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Sample records for water buffalo breeds

  1. Controlled breeding and reproductive management in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using Eazi Breed controlled internal drug release.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi; Ramesha, Kerekoppa P

    2015-06-04

    Buffalo reproduction is considerably affected by late maturity, poor oestrus symptoms and long postpartum periods. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of Eazi Breed controlled internal drug release (CIDR), an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device, in relation to oestrus and fertility. Five hundred true anoestrus buffalo cows, in the age group 4-6 years in 10 villages of Dharwad district in Karnataka state in India, were randomly selected and treated with CIDR for 9 days. Two mL of Cidirol (1 mg oestradiol benzoate) was administered intramuscularly to all animals on day 10. Forty-two buffaloes (8.4%) that failed to show oestrus signs (1.6%) or showed weak signs of oestrus (6.8%) after the first treatment were treated again 72 h after the Cidriol injection with a new device, and inseminated after the expression of oestrus. After the second treatment all the animals showed oestrus signs. The percentage of buffaloes showing intense oestrus was 67.40%, intermediate oestrus was shown by 25.80%, whilst 6.80% buffaloes showed weak oestrus even after the second treatment. The buffaloes showing oestrus signs were inseminated twice with an interval of 12 h, starting 12 h after the start of the oestrus signs. In 86 buffaloes showing prolonged oestrus signs a third insemination was done. The conception rates were 85.16%, 60.47% and 44.11% respectively in buffaloes showing intense, intermediate and weak oestrus. Transrectal palpation of the genital tract was performed 45-60 days post-insemination to diagnose pregnancy status, and in doubtful cases pregnancy was reconfirmed at 90 days after insemination. Out of 500 buffaloes treated in this way 380 animals became pregnant and the pregnancy rate was 76%. This study revealed the usefulness of Eazi Breed CIDR along with Cidirol treatment in buffaloes to improve their reproductive performance.

  2. Semen quality parameters as fertility predictors of water buffalo bull spermatozoa during low-breeding season.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hussain; Andrabi, S Murtaza Hassan; Jahan, Sarwat

    2016-10-01

    ) adjusted = 50.20%, P < 0.007). It is concluded that assessment of CASA parameters and some other sperm structural and functional parameters, that is, integrity of plasma membrane and acrosome, and transmembrane potential of mitochondria were able to predict the in vivo fertility of water buffalo bull during low-breeding season. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Breed traceability of buffalo meat using microsatellite genotyping technique.

    PubMed

    Kannur, Bheemashankar H; Fairoze, Md Nadeem; Girish, P S; Karabasanavar, Nagappa; Rudresh, B H

    2017-02-01

    Although buffalo has emerged as a major meat producing animal in Asia, major research on breed traceability has so far been focused on cattle (beef). This research gap on buffalo breed traceability has impelled development and validation of buffalo breed traceability using a set of eight microsatellite (STR) markers in seven Indian buffalo breeds (Bhadawari, Jaffaarabadi, Murrah, Mehsana, Nagpuri, Pandharpuri and Surti). Probability of sharing same profile by two individuals at a specific locus was computed considering different STR numbers, allele pooling in breed and population. Match probabilities per breed were considered and six most polymorphic loci were genotyped. Out of eight microsatellite markers studied, markers CSSMO47, DRB3 and CSSM060 were found most polymorphic. Developed technique was validated with known and unknown, blood and meat samples; wherein, samples were genetically traced in 24 out of 25 samples tested. Results of this study showed potential applications of the methodology and encourage other researchers to address the problem of buffalo traceability so as to create a world-wide archive of breed specific genotypes. This work is the first report of breed traceability of buffalo meat utilizing microsatellite genotyping technique.

  4. Selective breeding: the future of TB management in African buffalo?

    PubMed

    le Roex, N; Berrington, C M; Hoal, E G; van Helden, P D

    2015-09-01

    The high prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in regions of southern African has a negative economic impact on the trade of animals and animal products, represents an ecological threat to biodiversity, and poses a health risk to local communities through the wildlife-cattle-human interface. Test and cull methods may not be logistically feasible in many free-range wildlife systems, and with the presence of co-existing BTB hosts and the limited effectiveness of the BCG vaccine in buffalo, there is a need for alternative methods of BTB management. Selective breeding for increased resistance to BTB in buffalo may be a viable method of BTB management in the future, particularly if genetic information can be incorporated into these schemes. To explore this possibility, we discuss the different strategies that can be employed in selective breeding programmes, and consider the implementation of genetic improvement schemes. We reflect on the suitability of applying this strategy for enhanced BTB resistance in African buffalo, and address the challenges of this approach that must be taken into account. Conclusions and the implications for management are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A genome-wide scan for signatures of selection in Azeri and Khuzestani buffalo breeds.

    PubMed

    Mokhber, Mahdi; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Hossein; Stella, Alessandra; Nicolzzi, Ezequiel; Rahmaninia, Javad; Williams, John L

    2018-06-11

    Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection may shed light on the genetic history of livestock populations and help to identify variation controlling commercially important phenotypes. The Azeri and Kuzestani buffalos are the most common indigenous Iranian breeds which have been subjected to divergent selection and are well adapted to completely different regions. Examining the genetic structure of these populations may identify genomic regions associated with adaptation to the different environments and production goals. A set of 385 water buffalo samples from Azeri (N = 262) and Khuzestani (N = 123) breeds were genotyped using the Axiom® Buffalo Genotyping 90 K Array. The unbiased fixation index method (F ST ) was used to detect signatures of selection. In total, 13 regions with outlier F ST values (0.1%) were identified. Annotation of these regions using the UMD3.1 Bos taurus Genome Assembly was performed to find putative candidate genes and QTLs within the selected regions. Putative candidate genes identified include FBXO9, NDFIP1, ACTR3, ARHGAP26, SERPINF2, BOLA-DRB3, BOLA-DQB, CLN8, and MYOM2. Candidate genes identified in regions potentially under selection were associated with physiological pathways including milk production, cytoskeleton organization, growth, metabolic function, apoptosis and domestication-related changes include immune and nervous system development. The QTL identified are involved in economically important traits in buffalo related to milk composition, udder structure, somatic cell count, meat quality, and carcass and body weight.

  6. A review on breeding and genetic strategies in Iranian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Safari, Abbas; Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh, Navid; Shadparvar, Abdol Ahad; Abdollahi Arpanahi, Rostam

    2018-04-01

    The aim of current study was to review breeding progress and update information on genetic strategies in Iranian buffaloes. Iranian buffalo is one of the vital domestic animals throughout north, north-west, south and south-west of Iran with measurable characteristics both in milk and meat production. The species plays an important role in rural economy of the country due to its unique characteristics such as resistance to diseases and parasites, having long productive lifespan and showing higher capability of consuming low-quality forage. In Iran, total production of milk and meat devoted to buffaloes are 293,000 and 24,700 tons, respectively. Selection activities and milk yield recording are carrying out by the central government through the Animal Breeding Centre of Iran. The main breeding activities of Iranian buffaloes included the estimation of genetic parameters and genetic trends for performance traits using different models and methods, estimation of economic values and selection criteria and analysis of population structure. Incorporating different aspects of dairy buffalo management together with improved housing, nutrition, breeding and milking, is known to produce significant improvements in buffalo production. Therefore, identifying genetic potential of Iranian buffaloes, selection of superior breeds, improving nutritional management and reproduction and developing the education and increasing the skills of practical breeders can be useful in order to enhance the performance and profitability of Iranian buffaloes.

  7. Toll-Like Receptor Responses to Peste des petits ruminants Virus in Goats and Water Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Sakthivel; Biswas, Moanaro; Vignesh, Ambothi R.; Ramya, R.; Raj, Gopal Dhinakar; Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G.; Raja, Angamuthu; Kataria, Ranjit S.; Parida, Satya; Subbiah, Elankumaran

    2014-01-01

    Ovine rinderpest or goat plague is an economically important and contagious viral disease of sheep and goats, caused by the Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Differences in susceptibility to goat plague among different breeds and water buffalo exist. The host innate immune system discriminates between pathogen associated molecular patterns and self antigens through surveillance receptors known as Toll like receptors (TLR). We investigated the role of TLR and cytokines in differential susceptibility of goat breeds and water buffalo to PPRV. We examined the replication of PPRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Indian domestic goats and water buffalo and demonstrated that the levels of TLR3 and TLR7 and downstream signalling molecules correlation with susceptibility vs resistance. Naturally susceptible goat breeds, Barbari and Tellichery, had dampened innate immune responses to PPRV and increased viral loads with lower basal expression levels of TLR 3/7. Upon stimulation of PBMC with synthetic TLR3 and TLR7 agonists or PPRV, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were found to be significantly higher while immunosuppressive interleukin (IL) 10 levels were lower in PPRV resistant Kanni and Salem Black breeds and water buffalo at transcriptional level, correlating with reduced viralloads in infected PBMC. Water buffalo produced higher levels of interferon (IFN) α in comparison with goats at transcriptional and translational levels. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with human IFNα resulted in reduction of PPRV replication, confirming the role of IFNα in limiting PPRV replication. Treatment with IRS66, a TLR7 antagonist, resulted in the reduction of IFNα levels, with increased PPRV replication confirming the role of TLR7. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of TLR7 of these goat breeds did not show any marked nucleotide differences that might account for susceptibility vs resistance to PPRV. Analyzing other host genetic factors might provide

  8. A review of coccidiosis in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is important to the economy of several countries in Asia, and South America and there are also isolated herds in Europe. In India, buffalo is the main dairy animal. Coccidiosis due to Eimeria is an important cause of diarrhea in livestock worldwide. Eimeria specie...

  9. Transcript profiling of pattern recognition receptors in a semi domesticated breed of buffalo, Toda, of India.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, A R; Dhanasekaran, S; Raj, G Dhinakar; Balachandran, C; Pazhanivel, N; Sreekumar, C; Tirumurugaan, K G; Raja, A; Kumanan, K

    2012-06-15

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression profile and levels of toll-like receptor (TLR) mRNAs in the spleen, lung, mediastinal lymph node (MLN), jejunum, rectum, skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Toda and Murrah buffalos. Spleen and PBMC had increased expression of TLR mRNAs 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10; lung had increased expression of TLR mRNAs 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8, MLN TLR mRNA 6, 9, 10 and decrease in TLR 3 and 7 mRNAs in skin. No significant differences were observed in the expression levels of any of the TLR mRNA in jejunum and rectum. Toda buffaloes showed significantly higher expression levels of TLR 9 mRNA in MLN, TLR mRNAs 1, 5, 6, 9 and 10 in skin and TLR mRNAs 2, 4, 7 and 9 in PBMC than Murrah buffaloes living in the vicinity. Toda and Murrah buffaloes were inoculated with TLR5 (flagellin) and TLR9 (CpG ODN) ligands in vivo and expression levels of the respective TLRs analyzed 12h later. Following CpG inoculation, Toda buffaloes had significantly higher levels of TLR 9 mRNA expression but not in Murrah. However, flagellin induction did not increase TLR 5 mRNA expression in both these breeds. Histological sections of the skin were made and infiltrating cell clusters were graded and quantified. Following CpG inoculation, Toda buffaloes showed higher numbers of infiltrating grade 1 and grade 3 cell clusters while Murrah showed lower numbers of infiltrating grade 1 cells as compared to mock-inoculated skin sections. Flagellin treatment revealed no significant differences in infiltrating cell clusters in both the breeds. The results have shown differential expression of TLR mRNAs in various tissues between two divergent buffalo breeds with the highest difference in TLR expression profile seen in the skin, the largest portal of entry of pathogens, of Toda. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New Insights on Water Buffalo Genomic Diversity and Post-Domestication Migration Routes From Medium Density SNP Chip Data.

