nevertheless watched little TV in general) from irregular soap watchers (who nevertheless watched a lot of TV in general).

  14. Improving Acoustic Models by Watching Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witbrock, Michael J.; Hauptmann, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    Obtaining sufficient labelled training data is a persistent difficulty for speech recognition research. Although well transcribed data is expensive to produce, there is a constant stream of challenging speech data and poor transcription broadcast as closed-captioned television. We describe a reliable unsupervised method for identifying accurately transcribed sections of these broadcasts, and show how these segments can be used to train a recognition system. Starting from acoustic models trained on the Wall Street Journal database, a single iteration of our training method reduced the word error rate on an independent broadcast television news test set from 62.2% to 59.5%.

  15. Infant and Mother-Infant Play and the Presence of the Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masur, Elise Frank; Flynn, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Forty-eight middle-class mothers answered questionnaires about their 11-through 18-month-old infants' typical television watching and interest, the frequency and duration of their independent play with toys and dyadic play with and without toys, and whether the television was typically on or not on in the room at the time. Mothers reported that…

  16. Children's Learning from Broadcast Television: The Relationship between the Amount of Time a Child Watches Television with and without Adults and That Child's Learning from Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Susan Ruotsala

    A study examined young children's learning from selected television program content in varied subject matter and the relationship between that learning and the amount of time a child watches television with and without adults. A 28-item learning test based on instructional design principles was developed from selected television segments and…

  17. Energy cost of stepping in place while watching television commercials.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Jeremy A; Thompson, Dixie L; Bassett, David R

    2012-02-01

    Modifying sedentary television (TV) watching behaviors by stepping in place during commercials (TV commercial stepping) could increase physical activity and energy expenditure. The study's purpose was to determine the energy cost of TV commercial stepping and to quantify the amount of activity (number of steps and minutes) performed during 1 h of TV commercial stepping. In part 1, 23 adults (27.8 ± 7.0 yr) had their energy expenditure measured at rest, sitting, standing, stepping in place, and walking at 3.0 mph on the treadmill. The second part of this study involved 1 h of sedentary TV viewing and 1 h of TV commercial stepping. Actual steps were counted with a hand tally counter. There were no differences (P = 0.76) between the caloric requirements of reclining rest (79 ± 16 kcal·h(-1)) and sedentary TV viewing (81 ± 19 kcal·h(-1)). However, stepping in place (258 ± 76 kcal·h(-1)), walking at 3.0 mph on the treadmill (304 ± 71 kcal·h(-1)), and 1 h of TV commercial stepping (148 ± 40 kcal·h(-1)) had a higher caloric requirement than either reclining rest or sedentary TV viewing (P < 0.001). One hour of TV commercial stepping resulted in an average of 25.2 ± 2.6 min of physical activity and 2111 ± 253 steps. Stepping in place during commercials can increase the energy cost and amount of activity performed during TV viewing.

  18. Television watching, diet and body mass index of school children in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Iqbal, Zaheen A

    2016-04-01

    Watching television has been widely associated with various health and psychological outcomes in children. Excessive intake of carbonated, sweetened beverages and fast foods, inadequate intake of fruit and dairy products; and reduced levels of physical activity also pose a risk to healthy lifestyle among youth. Limited literature is available, however, on the cross-cultural aspects of duration of television viewing, diet preferences and their effect on weight in school children in the Middle East, especially in Saudi Arabia. We conducted an online survey in school children in Saudi Arabia (age 12-16 years) to determine whether there is any association between duration of daily television watching, body mass index (BMI), eating habits and diet preferences. A self-administered questionnaire was uploaded online and the link was sent to school children, inviting them to participate in the study. It included questions on demographic data; family medical status; daily routine in and after school; number of hours of daily TV watching, self-perception of health and daily diet habits and preferences. A total of 220 children aged between 12 and 16 years participated in the present study. There was a higher duration of television viewing, and higher consumption of high-fat fast foods and high-sugar drinks, and this was significantly associated with BMI (P < 0.05). The availability of television in children's bedrooms, and of high-fat foods and drinks at school and in other cafeterias in Saudi Arabia seems to be the major cause of the association between sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits, which needs to be checked and limited. Parents and teachers need to be trained because they can play a major role in its prevention. Saudi Arabia is a growing country banking on its youth. Their awareness can prevent the incidence and lower the prevalence of such ill health habits among them. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Relationship between parental estimate and an objective measure of child television watching

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jodie L; Winiewicz, Dana D; Fuerch, Janene H; Roemmich, James N; Epstein, Leonard H

    2006-01-01

    Many young children have televisions in their bedrooms, which may influence the relationship between parental estimate and objective measures of child television usage/week. Parental estimates of child television time of eighty 4–7 year old children (6.0 ± 1.2 years) at the 75th BMI percentile or greater (90.8 ± 6.8 BMI percentile) were compared to an objective measure of television time obtained from TV Allowance™ devices attached to every television in the home over a three week period. Results showed that parents overestimate their child's television time compared to an objective measure when no television is present in the bedroom by 4 hours/week (25.4 ± 11.5 vs. 21.4 ± 9.1) in comparison to underestimating television time by over 3 hours/week (26.5 ± 17.2 vs. 29.8 ± 14.4) when the child has a television in their bedroom (p = 0.02). Children with a television in their bedroom spend more objectively measured hours in television time than children without a television in their bedroom (29.8 ± 14.2 versus 21.4 ± 9.1, p = 0.003). Research on child television watching should take into account television watching in bedrooms, since it may not be adequately assessed by parental estimates. PMID:17129381

  20. Parental influences on television watching among children living on the Texas-Mexico border.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrew E; Kelder, Steven H; Barroso, Cristina S; Drenner, Kelli L; Shegog, Ross; Ranjit, Nalini; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2010-08-01

    We examined the association of parental television (TV) rules and compliance with the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) recommendations of television per day in a primarily Hispanic sample of elementary school children (n=734) living on the U.S. side of the Texas-Mexico border. The potential modifying effects of children's home environment (parental TV watching, parent at home after school, and TV in bedroom) were also examined. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on baseline survey data merged from two waves (2006 and 2007) of a CDC-funded TV reduction intervention with 4th grade children (mean age: 9.5 years). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations. Children who had TV rules were 1.4 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.94) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.22, 2.32) times more likely to meet the AAP recommendation for weekend and weekday TV watching, respectively. Parental TV watching and TV in bedroom modified the effect of TV rules on children's TV watching, with null associations found for children whose parents watch TV frequently and for children with no TV in bedroom. No interaction effect was found for children's afterschool context. Parental TV limits is one strategy for reducing children's television watching that merits further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Relationship of Students' Academic Achievement to Television Watching, Leisure Time Reading and Homework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Barbara; And Others

    To investigate the relationships between television watching, spare time reading, homework, and scholastic achievement, the National Assessment of Educational Progress gathered data on television viewing habits. Younger students were more avid viewers than older ones. Half the 9-year olds watched over 3 hours of television daily; most 13-year-olds…

  2. Television watching, videogames, and excess of body fat in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán; Rey-López, J Pablo; Martín-Matillas, Miguel; Moreno, Luis A; Wärnberg, Julia; Redondo, Carlos; Tercedor, Pablo; Delgado, Manuel; Marcos, Ascensión; Castillo, Manuel; Bueno, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the individual association of sedentary behaviors with the risk of overweight and excess body fat (overfat) in adolescents. A representative sample (1960 subjects, 1012 males, age 13-18.5 y) of Spanish adolescents was studied within the framework of the Alimentación y Valoración del Estado Nutricional de los Adolescentes (AVENA) study. Television (TV) watching, videogame and computer usage, doing homework, and the way students got to school, physical activity, and socioeconomic status were analyzed. Anthropometrics were measured to describe overweight (International Obesity Task Force cutoffs for body mass index) and overfat (body fat percentage >85th percentile). When all subjects were considered as an entire group, the overweight risk increased by 15.8% (P < 0.05) per increasing hour of TV watching. The overweight risks decreased by 32.5% in females, 22% per increasing year of age, and 12.5% by increasing socioeconomic status by 1 U (all Ps < 0.05). The obesity risks decreased with age by 17.8% per year in males and 27.1% in females (both Ps < 0.05). The overfat risks increased by 26.8% and 9.4% per increasing hour of TV and weekend videogame usage, respectively (both Ps < 0.05). In males, the overfat risk increased by 21.5% per increasing hour in weekend videogame usage (P < 0.05). Each hour of TV use increased the overfat risks by 22% in males and 28.3% in females (both Ps < 0.05). Time spent watching TV increased the risk of overweight and obesity in Spanish adolescents, but the effect was influenced by age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Moreover, an excess of body fat was more directly explained by the time spent watching TV and playing videogames during the weekend.

  3. Television Watching and Colorectal Cancer Survival in Men

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Andrew T.; Wu, Kana; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association between pre- and postdiagnostic time spent sitting watching TV as well as other sedentary behaviors (other sitting at home and at work/driving) and mortality from colorectal cancer or other causes, and overall mortality. Methods We followed stage I-III colorectal cancer patients from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986–2010). Cox models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results 926 and 714 patients were included in the analysis of pre- and postdiagnostic TV watching respectively, and 471 and 325 died during follow-up. Prolonged prediagnostic TV viewing was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity. The HRs (95% CIs) for 0–6, 7–13,14–20 and ≥21 h/wk were 1.00 (referent), 0.84 (0.56–1.25), 1.15 (0.75–1.78), 2.13 (1.31–3.45) (Ptrend=0.01). The association was observed primarily among overweight and obese individuals. Prediagnostic TV watching was also associated with overall mortality within 5 years of diagnosis, largely due to the association with colorectal cancer mortality. Other prediagnostic sitting at home or at work/driving was not associated with mortality. Postdiagnostic TV viewing was associated with non-significant increased risk of colorectal cancer-specific mortality (HR for ≥21 vs 0–6 h/wk=1.45; 95% CI 0.73–2.87) adjusting for TV viewing before diagnosis. Conclusion Prolonged prediagnostic TV watching is associated with higher colorectal cancer-specific mortality independent of leisure-time physical activity among colorectal cancer patients. PMID:26293240

  4. Incidental Foreign-Language Acquisition by Children Watching Subtitled Television Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ina, Lekkai

    2014-01-01

    Series of international studies have shown that subtitled television programs provide a rich context for foreign language acquisition. This study investigated whether incidental language acquisition occurs from watching a television program with/without subtitles. Children in the experimental conditions watch: (a) a 15 minute snapshot of a well…

  5. Televised Television Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorr, Aimee; And Others

    Ninety-four children, aged 5 to 12 years, were subjects of a study of recall of television literacy messages (drop-ins). The 30-second "How To Watch TV" (HTWTV) segments were designed for broadcast on Saturday mornings by the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) to convey to children some information and values about television (e.g., animals do…

  6. Watching your weight? The relations between watching soaps and music television and body dissatisfaction and restrained eating in young girls.

    PubMed

    Anschutz, Doeschka; Engels, Rutger; Leeuwe, Jan Van; Strien, Tatjana van

    2009-11-01

    Although previous research showed that the thin ideal provided by the media affects body image and eating behaviour in young children, less is known about specific media contents that are related to body image and eating behaviour. This study tested the associations between watching soaps and music television and body dissatisfaction and restrained eating directly, and indirectly through thin ideal internalisation. We conducted a survey in class, in which 245 girls (aged 7-9) completed scales on their television watching behaviour, thin ideal internalisation, body dissatisfaction and restrained eating. Additionally, height and weight were measured. Watching soaps and music television often was associated with higher thin ideal internalisation, which in turn was associated with higher body dissatisfaction and restrained eating. Furthermore, a direct association between watching soaps and music television and restrained eating was found. If watching other types of children's programmes or maternal encouragement to be thin were included in the models, watching soaps and music television remained an important factor, especially with regard to restrained eating. Therefore, our results suggest that if young girls watch soaps and music television often, this is related to higher restrained eating and body dissatisfaction, directly or indirectly, through higher thin ideal internalisation.

  7. Associations between children's diet quality and watching television during meal or snack consumption: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Avery, Amanda; Anderson, Catherine; McCullough, Fiona

    2017-10-01

    Studies have identified an association between watching television (TV) and childhood obesity. This review adds context to existing research by examining the associations between TV viewing, whilst eating, and children's diet quality. Web of Science and PubMed databases were searched from January 2000 to June 2014. Cross-sectional trials of case control or cohort studies, which included baseline data, measuring the associations between eating whilst watching TV and children's food and drink intake. Quality of selected papers was assessed. Thirteen studies, representing 61,674 children aged 1-18 yrs, met inclusion criteria. Of six studies reporting overall food habits, all found a positive association between TV viewing and consumption of pizza, fried foods, sweets, and snacks. Of eight studies looking at fruit and vegetable consumption, seven identified a negative association with eating whilst watching TV (p < .0001). Four out of five studies identified a positive association between watching TV whilst eating and servings of sugar-sweetened beverages (p < .0001). Four studies identified an association between low socioeconomic status and increased likelihood of eating whilst watching TV (p ≤ .01). Family meals did not overcome the adverse impact on diet quality of having the TV on at mealtimes. Eating whilst watching television is associated with poorer diet quality among children, including more frequent consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and high-fat, high-sugar foods and fewer fruits and vegetables. Although these differences in consumption are small, the cumulative effect may contribute to the positive association between eating whilst watching TV and childhood obesity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The effect of educational programs based on the theory of planned behavior on parental supervision in students' television watching.

    PubMed

    Moshki, Mahdi; Delshad Noghabi, Ali; Darabi, Fatemeh; Safari Palangi, Hossein; Bahri, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Excessive and uncontrolled television watching by children predisposes them to some risks such as developmental, social and psychological disorders. Parents play an important role in nurturing their children and controlling the factors affecting their health. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of health education programs on parents' supervision skills to control their children's television watching habits based on the theory of planned behavior. One hundred twenty parents of the students at the first and fifth grades of primary school were randomly divided into an intervention and a control group. Data were collected by a self-report questionnaire at the beginning of and one month after intervention. An educational intervention was implemented for the case group parents, who were divided into four 15-member groups, in the form of three 45-60 minute sessions with focus group discussions. Moreover, the parents were provided with children and television booklet. Data were entered into SPSS-16 and were analyzed using Chi-square, paired t test, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. After the intervention, significant changes were detected in the intervention group with respect to the mean hours of watching television (from 6.74±2.02 to 4.28±2.40; p= 0.039), knowledge scores (from 5.8±2.1 to 7.7±1.9; p= 0.001), attitude towards less television watching (from 35.5±11.5 to 48.4±8.9; p=0.003), subjective norms (from 11.8±8.1 to 24.5±8.6; p>0.001) and behavioral intention (from 18.6±7.4 to 31.8±5.1; p=0.001). The results revealed that educational interventions based on the theory of planned behavior are capable of changing knowledge, attitude, subjective norm and intention of parents towards controlling and monitoring their children's television watching and can improve the performance of parental control and reduce the hours of TV watching by children. Therefore, this pattern is suggested for reforming the nurturing skills of parents about other

  9. The effect of educational programs based on the theory of planned behavior on parental supervision in students’ television watching

    PubMed Central

    Moshki, Mahdi; Delshad Noghabi, Ali; Darabi, Fatemeh; Safari Palangi, Hossein; Bahri, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excessive and uncontrolled television watching by children predisposes them to some risks such as developmental, social and psychological disorders. Parents play an important role in nurturing their children and controlling the factors affecting their health. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of health education programs on parents’ supervision skills to control their children’s television watching habits based on the theory of planned behavior. Methods: One hundred twenty parents of the students at the first and fifth grades of primary school were randomly divided into an intervention and a control group. Data were collected by a self-report questionnaire at the beginning of and one month after intervention. An educational intervention was implemented for the case group parents, who were divided into four 15-member groups, in the form of three 45-60 minute sessions with focus group discussions. Moreover, the parents were provided with children and television booklet. Data were entered into SPSS-16 and were analyzed using Chi-square, paired t test, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. Results: After the intervention, significant changes were detected in the intervention group with respect to the mean hours of watching television (from 6.74±2.02 to 4.28±2.40; p= 0.039), knowledge scores (from 5.8±2.1 to 7.7±1.9; p= 0.001), attitude towards less television watching (from 35.5±11.5 to 48.4±8.9; p=0.003), subjective norms (from 11.8±8.1 to 24.5±8.6; p>0.001) and behavioral intention (from 18.6±7.4 to 31.8±5.1; p=0.001). Conclusion: The results revealed that educational interventions based on the theory of planned behavior are capable of changing knowledge, attitude, subjective norm and intention of parents towards controlling and monitoring their children's television watching and can improve the performance of parental control and reduce the hours of TV watching by children. Therefore, this pattern is suggested for reforming the

  10. Watching sport on television, physical activity, and risk of obesity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mark; Weiler, Richard; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-08

    Television (TV) viewing has been associated with obesity although the effects of specific TV content on health and other behaviours remains unknown. We examined the association between watching sport on TV, physical activity levels, and risk of obesity. We studied 6,733 (aged 64.9 ± 9.2 yrs) men and women from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a prospective study of community dwelling older adults. Data were collected on self reported TV time and content, and physical activity. Nurses measured height and weight for the calculation of body mass index. On average, participants reported viewing TV for 5.3 ± 4.1 hours per day and 30.3% of the sample watched sport on TV at least twice a week. There was no association between watching sport and physical activity levels. Participants that watched sports every day were at higher risk of obesity [odds ratio = 1.39, 95% CI, 1.15, 1.68) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, total TV time, disability, and self-rated health. Watching elite athletes may have no role in the promotion of physical activity in older adults, which has implications for staging large sporting events with physical activity legacy promises.

  11. Viewing preferences, symptoms of psychological trauma, and violent behaviors among children who watch television.

    PubMed

    Singer, M I; Slovak, K; Frierson, T; York, P

    1998-10-01

    To examine the extent to which children's television-viewing practices are associated with symptoms of psychological trauma and aggressive behaviors. The following three hypotheses were tested: (1) children who report watching greater amounts of television per day will report higher levels of trauma symptoms than children who report lesser amounts of television viewing; (2) children who report watching greater amounts of television per day will report higher levels of violent behaviors than children who report watching lesser amounts of television per day; and (3) children who report a preference for action and fighting programs will report higher levels of violent behaviors than children who report a preference for other types of television programs. The study used a survey design in which an anonymous self-report questionnaire was administered to students in grades 3 through 8 in 11 Ohio public schools during the 1995-1996 school year (N = 2,245). All three hypotheses were supported. Heavy television viewing by children may indicate the presence of problems such as depression, anxiety, and violent behaviors; such viewing should be screened for by psychiatrists and other mental health professionals working with children.

  12. Television watching, diet quality, and physical activity and diabetes among three ethnicities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Fatma G; Vaccaro, Joan A; Exebio, Joel C; Zarini, Gustavo G; Katz, Timothy; Dixon, Zisca

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a world-wide epidemic associated with multiple environmental factors. Prolonged television viewing (TV) time has been related to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. TV viewing has been positively associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower energy expenditure, over-eating high-calorie and high-fat foods. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of hours of TV viewing with dietary quality, obesity and physical activity for three ethnic minorities with and without type 2 diabetes. Diet quality and physical activity were inversely related to prolonged TV viewing. African Americans and participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to watch more than 4 hours of TV per day as compared to their counterparts. Diet quality was inversely associated with physical activity level. Future studies are needed to establish the risk factors of prolonged TV watching in adult populations for the development of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. Although strategies to reduce TV watching have been proven effective among children, few trials have been conducted in adults. Intervention trials aimed at reducing TV viewing targeting people with type 2 diabetes may be beneficial to improve dietary quality and physical activity, which may reduce diabetes complications.

  13. Television watching and risk of childhood obesity: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Wu, Lei; Zhou, Lingling; Lu, Weifeng; Mao, Chunting

    2016-02-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been a worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity. An important step in successful prevention in paediatrics is the identification of modifiable risk factors of childhood obesity. Many studies have evaluated the associations between television (TV) watching and childhood obesity but yielded inconsistent results. To help elucidate the role of TV watching, PubMed and Embase databases were searched for published studies on associations between TV watching and childhood obesity. Random-effects models and dose-response meta-analyses were used to pool study results. Fourteen cross-sectional studies with 24 reports containing 106 169 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were conducted by the available characteristics of studies and participants. The multivariable-adjusted overall OR of the childhood obesity for the highest vs. the lowest time of TV watching was 1.47 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.33-1.62]. A linear dose-response relationship was also found for TV watching and childhood obesity (P < 0.001), and the risk increased by 13% for each 1 h/day increment in TV watching. Subgroup analysis showed a basically consistent result with the overall analysis. The association is observed in both boys and girls (for boys, OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.16-1.45; for girls, OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.11-1.41). our meta-analysis suggested that increased TV watching is associated with increased risk of childhood obesity. And restricting TV time and other sedentary behaviour of children may be an important public health strategy to prevent childhood obesity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  14. Watching a food-related television show and caloric intake. A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Bodenlos, Jamie S; Wormuth, Bernadette M

    2013-02-01

    Television watching has been positively associated with overeating and obesity. How popular food-related television shows affects eating behavior has not been examined. An experimental study was conducted to examine how exposure to a food-related television program affects amount and type of food consumed in adults (N=80). Participants were randomized to watch a cooking or nature television program and were then presented with 800 total calories of chocolate covered candies, cheese curls, and carrots. Food was weighed before and after the ad libitum eating session to determine amount consumed. After controlling for dietary restraint, hunger and food preference, significantly more chocolate covered candies were consumed among individuals who watched the cooking program compared to the nature program. No significant differences between conditions were found for overall caloric intake or for cheese curl or carrot consumption. Findings suggest that watching food-related television programs may affect eating behavior and has implications for obesity prevention and intervention efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Association between hours of television watched, physical activity, sleep and excess weight among young adults].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moyá, María; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M; García de la Hera, Manuela; Giménez-Monzo, Daniel; González-Palacios, Sandra; Valera-Gran, Desirée; Sempere-Orts, María; Vioque, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    To explore the association between excess weight or body mass index (BMI) and the time spent watching television, self-reported physical activity and sleep duration in a young adult population. We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data of 1,135 participants (17-35 years old) from the project Dieta, salud y antropometría en población universitaria (Diet, Health and Anthrompmetric Variables in Univeristy Students). Information about time spent watching television, sleep duration, self-reported physical activity and self-reported height and weight was provided by a baseline questionnaire. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2) and excess of weight was defined as ≥25. We used multiple logistic regression to explore the association between excess weight (no/yes) and independent variables, and multiple linear regression for BMI. The prevalence of excess weight was 13.7% (11.2% were overweight and 2.5% were obese). A significant positive association was found between excess weight and a greater amount of time spent watching television. Participants who reported watching television >2h a day had a higher risk of excess weight than those who watched television ≤1h a day (OR=2.13; 95%CI: 1.37-3.36; p-trend: 0.002). A lower level of physical activity was associated with an increased risk of excess weight, although the association was statistically significant only in multiple linear regression (p=0.037). No association was observed with sleep duration. A greater number of hours spent watching television and lower physical activity were significantly associated with a higher BMI in young adults. Both factors are potentially modifiable with preventive strategies. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Watching Race. Television and the Struggle for "Blackness."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Herman

    Critical debates about black expressive culture and black cultural productions within television are examined as a means of exploring processes by which questions about the American racial order, and blackness itself, are constructed, reproduced, and challenged. The central thread of the argument is that commercial culture operates as both a site…

  17. Television Watching as an Information Processing Task: Programming and Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartella, Ellen

    A two-week consumer training program was designed to teach kindergarten children about advertising claims on commercial television programs. One objective of the program was to teach kindergarteners that commercials are designed to persuade people to buy products. Kindergarteners were taught to recognize the difference between commercials and…

  18. Physical activity and television watching in relation to semen quality in young men.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Audrey Jane; Mendiola, Jaime; Afeiche, Myriam; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-02-01

    Semen quality appears to have declined over the past decades but reasons for this decline are unresolved. The concurrent increase in sedentary behaviour may be a contributing factor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of physical activity and television (TV) watching with sperm parameters in a population of young, healthy men. Men aged 18-22 years (n=189) from the Rochester Young Men's Study (2009-2010) participated in this analysis. Physical activity (h/week of moderate and vigorous exercise) and TV watching (h/week of TV, video or DVD watching) over the past 3 months were assessed via questionnaire. Semen quality was assessed by sperm concentration, motility, morphology and total sperm count. Sperm concentration and total sperm count were directly related to physical activity after multivariable adjustment (p-trend=0.01 and 0.04); men in the highest quartile of moderate-to-vigorous activity (≥15 h/week) had 73% (95% CI 15% to 160%) higher sperm concentration than men in the lowest quartile (<5 h/week). TV watching was inversely associated with sperm concentration and total sperm count in multivariable analyses (p-trend=0.05 and 0.06); men in the highest quartile of TV watching (>20 h/week) had 44% (95% CI 15 to 63%) lower sperm concentration than men in the lowest quartile (0 h/week). These measures of physical and leisure time activities were not significantly associated with sperm motility or morphology. In this population of healthy men, higher moderate-to-vigorous activity and less TV watching were significantly associated with higher total sperm count and sperm concentration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Is aggression in children with behavioural and emotional difficulties associated with television viewing and video game playing? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, O; Paul, M; Spencer, N

    2009-01-01

    Possible associations between television viewing and video game playing and children's aggression have become public health concerns. We did a systematic review of studies that examined such associations, focussing on children and young people with behavioural and emotional difficulties, who are thought to be more susceptible. We did computer-assisted searches of health and social science databases, gateways, publications from relevant organizations and for grey literature; scanned bibliographies; hand-searched key journals; and corresponded with authors. We critically appraised all studies. A total of 12 studies: three experiments with children with behavioural and emotional difficulties found increased aggression after watching aggressive as opposed to low-aggressive content television programmes, one found the opposite and two no clear effect, one found such children no more likely than controls to imitate aggressive television characters. One case-control study and one survey found that children and young people with behavioural and emotional difficulties watched more television than controls; another did not. Two studies found that children and young people with behavioural and emotional difficulties viewed more hours of aggressive television programmes than controls. One study on video game use found that young people with behavioural and emotional difficulties viewed more minutes of violence and played longer than controls. In a qualitative study children with behavioural and emotional difficulties, but not their parents, did not associate watching television with aggression. All studies had significant methodological flaws. None was based on power calculations. This systematic review found insufficient, contradictory and methodologically flawed evidence on the association between television viewing and video game playing and aggression in children and young people with behavioural and emotional difficulties. If public health advice is to be evidence

  20. The Effects of Background Television on the Toy Play Behavior of Very Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Marie Evans; Pempek, Tiffany A.; Kirkorian, Heather L.; Lund, Anne Frankenfield; Anderson, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment tests the hypothesis that background, adult television is a disruptive influence on very young children's behavior. Fifty 12-, 24-, and 36-month-olds played with a variety of toys for 1 hr. For half of the hour, a game show played in the background on a monaural TV set. During the other half hour, the TV was off. The children…

  1. Television and families: what do young children watch with their parents?

    PubMed

    St Peters, M; Fitch, M; Huston, A C; Wright, J C; Eakins, D J

    1991-12-01

    A sample of 271 3- and 5-year-olds and their families participated in a 2-year longitudinal study of television viewing patterns. 5 1-week diaries for all family members were collected at 6-month intervals. Programs were categorized as: (1) child informative, (2) child entertainment, (3) news and informative, (4) sports, (5) comedy, (6) drama, (7) action-adventure, and (8) variety-game. The majority of child programs were viewed without parents, while the majority of adult programs were watched with parents. Coviewing patterns of adult programs were predicted from parents' individual viewing habits, but not from the child's. Coviewing declined with age. Parental encouragement and regulation of viewing were orthogonal. Children whose parents encouraged viewing watched more child informative programming; children of restrictive parents watched less entertainment programming. Encouraging parents coviewed more than nonencouraging parents. Results support the assertion that parental viewing preferences, habits, and orientations toward television influence children's viewing, both with and without parents.

  2. Watching TV and Food Intake: The Role of Content

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Colin D.; Nilsson, Victor C.; Thune, Hanna Å.; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Le Grevès, Madeleine; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S.; Benedict, Christian; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a serious and growing health concern worldwide. Watching television (TV) represents a condition during which many habitually eat, irrespective of hunger level. However, as of yet, little is known about how the content of television programs being watched differentially impacts concurrent eating behavior. In this study, eighteen normal-weight female students participated in three counter-balanced experimental conditions, including a ‘Boring’ TV condition (art lecture), an ‘Engaging’ TV condition (Swedish TV comedy series), and a no TV control condition during which participants read (a text on insects living in Sweden). Throughout each condition participants had access to both high-calorie (M&Ms) and low-calorie (grapes) snacks. We found that, relative to the Engaging TV condition, Boring TV encouraged excessive eating (+52% g, P = 0.009). Additionally, the Engaging TV condition actually resulted in significantly less concurrent intake relative to the control ‘Text’ condition (−35% g, P = 0.05). This intake was driven almost entirely by the healthy snack, grapes; however, this interaction did not reach significance (P = 0.07). Finally, there was a significant correlation between how bored participants were across all conditions, and their concurrent food intake (beta = 0.317, P = 0.02). Intake as measured by kcals was similarly patterned but did not reach significance. These results suggest that, for women, different TV programs elicit different levels of concurrent food intake, and that the degree to which a program is engaging (or alternately, boring) is related to that intake. Additionally, they suggest that emotional content (e.g. boring vs. engaging) may be more associated than modality (e.g. TV vs. text) with concurrent intake. PMID:24983245

  3. Watching television for more than two hours increases the likelihood of reporting poor sleep quality among Brazilian schoolteachers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Sara Carolina Scremin; Campanini, Marcela Zambrim; de Andrade, Selma Maffei; González, Alberto Durán; de Melo, Juliana Moura; Mesas, Arthur Eumann

    2017-10-01

    Although time spent watching television and sleep problems have increased in the last few decades, it is unclear whether these conditions are associated in working adults after controlling for lifestyle, job characteristics and other individual aspects. The present study analyzed the association between time spent watching television and sleep quality among teachers from public schools in Londrina, Brazil. In this cross-sectional study, information from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and about time spent watching television was obtained during personal interviews. Logistic regression models adjusted by the main confounders (sociodemographic, occupational and lifestyle variables) were used in the analyses. Among the 959 studied teachers (68.2% women, median age: 42years), teachers who watched >120min/day had a higher likelihood of reporting poor sleep quality (PSQI>5) (odds ratio=1.41; 95% confidence interval=1.01; 1.98) compared with those who watched television for up to 60min/day, regardless of gender, age, work hours, leisure time physical activity and other lifestyle variables. This association did not remain significant after the adjustment for health conditions, i.e., obesity, anxiety, depression and chronic pain, which may act as confounding variables in the relationship between watching television and poor sleep quality. Watching television for >120min/day was independently associated with poorer sleep quality, which should be considered in the prevention and treatment of sleep disturbances among working population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Television viewing, computer game play and book reading during meals are predictors of meal skipping in a cross-sectional sample of 12-, 14- and 16-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Custers, Kathleen; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2010-04-01

    To examine whether television viewing, computer game playing or book reading during meals predicts meal skipping with the aim of watching television, playing computer games or reading books (media meal skipping). A cross-sectional study was conducted using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Analyses were controlled for age, gender and BMI. Data were obtained from a random sample of adolescents in Flanders, Belgium. Seven hundred and ten participants aged 12, 14 and 16 years. Of the participants, 11.8 % skipped meals to watch television, 10.5 % skipped meals to play computer games and 8.2 % skipped meals to read books. Compared with those who did not use these media during meals, the risk of skipping meals in order to watch television was significantly higher for those children who watched television during meals (2.9 times higher in those who watched television during at least one meal a day). The risk of skipping meals for computer game playing was 9.5 times higher in those who played computer games weekly or more while eating, and the risk of meal skipping in order to read books was 22.9 times higher in those who read books during meals less than weekly. The more meals the respondents ate with the entire family, the less likely they were to skip meals to watch television. The use of media during meals predicts meal skipping for using that same medium. Family meals appear to be inversely related to meal skipping for television viewing.

  5. Background Television and Infants' Allocation of Their Attention during Toy Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setliff, Alissa E.; Courage, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of background television on 6- and 12-month-olds' attention during 20 min of toy play was examined. During the first or second half of the session, a clip from a variety of commonly available television programs was presented. The duration and frequency of infants' looks to the toys and to the television indicated that regardless of age…

  6. Isotemporal Substitution Analysis for Physical Activity, Television Watching, and Risk of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mekary, Rania A.; Lucas, Michel; Pan, An; Okereke, Olivia I.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.; Ding, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The isotemporal substitution model (ISM) was previously developed as a methodology to study the time-substitution effects of 1 type of activity for another in a data setting with continuous outcomes. To demonstrate the application of ISM with a dichotomous outcome, we prospectively examined the associations of different activities with various activity displacements with depression risk among 32,900 US women from the Nurses' Health Study who were free from depressive symptoms at baseline (in 1996). During a 10-year follow-up, 5,730 incident depression cases were documented. Results from the ISMs indicated that for each physical activity, differences in magnitude of effects of each activity type were observed, dependent on the activity being displaced/substituted. Notably, an isotemporal substitution gradient was found for television watching, in which its association with depression risk varied by its substitution for slow-, average-, or brisk-paced walking in a gradient toward high depression risk when television watching replaced a faster walking pace (relative risk = 1.18, 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.31). Conversely, no association with depression was found for replacement of television watching with 60 minutes/day of slow walking, whereas a lower depression risk (relative risk = 0.85, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.95) was found when 60 minutes/day of brisk walking replaced 60 minutes/day of television watching. Thus, the ISM could offer a more meaningful alternative to the standard nonsubstitution models to support public health recommendations. PMID:23785112

  7. Does eating while watching television influence children's food-related behaviours?

    PubMed

    Marquis, Marie; Filion, Yves P; Dagenais, Fannie

    2005-01-01

    To assess children's food-related behaviours and their relationships with eating while watching television (TV), data were collected from 534 ten-year-old French-Canadian children. A self-administered questionnaire was used. Almost 18% of girls and over 25% of boys reported eating in front of the TV every day. Although, overall, the boys' eating pattern was less healthy than the girls', all of the children's food choices deteriorated with increased frequency of eating in front of the TV. Compared with girls, boys gave more importance to coloured and attractive foods, and to selecting foods similar to those eaten by others. Over 50% of children reported always receiving negative weight-related comments from family members. For boys, significant correlations were found between the frequency of eating in front of the TV, the importance given to a food's appearance, and their requests to parents for advertised foods. Significance was at the p<0.05 level for all findings. These results suggest that gender should be considered in attempts to understand children's food motivations and behaviours. The findings also indicate the need to document children's eating environments, and to inform children and their families about eating behaviours that may be associated with a given environment.

  8. [Smoking initiation and watching television, video, DVD among adolescents in Poland].

    PubMed

    Kowalewska, Anna; Mazur, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between smoking initiation and the time spent watching TV, video, DVD by adolescents 11, 13, and 15-year-old in Poland. The research was conducted in 2010 as a part of Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: A WHO Collaborative Cross-national Study (HBSC) in a sample of 4751 students, using a standard, international HBSC questionnaire. It was found that there is a relationship between smoking attempts made by the young people and time spent watching TV during weekdays. In the analyzes using logistic regression combined variable relating to the time to watch TV on weekdays and weekends was used. Nearly a quarter of respondents (24.3%) were qualified to the group of adolescents spending too much time in front of the screen. Age was the strongest predictor of smoking onset. Between 11 and 13 years of age the risk of taking the first cigarette increased three times, and between 11 and 15 years of age more than seven times. Relative risk of smoking attempts related to gender and frequency of watching television, video or DVD was both equal to 1.5. In smoking prevention focused on adolescents it is should be better to pay more attention on constructive leisure time activities, and the role of parents in shaping pro-health attitudes. This is particularly important in the initial stages of schooling, when to develop and enhance the psychosocial competences as a the protective factor of risk taking behaviors among adolescents.

  9. Foreign-grammar acquisition while watching subtitled television programmes.

    PubMed

    Van Lommel, Sven; Laenen, Annouschka; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2006-06-01

    Past research has shown that watching a subtitled foreign movie (i.e. foreign language in the soundtrack and native language in the subtitles) leads to considerable foreign-language vocabulary acquisition; however, acquisition of the grammatical rules has failed to emerge. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence for the acquisition of grammatical rules in watching subtitled foreign movies. Given an informal context, younger children were predicted to outperform older children in acquiring a foreign language; however, older children will take more advantage of explicit instruction compared with younger children. In Experiment 1, 62 sixth-graders from a primary school and 47 sixth-graders from a secondary school volunteered to participate. The participants in Experiment 2 were 94 sixth-graders from primary schools and 84 sixth-graders from secondary schools. The two experiments manipulated the instructions (incidental- vs. intentional-language learning). Moreover, before the experiments began, some participants explicitly received some of the foreign grammatical rules (presented rules), while the movie contained cases of presented rules as well as cases of rules which had to be inferred (not-presented rules). Rule acquisition through the movie only was not obtained; there was a strong effect of advance rule presentation but only on the items of presented rules, particularly among the older participants. Contrary to vocabulary, grammar may be too complicated to acquire from a rather short movie presentation.

  10. Since They Are Going to Watch TV Anyway, Why Not Connect It To Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Laveria F.

    In view of the great amount of television viewing among poor readers, the Learning Model for Watching Television was developed to capitalize on students' television watching proclivities. The model encompasses three major overlapping component skill areas to reinforce classroom learning: active listening skills, auditory word recognition skills,…

  11. Watching reality television beauty shows is associated with tanning lamp use and outdoor tanning among college students.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Krausz, Faye

    2013-05-01

    Ultraviolet radiation exposure through natural sunlight or tanning lamps is a risk factor for skin cancer. As the media can influence behavior, we studied whether watching reality television (TV) beauty shows is associated with tanning lamp use or outdoor tanning. College students (n = 576) were surveyed on their reality TV beauty show watching, their use of tanning lamps, and outdoor tanning behavior. We asked media attitude questions about connectivity with reality TV shows and Internet use of Facebook to discuss reality TV shows. Those who did versus did not watch reality TV beauty shows used tanning lamps (12.9% vs 3.7%, P < .001) and tanned outdoors (43.3% vs 28.7%, P < .001) at significantly greater percentages. Significant predictors of tanning lamp use included watching reality TV beauty shows (odds ratio [OR] 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-6.00), increasing age (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.32), and female sex (OR 10.16, 95% CI 3.29-31.41). Significant predictors of outdoor tanning included watching reality TV beauty shows (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.33-3.34). The specific names of the reality TV beauty shows watched were not obtained and therefore we cannot determine if particular shows were more or less associated with this behavior. Watching reality TV beauty shows is associated with both tanning lamp use and outdoor tanning. Dermatologists should consider discussing the potential harmful aspects of tanning beds and outdoor tanning, especially with their patients who watch reality TV beauty shows. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The energy expenditure of an activity-promoting video game compared to sedentary video games and TV watching.

    PubMed

    Mitre, Naim; Foster, Randal C; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Levine, James A

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effect of television watching and the use of activity-promoting video games on energy expenditure in obese and lean children. Energy expenditure and physical activity were measured while participants were watching television, playing a video game on a traditional sedentary video game console, and while playing the same video game on an activity-promoting video game console. Energy expenditure was significantly greater than television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console when children played the video game on the activity-promoting console. When examining movement with accelerometry, children moved significantly more when playing the video game on the Nintendo Wii console. Activity-promoting video games have shown to increase movement, and be an important tool to raise energy expenditure by 50% when compared to sedentary activities of daily living.

  13. Playing a violent television game affects heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Malena; Anderson, Martin; Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Lindblad, Frank

    2009-01-01

    To investigate how playing a violent/nonviolent television game during the evening affects sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions during and after playing as well as sleep quality during the night after playing. In total, 19 boys, 12-15 years of age, played television games on two occasions in their homes and participated once without gaming. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and physical activity were measured during gaming/participating and the night to follow using a portable combined heart rate and movement sensor. A sleep diary and questionnaires about gaming experiences and session-specific experiences were filled in. Criteria for Selection of Games: Violent game involves/rewards direct physical violence (no handguns) against another person, and nonviolent game involves/rewards no violence; same game design ('third-person game'); conducted in the same manner; no differences concerning motor activity; similar sound and light effects; no sexual content, violence against women or racial overtones. During violent (vs. nonviolent) gaming, there was significantly higher activity of the very low frequency component of the HRV and total power. During the night after playing, very low frequency, low frequency and high frequency components were significantly higher during the violent (vs. nonviolent) condition, just as total power. There were no significant differences between the three conditions (violent/nonviolent/no gaming) with respect to an index reflecting subjectively perceived sleep difficulties. Nor was there any difference between violent and nonviolent condition for any single sleep item. Violent gaming induces different autonomic responses in boys compared to nonviolent gaming--during playing and during the following night--suggesting different emotional responses. Subjectively perceived sleep quality is not influenced after a single gaming experience. Future studies should address the development of the autonomic balance after gaming over longer

  14. Infants' Background Television Exposure during Play: Negative Relations to the Quantity and Quality of Mothers' Speech and Infants' Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masur, Elise Frank; Flynn, Valerie; Olson, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Research on immediate effects of background television during mother-infant toy play shows that an operating television in the room disrupts maternal communicative behaviors crucial for infants' vocabulary acquisition. This study is the first to examine associations between frequent background TV/video exposure during mother-infant toy play at…

  15. Associations between watching TV during family meals and dietary intake among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Shira; Eisenberg, Marla E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary

    2007-01-01

    To examine associations between watching television during family meals and dietary intake among adolescents. Cross-sectional study using survey data from a diverse sample of adolescents. Data were collected from a school-based survey during the 1998-1999 school year. Middle and high school students (N = 4746) from 31 public schools in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Response rate was 81.5%. Intake of fruits, total vegetables, dark green/yellow vegetables, calcium-rich food, grains, soft drinks, fried food, snack food, calories, family meal frequency, and watching television during meals. General linear modeling comparing dietary intake across 3 groups. 33.5% of boys and 30.9% of girls reported watching television during family meals. Adolescents watching television were found to have lower intakes of vegetables, dark green/yellow vegetables, calcium-rich food, and grains and higher intakes of soft drinks compared to adolescents not watching television during meals. However, watching television during family meals was associated with a more healthful diet than not eating regular family meals. Watching television during family meals was associated with poorer dietary quality among adolescents. Health care providers should work with families and adolescents to promote family meals, emphasizing turning the TV off at meals.

  16. Television watching, leisure time physical activity, and the genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index in women and men.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K; Kang, Jae H; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-10-09

    Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have focused mostly on the FTO gene and physical activity, whereas little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure time physical activity, and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years before assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 0.8 (SE, 0.4), 0.8 (SE, 0.2), 1.4 (SE, 0.2), 1.5 (SE, 0.2), and 3.4 (SE, 1.0) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40 h/wk; P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 1.5 (SE, 0.2), 1.3 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), and 0.8 (SE, 0.2) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. A sedentary lifestyle, indicated by prolonged TV watching, may accentuate the predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association.

  17. The amount of television that infants and their parents watched influenced children's viewing habits when they got older.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chan; Li, Yi-Fan; Wu, Wen-Chi; Chiang, Tung-Liang

    2017-06-01

    Excessive television (TV) exposure has negative impacts on a child's development, health and behaviour. This study examined the under-researched area of what impact infant and parental TV viewing during a child's infancy had on the child's later viewing habits. Data on 18 577 babies born in 2005 were collected from the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study, a prospective longitudinal study of a nationally representative cohort. Group-based trajectory analysis was conducted to identify childhood TV viewing trajectories at 18, 36 and 66 months of age. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the influence of parents' TV behaviour on their children's TV viewing trajectories. The percentage of children falling into the TV viewing trajectories that were identified were low (20%), increasing (46.5%) and high (33.5%). The child's TV viewing trajectory was significantly associated with the child's sex, parent's monthly household income, child's day care arrangements, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal TV viewing time and whether the child's TV viewing time was restricted. The amount of TV that children watched when they were older was associated with a range of factors, and the results particularly highlight the need to restrict child and parental viewing time in infancy. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Television watching and incident diabetes: Findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study.

    PubMed

    Ford, Earl S; Schulze, Matthias B; Kröger, Janine; Pischon, Tobias; Bergmann, Manuela M; Boeing, Heiner

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the amount of time spent watching television is a potential risk factor for incident diabetes and to what extent this association may be explained by obesity. We used data for 23,855 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study. During an average of 7.8 years of follow-up, 927 participants developed diabetes. Incident diabetes was identified on the basis of self-report and was verified by contacting the patient's attending physician. The amount of time spent watching television was self-reported. The mean time that the participants who developed diabetes watched television was 2.4 h/week, compared with 2.0 h/week for those who did not develop diabetes (P<0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, educational status, smoking status, alcohol use, occupational activity, physical activity, the intake of various foods, and systolic blood pressure, the adjusted hazard ratio for diabetes among participants who watched ≥4 h/day of television compared with those who watched <1 h/day was 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-2.27]. After additional adjustment for waist circumference and body mass index, the hazard ratio was reduced to 1.14 (95% CI: 0.81-1.61). In the present study, the amount of time spent watching television was an independent predictor of incident diabetes only in models that adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and systolic blood pressure. The attenuation of the association after adjusting for anthropometric measures may represent an explanatory mechanism for our findings. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. The Parents' Parenting Patterns, Education, Jobs, and Assistance to Their Children in Watching Television, and Children's Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purwati; Japar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this present is to test the effects of the parents' parenting patterns, education, jobs, and assistance to children in watching television on the children's aggressive behavior. This present research employed a quantitative approach with an ex-post factor design. The data were collected from 175 parents of which the children…

  20. Television watching and the emotional impact on social modeling of food intake among children.

    PubMed

    Bevelander, Kirsten E; Meiselman, Herbert L; Anschütz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to test whether exposure to happy, neutral, or sad media content influences social modeling effects of (snack) food intake in young children. The study was conducted at 14 Dutch urban and suburban primary schools. The participants (N=112) were asked to watch a movie with a same-sex normal-weight confederate who was instructed to eat either nothing or a standardized amount of snack food (10 chocolate-coated peanuts). The study involved a 3 (movie clips: happy, neutral, and sad)×2 (peer's food intake: no intake versus a standardized intake) between-participants design. A significant interaction between the movie clip condition and intake condition was found (F(2,102)=3.30, P=.04, Cohen's f(2)=.20). Positive as well as negative emotions were found to lead to adjustment to the intake of a peer, as compared to that of children in the neutral movie condition. The findings suggest that children eat more mindlessly when watching an emotional movie and, therefore, respond more automatically to a peer's food intake, whereas children may be less susceptible to a peer's intake while watching a neutral movie. As young children are not in the position to choose their food consumption environment yet, parents and schools should provide consumption settings that limit eating in front of the television. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Videogames, Television Violence, and Aggression in Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated relationships relative to teenagers' videogame playing, watching violent television programs, antisocial behavior, and self-esteem. Concluded that videogame playing is neither the menace critics portray it nor without possible negative consequences. (PD)

  2. Food commercials increase preference for energy-dense foods, particularly in children who watch more television.

    PubMed

    Boyland, Emma J; Harrold, Joanne A; Kirkham, Tim C; Corker, Catherine; Cuddy, Jenna; Evans, Deborah; Dovey, Terence M; Lawton, Clare L; Blundell, John E; Halford, Jason C G

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to determine if levels of television viewing (a proxy measure for habitual commercial exposure) affect children's food preference responses to television food commercials. A total of 281 children aged 6 to 13 years from northwest England viewed toy or food television commercials followed by a cartoon on 2 separate occasions; they then completed 3 food preference measures, a commercial recognition task, and a television viewing questionnaire. After viewing the food commercials, all children selected more branded and nonbranded fat-rich and carbohydrate-rich items from food preference checklists compared with after viewing the toy commercials. The food preferences of children with higher habitual levels of television viewing were more affected by food commercial exposure than those of low television viewers. After viewing food commercials, high television viewing children selected a greater number of branded food items compared with after the toy commercials as well as compared with the low television viewers. Children correctly recognized more food commercials than toy commercials. Exposure to television food commercials enhanced high television viewers' preferences for branded foods and increased reported preferences for all food items (branded and nonbranded) relative to the low television viewers. This is the first study to demonstrate that children with greater previous exposure to commercials (high television viewers) seemed to be more responsive to food promotion messages than children with lower previous advertising exposure. Copyright © 2011 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Children and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevallier, Eric; Mansour, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    This booklet examines the influence of television on children and adolescents in developing and developed nations, reviewing research on television's relationship to child health and development. The first section reviews specific research on such variables as number of television sets in use, amount of time spent watching television, age, sex,…

  4. TV and Teens: Television In Adolescent Social Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luker, Richard; Johnston, Jerome

    1988-01-01

    Presents television as an instrument through which adolescents can gain social experience and strengthen social development. Examines the link between watching television and social relationships, discussing how television viewing can provide "blueprints" for behavior in social situations. Lists four steps for using television as a learning tool.…

  5. TV Tips for Parents: Using Television To Help Your Child Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    Recognizing that children watch an average of 25 hours of television per week, this booklet is designed to help parents redirect their children's television viewing to higher quality programs. Ten "tips" are provided to help parents guide their children's television (TV) viewing: (1) set your child's TV schedule; (2) get involved (in the child's…

  6. We're Playing "Jeremy Kyle"! Television Talk Shows in the Playground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jackie; Bishop, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on an episode of play in a primary school playground in England, which featured a group of children re-enacting elements of the television talk show "The Jeremy Kyle Show". The episode is analysed in the light of work that has identified the key elements of the talk show genre and the children's play is examined in…

  7. Does watching sex on television predict teen pregnancy? Findings from a national longitudinal survey of youth.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Anita; Martino, Steven C; Collins, Rebecca L; Elliott, Marc N; Berry, Sandra H; Kanouse, David E; Miu, Angela

    2008-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that youth exposure to sexual content on television shapes sexual attitudes and behavior in a manner that may influence reproductive health outcomes. To our knowledge, no previous work has empirically examined associations between exposure to television sexual content and adolescent pregnancy. Data from a national longitudinal survey of teens (12-17 years of age, monitored to 15-20 years of age) were used to assess whether exposure to televised sexual content predicted subsequent pregnancy for girls or responsibility for pregnancy for boys. Multivariate logistic regression models controlled for other known correlates of exposure to sexual content and pregnancy. We measured experience of a teen pregnancy during a 3-year period. Exposure to sexual content on television predicted teen pregnancy, with adjustment for all covariates. Teens who were exposed to high levels of television sexual content (90th percentile) were twice as likely to experience a pregnancy in the subsequent 3 years, compared with those with lower levels of exposure (10th percentile). This is the first study to demonstrate a prospective link between exposure to sexual content on television and the experience of a pregnancy before the age of 20. Limiting adolescent exposure to the sexual content on television and balancing portrayals of sex in the media with information about possible negative consequences might reduce the risk of teen pregnancy. Parents may be able to mitigate the influence of this sexual content by viewing with their children and discussing these depictions of sex.

  8. Perceived realism and Twitter use are associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; King, Kahlil

    2014-08-01

    Reality television programming is a popular type of television programming, and features shows about cosmetic surgery. Social media such as Facebook and Twitter are increasingly popular methods of sharing information. The authors surveyed college students to determine among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs whether perceived realism or social media use was associated with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Participants (n=126) were surveyed about their reality television cosmetic surgery program viewing habits, their perception of the realism of reality television programming, and social media topics of Twitter and Facebook. Outcome variables were the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scales of social, intrapersonal, and consider. Perceived realism was significantly associated with increased scores on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale subscales of social (p=0.004), intrapersonal (p=0.03), and consider (p=0.03). Following a character from a reality television program on Twitter was significantly associated with increased social scores (p=0.04). There was no significant association of Facebook behavior with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Cosmetic plastic surgeons may benefit by advertising their services on cosmetic surgery reality television programs. These reality television programs portray cosmetic surgery in a positive manner, and viewers with increased perceived realism will be a potential receptive audience toward such advertising. Also, advertising cosmetic surgery services on Twitter feeds that discuss cosmetic surgery reality television programs would be potentially beneficial.

  9. Television and children's consumption patterns. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coon, K A; Tucker, K L

    2002-10-01

    The recent increase in childhood obesity has, among other things, focused attention on the role that television may play. This paper summarizes results of studies published in peer review journals since 1970 with data pertaining to the relationship between television use and children's food intake. Studies fall into four categories: content analyses; effects of television advertising on children's food behaviors; television and pediatric obesity, with effects on children's dietary intake and physical activity; and television use and children's food consumption patterns. Content analyses have shown that food is the most frequently advertised product category on children's TV. The majority of these ads target highly sweetened products, but more recently, the proportion from fast food meal promotions has been growing. Controlled studies on children's choices have consistently shown that children exposed to advertising choose advertised food products at significantly higher rates than do those not exposed. Purchase request studies have documented associations between number of hours of TV watched and number of requests from the child to the mother for specific food items, as well as the presence of those items in the home. Greater TV use has been associated with higher intakes of energy, fat, sweet and salty snacks, and carbonated beverages and lower intakes of fruit and vegetables. Several large studies have documented associations between number of hours of TV watched and both the prevalence and incidence of obesity. The combination of lifestyle factors that accompany heavy television use appear to place children at risk of obesity and poor nutritional status.

  10. Further Examination of the Immediate Impact of Television on Children's Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillard, Angeline S.; Drell, Marissa B.; Richey, Eve M.; Boguszewski, Katherine; Smith, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Three studies examined the short-term impact of television (TV) on children's executive function (EF). Study 1 (N = 160) showed that 4- and 6-year-olds' EF is impaired after watching 2 different fast and fantastical shows, relative to that of children who watched a slow, realistic show or played. In Study 2 (N = 60), 4-year-olds' EF was as…

  11. The Energy Expenditure of an Activity-Promoting Video Game compared to Sedentary Video Games and TV Watching

    PubMed Central

    Mitre, Naim; Foster, Randal C; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Levine, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Screen time continues to be a major contributing factor to sedentariness in children. There have been more creative approaches to increase physical over the last few years. One approach has been through the use of video games. In the present study we investigated the effect of television watching and the use of activity-promoting video games on energy expenditure and movement in lean and obese children. Our primary hypothesis was that energy expenditure and movement decreases while watching television, in lean and obese children. Our secondary hypothesis was that energy expenditure and movement increases when playing the same game with an activity-promoting video game console compared to a sedentary video game console, in lean and obese children. Methods Eleven boys (10 ± 1 year) and eight girls (9 ± 1 year) ranging in BMI from 14–29 kg/m2 (eleven lean and eight overweight or obese) were recruited. Energy expenditure and physical activity were measured while participants were watching television, playing a video game on a traditional sedentary video game console, and while playing the same video game on an activity-promoting video game (Nintendo Wii) console. Results Energy expenditure was significantly greater than television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console when children played the video game on the activity-promoting console(125.3 ± 38.2 Kcal/hr vs. 79.7 ± 20.1 and 79.4 ±15.7, P<0.0001, respectively). When examining movement with accelerometry, children moved significantly more when playing the video game on the Nintendo Wii console (p<0.0001). Conclusion The amount of movement and energy expenditure of television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console is not different. Activity-promoting video games have shown to increase movement, and be an important tool to raise energy expenditure by 50% when compared to sedentary activities of daily living. PMID:22145458

  12. Watching television or listening to music while exercising failed to affect post-exercise food intake or energy expenditure in male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Livock, Holly; Barnes, Joel D; Pouliot, Catherine; LeBlanc, Allana G; Saunders, Travis J; Tremblay, Mark S; Prud'homme, Denis; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2018-08-01

    Watching television or listening to music while exercising can serve as motivating factors, making it more pleasant to exercise for some people. However, it is unknown whether these stimuli influence food intake and/or physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) for the remainder of the day, potentially impacting energy balance and weight control. We examined the effects of watching television or listening to music while exercising on post-exercise energy intake and expenditure. Our study was a randomized crossover design, in which 24 male adolescents (mean age: 14.9 ± 1.1 years) completed three 30-min experimental conditions consisting of walking/jogging on a treadmill at 60% of heart rate reserve while (1) watching television; (2) listening to music; or (3) exercising with no other stimulus (control). An ad libitum lunch was offered immediately after the experimental conditions, and a dietary record was used to assess food intake for the remainder of the day. An Actical accelerometer was used to estimate PAEE until bedtime. The primary outcome measure was post-exercise energy intake and expenditure (kJ). We found that exercising while watching television or listening to music did not significantly affect post-exercise energy intake or energy expenditure. Exercising on a treadmill was found to be significantly more enjoyable while watching television than with no stimulus present. Ratings of perceived exertion were not significantly different between conditions. Overall, our results suggest that watching television or listening to music while exercising does not impact post-exercise energy intake or expenditure in male adolescents, which may have positive implications for adolescents who may need additional motivation to participate in physical activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender and Ability Attentional Differences while Watching an Educational Television Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This study investigated the attention or arousal of above and below average boys and girls while viewing a science television program on videotape. Skin resistance (GSR) was measured by a biosensor attached to a microcomputer and served as the dependent variable. Analysis of the data included a 2x2x8 ANOVA of gender v. ability v. GSR. The…

  14. Self-Directed English Language Learning through Watching English Television Drama in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Danping

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of a group of Chinese ESL learners in China, who study English by immersing themselves regularly and rigorously in English television drama. A self-directed learning pedagogy has been developed and discussed, which seems to have signposted an effective and economic way for ESL learners to improve linguistic,…

  15. Exploring the Impact of Television Watching on Vocabulary Skills in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Williams, Skyler; Jones, Britney; Cochrane, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    With the rising incidence of television consumption in children, the aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of such habits on vocabulary skills in young children. Very little research has targeted a key cognitive skill--vocabulary--during the toddler years, which represent a critical developmental period. We recruited toddlers,…

  16. Text in a Texture of Television: Children's Homework Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wober, J. Mallory

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of British children ages 7 to 15 that examined time spent watching television, listening to music, reading, and playing outdoors; attitudes and stereotypes regarding these activities; and frequency and opinions of doing homework with the television on. Correlations of various behaviors and perceptions are presented.…

  17. Acute effects of video-game playing versus television viewing on stress markers and food intake in overweight and obese young men: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Siervo, Mario; Gan, Jason; Fewtrell, Mary S; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Wells, Jonathan C K

    2018-01-01

    Sedentary or near-sedentary activities are associated with overweight/obesity in epidemiological studies. This has traditionally been attributed to physical activity displacement. A little-explored area is whether behavioural stresses alter sensations of appetite and eating behaviour. We examined whether behaviours conducted seated (television viewing, video gaming) induce different eating patterns, associated with differential levels of stress response. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 72 overweight/obese adult males, assigned to three groups (24 per group): (i) non-violent television (control group); (ii) non-violent game (FIFA); (iii) violent game (Call of Duty). Following a standardized breakfast, the 1-h intervention was followed by 25-min rest, with sweet and savoury snacks and drinks available ad libitum. Stress markers (heart rate, blood pressure, visual analogue scale (VAS)) were measured throughout. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and stress by VAS were significantly higher (p < 0.05) playing video games than watching non-violent television, though the two game groups did not differ. Considered separately, only the violent video game group consumed more energy (Δ = 208.3 kcal, 95%CI 16, 400), sweet foods (Δ = 25.9 g, 95%CI 9.9, 41.9) and saturated fat (Δ = 4.36 g, 95%CI 0.76, 7.96) than controls. Playing video games in overweight/obese adult males is associated with an acute stress response relative to watching non-violent television, associated with greater subsequent food intake. These findings highlight the need to focus on the metabolic effects, as well as the energy costs, of activities involving sitting in relation to obesity risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Distorted food pyramid in kids programmes: a content analysis of television advertising watched in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Keller, Simone K; Schulz, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    In the light of increasing childhood obesity, the role of food advertisements relayed on television (TV) is of high interest. There is evidence of food commercials having an impact on children's food preferences, choices, consumption and obesity. We describe the product categories advertised during kids programmes, the type of food promoted and the characteristics of food commercials targeting children. A content analysis of the commercials aired during the kids programmes of six Swiss, one German and one Italian stations was conducted. The commercials were collected over a 6-month period in 2006. Overall, 1365 h of kids programme were recorded and 11 613 advertisements were found: 3061 commercials (26.4%) for food, 2696 (23.3%) promoting toys, followed by those of media, cleaning products and cosmetics. Regarding the broadcast food advertisements, 55% were for fast food restaurants or candies. The results of the content analysis suggest that food advertising contributes to the obesity problem: every fourth advertisement is for food, half of them for products high in sugar and fat and hardly any for fruit or vegetables. Long-term exposure to this distortion of the pyramid of recommended food should be considered in the discussion of legal restrictions for food advertising targeting children.

  19. Conditioned to eat while watching television? Low-income caregivers’ perspectives on the role of snacking and television viewing among pre-schoolers

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Blake, Christine E; Orloski, Alexandria; Younginer, Nicholas; Bruton, Yasmeen; Ganter, Claudia; Rimm, Eric B; Geller, Alan C; Davison, Kirsten K

    2017-01-01

    Objective Although television (TV) viewing is frequently paired with snacking among young children, little is known about the environment in which caregivers promote this behaviour. We describe low-income pre-schoolers’ snacking and TV viewing habits as reported by their primary caregivers, including social/physical snacking contexts, types of snacks and caregiver rationales for offering snacks. These findings may support the development of effective messages to promote healthy child snacking. Design Semi-structured interviews assessed caregiver conceptualizations of pre-schoolers’ snacks, purpose of snacks, snack context and snack frequency. Setting: Interviews occurred in Boston, Massachusetts and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Subjects Forty-seven low-income multi-ethnic primary caregivers of children aged 3–5 years (92 % female, 32 % Hispanic/Latino, 34 % African American) described their child’s snacking in the context of TV viewing. Results TV viewing and child snacking themes were described consistently across racial/ethnic groups. Caregivers described snacks offered during TV viewing as largely unhealthy. Labels for TV snacks indicated non-nutritive purposes, such as ‘time out’, ‘enjoyment’ or ‘quiet.’ Caregivers’ primary reasons for providing snacks included child’s expectations, behaviour management (e.g. to occupy child) and social time (e.g. family bonding). Some caregivers used TV to distract picky children to eat more food. Child snacking and TV viewing were contextually paired by providing child-sized furniture (‘TV table’) specifically for snacking. Conclusions Low-income caregivers facilitate pre-schoolers’ snacking and TV viewing, which are described as routine, positive and useful for non-nutritive purposes. Messages to caregivers should encourage ‘snack-free’ TV viewing, healthy snack options and guidance for managing children’s behaviour without snacks or TV. PMID:26794059

  20. Play-by-Play: Radio, Television, and Big-Time College Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ronald A.

    This book explores the broadcast media coverage of college athletics from the early days of radio through the development of television. It examines the culture of college athletics, the role of the National Collegiate Athletic Association in media coverage, and the political infighting in college sports. The chapters are: (1) "The Media and Early…

  1. Reading and Television: Some Concerns; Some Answers!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; And Others

    This paper discusses the relationship of reading and television and describes a "critical viewing skills" program ("Spudbuster") for combatting the effects of prolonged TV watching. The paper enumerates helpful suggestions for both parents and teachers to ensure that children's television watching is not excessive and that what…

  2. Television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use and self-reported time to bed and time out of bed in secondary-school children.

    PubMed

    Van den Bulck, Jan

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between the presence of a television set, a gaming computer, and/or an Internet connection in the room of adolescents and television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use on the one hand, and time to bed, time up, time spent in bed, and overall tiredness in first- and fourth-year secondary-school children on the other hand. A random sample of students from 15 schools in Flanders, Belgium, yielded 2546 children who completed a questionnaire with questions about media presence in bedrooms; volume of television viewing, computer game playing, and Internet use; time to bed and time up on average weekdays and average weekend days; and questions regarding the level of tiredness in the morning, at school, after a day at school, and after the weekend. Children with a television set in their rooms went to bed significantly later on weekdays and weekend days and got up significantly later on weekend days. Overall, they spent less time in bed on weekdays. Children with a gaming computer in their rooms went to bed significantly later on weekdays. On weekdays, they spent significantly less time in bed. Children who watched more television went to bed later on weekdays and weekend days and got up later on weekend days. They spent less time in bed on weekdays. They reported higher overall levels of being tired. Children who spent more time playing computer games went to bed later on weekdays and weekend days and got up later on weekend days. On weekdays, they actually got up significantly earlier. They spent less time in bed on weekdays and reported higher levels of tiredness. Children who spent more time using the Internet went to bed significantly later during the week and during the weekend. They got up later on weekend days. They spent less time in bed during the week and reported higher levels of tiredness. Going out was also significantly related to sleeping later and less. Concerns about media use should not be limited to

  3. Not Just Fun and Games: Toy Advertising on Television Targeting Children Promotes Sedentary Play.

    PubMed

    Potvin Kent, Monique; Velkers, Clive

    2017-10-01

    To examine the volume of television toy advertising targeting Canadian children and to determine if it promotes active or sedentary play, targets males or females more frequently, and has changed over time. Data for toy/game advertising from 27 television stations in Toronto for the month of May in 2006 and 2013 were licensed from Neilsen Media Research (Montreal, Quebec, Canada). A content analysis was performed on all ads to determine what age group and gender were targeted and whether physical or sedentary activity was being promoted. Comparisons were made between 2006 and 2013. There were 3.35 toy ads/h/children's specialty station in 2013 (a 15% increase from 2006). About 88% of toy ads promoted sedentary play in 2013, a 27% increase from 2006 levels, while toy ads promoting active play decreased by 33%. In both 2006 and 2013, a greater number of sedentary toy ads targeted males (n = 1519, May 2006; n = 2030, May 2013) compared with females (n = 914, May 2006; n = 1619, May 2013), and between 2006 and 2013, these ads increased significantly for both males and females. Future research should explore whether such advertising influences children's preferences for activities and levels of physical activity.

  4. Multitasking With Television Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Claire G.; Bickham, David; Ross, Craig S.; Rich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using Ecological Momentary Assessment, we explored predictors of adolescents’ television (TV) multitasking behaviors. We investigated whether demographic characteristics (age, gender, race/ethnicity, and maternal education) predict adolescents’ likelihood of multitasking with TV. We also explored whether characteristics of the TV-multitasking moment (affect, TV genre, attention to people, and media multitasking) predict adolescents’ likelihood of paying primary versus secondary attention to TV. Demographic characteristics do not predict TV multitasking. In TV-multitasking moments, primary attention to TV was more likely if adolescents experienced negative affect, watched a drama, or attended to people; it was less likely if they used computers or video games. PMID:26549930

  5. Multitasking With Television Among Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Claire G; Bickham, David; Ross, Craig S; Rich, Michael

    Using Ecological Momentary Assessment, we explored predictors of adolescents' television (TV) multitasking behaviors. We investigated whether demographic characteristics (age, gender, race/ethnicity, and maternal education) predict adolescents' likelihood of multitasking with TV. We also explored whether characteristics of the TV-multitasking moment (affect, TV genre, attention to people, and media multitasking) predict adolescents' likelihood of paying primary versus secondary attention to TV. Demographic characteristics do not predict TV multitasking. In TV-multitasking moments, primary attention to TV was more likely if adolescents experienced negative affect, watched a drama, or attended to people; it was less likely if they used computers or video games.

  6. 47 CFR 74.798 - Digital television transition notices by broadcasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the highest number of viewers is watching. Stations have the discretion as to the form of these... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.798 Digital television transition notices by broadcasters. (a) Each low power television, TV translator and Class A television station...

  7. 47 CFR 74.798 - Digital television transition notices by broadcasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the highest number of viewers is watching. Stations have the discretion as to the form of these... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.798 Digital television transition notices by broadcasters. (a) Each low power television, TV translator and Class A television station...

  8. 47 CFR 74.798 - Digital television transition notices by broadcasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the highest number of viewers is watching. Stations have the discretion as to the form of these... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.798 Digital television transition notices by broadcasters. (a) Each low power television, TV translator and Class A television station...

  9. 47 CFR 74.798 - Digital television transition notices by broadcasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the highest number of viewers is watching. Stations have the discretion as to the form of these... SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.798 Digital television transition notices by broadcasters. (a) Each low power television, TV translator and Class A television station...

  10. Longitudinal association between television watching and computer use and risk markers in diabetes in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Beech, Bettina; Crume, Tessa; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Dabelea, Dana; Kaar, Jill L; Liese, Angela D.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Pate, Russell; Pettitt, David J.; Taplin, Craig; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Merchant, Anwar T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The study provides evidence of the longitudinal association between screen time with hemoglobin A1c and cardiovascular risk markers among youth with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) . Objective To examine the longitudinal relationship of screen time with HbA1c and serum lipids among youth with diabetes. Subjects Youth with T1D and T2D. Methods We followed up 1049 youth (≥10 yr. old) with recently diagnosed T1D and T2D participating in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. Results Increased television watching on weekdays and during the week over time was associated with larger increases in HbA1c among youth with T1D and T2D (p-value<0.05). Among youth with T1D, significant longitudinal associations were observed between television watching and TG (p-value<0.05) (week days and whole week), and LDL-c (p-value<0.05) (whole week). For example, for youth who watched 1 hour of television per weekday at the outset and 3 hours per weekday 5 years later, the longitudinal model predicted greater absolute increases in HbA1c (2.19% for T1D and 2.16% for T2D); whereas for youth who watched television 3 hours per weekday at the outset and 1 hour per weekday 5 years later, the model predicted lesser absolute increases in HbA1c (2.08% for T1D and 1.06% for T2D). Conclusions Youth with T2D who increased their television watching over time vs those that decreased it had larger increases in HbA1c over 5 years. Youth with T1D who increased their television watching over time had increases in LDL-c, TG and to a lesser extent HbA1c . PMID:25041407

  11. Use of television, videogames, and computer among children and adolescents in Italy.

    PubMed

    Patriarca, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Albano, Luciana; Marinelli, Paolo; Angelillo, Italo F

    2009-05-13

    This survey determined the practices about television (video inclusive), videogames, and computer use in children and adolescents in Italy. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire covered socio-demographics; behaviour about television, videogames, computer, and sports; parental control over television, videogames, and computer. Overall, 54.1% and 61% always ate lunch or dinner in front of the television, 89.5% had a television in the bedroom while 52.5% of them always watched television there, and 49% indicated that parents controlled the content of what was watched on television. The overall mean length of time daily spent on television viewing (2.8 hours) and the frequency of watching for at least two hours per day (74.9%) were significantly associated with older age, always ate lunch or dinner while watching television, spent more time playing videogames and using computer. Those with parents from a lower socio-economic level were also more likely to spend more minutes viewing television. Two-thirds played videogames for 1.6 daily hours and more time was spent by those younger, males, with parents that do not control them, who watched more television, and who spent more time at the computer. The computer was used by 85% of the sample for 1.6 daily hours and those older, with a computer in the bedroom, with a higher number of computers in home, who view more television and play videogames were more likely to use the computer. Immediate and comprehensive actions are needed in order to diminish time spent at the television, videogames, and computer.

  12. Use of television, videogames, and computer among children and adolescents in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Patriarca, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Albano, Luciana; Marinelli, Paolo; Angelillo, Italo F

    2009-01-01

    Background This survey determined the practices about television (video inclusive), videogames, and computer use in children and adolescents in Italy. Methods A self-administered anonymous questionnaire covered socio-demographics; behaviour about television, videogames, computer, and sports; parental control over television, videogames, and computer. Results Overall, 54.1% and 61% always ate lunch or dinner in front of the television, 89.5% had a television in the bedroom while 52.5% of them always watched television there, and 49% indicated that parents controlled the content of what was watched on television. The overall mean length of time daily spent on television viewing (2.8 hours) and the frequency of watching for at least two hours per day (74.9%) were significantly associated with older age, always ate lunch or dinner while watching television, spent more time playing videogames and using computer. Those with parents from a lower socio-economic level were also more likely to spend more minutes viewing television. Two-thirds played videogames for 1.6 daily hours and more time was spent by those younger, males, with parents that do not control them, who watched more television, and who spent more time at the computer. The computer was used by 85% of the sample for 1.6 daily hours and those older, with a computer in the bedroom, with a higher number of computers in home, who view more television and play videogames were more likely to use the computer. Conclusion Immediate and comprehensive actions are needed in order to diminish time spent at the television, videogames, and computer. PMID:19439070

  13. Nutritional Content of Foods Advertised During the Television Programs Children Watch Most

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kristen; Marske, Amy L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to code food (nutritional content and food type and eating occasion) and character (cartoon and live action) attributes of food advertisements airing during television programs heavily viewed by children, and to represent and evaluate the nutritional content of advertised foods in terms of the nutrition facts label. Methods. Food advertisements (n=426) aimed at general and child audiences were coded for food and character attributes. “Nutrition Facts” label data for advertised foods (n=275) were then analyzed. Results. Convenience/fast foods and sweets comprised 83% of advertised foods. Snacktime eating was depicted more often than breakfast, lunch, and dinner combined. Apparent character body size was unrelated to eating behavior. A 2000-calorie diet of foods in the general-audience advertisements would exceed recommended daily values (RDVs) of total fat, saturated fat, and sodium. A similar diet of foods in the child-audience advertisements would exceed the sodium RDV and provide 171 g (nearly 1 cup) of added sugar. Conclusions. Snack, convenience, and fast foods and sweets continue to dominate food advertisements viewed by children. Advertised foods exceed RDVs of fat, saturated fat, and sodium, yet fail to provide RDVs of fiber and certain vitamins and minerals. PMID:16118368

  14. Nutritional content of foods advertised during the television programs children watch most.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kristen; Marske, Amy L

    2005-09-01

    We sought to code food (nutritional content and food type and eating occasion) and character (cartoon and live action) attributes of food advertisements airing during television programs heavily viewed by children, and to represent and evaluate the nutritional content of advertised foods in terms of the nutrition facts label. Food advertisements (n=426) aimed at general and child audiences were coded for food and character attributes. "Nutrition Facts" label data for advertised foods (n=275) were then analyzed. Convenience/fast foods and sweets comprised 83% of advertised foods. Snacktime eating was depicted more often than breakfast, lunch, and dinner combined. Apparent character body size was unrelated to eating behavior. A 2000-calorie diet of foods in the general-audience advertisements would exceed recommended daily values (RDVs) of total fat, saturated fat, and sodium. A similar diet of foods in the child-audience advertisements would exceed the sodium RDV and provide 171 g (nearly 1 cup) of added sugar. Snack, convenience, and fast foods and sweets continue to dominate food advertisements viewed by children. Advertised foods exceed RDVs of fat, saturated fat, and sodium, yet fail to provide RDVs of fiber and certain vitamins and minerals.

  15. Living Happily with Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilvary, Linda; Penrose, Pat

    The amount of violence and inappropriate information that children receive through television and other media is a matter of concern. This paper reviews the values of fantasy play and compares those values with the effects of television viewing on New Zealand children. Both obvious and subtle messages that children receive from television are…

  16. Experimental study of the differential effects of playing versus watching violent video games on children's aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2008-01-01

    There is great concern about the effects of playing violent video games on aggressive behavior. The present experimental study was aimed at investigating the differential effects of actively playing vs. passively watching the same violent video game on subsequent aggressive behavior. Fifty-seven children aged 10-13 either played a violent video game (active violent condition), watched the same violent video game (passive violent condition), or played a non-violent video game (active non-violent condition). Aggression was measured through peer nominations of real-life aggressive incidents during a free play session at school. After the active participation of actually playing the violent video game, boys behaved more aggressively than did the boys in the passive game condition. For girls, game condition was not related to aggression. These findings indicate that, specifically for boys, playing a violent video game should lead to more aggression than watching television violence. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Just Watch What I'm Saying: A Television Teaching Course for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wermer, F. E.

    1969-01-01

    The Netherlands Television Academy Foundation prepared a weekly television series intended to teach lip reading to the deaf and to the hard of hearing. This article outlines the scope of this project, referring to the format of the 18 half-hour lessons, to the supplementary written materials employed, to the nature of the criticism received, and…

  18. About Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Martin

    The entire broadcast television industry is the subject of this book. An attempt is made to present history, theory, and anecdotes about television programing, television advertising, television and politics, and network news, focusing all the while on American television, but with consideration given to alternative structures and methods.…

  19. Student Produced Television Programs: The Relationship of Play Theory, Flow Experiences, and Experiential Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Stephen C.; Lowry, David N.

    Television production is a complicated task. It requires advanced technical skills and abilities, as well as tremendous creative input. It requires an outlying of time by an individual to learn the skills and implement the creative ideas he or she might have for a television show. A study examined the perceptions of 30 students who were highly…

  20. Neighborhood characteristics and TV viewing in youth: nothing to do but watch TV?

    PubMed

    Timperio, Anna; Salmon, Jo; Ball, Kylie; te Velde, Saskia J; Brug, Johannes; Crawford, David

    2012-03-01

    Neighborhoods that discourage physical activity may encourage indoor activities such as television viewing; however few studies have examined associations between neighborhood characteristics and sedentary activities. This study examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between perceived and objective measures of the physical and social neighborhood environment and TV viewing among children and adolescents. Cross-sectional and longitudinal. Parents of 190 children and 169 adolescents completed questionnaire items regarding facilities for physical activity, neighborhood safety (general and traffic), social trust/cohesion, social networks and their child's TV viewing in 2006. Adolescents self-reported their TV viewing. Objective measures of reported crime and neighborhood destinations, road connectivity and traffic exposure were also collected. Questions about TV viewing were repeated in 2008 (longitudinal sample: 157 children; 105 adolescents). In children, cul-de-sac density and reported crime were positively and parental agreement that their neighborhood has good sporting facilities was negatively associated with TV viewing in cross-sectional analyses. There were no longitudinal associations among children. In adolescents, number of sports options and parental agreement that there is so much traffic that it is difficult/unpleasant for their child to walk were negatively associated with TV viewing 2 years later. Crime and a lack of quality sporting facilities or options may contribute to greater TV viewing among youth. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Helping Parents Reduce Children's Television Viewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Fries, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Parents and educators around the country are concerned about the amount of time children watch television. Part of this concern stems from the fact that a considerable amount of violence is regularly portrayed on television. In addition, those youngsters who watch an excessive amount of television have little time for developing other interests…

  2. ObesiTV: how television is influencing the obesity epidemic.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Rebecca; Vikre, Emily Kuross; Oppenheimer, Sophie; Chang, Hannah; Kanarek, Robin B

    2012-08-20

    Obesity is a major public health concern in the United States. Over the last several decades, the prevalence of obesity among both adults and children has grown at an alarming rate and is now reaching epidemic proportions. The increase in obesity has been associated with rises in a host of other chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers. While the causes of obesity are multifaceted, there is growing evidence that television viewing is a major contributor. Results of numerous studies indicate a direct association between time spent watching television and body weight. Possible explanations for this relationship include: 1) watching television acts as a sedentary replacement for physical activity; 2) food advertisements for nutrient-poor, high-calorie foods stimulate food intake; and 3) television viewing is associated with "mindless" eating. In addition to decreasing physical activity and increasing the consumption of highly palatable foods, television viewing can also promote weight gain in indirect ways, such as through the use of targeted product placements in television shows; by influencing social perceptions of body image; and airing programs that portray cooking, eating and losing weight as entertainment. This paper will provide an interdisciplinary review of the direct and indirect ways in which television influences the obesity epidemic, and conclude with ways in which the negative impact of television on obesity could be reduced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of TV watching with sleep problems in a church-going population.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Salim; Lee, Jerry W; Dehom, Salem; Tonstad, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Sensory stimuli/inactivity may affect sleep. Sleep problems are associated with multiple health problems. We assessed TV habits in the Adventist Health Study-2 at baseline and sleep problems in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study 1 to 4 years later. After exclusions, 3914 subjects split equally into TV watchers less than 2 hours per day or 2 or more hours per day. Watching TV 2 or more hours per day predicted problems falling asleep, middle of the night awakening, and waking early with inability to sleep again in multiple logistic regression. Excess TV watching disturbed sleep induction and quality, though the relationship may be bidirectional. TV habits should be considered in individuals with sleep problems.

  4. Television viewing and snacking.

    PubMed

    Gore, Stacy A; Foster, Jill A; DiLillo, Vicki G; Kirk, Kathy; Smith West, Delia

    2003-11-01

    With the rise in obesity in America, the search for potential causes for this epidemic has begun to include a focus on environmental factors. Television (TV) viewing is one such factor, partially due to its potential as a stimulus for eating. The current study investigated the relationship between food intake and self-reported TV viewing in an effort to identify the impact of TV viewing on specific eating behaviors. Seventy-four overweight women seeking obesity treatment completed questionnaires assessing dietary habits and TV viewing behaviors. Results suggest that snacking, but not necessarily eating meals, while watching TV is associated with increased overall caloric intake and calories from fat. Therefore, interventions targeting stimulus control techniques to reduce snacking behavior may have an impact on overall caloric intake.

  5. A Content Analysis of How Sexual Behavior and Reproductive Health are Being Portrayed on Primetime Television Shows Being Watched by Teens and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, Janni J; Glik, Deborah; de Castro Buffington, Sandra; Malan, Hannah; Nadjat-Haiem, Carsten; Wainwright, Nicole; Papp-Green, Melissa

    2018-02-01

    Television is a leading source of sexual education for teens and young adults, thus it is important to understand how sexual behavior and reproductive health are portrayed in popular primetime programming. This study is a media content analysis of the 19 top-rated scripted English-language primetime television shows aired between January 1, 2015 and May 31, 2015, and viewed by American youth audiences 12-24 years of age. The purpose of this study is to assess how sex/sexuality and reproductive health are being portrayed in a popular medium that reaches many adolescent and young adult audiences. Themes used for this analysis include youth pregnancy/parenting, mentoring/guidance of youth regarding sexual behavior, sex/sexuality, body image/identity, sexual violence/abuse/harassment, gender identity/sexual orientation, and reproductive health. Themes have been classified in one of the following six categories: visual cues, brief mentions, dialogue, minor storylines, major storylines, and multi-episode storylines. Our findings indicate that narratives providing educational information regarding the risks and consequences of sexual behavior were missing from the television shows we analyzed and that storylines promoting low risk sexual behavior were rare. Sexual violence and abuse, casual sex among adults, lack of contraception use, or no portrayal of consequences of risky behaviors were common. Compared to prior research, we found an emergent theme normalizing non-heterosexual gender identity and sexual orientation. Our findings have important implications as exposure to popular media shapes the perceptions and behaviors of teens and young adults. This study has the potential to shed light on the need to create stories and narratives in television shows watched by American teens and young adults with educational messages regarding the risks and consequences of sexual behavior.

  6. Television and children's executive function.

    PubMed

    Lillard, Angeline S; Li, Hui; Boguszewski, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Children spend a lot of time watching television on its many platforms: directly, online, and via videos and DVDs. Many researchers are concerned that some types of television content appear to negatively influence children's executive function. Because (1) executive function predicts key developmental outcomes, (2) executive function appears to be influenced by some television content, and (3) American children watch large quantities of television (including the content of concern), the issues discussed here comprise a crucial public health issue. Further research is needed to reveal exactly what television content is implicated, what underlies television's effect on executive function, how long the effect lasts, and who is affected. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TV as storyteller: how exposure to television narratives impacts at-risk preschoolers' story knowledge and narrative skills.