    PubMed

    Colli, Licia; Milanesi, Marco; Vajana, Elia; Iamartino, Daniela; Bomba, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Francesco; Del Corvo, Marcello; Nicolazzi, Ezequiel L; Ahmed, Sahar S E; Herrera, Jesus R V; Cruz, Libertado; Zhang, Shujun; Liang, Aixin; Hua, Guohua; Yang, Liguo; Hao, Xingjie; Zuo, Fuyuan; Lai, Song-Jia; Wang, Shuilian; Liu, Ruyu; Gong, Yundeng; Mokhber, Mahdi; Mao, Yongjiang; Guan, Feng; Vlaic, Augustin; Vlaic, Bogdan; Ramunno, Luigi; Cosenza, Gianfranco; Ahmad, Ali; Soysal, Ihsan; Ünal, Emel Ö; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Garcia, José F; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Baruselli, Pietro S; Amaral, Maria E J; Parnpai, Rangsun; Drummond, Marcela G; Galbusera, Peter; Burton, James; Hoal, Eileen; Yusnizar, Yulnawati; Sumantri, Cece; Moioli, Bianca; Valentini, Alessio; Stella, Alessandra; Williams, John L; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The domestic water buffalo is native to the Asian continent but through historical migrations and recent importations, nowadays has a worldwide distribution. The two types of water buffalo, i.e., river and swamp, display distinct morphological and behavioral traits, different karyotypes and also have different purposes and geographical distributions. River buffaloes from Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Mozambique, Brazil and Colombia, and swamp buffaloes from China, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Brazil were genotyped with a species-specific medium-density 90K SNP panel. We estimated the levels of molecular diversity and described population structure, which revealed historical relationships between populations and migration events. Three distinct gene pools were identified in pure river as well as in pure swamp buffalo populations. Genomic admixture was seen in the Philippines and in Brazil, resulting from importations of animals for breed improvement. Our results were largely consistent with previous archeological, historical and molecular-based evidence for two independent domestication events for river- and swamp-type buffaloes, which occurred in the Indo-Pakistani region and close to the China/Indochina border, respectively. Based on a geographical analysis of the distribution of diversity, our evidence also indicated that the water buffalo spread out of the domestication centers followed two major divergent migration directions: river buffaloes migrated west from the Indian sub-continent while swamp buffaloes migrated from northern Indochina via an east-south-eastern route. These data suggest that the current distribution of water buffalo diversity has been shaped by the combined effects of multiple migration events occurred at different stages of the post-domestication history of the species.

  11. New Insights on Water Buffalo Genomic Diversity and Post-Domestication Migration Routes From Medium Density SNP Chip Data

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Licia; Milanesi, Marco; Vajana, Elia; Iamartino, Daniela; Bomba, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Francesco; Del Corvo, Marcello; Nicolazzi, Ezequiel L.; Ahmed, Sahar S. E.; Herrera, Jesus R. V.; Cruz, Libertado; Zhang, Shujun; Liang, Aixin; Hua, Guohua; Yang, Liguo; Hao, Xingjie; Zuo, Fuyuan; Lai, Song-Jia; Wang, Shuilian; Liu, Ruyu; Gong, Yundeng; Mokhber, Mahdi; Mao, Yongjiang; Guan, Feng; Vlaic, Augustin; Vlaic, Bogdan; Ramunno, Luigi; Cosenza, Gianfranco; Ahmad, Ali; Soysal, Ihsan; Ünal, Emel Ö.; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Garcia, José F.; Utsunomiya, Yuri T.; Baruselli, Pietro S.; Amaral, Maria E. J.; Parnpai, Rangsun; Drummond, Marcela G.; Galbusera, Peter; Burton, James; Hoal, Eileen; Yusnizar, Yulnawati; Sumantri, Cece; Moioli, Bianca; Valentini, Alessio; Stella, Alessandra; Williams, John L.; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The domestic water buffalo is native to the Asian continent but through historical migrations and recent importations, nowadays has a worldwide distribution. The two types of water buffalo, i.e., river and swamp, display distinct morphological and behavioral traits, different karyotypes and also have different purposes and geographical distributions. River buffaloes from Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Mozambique, Brazil and Colombia, and swamp buffaloes from China, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Brazil were genotyped with a species-specific medium-density 90K SNP panel. We estimated the levels of molecular diversity and described population structure, which revealed historical relationships between populations and migration events. Three distinct gene pools were identified in pure river as well as in pure swamp buffalo populations. Genomic admixture was seen in the Philippines and in Brazil, resulting from importations of animals for breed improvement. Our results were largely consistent with previous archeological, historical and molecular-based evidence for two independent domestication events for river- and swamp-type buffaloes, which occurred in the Indo-Pakistani region and close to the China/Indochina border, respectively. Based on a geographical analysis of the distribution of diversity, our evidence also indicated that the water buffalo spread out of the domestication centers followed two major divergent migration directions: river buffaloes migrated west from the Indian sub-continent while swamp buffaloes migrated from northern Indochina via an east-south-eastern route. These data suggest that the current distribution of water buffalo diversity has been shaped by the combined effects of multiple migration events occurred at different stages of the post-domestication history of the species. PMID:29552025

  12. Effect of breeding method and season on pregnancy rate and embryonic and fetal losses in lactating Nili-Ravi buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Arslan; Arshad, Usman; Yousuf, Muhammad Rizwan; Ahmad, Nasim

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of breeding method and season on pregnancy rate and cumulative embryonic and fetal losses in Nili-Ravi buffalo. Estrus detection was performed twice a day by teaser buffalo bull for 1 hour each. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to address the breeding method and season. Buffaloes (n = 130) exhibiting estrus were randomly assigned to be bred either in peak breeding season (PBS; n = 80) or low breeding season (LBS; n = 50). Within each season, buffaloes were divided to receive either natural service (NS; n = 65) or artificial insemination (AI; n = 65). NS buffaloes, in estrus, were allowed to remain with the bull until mating. AI was achieved, using frozen thawed semen of bull of known fertility. PBS comprised of September to December and LBS were from May to July. Serial ultrasonography was performed on days 30, 45, 60, and 90 after breeding (day 0) to monitor pregnancy rate and embryonic and fetal losses. The pregnancy rate on day 30 after breeding was higher in NS as compared to AI group (63 vs. 43%; P < 0.05) during PBS while it did not differ (48 vs. 32%; P > 0.05) in LBS. The cumulative embryonic and fetal losses between days 31 and 90 were significantly lower in PBS than LBS (33 vs. 60%; P < 0.05), ignoring breeding method. Pregnancy rates were better with NS in PBS, and cumulative embryonic fetal losses were higher in LBS in Nili-Ravi buffalo.

  13. Assessment of expected breeding values for fertility traits of Murrah buffaloes under subtropical climate.

    PubMed

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A K; Singh, Avtar; Shivahre, Pushp Raj; Upadhyay, Arpan; Sah, Vaishali; Singh, K Mahesh

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of temperature and humidity prevalent under subtropical climate on the breeding values for fertility traits viz. service period (SP), pregnancy rate (PR) and conception rate (CR) of Murrah buffaloes in National Dairy Research Institute (NDRI) herd. Fertility data on 1379 records of 581 Murrah buffaloes spread over four lactations and climatic parameters viz. dry bulb temperature and relative humidity (RH) spanned over 20 years (1993-2012) were collected from NDRI and Central Soil and Salinity Research Institute, Karnal, India. Monthly average temperature humidity index (THI) values were estimated. Threshold THI value affecting fertility traits was identified by fixed least-squares model analysis. Three zones of non-heat stress, heat stress and critical heat stress zones were developed in a year. The genetic parameters heritability (h(2)) and repeatability (r) of each fertility trait were estimated. Genetic evaluation of Murrah buffaloes was performed in each zone with respect to their expected breeding values (EBV) for fertility traits. Effect of THI was found significant (p<0.001) on all fertility traits with threshold THI value identified as 75. Based on THI values, a year was classified into three zones: Non heat stress zone(THI 56.71-73.21), HSZ (THI 75.39-81.60) and critical HSZ (THI 80.27-81.60). The EBVfor SP, PR, CR were estimated as 138.57 days, 0.362 and 69.02% in non-HSZ while in HSZ EBV were found as 139.62 days, 0.358 and 68.81%, respectively. EBV for SP was increased to 140.92 days and for PR and CR, it was declined to 0.357 and 68.71% in critical HSZ. The negative effect of THI was observed on EBV of fertility traits under the non-HSZ and critical HSZ Thus, the influence of THI should be adjusted before estimating the breeding values for fertility traits in Murrah buffaloes.

  14. Domestic water buffaloes: Access to surface water, disease prevalence and associated economic losses.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Ehsan; Abid, Muhammad; Zhang, Huiming; Cui, Weijun; Ul Hasson, Shabeh

    2018-06-01

    Given the shortage and non-availability of freshwater in Pakistan, wastewater is being used for bathing water buffaloes; however, this has a negative impact on animal welfare. Although there is a vast literature on indirect linkages between wastewater and animal productivity, studies focusing on the direct impacts of water buffaloes bathing in wastewater on animal productivity and economic losses are rare. Therefore, using 360 domestic water buffalo farms, this study examines the expenditure and production losses associated with bathing (in wastewater and freshwater) and non-bathing water buffaloes by employing partial budgeting and resource adjustment component techniques. Furthermore, it investigates the prevalence of animal diseases and associated economic effects using correlation analysis and propensity score matching techniques, respectively. The findings reveal that compared to their counterparts (freshwater bathing and non-bathing water buffaloes), buffaloes bathing in wastewater are at increased risk of clinical mastitis, foot and mouth disease (FMD) and tick infestation. Moreover, the use of wastewater for bathing buffaloes also leads to higher economic and production losses by affecting milk productivity, causing premature culling, and reducing slaughter value. The findings of the double-log model show that economic losses are higher if buffaloes bathe in wastewater within 30 min after milking, as there are more chances that those buffaloes would be exposed to bacterial penetration in the teat ducts, which may result in intramammary infection. According to the propensity score matching method, the higher economic damages per month are associated with buffaloes bathing in wastewater and freshwater, 155 and 110 USD per farm, respectively. The study findings reference the need for policies to restrict wastewater access by water buffaloes, and a regular check of and access to cool clean water wallows for bathing during hot summer days, to reduce excess

  15. Evaluation of fasting metabolism of growing water buffalo (Bubalus, Bubalis).

    PubMed

    Qin, Guangsheng; Zou, Caixia; Pang, Chunying; Yang, Bingzhuan; Liang, Xianwei; Liu, Jianxin; Xia, Zhongsheng; Wen, Qiuyan; Yan, Tianhai

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate fasting metabolism (FM) of water buffalo (Bubalus, Bubalis) at three stages of growth (12, 18 and 24 months) in Guangxi, China. Five female water buffalo were used for each age group and their live weight was on average 254, 326 and 338 kg, respectively. All animals were of average body condition, healthy and de-wormed before start of the study. Prior to a 6-day fasting period, buffalo were offered a mixed diet of forage and concentrates (70% and 30%, dry matter basis) on a restricted nutritional level (419 kJ/kg(0.75) of metabolizable energy, ME) for 15 days. Gas exchanges for each animal were determined for 3 days from day 4 of starvation, using open-circuit respiratory head hoods. Fasting body weight was 0.918 of live weight (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.99). Both fasting heat production (FHP) and FM (MJ/day) increased significantly with increased age of animals (P < 0.05). Linear regression analysis indicated a positive relationship between fasting body weight (kg(0.75)) and FHP (MJ/day, P < 0.01, r(2) = 0.49) or FM (MJ/day P < 0.01, r(2) = 0.52) when using individual animal data across three groups. However, when expressed as kJ/kg(0.75) of fasting body weight, the differences in FHP or FM between three groups of animals were not significant. The present average FHP and FM (322 and 347 kJ/kg(0.75) of fasting body weight) were compatible to those published in the literature for water buffalo, beef and dairy cattle. The present FM data were also used to estimate net energy (NE(m)) and ME (ME(m)) requirements for maintenance for water buffalo. The results for these two parameters were similar to those for FHP and FM. There was no significant difference between three groups of buffalo in NE(m) or ME(m) when expressed as kJ/kg(0.75) of live weight. The present average NE(m) and ME(m) values (347 and 506 kJ/kg(0.75) of live weight) are close to those proposed by the Agricultural and Food Research Council adopted in UK for

  16. Health and growth of water-buffalo calves in Nueva Ecija, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gundran, R S; More, S J

    1999-05-31

    This prospective observational study was undertaken in the province of Nueva Ecija in the Philippines to assess current levels of health and growth achieved by a defined cohort of water-buffalo calves raised by smallholder farmers and to identify factors associated with the performance of these animals during the first 6 months following birth. Seventy two animals were enrolled, including 16 Philippine native water-buffalo and 54 crossbred (F1, F2 or backcrosses) animals. Dullness (which was associated with manual assistance at birth and inadequate milk supply subsequently) and scouring were the main signs of morbidity in this cohort, and the crude morbidity and mortality rates during the first 6 months following birth were 2.9 cases and 0.31 deaths per 1000 calf-days at risk, respectively. Average daily gain was significantly influenced both by the breed of the calf and whether the calf developed dullness at any time during the period of observation. The results of this study suggest that the problem of dullness in water-buffalo calves deserves further research attention. Management procedures are likely to be important determinants of growth in these animals.