    PubMed

    Linebarger, Deborah L; Piotrowski, Jessica Taylor

    2009-03-01

    Educational media serve as informal educators within the home by supplementing young children's development. Substantial evidence documents the contributions of educational television to preschoolers' acquisition of a variety of skills; however, television's natural capacity as storyteller and the role it plays in preschoolers' early literacy development has been largely overlooked. This study examined the effects of viewing different TV program types on 311 at-risk preschoolers' story knowledge and narrative skills. Children were assigned to one of 4 viewing conditions (i.e. watching up to 40 episodes of a particular program type): no viewing; expository; embedded narrative; or traditional narrative. Story knowledge scores were higher for those viewing either narrative type. In contrast, viewing specific narrative types differentially affected the component skills of narrative competence. Story retelling and identification of explicit story events were higher after repeat viewing of embedded narratives while generating implicit story content was higher after repeat viewing of traditional narratives.

  8. Removing the Bedroom Television Set: A Possible Method for Decreasing Television Viewing Time in Overweight and Obese Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine E.; Otten, Jennifer J.; Johnson, Rachel K.; Harvey-Berino, Jean R.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. adults watch television (TV) for an average of 5 hours per day, an amount associated with increased obesity risk. Studies in children have found bedroom TV sets, which result in greater time spent by watching TV and shorter sleep durations, both of which increase a child's odds of becoming overweight. The authors examined associations between…

  9. Look who's cooking. Investigating the relationship between watching educational and edutainment TV cooking shows, eating habits and everyday cooking practices among men and women in Belgium.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Charlotte J S; Hudders, Liselot

    2016-01-01

    Television (TV) cooking shows have evolved from focusing on educating to focusing on entertaining, as well. At present, educational TV cooking shows focus on the transfer of cooking knowledge and skills, whereas edutainment TV cooking shows focus on entertaining their viewers. Both types of shows are ongoing success stories. However, little is known regarding the shows' links with the cooking and eating habits of their audiences. Therefore, the current study investigates the relationship between watching an educational or edutainment TV cooking show and one's cooking and eating habits. Given public health concerns regarding the decline in cooking behaviors and the simultaneous increase in caloric intake from food outside the home, this study suggests a promising intervention. The results of a cross-sectional survey in Belgium (n = 845) demonstrate that the audiences of educational and edutainment TV cooking shows do not overlap. Although there is little connection between watching specific shows and eating behavior, the connection between watching shows and cooking behaviors varies across gender and age lines. Behaviors also differ depending on whether the viewer is watching an educational or edutainment cooking show. For example, men of all ages appear to cook more often if they watch an educational show. However, only older men (above 38 years) seem to cook more often if they watch an edutainment TV show. The results demonstrate that the relationship between watching TV cooking shows and cooking habits warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concerned Parents Speak Out On Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcus, F. Earle

    Research investigated parents' opinions about children's television (TV). Questionnaire respondents were mainly parents of children ages 2-6; mothers outnumbered fathers 9:1. Results included the findings that children watched TV an average of three hours a day; this varied little throughout the country and between those viewing Public…

  11. Television Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Bruce M.; And Others

    Intended as an introduction to the economics of commercial television for the general reader, this volume considers the theory and analytical basis of television and the policy implications of those economics. Part I considers the economics of television markets with particular attention of the determinants of viewer markets; the supply of…

  12. Examining Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Maureen, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Designed for media specialists and educators, this issue contains four articles focusing on children and television. The lead article outlines major Australian views on television, analyzing how these concepts determine that country's use of the medium. The second article reviews international developments in children's television highlighted at…

  13. An intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Barbara A; Russo, Theresa J; Burdick, Patrick A; Jenkins, Paul L

    2004-02-01

    Television viewing has been associated with increased violence in play and higher rates of obesity. Although there are interventions to reduce television viewing by school-aged children, there are none for younger children. To develop and evaluate an intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children. Randomized controlled trial conducted in 16 preschool and/or day care centers in rural upstate New York. Children aged 2.6 through 5.5 years. Children attending intervention centers received a 7-session program designed to reduce television viewing as part of a health promotion curriculum, whereas children attending the control centers received a safety and injury prevention program. Change in parent-reported child television/video viewing and measured growth variables. Before the intervention, the intervention and control groups viewed 11.9 and 14.0 h/wk of television/videos, respectively. Afterward, children in the intervention group decreased their television/video viewing 3.1 h/wk, whereas children in the control group increased their viewing by 1.6 h/wk, for an adjusted difference between the groups of -4.7 h/wk (95% confidence interval, -8.4 to -1.0 h/wk; P =.02). The percentage of children watching television/videos more than 2 h/d also decreased significantly from 33% to 18% among the intervention group, compared with an increase of 41% to 47% among the control group, for a difference of -21.5% (95% confidence interval, -42.5% to -0.5%; P =.046). There were no statistically significant differences in children's growth between groups. This study is the first to show that a preschool-based intervention can lead to reductions in young children's television/video viewing. Further research is needed to determine the long-term effects associated with reductions in young children's television viewing.

  14. The Effects of Action and Violence in Television Programs on the Social Behavior and Imaginative Play of Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huston-Stein, Aletha; And Others

    The independent contributions of action and violence in television programs to children's attention and social behavior were investigated. Pairs of preschool children were assigned to one of four television conditions (1) high action-high violence, (2) high action-low violence, (3) low action-low violence, or (4) no television. Action was defined…

  15. "Television" Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    In an art class, children browse through space-age knobs, robot antennas and gyroscopic signal searchers. They extend space needle antennas before turning on an old TV. They discover the sights and sounds of televisions past, hearing the hiss, the gathering power, and seeing the blinking eye, the black-and-white light and blurry images projected…

  16. Reducing children's television-viewing time: a qualitative study of parents and their children.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Hersey, James C; McDivitt, Judith A; Heitzler, Carrie D

    2006-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children over age 2 years spend < or = 2 hours per day with screen media, because excessive viewing has been linked to a plethora of physical, academic, and behavioral problems. The primary goal of this study was to qualitatively explore how a recommendation to limit television viewing might be received and responded to by a diverse sample of parents and their school-age children. The study collected background data about media use, gathered a household media inventory, and conducted in-depth individual and small group interviews with 180 parents and children ages 6 to 13 years old. Most of the children reported spending approximately 3 hours per day watching television. The average home in this sample had 4 television sets; nearly two thirds had a television in the child's bedroom, and nearly half had a television set in the kitchen or dining room. Although virtually all of the parents reported having guidelines for children's television viewing, few had rules restricting the time children spend watching television. Data from this exploratory study suggest several potential barriers to implementing a 2-hour limit, including: parents' need to use television as a safe and affordable distraction, parents' own heavy television viewing patterns, the role that television plays in the family's day-to-day routine, and a belief that children should spend their weekend leisure time as they wish. Interviews revealed that for many of these families there is a lack of concern that television viewing is a problem for their child, and there remains confusion about the boundaries of the recommendation of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Parents in this study expressed interest in taking steps toward reducing children's television time but also uncertainty about how to go about doing so. Results suggest possible strategies to reduce the amount of time children spend in front of the screen.

  17. Points of view: where do we look when we watch TV?

    PubMed

    Brasel, S Adam; Gips, James

    2008-01-01

    How is our gaze dispersed across the screen when watching television? An exploratory eyetracker study with a custom-designed show indicated a very strong center-of-screen bias with gaze points following a roughly normal distribution peaked near screen center. Examining the show across time revealed that people were rarely all looking at the same location, and the amount of gaze dispersion within frames was highly variable. Different forms of programming yielded different levels of dispersion: static network 'bumpers' created the tightest visual groupings, and gaze dispersion for frames with show content was less than the dispersion for commercials. Advertising frames with brand logos generated higher dispersion than the non-branded advertisement portions, and repeated advertisements generated higher dispersion than their first-run counterparts.

  18. Adolescent Television Viewing and Belief in Vampires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Emyr; Robbins, Mandy; Picton, Laura

    2006-01-01

    A total of 1133 13-15-year-old pupils in six secondary schools in South Wales were invited to complete questions concerning vampire belief and amount of television watching. The data demonstrate that belief in vampires was positively associated with higher levels of television watching.

  19. Television Viewing and Physical Fitness in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Larry A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a study of 8,885 adults to determine whether the amount of time spent watching television was associated with cardiovascular fitness, considering confounding effects like age, gender, smoking, work week, exercise time, and obesity. Results indicate the duration of daily television watching is strongly and inversely associated with…

  20. Time Well Spent? Relating Television Use to Children’s Free-Time Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vandewater, Elizabeth A.; Bickham, David S.; Lee, June H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study assessed the claim that children’s television use interferes with time spent in more developmentally appropriate activities. METHODS Data came from the first wave of the Child Development Supplement, a nationally representative sample of children aged 0 to 12 in 1997 (N = 1712). Twenty-four-hour time-use diaries from 1 randomly chosen weekday and 1 randomly chosen weekend day were used to assess children’s time spent watching television, time spent with parents, time spent with siblings, time spent reading (or being read to), time spent doing homework, time spent in creative play, and time spent in active play. Ordinary least squares multiple regression was used to assess the relationship between children’s television use and time spent pursuing other activities. RESULTS Results indicated that time spent watching television both with and without parents or siblings was negatively related to time spent with parents or siblings, respectively, in other activities. Television viewing also was negatively related to time spent doing homework for 7- to 12-year-olds and negatively related to creative play, especially among very young children (younger than 5 years). There was no relationship between time spent watching television and time spent reading (or being read to) or to time spent in active play. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study are among the first to provide empirical support for the assumptions made by the American Academy of Pediatrics in their screen time recommendations. Time spent viewing television both with and without parents and siblings present was strongly negatively related to time spent interacting with parents or siblings. Television viewing was associated with decreased homework time and decreased time in creative play. Conversely, there was no support for the widespread belief that television interferes with time spent reading or in active play. PMID:16452327

  1. Duration of daily TV/screen watching with cardiovascular, respiratory, mental and psychiatric health: Scottish Health Survey, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-01-01

    The link of duration of TV and/or screen watching and chronic health conditions by subtypes is unclear. Therefore, the relationship between TV and/or screen watching hours and cardiovascular, respiratory, mental and psychiatric health and well-being (happiness) was assessed in an independent population-based survey to identify correlations of various hours with health conditions. Data was retrieved from the Scottish Health Survey, 2012-2013. Information on demographics, lifestyle factors, self-reported health conditions and TV and/or screen watching duration in both Scottish adults and children was collected by annual household interviews. Chi-square test and survey weighted logistic and multi-nominal modelling were performed. 5527 (57.0%) Scottish adults aged 16-99 watched TV and/or screen daily for 3 + h on average. There was a trend toward more hypertension, angina, stroke, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and poor self-rated health and mental health. Reporting watching TV and/or screen for 4 + h, for 5 + h and for 8 + h was associated with higher rates of heart attack, heart murmur or other heart troubles and abnormal heart rhythms, respectively. 414 (20.7%) Scottish children aged 4-12 watched TV and/or screen for 3h or more. They tended to have poor self-rated health and life difficulties perceived as emotional and behavioural problems. There were associations between various hours of TV and/or screen watching (3+h) and poor health observed both in Scottish adults and children. Future educational and public health programmes minimising TV and/or screen watching in order to protect cardiovascular, respiratory, mental and psychiatric health might be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The History of Television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Hisao; Kamemoto, Kazuhiro

    The report provides a relevant explanation about the advance of the television technology, especially about the systems and the receivers, from the beginning of the television development. (1) From the beginning of TV development to World War II. (2) Resumption of TV development by the end of war. (3) Monochrome TV to color TV. (4) Television technology in New Media, Multimedia and IT era.

  3. Watching TV has a distinct sociodemographic and lifestyle profile compared with other sedentary behaviors: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Watching TV has been consistently associated with higher risk of adverse health outcomes, but the effect of other sedentary behaviors (SB) is uncertain. Potential explanations are that watching TV is not a marker of a broader sedentary pattern and that each SB reflects different sociodemographic and health characteristics. Data were taken form a survey on 10,199 individuals, representative of the Spanish population aged ≥18 years. SB and other health behaviors were ascertained using validated questionnaires. Watching TV was the predominant SB (45.4% of the total sitting time), followed by sitting at the computer (22.7%). TV watching time showed no correlation with total time on other SB (r: -0.02, p = 0.07). By contrast, time spent at the computer was directly correlated with time spent on commuting (r: 0.07, p<0.01), listening to music (r: 0.10, p<0.01) and reading (r: 0.08, p<0.01). TV watching time was greater in those with older age, lower education, unhealthier lifestyle, and with diabetes or osteomuscular disease. More time spent at the computer or in commuting was linked to younger age, male gender, higher education and having a sedentary job. In conclusion, watching TV is not correlated with other SB and shows a distinct demographic and lifestyle profile. PMID:29206883

  4. Watching TV has a distinct sociodemographic and lifestyle profile compared with other sedentary behaviors: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Gómez, Elena; García-Esquinas, Esther; Ortolá, Rosario; Martínez-Gómez, David; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Watching TV has been consistently associated with higher risk of adverse health outcomes, but the effect of other sedentary behaviors (SB) is uncertain. Potential explanations are that watching TV is not a marker of a broader sedentary pattern and that each SB reflects different sociodemographic and health characteristics. Data were taken form a survey on 10,199 individuals, representative of the Spanish population aged ≥18 years. SB and other health behaviors were ascertained using validated questionnaires. Watching TV was the predominant SB (45.4% of the total sitting time), followed by sitting at the computer (22.7%). TV watching time showed no correlation with total time on other SB (r: -0.02, p = 0.07). By contrast, time spent at the computer was directly correlated with time spent on commuting (r: 0.07, p<0.01), listening to music (r: 0.10, p<0.01) and reading (r: 0.08, p<0.01). TV watching time was greater in those with older age, lower education, unhealthier lifestyle, and with diabetes or osteomuscular disease. More time spent at the computer or in commuting was linked to younger age, male gender, higher education and having a sedentary job. In conclusion, watching TV is not correlated with other SB and shows a distinct demographic and lifestyle profile.

  5. Television: the Community Hearth for the College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Michael J.; Sapp, Aimee

    A study examined how college students watch television: Are there gender differences in how students watch? Is watching a form of socialization or a means of escape and diversion? Is there a relationship between students' GPA and the number of hours they spend watching television? Subjects were 379 full-time undergraduates--half of whom were male…

  6. Mealtime exposure to food advertisements while watching television increases food intake in overweight and obese girls but has a paradoxical effect in boys.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G Harvey; Khodabandeh, Shokoufeh; Patel, Barkha; Luhovyy, Bohdan L; Bellissimo, Nick; Mollard, Rebecca C

    2015-02-01

    Food advertisements (ads) in TV programs influence food choice and have been associated with higher energy intake from snacks in children; however, their effects at mealtime have not been reported. Therefore, we measured energy intake at a pizza meal consumed by normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW/OB) children (aged 9-14 years) while they watched a TV program with or without food ads and following pre-meal consumption of a sweetened beverage with or without calories. NW and OW/OB boys (experiment 1, n = 27) and girls (experiment 2, n = 23) were randomly assigned to consume equally sweetened drinks containing glucose (1.0 g/kg body weight) or sucralose (control). Food intake was measured 30 min later while children watched a program containing food or nonfood ads. Appetite was measured before (0-30 min) and after (60 min) the meal. Both boys and girls reduced energy intake at the meal in compensation for energy in the glucose beverage (p < 0.05). Food ads resulted in further compensation (51%) in boys but not in girls. Food ads increased energy intake at the meal (9%; p = 0.03) in OW/OB girls only. In conclusion, the effects of TV programs with food ads on mealtime energy intake and response to pre-meal energy consumption in children differ by sex and body mass index.

  7. [Children's Television Advertising Excesses and Abuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Robert B.

    This testimony presents evidence of children's television advertising excesses and abuses. The testimony points out that the average TV-watching child sees more than 22,000 commercials a year, and that on the programs most popular with children large numbers of over-the-counter drugs and hazardous products are advertised. The history of private…

  8. Performing Play: Cultural Production on Twitch.tv

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicone, Anthony James

    2017-01-01

    Streaming is an emerging practice of videogame culture, where a player broadcasts a live capture of their game-play to an audience. Every day Twitch.tv, the most popular streaming platform, features thousands of streams broadcast to millions of viewers. Streams are detailed multimedia artifacts, and their study allows us to understand how the…

  9. Stretching Capabilities: Children with Disabilities Playing TV and Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasterfors, David

    2011-01-01

    Intervention studies show that if children with disabilities play motion-controlled TV and computer games for training purposes their motivation increases and their training becomes more intensive, but why this happens has not been explained. This article addresses this question with the help of ethnographic material from a public project in…

  10. [What roles can posters and television play to influence social participation of persons with mental disabilities?].

    PubMed

    El Shourbagi, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    For a long time, Québec has fostered the integration and social participation of people with an intellectual disability. However, few adaptations have been made in the context of integration. The current situation of these people is characterized by poverty, dependency, illiteracy and isolation. The "Processus de production du handicap" (Disability Creation Process) shows that this situation can be improved by adapting certain environmental elements, such as television and posters, to the characteristics of these people. These two modes of communication could respond to the needs of people with an intellectual disability by more directly fostering their social participation. This would contribute to increased acceptance of their differences on the part of the general population, encourage them to act on their own behalf, encourage them to feel they are capable of and will succeed at accomplishing a task, and better serve them in terms of accessing information. In addition, creators of media messages should assume the responsibility of adapting their messages to the characteristics and needs of people with an intellectual disability by such means as simplifying texts or adding pictograms.

  11. Evaluation of reading, writing, and watching TV using the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory.

    PubMed

    Bruijning, Janna E; van Rens, Ger H M B; Knol, Dirk L; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the longitudinal outcomes of rehabilitation (from baseline to 4 and 12 months) at a multidisciplinary rehabilitation center. The three goals ("Reading," "Writing," and "Watching TV") were measured with the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI). In addition, outcomes were compared with the Low Vision Quality-of-Life questionnaire (LVQOL) for better insight into the (longitudinal) interpretation. In a cohort of 241 visually impaired persons, corrected and uncorrected linear mixed models were used to determine longitudinal rehabilitation outcomes for the D-AI goals "Reading," "Writing," and "Watching TV," and difficulty and underlying tasks, as well as for the LVQOL scales "Basic aspects" and "Reading and fine work." At baseline, Spearman correlations were determined for similar scales of the D-AI and LVQOL. Importance scores of goals were stable over time. Difficulty scores decreased over time, but the differences were not significant at each measurement moment. For reading, difficulty of underlying tasks seemed to reflect the (change in) difficulty at the goal level; however, change in writing tasks did not reflect the change in the umbrella goal. Each of the three subscales of underlying tasks of the goal "Watching TV" changed in a different way. Changes in similar LVQOL scales were comparable, although less pronounced and more influenced by depression. Prescription or advice of low-vision aids and training in visual devices was not related (p > 0.01) with any of the outcome measures. It seems reasonable to conclude that the decrease in perceived difficulty was an effect of rehabilitation. The D-AI goal scores for difficulty were less influenced by depression and may be more sensitive to measure change over time compared with the LVQOL. Importance scores may not be useful for evaluation purposes.

  12. 76 FR 72849 - Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and To Amend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ...] Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and To Amend Rules... for Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and to Amend... television, TV translator, and Class A television station DTV licensees''). The Commission has also revised...

  13. To Watch or to Read? The Respective Influence of Televised Political Debates and Media Debate Coverage on Citizen Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunde, Meg

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Media and Politics, Political Communication, Political Rhetoric, Media Effects. Objective: By taking part in a classroom activity, students will explore how cognitive frames and media frames play a role in learning from political debates.

  14. Television Violence and Its Effect on Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Betty Jo; Stalsworth, Kelly; Wentzel, Heather

    1999-01-01

    Examines research on television violence and links violence to specific programs commonly watched by young children. Maintains that television violence is related to aggressive behavior, lessened sensitivity to the results of violence, and increased fear. Examines public reactions to children's educational television programs. (Author/KB)

  15. Television Violence and Behavior: A Research Summary. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marilyn E.

    This digest describes the overall pattern of the results of research on television violence and behavior. Several variables in the relationship between television violence and aggression related to characteristics of the viewers and to the portrayal of violence are identified. Viewer characteristics included: age, amount of television watched,…

  16. Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) presents a brief description of cable television and explains some basic regulations pertaining to it. The history of cable regulation covers the initial jurisdiction, economic considerations of the regulation, court tests, and the holding of public hearings. The major provisions of new cable rules are…

  17. Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report provides information about cable television and the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) responsibilities in regulating its operation. The initial jurisdiction and rules covered in this report pertain to the court test, public hearing, certificate of compliance, franchising, signal carriage, leapfrogging, access and origination…

  18. Children's attitudes toward violence on television.

    PubMed

    Hough, K J; Erwin, P G

    1997-07-01

    Children's attitudes toward television violence were studied. A 47-item questionnaire collecting attitudinal and personal information was administered to 316 children aged 11 to 16 years. Cluster analysis was used to split the participants into two groups based on their attitudes toward television violence. A stepwise discriminant function analysis was performed to determine which personal characteristics would predict group membership. The only significant predictor of attitudes toward violence on television was the amount of television watched on school days (p < .05), but we also found that the impact of other predictor variables may have been mediated by this factor.

  19. TV Watching and Computer Use in U.S. Youth Aged 12-15, 2012. NCHS Data Brief. Number 157

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Kirsten A.; Fakhouri, Tala H. I.; Carlson, Susan A.; Fulton, Janet E.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive screen-time behaviors, such as using a computer and watching TV, for more than 2 hours daily have been linked with elevated blood pressure, elevated serum cholesterol, and being overweight or obese among youth. Additionally, screen-time behavior established in adolescence has been shown to track into adulthood. The National Heart, Lung,…

  20. Reality Television Programs Are Associated With Illegal Drug Use and Prescription Drug Misuse Among College Students.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Shlivko, Alexander

    2016-01-02

    Reality television watching and social media use are popular activities. Reality television can include mention of illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. To determine if reality television and social media use of Twitter are associated with either illegal drug use or prescription drug misuse. Survey of 576 college students in 2011. Independent variables included watching reality television (social cognitive theory), parasocial interaction (parasocial interaction theory), television hours watched (cultivation theory), following a reality television character on Twitter, and demographics. Outcome variables were illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Watching reality television and also identifying with reality TV program characters were each associated with greater odds for illegal drug use. Also, following a reality TV character on Twitter had greater odds for illegal drug use and also in one analytical model for prescription drug misuse. No support was seen for cultivation theory. Those born in the United States had greater odds for illegal drug use and prescription drug misuse. Women and Asians had lower odds for illegal drug use. African Americans and Asians had lower odds for prescription drug misuse. Physicians, psychologists, and other healthcare practitioners may find it useful to include questions in their clinical interview about reality television watching and Twitter use. Physician and psychology groups, public health practitioners, and government health agencies should consider discussing with television broadcasting companies the potential negative impact of including content with illegal drugs and prescription drug misuse on reality television programs.

  1. Television Viewing Habits of Kindergarten, Third and Sixth Grade Students in a Western Kentucky County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossing, Lewis; Mikulcik, Marilyn

    Parents from rural and urban areas of Calloway County, Kentucky were surveyed regarding their children's television viewing habits. Fifteen survey questions were asked, among them whether there was a television set in the home; whether the child had a personal set; whether the family ate meals while watching television; whether television sound…

  2. Television viewing and physical activity among Latino children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watching television and using other forms of media such as video games, computers, print, music and movies takes up a surprisingly large amount of our children’s time. U.S. children spend more time watching television than any other activity except sleep. According to a recent nationwide report on c...

  3. Parenting style and family type, but not child temperament, are associated with television viewing time in children at two years of age.

    PubMed

    Howe, Anna S; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Lawrence, Julie; Galland, Barbara C; Gray, Andrew R; Taylor, Barry J; Sayers, Rachel; Taylor, Rachael W

    2017-01-01

    Despite the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommending that electronic media be avoided in children under two years of age, screen use is common in infants and toddlers. The aims of this study were to determine how parenting style, infant temperament, and family type are associated with television viewing in two-year-old children. Participants were from the Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) randomized controlled trial (n = 802) (Dunedin, New Zealand). Demographic information was collected at baseline (late pregnancy), and television and other screen time assessed by questionnaire at 24 months of age. Parenting style (Parenting Practices Questionnaire), infant temperament (Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory), and family type (7 categories) were reported by both parents. Data were available for 487 participants (61% of the original participants). Median television viewing was relatively low at 21 minutes per day, or 30 minutes in those watching television (82%). Children who watched television played with mobile phones (12% of children) or iPads/tablets (22% of children) more frequently than children who did not (6% of children). In terms of parenting style, children of more authoritarian mothers (β = 17, 95% CI: 6-27 minutes), more authoritarian partners (β = 14, 95% CI: 2-26 minutes), or more permissive mothers (β = 10, 95% CI: 3-17 minutes) watched significantly more television. No significant relationships were observed between child temperament and time watching television after adjustment for confounding variables. Children from "active" families (as rated by partners) watched 29 minutes less television each day (P = 0.002). Parenting style and family type were associated with television viewing time in young children, whereas child temperament was not.

  4. Parenting style and family type, but not child temperament, are associated with television viewing time in children at two years of age

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Anne-Louise M.; Lawrence, Julie; Galland, Barbara C.; Taylor, Barry J.; Sayers, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Despite the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommending that electronic media be avoided in children under two years of age, screen use is common in infants and toddlers. The aims of this study were to determine how parenting style, infant temperament, and family type are associated with television viewing in two-year-old children. Study design Participants were from the Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) randomized controlled trial (n = 802) (Dunedin, New Zealand). Demographic information was collected at baseline (late pregnancy), and television and other screen time assessed by questionnaire at 24 months of age. Parenting style (Parenting Practices Questionnaire), infant temperament (Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory), and family type (7 categories) were reported by both parents. Results Data were available for 487 participants (61% of the original participants). Median television viewing was relatively low at 21 minutes per day, or 30 minutes in those watching television (82%). Children who watched television played with mobile phones (12% of children) or iPads/tablets (22% of children) more frequently than children who did not (6% of children). In terms of parenting style, children of more authoritarian mothers (β = 17, 95% CI: 6–27 minutes), more authoritarian partners (β = 14, 95% CI: 2–26 minutes), or more permissive mothers (β = 10, 95% CI: 3–17 minutes) watched significantly more television. No significant relationships were observed between child temperament and time watching television after adjustment for confounding variables. Children from “active” families (as rated by partners) watched 29 minutes less television each day (P = 0.002). Conclusions Parenting style and family type were associated with television viewing time in young children, whereas child temperament was not. PMID:29261676

  5. Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Television Viewing Conditions of Preschoolers in Northern Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsiopoulou, Triantafillia; Melissa-Halikiopoulou, Chrisoula

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of television (TV) on preschoolers, their TV viewing patterns and the conditions under which they watch TV, taking into consideration their different socioeconomic and regional backgrounds. The survey instrument was a questionnaire with 23 closed-ended questions, given to parents whose children…

  6. Factors that affect television viewing time in preschool and primary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Songül Yalçin, Siddika; Tugrul, Belma; Naçar, NazIre; Tuncer, Murat; Yurdakök, Kadriye

    2002-12-01

    Excessive viewing of television (TV) has been linked to aggressive behavior, violence and childhood obesity. A cross-sectional study was conducted among preschool children and primary schoolchildren in Ankara during March and April 1999 to detect the factors that affect TV viewing time and to evaluate their parents' knowledge, attitudes and practices with regard to TV. The parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire about TV habits of their family, the number and location of TVs in the household and the effect of TV on children. Of 400 questionnaires, 350 answered the questions appropriately for this study. Children were divided into two groups, preschool children and primary schoolchildren. Television viewing time was given daily, as a mean of weekday. The mean age for becoming a TV viewer was 2.7 +/- 1.6 years. Of all, 62% of children spent >/= 2h/day watching TV and 8.3% of children spent > 4 h. The TV viewing time of child was significantly and positively correlated with that of siblings, mother and father for both groups. Age and sleeping time of the child, age and the education level of mother, presence of TV in the child's room and the starting age watching TV did not affect the viewing time. One-half of parents reported that the TV programs watched included violence, and one-third thought TV depicts child abuse, especially emotional abuse. It was found that the TV watching habits of parents had an influence on those of their children. Therefore, pediatricians should take 'TV histories' of children and their parents and educate parents how to become good TV viewers.

  7. Hidden addiction: Television

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Moran, Meghan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The most popular recreational pastime in the U.S. is television viewing. Some researchers have claimed that television may be addictive. We provide a review of the definition, etiology, prevention and treatment of the apparent phenomenon of television addiction. Methods: Selective review. Results: We provide a description of television (TV) addiction, including its negative consequences, assessment and potential etiology, considering neurobiological, cognitive and social/cultural factors. Next, we provide information on its prevention and treatment. Discussion and conclusions: We suggest that television addiction may function similarly to substance abuse disorders but a great deal more research is needed. PMID:25083294

  8. [Television and children: is television responsible for all the evils attributed to it?].

    PubMed

    Caviedes Altable, B E; Quesada Fernández, E; Herranz, J L

    2000-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to analyze children's television viewing habits and their parents attitudes towards such viewing. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Primary care. A survey was undertaken with 317 three to fourteen year old children and their parents as part of the primary care check-up program for healthy children. Time devoted to television viewing was 106 +/- 50 minutes on weekdays and 141 +/- 80 minutes weekends. Despite this, 49.2% of parents thought their children saw little television, especially those with children under six (57.6%). Children of parents in highly qualified positions and of parents in the uppermost socioeconomic group saw television the least, on non-working days (70 +/- 61 minutes and 144 +/- 78 minutes respectively, p < or = 0.0001). Some 71.9% of children watched television alone and 34% did so at meal-times. Altogether 48.3% of parents were unaware as to what their children watched and some 61.5% encouraged television viewing, above all those having children of under six (76%). The youngest children preferred to watch cartoons which were generally of a violent nature. For those aged from 11 to 14, 19.5% chose as their favorite programs those having a high level of violence. Television habits are an educational problem for parents, an important shake-up in their attitudes being called for, in which pediatricians should be involved in developing health programs aimed at proper use of the television.

  9. Children's violent television viewing: are parents monitoring?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tina L; Brenner, Ruth A; Wright, Joseph L; Sachs, Hari Cheryl; Moyer, Patricia; Rao, Malla R

    2004-07-01

    Violent media exposure has been associated with aggressive behavior, and it has been suggested that child health professionals counsel families on limiting exposure. Effective violence prevention counseling requires an understanding of norms regarding parental attitudes, practices, and influencing factors. Both theories of reasoned action and planned behavior emphasize that subjective norms and attitudes affect people's perceptions and intended behavior. Few data exist on violent television viewing and monitoring from a cross-section of families. By understanding the spectrum of parental attitudes, community-sensitive interventions for violence prevention can be developed. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes about and monitoring of violent television viewing from the perspective of parents. An anonymous self-report assisted survey was administered to a convenience sample of parents/guardians who visited child health providers at 3 sites: an urban children's hospital clinic, an urban managed care clinic, and a suburban private practice. The parent questionnaire included questions on child-rearing attitudes and practices and sociodemographic information. A total of 1004 adults who accompanied children for health visits were recruited for the study; 922 surveys were completed (participation rate: 92%). A total of 830 (90%) respondents were parents and had complete child data. Of the 830 respondents, 677 had questions on television viewing included in the survey and were the focus of this analysis. Seventy-five percent of families reported that their youngest child watched television. Of these, 53% reported always limiting violent television viewing, although 73% believed that their children viewed television violence at least 1 time a week. Among television viewers, 81% reported usually or always limiting viewing of sexual content on television and 45% reported usually or always watching television with their youngest child. Among children who watched

  10. 47 CFR 73.3521 - Mutually exclusive applications for low power television, television translators and television...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... television, television translators and television booster stations. 73.3521 Section 73.3521 Telecommunication..., television translators and television booster stations. When there is a pending application for a new low power television, television translator, or television booster station, or for major changes in an...

  11. 47 CFR 73.3521 - Mutually exclusive applications for low power television, television translators and television...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... television, television translators and television booster stations. 73.3521 Section 73.3521 Telecommunication..., television translators and television booster stations. When there is a pending application for a new low power television, television translator, or television booster station, or for major changes in an...

  12. 47 CFR 73.3521 - Mutually exclusive applications for low power television, television translators and television...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... television, television translators and television booster stations. 73.3521 Section 73.3521 Telecommunication..., television translators and television booster stations. When there is a pending application for a new low power television, television translator, or television booster station, or for major changes in an...

  13. 47 CFR 73.3521 - Mutually exclusive applications for low power television, television translators and television...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... television, television translators and television booster stations. 73.3521 Section 73.3521 Telecommunication..., television translators and television booster stations. When there is a pending application for a new low power television, television translator, or television booster station, or for major changes in an...

  14. 47 CFR 73.3521 - Mutually exclusive applications for low power television, television translators and television...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... television, television translators and television booster stations. 73.3521 Section 73.3521 Telecommunication..., television translators and television booster stations. When there is a pending application for a new low power television, television translator, or television booster station, or for major changes in an...

  15. Children, Television and the Holiday Blitz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betres, James; Toher, Gertrude

    Results of a small-scale study involving 20 third-grade students indicated that children who watch considerably less television than their peers nevertheless were effectively persuaded by virtue of what and when they watched. Additionally, while these children seemed to understand the functions of advertisments and had experienced prior…

  16. Watch-and-Comment as an Approach to Collaboratively Annotate Points of Interest in Video and Interactive-TV Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Maria Da Graça C.; Cattelan, Renan G.; Melo, Erick L.; Freitas, Giliard B.; Teixeira, Cesar A.

    In earlier work we proposed the Watch-and-Comment (WaC) paradigm as the seamless capture of multimodal comments made by one or more users while watching a video, resulting in the automatic generation of multimedia documents specifying annotated interactive videos. The aim is to allow services to be offered by applying document engineering techniques to the multimedia document generated automatically. The WaC paradigm was demonstrated with a WaCTool prototype application which supports multimodal annotation over video frames and segments, producing a corresponding interactive video. In this chapter, we extend the WaC paradigm to consider contexts in which several viewers may use their own mobile devices while watching and commenting on an interactive-TV program. We first review our previous work. Next, we discuss scenarios in which mobile users can collaborate via the WaC paradigm. We then present a new prototype application which allows users to employ their mobile devices to collaboratively annotate points of interest in video and interactive-TV programs. We also detail the current software infrastructure which supports our new prototype; the infrastructure extends the Ginga middleware for the Brazilian Digital TV with an implementation of the UPnP protocol - the aim is to provide the seamless integration of the users' mobile devices into the TV environment. As a result, the work reported in this chapter defines the WaC paradigm for the mobile-user as an approach to allow the collaborative annotation of the points of interest in video and interactive-TV programs.

  17. Earlier Violent Television Exposure and Later Drug Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Brook, David W.; Katten, Naomi S.; Ning, Yuming; Brook, Judith S.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the longitudinal pathways from earlier violent television exposure to later drug dependence. African American and Puerto Rican adolescents were interviewed during three points in time (N = 463). Violent television exposure in late adolescence predicted violent television exposure in young adulthood, which in turn was related to tobacco/marijuana use, nicotine dependence, and later drug dependence. Some policy and clinical implications suggest: a) regulating the times when violent television is broadcast; b) creating developmentally targeted prevention/treatment programs; and c) recognizing that watching violent television may serve as a cue regarding increased susceptibility to nicotine and drug dependence. PMID:18612881

  18. Watching TV and Recognizing Stereotypes: Another Application of the "Drip, Drip" and "Drench" Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbro, Susan

    A study examined the relationship between amount of television viewing and recognition of stereotypes. Subjects, 60 undergraduate students enrolled in mass media, advertising, and public relations classes at Indiana University, viewed movies produced by United States production companies but set in developing nations. After each movie, students…

  19. Shogun on TV: Who Watches and with What Effects among U. S. Midwestern Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatzer, Milton J.; And Others

    Working on the assumption that young people in the midwestern United States do not have many opportunities to witness an extensive representation of a remote culture, a study was designed to describe the social and psycho-sociological characteristics of those youngsters who were likely to be exposed to "Shogun" on television.…

  20. [Football, television and emergency services].

    PubMed

    Miró, O; Sánchez, M; Borrás, A; Millá, J

    2000-04-15

    To know the influence of televised football on the use of emergency department (ED). We assessed the number, demographic characteristics and acuity of patients attended during the broadcast of football matches played by FC Barcelona during Champions' League (n = 12), and they were compared with days without televised football (n = 12). Televised football was associated with a decrease in visits to ED (-18%; p = 0.002). Such a decrease was observed for all ED units, but only for traumatology unit reached statistical significance (-28%; p = 0.006). Decay of ED visits were mainly due to a decrease of low-acuity consults (-30%; p = 0.04). There is a significant decrease on ED use associated with televised football.

  1. Teaching Television Watchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Judy Lee

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities to help teachers address the needs and behaviors of students raised on television; includes resources to help teachers use television productively in the classroom, a send-home reproducible on children and television violence, and notes on an interview with Shari Lewis and television tips for primary students. (SM)

  2. Adolescent exposure to food advertising on television.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lisa M; Szczypka, Glen; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2007-10-01

    Television viewing is hypothesized to contribute to obesity among children and adolescents through several mechanisms that include the displacement of physical activity, snacking while watching TV, and the influence of food advertising. This study drew on television ratings to examine the distribution of food advertising exposure among adolescents aged 12 through 17 based on 170 top-rated shows across network, cable and syndicated TV stations over the 9-month period from September 2003 to May 2004. A total of 238,353 30-second equivalent advertisements on the top-rated shows were assessed. Each advertisement was weighted by its rating to measure actual exposure to advertisements. The results showed that among total nonprogram content time, food-related products accounted for roughly one fifth of advertising exposure. Excluding TV promotions and public service announcements, as a proportion of all product advertising, total food-related advertising made up 26% of advertised products viewed by adolescents. By race, the proportion of advertising exposure to food products was 14% greater for African-American versus white adolescents and total exposure to food advertising would be even larger for African-American teens given that, on average, they watched more TV. Fast food was the most frequently viewed food product category comprising 23% of all food-related advertisements among adolescents. Food ads made up just over one quarter of TV ads viewed by adolescents with the most commonly viewed products of fast food, sweets, and beverage products well within the reach of their own purchasing power.

  3. Associations of American Indian children's screen-time behavior with parental television behavior, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and media-related resources in the home.

    PubMed

    Barr-Anderson, Daheia J; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Smyth, Mary; Himes, John H; Hannan, Peter J; Holy Rock, Bonnie; Story, Mary

    2011-09-01

    American Indian children have high rates of overweight and obesity, which may be partially attributable to screen-time behavior. Young children's screen-time behavior is strongly influenced by their environment and their parents' behavior. We explored whether parental television watching time, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and media-related resources in the home are related to screen time (ie, television, DVD/video, video game, and computer use) among Oglala Lakota youth residing on or near the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. We collected baseline data from 431 child and parent/caregiver pairs who participated in Bright Start, a group-randomized, controlled, school-based obesity prevention trial to reduce excess weight gain. Controlling for demographic characteristics, we used linear regression analysis to assess associations between children's screen time and parental television watching time, parental perceptions of children's screen time, and availability of media-related household resources. The most parsimonious model for explaining child screen time included the children's sex, parental body mass index, parental television watching time, how often the child watched television after school or in the evening, parental perception that the child spent too much time playing video games, how often the parent limited the child's television time, and the presence of a VCR/DVD player or video game player in the home (F(7,367) = 14.67; P < .001; adjusted R(2) = .37). The presence of a television in the bedroom did not contribute significantly to the model. Changes in parental television watching time, parental influence over children's screen-time behavior, and availability of media-related resources in the home could decrease screen time and may be used as a strategy for reducing overweight and obesity in American Indian children.

  4. Television campaign.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Hospital Center embarked on a branding effort in hopes of raising customer awareness of the hospital's state-of-the-art technologies in advanced medical care. The campaign launched a new phase of TV spots that highlight the facility's advanced services, such as the computed tomography angiogram, the argon plasma coagulator, and heart valve replacement surgery.

  5. 76 FR 11680 - Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ...] Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and Digital Class A... Commission's Rules to Establish Rules for Digital Low Power, Television Translator, and Television Booster... Digital Low Power Television Translator, Television Booster Stations, and to Amend Rules for Digital Class...

  6. TV and Kids, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Public Radio, Washington, DC.

    In this series of National Public Radio interviews, individuals from education and television broadcasting discuss the use and abuse of television by schools and the influence of television on children in home viewing. It is asserted that television is and will continue to be watched, and therefore it is necessary to learn how to deal with it. By…

  7. The Television Generation, Television Literacy, and Television Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jodi R.

    Unlike the linear, serial process of reading books, learning to "read" television is a parallel process in which multiple pieces of information are simultaneously received. Perceiving images, only one aspect of understanding television, requires the concurrent processing of information that is compounded within a symbol system. The…

  8. Television Viewing and Its Association with Sedentary Behaviors, Self-Rated Heath and Academic Performance among Secondary School Students in Peru.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bimala; Cosme Chavez, Rosemary; Jeong, Ae Suk; Nam, Eun Woo

    2017-04-05

    The study assessed television viewing >2 h a day and its association with sedentary behaviors, self-rated health, and academic performance among secondary school adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among randomly selected students in Lima in 2015. We measured self-reported responses of students using a standard questionnaire, and conducted in-depth interviews with 10 parents and 10 teachers. Chi-square test, correlation and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed among 1234 students, and thematic analysis technique was used for qualitative information. A total of 23.1% adolescents reported watching television >2 h a day. Qualitative findings also show that adolescents spend most of their leisure time watching television, playing video games or using the Internet. Television viewing had a significant positive correlation with video game use in males and older adolescents, with Internet use in both sexes, and a negative correlation with self-rated health and academic performance in females. Multivariate logistic regression analysis shows that television viewing >2 h a day, independent of physical activity was associated with video games use >2 h a day, Internet use >2 h a day, poor/fair self-rated health and poor self-reported academic performance. Television viewing time and sex had a significant interaction effect on both video game use >2 h a day and Internet use >2 h a day. Reducing television viewing time may be an effective strategy for improving health and academic performance in adolescents.

  9. Television Viewing and Its Association with Sedentary Behaviors, Self-Rated Health and Academic Performance among Secondary School Students in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bimala; Cosme Chavez, Rosemary; Jeong, Ae Suk; Nam, Eun Woo

    2017-01-01

    The study assessed television viewing >2 h a day and its association with sedentary behaviors, self-rated health, and academic performance among secondary school adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among randomly selected students in Lima in 2015. We measured self-reported responses of students using a standard questionnaire, and conducted in-depth interviews with 10 parents and 10 teachers. Chi-square test, correlation and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed among 1234 students, and thematic analysis technique was used for qualitative information. A total of 23.1% adolescents reported watching television >2 h a day. Qualitative findings also show that adolescents spend most of their leisure time watching television, playing video games or using the Internet. Television viewing had a significant positive correlation with video game use in males and older adolescents, with Internet use in both sexes, and a negative correlation with self-rated health and academic performance in females. Multivariate logistic regression analysis shows that television viewing >2 h a day, independent of physical activity was associated with video games use >2 h a day, Internet use >2 h a day, poor/fair self-rated health and poor self-reported academic performance. Television viewing time and sex had a significant interaction effect on both video game use >2 h a day and Internet use >2 h a day. Reducing television viewing time may be an effective strategy for improving health and academic performance in adolescents. PMID:28379202

  10. FEDERAL PROGRAMS FOR EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BYSTROM, JOHN W.

    THE GROWTH AND PROGRESS OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION IS DESCRIBED. GRANTS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF NONCOMMERCIAL TELEVISION (TV) BROADCASTING STATIONS (EDUCATIONAL TV FACILITIES ACT), GRANTS OF SURPLUS PROPERTY UNDER THE NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT HAVE AIDED THE GROWTH OF EDUCATIONAL TV. GREATER USE IS MADE OF EDUCATIONAL TV BECAUSE OF GREATER USE…

  11. Black Television: Avenue of Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Pamela

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes a few of the prominent issues in black television, examining public television, commercial television, black ownership of stations, cable television, and some projections for the future. (Author/JM)

  12. Taking a Look at Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, William, Comp.

    1981-01-01

    A collection of quotations drawn from research and opinion papers dealing with the impact of television viewing on children. Subtopics addressed are: television viewing statistics, effects of television violence, and the relationship of television to education. (JJD)

  13. Teens Talk about Sexuality, Sex and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Shelley

    1983-01-01

    Teenagers discuss their sexual uncertainties and roles parents and television could play in enlightening them on sexuality. From parents, they would like honesty and support, and, from television, portrayals of strong women, emotional attachment, sexual attraction without glamor, connection between sex and pregnancy, and information on…

  14. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  15. Inside Public Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtzel, Alan

    1977-01-01

    In the continuing saga of the perils of public television, the author, University of Georgia School of Journalism TV Coordinator, gives the viewer an inside look at the unwieldy structure of this non-commercial medium. Today's episode: Will high-quality programming survive? The players: 265 independent public TV stations, a decentralized public TV…

  16. Television in Indian Adolescents' Lives: A Member of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman; Larson, Reed W.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the context in which eighth graders in India watch television through an experience sampling study of 100 urban middle-class Indian families. As a whole, findings indicate that the television viewing of middle-class Indian youth is typically a relaxed antidote to the stresses of the day that they share with their families. (SLD)

  17. Impact of the Children's Television Act on Children's Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sandra; Kotler, Jennifer; Kuhl, Alison; Riboli, Michael

    The impact of the Children's Television Act, which requires broadcasters to provide educational and informational programs for children, was examined by having 141 second through sixth graders watch 16 popular and unpopular television programs and then assess the motivational appeal of, and children's learning from, these programs. Popular and…

  18. Parent-Child Interaction, Television Violence, and Aggression of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews findings of two longitudinal studies on development of aggression. Observes that the process by which children learn violence from television is circular: i.e., aggressive children are unpopular and consequently spend less time with peers and more time watching television, which in turn, assures them that aggressive behavior is…

  19. Beliefs about the Realism of Television Programs Featuring Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorr, Aimee; And Others

    When children watch television, they can assess the reality of what they are seeing. Content judged unreal may have less influence on viewers than does content judged real. This study examines children's reality judgments about television series featuring families with children. Participants included twenty-seven 7-year-olds, nineteen…

  20. Do television and electronic games predict children's psychosocial adjustment? Longitudinal research using the UK Millennium Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel; Henderson, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background Screen entertainment for young children has been associated with several aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Most research is from North America and focuses on television. Few longitudinal studies have compared the effects of TV and electronic games, or have investigated gender differences. Purpose To explore how time watching TV and playing electronic games at age 5 years each predicts change in psychosocial adjustment in a representative sample of 7 year-olds from the UK. Methods Typical daily hours viewing television and playing electronic games at age 5 years were reported by mothers of 11 014 children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Conduct problems, emotional symptoms, peer relationship problems, hyperactivity/inattention and prosocial behaviour were reported by mothers using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Change in adjustment from age 5 years to 7 years was regressed on screen exposures; adjusting for family characteristics and functioning, and child characteristics. Results Watching TV for 3 h or more at 5 years predicted a 0.13 point increase (95% CI 0.03 to 0.24) in conduct problems by 7 years, compared with watching for under an hour, but playing electronic games was not associated with conduct problems. No associations were found between either type of screen time and emotional symptoms, hyperactivity/inattention, peer relationship problems or prosocial behaviour. There was no evidence of gender differences in the effect of screen time. Conclusions TV but not electronic games predicted a small increase in conduct problems. Screen time did not predict other aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Further work is required to establish causal mechanisms. PMID:23529828

  1. Do television and electronic games predict children's psychosocial adjustment? Longitudinal research using the UK Millennium Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel; Henderson, Marion

    2013-05-01

    Screen entertainment for young children has been associated with several aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Most research is from North America and focuses on television. Few longitudinal studies have compared the effects of TV and electronic games, or have investigated gender differences. To explore how time watching TV and playing electronic games at age 5 years each predicts change in psychosocial adjustment in a representative sample of 7 year-olds from the UK. Typical daily hours viewing television and playing electronic games at age 5 years were reported by mothers of 11 014 children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Conduct problems, emotional symptoms, peer relationship problems, hyperactivity/inattention and prosocial behaviour were reported by mothers using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Change in adjustment from age 5 years to 7 years was regressed on screen exposures; adjusting for family characteristics and functioning, and child characteristics. Watching TV for 3 h or more at 5 years predicted a 0.13 point increase (95% CI 0.03 to 0.24) in conduct problems by 7 years, compared with watching for under an hour, but playing electronic games was not associated with conduct problems. No associations were found between either type of screen time and emotional symptoms, hyperactivity/inattention, peer relationship problems or prosocial behaviour. There was no evidence of gender differences in the effect of screen time. TV but not electronic games predicted a small increase in conduct problems. Screen time did not predict other aspects of psychosocial adjustment. Further work is required to establish causal mechanisms.

  2. The Sociability of Mobile TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, David

    Both mobile phones and television are known for the social practices they enable. Television has been a social medium since its introduction in households all over the world. Although its main aim is entertaining and informing its viewers, people often watch television together with close relatives or good friends, talk about what is going on while watching television or even structure their social activities around a television show (e.g., eating dinner while watching the news) (Lull 1980). But television programs are also part of social interactions away from the television set, when discussing favorite television programs around the water cooler at work, or recommending shows to watch to good friends. The main function of mobile phones on the other hand has always been social from the start: communicating with other people, when and wherever you want, first using voice communication and later also with text messages and video communication. So what happens when these two social media are combined? It is clear that mobile TV cannot be successful without taking social practices when watching TV on a mobile device into account. Although one approach could be to let the users appropriate the device in their social environment, as happened with text messaging, the risk that it does not match their current practices is too big. A better approach is to design mobile TV applications that take direct advantage of the social aspects of each medium, which means adding interactive features that will enable and support social interaction between users on different levels. In order to get an idea of the possibilities, it is interesting to look at recent research in the closely related domain of interactive television.

  3. Television Looks at Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briller, Bert R., Ed.; Knight, Pamela, Ed.

    How television is helping to make older adults more visible by drawing attention to their needs and by recognizing their contributions to society is examined in this book, which presents a sample of television programing in the 1980s. The book begins with an introduction by Mary Cassata that surveys the literature on television's roles as both…

  4. Television and the Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    Television is a large part of growing up in America, and a part that meshes in various ways with other influences. Teachers should understand it, and as the occasion requires, confront, correct, or take advantage of it. Research on television viewing yields five lessons. Television experience is an individual one, although there are definite…

  5. The Twilight of Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrisett, Lloyd N.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the evolution of television technology and the changes in its use brought about by cable television and the videocassette recorder. The increasing use of multimedia, made possible by the marriage of television and computer, are discussed. A reemergence of the importance of written language in this new medium is forecast. (KRN)

  6. Educational Television: Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, R.; Shinar, D.

    Based on evaluation of nine Brazilian educational television centers, an Instructional Television Training Model (ITV) was developed to aid in determining and designing training requirements for instructional television systems. Analysis based on this model would include these tasks: (1) determine instructional purpose of the television…

  7. INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION IN GERMANY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Central Inst. for Youth and Educational Television, Munich (West Germany).

    DISCUSSIONS HELD AT THE BERLIN CONGRESS ON INSTRUCTIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION (SEPTEMBER 27-29, 1966) ARE BRIEFLY SUMMARIZED. THIS DOCUMENT ALSO LISTS RESEARCH PROJECTS IN INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION IN GERMANY, DESCRIBES THE BAVARIAN RADIO INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION PROGRAM, SUMMARIZES THE OPINIONS OF THE GERMAN PRESS ON INSTRUCTIONAL…

  8. Action for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranly, Donald P.

    The origins, development, and effectiveness of Action for Children's Television (ACT) are examined in this pamphlet. The strategies used by ACT to obtain change at the congressional level and within television stations and networks include the following: a "tuneout" day when people are urged to turn off their television sets, a boycott…

  9. Coping with Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littell, Joseph Fletcher, Ed.

    This book could be a useful supplement in any course dealing with television, such as mass media, communication, film, and humanities. The book is divided into six sections. "The Impact of Television" discusses the impact of television on society, the broadcast media, the Federal Communications Commission, public broadcasting, educational…

  10. [Children, television and violence].

    PubMed

    Zann, M

    2000-03-01

    The relationships between children and television are a source of heated debate. Several studies, mainly conducted in North America, have found a correlation between television violence viewing and aggressive behavior, preadolescents appearing as the most vulnerable. However, in France opinions are more nuanced and one generally considers that television-induced violence in children mainly depends upon individual and educative socio-familial factors.

  11. Predicting Exposure to and Uses of Television Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krcmar, Marina; Greene, Kathryn

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between sensation seeking and exposure to violent and non-violent television, and the subsequent role violent television may play among high sensation-seeking secondary and college students. Finds disinhibition (positively) and experience seeking (negatively) related to adolescents' exposure to violent television. Shows…

  12. More than Just a Communication Medium: What Older Adults Say about Television and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Giang T.; Wittink, Marsha N.; Murray, Genevra F.; Barg, Frances K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults watch more television than younger people do. Television's role in mental health has been described in the general population, but less is known about how older adults think of television in the context of depression. Design and Methods: Using a semistructured interview created to help clinicians understand how older adults…

  13. Parent-Child Communication about Television: A View from the Parent's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantz, Walter; Weaver, James B., III

    This study examined both general and specific parent-child television viewing experiences together with any interactions related to television viewing whether the child has watched television with a parent or alone. A total of 384 telephone interviews of parents (57% female, 43% male) with children at home between the ages of 6 and 18 were…

  14. Dual Audio Television; an Experiment in Saturday Morning Broadcast and a Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borton, Terry; And Others

    The Philadelphia City Schools engaged in a four-year program to develop and test dual audio television, a way to help children learn more from the massive amounts of time they spend watching commercial television. The format consisted of an instructional radio broadcast which accompanied popular television shows and attempted to clarify and…

  15. Fit5Kids TV reduction program and Latino preschoolers' TV viewing behaviors: A pilot cluster RCT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excessive television (TV) viewing has been associated with a greater risk of childhood obesity. Latino children watch higher amounts of TV than their peers and are disproportionately affected by childhood obesity. Since TV viewing and obesity track from preschool into adolescence, early intervention...

  16. Children's television: an environmental learning resource?

    Treesearch

    Gwen Hamlin; Yona Nelson-Shulman; Sheree West

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the environmental information currently available on those television programs most frequently watched by children 2 to 11. The aspects investigated were: range and type of environments shown, relative proportions of time spent on interior and exterior scenes, and verbal expressions and actions related to the environment. Exterior...

  17. The relationship between TV/computer time and adolescents' health-promoting behavior: a secondary data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yen; Liou, Yiing-Mei; Wu, Jen-Yee

    2008-03-01

    Television and computers provide significant benefits for learning about the world. Some studies have linked excessive television (TV) watching or computer game playing to disadvantage of health status or some unhealthy behavior among adolescents. However, the relationships between watching TV/playing computer games and adolescents adopting health promoting behavior were limited. This study aimed to discover the relationship between time spent on watching TV and on leisure use of computers and adolescents' health promoting behavior, and associated factors. This paper used secondary data analysis from part of a health promotion project in Taoyuan County, Taiwan. A cross-sectional design was used and purposive sampling was conducted among adolescents in the original project. A total of 660 participants answered the questions appropriately for this work between January and June 2004. Findings showed the mean age of the respondents was 15.0 +/- 1.7 years. The mean numbers of TV watching hours were 2.28 and 4.07 on weekdays and weekends respectively. The mean hours of leisure (non-academic) computer use were 1.64 and 3.38 on weekdays and weekends respectively. Results indicated that adolescents spent significant time watching TV and using the computer, which was negatively associated with adopting health-promoting behaviors such as life appreciation, health responsibility, social support and exercise behavior. Moreover, being boys, being overweight, living in a rural area, and being middle-school students were significantly associated with spending long periods watching TV and using the computer. Therefore, primary health care providers should record the TV and non-academic computer time of youths when conducting health promotion programs, and educate parents on how to become good and healthy electronic media users.

  18. Mediators of longitudinal associations between television viewing and eating behaviours in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Television viewing has been associated with poor eating behaviours in adolescents. Changing unhealthy eating behaviours is most likely to be achieved by identifying and targeting factors shown to mediate the association between these behaviours. However, little is known about the mediators of the associations between television viewing and eating behaviours. The aim of this study was to examine mediators of the longitudinal associations between television viewing (TV) and eating behaviours among Australian adolescents. Method Eating behaviours were assessed using a web-based survey completed by a community-based sample of 1729 adolescents from years 7 and 9 of secondary schools in Victoria, Australia, at baseline (2004-2005) and two years later. TV viewing and the potential mediators (snacking while watching TV and perceived value of TV viewing) were assessed via the web-based survey at baseline. Results Adolescents who watched more than two hours of TV/day had higher intakes of energy-dense snacks and beverages, and lower intakes of fruit two years later. Furthermore, the associations between TV viewing and consumption of energy-dense snacks, energy-dense drinks and fruit were mediated by snacking while watching TV. Perceived value of TV viewing mediated the association between TV viewing and consumption of energy-dense snacks, beverages and fruit. Conclusion Snacking while watching TV and perceived value of TV viewing mediated the longitudinal association between TV viewing and eating behaviours among adolescents. The efficacy of methods to reduce TV viewing, change snacking habits while watching TV, and address the values that adolescents place on TV viewing should be examined in an effort to promote healthy eating among adolescents. PMID:21450065

  19. The Impact of the Newer Television Technologies on Television Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Elizabeth M.; Ferguson, Douglas A.

    1993-01-01

    Finds that use of new television technologies (cable television, videocassette recorders, and remote control devices) had an impact on receiving, pass-the-time, and companionship gratifications from television viewing. Shows that instrumental viewing motives, television exposure, and receiving informational gratifications from television viewing…

  20. Nursing on television: student perceptions of television's role in public image, recruitment and education.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Roslyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Koch, Jane; Jackson, Debra

    2013-12-01

    To explore nursing students' perceptions of how their profession is portrayed on medical television programmes. Recruitment and retention in nursing have been linked to the image of the profession in society. Images of nursing in popular media frequently draw on stereotypes that may damage the appeal of nursing for potential students and denigrate the value and status of the profession. A growing body of work analyses how nursing is portrayed in popular media, but less research asks nursing students themselves to reflect on this area. Convergent parallel mixed methods. Data were collected in 2011 from surveys of 484 undergraduate nursing students at a large university in New South Wales, Australia, that included demographic data, their viewing habits of medical television programmes and their opinions of how the shows handled nursing ethics and professionalism and the image of nursing on television and nursing role models. Most students watch medical television programmes. Students who do not speak English at home watched fewer programmes but were more positive about the depictions of professionalism. The qualitative data showed students were concerned that television can have a negative influence on the image of nursing, but they also recognized some educational and recruitment value in television programmes. It is important for nurses, educators and students to be critically engaged with the image of their profession in society. There is value in engaging more closely with contemporary media portrayals of nursing for students and educators alike. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Vicissitudes of "Progressive Television."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Ien

    This document analyzes and evaluates dilemmas and difficulties in developing/implementing "progressive television," a kind of television that seeks to transgress the boundaries of dominant (mainstream) television by proposing a new constellation of television production and consumption. The ideal is described as a television that tries…

  2. The Future of Educational Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Robert B.

    In order to predict the future of educational television, the author discusses first instructional television, then public television, and also comments on the applications of communications satellites to television in both industrialized and developing nations. He predicts that in the future instructional television will be mainly carried by…

  3. MASTER TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FURNISHING AND INSTALLATION OF TELEVISION MASTER ANTENNA SYSTEMS FOR SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ARE GIVEN. CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS, EQUIPMENT, PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, AND FUNCTIONS ARE DESCRIBED. (MS)

  4. Copycat Suicides Without an Intention to Die After Watching TV Programs: Two Cases at Five Years of Age.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Mustafa; Kalenderoğlu, Aysun; Almiş, Habib; Turgut, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Suicide is an intentional self-destructive act. As conceptualization of death as an irreversible end occurs at approximately 8-10 years, attempted and completed suicides are rare before 7 years of age. Studies have suggested that media may contribute to increased suicides in adolescents through social learning. Effects of media on suicides were thoroughly evaluated in children and adolescents who committed suicide after identifying with the subject of a TV program, movie, or book. We present 2 cases at 5 years of age who committed suicide by hanging themselves after watching a TV program. These cases differed from copycat suicides reported in the literature that are performed mostly by adolescents because victims are very young children and because they died without an actual intent to die while they were imitating suicides. By presenting these cases, we want to emphasize that destructive effects of media may involve not only adults and adolescents but also very young children who do not have a completely developed concept of death.

  5. Reviews Equipment: Data logger Book: Imagined Worlds Equipment: Mini data loggers Equipment: PICAXE-18M2 data logger Books: Engineering: A Very Short Introduction and To Engineer Is Human Book: Soap, Science, & Flat-Screen TVs Equipment: uLog and SensorLab Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND Data logger Fourier NOVA LINK: data logging and analysis To Engineer is Human Engineering: essays and insights Soap, Science, & Flat-Screen TVs People, politics, business and science overlap uLog sensors and sensor adapter A new addition to the LogIT range offers simplicity and ease of use WORTH A LOOK Imagined Worlds Socio-scientific predictions for the future Mini light data logger and mini temperature data logger Small-scale equipment for schools SensorLab Plus LogIT's supporting software, with extra features HANDLE WITH CARE CAXE110P PICAXE-18M2 data logger Data logger 'on view' but disappoints Engineering: A Very Short Introduction A broad-brush treatment fails to satisfy WEB WATCH Two very different websites for students: advanced physics questions answered and a more general BBC science resource

  6. Playing Videogames: The Electronic Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selnow, Gary W.

    1984-01-01

    Concluded that the children in this study (ages 10-14) played video games in arcades for some of the same reasons they watched television: (1) escape; (2) a sense of personal involvement in the action; and (3) a source of or substitute for companionship. (PD)

  7. Television and the Humanist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigerell, James

    The mass media and especially television pose problems for teachers in humanities disciplines traditionally associated with leisure, time for reflection, and the quiet contemplation of the good, true, and beautiful. Although other media have been criticized for their deleterious effects, television most affects humanists in their mission because…

  8. FUNDAMENTALS OF TELEVISION SYSTEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KESSLER, WILLIAM J.

    DESIGNED FOR A READER WITHOUT SPECIAL TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE, THIS ILLUSTRATED RESOURCE PAPER EXPLAINS THE COMPONENTS OF A TELEVISION SYSTEM AND RELATES THEM TO THE COMPLETE SYSTEM. SUBJECTS DISCUSSED ARE THE FOLLOWING--STUDIO ORGANIZATION AND COMPATIBLE COLOR TELEVISION PRINCIPLES, WIRED AND RADIO TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS, DIRECT VIEW AND PROJECTION…

  9. Television: Alcohol's Vast Adland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Concern about how much television alcohol advertising reaches underage youth and how the advertising influences their attitudes and decisions about alcohol use has been widespread for many years. Lacking in the policy debate has been solid, reliable information about the extent of youth exposure to television alcohol advertising. To address this…

  10. Television and Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Roger G.

    The television industry is characterized by numerous imperfections in market competition. The spectrum allocation policy of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assures that there will be only three national television networks; consequently in nearly all markets these stations account for 75% to 100% of revenues. These networks in turn…

  11. Cable Television: Franchising Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Walter S.; And Others

    This volume is a comprehensive reference guide to cable television technology and issues of planning, franchising, and regulating a cable system. It is intended for local government officials and citizens concerned with the development of cable television systems in their communities, as well as for college and university classes in…

  12. Science on Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, John

    2011-01-01

    Television is frequently blamed for the problems adults face with some young people. Does television affect their understanding and behaviour? Of course it does. "Sesame Street", the most researched educational programme in the world, gave its pre-school viewers a head start in literacy that was still measurable ten years later. BBC…

  13. RX for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicholas

    In his remarks delivered at the Second National Symposium on Children and Television, Federal Communications Commissioner Nicholas Johnson charges that television is not adequately serving those 20 million Americans under the age of five. He scores the networks for the inane, if not actually harmful, nature of their programming and for the…

  14. Quality in Instructional Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur, Ed.

    The result of an interdisciplinary conference on the qualities of an effective instructional television program, this book reports the ideas of various participants. Two papers by broadcasters represent the producer's view of ITV; one deals with instructional television in Sweden and the other with a Nigerian project. The scholar's view is…

  15. Community Antenna Television (CATV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The number of households hooked up to cable television or community antenna television (CATV) is expanding rapidly, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been developing regulations since 1962 to guide the growth of the industry. By 1965 the FCC had claimed jurisdiction over all CATV systems in the U. S. This jurisdiction was challenged…

  16. Satellite Television Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Governor's Office of Telecommunications, Juneau.

    This report describes the status of this pilot satellite television project for the state of Alaska which provides for the distribution of television programming to the RCA Toll Centers in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Sitka, and Bethel, as well as to 23 selected rural sites. The historical background is discussed, as well as the process involved…

  17. Reading on Television?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewalt, Mark W.; And Others

    The portrayal of reading, writing, and other selected behaviors on prime-time network television was examined in this two-part study. First, an interest inventory was administered to a sample of 301 elementary students (i.e., grades 1-5) in South Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania to determine their favorite television shows, books, and school…

  18. Television in the Philippines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateneo de Manila Univ., Quezon City (Philippines). Center for Educational Television.

    Information about instructional television (ITV) programing in the Philippines is summarized in this three part document. An outline of the status of the Center for Educational Television, Inc., (CETV) and a description of its current activities and financial support are provided in the first section. A narrative review of both CETV and other…

  19. Television is Beautiful.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Peter

    This paper presents evidence for the positive impact of television on 1,500 children, aged 6 to 16 years old, specifically concerning their conceptions of beauty. The role of television was repeatedly mentioned by the subjects although it was not the primary research goal of the researcher. Examples of children's descriptions of beauty as derived…

  20. Television and the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsing, John

    Excessive viewing of television, often late into the night, causes children to be tired when they come to school and therefore unable to do a good day's work. Furthermore, television fosters passive behavior, weakening students' ability and willingness to take active roles in their learning. Critics of education continue to attack the abilities of…

  1. Investigating the influence of eating habits, body weight and television programme preferences on television viewing time and domestic computer usage.

    PubMed

    Raptou, Elena; Papastefanou, Georgios; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2017-01-01

    The present study explored the influence of eating habits, body weight and television programme preference on television viewing time and domestic computer usage, after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and home media environment indicators. In addition, potential substitution or complementarity in screen time was investigated. Individual level data were collected via questionnaires that were administered to a random sample of 2,946 Germans. The econometric analysis employed a seemingly unrelated bivariate ordered probit model to conjointly estimate television viewing time and time engaged in domestic computer usage. Television viewing and domestic computer usage represent two independent behaviours in both genders and across all age groups. Dietary habits have a significant impact on television watching with less healthy food choices associated with increasing television viewing time. Body weight is found to be positively correlated with television screen time in both men and women, and overweight individuals have a higher propensity for heavy television viewing. Similar results were obtained for age groups where an increasing body mass index (BMI) in adults over 24 years old is more likely to be positively associated with a higher duration of television watching. With respect to dietary habits of domestic computer users, participants aged over 24 years of both genders seem to adopt more healthy dietary patterns. A downward trend in the BMI of domestic computer users was observed in women and adults aged 25-60 years. On the contrary, young domestic computer users 18-24 years old have a higher body weight than non-users. Television programme preferences also affect television screen time with clear differences to be observed between genders and across different age groups. In order to reduce total screen time, health interventions should target different types of screen viewing audiences separately.

  2. Television and music video exposure and adolescent 'alcopop' use.

    PubMed

    Van den Bulck, Jan; Beullens, Kathleen; Mulder, Joost

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol abuse among adolescents is a cause for concern. Around 1995 alcopops (sweetened alcoholic drinks) entered the scene and caused even more concern. Many fear that the sweet taste makes is easier to start drinking for those not yet used to drinking alcohol and the marketing appears aimed at adolescents. Because alcohol use has been linked to television viewing in general and music video viewing in particular this article examined whether a relationship existed between television and music video exposure and the consumption of alcopops. Data were collected with a questionnaire focused on television exposure and alcohol behavior. Respondents were a random sample of 2,546 first- and fourth year schoolchildren of Flanders, the Dutch speaking region of Belgium (60% of the Belgian population). Self reported general TV viewing, music video exposure and drinking of alcopops at home and/or while going out were measured. 68.4% of the respondents watched music videos at least several times a week. The odds of being an alcopop drinker at home increased by 196% for those, who watched music videos at least several times a week (OR = 1.961). For each additional hour of TV viewed per day, the respondents were 17% more likely to be drinkers of altopops at home (OR = 1.169). The odds of being an alcopop drinker, when going out increased by 239% for those who watched music videos at least several times a week (OR = 2.394). For each additional hour of TV viewed per day, the respondents were 19% more likely to be drinkers of alcopops when going out (OR = 1.186). These findings suggest that there is an association between music video exposure and use of alcopops not explained by overall exposure to television. This relationship merits further attention as it is a better predictor of alcopop use, than the control variables and overall TV viewing.

  3. Reality television predicts both positive and negative outcomes for adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christopher J; Salmond, Kimberlee; Modi, Kamla

    2013-06-01

    To assess the influence of media, specifically reality television, on adolescent behavior. A total of 1141 preteen and adolescent girls (age range 11-17) answered questions related to their reality television viewing, personality, self-esteem, relational aggression, appearance focus, and desire for fame. Our results indicated that the influence of reality television on adolescent behavior is complex and potentially related to the adolescents' intended uses and gratifications for using reality television. Reality television viewing was positively related to increased self-esteem and expectations of respect in dating relationships. However, watching reality television also was related to an increased focus on appearance and willingness to compromise other values for fame. Reality television viewing did not predict relational aggression. The potential influences of reality television use on adolescent girls are both positive and negative, defying easy categorization. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. What Researchers Have Learned about Toddlers and Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel R.; Hanson, Katherine G.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews research conducted after the American Academy of Pediatrics 1999 recommendation against screen exposure for children less than 2 years old. Television in the background disrupts play and parent-child interactions. Background TV exposure is associated with negative cognitive and language outcomes. Children begin to understand…

  5. Pressures on TV Programs: Coalition for Better Television's Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, John M., Jr.

    In 1981, the conservative Coalition for Better Television (CBTV) threatened an economic boycott against advertisers who marketed their wares on programs that the coalition felt had excessive sex and violence. Because television networks are dependent on advertising, the coalition believed economic pressure on advertisers would force a…

  6. From the Couch to the Classroom: A Fresh Curricular Approach for Television in EFL Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mora, Raul Alberto

    2003-01-01

    American (and English language) television has gradually become a more influential factor in the way people are learning English overseas, as access to cable programming has widely spread across cities, regardless of socio-cultural backgrounds. What students watch on TV affects not only how they are learning the language, but also their cultural…

  7. Television viewing, computer use, obesity, and adiposity in US preschool children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is limited evidence in preschool children linking media use, such as television/video viewing and computer use, to obesity and adiposity. We tested three hypotheses in preschool children: 1) that watching > 2 hours of TV/videos daily is associated with obesity and adiposity, 2) that computer u...

  8. Television viewing and food consumption in Flemish adolescents in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, Carine Anna; Maes, Lea

    2006-01-01

    To examine associations of television viewing with overall food consumption A computerised 24-hour dietary recall and a questionnaire were completed by 1031 adolescents (+/- 12-14 years of age). Those who generally watched more television were more likely to consume frequently advertised items such as soft drinks and snacks. Not all frequently advertised food items (e.g. cereals) were associated with television viewing. An inverse association was found with fruit, water and milk. A negative association was found with brown bread; a positive association was found with white bread. The results indicate that high television viewing and a less nutrient dense food pattern are part of a lifestyle influenced by common underlying factors. Nutrition interventions aimed at improving adolescents' food habits should target high television-viewers. Our findings underline the importance of tackling socio-demographic differences.

  9. Young Children's Preference for Television Viewing Compared with Other Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavenas, Rosemarie

    1987-01-01

    Young children's own perceptions of their preference for television viewing relative to other developmentally appropriate activities were studied through means of a questionnaire. The respondents rated television viewing as a less attractive activity than playing outside, playing with play dough, and building with sand, but few preferred story…

  10. Association between television viewing and self-esteem in children.

    PubMed

    Tin, Sze Pui Pamela; Ho, Daniel Sai Yin; Mak, Kwok Hang; Wan, Ka Leung; Lam, Tai Hing

    2012-07-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of excess television (TV) viewing on specific mental health outcomes, such as self-esteem. We explored the cross-sectional association between TV viewing hours and self-esteem in young children. A total of 70,210 primary 4 (US grade 4) participants of the Department of Health Student Health Service, Hong Kong, in 1998-2000 reported TV viewing hours in a standardized questionnaire. Self-esteem was assessed using the Culture-Free Self-Esteem Inventories for Children (SEI) with 4 subscales. Multivariate linear regression yielded beta coefficients (β) for SEI subscale scores by TV hours, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, lifestyle characteristics, and highest parental education and occupational status. Only 10.9% of children watched >4 hours per day, while 45.3% watched TV for 1 to ≤2 hours per day. Compared with children who watched <1 hour of TV per day, those who watched a moderate amount (1 to ≤2 hours/day) had higher (more favorable) SEI scores in the General (β = 0.09; 95% confidence interval = 0.02-0.16), Social (0.05; 0.01-0.09), and Parent-Related (0.04; 0.00-0.08) subscales but lower scores in the Academic subscale (-0.06; -0.09 to -0.02). Children who watched >2 hours of TV per day had lower SEI scores than those who watched <1 hour per day in all 4 subscales. An inverted J-shaped relation was observed between TV viewing hours and self-esteem among young children. The development of self-esteem among children who report little or excessive TV viewing should be further studied.

  11. Television use and snacking behaviors among children and adolescents in China.

    PubMed

    Parvanta, Sarah A; Brown, Jane D; Du, Shufa; Zimmer, Catherine R; Zhao, Xinshu; Zhai, Fengying

    2010-04-01

    Television (TV) use has been linked with poor eating behaviors and obesity in young people. This study examines the association between TV watching and paying attention to TV commercials with buying and requesting snacks seen on commercials, and eating snacks while watching TV among youth in China. Data from 1,552 participants (ages 6-17.99) in the 2004 China Health and Nutrition Survey were analyzed cross-sectionally. The 2004 China Health and Nutrition Survey was conducted in nine Chinese provinces. Most respondents (92.2%) reported watching TV; on average children (6-11.99 years old) and adolescents (12-17.99 years old) watched TV for 9-10 hours per week. Nearly half (42.9%) of all the respondents said they "sometimes" or "often" paid attention to TV commercials. Respondents who reported paying attention to commercials had higher odds of requesting snacks (odds ratio [OR] = 3.43; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.55-4.60) and buying snacks (OR = 2.73; 95% CI = 2.17-3.43) seen on TV, and eating snacks while watching TV (OR = 1.60; 95% CI = 1.23-2.07) than those who did not pay attention. However, frequency of watching TV was not significantly related to snacking. Attention to TV commercials for snack foods may be one of the factors affecting the increase in obesity among children and adolescents in China. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Cartocci, Giulia; Cherubino, Patrizia; Rossi, Dario; Modica, Enrica; Maglione, Anton Giulio; di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1) and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population. PMID:27313602

  13. Gender and Age Related Effects While Watching TV Advertisements: An EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Giulia; Cherubino, Patrizia; Rossi, Dario; Modica, Enrica; Maglione, Anton Giulio; di Flumeri, Gianluca; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show how the variation of the EEG frontal cortical asymmetry is related to the general appreciation perceived during the observation of TV advertisements, in particular considering the influence of the gender and age on it. In particular, we investigated the influence of the gender on the perception of a car advertisement (Experiment 1) and the influence of the factor age on a chewing gum commercial (Experiment 2). Experiment 1 results showed statistically significant higher approach values for the men group throughout the commercial. Results from Experiment 2 showed significant lower values by older adults for the spot, containing scenes not very enjoyed by them. In both studies, there was no statistical significant difference in the scene relative to the product offering between the experimental populations, suggesting the absence in our study of a bias towards the specific product in the evaluated populations. These evidences state the importance of the creativity in advertising, in order to attract the target population.

  14. Television, video game and social media use among children with ASD and typically developing siblings.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Micah O; Wenstrup, Colleen

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the nature of television, video game, and social media use in children (ages 8-18) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, n = 202) compared to typically developing siblings (TD, n = 179), and relative to other activities. Parents completed measures assessing children's screen-based and other extracurricular activities. Children with ASD spent approximately 62% more time watching television and playing video games than in all non-screen activities combined. Compared with TD siblings, children with ASD spent more hours per day playing video games (2.4 vs. 1.6 for boys, and 1.8 vs. 0.8 for girls), and had higher levels of problematic video game use. In contrast, children with ASD spent little time using social media or socially interactive video games.

  15. Cable Television; A Bibliographic Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenung, James

    This bibliographic review of publications in the field of cable television begins with an introduction to cable television and an outline of the history and development of cable television. Particular attention is given to the regulatory activities of the Federal Communications Commission and the unfulfilled potential of cable television. The…

  16. Television Studies: A Widening Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    1981-01-01

    Reviews three books concerned with the effects of television advertising upon children and their parents: "Television Advertising and Children," edited by June Esserman; "Children and the Faces of Television," edited by Edward Palmer and Aimee Dorr; and "The Effects of Television Advertising on Children," by Richard Adler and others. (JJD)

  17. Television and adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Brown, J D; Childers, K W; Waszak, C S

    1990-01-01

    Existing studies of the sexual content of television programming and advertising and the effects of this content on adolescent viewers are reviewed. Content studies show that the frequency of sexual references have increased in the past decade and are increasingly explicit. Studies of the effects of this content, while scarce, suggest that adolescents who rely heavily on television for information about sexuality will have high standards of female beauty and will believe that premarital and extramarital intercourse with multiple partners is acceptable. They are unlikely to learn about the need for contraceptives as a form of protection against pregnancy or disease. Suggestions for future research and trends in television programming policies are explored.

  18. Television's impact on children.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, D M; Zuckerman, B S

    1985-02-01

    Television has a major impact on children's knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Research has demonstrated the association between television viewing and four areas: (1) children's aggressive behavior; (2) racial and sex-role stereotypes; (3) decreased interest in reading and school activities; and (4) poorer health habits and attitudes. Methodological limitations make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about a causal relationship between television viewing and children's behavior. Representative studies in these four areas are reviewed, important methodological concerns are pointed out, and conclusions from the research findings are drawn. The implications of the data for pediatricians and other health professionals are discussed.

  19. Help Children Become More Critical TV-Watchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, Nancy Lee

    1988-01-01

    Watching television is not necessarily a bad habit, and when parents monitor their children's viewing habits, it can prove educational. Ways parents might teach their children to view television programs and commercials critically are suggested. (JL)

  20. [Television and eating disorders. Study of adolescent eating behavior].

    PubMed

    Verri, A P; Verticale, M S; Vallero, E; Bellone, S; Nespoli, L

    1997-06-01

    The media, mainly TV, play a significant social and cultural role and may affect the prevalence and incidence of eating disorders such as bulimia and anorexia nervosa. Their influence acts mainly by favoring a tall and thin body as the only fashionable for female adolescents: your social success depends primarily and totally by your physical appearance and you can, (and must), shape your body as you like better. Our research aims t analyze the attitude of adolescent people toward the TV and to investigate on: 1) time spent watching TV programs; 2) the influence of TV on the personal choices of goods to buy; 3) the ideal body images; 4) choice of TV programs. Sixty-seven healthy adolescents (36 F-31 M) were included in our study as controls together with 24 female adolescents with eating disorders (DCA) diagnosed according to the DSM-IV and EAT/26 criteria. Our results show a psychological dependence of DCA adolescents from the TV (longer period of time spent watching TV programs, buying attitudes more influenced by TV advertising). The thin and tall body image is preferred by the DCA girls as well as by the controls; however the body appearance and proportions have a predominant and utmost importance only for the eating disorder females. The masculine subjects instead have a preference for a female and masculine opulent body appearance. To prevent the observed increase in prevalence and incidence of eating disorders among adolescents, it is appropriate to control the messages, myths and false hood propagated by media, TV in particular.

  1. Does Watching a Play about the Teenage Brain Affect Attitudes toward Young Offenders?

    PubMed Central

    Blakey, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience is increasingly used to infer the cognitive capacities of offenders from the activity and volume of different brain regions, with the resultant findings receiving great interest in the public eye. This field experiment tested the effects of public engagement in neuroscience on attitudes toward offenders. Brainstorm is a play about teenage brain development. Either before or after watching this play, 728 participants responded to four questions about the age of criminal responsibility, and the moral responsibility and dangerousness of a hypothetical young or adult offender. After watching the play, participants perceived the young offender as less likely to reoffend than the adult offender and the young, but not adult, offender as less morally responsible for his actions, especially on the first offense. Therefore, public engagement in the newest arrival to the criminological scene – neuroscience – may shift support for different youth justice responses. PMID:28649215

  2. Physical inactivity, TV-watching hours and body composition in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ivan Romero; Silva, Maria Alayde Mendonça da; Silva, Renata D'Andrada Tenório Almeida; Oliveira, Bruno Almeida Viana de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo

    2010-08-01

    Physical inactivity is a predisposing factor to the onset/worsening of other cardiovascular risk factors, particularly obesity. To determine physical activity level (PAL) and daily number of hours of TV (HTV) and the association and/or correlation of these variables with age, gender, economic class, public/private school, overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Cross sectional study, school-based population, public and private education, primary and secondary education. The sample was calculated based on the minimum expected prevalence of several variables, including physical inactivity. Cluster sampling. structured questionnaire, including Physical Activity for Older Children Questionnaire (PAQ-C) measurements of weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and triceps skinfold (TSF). Chi-square, linear correlation. Among the 1,253 students, averaging 12.4 ± 2.9 years old, of which 549 were male, there was a prevalence of inactivity in 93.5%, more commonly found in female adolescents and there was no association between PAL and excess weight or body fat, soccer and dance were the most frequent activities in boys and girls, respectively; 60% of students did not have physical education classes. Average and median HTV were respectively 3.6 and 3 hours; there was a significant association between HTV and obesity and significant correlation between PAL and age (negative) and between BMI and TSF (positive). Physical inactivity is present in 93.5% of children and adolescents from Maceió. It is more commonly found among teenagers and females, with no association or correlation of this variable with excess weight or body fat; obesity was associated with ≥ 3 HTV.

  3. Description of Children's Television Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcus, F. Earle

    This paper is a report of two studies which were conducted on children's television. The first, "Saturday Children's Television," is a content analysis of programming and advertising matter on four Boston commercial TV stations. The second, "Romper Room, An Analysis," focuses on that program's commercial practices. The first…

  4. 76 FR 44821 - Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and To Amend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...] Digital Low Power Television, Television Translator, and Television Booster Stations and To Amend Rules... this proceeding in order to allow a timely and successful completion of the low power television digital transition. Although Congress established a hard deadline of June 12, 2009 for full power stations...