  17. Seroepidemiology of Bovine Herpes Virus-1 Infection in Water Buffaloes from Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were introduced to Mexico at the end of the last century. Buffaloes are commonly pastured together with cattle. However, few studies have been done on buffalo herd health in Mexico. We hypothesized that a better knowledge of the epidemiology of infections shared bet...

  18. [Selenium deficiency in an organic extensive water buffalo farm].

    PubMed

    Große, Reinhard; Binici, Cagri; Pieper, Robert; Müller, Kerstin E

    2018-06-01

    This case report presents investigations of muscle problems in three male water buffaloes (1-2 years) kept extensively (loose housing, pasture). The bulls were presented because of listlessness and increased lying periods. They displayed difficulties to stand up, a stilted gait, and tremor in the legs. The determination of the selenium concentration by the measurement of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood samples (EDTA) demonstrated selenium deficiency in all three buffaloes. This confirmed the tentative diagnosis of nutritive myodystrophy due to selenium deficiency. Following a single injection of 1500 mg all-rac-alpha-tocopherol acetate and 11 mg sodium selenite, the bulls recovered clinically. The whole blood samples taken subsequently from seven adult water buffaloes on the farm showed selenium deficiency in all animals. Consequently, slow-release multi-trace element boluses were administered once orally - as far as possible - to all adult animals of the herd. After 1 year, a good to very good selenium supply was observed in all these buffaloes, except for one cow, in which bolus application had failed. Schattauer GmbH.

  19. Water Quality Assessment of the Buffalo River, Arkansas, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, K. L.; Ruhl, L. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Buffalo River was established as a National River by the U.S. Congress in 1972, and runs approximately 150 miles from Newton County, Arkansas to Baxter County where it joins the White River. The Buffalo National River is the one of the last free flowing rivers in the continental U.S. with a rich cultural and political history surrounding it. The geology surrounding the river can be characterized by its karst environment, which has led to the many caves, depressions, and sinkholes found along the river. Karst environments are more susceptible to groundwater pollution so drainage from septic systems is a major concern for towns along the river. There are also numerous abandoned mines in the Buffalo River watershed, especially in the Rush area, which was mined for lead and zinc. Additionally, an increase in livestock production in the area is also a concern for increased nitrate and phosphate, along with fertilizer runoff from agricultural areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the water quality changes along the Buffalo River from human and environmental influences. Samples at six different locations along the river were collected along with parameters such as pH, conductivity, salinity, and temperature during several trips in the summer of 2017. Water samples were analyzed for cations and anions by IC, trace metals by ICPMS, and Escherichia coli with agar plate colony counts. The results were used to map geochemical changes in the Buffalo River watershed, and calculate enrichment factors of constituents (like nitrate, phosphate, and trace elements) as the water flowed downstream.

  20. Genetic diversity in Trypanosoma theileri from Sri Lankan cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Fukushi, Shintaro; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru

    2015-01-30

    Trypanosoma theileri is a hemoprotozoan parasite that infects various ruminant species. We investigated the epidemiology of this parasite among cattle and water buffalo populations bred in Sri Lanka, using a diagnostic PCR assay based on the cathepsin L-like protein (CATL) gene. Blood DNA samples sourced from cattle (n=316) and water buffaloes (n=320) bred in different geographical areas of Sri Lanka were PCR screened for T. theileri. Parasite DNA was detected in cattle and water buffaloes alike in all the sampling locations. The overall T. theileri-positive rate was higher in water buffaloes (15.9%) than in cattle (7.6%). Subsequently, PCR amplicons were sequenced and the partial CATL sequences were phylogenetically analyzed. The identity values for the CATL gene were 89.6-99.7% among the cattle-derived sequences, compared with values of 90.7-100% for the buffalo-derived sequences. However, the cattle-derived sequences shared 88.2-100% identity values with those from buffaloes. In the phylogenetic tree, the Sri Lankan CATL gene sequences fell into two major clades (TthI and TthII), both of which contain CATL sequences from several other countries. Although most of the CATL sequences from Sri Lankan cattle and buffaloes clustered independently, two buffalo-derived sequences were observed to be closely related to those of the Sri Lankan cattle. Furthermore, a Sri Lankan buffalo sequence clustered with CATL gene sequences from Brazilian buffalo and Thai cattle. In addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of T. theileri among Sri Lankan-bred cattle and water buffaloes, the present study found that some of the CATL gene fragments sourced from water buffaloes shared similarity with those determined from cattle in this country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiology of bovine hemoprotozoa parasites in cattle and water buffalo in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Weerasooriya, Gayani; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Long, Phung Thang; Takemae, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-09-01

    A PCR-based survey of hemoprotozoa parasites detected Babesia bigemina, Theileria orientalis and Trypanosoma theileri among cattle and water buffalo in Vietnam, and a new Babesia sp. closely related to Babesia ovata was detected in cattle only. In addition, Theileria annulata and Trypanosoma evansi were not detected in both cattle and water buffalo. Phylogenetic analysis detected T. orientalis MPSP genotypes 3, 5, 7 and N3 in cattle and 5, 7, N1 and N2 in water buffalo. Additionally, water buffalo-derived T. theileri CATL sequences clustered together with a previously reported cattle-derived sequence from Vietnam. This is the first report of a new Babesia sp. in cattle, and T. orientalis MPSP genotype 7 and T. theileri in water buffalo in Vietnam.

  2. Epidemiology of bovine hemoprotozoa parasites in cattle and water buffalo in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    WEERASOORIYA, Gayani; SIVAKUMAR, Thillaiampalam; LAN, Dinh Thi Bich; LONG, Phung Thang; TAKEMAE, Hitoshi; IGARASHI, Ikuo; INOUE, Noboru; YOKOYAMA, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    A PCR-based survey of hemoprotozoa parasites detected Babesia bigemina, Theileria orientalis and Trypanosoma theileri among cattle and water buffalo in Vietnam, and a new Babesia sp. closely related to Babesia ovata was detected in cattle only. In addition, Theileria annulata and Trypanosoma evansi were not detected in both cattle and water buffalo. Phylogenetic analysis detected T. orientalis MPSP genotypes 3, 5, 7 and N3 in cattle and 5, 7, N1 and N2 in water buffalo. Additionally, water buffalo-derived T. theileri CATL sequences clustered together with a previously reported cattle-derived sequence from Vietnam. This is the first report of a new Babesia sp. in cattle, and T. orientalis MPSP genotype 7 and T. theileri in water buffalo in Vietnam. PMID:27149894

  3. Assessment of a specifically developed bullet casing gun for the stunning of water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Meichtry, Carmen; Glauser, Urs; Glardon, Matthieu; Ross, Steffen G; Lechner, Isabel; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Gascho, Dominic; Spadavecchia, Claudia; von Rotz, Alois; Stojiljkovic, Ana; Stoffel, Michael H

    2018-01-01

    Water buffaloes and cattle differ considerably with respect to the anatomy of the head. As a result, captive bolt stunners often fail to reliably produce adequate loss of consciousness in water buffaloes and, thus, do not fulfill animal welfare requirements. The goal of the present study was to assess and validate a new stunning device for water buffaloes meeting animal welfare and occupational safety requirements. The newly designed bullet casing gun uses .357Mag/10.2g hollow point bullets and has additional safety features. Its effectiveness and usability were assessed under practical conditions in an abattoir as based on widely accepted criteria. Stunning resulted in deep unconsciousness in 19 out of 20 water buffaloes. One 9-year old male did not immediately collapse. Except for very old bulls, the device presented herewith provides a means to stun water buffaloes of both sexes effectively and reliably while keeping occupational hazards to a minimum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Diversity in the Prion Protein Gene (PRNP) of Domestic Cattle and Water Buffaloes in Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    UCHIDA, Leo; HERIYANTO, Agus; THONGCHAI, Chalermchaikit; HANH, Tran Thi; HORIUCHI, Motohiro; ISHIHARA, Kanako; TAMURA, Yutaka; MURAMATSU, Yasukazu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been an accumulation of information on frequencies of insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms within the bovine prion protein gene (PRNP) and on the number of octapeptide repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region of bovine PRNP related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) susceptibility. We investigated the frequencies of 23-bp indel polymorphism in the promoter region (23indel) and 12-bp indel polymorphism in intron 1 region (12indel), octapeptide repeat polymorphisms and SNPs in the bovine PRNP of cattle and water buffaloes in Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand. The frequency of the deletion allele in the 23indel site was significantly low in cattle of Indonesia and Thailand and water buffaloes. The deletion allele frequency in the 12indel site was significantly low in all of the cattle and buffaloes categorized in each subgroup. In both indel sites, the deletion allele has been reported to be associated with susceptibility to classical BSE. In some Indonesian local cattle breeds, the frequency of the allele with 5 octapeptide repeats was significantly high despite the fact that the allele with 6 octapeptide repeats has been reported to be most frequent in many breeds of cattle. Four SNPs observed in Indonesian local cattle have not been reported for domestic cattle. This study provided information on PRNP of livestock in these Southeast Asian countries. PMID:24705506

  5. Effect of consecutive re-synchronization protocols on pregnancy rate in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) heifers out of the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Neglia, Gianluca; Capuano, Massimo; Balestrieri, Anna; Cimmino, Roberta; Iannaccone, Francesco; Palumbo, Francesco; Presicce, Giorgio A; Campanile, Giuseppe

    2018-06-01

    The combined effect of six consecutive timed artificial inseminations (TAIs) on pregnancy rates, following two different synchronization protocols on buffalo heifers, over a period of seven months typically characterized by low breeding performances, were investigated in this study. A total of 2189 TAIs were performed on 1463 buffalo heifers within a large buffalo farm in the south of Italy. Individual animals were allowed to undergo synchronization protocol (either a slightly modified Ovsynch or Progesterone treatment) and TAI until establishment of pregnancy or else for not more than six consecutive times. Semen of seven proven bulls was used throughout the study, which was carried out from March to September of the same year. Therefore, other than the effect given by consecutive TAIs over time, a monthly and a seasonal effect could also be tested, once the entire period was split into a Low Breeding Season (LBS) from March to June, and a Transition to Breeding Season (TBS) from July to September. From the data recorded in this study and the statistical analysis performed, it can be stated that the two protocols for the synchronization of ovulation were similar in efficiency in determining pregnancies with an overall fertility rate of 89.4% when the comparison was run both on a monthly basis or when months were grouped into two different seasons. In addition, an average of 1.83 AI/pregnancy was reported, slightly higher for the Ovsynch when compared to the Progesterone protocol: 1.91 vs 1.70, respectively. Finally, when considering the number of progressive synchronization treatments implemented over time as covariate, neither Ovsynch nor Progesterone treatment significantly affected pregnancy rates following the first of the six synchronization sessions. However, repeating the synchronization procedure, the progesterone based protocol resulted in significantly higher probability of success in terms of established pregnancies during the second and third re

  6. Milk progesterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a tool to investigate ovarian cyclicity of water buffaloes in relation to body condition score and milk production.

    PubMed

    Banu, Turgish A; Shamsuddin, Mohammed; Bhattacharjee, Jayonta; Islam, Mohammad F; Khan, Saiful I; Ahmed, Jalal U

    2012-05-03

    Application of assisted reproductive technologies in buffaloes is limited to some extent by farmers' inability to detect oestrus because of its poor expression. The present study aimed at investigating reliability of a milk progesterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to assess the ovarian cyclicity during post partum, oestrus and post-breeding periods in water buffaloes. Progesterone concentrations were measured by an ELISA in milk of 23 postpartum buffaloes in relation to oestrus, pregnancy, body condition score (BCS) and milk production. Two milk samples were taken at 10 days intervals, every month starting from day 30 and continued to day 150 post partum. BCS and milk production were recorded during sample collection. Milk samples from bred buffaloes were collected at Day 0 (day of breeding), Days 10-12 and Days 22-24. Defatted milk was preserved at -80°C until analysis. Pregnancy was confirmed by palpation per rectum on Days 70-90. Seventeen buffaloes had 47 ovulatory cycles, one to four in each, 13 were detected in oestrus once (28 % oestrus detection rate). Progesterone concentration ≥1 ng/ml in one of the two 10-day-interval milk samples reflected ovulation and corpus luteum formation. The intervals between calving to first luteal activity and to first detected oestrus varied from 41 to 123 days (n = 17) and 83 to 135 (n = 13) days, respectively. Eight buffaloes were bred in the course of the study and seven were found pregnant. These buffaloes had a progesterone profile of low (<1 ng/ml), high (≥ 1 ng/ml) and high (≥ 1 ng/ml) on Day 0, Days 10-12 and Days 22-24, respectively. Buffaloes cycling later in the postpartum period had fewer missed oestruses (P < 0.05). Buffaloes with a superior BCS had a shorter calving to oestrus interval and produced more milk (P < 0.05). Milk progesterone ELISA is a reliable tool for monitoring ovarian cyclicity and good BCS may be an indicator of resuming cyclicity in water buffalo.

  7. Skin Testing With Water Buffalo's Milk in Children With Cow's Milk Allergy.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, William J; Gardynski, Andrea; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2009-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Cow's milk allergy is the most common food allergy in young children. In areas outside the United States, milk from other mammals has been studied as a possible and desirable alternative for children with cow's milk allergy. OBJECTIVES: We chose to further investigate water buffalo's milk as an alternative for cow's milk allergic children in the United States. METHODS: Children with cow's milk allergy were skin prick tested with water buffalo's milk. Additionally, subjects were followed clinically for 1 year after the test to determine how many of the subjects had persistent cow's milk allergy. RESULTS: In total, 30 children, age 8 months to 8 years, were skin prick tested to water buffalo's milk with 73% (22/30) having a positive test. All children with a negative water buffalo's milk skin test also had a negative cow's milk skin test. In follow-up, most (7 of 8) of the children with a negative skin prick test (SPT) to water buffalo's milk were found to have outgrown their cow's milk allergy. In comparison, all of the subjects with a positive skin test to water buffalo's milk had persistent cow's milk allergy. After adjusting for this, we determined that 96% (22/23) of the children with persistent cow's milk allergy were positive on skin testing to water buffalo's milk. CONCLUSIONS: In this population, the vast majority of children with persistent cow's milk allergy were positive on skin prick testing to water buffalo's milk. These results indicate that water buffalo's milk is unlikely to be a successful alternative for children with cow's milk allergy.

  8. Comparison digestibility and protozoa population of Khuzestan water buffalo and Holstein cow.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Safora; Eslami, Moosa; Chaji, Morteza; Mohammadabadi, Tahereh; Bojarpour, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The major aim of this study was to compare the morphology and activity of rumen protozoa of Khuzestan water buffalo and Holstein cow using in vitro digestibility and gas production parameters of steam treated sugarcane pith. Rumen fluid obtained from two buffalo and cow steers fed the same diet, 30:70 concentrate: forage. To separate rumen protozoa, antibiotic solution and fungicides were added to rumen fluid. The results of present experiment indicated that the neutral detergent fiber (NDF; 7.8 vs. 1.69%) and acid detergent fiber (ADF; 6.24 vs. 3.24%) digestibility of steam treated sugarcane pith by rumen protozoal population of Khuzestan buffalo was higher than those of cow (p < 0.05). Also, digestibility of dry matter, NDF and ADF by whole buffalo micro-organisms was more than those in cow (p < 0.05). The results indicated that the potential of gas production of sugarcane pith by rumen protozoa in water buffalo was more than that of cow (p < 0.05). Total rumen ciliate protozoa numbers in water buffalo were significantly higher than those of cow (3.68 × 10(5) vs. 2.18 × 10(5) mL(-1) of rumen content) (p < 0.05). The number of Diplodinium in buffalo was more than that of cow (41.27 vs. 35.7% of total rumen protozoa, respectively). Percentage of Entodinium, Epidinium, Ophryoscolex and Isotricha in cow was more than those of buffalo. Therefore, in the same diet, protozoa and total rumen micro-organisms of Khuzestan water buffalo have higher digestion activity compared to Holstein cow.

  9. Screening and Assessment of Low-Molecular-Weight Biomarkers of Milk from Cow and Water Buffalo: An Alternative Approach for the Rapid Identification of Adulterated Water Buffalo Mozzarellas.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, Chiara; Panero, Stefania; Navarra, Maria Assunta; Tomai, Pierpaolo; Curini, Roberta; Gentili, Alessandra

    2018-05-30

    Adulteration of Mozzarella di Bufala Campana with cow milk is a common fraud because of the high price and limited seasonal availability of water buffalo milk. To identify such adulteration, this work proposes a novel approach based on the use of species-specific, low-molecular-weight biomarkers (LMWBs). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry screening analyses identified β-carotene, lutein, and β-cryptoxanthin as LMWBs of cow milk, while ergocalciferol was found only in water buffalo milk. Adulterated mozzarellas were prepared in the laboratory and analyzed for the four biomarkers. Combined quantification of β-carotene and ergocalciferol enabled the detection of cow milk with a sensitivity threshold of 5% (w/w). The method was further tested by analyzing a certificated water buffalo mozzarella and several commercial products. This approach is alternative to conventional proteomic and genomic methods and is advantageous for routine operations as a result of its simplicity, speed, and low cost.

  10. Genetic characterization of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Fukushi, Shintaro; Hayashida, Kyoko; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Vimalakumar, Singarayar Caniciyas; Kanagaratnam, Ratnam; Meewewa, Asela Sanjeewa; Suthaharan, Kalpana; Puvirajan, Thamotharampillai; de Silva, Weligodage Kumarawansa; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-24

    Water buffaloes are thought to be the reservoir hosts for several hemoprotozoan parasites that infect cattle. In the present study, we surveyed Sri Lankan bred water buffaloes for infections with Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Theileria orientalis using parasite-specific PCR assays. When 320 blood-derived DNA samples from water buffaloes reared in three different districts (Polonnaruwa, Mannar, and Mullaitivu) of Sri Lanka were PCR screened, B. bovis, B. bigemina, and T. orientalis were detected. While T. orientalis was the predominant parasite (82.5%), low PCR-positive rates were observed for B. bovis (1.9%) and B. bigemina (1.6%). Amplicons of the gene sequences of the Rhoptry Associated Protein-1 (RAP-1) of B. bovis, the Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) of B. bigemina, and the Major Piroplasm Surface Protein (MPSP) of T. orientalis were compared with those characterized previously in Sri Lankan cattle. While the B. bigemina AMA-1 sequences from water buffaloes shared high identity values with those from cattle, B. bovis RAP-1 sequences from water buffaloes diverged genetically from those of cattle. For T. orientalis, none of the MPSP sequence types reported previously in Sri Lankan cattle (types 1, 3, 5, and 7) were detected in the water buffaloes, and the MPSP sequences analyzed in the present study belonged to types N1 or N2. In summary, in addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka, the present study found that the predominant variants of water buffalo-derived B. bovis RAP-1 and T. orientalis MPSP sequences were different from those previously described from cattle in this country. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Cloning, Identification, and Expression Patterns of Myostatin Gene in Water Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Haiyang; Huang, Guiting; Cui, Jiayu; Zhang, Ruimen; Cui, Kuiqing; Yang, Sufang; Shi, Deshun

    2018-01-02

    Myostatin (MSTN), also named growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), is a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family member with a key role in the negative regulation of skeletal muscle growth. However, its role in ovarian folliculogenesis remains unclear. To provide us with a basis for understanding this role, we cloned MSTN and examined its expression patterns in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The complete ORF of the water buffalo MSTN gene is 1,128 nucleotides, which encode a 375 amino acid protein and sharing 99% identity at the deducted amino acid level with that of Bos taurus. Protein sequence analysis showed that MSTN is a weakly acerbic extracellular protein, consisting of signal peptides at 18-19 sites, a TGF-β propeptide, and a TGF-β domain. RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that water buffalo MSTN was expressed in multiple tissues but not limited to muscle. Immunohistochemistry staining confirmed the presence of MSTN in oocytes and granulosal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to confirm the expression of MSTN in the water buffalo ovary, suggesting an additional role of MSTN in water buffalo folliculogenesis, along with its role in skeletal muscle growth regulation. Further study of the regulatory mechanism of MSTN in water buffalo reproduction is warranted. MSTN, myostatin; ORF, open reading frame.

  12. The microbiota of water buffalo milk during mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Catozzi, Carlotta; Sanchez Bonastre, Armand; Francino, Olga; Lecchi, Cristina; De Carlo, Esterina; Vecchio, Domenico; Martucciello, Alessandra; Fraulo, Pasquale; Bronzo, Valerio; Cuscó, Anna; D’Andreano, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the microbiota of water buffalo milk during sub-clinical and clinical mastitis, as compared to healthy status, by using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 137 quarter samples were included in the experimental design: 27 samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters, with a Somatic Cell Count (SCC) of less than 200,000 cells/ml; 27 samples from quarters with clinical mastitis; 83 samples were collected from quarters with subclinical mastitis, with a SCC number greater of 200,000 cells/ml and/or culture positive for udder pathogens, without clinical signs of mastitis. Bacterial DNA was purified and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and sequenced. Significant differences were found in milk samples from healthy quarters and those with sub-clinical and clinical mastitis. The microbiota diversity of milk from healthy quarters was richer as compared to samples with sub-clinical mastitis, whose microbiota diversity was in turn richer as compared to those from clinical mastitis. The core microbiota of water buffalo milk, defined as the asset of microorganisms shared by all healthy milk samples, includes 15 genera, namely Micrococcus, Propionibacterium, 5-7N15, Solibacillus, Staphylococcus, Aerococcus, Facklamia, Trichococcus, Turicibacter, 02d06, SMB53, Clostridium, Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter and Pseudomonas. Only two genera (Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas) were present in all the samples from sub-clinical mastitis, and no genus was shared across all in clinical mastitis milk samples. The presence of mastitis was found to be related to the change in the relative abundance of genera, such as Psychrobacter, whose relative abundance decreased from 16.26% in the milk samples from healthy quarters to 3.2% in clinical mastitis. Other genera, such as SMB53 and Solibacillus, were decreased as well. Discriminant analysis presents the evidence that the microbial community of healthy and clinical

  13. The microbiota of water buffalo milk during mastitis.

    PubMed

    Catozzi, Carlotta; Sanchez Bonastre, Armand; Francino, Olga; Lecchi, Cristina; De Carlo, Esterina; Vecchio, Domenico; Martucciello, Alessandra; Fraulo, Pasquale; Bronzo, Valerio; Cuscó, Anna; D'Andreano, Sara; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the microbiota of water buffalo milk during sub-clinical and clinical mastitis, as compared to healthy status, by using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. A total of 137 quarter samples were included in the experimental design: 27 samples derived from healthy, culture negative quarters, with a Somatic Cell Count (SCC) of less than 200,000 cells/ml; 27 samples from quarters with clinical mastitis; 83 samples were collected from quarters with subclinical mastitis, with a SCC number greater of 200,000 cells/ml and/or culture positive for udder pathogens, without clinical signs of mastitis. Bacterial DNA was purified and the 16S rRNA genes were individually amplified and sequenced. Significant differences were found in milk samples from healthy quarters and those with sub-clinical and clinical mastitis. The microbiota diversity of milk from healthy quarters was richer as compared to samples with sub-clinical mastitis, whose microbiota diversity was in turn richer as compared to those from clinical mastitis. The core microbiota of water buffalo milk, defined as the asset of microorganisms shared by all healthy milk samples, includes 15 genera, namely Micrococcus, Propionibacterium, 5-7N15, Solibacillus, Staphylococcus, Aerococcus, Facklamia, Trichococcus, Turicibacter, 02d06, SMB53, Clostridium, Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter and Pseudomonas. Only two genera (Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas) were present in all the samples from sub-clinical mastitis, and no genus was shared across all in clinical mastitis milk samples. The presence of mastitis was found to be related to the change in the relative abundance of genera, such as Psychrobacter, whose relative abundance decreased from 16.26% in the milk samples from healthy quarters to 3.2% in clinical mastitis. Other genera, such as SMB53 and Solibacillus, were decreased as well. Discriminant analysis presents the evidence that the microbial community of healthy and clinical