  5. Physical Activity, TV Watching Time, Sleeping, and Risk of Obesity and Hyperglycemia in the Offspring of Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Peng; Liu, Huikun; Wang, Leishen; Li, Weiqin; Leng, Junhong; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shuang; Qi, Lu; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Yu, Zhijie; Yang, Xilin; Hu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the association of physical activity, TV watching time, sleeping time with the risks of obesity and hyperglycemia among 1263 offspring aged 1-5 years of mothers with gestational diabetes (GDM) in a cross-sectional study. Logistic regression models were used to obtain the odd ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) of childhood obesity and hyperglycemia associated with different levels of indoor activity, outdoor activity, TV watching, and sleeping time. The multivariable-adjusted ORs of obesity based on different levels of TV watching time (0, <1.0, and ≥1.0 hour/day) were 1.00, 1.21 (95% CI 0.72-2.05), and 2.20 (95% CI 1.33-3.63) (Ptrend = 0.003), respectively. The multivariable-adjusted ORs of hyperglycemia based on different levels of indoor activity (<5.0, 5.0-6.9, and ≥7.0 hours/day) were 1.00, 0.74 (95% CI 0.45-1.21), and 0.49 (95% CI 0.28-0.84) (Ptrend = 0.034), respectively. The multivariable-adjusted ORs of hyperglycemia associated with different levels of sleeping time (<11.0, 11.0-11.9, and ≥12.0 hours/day) were 1.00, 0.67 (95% CI 0.42-1.05), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.23-0.67) (Ptrend = 0.003), respectively. The present study indicated a positive association of TV watching with the risk of obesity, and an inverse association of either indoor activity or sleeping time with the risk of hyperglycemia among offspring born to GDM mothers in Tianjin, China.

  6. Analysis of food advertising to children on Spanish television: probing exposure to television marketing

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Daniel; Hernández-Torres, Juan José; Agil, Ahmad; Comino, Mariano; López, Juan Carlos; Macías, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to assess longitudinal changes in television (TV) food advertising during 2013 compared to 2007, measuring children's exposure to healthy and unhealthy advertisements, after the new European and Spanish Public Health laws published in 2011. Material and methods Two thematic channels for children (TC), and 2 generalist channels (GC) for all ages were recorded, between April and May 2013, on 2 week and 2 weekend days. Food advertisements were classified as core (CFA) (nutrient dense, low energy), non-core (NCFA) (unbalanced energy profile or high in energy), or others (OFA) (supermarkets and special food). Results One thousand two hundred sixty-three food advertisements were recorded (TC: 579/GC: 684) in 2013. NCFA were the most shown (54.9%) in the regular full day TV programming (p < 0.001). In 2013, children watching GC had a higher relative risk of being exposed to fast food advertisements than when watching TC (RR = 2.133, 95% CI: 1.398–3.255); CFA were broadcast most frequently in 2013 (GC: 23.7%; and TC: 47.2%) vs. 2007 (TC: 22.9%) (p < 0.001). The proportion of broadcasting between NCFA/CFA and OFA food advertisements in children's peak time slots was higher on TC (203/162) during 2013 than on GC (189/140), and significantly higher than that shown on TC in 2007 (180/36, p < 0.001). Conclusions Broadcasting of unhealthy TV food advertising on TC is lower today than six years ago; but, children's exposure to TV advertising of unhealthy food is worrying in Spain, and there is more exposure to unhealthy than healthy food by TV. Watching GC in 2013 had higher risk of being exposed to fast food advertisements than watching TC. PMID:27478462

  7. Analysis of food advertising to children on Spanish television: probing exposure to television marketing.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel; Hernández-Torres, Juan José; Agil, Ahmad; Comino, Mariano; López, Juan Carlos; Macías, Victoria; Campoy, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess longitudinal changes in television (TV) food advertising during 2013 compared to 2007, measuring children's exposure to healthy and unhealthy advertisements, after the new European and Spanish Public Health laws published in 2011. Two thematic channels for children (TC), and 2 generalist channels (GC) for all ages were recorded, between April and May 2013, on 2 week and 2 weekend days. Food advertisements were classified as core (CFA) (nutrient dense, low energy), non-core (NCFA) (unbalanced energy profile or high in energy), or others (OFA) (supermarkets and special food). One thousand two hundred sixty-three food advertisements were recorded (TC: 579/GC: 684) in 2013. NCFA were the most shown (54.9%) in the regular full day TV programming (p < 0.001). In 2013, children watching GC had a higher relative risk of being exposed to fast food advertisements than when watching TC (RR = 2.133, 95% CI: 1.398-3.255); CFA were broadcast most frequently in 2013 (GC: 23.7%; and TC: 47.2%) vs. 2007 (TC: 22.9%) (p < 0.001). The proportion of broadcasting between NCFA/CFA and OFA food advertisements in children's peak time slots was higher on TC (203/162) during 2013 than on GC (189/140), and significantly higher than that shown on TC in 2007 (180/36, p < 0.001). Broadcasting of unhealthy TV food advertising on TC is lower today than six years ago; but, children's exposure to TV advertising of unhealthy food is worrying in Spain, and there is more exposure to unhealthy than healthy food by TV. Watching GC in 2013 had higher risk of being exposed to fast food advertisements than watching TC.

  8. Television food advertising to children in Malta.

    PubMed

    Cauchi, Daniel; Reiff, Sascha; Knai, Cecile; Gauci, Charmaine; Spiteri, Joanna

    2017-06-01

    To undertake a cross-sectional survey of the extent and nature of food and beverage advertising to children on Maltese national television stations. Seven national free-to-air channels were recorded for seven consecutive days in March 2014 between 07:00 and 22:00 h. Advertisements were coded according to predefined categories, with a focus on advertisements aired during 'peak' children's viewing times, defined as periods during which more than 25% of children were likely to be watching television on any channel. Food and beverage advertisements were classified as core (healthy), non-core (unhealthy) or miscellaneous foods. Malta. Whole population, with a focus on children. Food and drinks were the most heavily advertised product category (26.9% of all advertisements) across all channels. The proportion of non-core food/drink advertisements was significantly greater during peak compared with non-peak children's viewing times (52 vs 44.6%; p ≤ 0.001). A majority of advertisements aimed at children are for non-core foods, and are typically shown during family-oriented programmes in the late evening rather than being restricted to children's programmes. 'Taste', 'enjoyment' and 'peer status' were the primary persuasive appeals used in adolescent and child-focused advertisements. This first content analysis of television advertising in Malta suggests that there is scope for the implementation of statutory regulation regarding advertising of foods high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) during times when children are likely to watch television, rather than during children's programmes only. Ongoing, systematic monitoring is essential for evaluation of the effectiveness of regulations designed to reduce children's exposure to HFSS food advertising on television. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Television, computer and portable display device use by people with central vision impairment

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Russell L; Satgunam, PremNandhini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To survey the viewing experience (e.g. hours watched, difficulty) and viewing metrics (e.g. distance viewed, display size) for television (TV), computers and portable visual display devices for normally-sighted (NS) and visually impaired participants. This information may guide visual rehabilitation. Methods Survey was administered either in person or in a telephone interview on 223 participants of whom 104 had low vision (LV, worse than 6/18, age 22 to 90y, 54 males), and 94 were NS (visual acuity 6/9 or better, age 20 to 86y, 50 males). Depending on their situation, NS participants answered up to 38 questions and LV participants answered up to a further 10 questions. Results Many LV participants reported at least “some” difficulty watching TV (71/103), reported at least “often” having difficulty with computer displays (40/76) and extreme difficulty watching videos on handheld devices (11/16). The average daily TV viewing was slightly, but not significantly, higher for the LV participants (3.6h) than the NS (3.0h). Only 18% of LV participants used visual aids (all optical) to watch TV. Most LV participants obtained effective magnification from a reduced viewing distance for both TV and computer display. Younger LV participants also used a larger display when compared to older LV participants to obtain increased magnification. About half of the TV viewing time occurred in the absence of a companion for both the LV and the NS participants. The mean number of TVs at home reported by LV participants (2.2) was slightly but not significantly (p=0.09) higher than NS participants (2.0). LV participants were equally likely to have a computer but were significantly (p=0.004) less likely to access the internet (73/104) compared to NS participants (82/94). Most LV participants expressed an interest in image enhancing technology for TV viewing (67/104) and for computer use (50/74), if they used a computer. Conclusion In this study, both NS and LV participants

  10. Television and Learning Systems (Distance Education). Papers on Information Technology No. 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, A. W.

    Arguing that television has a very important role to play in distance education courses, this paper outlines some of the unique roles that television can play and gives examples of how television can provide learning material not otherwise available to distance learners and help in the development of thinking and learning. Examples of how…

  11. Television, video, and computer game usage in children under 11 years of age.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Ebel, Beth E; Rivara, Frederick P; Zimmerman, Frederick J

    2004-11-01

    To conduct a population-based survey of television and other media usage in young children to determine (1) total media usage; (2) the proportion of children who have televisions in their bedrooms and who eat breakfast or dinner in front of the television; and (3) predictors of parental concern about the amount of television their child watches. Telephone survey administered to 1454 parents of children <11 years old derived from a diverse clinic population. The mean age of the index child was 5.05 years. Mean daily reported child media use was as follows: television (1.45 hours; SD, 1.5); videos (1.1 hours; SD, 1.30); and computer games (0.54 hours; SD, 0.96). Thirty percent of parents reported that their child ate breakfast or dinner in front of the television in the past week, and 22% were concerned about the amount of television that their child watched. In multivariate linear regression, eating breakfast or dinner in front of the television in the past week was associated with increased hours of television viewing (0.38 hours [0.21, 0.54]) and video (0.19 hours [0.04, 0.34]). Having a television in a child's bedroom was associated with increased hours of television (0.25 hours [0.07, 0.43]), video viewing (0.31 hours [0.16, 0.47]), and computer games (0.21 hours [0.10, 0.32]). In general, higher parental education was associated with decreased hours of television and video but not computer games. Older children were 2 to 3 times more likely than younger children to have a television in their bedroom and to have eaten a meal in front of it in the past week. More educated parents were less likely to report that their child had a television in their bedroom and more likely to be concerned about the amount of television their child viewed. Combined video and computer game usage exceeded television usage. Both children of low- and high-income parents are at risk for certain behaviors associated with television usage. Parents whose children watched more television

  12. An assessment of obese and non obese girls' metabolic rate during television viewing, reading, and resting.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Theodore V; Klesges, Lisa M; Debon, Margaret; Klesges, Robert C; Shelton, Mary Lee

    2006-05-01

    While childhood obesity has been linked to television (TV) viewing, specific mechanisms are not well understood. Obesity related to TV viewing might plausibly be related to decreased physical activity, increased food intake, reductions in metabolic rate, or combinations of these. The current investigation sought to ascertain the metabolic effects of quiet rest, listening to a story, watching a passive TV program, and watching an active TV show. Counter-balanced conditions were presented to 90 pre-pubertal girls ranging in body mass index from underweight to obese. In addition, effects between resting energy expenditure (REE) and race, body mass index, skinfold measures, physical activity, pubertal stage and average hours spent viewing TV were explored. Results indicated no significant differences in metabolic rate between weight groups nor between activity conditions (story listening and TV viewing) and rest conditions. A significant dose-response relationship was found in which REE decreased as average weekly hours of TV viewing increased, after adjusting for body mass index and puberty stage. Additionally, later stages of pubertal development compared to earlier stages were related to higher levels of REE. Results of this study suggest that metabolic rate alone cannot account for the consistently observed relationship between television viewing and obesity. Future studies should focus on energy intake, physical inactivity, or combinations of these with metabolic rate in seeking specific mechanisms responsible for television viewing related to obesity.

  13. Food advertising and television exposure: influence on eating behavior and nutritional status of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suzane Mota Marques; Horta, Paula Martins; dos Santos, Luana Caroline

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of food advertising and television exposure on eating behaviour and nutritional status of children and adolescents. It was a cross sectional study developed among 116 students from a private school in Brazil. Socio-demographic and health conditions were evaluated. Anthropometric data, food consumption, physical activity, television viewing habits and behaviour in relation to food advertising were also investigated. Among the results, a 1:2 relationship was identified between the number of televisions and residents per household. Excessive weight was present in 25.8% of subjects and 66.4% of children watched television while eating. Children were exposed to television for a median of 3.0 hours daily (95% CI: 2.9 to 3.6). There was a direct association between attraction to foods advertised and purchasing the product (p < 0.001) and a positive relationship between the number of televisions per household and body weight (r = 0.246, p = 0.015) and the amount of liquid consumed during meals (r = 0.277, p = 0.013). Findings also highlighted the association between watching television while eating and the reduced probability of fruit consumption (p = 0.032), contrasted with a greater likelihood of daily artificial juice intake (p = 0.039). In conclusion, watching television is associated with lower probability of daily consumption of fruits and the number of television at household is positively related to BMI in children and adolescents.

  14. The Impact of Background Television on Parent-Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkorian, Heather L.; Pempek, Tiffany A.; Murphy, Lauren A.; Schmidt, Marie E.; Anderson, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that background television affects interactions between parents and very young children. Fifty-one 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children, each accompanied by 1 parent, were observed for 1 hr of free play in a laboratory space resembling a family room. For half of the hour, an adult-directed television program…

  15. Children & Television: Images in a Changing Sociocultural World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Gordon L.; Asamen, Joy Keiko

    Television now plays a major role in the socialization of children. Set within a multicultural context, this book identifies the social and cultural impact of television on the psychosocial development of children. The book also analyzes major media organizations and projects policies, practices and research directions for the future. Following an…

  16. Educational Uses of Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    The different educational uses of cable television as well as the methods and problems of that use are described in a state of the art review. The Federal Communications Commission regulations and related franchise activity are described, and the methods of using the educational channel as open or closed circuit TV or pay TV are indicated for…

  17. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Radio and T.V. Repair. Course: Television Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arneson, R.; And Others

    One of four individualized courses included in a radio and television repair, curriculum, this course focuses on trouble-shooting procedures for both black and white and color television equipment. The course is comprised of ten units: (1) Introduction to/and Block Diagrams of Television, (2) Television Audio Section Troubles, (3) Television Video…

  18. Reading and Television Viewing Habits of American Adults during Time Spent in Waiting Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spirn, Sharon L.

    In order to determine the reading and television viewing habits of American adults during time spent in waiting rooms, a study observed 100 adults waiting outside the Emergency Treatment Room of John F. Kennedy Hospital in Edison, New Jersey, over a four-week period. Results revealed that more of these adults chose to watch television as an…

  19. Radio and television use in Butte County, California: application to fire prevention

    Treesearch

    William S. Folkman

    1975-01-01

    A sample of Butte County residents were interviewed about their radio and television use habits. Their responses were analyzed in terms of demographic, social, and economic characteristics. The findings can be used in developing more effective fire prevention programs. Most people in Butte County listen to the radio or watch television but they differ widely in the way...

  20. Television in Inner-City Homes: Viewing Behavior of Young Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.

    To determine whether watching violence on television instills aggressive behavior in a child, the television viewing of 27 5-and 6-year old black males from a sample of urban poor families was periodically observed and charted over a 1-year period. Data was collected on each child's family unit, home setting and available media. Longitudinal…

  1. Children and Television: A Basic Concern in Social Science Education. Occasional Paper No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Milton

    Television viewing by children is a major concern of parents, legislators, and educators in the United States today. By high school graduation a young person will have watched 15,000 hours of television as compared to 11,000 to 12,000 hours spent in school. Concerned groups fear a loss of reading ability, the development of a consumer mentality,…

  2. The Impact of Internet and Television Use on the Reading Habits and Practices of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Reichard, Carla A.; Gardner, Anne

    2009-01-01

    How much time do college students spend reading for recreational and academic purposes? Do Internet and television use displace or interfere with reading time? In this study, we used an innovative time-diary survey method to explore whether the time students spend on the Internet or watching television displaces time that would be spent reading…

  3. The Association between Television-Viewing Behaviors and Adolescent Dating Role Attitudes and Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivadeneyra, Rocio; Lebo, Melanie J.

    2008-01-01

    Two hundred and fifteen ninth grade students were surveyed to examine the relationship between television use and gender role attitudes and behavior in dating situations. Findings indicate the existence of a relationship between watching "romantic" television programming and having more traditional gender role attitudes in dating situations.…

  4. The World According to Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Don

    1985-01-01

    Adult guidance and discussion are two elements necessary to transform children from passive consumers into active critics of the social world presented by television. Ways in which teachers can help students scrutinize what they see on television are discussed. (CB)

  5. Television and the Young Viewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakouri, M. Embrahim

    1984-01-01

    Television viewing has negative effects and positive potential for young children. It is evident that children need to be educated in television viewing in order to understand the differences between fantasy and reality, and sponsor motives. (DF)

  6. Coming of Age on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJesus, Ora M.

    Unlike commercial television, whose portrayal of older adults is often negative or degrading, cable television could offer an opportunity for more positive programming directed at older adults. Those who are interested in the portrayal of older adults and aging on television should seek control of the medium available to them, i.e., local cable…

  7. A GUIDE TO INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DIAMOND, ROBERT M., ED.

    THIS IS A GUIDE DESIGNED AS A SINGLE REFERENCE FOR ADMINISTRATORS, TEACHERS, STUDENTS, AND LAYMEN INTERESTED IN TELEVISION FOR A SPECIFIC SCHOOL OR SCHOOL SYSTEM. FOUR EXAMPLES OF SINGLE-ROOM TELEVISION ARE GIVEN AND SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS OF STUDIO TELEVISION ARE PRESENTED. ITS USE IN GUIDANCE AND IN ADMINISTRATION IS EXPLAINED. THE PROBLEMS…

  8. Vocabulary Demands of Television Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Stuart; Rodgers, Michael P. H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated vocabulary coverage and the number of encounters of low-frequency vocabulary in television programs. Eighty-eight television programs consisting of 264,384 running words were categorized according to genre. Television shows were classified as either British or American and then put into the following genres: news, drama,…

  9. Factors in Dubbing Television Comedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabalbeascoa, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Advocates a greater awareness of the factors involved with dubbing television comedies. Considers the translation of jokes and provides an outline of the various kinds of jokes in television shows. Calls for more research on comedy dubbing and television translation in general. (HB)

  10. Television Violence and Your Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sally; Crane, Valerie

    Television programing has a high degree of credibility to the undiscriminating eyes of children. Programing on commercial television is composed of shows produced specifically for children and shows formerly made for adults but now shown as reruns. Observation and imitation of behavior viewed on television by children may be a link to aggressive…

  11. An Evaluation of Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beron, Barbara

    The impact of television on the development of preschool children is considered, and some popular programs are reviewed. After a review of the literature on the effects of television, a rating scale was prepared and applied to a number of broadcast (noncable) television shows aimed at children. Ratings were compared with those of 60 parents of…

  12. 1979 Nielsen Report on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen (A.C.) Co., Chicago, IL.

    The Nielsen data on commercial television viewing and programming contained in this report are estimates of the audiences and other characteristics of television usage as derived from Nielsen Television Index and Nielsen Station Index measurements. Data and brief discussions are provided on the number of commercial and public stations; number of…

  13. Television: The Preschooler's First Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Sherryl Browne

    1978-01-01

    Notes the potential educational and socializing role of television for children in light of the amount of viewing time, sensitivity to nonverbal communications, and their relative ease of influence. The effects of commercials and televised violence are cited, as is television's ability to influence behavior and cognitive functioning. (RAO)

  14. Television and School Building Design in the Asian Region. School Building Digest 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickery, D. J.

    Television plays an important part in the process of teaching and learning in a number of countries in the Asian Region. Although television can be used in any normal classroom, there are a few aspects of television viewing that, if considered at the design stage, will result in greater convenience. This digest sets out the main points that should…

  15. Influences of Television on Children's Behavior: Implications for War and Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    Television is robbing children of their childhood. Moreover, it is destroying children's developing symbolic processes, and inhibiting their creativity and play. Television has remarkable influence over children's behavior. At this point, it is plausible to hypothesize linkages between television viewing and numerous social problems involving…

  16. Your Child and Play/TV. Getting Involved Workshop Guide. A Manual for the Parent Group Trainer. The Best of BES--Basic Educational Skills Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    Containing many handouts for parents, this manual for parent group trainers provides guidelines for conducting workshops on the nature and value of young children's play and on regulating children's television viewing. In addition to the guidelines, the manual offers basic information about play, suggests hands-on activities, and provides a list…

  17. Cable Television Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept. , Albany. Bureau of Mass Communications.

    Included in this compendium are fifteen documents pertaining to cable television for New York State. Two of the documents deal with the relationships between school districts and the cable operators. The arrangements discussed are from the experiences of the Michigan State School System and the Pasadena, California School District. These reveal…

  18. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958…

  19. Tourism on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bruce

    Thirteen half-hour television programs entitled "The Geography of Tourism" developed for use in Wilfrid Laurier University's (Canada) distance education program are discussed. Distance education embraces teaching, or communicating with, students who are not physically in the classroom with the instructor. The central theme of the series…

  20. Pediatrics and Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Edward; And Others

    The Department of Community Medicine of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York City), in cooperation with the TelePrompTer Corporation and with funding from the Health Services and Mental Health Administration of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, has developed a bidirectional television system using coaxial cable which links…

  1. Information Retrieval by Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billowes, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    Bell Canada, the Public School and Collegiate Institute Boards of Ottawa, and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education are collaborating on an educational television project which will provide a retrieval system that can supply any given program at any time under the control of the classroom teacher. Four schools in Ottawa will participate…

  2. PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WIENS, JACOB H.

    EXPERIENCES OF THREE JUNIOR COLLEGES WERE THE BASIS FOR THIS SUMMARY OF (1) PROCEDURES FOR ACQUIRING A TELEVISION CHANNEL, (2) METHODS OF SETTING UP AND FINANCING A STATION, AND (3) PROGRAMS SUITABLE FOR A DISTRICT OWNED STATION. THE COMPLEXITIES OF ACQUIRING A CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT ARE DESCRIBED IN DETAIL, INCLUDING THE FUNCTIONS OF LAWYERS AND…

  3. FIESTA; Minority Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Wes; And Others

    The suggestions for planning, running, and evaluating minority television programing presented in this handbook are based on the experience and example of the FIESTA project (Tucson, Arizona). After initiating the reader into the topic of minority programing, the document disucsses the following topics: broadcast research, origins of the FIESTA…

  4. Television and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George; And Others

    To compile a comprehensive review of English language scientific literature regarding the effects of television on human behavior, the authors of this book evaluated more than 2,500 books, articles, reports, and other documents. Rather than taking a traditional approach, the authors followed a new model for the retrieval and synthesis of…

  5. Educational Television in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vera, Jose Maria

    With an eye toward further collaboration between U.S. and Japanese broadcasters, the overall approach and effect of Japanese educational television (ETV) is examined. While in the United States ETV has no advertisement and is non-profit, the Japanese only require that any advertisement be not obstructive to social education. Their broadcasting has…

  6. Schools and Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Educational Technology Div.

    The papers gathered here are designed to provide a foundation of background information for those charged with the responsibility of formulating school district goals regarding cable television (CATV) and of obtaining the necessary cooperation from the local CATV franchise operators to reach these goals. The position of the National Education…

  7. Skylab IV - Television

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-12-26

    S73-38687 (24 Dec. 1973) --- This "Christmas tree" was created by the three crewmen of the third manned Skylab mission (Skylab 4) aboard the space station in Earth orbit. Food cans were used to fashion the tree. This photograph was made from a television transmission made from a video tape recording on Dec. 24, 1973. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Cable Television for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brigitte L., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    In September 1972, a federally-funded 3-day institute was held, under the auspices of the Drexel University Graduate School of Library Science, to acquaint librarians from local State and Regional public libraries with current developments in the cable television field as they affect library planning and activities. The program utilized several…

  9. "Feedback" For Instructioal Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Wilbur

    A number of different methods have been used by instructional television (ITV) projects to obtain audience feedback, and some of these are now being used in the ITV system in El Salvador. We know that pretesting programs on a representative sample can bring considerable gains in learning. Another feedback source can be a classroom of pupils in the…

  10. Cable Television Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    State and local governments have not been involved in the complexities of cable television interconnection issues in the past despite opportunities. Without their intervention, the result may well be a lack of concern for local public services. However, the entertainment and communications industries will interconnect cable systems without the…

  11. Television and Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Robert L.

    To make adequate use of mass media for children's education, we must recognize that the medium is the message, that the conveyer is the content. The medium itself changes behavior, learning and growth patterns of the child. For example television itself teaches a special kind of visual awareness and enhances the ability to relate non-immediate…

  12. Technology of Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    The technology of cable television (CATV) is one area in which local community officials need to develop knowledge so that their decisions about the structure of CATV within the community will be informed. Thus, this paper is designed to familiarize local decision makers with the technological aspects of cable communications, to isolate specific…

  13. Writing for Instructional Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Bryan, Kenneth G.

    Writing considerations specific to instructional television (ITV) situations are discussed in this handbook written for the beginner, but designed to be of use to anyone creating an ITV script. Advice included in the handbook is based on information obtained from ITV wirters, literature reviews, and the author's personal experience. The ITV…

  14. The Moral Lives of Laboratory Monkeys: Television and the Ethics of Care.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Why do lab monkeys watch TV? This essay examines the preponderance of televisions in primate housing units based in academic research laboratories. Within such labs, television and related visual media are glossed as part-and-parcel of welfare or species-specific enrichment practices intended for research monkeys, a logic that is simultaneously historically- and ontologically-based. In many research centers, television figures prominently in the two inseparable domains of a lab monkey's life: as a research tool employed during experiments, and in housing units where captive monkeys are said to enjoy watching TV during "down time." My purpose is not to determine whether monkeys do indeed enjoy, or need, television; rather, I employ visual media as a means to uncover, and decipher, the moral logic of an ethics of care directed specifically at highly sentient creatures who serve as human proxies in a range of experimental contexts. I suggest that this specialized ethics of animal care materializes Mattingly's notion of "moral laboratories" (Mattingly in Moral laboratories: family peril and the struggle for a good life, University of California Press, Berkeley, 2014), where television mediates the troublesome boundary of species difference among the simian and human subjects who cohabit laboratory worlds.

  15. Telephone Interview Audience Analysis of WPSX-TV--its Measurement and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Samuel S.; And Others

    The results of a telephone survey were used to estimate that 156,000 families watch WPSX-TV, an Educational television station located in central Pennsylvania. Of the sample contacted (N=1,984) 78% watched the station at least once a week and 15% watched daily. During the telephone interview 80% of the respondents agreed to fill out a follow-up…

  16. Television Commercial Preferences of Children Aged 3-6 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtsever Kilicgun, Muge

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: When children watch television, they are exposed to commercial advertisements whose general purpose is to make a positive impression on viewers about a commodity or service in order to drive the sales of that commodity or service. Due to their voiced and moving images, their setup and characters, and their being short and…

  17. Social Trust, Social Partner Time and Television Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patulny, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Social trust is an important phenomenon, but the influence of important time-based measures upon trust has not been examined. Such measures include social contact and anti-social activity, such as television watching, which allows for the co-presence of other people. This paper reports on associations between trust and weighted means of co-present…

  18. Nonverbatim Captioning in Dutch Television Programs: A Text Linguistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilperoord, Joost; de Groot, Vanja; van Son, Nic

    2005-01-01

    In the Netherlands, as in most other European countries, closed captions for the deaf summarize texts rather than render them verbatim. Caption editors argue that in this way television viewers have enough time to both read the text and watch the program. They also claim that the meaning of the original message is properly conveyed. However, many…

  19. Learning Vocabulary from Television: Does Onscreen Print Have a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linebarger, Deborah L.; Moses, Annie; Garrity Liebeskind, Kara; McMenamin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Vocabulary acquisition associated with watching high-quality educational television has been documented in a number of studies. One lingering question is whether adding strategically placed onscreen print to a program can enhance vocabulary acquisition beyond those effects attributable to viewing educational content alone. The present study was…

  20. Television, Dialogue Journals, and Feedback in the EFL Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Mark

    1997-01-01

    An approach used to teach English as a foreign language (EFL) and American culture that addresses the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading writing) in a complementary, non-contrived way is described. Classroom activities combine television viewing, discussion, writing, and reading journal entries. Students watch small segments of…

  1. Maternal Participation and Scaffolding While Coviewing Educational Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neulight, Nina Raquel

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation study examined how mothers participated and scaffolded while watching an educational television program at home with their 3- to 5-year-old children; whether maternal participation and scaffolding predicted children's learning of vocabulary, sight words, and reading skills presented in the program; and reasons (i.e.,…

  2. A forecasting study on Chinese television development (1986 to 2001).

    PubMed

    Sun, L

    1988-01-01

    Given its widespread availability and impact on social values, television is expected to play an important role in China's modernization drive. Necessary to this process is a detailed analysis of the framework in which the technical aspects of television's development are related to political, economic, telecommunications, and social factors. To facilitate this analysis, a Delphi survey was conducted in 1986 as was a cross-impact analysis assisted by computer modelling. Entitled "Future Development of Chinese Television, 1986-2001," the Delphi survey sought to provide decision makers with operationally meaningful assistance in the form of information and analysis. The responses from experts suggested that, if economic growth can be sustained over the next 5 years, telecommunications development will receive top priority in state planning. Cross-impact analysis helps to clarify and promote better understanding of the complex relationships among future events and trends. This analysis tended to confirm the hypothesis that a nongovernmental television station is unlikely to emerge before 1991. Crucial to the success of any television policy (such as cable television service or videotext systems) is legislative support. The appearance of a nongovernmental television station would have a considerable impact on the private sector in China and lead to competition in programming quality, attracting audiences, and further commercialization. While the future development of Chinese television is dependent on economic factors such as purchasing power and the quality of life, its development can thus also be expected to exert a strong influence on economic life.

  3. Associations between eating meals, watching TV while eating meals and weight status among children, ages 10-12 years in eight European countries: the ENERGY cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vik, Frøydis N; Bjørnarå, Helga Birgit; Overby, Nina C; Lien, Nanna; Androutsos, Odysseas; Maes, Lea; Jan, Natasa; Kovacs, Eva; Moreno, Luis A; Dössegger, Alain; Manios, Yannis; Brug, Johannes; Bere, Elling

    2013-05-15

    To assess the association of eating meals, and never watching TV while eating meals, with weight status among children, ages 10-12 years across Europe. 7915 children (mean age: 11.5 years) in eight European countries (Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland) completed a questionnaire at school. Data on meals eaten the day before questionnaire administration and the frequency of eating meals while watching TV were collected. Height and weight of the children were objectively assessed. Multinomial and binary regression analyses were conducted to test associations of eating meals (adjusted for gender and ethnicity) and never watching TV while eating meals (adjusted for gender, ethnicity and total TV time) with overweight/obesity, and to test for country- and socio-demographic differences. The proportions of children reporting eating breakfast, lunch and dinner were 85%, 96%, and 93% respectively, and 55%, 46% and 32% reported to never watch TV at breakfast, lunch and dinner respectively. The children who ate breakfast (OR = 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.7)) and dinner (OR = 0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.5)), had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who did not. The children who never watched TV at lunch (OR = 0.7 (95% CI 0.7-0.8)) and dinner (OR = 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9)) had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who watched TV at the respective meals. The odds of being overweight was lower for children who ate breakfast and dinner compared to those who did not eat the respective meals. The odds of being overweight was lower for children who reported to never watch TV at lunch and dinner compared to those who did. A focus towards meal frequency and watching TV during meals in longitudinal and interventions studies in prevention of overweight and obesity, may contribute to a better understanding of causality.

  4. Associations between eating meals, watching TV while eating meals and weight status among children, ages 10–12 years in eight European countries: the ENERGY cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the association of eating meals, and never watching TV while eating meals, with weight status among children, ages 10–12 years across Europe. Methods 7915 children (mean age: 11.5 years) in eight European countries (Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland) completed a questionnaire at school. Data on meals eaten the day before questionnaire administration and the frequency of eating meals while watching TV were collected. Height and weight of the children were objectively assessed. Multinomial and binary regression analyses were conducted to test associations of eating meals (adjusted for gender and ethnicity) and never watching TV while eating meals (adjusted for gender, ethnicity and total TV time) with overweight/obesity, and to test for country- and socio-demographic differences. Results The proportions of children reporting eating breakfast, lunch and dinner were 85%, 96%, and 93% respectively, and 55%, 46% and 32% reported to never watch TV at breakfast, lunch and dinner respectively. The children who ate breakfast (OR = 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.7)) and dinner (OR = 0.4 (95% CI 0.3-0.5)), had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who did not. The children who never watched TV at lunch (OR = 0.7 (95% CI 0.7-0.8)) and dinner (OR = 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9)) had lower odds of being overweight compared to those who watched TV at the respective meals. Conclusions The odds of being overweight was lower for children who ate breakfast and dinner compared to those who did not eat the respective meals. The odds of being overweight was lower for children who reported to never watch TV at lunch and dinner compared to those who did. A focus towards meal frequency and watching TV during meals in longitudinal and interventions studies in prevention of overweight and obesity, may contribute to a better understanding of causality. PMID:23675988

  5. Television and Its Effects on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lewis

    This paper presents a redefinition of the term "television," examines problems of determining the effects of television on children, reviews research on possible effects of TV on children, and concludes by focusing on prosocial, educational programming. The argument is made that because we are immersed in the phenomenon of television, we…

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on Flemish television: challenges to the television effects hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bulck, J; Damiaans, K

    2004-01-01

    Background: People who watch a lot of medical fiction overestimate the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It has been suggested that this is because CPR is usually shown to be successful on television. This study analysed a popular Flemish medical drama series. Previous research showed that heavy viewing of this series was related to overestimation of CPR success. Method: Content analysis of 70 episodes of "Spoed" in the period between 2001 and the first three months of 2003. Causes and treatment of cardiac arrest and outcome of CPR were recorded in the same way as previous studies. Results: CPR was performed 31 times in the 70 episodes. Only 19% of the patients survived the resuscitation attempt. Most patients were middle aged or older. Causes of arrest were different from those in British or American television series. Conclusions: The low survival rate challenges the idea that heavy viewers adopt the overestimation shown by television. Psychological research shows that people ignore base rate information in the shape of statistics, in favour of vivid, dramatic examples. Showing some impressive examples of success might therefore be more important than the overall success rate. It is suggested that the message of television fiction is that doctors are not powerless and that treatment does not stop once the heart stops beating. This helps to create what has been called an "illusion of efficacy". PMID:15333531

  7. The effects of television food advertisement on children's food purchasing requests.

    PubMed

    Aktaş Arnas, Yaşare

    2006-04-01

    Children's eating habits and their food consumption have direct relations with obesity, diabetes, cancers, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Television advertisements directly affect children's eating habits and their food consumption. This study was conducted in order to examine television advertisements and children's food consumption while watching television and their desire to purchase goods that they see on television advertisements. In the first stage of the study, content analysis of the television advertisements was conducted. In the second stage of the study, a questionnaire (check list) was developed in order to examine children's food consumption while watching television and their purchasing requests while shopping in the supermarket. It was given to 347 mothers who have children aged between 3 and 8 years. When the results of the study were examined it was found that the time devoted to children's programs was approximately 121 min and the advertisements during this period were approximately 35 min. A total of 344 of the 775 television advertisements shown were related to food. It was also found that most of the food advertisements were about candy/chocolate, chips, milk and milk products such as cheese, yoghurt, and breakfast cereals. The results also revealed that 89.6% of the children either drank or ate something while watching television and the food they consumed most while watching television were fruits, soft drinks, popcorn/nuts, cake, chips and candy/chocolate. The results also revealed that 40.3% of the children asked their parents to purchase the goods that they saw on the television advertisements and that 8.9% of them argued with their parents and/or cried in order for their parents to buy that particular product. It was found that the children tended to request more sweetened products such as candy, ice-cream, biscuit, cake or soft drinks. More than half of the food presented in television advertisements were rich in fat and

  8. More Time for Play: 1999 Rambusch Lecturers Urge More Fun, Less Work, and Less TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Marie M.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes presentations by Arlie Hochschild and Henry Labalme at the 1999 Rambusch Lecture Series. Hochschild's lecture focused on concerns regarding dual-career families struggling to meet work and home demands and their impact on children, proposing a national movement for reduced work hours. Labalme discussed television viewing as a public and…

  9. On learning science and pseudoscience from prime-time television programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittle, Christopher Henry

    The purpose of the present dissertation is to determine whether the viewing of two particular prime-time television programs, ER and The X-Files, increases viewer knowledge of science and to identify factors that may influence learning from entertainment television programming. Viewer knowledge of scientific dialogue from two science-based prime-time television programs, ER, a serial drama in a hospital emergency room and The X-Files, a drama about two Federal Bureau of Investigation agents who pursue alleged extraterrestrial life and paranormal activity, is studied. Level of viewing, education level, science education level, experiential factors, level of parasocial interaction, and demographic characteristics are assessed as independent variables affecting learning from entertainment television viewing. The present research involved a nine-month long content analysis of target television program dialogue and data collection from an Internet-based survey questionnaire posted to target program-specific on-line "chat" groups. The present study demonstrated that entertainment television program viewers incidentally learn science from entertainment television program dialogue. The more they watch, the more they learn. Viewing a pseudoscientific fictional television program does necessarily influence viewer beliefs in pseudoscience. Higher levels of formal science study are reflected in more science learning and less learning of pseudoscience from entertainment television program viewing. Pseudoscience learning from entertainment television programming is significantly related to experience with paranormal phenomena, higher levels of viewer parasocial interaction, and specifically, higher levels of cognitive parasocial interaction. In summary, the greater a viewer's understanding of science the more they learn when they watch their favorite science-based prime-time television programs. Viewers of pseudoscience-based prime-time television programming with higher levels

  10. Glossary of Television Terms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    BELOW THE LINE--Physical requirements of a television produc- tion including facilities, studios, services, and staging. BETACAM --The component video...composite NTSC in color resolution. This signal must be translated and encoded before interfacing to NTSC systems. Betacam is a trademark of the Sony...luminance). The PAL, S-M AC. or Betacam component video signal that is equivalent but not equal to the~ ’I’ signal in NTSC. 17 -C- C--See TYPE C FORMAT

  11. Comparative responses to radio and television anti-smoking advertisements to encourage smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Sarah; Wakefield, Melanie

    2010-03-01

    While mass media campaigns have been shown to contribute to reductions in smoking prevalence, little research has been undertaken on the effectiveness of radio advertising as a communication medium. This is despite radio being less expensive and having greater reach than television in some low and middle income countries. We aimed to explore the potential of radio as an adjunct or alternative to televised campaigns by comparing reactions to a radio anti-smoking ad with three televised anti-smoking ads, all of which communicated the serious health consequences of smoking in an emotionally evocative way. In pre-exposure interviews, 18-59-year-old daily smokers (n = 306) were asked to listen to a particular radio time slot/watch a particular television program that they usually listened to/watched, in which the ad was broadcast. Post-exposure interviews were conducted within 3 days of exposure and measured recall, recognition, emotional and cognitive responses, and intentions to quit smoking. Findings indicate that the radio ad showed similar or slightly higher levels than a concurrently aired television ad on understanding (radio: 96%; television: 95%), believability (radio: 89%; television: 90%), concern about smoking (both 77%) and motivation to quit (radio: 51%; television: 45%), and significantly higher levels of unprompted recall (radio: 20%; television: 6%). It also compared well against two subsequent anti-smoking television ads. Emotionally evocative radio advertising may be an effective adjunct or alternative to television advertising in jurisdictions where there are substantial limits on funds available for airing these campaigns, or where the reach of radio outstrips television.

  12. Associations of Television Content Type and Obesity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Janice F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the associations of content types of children's television viewing with subsequent body mass index (BMI) to assess the plausibility of different causal pathways. Methods. We used time-use diary data from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics to measure television viewing categorized by format and educational and commercial content. Analyses were stratified by age because children younger than 7 years are less able to understand the persuasive intent of advertising. BMI z scores in 2002 were regressed on television viewing, sociodemographic variables, mother's BMI, and BMI in 1997 (for older children only). Results. Among children aged 0 to 6 years in 1997, commercial viewing in 1997 was significantly associated with BMI z scores in 2002 in fully adjusted regressions. Among children older than 6 years, commercial viewing in 2002 was associated with 2002 BMI. These results were robust after adjustment for exercise and eating while watching television. Conclusions. The evidence does not support the contention that television viewing contributes to obesity because it is a sedentary activity. Television advertising, rather than viewing per se, is associated with obesity. PMID:20019313

  13. Food appearances in children's television programmes in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Steingerdur; Berg, Christina

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to advertisements cannot fully explain the associations between young children's dietary intake and the time they spend in front of the television. It is therefore of importance to study television content other than advertisements in this aspect. The present study aimed to examine the nature and extent of verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages in children's television programmes on Icelandic public service television. A total of 27 h of children's programmes (domestic and internationally produced) were watched. All verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages were coded, as well as the context in which the foods/beverages were discussed or appeared. Children's programmes on Icelandic public service television. Two food groups were of special interest for their importance from a public health perspective: high-calorie and low-nutrient (HCLN) foods and fruits and vegetables (F&V). The χ 2 test and logistic regression were performed to analyse if the occurrence of the two groups was associated with the context where foods/beverages appeared. Of the 125 different programmes, a food or beverage appeared in 86 %. Of the total food appearances (n 599), HCLN foods accounted for 26 % and F&V for 23 %. HCLN foods were presented as desirable by appearing more frequently with child characters (P<0·01) than F&V. Public service television has the potential to improve the way food and eating is presented in children's programmes, as young childhood is a critical period for founding healthy habits for later life.