  14. Strategies to overcome seasonal anestrus in water buffalo.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Nelcio Antonio Tonizza; Soares, Julia Gleyci; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-07-01

    Reproductive seasonality in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is characterized by behavioral, endocrine, and reproductive changes that occur over distinct periods of the year. During the nonbreeding season (spring and summer), the greater light-dark ratio (long days) suppresses estrus behavior and the occurrence of ovulation. Anestrous buffaloes have insufficient pulsatile of LH to support the final stages of follicular development, and subsequently, estrus behavior and ovulation do not occur, limiting reproductive efficiency, especially in artificial insemination (AI) programs. A number of therapeutic strategies designed to synchronize follicular wave emergence and ovulation have allowed for the use of AI throughout the year, overcoming seasonal anestrus in buffalo. These therapies also improve reproductive performance by increasing the service rate and pregnancy per AI in buffalo herds, regardless of reproductive seasonality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishment of a Somatic Cell Bank for Indian Buffalo Breeds and Assessing the Suitability of the Cryopreserved Cells for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Selokar, Naresh L; Sharma, Papori; Krishna, Ananth; Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Dharmendra; Saini, Monika; Sharma, Arpna; Vijayalakshmy, Kennady; Yadav, Prem Singh

    2018-06-01

    Biobanks of cryopreserved gametes and embryos of domestic animals have been utilized to spread desired genotypes and to conserve the animal germplasm of endangered breeds. In principle, somatic cells can be used for the same purposes, and for reviving of animals, the somatic cells must be suitable for animal cloning techniques, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer. In the present study, we derived and cryopreserved somatic cells from three breeds of riverine and swamp-like type buffaloes and established a somatic cell bank. In total, 350 cryovials of 14 different individual animals (25 cryovials per animal) were cryopreserved and informative data such as breed value, origin, and others were documented. Immunostaining of the established cells against vimentin and cytokeratin suggested a commitment to the fibroblast lineage. In addition, microsatellite analysis was performed and documented for unambiguous parentage verification of clones in the future. Subsequently, the cryopreserved cells were tested for their suitability as nuclear donors (n = 7) using handmade cloning, and the reconstructed embryos were cultured in vitro. The cleavage rates (95.99% ± 2.17% vs. 82.18% ± 2.50%) and blastocyst rates (37.73% ± 1.54% vs. 24.31% ± 1.78%) were higher (p < 0.05) for riverine buffalo cells than that of swamp-like buffalo cells, whereas the total cell numbers of blastocysts (258.16 ± 36.25 vs. 198.16 ± 36.25, respectively) were similar. In conclusion, we demonstrated the feasibility of biobanking of buffalo somatic cells, and that the cryopreserved cells can be used to produce cloned embryos. This study encourages the development of somatic cell biobanks of domestic livestock, including endangered breeds of buffalo, to preserve valuable genotypes for future revitalization by animal cloning techniques.

  16. Serum levels of cytokines in water buffaloes experimentally infected with Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Kai; Guo, Ai-Jiang; Hou, Jun-Ling; Sun, Miao-Miao; Sheng, Zhao-An; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Huang, Wei-Yi; Elsheikha, Hany M; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-09-15

    Fasciola gigantica infection in water buffaloes causes significant economic losses especially in developing countries. Although modulation of the host immune response by cytokine neutralization or vaccination is a promising approach to control infection with this parasite, our understanding of cytokine's dynamic during F. gigantica infection is limited. To address this, we quantified the levels of serum cytokines produced in water buffaloes following experimental infection with F. gigantica. Five buffaloes were infected via oral gavage with 500 viable F. gigantica metacercariae and blood samples were collected from buffaloes one week before infection and for 13 consecutive weeks thereafter. The levels of 10 cytokines in serum samples were simultaneously determined using ELISA. F. gigantica failed to elicit the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, and IFN-γ. On the other hand, evidence of a Th2 type response was detected, but only early in the course of parasite colonization and included modest increase in the levels of IL-10 and IL-13. The results also revealed suppression of the immune responses as a feature of chronic F. gigantica infection in buffaloes. Taken together, F. gigantica seems to elicit a modest Th2 response at early stage of infection in order to downregulate harmful Th1- and Th17-type inflammatory responses in experimentally infected buffaloes. The full extent of anti-F. gigantica immune response and its relation to pathogenesis requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Circulating oxidative stress caused by Psoroptes natalensis infestation in Indian water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sumit; Panigrahi, Padma Nibash; Dey, Sahadeb; Dan, Ananya; Kumar, Akhilesh; Mahendran, K; Maurya, P S

    2017-09-01

    The present study reports the circulating oxidative stress associated with Psoroptes natalensis infestation in Indian water buffaloes. Three non-descriptive water buffaloes, age ranging between 4 and 9 years, presented to Referral Veterinary Polyclinic, IVRI, for treatment served as clinical subject. The infested animals were treated with Ivermectin subcutaneously and Amitraz topically along with antioxidant like ascorbic acid, Vitamin E and selenium. The level of lipid peroxidase was significantly higher (3.94 ± 0.34) in Psoroptes infested buffalo and was reduced significantly ( P  ≤ 0.05) after treatment (1.56 ± 0.40). The significantly higher levels of MDA before treatment signify the role of lipid peroxide mediated skin lesions in P. natalensis infested buffaloes. Similarly the activities of the body antioxidant like GSH and CAT were significantly higher ( P  ≤ 0.05) after treatment. The less level of the body antioxidant (GSH) and reduced activities of the antioxidant enzymes like CAT and SOD before treatment imply that Psoroptes mite-infested buffaloes were in a state of significant oxidative stress. The study provides information on oxidative stress indices in P. natalensis infested buffaloes and gives additional insight regarding the pathogenesis of the disease and its management.

  18. Baccharis megapotamica var. weirii poisoning in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Filho, José C; Carmo, Priscila M S; Lucena, Ricardo B; Pierezan, Felipe; Barros, Claudio S L

    2011-05-01

    An outbreak of an acute disease in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) caused by the ingestion of Baccharis megapotamica var. weirii occurred in the southern region of Brazil. Ten out of 50 buffalo died 24-48 hr after being introduced into a pasture containing abundant amounts of the plant. Factors influencing the ingestion of the plant and consequent toxicosis included hunger, stress caused by shipment, and unfamiliarity with the plant. Clinical signs included serous ocular discharge, incoordination, mild bloat, and muscle trembling. One buffalo was necropsied. Gross findings included dehydration, abundant liquid in the rumen, reddening of the mucosa of forestomachs, abomasum, and intestine, and edema of the wall of the rumen. The main histologic lesions were superficial to full thickness degeneration and necrosis of the stratified epithelium lining the forestomachs, necrosis of the intestinal mucosa, and widespread lymphoid necrosis. A calf (Bos taurus) was fed a single dose of 5 g/kg/body weight of B. megapotamica var. weirii harvested from the same site where the buffalo died. Twenty hours after the administration of the plant this calf died with clinical signs and lesions similar to those observed in the naturally poisoned buffalo. © 2011 The Author(s)

  19. Serological investigation of Leptospira infection and its circulation in one intensive-type water buffalo farm in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Marvin A; Mingala, Claro N; Gloriani, Nina G; Yanagihara, Yasutake; Isoda, Norikazu; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Koizumi, Nobuo

    2016-02-01

    Water buffalo is an indispensable livestock in the Philippines. Leptospirosis is a serious zoonosis that can be fatal to humans and cause reproductive problems in livestock. Leptospirosis has been reported in some countries where water buffaloes are commercially raised, highlighting the Leptospira prevalence in this farming system, but information on leptospirosis in water buffalo farms in the Philippines is limited. In this study, we collected blood samples from rats (n = 21), and water buffaloes (n = 170) from different groups and locations in one intensive-type buffalo farm in the Philippines. Serum was analyzed by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Anti-Leptospira antibodies reacting with serogroups Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were found in sera of 30% tested rats, and 48% of water buffalo sera tested positive for at least one Leptospira strain, in which serogroups Mini, Hebdomadis, Tarassovi and Pyrogenes were predominantly agglutinated. The number of seropositive young water buffaloes (< 1 year-old) was lower than that of older seropositive ones. Furthermore, sera from younger water buffaloes were reactive with single serotypes with low MAT titers, but older animals were reactive with multiple Leptospira strains with variable MAT titers. In addition, antibodies against serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae and Pomona were detected in both animals. Finally, Leptospira infection was found associated with age and animal grouping, highlighting the impact of management in the persistence of leptospirosis at intensive-type buffalo farm settings in the Philippines. Further investigation and appropriate control strategies are required to prevent leptospirosis from causing risks to public health and economic losses to the water buffalo farming industry.

  20. Detection of fraudulent addition of bovine whey in water buffalo ricotta cheese by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Fuselli, Fabio; Deluca, Anna; Montepeloso, Emanuela A; Ibba, Giulia; Tidona, Flavio; Longo, Lucia; Marianella, Rosa M

    2015-10-01

    Prevention of food fraud in the dairy field is a difficult issue for researchers, industries and policy makers, both for commercial and health reasons. Currently, no analytical method allows detection of the addition of bovine whey to water buffalo ricotta, so this fraudulent practice cannot be prevented. The authors' aim was to develop such a method. The conditions for extraction and purification of denatured ricotta whey proteins, which are unfolded and coagulated by heating during the production process, were optimized. The optimal composition of the polyacrylamide gel (pH range, type and concentration of chemical separator) was first evaluated and then the best conditions to perform the separation by isoelectric focusing were established. The performance of the method (precision, selectivity, robustness, sensibility) was determined. The method was shown to be reliable and robust for detection of the presence of bovine whey added to water buffalo Ricotta at percentages above 5% (v/v). The results suggest that the differences observed between bovine and water buffalo electrophoretic profiles are due to bovine β-lactoglobulin isoform A, which is never detected in water buffalo samples. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Redescription of Sarcocystis fusiformis sarcocysts from the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five species of Sarcocystis have been reported from the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): Sarcocystis fusiformis and Sarcocystis buffalonis have macrocysts and cats act as definitive hosts; Sarcocystis levinei has microcysts and dogs act as definitive host; Sarcocystis dubeyi and S. sinensis have mic...

  2. Energy loss and impact of various stunning devices used for the slaughtering of water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Glardon, Matthieu; Schwenk, Barbara K; Riva, Fabiano; von Holzen, Adrian; Ross, Steffen G; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Stoffel, Michael H

    2018-01-01

    Stock management of the Swiss water buffalo livestock results in the slaughtering of about 350 animals per year. As the stunning of water buffaloes still is an unresolved issue, we investigated the terminal ballistics of currently used perforating stunning devices. Cartridge fired captive bolt devices, handguns and a bullet casing gun were tested in a shooting steep by firing on bisected heads, forehead plates and soap blocks. Energy loss of captive bolts confirmed their inadequacy when used for heavy water buffaloes, notably adult males. As for the free projectiles, ballistics revealed that beyond the impact energy, bullet deformation has a strong impact on the outcome. Light 9mm Luger or .38 Spl bullets as well as large deformable .44 Rem. Magnum bullets should be avoided in favor of heavier .357 Magnum deformation ammunition. These data have been translated into the development of a new stunning device for water buffaloes meeting both animal welfare and occupational safety requirements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with exposure of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) to Neospora caninum in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kengradomkij, Chanya; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Wongpanit, Kannika; Wongnakphet, Sirichai; Mitchell, Thomas J; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Stich, Roger W

    2015-01-15

    Water buffalo are important draft animals for agriculture in resource-restricted areas worldwide. Water buffalo were shown to be experimentally susceptible to infection with Neospora caninum, potentially affected by neosporosis, and naturally exposed to the parasite in Asia. Although enzootic to Thailand, the distribution of N. caninum among Thai water buffalo is unclear. The objectives of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of N. caninum among water buffalo of northeast Thailand and to identify risk factors associated with their exposure to N. caninum. Sera from 628 water buffalo from 288 farms were tested with an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). A total of 57 samples from 48 herds contained antibodies to N. caninum, indicating overall seroprevalence of 9.1% and 16.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The overall seroprevalence was highest in provinces located in the Khorat Basin in the southern part of the region tested. Host age was also associated with seroprevalence, with the greatest seroprevalence (16.1%) among buffalo over 10 years of age, followed by 5-10 years of age (13.4%), 3-5 years (9.2%), and less than 3 years (1.2%). These results collectively suggested that horizontal transmission from canine definitive hosts was an important route of water buffalo exposure to N. caninum. These results also verified the importance of risk factor analysis for effective bovine neosporosis control strategies at the local level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro fertilization of water buffalo follicular oocytes and their ability to cleave in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Singla, S K; Sujata, J; Madan, M L

    1992-12-01

    Water buffalo (Murrah) oocytes were collected from ovaries obtained from a local slaughterhouse. They were classified according to the character of the cumulus cells under a stereomicroscope and then cultured in 25 mM Hepes buffered tissue culture medium-199 (TCM-199) supplemented with 5% estrous water buffalo serum in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air at 39 degrees C. After 20 to 24 hours of in vitro maturation, the oocytes were cultured at 38.5 degrees C in TCM-199 supplemented with 1% estrous water buffalo serum and in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air. Oocytes with compact and dense cumulus cells cleaved significantly further (P<0.01, 67.3%, 33/49) than those with fair, partially denuded oocytes with thin cumulus layers (27.5%, 25/91) or small remnants of cumulus cells and poor naked oocytes (3/100). A substantial variation in fertilization and developmental rates (16.0 to 43.8%) was observed among 4 different bulls. Late morulae were transferred nonsurgically into 14 buffalo recipients on Day 6 or 7 of their estrous cycle. One recipient was diagnosed to be pregnant by palpation per rectum on Day 60 and delivered a calf in October 1991.

  5. Cleavage capability of water buffalo follicular oocytes classified by cumulus cells and fertilized in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Singla, S K; Sujata, J; Madan, M L

    1991-06-01

    Water buffalo (Murrah) oocytes were collected from ovaries obtained from the slaughter house. They were classified according to the character of the cumulus cells under a stereomicroscope, and cultured in 25 mM Hepes buffered Tissue Culture Medium-199 (TCM-199) supplemented with 5% estrous water buffalo serum in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air at 39 degrees C. After 20-24 hr of in vitro maturation, the oocytes were fertilized using capacitated sperm obtained from 4 different bulls. For cleavage the oocytes were cultured at 39 degrees C in TCM-199 supplemented with 1% estrous water buffalo serum and in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2 in air. The good oocytes, with compact and dense cumulus cells cleaved significantly higher (p less than 0.01, 67.3%), than those of fair. partially naked oocytes with thin cumulus layers (27.5%, 25/91) or small remnants of cumulus cells and poor naked oocytes (3/100). A substantial variation cumulus layers (27.5% 25/91) or small remnants of cumulus cells and poor naked oocytes (3/100). A substantial variation in fertilization and developmental rates (16.0% to 43.8%) was observed among 4 different bulls. Late non-surgically into 14 buffalo recipients on day 6 or 7 of their estrous cycle. One recipient was diagnosed to be pregnant by rectal palpation on day 60 and confirmed to be so on day 90 post-estrus.

  6. Skin injuries identified in cattle and water buffaloes at livestock markets in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, M R; Gregory, N G; Jabbar, M A; Uddin, M S; Kibria, A S M G; Silva-Fletcher, A

    2010-09-11

    Skin injuries were assessed in 560 imported and local cattle and water buffaloes at two livestock markets in Bangladesh. The body of each animal was divided into 11 anatomical regions, and abrasions, lacerations, penetrations, ulcerations, bleeding, swelling, hyperkeratosis and scars were recorded for each region. Among the 560 animals studied, 501 were found to have at least one injury. The prevalence of skin injuries was 89 per cent, with 84 per cent of the cattle and 99 per cent of the water buffaloes having obvious skin injuries. The most common types of injury were abrasions that were found in 73 per cent of the animals, followed by scars (50 per cent), and lacerations (41 per cent). Buffaloes had more abrasions (95 per cent), lacerations (57 per cent), swelling (15 per cent) and hyperkeratosis (32 per cent) compared with cattle, whereas scars (60 per cent) were more common in cattle (P<0.001). Within the 11 different anatomical regions, all types of injuries were present but in different proportions. The buttock region had a higher proportion of abrasions (36 per cent) followed by the hip, hindlimb and back regions. Penetration, ulceration, bleeding and swelling were present at lower frequencies in all regions. Causes for these injuries included rubbing against the inside wall of vehicles used for transportation and stock-handler abuse (59 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively). Buffaloes sustained more transport injuries than cattle, and the number of injuries was higher in imported than local animals.

  7. Genetic variations in merozoite surface antigen genes of Babesia bovis detected in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru; Long, Phung Thang; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich

    2015-03-01

    The genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs) in Babesia bovis are genetically diverse. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of B. bovis MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes. Blood DNA samples from 258 cattle and 49 water buffaloes reared in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam were screened with a B. bovis-specific diagnostic PCR assay. The B. bovis-positive DNA samples (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then subjected to PCR assays to amplify the MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes. Sequencing analyses showed that the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences are genetically diverse, whereas MSA-2c is relatively conserved. The nucleotide identity values for these MSA gene sequences were similar in the cattle and water buffaloes. Consistent with the sequencing data, the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences were dispersed across several clades in the corresponding phylogenetic trees, whereas the MSA-2c sequences occurred in a single clade. Cattle- and water-buffalo-derived sequences also often clustered together on the phylogenetic trees. The Vietnamese MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c sequences were then screened for recombination with automated methods. Of the seven recombination events detected, five and two were associated with the MSA-2b and MSA-2c recombinant sequences, respectively, whereas no MSA-1 recombinants were detected among the sequences analyzed. Recombination between the sequences derived from cattle and water buffaloes was very common, and the resultant recombinant sequences were found in both host animals. These data indicate that the genetic diversity of the MSA sequences does not differ between cattle and water buffaloes in Vietnam. They also suggest that recombination between the B. bovis MSA sequences in both cattle and water buffaloes might contribute to the genetic variation in these genes in Vietnam. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of antibodies against Bubaline herpesvirus (BuHV-1) among Mediterranean water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) with implications in buffalo trade.

    PubMed

    Caruso, C; Prato, R; Ingravalle, F; Vecchio, D; Sciarra, A; Ternavasio, M; Ceccarelli, L; Martucciello, A; Galiero, G; De Carlo, E; Masoero, L

    2016-12-01

    Both Bovine herpesvirus (BoHV-1) and Bubaline herpesvirus (BuHV-1) have been reported to cross the species barrier. Antibody seroconversion in glycoprotein E (gE) blocking ELISA during BuHV-1 infection has been documented. Recent diagnostic efforts have focused on the development and application of discriminatory tests to distinguish between infections with BoHV-1 and BuHV-1. To evaluate the impact and distribution of these two infections in water buffalo farms in two regions (Piedmont (n = 3) and Campania (n = 10), Italy) where infectious bovine rhinotracheitis control programs have been implemented. Sampling was carried out on 13 buffalo farms comprising 1089 animals using specific gE-indirect ELISA's test able to discriminate among BoHV-1 and BuHV-1 infections. 59.0% of animals reacted positive to ELISA (irrespective of whether BoHV-1 or BuHV-1 antigen was used) and 86.4% of these were reactive to BuHV-1 only, whereas 11.8% showed absorbance values for both antigens and were classified as inconclusive. There was a statistically significant age-related difference in BuHV-1 infection rates but not in overall individual (47% vs. 58%) or herd prevalence (100% vs. 90%) of infection between the two regions. The low percentage of sera reactive to BoHV-1 (1.8%, 12/643) indicates that BuHV-1 may be the main circulating alphaherpesvirus infection in Mediterranean water buffalo in the two study areas. Since Bubalus bubalis is included in Directive 64/432/EEC on animal health problems affecting intra-community trade in bovine animals, diagnostic testing with nonspecific ELISA for BoHV-1 infection in buffalo may yield false-positive reactions. This scenario could lead to economic losses and hamper buffalo trade and movement, particularly for reproduction purposes.

  9. Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 in raw water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) milk products in Italy.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Vanessa; Dambrosio, Angela; Quaglia, Nicoletta Cristiana; Parisi, Antonio; La Salandra, Giovanna; Lucifora, Giuseppe; Mula, Giuseppina; Virgilio, Sebastiano; Carosielli, Leonardo; Rella, Addolorata; Dario, Marco; Normanno, Giovanni

    2009-08-01

    Escherichia coli 026 is known as a verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) organism that causes severe foodborne diseases such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Although cattle are the most important reservoir of VTEC, only a few reports on the role of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as a reservoir of VTEC and on the presence of these organisms in their milk are available. However, in Southern Italy, where water buffalo are intensively reared, an outbreak of hemolytic uremic syndrome due to E. coli 026 has recently been reported, in which the consumption of typical dairy products was considered to be a common risk factor. The aims of this work were to assess the prevalence of E. coli O26 in raw water buffalo milk, to characterize the virulence gene profiles of the isolates, and to evaluate their phenotypic antimicrobial resistance pattern. Of 160 analyzed samples, 1 (0.6%) tested positive for E. coli O26, and the isolate showed the stx1+/stx2+/eae-/hlyA+ genotypic profile. The strain showed resistance against glycopeptides, macrolides, and penicillins. The presence of VTEC organisms in raw water buffalo milk could be considered to be a potential threat to consumers; however, the strict adherence to the processes used in the preparation of the most common buffalo dairy products could strongly mitigate the foodborne risk. To our knowledge, this article reports the first isolation and characterization of E. coli O26 VTEC in raw water buffalo milk.

  10. First molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) on two extensive farms (450 km apart) in Victoria, Australia. Faecal samples (n=476) were collected from different age groups of water buffalo at two time points (six months apart) and tested using a PCR-based mutation scanning-targeted sequencing-phylogenetic approach, employing markers within the small subunit of ribosomal RNA (designated pSSU) and triose phosphate isomerase (ptpi) genes. Based on pSSU data, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium bovis and Cryptosporidium genotypes 1, 2 (each 99% similar genetically to Cryptosporidium ryanae) and 3 (99% similar to Cryptosporidium suis) were detected in two (0.4%), one (0.2%), 38 (8.0%), 16 (3.4%) and one (0.2%) of the 476 samples tested, respectively. Using ptpi, Giardia duodenalis assemblages A and E were detected in totals of 56 (11.8%) and six (1.3%) of these samples, respectively. Cryptosporidium was detected on both farms, whereas Giardia was detected only on farm B, and both genera were detected in 1.5% of all samples tested. The study showed that water buffaloes on these farms excreted C. parvum and/or G. duodenalis assemblage A, which are consistent with those found in humans, inferring that these particular pathogens are of zoonotic significance. Future work should focus on investigating, in a temporal and spatial manner, the prevalence and intensity of such infections in water buffaloes in various geographical regions in Australia and in other countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of worm development and host immune responses in natural hosts of schistosoma japonicum, yellow cattle and water buffalo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Yellow cattle and water buffalo are two of the most important natural hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in China. Previous observation has revealed that yellow cattle are more suited to the development of S. japonicum than water buffalo. Understanding more about the molecular mechanisms involved in worm development, as well as the pathological and immunological differences between yellow cattle and water buffalo post infection with S japonicum will provide useful information for the vaccine design and its delivery procedure. Results The worm length (p < 0.01), worm recovery rate (p < 0.01) and the percentage of paired worms (p < 0.01) were significantly greater in yellow cattle than those in water buffalo. There were many white egg granulomas in the livers of yellow cattle, but fewer were observed in water buffalo at 7 weeks post infection. The livers of infected yellow cattle contained significantly increased accumulation of inflammatory cells, and the schistosome eggs were surrounded with large amounts of eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, no hepatocyte swelling or lymphocyte infiltration, and fewer white blood cells, was observed in water buffalo. The percentage of CD4+ T cells was higher in yellow cattle, while the percentage of CD8+ T cells was higher in water buffalo from pre-infection to 7 w post infection. The CD4/CD8 ratios were decreased in both species after challenge with schistosomes. Comparing with water buffalo, the IFN-γ level was higher and decreased significantly, while the IL-4 level was lower and increased gradually in yellow cattle from pre-infection to 7 w post infection. Conclusions In this study, we confirmed that yellow cattle were more suited to the development of S. japonicum than water buffalo, and more serious pathological damage was observed in infected yellow cattle. Immunological analysis suggested that CD4+ T cells might be an integral component of the immune response and might associate with worm development in yellow

  12. Ovarian responses of dairy buffalo cows to timed artificial insemination protocol, using new or used progesterone devices, during the breeding season (autumn-winter).