  14. Moving Young Children's Play Away from TV Violence. A How-to Guide for Early Childhood Educators: Child Care Providers, Head Start Instructors, Preschool and Kindergarten Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Diane

    Research concerning the effects of television violence on children--particularly young children under the age of six--has found that it tends to desensitize them to aggressive behavior and, in some children, promotes aggressive behavior in their play and other interactions with children and adults. This guide is designed to assist early childhood…

  15. Interactive Cable Television. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Active Learning Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, MN.

    This report describes an interactive video system developed by Active Learning Systems which utilizes a cable television (TV) network as its delivery system to transmit computer literacy lessons to high school and college students. The system consists of an IBM PC, Pioneer LDV 4000 videodisc player, and Whitney Supercircuit set up at the head end…

  16. Parental mediation of television viewing and videogaming of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and their siblings.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Melissa H; Magill-Evans, Joyce; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2015-08-01

    Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder spend considerable time in media activities. Parents play an important role in shaping adolescents' responses to media. This study explored the mediation strategies that parents of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder used to manage television and video game use, factors associated with their use of different strategies, and whether mediation strategies changed over time. A secondary purpose was to examine whether parents applied different mediation strategies to adolescents with autism spectrum disorder versus siblings, and the factors that created stress related to managing media use. Parents of 29 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 16 siblings completed questionnaires at two time points. Parents most frequently supervised their television viewing by watching it with the adolescents, and used restrictive strategies to regulate their videogaming. Parents used similar strategies for siblings, but more frequently applied restrictive and instructive strategies for videogaming with adolescents with autism spectrum disorder than their siblings. Restrictive mediation of television viewing for the adolescents decreased significantly over the year. Adolescents' time spent in media activities, age, and behavior problems, and parents' concerns about media use were significant factors associated with the strategies that parents employed. Parents' stress related to the adolescents' behavioral and emotional responses to parental restrictions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Inside Television: A Guide To Critical Viewing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ned

    This course is divided into seven units, each focusing on a particular aspect of television. The unit topics and some of the subtopics included are: (1) television and the American viewer; (2) the television industry (the networks, the role of the Federal Communications Commission, public television, and the business of television); (3) programs…

  18. Television for Deaf People: Selected Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freebairn, Thomas

    Television projects for the deaf are described with special focus on activities by the Deafness Research and Training Center to develop a cable television cooperative to produce and distribute programs for the deaf. The chapter on cable television considers principles of cable television, the model for a cable television cooperative, steps in…

  19. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... power television and television translator stations. 74.789 Section 74.789 Telecommunication FEDERAL... AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator...

  20. Adolescent Sedentary Behaviors: Correlates Differ for Television Viewing and Computer Use

    PubMed Central

    Babey, Susan H.; Hastert, Theresa A.; Wolstein, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Sedentary behavior is associated with obesity in youth. Understanding correlates of specific sedentary behaviors can inform the development of interventions to reduce sedentary time. The current research examines correlates of leisure computer use and television viewing among California adolescents. Methods Using data from the 2005 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), we examined individual, family and environmental correlates of two sedentary behaviors among 4,029 adolescents: leisure computer use and television watching. Results Linear regression analyses adjusting for a range of factors indicated several differences in the correlates of television watching and computer use. Correlates of additional time spent watching television included male sex, American Indian and African American race, lower household income, lower levels of physical activity, lower parent educational attainment, and additional hours worked by parents. Correlates of a greater amount of time spent using the computer for fun included older age, Asian race, higher household income, lower levels of physical activity, less parental knowledge of free time activities, and living in neighborhoods with higher proportions of non-white residents and higher proportions of low-income residents. Only physical activity was associated similarly with both watching television and computer use. Conclusions These results suggest that correlates of time spent on television watching and leisure computer use are different. Reducing screen time is a potentially successful strategy in combating childhood obesity, and understanding differences in the correlates of different screen time behaviors can inform the development of more effective interventions to reduce sedentary time. PMID:23260837

  1. Benchmarking the Cultivation Approach to Video Game Effects: A Comparison of the Correlates of TV Viewing and Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mierlo, Jan; Van den Bulck, Jan

    2004-01-01

    This study found significant relationships between first- and second-order cultivation measures and TV viewing, but found a relationship with video game play for only two variables in a sample of 322 Flemish 3rd and 6th year secondary school children. This suggests that the absence of a relationship with video game play is not the result of the…

  2. Content of Food Advertising for Young Adolescents on Television.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Setu; Kalra, Swati; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Gupta, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    Food related advertisements on television may have a major influence on the dietary habits and obesity among young adolescents. To evaluate the frequency and typology of food advertisements on most popular television channels, watched by school-going young adolescents in Delhi. Biphasic study to (a) identify the three television channels most frequently watched by administering a questionnaire to 400 school going young adolescents; and (b) view each of these channels for 2 hours per day for 6 days each, and observe the content of advertisements related to foods, beverages, and food outlets. Four hundred and three food related advertisements were viewed over 36 hour on Discovery, MTV and Disney Channels. Among 235 food related advertisements 163 (69.3%) pertained to candies, chocolates and confectionary and 35 (14.8%) to salty snacks. Sugar sweetened soft drinks contributed 90 of 106 (85%) of beverage advertisements. Of 62 advertisements related to food outlets, 59 were of fast food joints. Majority of food advertising content on television most commonly watched by young adolescents is related to unhealthy foods and beverages, igh in energy and low in micronutrient content.

  3. Television Use by Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the relationships between child and adolescent television use motivations and various sociodemographic characteristics, television viewing levels, program preference, and television attitudes. Viewing motivations include learning, passing time, companionship, escape, arousal, and relaxation. Discusses implications within the conceptual…

  4. Computerized Television: New Developments in Television Production Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    Based on the notion that technological and artistic developments in the area of television production affect viewers' comprehension and appreciation of televised programs, this essay examines the impact of telecommunication advances on the industry. The first section briefly considers the technological advances of the last decade in major TV…

  5. The Impact of the Cable Television Industry on Public Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoy, David J.; LeRoy, Judith M.

    This assessment of the possible impact of the cable television industry upon public television relies primarily on audience demographic characteristics as a convenient summary indicator and, in many instances, the only kind of evidence available for review. Primary sources of information used were the national Nielsen ratings; mail surveys of…

  6. PERCEPTION AND TELEVISION--PHYSIOLOGICAL FACTORS OF TELEVISION VIEWING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GUBA, EGON; AND OTHERS

    AN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM WAS DEVELOPED FOR RECORDING EYE-MOVEMENT DATA. RAW DATA WERE IN THE FORM OF MOTION PICTURES TAKEN OF THE MONITOR OF A CLOSED LOOP TELEVISION SYSTEM. A TELEVISION CAMERA WAS MOUNTED ON THE SUBJECTS' FIELD OF VIEW. THE EYE MARKER APPEARED AS A SMALL SPOT OF LIGHT AND INDICATED THE POINT IN THE VISUAL FIELD AT WHICH THE SUBJECT…

  7. Television and contraception.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1986-01-01

    This article consists of excerpts from a speach made on October 19th at the 1986 annual meeting of the Association of Planned Parenthood Professionals by Dr. Luella Klein, President of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) between 1984-85. The speaker described the reaction of US television network to the ACOG's request that the networks air a public service announcement encouraging responsible sexual behavior among the nation's young people. In 1984 the ACOG initiated a public information program aimed at reducing the high number of unwanted births among young people. The ACOG with the help of an advertising agency developed a 27-second public service announcement stressing responsible parenthood and informing young people that they could write or call for further information. A booklet, entitled "Facts," was prepared for distribution to those who inquired. It advised young people to consider postponing sexual intercourse but to use the most effective methods of contraception if they decided to be sexually active. Oral contraceptives for females and condoms for males were recommended as the most effective methods. When the 3 major television networks, i.e., the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), were requested to carry the announcement, all 3 networks claimed the announcement was too controversial to air. These same networks do not hesitate to show blatant, irresponsible sexual behavior repeatedly during their entertainment programming, and commercials with sexual innuendos are routinely accepted for airing by the networks. In July, 1986, the ACOG called a news conference in New York City to inform the news media about the rejection of the announcement by the networks. The conference stimulated considerable interest, and the story was carried by many newspapers and by radio and television news programs. Many of the news accounts of the story contained

  8. Television viewing and forms of bullying among adolescents from eight countries.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Pickett, William; Overpeck, Mary; Craig, Wendy; Boyce, William; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar

    2006-12-01

    Based on theories suggesting that frequent television viewers act and react in hostile, malicious, malevolent, or verbally aggressive ways rather than being physically violent, the present study investigates relationships between television viewing and different forms of bullying. Multilevel regression models were estimated based on cross-sectional data from 31,177 adolescents aged 11, 13, and 15 years from Canada, Estonia, Israel, Latvia, Macedonia, Poland, Portugal, and the United States who participated in the 2001-2002 Health Behavior in School-aged Children Survey. Although all different forms of bullying were associated with television viewing in bivariate analyses, only the verbal forms (i.e. "calling mean names" and "spreading rumors") remained significant in multiple regression models. These relationships were observed consistently in all eight participating countries. However, the association between television viewing and physical forms of bullying such as kicking, pushing, or shoving around, varied across countries. In most weekend TV viewing cultures, frequent television viewers were prone to kick or push another student in addition to verbal forms of bullying, which was not the case in weekday viewing cultures. These results demonstrate the importance of limiting adolescents' time engaged in unsupervised television watching, and the need to motivate adolescents to engage in joint family activities or organized after-school activities.

  9. Analyzing Prosocial Content on T.V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Emily S.; Neale, John M.

    To enhance knowledge of television content, a prosocial code was developed by watching a large number of potentially prosocial television programs and making notes on all the positive acts. The behaviors were classified into a workable number of categories. The prosocial code is largely verbal and contains seven categories which fall into two…

  10. The Smart Parent's Guide to Kids' TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Milton

    This book is a practical, accessible guide for parents on the use of television with children in today's media-focused world. It offers parents practical techniques and strategies to take control of the types of programs and amounts of television their children watch. Parts 1 and 2 of the book contain views on parenting in general and some…

  11. Regulatory axes on food advertising to children on television

    PubMed Central

    Handsley, Elizabeth; Mehta, Kaye; Coveney, John; Nehmy, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates some of the criteria on the basis of which food advertising to children on television could be regulated, including controls that revolve around the type of television programme, the type of product, the target audience and the time of day. Each of these criteria potentially functions as a conceptual device or "axis" around which regulation rotates. The article considers examples from a variety of jurisdictions around the world, including Sweden and Quebec. The article argues that restrictions centring on the time of day when a substantial proportion of children are expected to be watching television are likely to be the easiest for consumers to understand, and the most effective in limiting children's exposure to advertising. PMID:19159485

  12. Graphic Design in Educational Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Beverley

    To help educational television (ETV) practitioners achieve maximum clarity, economy and purposiveness, the range of techniques of television graphics is explained. Closed-circuit and broadcast ETV are compared. The design process is discussed in terms of aspect ratio, line structure, cut off, screen size, tone scales, studio apparatus, and…

  13. Cable Television: Notebook Number Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notebook, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Cable television has been introduced to the public as a revolutionary development in communications, but its history, evolving structure, and present operation indicate otherwise. A few large industrial conglomerates have come to dominate the field of cable television and studies by private institutions and the regulatory activities of the Federal…

  14. Television News Program. 1968 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Public Schools, PA.

    The Pittsburgh Public Schools' television news program, "News 67-68," aimed at the fifth and sixth grade levels is conceived as a means of instructing students about the significance of national and local news events using television as an instructional device. An evaluation of the program was carried out by means of a questionnaire administered…

  15. Cable Television and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Richard

    Universities contain powerful blocs of resistance to new educational technology, perhaps especially to television. University attitudes and structures as well as faculty ignorance, apathy, and resistance affect the development of cable television. No one seems to speak with great confidence and precision about the educational potential of cable.…

  16. The Individualized Television Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Bernard

    This paper describes the development of a reading program based on popular television broadcasts. The project was carried out in one inner-city middle school--seventh and eighth grades--(Rhodes Middle School, Philadelphia). The aims of the project were to use television as a means for children to read and for drawing administrators and teachers…

  17. About Television Reality and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Brice

    The author presents the argument that television reality is a new kind of performance in our environment: we don't respond to it and it doesn't acknowledge our presence. The images and sounds of television reality are "its", and our human organisms must be disconcerted by these "its" occuring in the privacy of our homes. We are being taught to…

  18. Kansas Public Television Network (KPTN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemen, Jack A.

    The plans of the Kansas Public Television Board (KPTB) for development of the Kansas Television Network are detailed for the period extending from FY 1979 to FY 1983; the proposed system is designed to serve the needs of the communities by extending existing capabilities and resources, sharing common resources, and enriching the total system.…

  19. National Leadership for Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, John

    1983-01-01

    In view of the significant impact of television on children, the national leadership must work for increased production of high quality children's programs. Public and private actions are needed to generate both financial and nonfinancial incentives to encourage creativity in the television industry. (Author/MJL)

  20. Children's Television Workshop. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, Joan Ganz

    During the third quarter of 1973 (July through September) the Children's Television Workshop (CTW) evaluated old material and planned new programing. The fourth season of Sesame Street and the second season of The Electric Company were rerun through the summer by most of the public and commercial television stations that carried the shows…

  1. The Social Uses of Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrates that audience members create specific and sometimes elaborate practical actions involving television in order to gratify particular needs in the context of family viewing. Supports a typology of the social uses of television using ethnographic research and current uses and gratifications literature. (JMF)

  2. Empirical Studies on Television Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metallinos, Nikos

    A review of research on television's major compositional factors was undertaken to determine the status of such research and to note the major variables involved in the structure of television pictures. It was found that such research could be grouped in four categories--lighting and color, staging, editing, and sound--and that these areas covered…

  3. Nielsen Television '73; A Look at the Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen (A.C.) Co., Chicago, IL.

    The latest (1973) edition of Nielsen Television presents data on the television audience. Major findings are graphically summarized and data are presented for: number of stations receivable by household; households equipped with TV sets; United States TV households with color television; total United States households using television by time of…

  4. Viewing the Viewers: Viewing Behaviors by Children and Adults during Television Programs and Commercials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Kelly L.; Woolf, Kimberly Duyck; Anderson, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    Reveals that 46% of the time with television was spent in some activity instead of or in addition to looking at the TV. Notes that social interaction was the most common nonviewing activity for all viewers, followed by playing and eating for children and reading for adults. Considers how nonviewing behaviors occurred most often during programming…

  5. SKYLAB (SL)-2 - TELEVISION (INFLIGHT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-27

    S73-26776 (26 May 1973) --- An interior view of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 space station cluster in Earth orbit can be seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the space station. Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, is floating up through the hatch. Food lockers are in the foreground. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Gender constancy and the effects of sex-typed televised toy commercials.

    PubMed

    Ruble, D N; Balaban, T; Cooper, J

    1981-06-01

    The present study represented a cognitive-developmental analysis of the effects of televised, sex-stereotypic information on children's behavior and attitudes toward toy play. The subjects were 50 male and 50 female 4-6-year-olds divided into high and low gender-constancy levels. As the children watched a cartoon, they either saw a commercial of a gender-neutral toy that showed 2 boys or 2 girls playing with the toy, or they saw no commercial (control). As predicted, only the high gender-constant children were differentially affected by the sex-role information in the different commercial conditions. Children at this stage who saw opposite-sex children playing with the toy avoided spending time with the toy and stated verbally that the toy was more appropriate for an opposite-sex sibling, relative to children in the 2 other conditions. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for theories of sex-role development and in terms of the role that television may play in maintaining sex stereotypes and sex-typed behavior.

  7. Longitudinal associations between television in the bedroom and body fatness in a UK cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, A; Rouxel, P; Fitzsimons, E; Kelly, Y; Watt, R G

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess longitudinal associations between screen-based media use (television (TV) and computer hours, having a TV in the bedroom) and body fatness among UK children. Methods: Participants were 12 556 children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study who were followed from age 7 to age 11 years. Associations were assessed between screen-based media use and the following outcomes: body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), and overweight. Results: In fully adjusted models, having a bedroom TV at age 7 years was associated with significantly higher BMI and FMI (excess BMI for boys=0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06–0.52; excess BMI for girls=0.57, 95% CI 0.31–0.84; excess FMI for boys=0.20, 95% CI 0.04–0.37; excess FMI for girls=0.39, 95% CI 0.21–0.57) and increased risk of being overweight (relative risk (RR) for boys=1.21, 95% CI 1.07–1.36; RR for girls=1.31, 95% CI 1.15–1.48) at age 11 years, compared with having no bedroom TV. Hours spent watching TV or digital versatile disks were associated with increased risk of overweight among girls only. Computer use at age 7 years was not related to later body fatness for either gender. Conclusion: Having a TV in the child’s bedroom was an independent risk factor for overweight and increased body fatness in this nationally representative sample of UK children. Childhood obesity prevention strategies should consider TVs in children’s bedrooms as a risk factor for obesity. PMID:28566749

  8. Blurred world view: A study on the relationship between television viewing and the perception of the justice system.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Truong, Florence; Mar, Raymond A; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that distorted representations of reality on television can lead to distorted perceptions of reality among viewers. In this study, 322 individuals in Austria reported their weekly television consumption and whether they believe that there is active practice of capital punishment in Austria, which has been abolished since 1968. The more television participants watched, the more likely they mistakenly believed that there is, or recently was, capital punishment in Austria, even when controlling for participants' age and education. It seems that television has the potential to influence viewers' perception and knowledge of core aspects of society.

  9. Broadcasting presence: immersive television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David; Lodge, Nicholas

    2000-06-01

    Being present at a live event is undeniably the most exciting way to experience any entertainment. This is true whether we are talking about a musical concert, a theatrical performance, a cricket match, or even a firework display. The ability to direct your gaze where you wish, to hear sounds from all around you, to experience the immediacy and expectation of an unscripted happening, to feel the buzz of the crowd and to smell the grass or smoke, are all sensory cues which contribute to the powerful experience of being there. This paper examines the ways in which entertainment media have attempted to recreate experiences which encourage the viewer to suspend disbelief and become part of a remote or recorded event. We introduce the concept of immersive television and look at some of the research, spanning many disciplines of science and art, which the ITC is conducting to explore the potential of this new medium.

  10. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  11. Television viewing by young Hispanic children: evidence of heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Darcy A; Sibinga, Erica M S; Jennings, Jacky M; Bair-Merritt, Megan H; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2010-02-01

    To determine if hours of daily television viewed by varying age groups of young children with Hispanic mothers differs by maternal language preference and to compare these differences with young children with white mothers. Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2000 from the National Survey of Early Childhood Health. Nationally representative sample. One thousand three hundred forty-seven mothers of children aged 4 to 35 months. Subgroups of self-reported maternal race/ethnicity (white or Hispanic) and within Hispanic race/ethnicity, stratification by maternal language preference (English or Spanish). Hours of daily television the child viewed. Bivariate analyses showed that children of English- vs Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television daily (1.88 vs 1.31 hours, P < .01). Multivariable regression analyses stratified by age revealed differences by age group. Among 4- to 11-month-old infants, those of English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts. However, among children aged 12 to 23 and 24 to 35 months, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television than children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.22; IRR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10-2.51, respectively). Compared with children of white mothers, children of both Hispanic subgroups watched similar amounts among the 4- to 11-month-old group. However, among 12- to 23-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more compared with children of white mothers (IRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.18-2.11). Among 24- to 35-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts compared with children of white mothers, but children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched less (IRR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.95). Television-viewing amounts among young children with Hispanic mothers vary by child age and maternal language preference, supporting the

  12. Documents televises et apprentissage linguistique (Televised Materials and Language Learning).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marie-Claude; Berard-Lavenne, Evelyne

    1980-01-01

    Explores the resources of television broadcasts for language instruction, particularly when they provide authentic models for the acquisition of communication skills illustrating the functional aspects of language, discourse strategies, and extralinguistic components of a situation. (MES)

  13. A Structuralist Approach to Television Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robards, Brooks

    Although television is highly dependent on language and semiotic analysis, its form can best be analyzed through the structural notion of transformation. The critic's task becomes the articulation of structural laws intrinsic to television. One such law has to do with how television structures time. Television programming transforms action into…

  14. The "Checkers" Speech and Televised Political Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaningam, Carl

    Richard Nixon's 1952 "Checkers" speech was an innovative use of television for political communication. Like television news itself, the campaign fund crisis behind the speech can be thought of in the same terms as other television melodrama, with the speech serving as its climactic episode. The speech adapted well to television because…

  15. National Television Violence Study. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seawell, Margaret, Ed.

    The National Television Violence Study (NTVS) was a 3-year effort to assess the effects of violence on television, of particular interest to education professionals is the effects of television violence on children. Funded by the National Cable Television Association, the project began in June 1994 and involved the participation of media scholars…

  16. National Television Violence Study. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seawell, Margaret, Ed.

    The National Television Violence Study (NTVS) was a 3-year effort to assess the effects of violence on television, of particular interest to education professionals is the effects of television violence on children. Funded by the National Cable Television Association, the project began in June 1994 and involved the participation of media scholars…

  17. National Television Violence Study. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seawell, Margaret, Ed.

    The National Television Violence Study (NTVS) was a 3-year effort to assess the effects of violence on television, of particular interest to education professionals is the effects of television violence on children. Funded by the National Cable Television Association, the project began in June 1994 and involved the participation of media scholars…

  18. The Work of the Television Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Robert

    This book describes the various functions of the television journalist--in the United States and Great Britain--and supplies knowledge enabling members of a television team to work successfully as a unit. Separate chapters are devoted to discussions of (1) the world of television journalism, (2) writing for television, (3) the role of the…

  19. Presidential Elections in the Age of Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Jennifer Truran

    2000-01-01

    Explores the role of television in politics providing historical examples of the use of television and its possible effects on elections. Focuses on television as the dominant medium for politics, the connections among television, advertising, and political money, and ideas for reforming the electoral process. Includes a teaching activity on…

  20. Television and the American Family. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jennings, Ed.; Bryant, J. Alison, Ed.

    Noting drastic changes in both television and the family since the 1990 edition, this revised volume provides an extensive consideration of television's role in the American family, from the uses families make of television and how extensions such as remote controls and VCRs affect usage, to the meanings families have for television, families'…

  1. Some Structural Characteristics of Music Television Videos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Donald L.; Fry, Virginia H.

    1987-01-01

    Indicates, by analyzing two types of montage structures, that music television is a hybrid form of television programing displaying visual characteristics of both television commercials and drama. Argues that this amalgam of different characteristics gives music television its distinctive look and power as a promotional tool for the record…

  2. Are parental concerns for child TV viewing associated with child TV viewing and the home sedentary environment?

    PubMed

    Pearson, Natalie; Salmon, Jo; Crawford, David; Campbell, Karen; Timperio, Anna

    2011-09-27

    Time spent watching television affects multiple aspects of child and adolescent health. Although a diverse range of factors have been found to be associated with young people's television viewing, parents and the home environment are particularly influential. However, little is known about whether parents, particularly those who are concerned about their child's television viewing habits, translate their concern into action by providing supportive home environments (e.g. rules restricting screen-time behaviours, limited access to screen-based media). The aim of this study was to examine associations between parental concerns for child television viewing and child television viewing and the home sedentary environment. Parents of children aged 5-6 years ('younger' children, n = 430) and 10-12 years ('older children', n = 640) reported usual duration of their child's television (TV) viewing, their concerns regarding the amount of time their child spends watching TV, and on aspects of the home environment. Regression analyses examined associations between parental concern and child TV viewing, and between parental concern and aspects of the home environment. Analyses were stratified by age group. Children of concerned parents watched more TV than those whose parents were not concerned (B = 9.63, 95% CI = 1.58-17.68, p = 0.02 and B = 15.82, 95% CI = 8.85-22.80, p < 0.01, for younger and older children respectively). Parental concern was positively associated with younger children eating dinner in front of the television, and with parental restriction of sedentary behaviours and offering sedentary activities (i.e. TV viewing or computer use) as a reward for good behaviour among older and young children. Furthermore, parents of older children who were concerned had fewer televisions in the home and a lower count of sedentary equipment in the home. Children of concerned parents watched more TV than those whose parents who were not concerned. Parents appear to recognise

  3. Trends in food advertising to children on free-to-air television in Australia.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Bridget; Chapman, Kathy; King, Lesley; Hebden, Lana

    2011-04-01

    The issue of marketing unhealthy food to children and its contribution to childhood obesity has become a highly politicised debate in Australia. The aim of this study was to compare recent television food advertising patterns in 2008 to previously published Australian research on television advertising from 2006 and 2007, to examine any changes following policy debates. Television broadcasting was recorded for two weekdays and two weekend days between 6:00 and 22:00 in February 2008 for all three commercial television channels. Food advertisements were classified as core/healthy, non-core/unhealthy or miscellaneous. Television audience data were obtained to determine broadcast periods corresponding to children's peak viewing times. The overall rate of food advertising decreased over time: from seven food advertisements/hour/channel in 2006/07 to five in 2008. However, the relative contribution of non-core food advertising to overall food advertising remained stable. In 2008, the proportion of food advertisements for non-core foods was significantly higher during children's peak viewing times (p<0.01). Australian children remain exposed to a disproportionate volume of television advertisements for unhealthy foods on commercial television, which are shown during time periods when the highest numbers of children are watching. Regulations to limit unhealthy food advertising during the time periods when a significant number of children are watching are required. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  4. Childhood and Adolescent Television Viewing and Antisocial Behavior in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Lindsay A.; McAnally, Helena M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether excessive television viewing throughout childhood and adolescence is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood. METHODS: We assessed a birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972–1973, at regular intervals from birth to age 26 years. We used regression analysis to investigate the associations between television viewing hours from ages 5 to 15 years and criminal convictions, violent convictions, diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and aggressive personality traits in early adulthood. RESULTS: Young adults who had spent more time watching television during childhood and adolescence were significantly more likely to have a criminal conviction, a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and more aggressive personality traits compared with those who viewed less television. The associations were statistically significant after controlling for sex IQ, socioeconomic status, previous antisocial behavior, and parental control. The associations were similar for both sexes, indicating that the relationship between television viewing and antisocial behavior is similar for male and female viewers. CONCLUSIONS: Excessive television viewing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood. The findings are consistent with a causal association and support the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation that children should watch no more than 1 to 2 hours of television each day. PMID:23420910

  5. Family structure and children's television viewing and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Sarah; Salmon, Jo; Crawford, David

    2006-05-01

    This study aimed to examine how physical activity (PA) and television (TV) viewing time of children varied according to family structure. In 2001, 5- to 6-yr-old (N = 296) and 10- to 12-yr-old (N = 919) children and their parents were recruited from 19 state elementary schools in Melbourne, Australia. Children's PA was objectively assessed using accelerometers worn for 8 d. Sociodemographic and family structure information and time spent watching TV was collected via questionnaire completed by parents. ANCOVA revealed that, after controlling for socioeconomic status and age of child, boys without any siblings spent more minutes per day watching TV (153.2 +/- 71.3) compared with those who have siblings (129.0 +/- 64.4, P < 0.05). There were also significant differences in TV viewing time between boys with one sibling (125.5 +/- 59.9), two siblings (141.9 +/- 70.1), or three or more siblings (111.6 +/- 62.6, P < 0.001). Girls from single-parent families (145.7 +/- 85.1) spent significantly more minutes per day watching TV compared with girls from two-parent families (125.1 +/- 67.7, P < 0.05). Girls with siblings spent more minutes per day in PA (148.3 +/- 67.7) compared with those who were an only child (131.0 +/- 58.9, P < 0.05). There were significant interactions between parental status and having a sibling, with PA, and also with TV viewing for girls and between parental status and having a brother with PA for boys. There were also significant interactions between having an older sibling and child's sex with PA and between number of siblings and sex with TV viewing. Family structure may be an important source of influence on children's PA and TV viewing time. Aspects of family structure interact differently with PA and TV viewing, suggesting interventions may need to be tailored with consideration of the family structure of children.

  6. Children's hostile attribution bias is reduced after watching realistic playful fighting, and the effect is mediated by prosocial thoughts.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Hostile attribution bias (HAB) has been found to characterize aggressive children. Watching prosocial media has been shown to have positive effects on children, and the general learning model has been used to account for these observations. This study tested the hypotheses derived from this theory that exposure to playful fighting would lead to a reduction in HAB, both immediately and after a 1-day delay, and that this effect would be mediated by positive thoughts. Four studies exposed child participants (N=242) to playful fighting versus neutral behavior primes and then tested their HAB. In two studies, thoughts about playful fighting and about children were assessed and tested as mediators. The main hypotheses were supported. The positive effect of watching playful fighting on HAB was evident immediately but not after 1 day. This effect was mediated by positive thoughts. In line with the general learning model, watching playful fighting reduced HAB in children, and positive thoughts contribute to this effect. This extends the realm of the general learning model and suggests interventions to help children avoid aggression. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Relationship of Life Stage to Motives for Using Television and the Perceived Reality of TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostman, Ronald E.; Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A model specifying relationships between life stage, motives for using television and the perceived reality of television was tested with data from 140 telephone interviews of adults living in Southern Illinois. The adults ranged in age from 18 to 87 years. Life stage was related to five of the 11 motives for using television: learning things,…

  8. TV Fights: Women and Men in Interpersonal Arguments on Prime-Time Television Dramas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    Studies the behaviors of women and men represented in interpersonal arguments in prime-time television dramas. Finds a weak link between actual argument behaviors and those on television, thereby socializing viewers in a manner inconsistent with reality. Suggests that television arguments are guided more by the needs of the medium that a need to…

  9. Television Viewing at Home: Age Trends in Visual Attention and Time with TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Decribes age trends in television viewing time and visual attention of children and adults videotaped in their homes for 10-day periods. Shows that the increase in visual attention to television during the preschool years is consistent with the theory that television program comprehensibility is a major determinant of attention in young children.…

  10. The Color TV; Radio and Television Service 3: 9787.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The 135 hour course is the terminus of the series of radio and television service courses. The basic course includes a study of color signal demodulation and matrix circuits, the color-picture tube, alignment and trouble shooting of a color television receiver. Laboratory experiments and live production work on color television receivers…

  11. Excessive TV viewing and cardiovascular disease risk factors in adolescents. The AVENA cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive television (TV) viewing might play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to examine the independent associations between TV viewing and CVD risk factors in adolescents. Methods A sample of 425 adolescents, aged 13- to 18.5-year-old, was included in this study. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein (apo) A-1, apo B-100, and lipoprotein(a) levels were determined. A composite CVD risk score was computed based on age-, sex-, sexual maturation- and race-standardized triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and glucose. TV viewing was self-reported. Results Two hundred and twenty-five adolescents (53%) who spent >3 hrs/day watching TV were considered as the "high TV viewing" group. Ninety-nine adolescents (23%) from the total sample were classified as overweight according to International age- and sex-specific BMI values. The high TV viewing group had significantly less favorable values of HDL-cholesterol, glucose, apo A1 and CVD score, independent of age, sex, sexual maturation, race and weight status. There was a significant interaction effect of TV viewing × weight status (P = 0.002) on WC, and the negative influence of TV viewing on WC persisted in the overweight group (P = 0.031) but was attenuated in non-overweight adolescents (P > 0.05). Conclusion Excessive TV viewing seems to be related to an unfavorable CVD risk factors profile in adolescence. Reducing TV viewing in overweight adolescents might be beneficial to decrease abdominal body fat. PMID:20500845

  12. Television violence and its effect on children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M O

    1996-04-01

    Television (TV) has become a large part of children's activities. Much discussion exists as to the level of violence on TV programs and its effect on children's behavior. This article reviews the literature, discusses social issues, and presents some interventions available to nursing professionals to assist children and families in coping with the impact of TV on children's lives.

  13. High speed imaging television system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William O.; Rabenhorst, David W.

    1984-01-01

    A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

  14. Television Time among Brazilian Adolescents: Correlated Factors are Different between Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Mark Stephen; Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Silva, Roberto Jerônimo dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of excess television time and verify correlated factors in adolescent males and females. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 2,105 adolescents aged from 13 to 18 years from the city of Aracaju, Northeastern Brazil. Television time was self-reported, corresponding to the time spent watching television in a typical week. Several correlates were examined including age, skin color, socioeconomic status, parent education, physical activity level, consumption of fruits and vegetables, smoking status, alcohol use, and sports team participation. Results. The prevalence excess television time (≥2 hours/day) in girls and boys was 70.9% and 66.2%, respectively. Girls with low socioeconomic status or inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables were more likely to have excess television time. Among boys, those >16 years of age or with black skin color were more likely to have excess television time. Conclusions. Excess television time was observed in more than two-thirds of adolescents, being more evident in girls. Correlated factors differed according to sex. Efforts to reduce television time among Brazilian adolescents, and replace with more active pursuits, may yield desirable public health benefits. PMID:24723826

  15. Family Socioeconomic Status Moderates Associations Between Television Viewing and School Readiness Skills.

    PubMed

    Ribner, Andrew; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Blair, Clancy

    2017-04-01

    We examined whether the negative relation between television viewing that exceeds the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and school readiness varied by family income. Data were collected from 807 children from diverse backgrounds. Parents reported hours of television viewing, as well as family income. Children were assessed using measures of math, knowledge of letters and words, and executive function (EF). Television viewing was negatively associated with math and EF but not with letter and word knowledge. An interaction between television viewing and family income indicated that the effect of television viewing in excess of the AAP recommended maximum had negative associations with math and EF that increased as a linear function of family income. Furthermore, EF partially mediated the relation between television viewing and math. Television viewing is negatively associated with children's school readiness skills, and this association increased as family income decreased. Active efforts to reinforce AAP guidelines to limit the amount of television children watch should be made, especially for children from middle- to lower-income families.

  16. Televison Literacy: Making the T.V. Work for Young Children, Parents and Early Childhood Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Wayne

    Television plays a dominant role in our society; however, television on its own is neither bad nor good. It offers children benefits such as education and entertainment, but television can impact negatively on young lives by detracting children from other activities such as physical and dramatic play. The effect of television on children's…

  17. Health messages on television commercials.

    PubMed

    Wallack, L; Dorfman, L

    1992-01-01

    Television is an important source of health information in the United States, yet little research has focused on the presentation of general health issues on television. This preliminary study reports on the health-related content of television commercials found on a typical television day. We conducted a content analysis of a composite day of television comprising 20 hours randomly selected over a three week period (April-May 1989). Findings are presented regarding health messages found in commercial time--advertisements, public service announcements (PSAs), editorials, and promotions for upcoming programs. Overall, 31% of the 654 commercial spots contained health messages. Most health messages were claims of good nutrition in food and beverage advertisements. PSAs comprise 1.4% of the 20-hour sample and 5.8% of the commercial time. Health messages appeared in 38% of PSAs, accounting for less than seven minutes. Not one PSA addressed tobacco, alcohol, or diet--the three leading behavioral risk factors for poor health. PSAs are usually seen as a mechanism by which the public health community can alert the public to important health issues. Given the declining pool of PSA time, public health educators will need to seek alternative strategies for influencing television content, such as media advocacy. In addition, further research on audience interpretation and response to commercial messages is suggested.

  18. The Fun Families Study: intervention to reduce children's TV viewing.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Markham, Christine M; Addy, Robert C; Greisinger, Anthony; Murray, Nancy G; Brehm, Brenda

    2010-02-01

    Media consumption may contribute to childhood obesity. This study developed and evaluated a theory-based, parent-focused intervention to reduce television and other media consumption to prevent and reduce childhood obesity. Families (n = 202) with children ages 6-9 were recruited from a large, urban multiethnic population into a randomized controlled trial (101 families into the intervention group and 101 into the control group), and were followed for 6 months. The intervention consisted of a 2-hour workshop and six bimonthly newsletters. Behavioral objectives included: (i) reduce TV watching; (ii) turn off TV when nobody is watching; (iii) no TV with meals; (iv) no TV in the child's bedroom; and (v) engage in fun non-media related activities. Parents were 89% female, 44% white, 28% African American, 17% Latino, and 11% Asian, mean age 40 years (s.d. = 7.5); 72% were married. Children were 49% female, mean age 8 years (s.d. = 0.95). Sixty-five percent of households had three or more TVs and video game players; 37% had at least one handheld video game, and 53% had three or more computers. Average children's weekday media exposure was 6.1 hours. At 6 months follow-up, the intervention group was less likely to report the TV being on when nobody was watching (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.23, P < 0.05), less likely to report eating snacks while watching TV (AOR = 0.47, P < 0.05), and less likely to have a TV in the child's bedroom (AOR = 0.23, P < 0.01). There was a trend toward reducing actual media consumption but these outcomes did not reach statistical significance. Effective strategies to reduce children's TV viewing were identified.

  19. [Association between television viewing and obesity in Peruvian women].

    PubMed

    Poterico, Julio A; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Loret de Mola, Christian; Miranda, J Jaime

    2012-08-01

    To assess the association between frequency of television viewing, overweight and obesity in a nationally representative sample of Peruvian women. Secondary analysis of the Demographic and Health Survey 2008 including women aged from 15 to 49 years old. The outcome variables were obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m²) and overweight (body mass index >25 but <30 kg/m²) whereas the exposure variable was frequency of television viewing (never, occasionally, almost every day). Logistic regression taking into account the multistage study design and adjusting for potential confounders was used. Results were presented as adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 21,712 women were included in the analysis. The prevalence of overweight was 34.7% (95%CI 33.8%;35.7%), and obesity prevalence was 14.3% (95%CI 13.6%;15.1%). Compared to women who never watched television, those who reported watching television occasionally and almost daily were more likely to be obese: aOR 1.7 (95%CI 1.3;-2.3) and aOR 2.6 (95%CI 2.0;3.5), respectively. The magnitude of this association was lower for overweight: aOR 1.2 (95CI 1.3;2.3) and aOR 1.6 (95%CI 1.1;1.4), respectively. The strength of the association was greater in urban areas. Frequency of television viewing was associated with overweight and obesity in Peruvian women and the strength of this association varied by area of residence. These findings can provide input to strategies for obesity prevention in the Peruvian context.

  20. Parental sedentary restriction, maternal parenting style, and television viewing among 10- to 11-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Jago, Russell; Davison, Kirsten K; Thompson, Janice L; Page, Angie S; Brockman, Rowan; Fox, Kenneth R

    2011-09-01

    To examine whether parenting styles or practices were associated with children's television (TV) viewing. A total of 431 parent-child dyads (10- to 11-year-old children) from Bristol, United Kingdom, were included. Child and parent TV viewing were self-reported and categorized as <2, 2 to 4, or >4 hours/day. Children reported maternal parenting style (authoritarian, authoritative, or permissive). Child-reported maternal and paternal sedentary restriction scores were combined to create a family-level restriction score. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine whether child TV viewing was predicted by parenting style or family restriction. A greater proportion of children with permissive mothers watched >4 hours of TV per day, compared with children with authoritarian or authoritative mothers (P = .033). A greater proportion of children for whom both parents demonstrated high restriction watched <2 hours of TV per day (P < .001). The risk of watching 2 to 4 hours (vs <2 hours) of TV per day was 2.2 times higher for children from low-restriction families (P = .010). The risk of watching >4 hours (vs <2 hours) of TV per day was 3.3 times higher for children from low-restriction families (P = .013). The risk of watching >4 hours of TV per day was 5.2 times higher for children with permissive (versus authoritative) mothers (P = .010). Clinicians need to talk directly with parents about the need to place limitations on children's screen time and to encourage both parents to reinforce restriction messages.

  1. Television Viewing, Walking Speed, and Grip Strength in a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    KEEVIL, VICTORIA L.; WIJNDAELE, KATRIEN; LUBEN, ROBERT; SAYER, AVAN A.; WAREHAM, NICHOLAS J.; KHAW, KAY-TEE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Television (TV) watching is the most prevalent sedentary leisure time activity in the United Kingdom. We examined associations between TV viewing time, measured over 10 yr, and two objective measures of physical capability, usual walking speed (UWS) and grip strength. Methods Community-based participants (n = 8623; 48–92 yr old) enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer—Norfolk study attended a third health examination (3HC, 2006–2011) for measurement of maximum grip strength (Smedley dynamometer) and UWS. TV viewing time was estimated using a validated questionnaire (n = 6086) administered during two periods (3HC, 2006–2007; 2HC, 1998–2000). Associations between physical capability and TV viewing time category (<2, 2 < 3, 3 < 4, and ≥4 h·d−1) at the 3HC, 2HC, and using an average of the two measures were explored. Sex-stratified analyses were adjusted for age, physical activity, anthropometry, wealth, comorbidity, smoking, and alcohol intake and combined if no sex–TV viewing time interactions were identified. Results Men and women who watched the least TV at the 2HC or 3HC walked at a faster usual pace than those who watched the most TV. There was no evidence of effect modification by sex (Pinteraction = 0.09), and in combined analyses, participants who watched for <2 h·d−1 on average walked 4.29 cm·s−1 (95% confidence interval, 2.56–6.03) faster than those who watched for ≥4 h·d−1, with evidence of a dose–response association (Ptrend < 0.001). However, no strong associations with grip strength were found. Conclusions TV viewing time predicted UWS in older adults. More research is needed to inform public health policy and prospective associations between other measures of sedentariness, such as total sitting time or objectively measured sedentary time, and physical capability should be explored. PMID:25785826

  2. Do parental co-viewing and discussions mitigate TV-induced fears in young children?

    PubMed

    Paavonen, E J; Roine, M; Pennonen, M; Lahikainen, A R

    2009-11-01

    While excessive television viewing has been associated with negative outcomes in children's welfare, parental co-viewing has been suggested as an effective way to prevent these negative effects. The objective of the present study is to specify some social contexts of co-viewing and to assess whether co-viewing modifies the effects of media on children's TV-related fears. The study is based on a representative random sample of 331 children aged 5-6 years. It is based on parental reports of children's TV-related fears and family television viewing practices. Parental co-viewing and discussion of television programmes with the child were found to be associated with higher rates of children's TV-related fears, high television exposure in general and watching adults' television programmes. The association between TV-related fears and co-viewing remained significant even after controlling for gender, maternal education, family income and the quantity and quality of television viewing. Co-viewing and TV-related discussions increased the risk for TV-related fears nearly fourfold (adjusted odds ratio 3.92, 95% confidence interval 1.37-11.17 and adjusted odds ratio 3.31, 95% confidence interval 1.33-8.20, respectively). The findings suggest that co-viewing and discussing television programmes are more common in families where television exposure is high. Because both co-viewing and discussing television programmes were associated with higher fear scores regardless of the quantity and quality of television exposure, the research shows that in everyday life co-viewing may not be done in such a way that it leads to a reduction of children's fears. More studies are needed to explore the co-viewing practices of families in more detail.