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Bruno Moura; de Souza, Diego Cavalcante; Vasconcellos, Guilherme Souza Floriano Machado; Corrêa, Thalita Bueno; Vecchio, Domenico; de Sá Filho, Manoel Francisco; de Carvalho, Nelcio Antonio Tonizza; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of new or used P4 devices on the ovarian responses of dairy buffalo that were administered an estradiol (E2) plus progesterone (P4)-based timed artificial insemination (TAI) protocol during the breeding season. On the first day of the TAI protocol, 142 cows were randomly assigned to receive one of the following: a new device (New; 1.0 g of P4; n = 48); a device that had previously been used for 9 days (Used1x, n = 47); or a device that had previously been used for 18 days (Used2x, n = 47). Ultrasound was used to evaluate the following: the presence of a corpus luteum (CL); the diameter of the dominant follicle (ØDF) during protocol; ovulatory response; and pregnancies per AI (P/AI). Despite similar responses among the treatments, there was a significant positive association of the ØDF during TAI protocol with ovulatory responses and number of pregnancies. In conclusion, satisfactory ovarian responses and a satisfactory pregnancy rate were achieved when grazing dairy buffalo were subjected to the TAI protocol in breeding season, independent of whether a new or used P4 device was used. Furthermore, the presence of the larger follicle was associated with a higher ovulation rate and higher P/AI following TAI. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Manipulation of reproductive performance of lactating buffaloes using melatonin and controlled internal drug release device treatment during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, T A; Sharma, R K; Phulia, S K; Balhara, A K; Ghuman, S S; Singh, I

    2016-09-01

    Twelve lactating Murrah buffalo, divided into control and treatment group of six animals each, were used to study the effect of melatonin and controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device treatment on the resumption of ovarian activity during out-of-breeding season (summer solstice). Treated group implanted with melatonin (18-mg melatonin/50-kg body weight) for 45 days and then animals of both groups received CIDR for 9 days. All animals received intramuscular 500 IU eCG, at day before CIDR removal, and 10-μg GnRH at day after CIDR withdrawal. All animals were subjected to estrus detection daily. Blood samples in conjunction with transrectal ultrasonography were performed once a week to determine serum concentrations of melatonin, progesterone, and antioxidant enzyme activities, as well as to monitor the ovarian activity. Melatonin treatment resulted in an increase (P < 0.01) in the overall mean superoxide dismutase activity. Melatonin and CIDR increased the diameter of CL (P < 0.01) and plasma progesterone concentration (P < 0.05). In addition, melatonin and CIDR exhibited superior ability to maintain presence of CL at Day 21 and Day 30 after artificial insemination and achieved higher percentage of conception rate than control. In conclusion, the CIDR treatment preceded by melatonin improved the reproductive performance in lactating buffaloes during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Schistosoma japonicum: An ultraviolet-attenuated cercarial vaccine applicable in the field for water buffaloes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Y.E.; Jiang, C.F.; Han, J.J.

    1990-07-01

    Water buffaloes were vaccinated three times with 10,000 Schistosoma japonicum cercariae irradiated with ultraviolet (uv) light at a dose of 400 microW x min/cm2. The irradiation was performed with cheap, simple, and portable equipment in a rural area of Hubei Province (People's Republic of China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given to six vaccinated and six naive control buffaloes, while two vaccinated animals were not challenged. The experiment was terminated 6 weeks after the challenge. Control animals had lost body weight and harbored a mean of 110 worms and 37 eggs per gram of liver. The vaccinatedmore » animals gained weight after the challenge and developed 89% resistance to infection with S. japonicum. Since schistosomiasis japonica is nowadays transmitted in China predominantly by domestic livestock, a uv-attenuated cercarial vaccine for bovines may contribute to the control of this disease.« less

  15. Two Different Macaviruses, ovine herpesvirus-2 and caprine herpesvirus-2, Behave Differently in Water Buffaloes than in Cattle or in Their Respective Reservoir Species

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, Anina B. J.; Baggenstos, Rhea; Engels, Monika; Friess, Martina; Ackermann, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing global spread of “exotic” farm animals, such as water buffaloes, which carry their native sets of viruses, may bear unknown risks for the animals, into whose ecological niches the former are introduced and vice versa. Here, we report on the occurrence of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) on Swiss farms, where “exotic” water buffaloes were kept together with “native” animals, i.e. cattle, sheep, and goats. In the first farm with 56 water buffaloes, eight cases of MCF due to ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) were noted, whereas additional ten water buffaloes were subclinically infected with either OvHV-2 or caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2). On the second farm, 13 water buffaloes were infected with CpHV-2 and two of those succumbed to MCF. In neither farm, any of the two viruses were detected in cattle, but the Macaviruses were present at high prevalence among their original host species, sheep and goats, respectively. On the third farm, sheep were kept well separated from water buffaloes and OvHV-2 was not transmitted to the buffaloes, despite of high prevalence of the virus among the sheep. Macavirus DNA was frequently detected in the nasal secretions of virus-positive animals and in one instance OvHV-2 was transmitted vertically to an unborn water buffalo calf. Thus, water buffaloes seem to be more susceptible than cattle to infection with either Macavirus; however, MCF did not develop as frequently. Therefore, water buffaloes seem to represent an interesting intermediate-type host for Macaviruses. Consequently, water buffaloes in their native, tropic environments may be vulnerable and endangered to viruses that originate from seemingly healthy, imported sheep and goats. PMID:24386255

  16. Seroepidemiology of infection with Neospora caninum, Leptospira, and bovine herpesvirus type 1 in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Veracruz State, Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We aimed to determine the seroprevalence of infection with N. caninum, Leptospira, and bovine herpesvirus type 1 and risk factors associated with these infections in water buffaloes in Veracruz State, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study, 144 water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) raised in 5 ranches ...

  17. Embryo Sexing and Sex Chromosomal Chimerism Analysis by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification in Cattle and Water Buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    HIRAYAMA, Hiroki; KAGEYAMA, Soichi; MORIYASU, Satoru; SAWAI, Ken; MINAMIHASHI, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In domestic animals of the family Bovidae, sex preselection of offspring has been demanded for convenience of milk/beef production and animal breeding. Development of the nonsurgical embryo transfer technique and sexing methods of preimplantation embryos made it possible. Sexing based on detection of Y chromosome-specific DNA sequences is considered the most reliable method to date. PCR enables amplification of a target sequence from a small number of blastomeres. However, it requires technical skill and is time consuming. Furthermore, PCR has the risk of false positives because of DNA contamination during handling of the PCR products in duplicate PCR procedures and/or electrophoresis. Therefore, for embryo sexing to become widely used in the cattle embryo transfer industry, a simple, rapid and precise sexing method needs to be developed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel DNA amplification method, and the reaction is carried out under isothermal conditions (range, 60 to 65 C) using DNA polymerase with strand displacement activity. When the target DNA is amplified by LAMP, a white precipitate derived from magnesium pyrophosphate (a by-product of the LAMP reaction) is observed. It is noteworthy that LAMP does not need special reagents or electrophoresis to detect the amplified DNA. This review describes the development and application of an embryo sexing method using LAMP in cattle and water buffaloes. PMID:23965599

  18. Effectiveness of melatonin and controlled internal drug release device treatment on reproductive performance of buffalo heifers during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, T A; Sharma, R K; Phulia, S K; Balhara, A K; Ghuman, S S; Singh, I

    2014-12-01

    Sixteen Murrah buffalo heifers, divided into control and treatment groups of eight animals each, were used to study the effect of melatonin and controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device treatment on the resumption of ovarian activity during out-of-breeding season (summer solstice). Treated group was implanted with melatonin (18 mg of melatonin per 50 kg of body weight) for 45 days and then heifers of both groups received CIDR for 9 days. All heifers received intramuscular 500 IU eCG on the day before CIDR removal and 10 μg GnRH on the day after CIDR withdrawal. All animals were subjected to estrus detection daily. Blood sampling in conjunction with transrectal ultrasonography were performed twice weekly to determine serum concentrations of melatonin, progesterone, LH, and antioxidant enzyme activities, as well as to monitor the ovarian follicular activity. Melatonin treatment resulted in an increase (P < 0.01) in serum melatonin and a decrease (P < 0.01) in serum progesterone and LH. In addition, melatonin had no significant effect on the frequency of LH pulses. Furthermore, melatonin treatment increased (P < 0.01) the diameter of the largest follicle and the number of large follicles between Days 0 and 35 of melatonin treatment. However, melatonin exhibited superior ability to maintain CL at 21 days after artificial insemenation (AI) and increased the percentage of conception to threefold higher than control. In conclusion, melatonin implantation successfully improved the diameter of largest follicles and the ability to maintain CL at 21 days after AI in buffalo heifers during out-of-breeding season under tropical conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa is improved with the addition of catalase in cryodiluent.

    PubMed

    Ali, L; Hassan Andrabi, S M; Ahmed, H; Hussain Shah, A A

    Catalase enzyme is usually distributed in mammalian seminal plasma, where it decomposes hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen and enhances sperm survivability. To evaluate the effect of catalase (0, 100, 200 or 300 IU/ml) added in tris-citric acid (TCA) based extender on motion characteristics, viability and DNA integrity of bubaline spermatozoa at post dilution (PD) and post thawing (PT) stages of cryopreservation. Collection of semen was done in four Nili-Ravi bulls with an artificial vagina (42 degree C). Qualified semen samples from each bull were further subdivided into four aliquots for dilution with the experimental TCA extender containing either 0.0 (T1), 100 IU (T2), 200 IU (T3) or 300 IU (T4) catalase (activity12660 U/mg). At PT, mean computer progressive motility, average path velocity, straight line velocity, curvilinear velocity, visual motility and DNA integrity were higher (P < 0.05) in catalase fortified treatment groups as compared with control. Regarding plasma membrane integrity and supra-vital plasma membrane integrity, at PT the mean values were higher (P < 0.05) in T4 as compared with control. At PD and PT, mean acrosomal integrity of buffalo bull spermatozoa was higher (P < 0.05) in T4 group as compared with control. Addition of catalase at a concentration of 300IU/ml in TCA cryodiluent improved the freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa.

  20. Re-evaluation of endogenous development of Eimeria bareillyi Gill, Chhabra and Lall, 1963 in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2018-04-25

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is important for the economy of Asia, South America and parts of Europe. Coccidiosis is an important cause of neonatal mortality in livestock, including buffalo. Of more than 12 species of Eimeria in buffalo, Eimeria bareillyi is the most pathogenic. There are uncertainties concerning its asexual and sexual development. During a previously reported outbreak of fatal enteritis associated with E. bareillyi in buffaloes in the Netherlands, sections of small intestine were re-evaluated histologically and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to seek details of endogenous development. Profuse asexual multiplication occurred in the jejunum and ileum. Light microscopic examination revealed that parasites divided in two (probably endodyogeny) or more organisms. There were two or more generations of morphologically different merozoites; some of these observations were confirmed by TEM. Details of gametogonic development, including oocyst wall formation are provided. Schizogonic and gametogonic development described in the present study can serve as a guide for differential diagnosis of Eimeria species in histological sections of intestines of buffaloes.