  3. Mediators of the relationship between maternal education and children's TV viewing.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Kylie; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Campbell, Karen; Salmon, Jo

    2007-07-01

    Maternal education is consistently found to be inversely related to children's television viewing and is associated with aspects of the family television environment. This study investigates whether family television environment mediates the relationship between maternal education and children's television viewing. Parents of 1484 children reported maternal education, time their child spends watching television, and 21 aspects of the family television environment (potential mediators) during 2002 and 2003. Separate regression analyses were conducted in 2006 for each potential mediator that met two initial conditions for mediation (associated with both maternal education and children's television viewing (p<0.10)), to assess whether inclusion reduced the association between maternal education and children's television viewing. Multivariable regression assessed the combined impact of all mediators. Twelve of 21 potential mediators met the initial conditions for mediation. Inclusion of each resulted in decreased beta values (3.2% to 15.2%) for the association between maternal education and television viewing. Number and placement of televisions in the home appeared to have the greatest mediating effect, followed by frequency of eating dinner in front of the television with the child and rules about television viewing during mealtimes. Together, the 12 mediators accounted for more than one-third of the association between maternal education and children's television viewing time. This study suggests the strong inverse relationship between maternal education and children's television viewing is partly mediated by aspects of the family television environment.

  4. Hours of television viewing and sleep duration in children: a multicenter birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Marcella; Sunyer, Jordi; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Iñiguez, Carmen; Torrent, Maties; Vioque, Jesús; Turner, Michelle C; Julvez, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine potential associations between hours of television viewing and sleep duration in children. To examine the association between hours of television viewing and sleep duration in preschool and school-aged children. Longitudinal, multicenter study among birth cohorts in Menorca, Sabadell, and Valencia from the Spanish Infancia y Medio Ambiente (environment and childhood) project. The study sample included 1713 children (468 from Menorca, 560 from Sabadell, and 685 from Valencia). Parent-reported child television viewing duration measured in hours per day at 2 and 4 years of age in Sabadell and Valencia and at 6 and 9 years of age in Menorca. Parent-reported child sleep duration measured in hours per day at 2 and 4 years of age in Sabadell and Valencia and at 6 and 9 years of age in Menorca. In cross-sectional analysis, children with longer periods of television viewing reported at baseline (≥ 1.5 hours per day) had shorter sleep duration. Longitudinally, children with reported increases in television viewing duration over time (from <1.5 to ≥ 1.5 hours per day) had a reduction in sleep duration at follow-up visits. Results were similar when examining television viewing duration as a continuous variable, with each 1 hour per day of increased viewing decreasing sleep duration at follow-up visits (β = -0.11; 95% CI, -0.18 to -0.05). Associations were similar when television viewing duration was assessed during weekends and after adjusting for potential intermediate factors (child executive function and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms) and confounders (child physical activity level, parental mental health status, maternal IQ, and maternal marital status). Children spending longer periods watching television had shorter sleep duration. Changes in television viewing duration were inversely associated with changes in sleep duration in longitudinal analysis. Parents should consider avoiding long periods of

  5. Television and Creativity; The Effect of Viewing Certain Categories of Commercial Television Broadcasting on the Divergent Thinking Abilities of Intellectually Gifted Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Stanley Lawrence

    Research sought to determine what effect viewing increased amounts of specific types of televised material would have upon the creative performance of highly intelligent children. Gifted students in grades 4, 5, and 6 of a suburban district were given Guilford's tests of creativity and then divided into seven groups. Six of these watched a…

  6. The diffusion of television in India.

    PubMed

    Singhal, A; Doshi, J K; Rogers, E M; Rahman, S A

    1988-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1987, the number of television sets increased by 10 times in India. Television now reaches an audience of about 800 million, 10% of the population. 3 main reasons account for the rapid diffusion of television in India: the role of communication satellites in expanding access to television signals, the introduction and popularity of soap operas, and the increasing revenues to the national television system (Doordarshan) from commercial advertising. Hum Log, the 1st soap opera on the national network, was patterned after pro-development soap operas in Mexico and addresses social issues such as family communication, women's status, small family size, national integration, dowry, and alcoholism. The main lesson from the Hum Log experience was that indigenous soap operas can attract large audiences and substantial profits. A 1987 household survey indicated that television ownership is more common in urban areas (88% of households) than rural areas (52%) and among households with incomes above RS 1500 (75% of television owners). The commercialization of Indian television has precipitated a policy debate about television's role. Supporters of further expansion of television services cite popular will, the potential to use this medium for educational development, high advertising incomes, the ability of satellite television to penetrate rural areas, and high government expenditures for television broadcasting. On the other hand, detractors of the commercialization policy argue that television promotes consumerism, widens the gap between the urban elite and the rural poor, disregards regional sociocultural norms, and diverts funding from development programs in areas such as health and education.

  7. Impact of television on the quality of sleep in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Pablo E; Diaz, Blanca; Damiani, Felipe; Villarroel, Luis; Núñez, Felipe; Bruni, Oliviero

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of different habits concerning television (TV) use and the time of day in which TV is watched on the sleep quality of young children. Parents of 100 healthy children (58% boys, mean age of 2.7 ± 1.5 years) attending a routine health check completed the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) and a questionnaire concerning TV and electronic media use. Children were divided into those with a normal (SDSC-) or abnormal (SDSC+) questionnaire score. TV viewing habits were compared between groups. The total sleep time and total TV viewing time were not different between groups. A TV set was inside each child's bedroom in 51% of participants. Children with a TV in their bedroom showed significantly higher scores in the "sleep terrors," "nightmares," "sleep talking," and "tired when waking up" responses of the SDSC (P = 0.02, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.01, respectively). Children with a TV in their room had an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.29 (1.08-9.99) for having an abnormal SDSC. Evening TV viewers had significantly higher SDSC scores compared with those who watched TV earlier during the day (P = 0.04). The presence of a TV set in the child's bedroom was associated with significant reductions in the quality of young children's sleep. Evening exposure to TV was associated with significantly worse sleep quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. International epidemic of childhood obesity and television viewing.

    PubMed

    Guran, T; Bereket, A

    2011-12-01

    Childhood obesity is one of the most serious global public health challenges of the 21st century. The prevalence of this problem has increased at an alarming rate in many countries. The main causes of childhood obesity are; sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy eating patterns, genetic factors, socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, media and marketing, and the physical environment. Children are clearly being targeted as a receptive market by the manufacturing industry. Undoubtedly, television provides one of the most powerful media through which products can be advertised. Furthermore, food advertising accounted for the largest percentage of these advertisements in virtually all countries. Detailed nutritional analysis of food advertisements identified that up to 90% of food products have a high fat, sugar or salt content. Therefore TV viewing is recently identified as one of the risk factors contributing to development of childhood obesity by several mechanisms. This review provides some facts and figures about the global trend of rising obesity among children, amount and content of television and especially food advertisements being watched by children and its possible mechanisms how to cause adverse effects on children's health and contribute to childhood obesity.

  9. The Personal and Social Contributions of Television as Perceived by College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Jon T.; Breen, Myles P.

    While the perceived role of television may differ considerably from its actual function, such perception plays an important part in determining individual response. First-year college students' opinions of the personal and social contributions of television were measured in a survey using students in a basic speech class. Students thought…

  10. Myths, Men, & Beer: An Analysis of Beer Commercials on Broadcast Television, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postman, Neil; And Others

    Theory and research on the processes of early social learning in children has indicated that television and television commercials play an important role in children's internalization of cultural meanings, interpretations, and values, whether or not the commercials children see are intended for or directed at them. Between the ages of 2 and 18,…

  11. Apollo experience report: Television system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, P. P.

    1973-01-01

    The progress of the Apollo television systems from the early definition of requirements through the development and inflight use of color television hardware is presented. Television systems that have been used during the Apollo Program are discussed, beginning with a description of the specifications for each system. The document describes the technical approach taken for the development of each system and discusses the prototype and engineering hardware built to test the system itself and to perform the testing to verify compatibility with the spacecraft systems. Problems that occurred during the design and development phase are described. Finally, the flight hardware, operational characteristics, and performance during several Apollo missions are described, and specific recommendations for the remaining Apollo flights and future space missions are made.

  12. Trends in US newspaper and television coverage of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David E; Pederson, Linda L; Mowery, Paul; Bailey, Sarah; Sevilimedu, Varadan; London, Joel; Babb, Stephen; Pechacek, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The news media plays an important role in agenda setting and framing of stories about tobacco control. The purpose of this study was to examine newspaper, newswire and television coverage of tobacco issues in the USA over a 7-year period. Analyses of 2004-2010 news media surveillance system data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health, based on content analysis and quantitative methods. Information on extent of news coverage, and types of tobacco-related themes, were examined from articles in 10 newspapers and 2 major newswires, as well as transcripts from 6 national television networks. The overall extent of newspaper, newswire and television stories about tobacco, and level of coverage by specific media outlets, varied over time, especially for newspapers. Nevertheless, there was an average of 3 newspaper stories, 4 newswire stories, and 1 television tobacco-related story each day. Television stories were more likely to contain cessation/addiction or health effects/statistics themes and less likely to contain secondhand smoke or policy/regulation themes than newspaper/newswire stories. There was more variation in the choice of tobacco theme among individual newspapers/newswires than television media outlets. News coverage of tobacco in the USA was relatively constant from 2004 to 2010. Audiences were more likely to be exposed to different tobacco themes in newspapers/newswires than on television. Tracking information about tobacco news stories can be used by advocates, programs and others for planning and evaluation, and by researchers for hypothesis generation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Children's Television: More than Mere Entertainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Aimee Dorr; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The authors propose that television, while entertaining children, also socializes them. To support this conclusion they review the literature regarding effects of television content on aggressive and prosocial behavior and social attitudes. (Editor)

  14. Racism and the Media: Racism in Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marquita

    1971-01-01

    The major problem confronting black people working in the television industry today is that of communicating with the black community, despite the nature of television and its system of operation. (DM)

  15. An Examination of Television Viewing Motivations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Alan M.

    1981-01-01

    Identifies nine motivations for television viewing and relates these to age, viewing levels, television attitudes of attachment and reality, and program preferences. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of uses and gratifications research perspectives. (JMF)

  16. Broadcasts for a billion: the growth of commercial television in China.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, C

    1987-01-01

    At present, Chinese television reaches 35% of the population (80-90% in urban areas) and is used by the government as a source of education and information. In recognition of the potential market represented by 1.1 billions consumers, Western advertisers have commissioned elaborate market research studies. Drama, sports, news, and movies are consistently identified as the favorite type of programming among Chinese television viewers. About 75% of Beijing adults watch television daily, making the medium both an important target for advertising campaigns and a way for Westerners to influence Chinese business and government leaders. Western advertisers have tended to concentrate their investments in the more urban, affluent regions where products have the greatest likelihood of being sold. There has been a recent trend, however, toward industrial commercials, with British and French companies buying television time to promote their image as partners in China's modernization. Key to the future of commercial advertising on Chinese Television. In many provinces, local television stations have developed a unique character and portray different sociocultural values than the national channel. Outside advertisers have sometimes experienced problems with local networks that substitute local advertising without informing the network. To correct this situation, the government is enacting pro-sponsor regulations that forbid the preemption of the national channel and its advertisements. At the same time, efforts are being made to improve relationships with local television stations by either paying them a fee or airing local commercials on the national network.

  17. Television advertising, not viewing, is associated with negative dietary patterns in children.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B; Freeman, B; King, L; Chapman, K; Baur, L A; Gill, T

    2016-04-01

    Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing is a contributor to poor diets and weight gain. Television food advertising, in particular, has been the focus of research and policy discussions. We aimed to quantify the specific impact of television advertising, as distinct from television viewing generally, on children's usual diet. Methods Four hundred seventeen Australian children aged 10-16 participated in an online survey, which assessed television viewing habits and consumption of 12 frequently advertised unhealthy foods/drinks. Consumption of these foods/drinks was dichotomized (less weekly, weekly or more) and summed (1 point for each item consumed weekly or more) to give cumulative consumption scores. After adjusting for age and socioeconomic status, there was strong evidence of an increase in unhealthy food score (P < 0.001), drink score (P = 0.002) and food/drink combined score (P < 0.001), with increasing commercial television viewing. The link between television viewing and poor diet was strongest for children who watched the most commercial television, and those who were actually exposed to advertisements embedded within programs. This association between advertisement exposure and poor diet emphasizes the need for public policy intervention to reduce children's food advertising exposures. © 2015 World Obesity.

  18. Impact of changes in television viewing time and physical activity on longevity: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C; Sampson, Joshua N; Matthews, Charles E

    2015-12-18

    Television viewing is a highly prevalent sedentary behavior among older adults, yet the mortality risks associated with hours of daily viewing over many years and whether increasing or decreasing viewing time affects mortality is unclear. This study examined: 1) the long-term association between mortality and daily viewing time; 2) the influence of reducing and increasing in television viewing time on longevity and 3) combined effects of television viewing and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on longevity. Participants included 165,087 adults in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health (aged 50-71 yrs) who completed questionnaires at two-time-points (Time 1: 1994-1996, and Time 2: 2004-2006) and were followed until death or December 31, 2011. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate Hazard Ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) with self-reported television viewing and MVPA and all-cause mortality. Over 6.6 years of follow-up, there were 20,104 deaths. Compared to adults who watched < 3 h/day of television at both time points, mortality risk was 28% greater (CI:1.21,1.34) those who watched 5+ h/day at both time-points. Decreasing television viewing from 5 + h/day to 3-4 h/d was associated with a 15% reduction in mortality risk (CI:0.80, 0.91) and decreasing to <3 h/day resulted in an 12% lower risk (CI:0.79, 0.97). Conversely, adults who increased their viewing time to 3-4 h/day had an 17% greater mortality risk (CI:1.10, 1.24) and those who increased to 5+ h/day had a 45% greater risk (CI:1.32, 1.58), compared to those who consistently watched <3 h/day. The lowest mortality risk was observed in those who were consistently active and watched < 3 h/day of television. We confirm that prolonged television viewing time was associated with greater mortality in older adults and demonstrate for the first time that individuals who reduced the amount of time they spent watching television had lower mortality. Our

  19. Digital television system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of digital techniques for transmission of pictorial data is discussed for multi-frame images (television). Video signals are processed in a manner which includes quantization and coding such that they are separable from the noise introduced into the channel. The performance of digital television systems is determined by the nature of the processing techniques (i.e., whether the video signal itself or, instead, something related to the video signal is quantized and coded) and to the quantization and coding schemes employed.

  20. Television in the Schools: Instructional Television and Educational Media Resources at the National Public Broadcasting Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In 1964, in "A Guide to Instructional Television," editor Robert M. Diamond defined "educational television" as a "broad term usually applied to cultural and community broadcasting which may include some programs for in-school use" (p. 278). His definition for instructional television was "television used within the formal classroom context on any…

  1. Children, Radio and Television--Now and in the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Feilitzen, Cecilia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes aspects of television and radio broadcasting in Sweden. Particular attention is given to children's programs, children's viewing patterns, the influence of TV on children, and how to improve the quality of radio and television programs. (Author/SS)

  2. Medical and Nursing Students’ Television Viewing Habits: Potential Implications for Bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Matthew J.; Faden, Ruth R.; Nolan, Marie T.; Bodensiek, Edwin; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Television medical dramas frequently depict the practice of medicine and bioethical issues in a strikingly realistic but sometimes inaccurate fashion. Because these shows depict medicine so vividly and are so relevant to the career interests of medical and nursing students, they may affect these students’ beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions regarding the practice of medicine and bioethical issues. We conducted a web-based survey of medical and nursing students to determine the medical drama viewing habits and impressions of bioethical issues depicted in them. More than 80% of medical and nursing students watch television medical dramas. Students with more clinical experience tended to have impressions that were more negative than those of students without clinical experience. Furthermore, viewing of television medical dramas is a social event and many students discuss the bioethical issues they observe with friends and family. Television medical dramas may stimulate students to think about and discuss bioethical issues. PMID:19085461

  3. ILLINOIS JOURNAL OF EDUCATION--ILLINOIS SCHOOLS AND EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PAGE, RAY

    THIS PUBLICATION CONTAINS THIRTEEN ARTICLES ON THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION IN ILLINOIS. AMONG THE TOPICS COVERED ARE MULTICHANNEL MICROWAVE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, INNOVATIVE TELEVISION, OPEN- AND CLOSED-CIRCUIT TELEVISON, TELEVISION IN PSYCHOLOGY, AND STATE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION LEGISLATION. THE USE OF THE TELEVISION MEDIUM IN VARIOUS…

  4. Television the Medium, the Message and Nutritional Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Laurie A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a review of research linking nutritional health and body image attitudes with television viewing. Highlights include content analyses of advertisements and programming; audience uses of television; television as reality; socialization of attitudes and television; television, body image and self-esteem; television and health behaviors; and…

  5. Globe Watch. Teachers' Guide for Globe Watch IV: Mexico, Canada, Finland, Japan, the Arms Race, the Iran-Iraq War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ginny

    To enhance the use of the Globe Watch IV public television series, produced jointly by Hampden-Sydney College (Virginia) and the University of North Carolina Center for Public Television, each lesson in this guide provides: (1) a statement of the objective of the program; (2) a synopsis of the issue discussed; (3) background information; (4) brief…

  6. Preferred color correction for digital LCD TVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung Tae; Kim, Choon-Woo; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kang, Dong-Woo; Shin, Hyun-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Instead of colorimetirc color reproduction, preferred color correction is applied for digital TVs to improve subjective image quality. First step of the preferred color correction is to survey the preferred color coordinates of memory colors. This can be achieved by the off-line human visual tests. Next step is to extract pixels of memory colors representing skin, grass and sky. For the detected pixels, colors are shifted towards the desired coordinates identified in advance. This correction process may result in undesirable contours on the boundaries between the corrected and un-corrected areas. For digital TV applications, the process of extraction and correction should be applied in every frame of the moving images. This paper presents a preferred color correction method in LCH color space. Values of chroma and hue are corrected independently. Undesirable contours on the boundaries of correction are minimized. The proposed method change the coordinates of memory color pixels towards the target color coordinates. Amount of correction is determined based on the averaged coordinate of the extracted pixels. The proposed method maintains the relative color difference within memory color areas. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated using the paired comparison. Results of experiments indicate that the proposed method can reproduce perceptually pleasing images to viewers.

  7. Documentary in American Television: Form, Function, Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleum, A. William

    The documentary movement in American television is explored. Analyzed are the forms and functions of television documentary and its heritage in other media (print, still photography, motion pictures, radio, theater). The major achievements in these media and in television, such as "See It Now,""Victory at Sea," and many news documentaries are…

  8. Television Planning in the 1952 Eisenhower Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkin, Steve M.

    This report of a study of the activities of a secret planning board, formed to promote the nomination of Dwight Eisenhower through the intensive use of television, concludes that the significance of television planning in the 1952 Eisenhower campaign had less to do with the outcome of the election than with the first massive use of television with…

  9. Interaction between Siblings in Primetime Television Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Mary S.

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes three primetime family sitcoms in order to describe the nature of sibling interaction in television families. Research on television families is examined, and questions are raised concerning the value of television sibling images as role models for real people, and the effects of these models on family and peer relationships. (27…

  10. Proceedings of the Symposium on Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, Inc., New York, NY.

    The papers given at a symposium on cable television (CATV) are collected in this volume. The chairman of the symposium notes that "the phrase 'cable television' is not totally pertinent since we are talking about a wired-city concept that may encompass many services other than television." He prefers the term "broadband communications network,"…

  11. HOW TELEVISION CAN TRAIN YOUR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1961

    EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION MAY SOLVE THE PROBLEMS OF TEACHER INSERVICE TRAINING. IN SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA, 21 SCHOOL DISTRICTS HAVE COOPERATED IN PRODUCING A TEACHER INSERVICE PROGRAM. THE TELEVISION CENTER OF THE STATE COLLEGE PRODUCES AND DIRECTS THE TELECASTS. A COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STATION DONATES ITS FACILITIES AND AIR TIME. A PERMANENT…

  12. Television and Reading: A Research Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.

    Drawing on communications, psychological, and educational studies, this paper examines television's influence on reading performance and school achievement. The first section of the paper reviews and synthesizes major studies dealing with the introduction of television in a community and with correlations between television use and school…

  13. Why Television Advertising Is Deceptive and Unfair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsen, Rose K.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses many topics, including proposals to limit television advertisers' access to children; the dependence of television commercials on involuntary, mnemonic learning; the way television commercials' bypassing of rationality is aided by cognitive processing of music, rhythms, and familiar sensory events; and ideas for correcting the damage…

  14. Leisure and Television: A Study in Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myersohn, Rolf Bernard

    This seven-chapter essay investigated determinants of television viewing. An introductory chapter suggests the prematurity of considering social effects and the desirability of examining social determinants of television. Chapter One contains a summary of television viewing as studied in the context of communications, leisure, and time allocation…

  15. Predictors for the Effects of Televised Executions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEnteer, James B.

    This paper discusses the controversy that has traditionally surrounded the issue of capital punishment. When a Texas television reporter sought permission to televise the execution of a convicted murderer by lethal injection in 1983, arguments were advanced both for and against televising executions. A recent poll shows that 84% of Americans…

  16. Children's Rights: Television Programmes Aired in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrier, Sheela; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on aspects of children's rights as portrayed in television. The results of a six-month research study show analyses of television content of Channel 5, which is the only free-to-air, 24-hour, English-language entertainment channel in Singapore. The results identify the role of television in assisting Singapore to meet its…

  17. Televised Dance: Evaluation of Three Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oglesbee, Frank W.

    A study was conducted to determine whether dance-trained, television-trained, and regular television viewing audiences would evaluate different approaches to televising dance differently. Three versions of a dance performance were videotaped: (1) version A, a one-camera, one-shot recording; (2) version B, a two-camera, real-time-edited approach,…

  18. Television and Its News: A Discrepancy Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Gary Warren

    This exploratory endeavor utilized a functional discrepancy model of mass communication research to examine the audience experience with television generally and its news in particular. Specifically, gratifications sought from television in general and gratifications perceived as being obtained from television news are analyzed for a random sample…

  19. The Selling of Cable Television 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Cable Television Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 1972 Cable Television Marketing Workshop reviewed in depth a wide variety of marketing and public relations techniques as they pertain to cable television. The workshop was attended by representatives of commercial television systems throughout the United States; it was intended to disseminate the sales and marketing experience of those…

  20. CATV; A History of Community Antenna Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Mary Alice Mayer

    The development of community antenna television (CATV) is traced from its beginnings in various local efforts to bring television to areas of poor reception. The history of federal, state, and municipal regulatory practices and problems are examined, and the potential applications of cable television are discussed in some detail. (JY)

  1. Television and Oracy: A Psychological Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Grant

    Australian studies show that television assists in the socialization of immigrants, changing and shaping their self-images and perceptions of reality and fostering their interpersonal communication skills. Studies conducted to evaluate the introduction of television have found that television helps in the vocabulary development of young children.…

  2. Television Violence: Implications for Violence Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jan N.; Hasbrouck, Jan E.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the scientific and public-opinion debate on the impact television violence in America has on aggression and violence. Research supports the view that television violence contributes to children's level of aggressiveness and subsequent violence and criminality. Describes attempts to improve the quality of television programming for children…

  3. EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, THE NEXT 10 YEARS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHRAMM, WILBUR

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A COMPILATION OF STUDIES ON THE PROBLEMS AND POTENTIALS OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION DURING THE TIME PERIOD 1961-71. SIX TOPIC AREAS WERE COVERED--(1) RECOMMENDATIONS, (2) THE FUTURE OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, (3) THE COMMUNITY JOB OF EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, (4) THE PROBLEM OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS, (5) THE PROBLEM OF FINANCING, (6) THE…

  4. 21 CFR 1020.10 - Television receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., under normal usage, are not accessible to the user. (4) Television receiver means an electronic product designed to receive and display a television picture through broadcast, cable, or closed circuit television... from that component or circuit failure which maximizes x-radiation emissions. (4) Critical component...

  5. 21 CFR 1020.10 - Television receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., under normal usage, are not accessible to the user. (4) Television receiver means an electronic product designed to receive and display a television picture through broadcast, cable, or closed circuit television... from that component or circuit failure which maximizes x-radiation emissions. (4) Critical component...

  6. 21 CFR 1020.10 - Television receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., under normal usage, are not accessible to the user. (4) Television receiver means an electronic product designed to receive and display a television picture through broadcast, cable, or closed circuit television... from that component or circuit failure which maximizes x-radiation emissions. (4) Critical component...

  7. 21 CFR 1020.10 - Television receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., under normal usage, are not accessible to the user. (4) Television receiver means an electronic product designed to receive and display a television picture through broadcast, cable, or closed circuit television... from that component or circuit failure which maximizes x-radiation emissions. (4) Critical component...

  8. 21 CFR 1020.10 - Television receivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., under normal usage, are not accessible to the user. (4) Television receiver means an electronic product designed to receive and display a television picture through broadcast, cable, or closed circuit television... from that component or circuit failure which maximizes x-radiation emissions. (4) Critical component...

  9. Television News as Drama: An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    An observer can identify a trend in television news presentation style toward the dramatic, not only in the sets and the personnel, but more importantly in the choice of what is deemed newsworthy. A thesis is proposed by many suggesting that television is a regular ritual of many viewers of which news is a minor part and that television's first…

  10. TV And Your Child; In Search of an Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannitt, Merrill, Ed.

    Like all television programing, programs for children are aimed to produce profit. Since cartoon shows are inexpensive, they are staples of children's television. These programs can offer sponsors a pure, undifferentiated audience at which to aim commercials for toys and breakfast cereals. In addition to cartoon shows, children watch "Sesame…

  11. The Night Sky, The Forgotten Nature: Uncovering the Impact of One Television Programme on Astronomy Communication in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazemi, P.

    2017-09-01

    In 2001, two brothers known as the Saffarianpour brothers started a television programme on Iranian state television called Aseman-e-shab (The Night Sky). The programme, which explores astronomy and space science, became one of the longest-running television shows in the history of Iranian television and played a major role in the public communication of science and astronomy. It inspired many of the next generation of Iranian scientists and astronomers and played a key role in the advancement of science journalism and science communication in Iranian media. This article outlines a brief history of the show and its producer and describes the role they played in Iranian society.

  12. Food and beverage advertising during children's television programming.

    PubMed

    Scully, P; Macken, A; Leddin, D; Cullen, W; Dunne, C; Gorman, C O

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of overweight and obese children in developed countries poses a substantial threat to long-term health. One well-described factor is the amount of time spent watching television, with exposure to food advertising a known influence on food preferences and consumption patterns. Following recent formulation of new rules regarding advertising of food during children's programming, we sought to examine the advertising content in children-specific television broadcasts on Irish television. Advertisement content analysis for 5 weekdays of children-specific television broadcasting from 0700 to 1700 hours on Irish television was performed. Data were coded and transferred to SPSS for analyses. Food and beverage advertisements were coded based on type of product, nutritional content, intended age group and outcome. 322 advertisements were broadcast during the recording period. 31 % (n = 101) of advertisements related to food or beverage products with 66.3 % (n = 68) of food advertisements being for foods that should be eaten in moderation. The most frequently recorded food advertisement was for fast food products (27.3 %, n = 24), followed by sweets/candy (21.6 %, n = 19) and dairy products (17.0 %, n = 15). The most frequently recorded beverage advertisement was for natural orange juices (46.2 %, n = 6). 54.7 % (n = 176) of advertisements were adult specific with 27.3 % (n = 88) being children specific. All food and beverage advertisements were associated with a positive outcome (n = 322). These results demonstrate that food and beverages depicted in advertisements during children's programming are predominantly unhealthy foods with high salt and sugar contents. The findings from this study again highlight the ongoing need for new rules regarding food advertising in children's programming.

  13. Television viewing and alcohol advertising with alcohol expectancies among school-aged children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Chiu, Yu-Chan; Ting, Te-Tien; Liao, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Wei J; Chen, Chuan-Yu

    2016-05-01

    This study is aimed to examine the strength of association between television watching and potential exposure to alcohol advertising with multidimensional alcohol expectancies in school-aged children. A total of 779 4th (age 10) and 768 6th (age 12) grade students were recruited from 17 public elementary schools in northern Taiwan in 2006, with two waves of follow-up at 6 months apart. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information concerning individual characteristics, parental attributes, past-week screen time, drinking behaviors, and alcohol expectancies. Data of aired alcohol advertisements at baseline were obtained from the Nielsen Media Research Advertising Information Services; parenting styles were ascertained from the 1st follow-up. Alcohol Expectancies Questionnaire-Children version was used to measure alcohol expectancies (AEs) at baseline and the 2nd follow-up. Nearly 27% of students reported watching television for more than two hours per day and 58% watching television after 9 p.m. Dimension-related heterogeneity exists in the relationship between TV viewing and alcohol advertising with AEs. With statistical adjustment for covariates, spending more than two hours watching TV per day was associated with increased levels of positive AEs "Promoting Relaxation or Tension Reduction [PRTR]" (β=1.52, 95% CI=0.92, 2.12; p<0.001); the exposure to alcohol advertising was associated with decline in negative AEs "Deteriorated Cognitive and Behavioral Function" (e.g., >8.0 ads: β=-1.06, 95% CI=-1.66, -0.47, p<0.01). Greater screen time is associated with elevated positive expectancies of PRTR and alcohol advertising exposure is linked with lowered negative expectancies in late childhood. School-based anti-underage drinking programs may consider integrating the media literacy curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ESA and Television - bringing space to Europe's television viewers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habfast, Claus

    2007-05-01

    Getting ESA into the TV news of its Member States is an important element of the Agency's communication strategy. TV news ingages the public in space activities, leading to political support and, ultimately, funding for future programmes. "ESA TV" is a trusted source of space images and stories for Europe's broadcasters. Space is too good a story not to be part of the news.

  15. Color-televised medical microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. A.; Peck, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Color television microscopy used at laboratory range magnifications, reproduces a slide image with sufficient fidelity for medical laboratory and instructional use. The system is used for instant pathological reporting between operating room and remotely located pathologist viewing a biopsy through this medium.

  16. Adjective Identification in Television Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd Rahim, Normaliza

    2013-01-01

    Learning the Malay language has been a challenging task for foreign language learners. Learners have to learn Malay grammar structure rules in order to write simple sentences. The word choice is important in constructing a sentence. Therefore, the study focuses on the use of adjectives in television advertisements among Korean learners at Hankuk…

  17. Vallecito Middle School's Educational Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixie Elementary School District, San Rafael, CA.

    Vallecito Middle School in San Rafael (California) has been using video production techniques since 1981, and the staff has observed many positive changes in learning, attitudes, and behavior resulting from the use of television. Videotaping has facilitated learning in science, physical education, English, and social studies classes. Guest experts…

  18. Cable Television in Sedalia, Missouri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamkin, Kathryn Janel

    A field study was conducted of the status of cable television in Sedalia, Missouri. Based on interviews of city council members and staff members of Cablevision, the Sedalia cable franchise holder, the following issues were investigated: (1) subscription rates; (2) franchise negotiations; (3) quality of existing services; and (4) possible…

  19. Future Development of Instructional Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, H. J.; Denzau, A. T.

    Instructional television (ITV) has been little used in the nation's schools because ITV hardware and software has been unreliable and expensive and teachers have yet to learn to use ITV. The perfection of inexpensive videotape recorders/players (VTR) and inexpensive tapes and cameras could remedy the problem. A package consisting of 10 mobile…

  20. Prosocial Television and Children's Fantasy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra; And Others

    This study, part of a larger study on the effects of prosocial television and environmental variables on children's behavior, analyzed fantasy structure and content characteristics. Also investigated were possible effects of treatment and sex. Following a baseline period, 142 lower-class children were assigned to one of four experimental…

  1. Cable Television and Public Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranberg, Gilbert

    One of the most promising applications of cable television (CATV) is municipal surveillance of public areas for protection against crime, fire detection, control of air pollution, and traffic. Thus far, however, the CATV industry has made minimal efforts to realize the potential of CATV for community protection--the use of cable for public safety…

  2. Selective Exposure to Televised Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Charles; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Present the results of a study conducted to determine the correlation between children's selection of television programs and aggression. The regression analysis suggests that the relationship between viewing and aggression may be attributable to selective exposure rather than the reverse viewing-causes-aggression sequence. (Author/JVP)

  3. New Trends in Television Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richeri, Giuseppe

    A phenomenon which tends to transform the function and methods of traditional television consumption is the gradual reduction of its "mass" dimensions, which tend to disappear for an increasing share of the audience. This reduction of the mass dimension ranges from fragmentation of the audience to its segmentation, and, in the most…

  4. Violence on Canadian Television Networks

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Over the past twenty years, the question of the effects of violence on television has figured prominently in public opinion and hundreds of studies have been devoted to this subject. Many researchers have determined that violence has a negative impact on behavior. The public, broadcasters and political figures all support the idea of reducing the total amount of violence on television - in particular in shows for children. A thousand programs aired between 1993 and 2001 on major non-specialty television networks in Canada were analyzed: TVA, TQS, as well as CTV and Global, private French and English networks, as well as the English CBC Radio and French Radio-Canada for the public networks. Method The methodology consists of a classic analysis of content where an act of violence constitutes a unit of analysis. Results The data collected revealed that the amount of violence has increased regularly since 1993 despite the stated willingness on the part of broadcasters to produce programs with less violence. The total number of violent acts, as well as the number of violent acts per hour, is increasing. Private networks deliver three times more violence than public networks. Researchers have also noted that a high proportion of violence occurs in programs airing before 21:00 hours, thereby exposing a large number of children to this violence. Conclusion Psychological violence is taking on a more significant role in Canadian Television. PMID:19030148

  5. Violence on canadian television networks.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Guy

    2004-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, the question of the effects of violence on television has figured prominently in public opinion and hundreds of studies have been devoted to this subject. Many researchers have determined that violence has a negative impact on behavior. The public, broadcasters and political figures all support the idea of reducing the total amount of violence on television - in particular in shows for children. A thousand programs aired between 1993 and 2001 on major non-specialty television networks in Canada were analyzed: TVA, TQS, as well as CTV and Global, private French and English networks, as well as the English CBC Radio and French Radio-Canada for the public networks. The methodology consists of a classic analysis of content where an act of violence constitutes a unit of analysis. The data collected revealed that the amount of violence has increased regularly since 1993 despite the stated willingness on the part of broadcasters to produce programs with less violence. The total number of violent acts, as well as the number of violent acts per hour, is increasing. Private networks deliver three times more violence than public networks. Researchers have also noted that a high proportion of violence occurs in programs airing before 21:00 hours, thereby exposing a large number of children to this violence. Psychological violence is taking on a more significant role in Canadian Television.

  6. UHF Television: Breaking the Monolith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheim, Jerrold

    1975-01-01

    Advocates that the Federal Communications Council should remove unnecessary UHF restrictions to dramatically increase the number of UHF stations, put all existing stations on the UHF band, and license new low-power stations on the UHF channels, arguing that television fails to serve a sizable number of viewers. (Author/JM)

  7. The Words of Children's Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.

    1984-01-01

    Dialog features--communication flow, language structures, and meaning/content--and nonverbal formal features of six children's television programs are examined to determine if there is dialog simplification, if certain dialog characteristics differentiate among shows sampled, and if there are different combinations of linguistic features and…

  8. Dictionary of Radio and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannett, W. E.

    This dictionary presents definitions of both the well-established terms and many new ones that have come into use with the advances that have taken place in the fields of radio and television. In many cases extended definitions are given in order to describe briefly elementary principles and circuits, while newer and more complex devices and…

  9. Sexuality, Television and Broadcast Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Melvin S.

    This monograph provides a rationale for contemporary guidelines for the television and broadcast network management of sexual content in proposed progam materials. Beginning with a brief outline of the professional practices and responsibilities of broadcast standards editors, it then explores the relationships between sexual development,…

  10. Regulatory Developments in Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes major rule making actions since 1972, current rules and regulations, and guidelines for citizen participation in FCC (Federal Communications Commission) processes related to cable television regulation. A large portion of the report pertains to current rules and regulations in the areas of certificate of compliance,…

  11. Cable Television: Uses in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Polly

    This is the first volume of a two-part study of the role of cable television in education; its purposes are to discuss the implications of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruling that all cable systems in the top 100 markets must reserve one channel for educational purposes and to stimulate the interests of educators by making them…

  12. Television, Censorship and South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giffard, C. Anthony; Cohen, Lisa

    Network television news has often been accused of inciting and prolonging incidents of public violence, whether riots or terrorism, and in South Africa this type of thinking has led to increasingly stringent restrictions on both domestic and foreign media covering the violent unrest there. A study determined a chronology of events and analyzed the…

  13. Biometric Communication Research for Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, M. F.

    Biometric communication research is defined as research dealing with the information impact of a film or television show, photographic picture, painting, exhibition, display, or any literary or functional texts or verbal stimuli on human beings, both as individuals and in groups (mass audiences). Biometric communication research consists of a…

  14. On the road to obesity: Television viewing increases intake of high-density foods.

    PubMed

    Blass, Elliott M; Anderson, Daniel R; Kirkorian, Heather L; Pempek, Tiffany A; Price, Iris; Koleini, Melanie F

    2006-07-30

    Television viewing (TVV) has been linked with obesity, possibly through increased sedentary behavior and/or through increased ingestion during TVV. The proposition that TVV causes increased feeding, however, has not been subjected to experimental verification until recently. Our objective was to determine if the amount eaten of two familiar, palatable, high-density foods (pizza and macaroni and cheese) was increased during a 30-min meal when watching TV. In a within-subjects design, one group of undergraduates (n = 10) ate pizza while watching a TV show of their choice for one session and when listening to a symphony during the other session. A second group of undergraduates (n = 10) ate macaroni and cheese (M&C). TVV increased caloric intake by 36% (one slice on average) for pizza and by 71% for M&C. Eating patterns also differed between conditions. Although the length of time to eat a slice of pizza remained stable between viewing conditions, the amount of time before starting another slice was shorter during TVV. In contrast, M&C was eaten at a faster rate and for a longer period of time during TVV. Thus, watching television increases the amount eaten of high-density, palatable, familiar foods and may constitute one vector contributing to the current obesity crisis.

  15. Participant characteristics and intervention processes associated with reductions in television viewing in the High Five for Kids study

    PubMed Central

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M.; Horan, Christine M.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Price, Sarah; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Mitchell, Kathleen; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the High Five for Kids intervention effect on television (TV) within subgroups, examine participant characteristics associated with process measures and assess perceived helpfulness of TV intervention components. Method High Five (RCT of 445 overweight/obese 2–7 year-olds in Massachusetts [2006–2008]) reduced TV by 0.36 hours/day. 1-year effects on TV, stratified by subgroup, were assessed using linear regression. Among intervention participants (n=253), associations of intervention component helpfulness with TV reduction were examined using linear regression and associations of participant characteristics with processes linked to TV reduction (choosing TV and completing intervention visits) were examined using logistic regression. Results High Five reduced TV across subgroups. Parents of Latino (v. white) children had lower odds of completing >=2 study visits (OR 0.39 [95%CI: 0.18, 0.84]). Parents of black (v. white) children had higher odds of choosing TV (OR: 2.23 [95% CI: 1.08, 4.59]), as did parents of obese (v. overweight) children and children watching >=2 hours/day (v. <2) at baseline. Greater perceived helpfulness was associated with greater TV reduction. Conclusion Clinic-based motivational interviewing reduces TV in children. Low cost education approaches (e.g., printed materials) may be well-received. Parents of children at higher obesity risk could be more motivated to reduce TV. PMID:24518002

  16. Television and eating: repetition enhances food intake

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Utsa; Stevenson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Some studies find that eating with TV increases food intake while others do not. Some of this variability may reflect the engagingness of what is being watched (i.e., content). To test this we varied engagingness by manipulating content familiarity. Female participants undertook two sessions. In the “Different” session they watched two different episodes of the comedy Friends, with snack food presented during the second episode. In the “Same” session they viewed another episode of Friends twice in succession, with snack food presented during the second repeat showing. The three episodes of Friends used here were fully counterbalanced, so overall the only difference between the “Same” and “Different” sessions was whether the content of the second show was familiar or novel. As expected, 14% less was eaten in the “Different” session, suggesting that novel and presumably more engaging content can reduce intake relative to watching familiar and presumably less engaging content. These findings are consistent with the idea that the engagingness of TV can differentially affect food intake, although boredom or irritability resulting from repeat viewing might also explain this effect. PMID:26579040

  17. The Impact of Television Cartoons on Child Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Clara M.; Gillis-Olion, Marion

    Observations made by kindergarten teachers of their children and the researchers' observations of the same children were used in this study to examine the impact of television cartoons on children's free play behavior. Sixty-five kindergarten children and their teachers (N=18) were studied. Each child was individually interviewed and was asked the…

  18. Black Males and Television: New Images Versus Old Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focuses on historic portrayal of black males in service and support roles in the media and their relation to social reality. Both television and films use glamorous sophisticated trappings seemingly to enhance the image of black males, but the personalities of the characters they play remain stereotypic. (VM)

  19. Remembering Life with Television: An Analysis of Israeli Students' TV Autobiographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy; Ginossar, Tamar

    This study analyzes Israeli students' memories of television in the context of family life, and considers culture and systems as well. The study was geared toward broadening the understanding of individuals' perceptions of the role of television in the family, as well as gaining insight into the collective story or stories of life with television…

  20. In Search of a Discourse on Aging: The Elderly on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, John

    1992-01-01

    Analyzed images of aging presented in five television programs of 1989 most watched by the elderly: "Murder, She Wrote,""The Golden Girls,""Matlock,""Jake and the Fatman," and "In the Heat of the Night." Reveals earlier stereotypes of the elderly have been replaced by more positive stereotypes of them as powerful, affluent, healthy, active,…

  1. Children's Recall of Television and Print News: A Media Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Juliette H. Walma; van der Voort, Tom H. A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a cued-recall test taken by 152 Dutch fourth and sixth graders indicate that children who watch a children's news show on television recall more than those who read the same news in print regardless of reading proficiency or expectation of a memory test. (SLD)

  2. Televised Self-Confrontation and Recalled Affect: A New Look at Videotape Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David; Resnikoff, Arthur

    1977-01-01

    The extent to which individuals can recall feelings they experienced during a dyadic interaction, when shown a televised replay of that interaction, was investigated. Pairs of subjects (N=10) were trained rate their degree of comfort or discomfort during the actual ("live") interaction and, subsequently, as they watched a video-taped replay of…

  3. [Television publicity and food preferences of school age children of the metropolitan region].

    PubMed

    Olivares, S; Albala, C; García, F; Jofré, I

    1999-07-01

    There is an alarming increase in the prevalence of child obesity in Chile. Lack of exercise and bad feeding habits strongly strongly contribute to the problem. To investigate the influence of television publicity on school age children food preferences. A semi structured interview was applied to a representative sample of 786 school age children aged 6 to 11 years old, living in Metropolitan Santiago. Time watching television during week days and the attitude towards food and beverage commercials was analyzed and related to food preferences. Ninety nine percent of school age children watch television during week days and 20% watches more the three hours daily. Snack commercials such as those about potato chips, chocolates, cookies and ice cream, are preferred by 35% of children. Soda commercials are preferred by 33% and yoghurt commercials by 12%. Eighty five percent of children had money to buy food. Of these, 66% bought snacks, 15% bought sodas and 7% yoghurt. The same tendency was observed in school collations. The high percentage of children, watching television and the influence of commercials in their food preferences, requires an urgent educational strategy to promote healthy feeding habits.

  4. Countering the New Media: The Resurgence of Inheritance Effects in Primetime Network Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Donald M.; Walker, James R.

    A study examined the impact of remote control devices, videocassette recorders, and cable television on inheritance effects (the tendency for viewers to continue watching a channel at the conclusion of a program). Inheritance effects were measured by calculating the correlation between program share and lead-in program share for all primetime…

  5. Television Viewing Does Not Have to Be Sedentary: Motivation to Participate in a TV Exercise Program

    PubMed Central

    Meis, Jessie J. M.; Kremers, Stef P. J.; Bouman, Martine P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored which underlying motivations induced people to participate in a television exercise program called “The Netherlands on the Move!-television” (NOM-tv). A cross-sectional study was carried out among 1,349 viewers of NOM-tv. The respondents completed the intrinsic motivation inventory (IMI), assessing their levels of intrinsic motivation towards participating in the NOM-tv exercises. The results showed that higher levels of intrinsic motivation (i.e. enjoying the NOM-tv exercises, feeling competent to perform this activity, and willingness to put effort into the exercises) were the most important predictive factors of more frequent participation in the NOM-tv exercises. Future screen-based interventions to reduce sedentary behavior should aim especially at encouraging people's intrinsic orientations towards physical activity in an autonomy-supportive way. PMID:22187637

  6. Priming Effects of Television Food Advertising on Eating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jennifer L.; Bargh, John A.; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Health advocates have focused on the prevalence of advertising for calorie-dense low-nutrient foods as a significant contributor to the obesity epidemic. This research tests the hypothesis that exposure to food advertising during television viewing may also contribute to obesity by triggering automatic snacking of available food. Design In Experiments 1a and 1b, elementary-school-aged children watched a cartoon that contained either food advertising or advertising for other products and received a snack while watching. In Experiment 2, adults watched a television program that included food advertising that promoted snacking and/or fun product benefits, food advertising that promoted nutrition benefits or no food advertising. The adults then tasted and evaluated a range of healthy to unhealthy snack foods in an apparently separate experiment. Main Outcome Measures Amount of snack foods consumed during and after advertising exposure. Results Children consumed 45% more when exposed to food advertising. Adults consumed more of both healthy and unhealthy snack foods following exposure to snack food advertising compared to the other conditions. In both experiments, food advertising increased consumption of products not in the presented advertisements, and these effects were not related to reported hunger or other conscious influences. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate the power of food advertising to prime automatic eating behaviors and thus influence far more than brand preference alone. PMID:19594263

  7. The mediating effects of dietary habits on the relationship between television viewing and body mass index among youth.

    PubMed

    Carson, Valerie; Janssen, Ian

    2012-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest that excessive television viewing is an independent determinant of obesity in young people. However, the pathways between television viewing and obesity are not fully understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether the relationship between television and body mass index (BMI) is mediated by television snacking and junk food consumption. Results are based on 15,973 youth in grades 6-10 who participated in the Canadian 2009/2010 health behaviour in school-aged children survey (HBSC). Participants self-reported their weight and height and BMI z-scores were calculated based on World Health Organization growth standards. Participants reported the frequency of snacking while watching television and the frequency of eating junk food (sweets, soft drinks, baked goods, French fries, potato chips). Total hours per week of television were calculated. A contemporary multiple mediation analysis was used to examine associations. A modest positive relationship was observed between television viewing and BMI. The mean BMI z-score was 0.15 units higher in youth in the highest television viewing quartile by comparison with the youth in the lowest quartile. However, contrary to our hypothesis, television snacking and junk food consumption were not significant positive mediators of the television and BMI relationship. The pathways between television viewing and obesity are complicated and remain poorly understood. Future research using longitudinal or experimental designs, more precise measurement tools and formal mediation analyses is needed. This research should consider mediators related to both energy intake and expenditure. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  8. Individual and family environmental correlates of television and computer time in 10- to 12-year-old European children: the ENERGY-project.

    PubMed

    Verloigne, Maïté; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Bere, Elling; Manios, Yannis; Kovács, Éva; Grillenberger, Monika; Maes, Lea; Brug, Johannes; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2015-09-18

    The aim was to investigate which individual and family environmental factors are related to television and computer time separately in 10- to-12-year-old children within and across five European countries (Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Norway). Data were used from the ENERGY-project. Children and one of their parents completed a questionnaire, including questions on screen time behaviours and related individual and family environmental factors. Family environmental factors included social, political, economic and physical environmental factors. Complete data were obtained from 2022 child-parent dyads (53.8 % girls, mean child age 11.2 ± 0.8 years; mean parental age 40.5 ± 5.1 years). To examine the association between individual and family environmental factors (i.e. independent variables) and television/computer time (i.e. dependent variables) in each country, multilevel regression analyses were performed using MLwiN 2.22, adjusting for children's sex and age. In all countries, children reported more television and/or computer time, if children and their parents thought that the maximum recommended level for watching television and/or using the computer was higher and if children had a higher preference for television watching and/or computer use and a lower self-efficacy to control television watching and/or computer use. Most physical and economic environmental variables were not significantly associated with television or computer time. Slightly more individual factors were related to children's computer time and more parental social environmental factors to children's television time. We also found different correlates across countries: parental co-participation in television watching was significantly positively associated with children's television time in all countries, except for Greece. A higher level of parental television and computer time was only associated with a higher level of children's television and computer time in Hungary. Having rules

  9. Energy savings opportunities in the global digital television transition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Young; Gopal, Anand; Phadke, Amol

    Globally, terrestrial television (TV) broadcasting is in the midst of a complete transition to digital signals. The last analog terrestrial broadcast is expected to be switched off in the early 2020s. This transition presents huge energy savings opportunities that have thus far been ignored. Digital TV switchovers have likely increased energy consumption as countries have completed transitions by providing digital TV converters to analog TV users, which increase energy consumption and extend the life of energy-inefficient analog TVs. We find that if analog TVs were retired at the time of a digital switchover and replaced with super-efficient flat-panel TVs, suchmore » as light-emitting diode (LED) backlit liquid crystal display (LCD) TVs, there is a combined electricity savings potential of 32 terawatt hours [TWh] per year in countries that have not yet completed their digital TV transition. In view of these findings as well as the dramatic drops of super-efficient TV prices and the unique early-retirement opportunity resulting from cessation of terrestrial analog broadcasts, TV-exchange programs would easily and substantially advance energy efficiency.« less

  10. Energy savings opportunities in the global digital television transition

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Won Young; Gopal, Anand; Phadke, Amol

    2016-12-20

    Globally, terrestrial television (TV) broadcasting is in the midst of a complete transition to digital signals. The last analog terrestrial broadcast is expected to be switched off in the early 2020s. This transition presents huge energy savings opportunities that have thus far been ignored. Digital TV switchovers have likely increased energy consumption as countries have completed transitions by providing digital TV converters to analog TV users, which increase energy consumption and extend the life of energy-inefficient analog TVs. We find that if analog TVs were retired at the time of a digital switchover and replaced with super-efficient flat-panel TVs, suchmore » as light-emitting diode (LED) backlit liquid crystal display (LCD) TVs, there is a combined electricity savings potential of 32 terawatt hours [TWh] per year in countries that have not yet completed their digital TV transition. In view of these findings as well as the dramatic drops of super-efficient TV prices and the unique early-retirement opportunity resulting from cessation of terrestrial analog broadcasts, TV-exchange programs would easily and substantially advance energy efficiency.« less

  11. Future development of instructional television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, H. J.; Denzau, A. T.; Dumolin, J. R.; Singh, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The use of television in schools as an aid to instruction is proposed for individualized instruction, repetition for slow learners, acceleration for fast learners, and lectures from the best teachers for all students. A dedicated school district cable system, a 40 channel cable to each school and classroom, is considered. This innovation offers an opportunity for improving the quality and content of the school's instruction and for reducing the cost.

  12. [TV, overweight and nutritional surveillance. Ads content, food intake and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, T D; Bioletti, L; Bo, C; Formigatti, M

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between television viewing and obesity in children and adults was examined in a large number of cross-sectional epidemiological studies. Some randomised, controlled trials confirmed the evidence that television viewing is a cause of increased body fatness. It seems of utility in nutritional surveillance to esteem time spent by children and adults in television watching and to evaluate ads contents and food preferences suggested by them. This editorial shows a two-years long analysis of food commercials broadcasted by the main Italian TV networks; food ads targeted on children, housewives and sport fans were evaluated; the relationship between television viewing, commercials and food intake or global lifestyle was investigated in a Piedmont's population (from Northern Italy). School projects aimed to reduce television viewing represent a promising strategy for preventing childhood obesity.

  13. Using films and television shows with a medical theme as a medium to accelerate the spread of medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenting; Qian, Haihong

    2017-05-23

    People have more visual experiences than ever before, and the same is true for situations in medicine. More mature films and television shows with a medical theme have been available over the past 20 years. In mainland China, the TV series "Angel Heart" has generated a wave of universal concern since it truly depicts the work of health care workers and it reflects the sharp distinction between doctors and patients to a certain extent. Riding this wave, many medical documentaries like The Human World have also been launched in China and have garnered sizable audiences. Such films and television shows with a medical theme strive to depict the lives of ordinary people. When watching these medical documentaries, audiences are able to better comprehend the work of health care workers in light of their life experiences and feelings towards current society. Audiences can gain a profound understanding of the medical humanities through films and television shows with a medical theme. We look forward to more such films and television shows with a medical theme that depict "hospitals-the realest place" on camera. Films and television shows with a medical theme can serve as a storytelling medium to accelerate the spread of medical humanities and to promote harmony among doctors, patients, and the public.

  14. Can Television Enhance Children's Mathematical Problem Solving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisch, Shalom M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A summative evaluation of "Square One TV," an educational mathematics series produced by the Children's Television Workshop, shows that children who regularly viewed the program showed significant improvement in solving unfamiliar, complex mathematical problems, and viewers showed improvement in their mathematical problem-solving ability…

  15. Report of the Television Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedell, Fran; And Others

    In early 1985, one of the new television channels resulting from the expansion of the Fort Smith TV Cable Company was allocated to Westark Community College (WCC). In July, a task force was appointed to develop recommendations regarding programming, policies, staffing, equipment, physical location, and organizational location. This report presents…

  16. Mitigating the Harmful Effects of Violent Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkoetter, Lawrence I.; Rosenkoetter, Sharon E.; Ozretich, Rachel A.; Acock, Alan C.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to minimize the harmful effects of violent TV, a yearlong intervention was undertaken with children in Grades 1 through 3 (N = 177). The classroom-based intervention consisted of 31 brief lessons that emphasized the many ways in which television distorts violence. As hypothesized, the intervention resulted in a reduction in children's…

  17. TV Audience Measurement with Big Data.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shawndra

    2014-06-01

    TV audience measurement involves estimating the number of viewers tuned into a TV show at any given time as well as their demographics. First introduced shortly after commercial television broadcasting began in the late 1940s, audience measurement allowed the business of television to flourish by offering networks a way to quantify the monetary value of TV audiences for advertisers, who pay for the estimated number of eyeballs watching during commercials. The first measurement techniques suffered from multiple limitations because reliable, large-scale data were costly to acquire. Yet despite these limitations, measurement standards remained largely unchanged for decades until devices such as cable boxes, video-on-demand boxes, and cell phones, as well as web apps, Internet browser clicks, web queries, and social media activity, resulted in an explosion of digitally available data. TV viewers now leave digital traces that can be used to track almost every aspect of their daily lives, allowing the potential for large-scale aggregation across data sources for individual users and groups and enabling the tracking of more people on more dimensions for more shows. Data are now more comprehensive, available in real time, and cheaper to acquire, enabling accurate and fine-grained TV audience measurement. In this article, I discuss the evolution of audience measurement and what the recent data explosion means for the TV industry and academic research.

  18. Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports.

    PubMed

    Carr, Sherilene; O'Brien, Kerry S; Ferris, Jason; Room, Robin; Livingston, Michael; Vandenberg, Brian; Donovan, Robert J; Lynott, Dermot

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to alcohol advertising is associated with greater alcohol consumption in children and adolescents, and alcohol advertising is common in Australian sport. We examine child, adolescent and young adult exposure to alcohol advertising during three televised sports in Australia: Australian Football League (AFL), cricket and the National Rugby League (NRL). Alcohol advertising and audience viewing data were purchased for all AFL, cricket and NRL TV programs in Australia for 2012. We estimated children and adolescents (0-17 years) and young adults (18-29 years) exposure to alcohol advertising during AFL, cricket and NRL programs in the daytime (06:00-20:29 h), and night-time (20:30-23:59 h). There were 3544 alcohol advertisements in AFL (1942), cricket (941) and NRL programs (661), representing 60% of all alcohol advertising in sport TV, and 15% of all alcohol advertisements on Australian TV. These programs had a cumulative audience of 26.9 million children and adolescents, and 32 million young adults. Children and adolescents received 51 million exposures to alcohol advertising, with 47% of this exposure occurring during the daytime. Children and adolescents exposure to alcohol advertising was similar to young adults and peaked after 8.30pm. Child and adolescent and young adult's exposure to alcohol advertising is high when viewing sport TV in Australia in the daytime and night-time. Current alcohol advertising regulations are not protecting children and adolescents from exposure, particularly in prominent televised sports. The regulations should be changed to reduce children and adolescent excessive exposure to alcohol advertising when watching sport. [Carr S, O'Brien KS, Ferris J, Room R, Livingston M, Vandenberg B, Donovan RJ, Lynott D. Child and adolescent exposure to alcohol advertising in Australia's major televised sports. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:406-411]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. Salty-snack eating, television or video-game viewing, and asthma symptoms among 10- to 12-year-old children: the PANACEA study.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Fotini; Priftis, Kostas N; Papadimitriou, Anastasios; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Anthracopoulos, Michael B; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2011-02-01

    Salty-snack consumption, as well as the amount of time children spend watching television or playing video games, have been implicated in the development of asthma; however, results are still conflicting. The aim of this work was to evaluate the association of salty-snack eating and television/video-game viewing with childhood asthma symptoms. Cross-sectional study. Seven hundred children (323 male), 10 to 12 years old, from 18 schools located in the greater area of Athens were enrolled. Children and their parents completed questionnaires, which evaluated, among other things, dietary habits. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the KIDMED (Mediterranean Diet Quality Index for Children and Adolescents) score. The association of children's characteristics with asthma symptoms was performed by calculating the odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Overall lifetime prevalence of asthma symptoms was 23.7% (27.6% boys, 20.4% girls; P=0.03). Forty-eight percent of children reported salty-snack consumption (≥ 1 times/week). Salty-snack consumption was positively associated with the hours of television/video-game viewing (P=0.04) and inversely with the KIDMED score (P=0.02). Consumption of salty snacks (>3 times/week vs never/rare) was associated with a 4.8-times higher likelihood of having asthma symptoms (95% confidence interval: 1.50 to 15.8), irrespective of potential confounders. The associations of salty-snack eating and asthma symptoms were more prominent in children who watched television or played video games >2 hours/day. In addition, adherence to the Mediterranean diet was inversely associated with the likelihood of asthma symptoms. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, such as salty-snack eating and television/video-game viewing were strongly associated with the presence of asthma symptoms. Future interventions and public health messages should be focused on changing these behaviors from the early stages of life. Copyright © 2011

  20. Changes in television viewing and computers/videogames use among high school students in Southern Brazil between 2001 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kelly Samara; da Silva Lopes, Adair; Dumith, Samuel Carvalho; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro; Bezerra, Jorge; Nahas, Markus Vinicius

    2014-02-01

    To compare the prevalence of television (TV) watching and of computer/videogame use among high school students (15-19 years) from Southern Brazil between 2001 and 2011 and to identify associated socio-demographic factors. Panel studies were conducted with high school students in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, in 2001 (n = 5,028) and 2011 (n = 6,529). TV watching and computer/videogame use were collected using questionnaires. Prevalence of ≥2 h/day of TV watching dropped from 76.8 to 61.5 % and ≥2 h/day of computer/videogame use increased from 37.9 to 60.6 %. In both surveys, those aged 15-16 and those who did not work had higher likelihoods of being exposed to ≥2 h/day of TV watching. Boys, those with higher family income, and those who were living in urban areas had higher likelihoods of ≥2 h/day of computer/videogame use. Older age, studying at night and not working were protective factors to these behaviors. After a decade, there was a decrease in the prevalence of TV viewing and an increase in computer/videogame use. Socio-demographic factors were differently associated with these behaviors.

  1. Time with friends and physical activity as mechanisms linking obesity and television viewing among youth.

    PubMed

    Vandewater, Elizabeth A; Park, Seoung Eun; Hébert, Emily T; Cummings, Hope M

    2015-07-27

    Though bivariate relationships between childhood obesity, physical activity, friendships and television viewing are well documented, empirical assessment of the extent to which links between obesity and television may be mediated by these factors is scarce. This study examines the possibility that time with friends and physical activity are potential mechanisms linking overweight/obesity to television viewing in youth. Data were drawn from children ages 10-18 years old (M = 13.81, SD = 2.55) participating in the 2002 wave of Child Development Supplement (CDS) to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) (n = 1,545). Data were collected both directly and via self-report from children and their parents. Path analysis was employed to examine a model whereby the relationships between youth overweight/obesity and television viewing were mediated by time spent with friends and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Overweight/obesity was directly related to less time spent with friends, but not to MVPA. Time spent with friends was directly and positively related to MVPA, and directly and negatively related to time spent watching television without friends. In turn, MVPA was directly and negatively related to watching television without friends. There were significant indirect effects of both overweight/obesity and time with friends on television viewing through MVPA, and of overweight/obesity on MVPA through time with friends. Net of any indirect effects, the direct effect of overweight/obesity on television viewing remained. The final model fit the data extremely well (χ2 = 5.77, df = 5, p<0.0001, RMSEA = 0.01, CFI = 0.99, TLI =0.99). We found good evidence that the positive relationships between time with friends and physical activity are important mediators of links between overweight/obesity and television viewing in youth. These findings highlight the importance of moving from examinations of bivariate relationships between weight status and television

  2. Time with friends and physical activity as mechanisms linking obesity and television viewing among youth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Though bivariate relationships between childhood obesity, physical activity, friendships and television viewing are well documented, empirical assessment of the extent to which links between obesity and television may be mediated by these factors is scarce. This study examines the possibility that time with friends and physical activity are potential mechanisms linking overweight/obesity to television viewing in youth. Methods Data were drawn from children ages 10-18 years old (M = 13.81, SD = 2.55) participating in the 2002 wave of Child Development Supplement (CDS) to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) (n = 1,545). Data were collected both directly and via self-report from children and their parents. Path analysis was employed to examine a model whereby the relationships between youth overweight/obesity and television viewing were mediated by time spent with friends and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results Overweight/obesity was directly related to less time spent with friends, but not to MVPA. Time spent with friends was directly and positively related to MVPA, and directly and negatively related to time spent watching television without friends. In turn, MVPA was directly and negatively related to watching television without friends. There were significant indirect effects of both overweight/obesity and time with friends on television viewing through MVPA, and of overweight/obesity on MVPA through time with friends. Net of any indirect effects, the direct effect of overweight/obesity on television viewing remained. The final model fit the data extremely well (χ2 = 5.77, df = 5, p<0.0001, RMSEA = 0.01, CFI = 0.99, TLI =0.99). Conclusions We found good evidence that the positive relationships between time with friends and physical activity are important mediators of links between overweight/obesity and television viewing in youth. These findings highlight the importance of moving from examinations of bivariate relationships

  3. Social support may buffer the effect of intrafamilial stressors on preschool children's television viewing time in low-income families.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaigang; Jurkowski, Janine M; Davison, Kirsten K

    2013-12-01

    Excessive television (TV) viewing in preschool children has been linked to negative outcomes during childhood, including childhood obesity. In a sample of low-income families, this study examined associations between intrafamilial factors and preschool children's TV-viewing time and the moderating effect of social support from nonfamily members on this association. In 2010, 129 mothers/female guardians of 2- to 5-year-old children enrolled at five Head Start centers in Rensselaer County, New York, completed a self-report survey. The survey assessed child TV-viewing time (including TV, DVDs, and videos) and intrafamilial risk factors, including maternal perceived stress, depressive symptoms, TV viewing, leisure-time physical activity (inactivity), and family functioning. Social support from nonfamily members (nonfamily social support) was also measured and examined as an effect modifier. Children watched TV an average of 160 minutes per day. Moderate depressive symptoms (Personal Health Questionnaire depression scale scores ≥10), higher perceived stress, poorer family functioning, and higher maternal TV-viewing were significantly and independently associated with greater minutes of child TV viewing, controlling for covariates. In all instances, nonfamily social support moderated these associations, such that negative experiences within the family environment were linked with higher child TV-viewing time under conditions of low nonfamily social support, but not high nonfamily support. Social support from nonfamily members may buffer potentially negative effects of intrafamilial factors on preschool children's TV-viewing time.

  4. Food advertisements on UK television popular with children: a content analysis in relation to dental health.

    PubMed

    Al-Mazyad, M; Flannigan, N; Burnside, G; Higham, S; Boyland, E

    2017-02-10

    Objective To quantify the prevalence of advertising for foods and beverages potentially detrimental to dental health on UK television watched by children.Design Content analysis of pre-recorded television advertisements (adverts).Materials and methods Three hundred and fifty-two hours of television were recorded (one weekday and one weekend day, 6 am - 10 pm) from the main commercial channel (ITV1). All adverts were coded using pre-defined criteria.Setting UK television recorded between January and December 2012.Results Of 9,151 adverts, foods and beverages were the second most commonly advertised products (16.7%; n = 1,532). Nearly two-thirds of food adverts were for items that are potentially harmful to dental health (61%; n = 934). Of these, 96.6% were cariogenic and 11% were acidogenic foods. During peak children's viewing hours, the proportion of foods that are potentially harmful to dental health was significantly higher than for non-harmful foods (65.9% vs. 34.1%; p = 0.011). Adverts for foods potentially harmful to dental health were rare around children's programmes, but significantly more frequent during other programmes watched by children (p <0.001).Conclusion UK children are exposed to a particularly high proportion of advertisements for foods that are potentially detrimental to their dental health during their peak viewing hours and around the programmes they watch the most.

  5. Death and television: terror management theory and themes of law and justice on television.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Laramie D

    2012-04-01

    Based on terror management theory, it was hypothesized that media choices may be affected by the salience of death-related thoughts. Three experiments with samples of undergraduate students were conducted to investigate whether such a process would affect preferences for law and justice television programming. In the first experiment (n = 132), individuals for whom mortality had been made salient through experimental induction preferred more programs with law and justice themes than individuals for whom mortality had not been made salient. In the second experiment (n = 761), this effect was observed regardless of trust in law enforcement and only for participants induced to think about death, not those induced to think about pain. In the third experiment (n = 163), participants for whom mortality was salient who watched a crime drama that showed justice being carried out showed a diminished self-enhancing bias compared to participants who watched a version of the same program in which justice was thwarted. Results indicate that entertainment choices are influenced by thought of death beyond simply seeking distraction and that entertainment programming emphasizing justice can effectively ameliorate existential anxiety that arises from thoughts of death.

  6. Selecting Television Programs for Language Learning: Investigating Television Programs from the Same Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The scripts of 288 television episodes were analysed to determine the extent to which vocabulary reoccurs in television programs from the same subgenres and unrelated television programs from different genres. Episodes from two programs from each of the following three subgenres of the American drama genre: medical, spy/action, and criminal…

  7. Television's Child; The Impact of Television on Today's Children; What Parents Can Do About It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Norman S.

    Based on an extensive series of interviews with clinical psychiatrists and psychologists, educators, television executives, producers, performers, advertisers, parents, and children themselves, this book explores the effect of television on a child's values. It delves into the question of a relationship between violence on television and violent…

  8. Television Violence and Behavior: The Effects of Television Violence on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Charla A.

    Television violence and the impact it has on children is a growing concern in the world today. Although research indicates that violence on television triggers aggressive behavior in children, the characteristics of those children also need to be examined. Factors such as age, intellectual level, identification with television personalities, the…

  9. Toddler activity intensity during indoor free-play: stand and watch.

    PubMed

    Fees, Bronwyn S; Fischer, Elexa; Haar, Sherry; Crowe, Linda K

    2015-01-01

    Movement patterns among toddlers (16-36 months) differ from other early developmental periods; toddlers practice coordination, balance, and control. Toddler care environments may afford repetition of these emerging skills. This study examined intensity and type of movements during free-play indoors in child care among toddlers. A convenience sample (n, 41; mean, 26.5 months) was observed for intensity of physical activity (PA), motor activity type, activity context, and teacher prompts in center-based care using a modified version of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity for Children-Preschool. The most frequent PA intensity level was sedentary with limb movement. No significant gender differences emerged. Standing, sitting/squatting, and walking were the most frequent activity types. Dominant activity contexts included fine motor manipulative, self-care, and onlooking. Logistic regression results indicated that onlooking significantly decreased the odds of moderate to vigorous PA. Teachers offered few prompts to increase PA. Toddlers demonstrate predominantly sedentary behaviors during free-play. Further observational research across the entire day is warranted to accurately assess intensity and teacher's support for moderate to vigorous PA. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between energy intake and viewing television, distractibility, and memory for advertisements12345

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Corby K; Coulon, Sandra M; Markward, Nathan; Greenway, Frank L; Anton, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Background: The effect of television viewing (TVV) with and without advertisements (ads) on energy intake is unclear. Objective: The objectives were to test 1) the effect of TVV, with and without ads, on energy intake compared with a control and reading condition and 2) the association of distractibility and memory for ads with energy intake and body weight. Design: Forty-eight (26 female) adults (age: 19–54 y) with a body mass index (in kg/m2) of 20–35 completed this laboratory-based study. All participants completed 4 buffet-style meals in random order in the following conditions: 1) control, 2) while reading, 3) while watching TV with food and nonfood ads (TV-ads), and 4) while watching TV with no ads (TV-no ads). Energy intake was quantified by weighing foods. Distractibility and memory for ads in the TV-ads condition were quantified with a norm-referenced test and recognition task, respectively. Results: Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that energy and macronutrient intake did not differ significantly among the 4 conditions (P > 0.65). Controlling for sex, memory for ads was associated with body weight (r = 0.36, P < 0.05) and energy intake but only when viewing TV (r = 0.39, P < 0.05 during the TV-no ads condition, and r = 0.29, P = 0.06 during the TV-ads condition). Controlling for sex, distractibility was associated with body weight (r = 0.36, P < 0.05) but not energy intake. Distractibility, however, accounted for 13% of the variance in men's energy intake (P = 0.11). Conclusions: TVV did not affect energy intake, but individual characteristics (memory for ads) were associated with body weight and energy intake in certain conditions. These characteristics should be considered in food intake and intervention studies. PMID:19056603

  11. As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, P N; Williamson, S; Lawler, P G

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and accuracy with which cardiopulmonary resuscitation is portrayed in British television medical dramas. Design: Observational study. Subjects: 64 episodes of three major British television medical dramas: Casualty, Cardiac Arrest, and Medics. Main outcome measures: Frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation shown on television; age, sex, and diagnosis of the patients undergoing resuscitation; rate of survival through resuscitation. Results: Overall 52 patients had a cardiorespiratory arrest on screen and 3 had a respiratory arrest alone, all the arrests occurring in 40 of the 64 episodes. Of the 52 patients having cardiorespiratory arrest, 32 (62%) underwent an attempt at cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 8 attempts were successful. All 3 of the patients having respiratory arrests alone received ventilatory support and survived. On 48% of occasions, victims of cardiac arrest seemed to be less than 35 years old. Conclusions: Cardiorespiratory resuscitation is often depicted in British television medical dramas. Patients portrayed receiving resuscitation are likely to be in a younger age group than in real life. Though the reasons for resuscitation are more varied and more often associated with trauma than in reality, the overall success rate is nevertheless realistic. Widespread overoptimism of patients for survival after resuscitation cannot necessarily be blamed on British television medical dramas. Key messagesA quarter of patients in British television medical dramas who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation on screen seemed to surviveThis figure is comparable to initial survival rates in a series of patients in real lifePatients on television are more likely to suffer cardiac arrest as a result of trauma than in real life, and patients undergoing resuscitation are likely to be younger than patients in real lifeThe overall survival rate of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical drama seems

  12. Childhood obesity stigma: association with television, videogame, and magazine exposure.

    PubMed

    Latner, Janet D; Rosewall, Juliet K; Simmonds, Murray B

    2007-06-01

    Although the stigmatization of obesity among children is highly prevalent, its origins and relationship to mass media exposure are largely unknown. Ninety boys and 171 girls aged 10-13 years (mean BMI=19.84) were asked to rank, in order of liking, 12 figures of peers depicted both with and without various disabilities or obesity, and to rate their attitudes towards the obese child on visual analogue scales. Weekly time spent watching television, watching videogames, and reading magazines on weekdays and weekends was assessed. Total media use, magazine use, and videogame use were significantly correlated with more negative reactions to obese girls and boys. Regression analyses revealed that greater dislike of obese children relative to their non-overweight peers was uniquely predicted by magazine reading time. Thus, media exposure was associated with stigmatizing attitudes towards obese children. Mass media sources may lead children to devalue and stigmatize peers with above-average body weights.

  13. Independent and combined associations of total sedentary time and television viewing time with food intake patterns of 9- to 11-year-old Canadian children.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Michael M; Tremblay, Mark S; Leduc, Genevieve; Boyer, Charles; Bélanger, Priscilla; LeBlanc, Allana G; Francis, Claire; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    The relationships among sedentary time, television viewing time, and dietary patterns in children are not fully understood. The aim of this paper was to determine which of self-reported television viewing time or objectively measured sedentary time is a better correlate of the frequency of consumption of healthy and unhealthy foods. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 9- to 11-year-old children (n = 523; 57.1% female) from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Accelerometers were used to determine total sedentary time, and questionnaires were used to determine the number of hours of television watching and the frequency of consumption of foods per week. Television viewing was negatively associated with the frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and green vegetables, and positively associated with the frequency of consumption of sweets, soft drinks, diet soft drinks, pastries, potato chips, French fries, fruit juices, ice cream, fried foods, and fast food. Except for diet soft drinks and fruit juices, these associations were independent of covariates, including sedentary time. Total sedentary time was negatively associated with the frequency of consumption of sports drinks, independent of covariates, including television viewing. In combined sedentary time and television viewing analyses, children watching >2 h of television per day consumed several unhealthy food items more frequently than did children watching ≤2 h of television, regardless of sedentary time. In conclusion, this paper provides evidence to suggest that television viewing time is more strongly associated with unhealthy dietary patterns than is total sedentary time. Future research should focus on reducing television viewing time, as a means of improving dietary patterns and potentially reducing childhood obesity.

  14. Effects of exposure to television advertising for energy-dense/nutrient-poor food on children's food intake and obesity in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Kim, Hyogyoo; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Jihyun; Chung, Sang-Jin

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of television food advertising on participant food intake and risk of obesity. A total of 2419 children aged 11-13 years were selected from 118 elementary schools in South Korea. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire with questions about height, weight, television viewing times, food preferences, and food intakes. To estimate actual exposure to food advertising, we asked participants to specify the times at which they usually watched television. We then collected data on the various types of food advertisement broadcast on five different television networks during those viewing times over the course of the previous 7 months. The amount of television watched and exposure to energy-dense/nutrient-poor (EDNP) food advertising were associated with an increased risk of being overweight or obese. Exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was also significantly associated with higher EDNP food preference and intake and lower fruit and vegetable intake. However, these relationships disappeared for all foods after adjusting for the overall amount of television watched. Although it was not possible to conclude that exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was associated with an increased risk of obesity, preference for EDNP foods, or overall food intake due to the strong comprehensive effects of television viewing time, there was a reason to believe the evidence of the effects of advertising in this study. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine the exclusive effects of exposure to television advertising for EDNP food. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Television viewing and hostile personality trait increase the risk of injuries.

    PubMed

    Fabio, Anthony; Chen, Chung-Yu; Dearwater, Steven; Jacobs, David R; Erickson, Darin; Matthews, Karen A; Iribarren, Carlos; Sidney, Stephen; Pereira, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with high levels of hostility may be more susceptible to the influence of television on violence and risk taking behaviors. This study aimed to examine whether hostile personality trait modifies the association between TV viewing and injuries. It is a prospective study of 4,196 black and white adults aged 23 to 35 in 1990/1. Cross-lagged panel models were analyzed at three 5-year time periods to test whether TV viewing predicted injuries. Covariates were gender, race, and education. Individuals who watched more TV (0 hours, 1-3 hours, 4-6 hours, and ≥7 hours) were more likely to have a hospitalization for an injury in the following 5 years across each of the three follow-up periods [OR = 1.5 (95%CI = 1.2, 1.9), 1.5 (1.1, 1.9), and 1.9 (1.3, 2.6)]. The cross-lagged effects of TV viewing to injury were significant in the high hostility group [OR = 1.4 (95%CI = 1.1, 1.8), 1.3 (1.0, 1.8), and 2.0 (1.3, 2.9)] but not in the low hostility group [OR = 1.3 (95%CI = 0.6, 2.2), 1.1 (0.6, 2.1), and 1.4 (0.7, 2.8)]. Additionally, a statistically significant difference between the two models (P < 0.001) suggested that hostility moderated the relationship between TV watching and injury. These findings suggest that individuals who watch more TV and have a hostile personality trait may be at a greater risk for injury.

  16. Television viewing and hostile personality trait increase the risk of injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, Anthony; Chen, Chung-Yu; Dearwater, Steven; Jacobs, David R.; Erickson, Darin; Matthews, Karen A.; Iribarren, Carlos; Sidney, Stephen; Pereira, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Individuals with high levels of hostility may be more susceptible to the influence of television on violence and risk taking behaviors. Aim This study aimed to examine whether hostile personality trait modifies the association between TV viewing and injuries. Methods It is a prospective study of 4,196 black and white adults aged 23 to 35 in 1990/1. Cross-lagged panel models were analyzed at three 5-year time periods to test whether TV viewing predicted injuries. Covariates were gender, race, and education. Results Individuals who watched more TV (0 hours, 1–3 hours, 4–6 hours, and ≥7 hours) were more likely to have a hospitalization for an injury in the following 5 years across each of the three follow-up periods [OR = 1.5 (95%CI = 1.2, 1.9), 1.5 (1.1, 1.9), and 1.9 (1.3, 2.6)]. The cross-lagged effects of TV viewing to injury were significant in the high hostility group [OR = 1.4 (95%CI = 1.1, 1.8), 1.3 (1.0, 1.8), and 2.0 (1.3, 2.9)] but not in the low hostility group [OR = 1.3 (95%CI = 0.6, 2.2), 1.1 (0.6, 2.1), and 1.4 (0.7, 2.8)]. Additionally, a statistically significant difference between the two models (P < 0.001) suggested that hostility moderated the relationship between TV watching and injury. Conclusions These findings suggest that individuals who watch more TV and have a hostile personality trait may be at a greater risk for injury. PMID:26274936

  17. Childhood correlates of adult TV viewing time: a 32-year follow-up of the 1970 British Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L; Gardner, B; Hamer, M

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify, using a longitudinal data set, parental and childhood correlates of adult television (TV) viewing time at 32-year follow-up. Method Data were derived from the 1970 British Cohort Study, a longitudinal observational study of 17 248 British people born in a single week of 1970. The present analyses incorporated data from the age 10 and 42-year surveys. When participants were aged 10 years, their mothers provided information on how often participants watched TV and played sports (never/sometimes/often), and parents’ own occupation, as well as height and weight. A health visitor objectively assessed participants’ height and weight at age 10. Thirty-two years later, when participants were aged 42 years, they reported their daily TV viewing hours (none/0≤1/1<3/3<5/≥5), physical activity and health status. Associations between putative childhood and parental correlates and adult TV viewing time were investigated using logistic regression. Results Valid data at both time points were available for 6188 participants. Logistic regression models showed that those who reported ‘often’ watching TV at baseline were significantly more likely to watch >3 h/days of TV at follow-up (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.65), as were those whose father was from a lower socio-occupational class (intermediate, routine/manual) compared with managerial (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.11; OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.87). Body mass index (BMI) at age 10 was inversely associated with high TV in adulthood (per unit increase; OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.96) although fathers BMI when the child was aged 10 was positively associated with high TV in adulthood (per unit increase; OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06). Conclusions Findings suggest that childhood TV viewing time tracks into adulthood. Parents’ health behaviours and social position appear to be associated with their children's viewing habits, which may have important implications for the direction of future policy and

  18. Immature psychological defense mechanisms are associated with greater personal importance of junk food, alcohol, and television.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui Miguel; Brody, Stuart

    2013-10-30

    Immature psychological defense mechanisms are psychological processes that play an important role in suppressing emotional awareness and contribute to psychopathology. In addition, unhealthy food, television viewing, and alcohol consumption can be among the means to escape self-awareness. In contrast, engaging in, and responding fully to specifically penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI) is associated with indices of better emotional regulation, including less use of immature defense mechanisms. There was a lack of research on the association of immature defense mechanisms with personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. In an online survey, 334 primarily Scottish women completed the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40), and rated the personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. Immature defense mechanisms correlated with importance of junk food, alcohol, and television. Importance of PVI correlated with mature defenses, and less use of some component immature defenses. Importance of alcohol correlated with importance of junk food, television, and noncoital sex. Importance of junk food was correlated with importance of television and noncoital sex. The findings are discussed in terms of persons with poorer self-regulatory abilities having more interest in junk food, television, and alcohol, and less interest in PVI. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations between television viewing and consumption of commonly advertised foods among New Zealand children and young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Utter, Jennifer; Scragg, Robert; Schaaf, David

    2006-08-01

    To explore how time spent watching television (TV) is associated with the dietary behaviours of New Zealand children and young adolescents. Secondary data analysis of a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. In homes or schools of New Zealand school students. In total, 3275 children aged 5 to 14 years. The odds of being overweight or obese increased with duration of TV viewing for children and adolescents when controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status and physical activity. Children and adolescents who watched the most TV were significantly more likely to be higher consumers of foods most commonly advertised on TV: soft drinks and fruit drinks, some sweets and snacks, and some fast foods. Both children and adolescents watching two or more hours of TV a day were more than twice as likely to drink soft drinks five times a week or more (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively), eat hamburgers at least once a week (both P = 0.02), and eat French fries at least once a week (both P < 0.01). These findings suggest that longer duration of TV watching (thus, more frequent exposure to advertising) influences the frequency of consumption of soft drinks, some sweets and snacks, and some fast foods among children and young adolescents. Efforts to curtail the amount of time children spend watching TV may result in better dietary habits and weight control for children and adolescents. Future studies examining the impact of advertising on children's diets through interventions and international comparisons of legislation would provide more definitive evidence of the role of advertising in child and adolescent obesity.

  20. The AFI Film/Television Documentation Workshop: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Paul B.

    1986-01-01

    Very briefly describes a workshop on film and television documentation that informed participants about available reference and resource materials for information about films and television shows. (CLB)