  1. Polymorphisms in the ghrelin gene and their associations with milk yield and quality in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Gil, F M M; de Camargo, G M F; Pablos de Souza, F R; Cardoso, D F; Fonseca, P D S; Zetouni, L; Braz, C U; Aspilcueta-Borquis, R R; Tonhati, H

    2013-05-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone that acts in releasing growth hormone and influences the body general metabolism. It has been proposed as a candidate gene for traits such as growth, carcass quality, and milk production of livestock because it influences feed intake. In this context, the aim of this study was to verify the existence of polymorphisms in the ghrelin gene and their associations with milk, fat and protein yield, and percentage in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). A group of 240 animals was studied. Five primer pairs were used and 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were found in the ghrelin gene by sequencing. The animals were genotyped for 8 SNP by PCR-RFLP. The SNP g.960G>A and g.778C>T were associated with fat yield and the SNP g.905T>C was associated with fat yield and percentage and protein percentage. These SNP are located in intronic regions of DNA and may be in noncoding RNA sites or affect transcriptional efciency. The ghrelin gene in buffaloes influences milk fat and protein synthesis. The polymorphisms observed can be used as molecular markers to assist selection. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in dairy cattle, beef cattle and water buffaloes in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingbo; Li, Pei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Xu, Hailing; Wu, Wenxian; Wang, Yuanfei; Guo, Yaqiong; Wang, Lin; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-01-30

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi are important protists in a wide range of vertebrate hosts, causing diarrheal diseases. Cattle are considered potential reservoirs of Cryptosporidium infection in humans, although their role in the transmission of E. bieneusi is not clear. In the present work, 793 fecal specimens from dairy cattle, native beef cattle, and water buffaloes on 11 farms in China were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi using nested PCR targeting the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium spp. and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of E. bieneusi. For Cryptosporidium, 144/446 (32.3%) dairy cattle, 44/166 (26.5%) beef cattle, and 43/181 (23.8%) water buffaloes were PCR-positive. Sequence analysis was successful for 213 of the 231 Cryptosporidium-positive isolates; among them 94 had Cryptosporidium andersoni, 61 had Cryptosporidium bovis, 54 had Cryptosporidium ryanae, 2 had a Cryptosporidium suis-like genotype, and 2 had mixed infections of C. bovis and C. ryanae. In dairy and beef cattle, C. andersoni and C. bovis were the most common species, whereas C. ryanae was the dominant species in water buffaloes. The latter species produced SSU rRNA sequences different between cattle and water buffaloes. For E. bieneusi, the infection rate of E. bieneusi in dairy cattle, beef cattle and water buffaloes was 4.9%, 5.4% and 2.2%, respectively. All 35 E. bieneusi-positive specimens were successfully sequenced, revealing the presence of four genotypes: three Group 2 genotypes previously reported in cattle as well as humans (I, J and BEB4) and one Group 1 genotype recently reported in yaks (CHN11). Genotypes I and J were the most common genotypes in dairy and beef cattle, while genotype CHN11 was the only genotype seen in water buffaloes. Thus, the distribution of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in water buffaloes might be different from in dairy and beef cattle in China. These findings indicate that some

  3. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of diverse bovine astroviruses associated with diarrhea in cattle and water buffalo calves in China

    PubMed Central

    ALFRED, Niyokwishimira; LIU, Huan; LI, Mu Lan; HONG, Shao Feng; TANG, Hai Bo; WEI, Zu Zhang; CHEN, Ying; LI, Fa Kai; ZHONG, Yi Zhi; HUANG, Wei Jian

    2015-01-01

    Astroviruses are the principal causative agents of gastroenteritis in humans and have been associated with diarrhea in other mammals as well as birds. However, astroviral infection of animals had been poorly studied. In the present study, 211 rectal swabs collected from cattle and water buffalo calves with mild to severe diarrhea were tested for bovine astrovirus (BAstV) by RT-PCR. Results: 92/211 (43.6%) samples were positive for BAstV, at a rate of 46.10% (71/154) in cattle and 36.84% (21/57) in water buffalo. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial and full-length of 25 ORF2 amino acid sequences obtained in this study classified the Guangxi BAstVs isolates into five subgroups under the genus of Mamastrovirus, genotype MAstV33, which suggested that the water buffalo was a new host of this genogroup that previously included only cattle and roe deer. Despite the origin of the host, the Guangxi BAstV isolates were closely related to the BAstV Hong Kong isolates (B18/HK and B76-2/HK), but highly divergent from the BAstV NeuroS1 isolate previously associated with neurologic disease in cattle in the U.S.A. Nucleotide sequence-based characterization of the ORF1b/ORF2 junction and corresponding overlapping regions showed distinctive properties, which may be common to BAstVs. Our results suggested that cattle and water buffalo are prone to infection of closely related astroviruses, which probably evolved from the same ancestor. The current study described astroviruses in water buffalo for the first time and is thus far among the largest epidemiological investigations of BAstV infection in cattle conducted in China. PMID:25716289

  4. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with persistent fever, dyspnoea, nasal bleeding and haematuria. Despite symptomatic therapy, the buffalo died and was submitted to post mortem examination. Major findings were an abomasal ulceration, a mild haemorrhagic cystitis and multifocal haemorrhages on the epicardium and on serosal and mucosal surfaces. Eyes and oral cavity were not affected. Histopathology revealed a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic vasculitis limited to the brain and the urinary bladder. Although these findings are typical for MCF, OvHV-2 DNA was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in paraffin-embedded brain, using an OvHV-2 specific real time PCR. With the aid of a panherpesvirus PCR, a caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2) sequence could be amplified from both samples. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant catarrhal fever in the subfamily Bovinae, where the presence of CpHV-2 could be demonstrated. The etiological context has yet to be evaluated. PMID:22132808

  5. Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as a spontaneous animal model of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Pal; Motiani, Rajender K; Singh, Archana; Malik, Garima; Aggarwal, Rangoli; Pratap, Kunal; Wani, Mohan R; Gokhale, Suresh B; Natarajan, Vivek T; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2016-07-01

    Vitiligo is a multifactorial acquired depigmenting disorder. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms driving the gradual destruction of melanocytes in vitiligo will likely lead to the discovery of novel therapies, which need to be evaluated in animal models that closely recapitulate the pathogenesis of human vitiligo. In humans, vitiligo is characterized by a spontaneous loss of functional melanocytes from the epidermis, but most animal models of vitiligo are either inducible or genetically programmed. Here, we report that acquired depigmentation in water buffalo recapitulates molecular, histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural changes observed in human vitiligo and hence could be used as a model to study vitiligo pathogenesis and facilitate the discovery and evaluation of therapeutic interventions for vitiligo. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identification and genetic characterization of rabies virus from Egyptian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) bitten by a fox.

    PubMed

    El-Tholoth, Mohamed; El-Beskawy, Mohamed; Hamed, Mohamed F

    2015-09-01

    Rabies is caused by negative strand RNA-virus classified in the genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae of the order Mononegavirales. The aim of the present study was to identify and analyze nucleotides sequence of nucleoprotein (N) gene of rabies virus (RABV) from two cases of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) bitten by a fox in Egypt, 2013. The diseased buffaloes showed nervous manifestations with fever. Specimens from brains of the buffaloes with suspected rabies were collected. RABV in collected samples was identified using direct fluorescent antibody (dFA) technique, histopathological examination and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Also, nucleotides sequence of partially amplified nucleoprotein (N) gene was compared with the other street strains of RABV available on GenBank. The results revealed that RABV antigen was identified in the brains of diseased buffaloes by dFA technique and the characteristic intracytoplasmic inclusions (Negri bodies) and RABV nucleic acid were detected by histopathology and RT-PCR, respectively. The identified virus showed close genetic relationship with street strains identified previously from dogs in different Governorates in Egypt and with strains identified in Israel and Jordan indicating transmission of the virus between Egyptian Governorates with a potential transmission from and/or to our neighboring countries.

  7. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  8. Mining of Ruminant Microbial Phytase (RPHY1) from Metagenomic Data of Mehsani Buffalo Breed: Identification, Gene Cloning, and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Mootapally, Chandra Shekar; Nathani, Neelam M; Patel, Amrutlal K; Jakhesara, Subhash J; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2016-01-01

    Phytases have been widely used as animal feed supplements to increase the availability of digestible phosphorus, especially in monogastric animals fed cereal grains. The present study describes the identification of a full-length phytase gene of Prevotella species present in Mehsani buffalo rumen. The gene, designated as RPHY1, consists of 1,251 bp and is expressed into protein with 417 amino acids. A homology search of the deduced amino acid sequence of the RPHY1 phytase gene in a nonredundant protein database showed that it shares 92% similarity with the histidine acid phosphatase domain. Subsequently, the RPHY1 gene was expressed using a pET32a expression vector in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified using a His60 Ni-NTA gravity column. The mass of the purified RPHY1 was estimated to be approximately 63 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimal RPHY1 enzyme activity was observed at 55°C (pH 5) and exhibited good stability at 5°C and within the acidic pH range. Significant inhibition of RPHY1 activity was observed for Mg2+ and K+ metal ions, while Ca2+, Mn2+, and Na+ slightly inhibited enzyme activity. The RPHY1 phytase was susceptible to SDS, and it was highly stimulated in the presence of EDTA. Overall, the observed comparatively high enzyme activity levels and characteristics of the RPHY1 gene mined from rumen prove its promising candidature as a feed supplement enzyme in animal farming. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Complement component 3: characterization and association with mastitis resistance in Egyptian water buffalo and cattle.

    PubMed

    El-Halawany, Nermin; Abd-El-Monsif, Shawky A; Al-Tohamy Ahmed, F M; Hegazy, Lamees; Abdel-Shafy, Hamdy; Abdel-Latif, Magdy A; Ghazi, Yasser A; Neuhoff, Christiane; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Schellander, Karl

    2017-03-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease of the mammary gland that leads to reduced milk production and change in milk composition. Complement component C3 plays a major role as a central molecule of the complement cascade involving in killing of microorganisms, either directly or in cooperation with phagocytic cells. C3 cDNA were isolated, from Egyptian buffalo and cattle, sequenced and characterized. The C3 cDNA sequences of buffalo and cattle consist of 5025 and 5019 bp, respectively. Buffalo and cattle C3 cDNAs share 99% of sequence identity with each other. The 4986 bp open reading frame in buffalo encodes a putative protein of 1661 amino acids-as in cattle-and includes all the functional domains. Further, analysis of the C3 cDNA sequences detected six novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in buffalo and three novel SNPs in cattle. The association analysis of the detected SNPs with milk somatic cell score as an indicator of mastitis revealed that the most significant association in buffalo was found in the C>A substitution (ss: 1752816097) in exon 27, whereas in cattle it was in the C>T substitution (ss: 1752816085) in exon 12. Our findings provide preliminary information about the contribution of C3 polymorphisms to mastitis resistance in buffalo and cattle.

  10. Maps showing water geochemistry of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Lake, Park, and Chaffee Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Ficklin, Walter H.; Dover, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents results of geochemical studies carried out in June and July of 1982 in the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colo. (see index map). Samples of water were collected from 84 streams and 18 springs draining the study area. Tabulations of the analyses and a sample locality map are in Ficklin and others (1984). The geochemistry of stream sediments and panned concentrates of the study area is in Nowlan and Gerstel (1985). The geology of the study area and vicinity is in Hedlund (1985). The mineral resource potential of the study area is described in Hedlund and others (1983). This report (1) assists in the assessment of the mineral resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area; and (2) compares analyses of water samples with analyses of stream-sediment and panned-concentrate samples (Nowlan and Gerstel, 1985).

  11. Concentration of Fluoride in Cow's and Buffalo's Milk in Relation to Varying Levels of Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water of Mathura City in India- A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prahlad; Gupta, Nidhi; Meena, Komal; Moon, Ninad Joshirao; Kumar, Puneet; Kaur, Ravneet

    2015-05-01

    To estimate fluoride concentration in drinking water, cow's milk and buffalo's milk and to correlate the concentration of fluoride in cow's milk and buffalo's milk with varying levels of fluoride concentration in drinking water. Ten households having both cows and buffalo's were selected by convenience in each of the 3 zones (below optimum fluoride <0.7 ppm (parts per million), optimum fluoride 0.7-1.2 ppm and above optimum fluoride areas > 1.2 ppm). From these selected households, 200 ml of fresh milk of both cows and buffaloes was collected along with 200 ml of drinking water for estimation of fluoride concentration by using a fluoride ion selective electrode method. The data was analysed using SPSS, version 11.5 for windows. The mean fluoride concentration of drinking water, cow's milk and buffalo's milk in three different fluoride zones was 0.89±0.39, 0.09±0.07, 0.09±0.08 respectively. Pearson's correlation found a statistically significant correlation between fluoride concentrations in cow's and buffalo's milk with varying levels of fluoride concentration in drinking water in zone B and zone C. However, this correlation was not statistically significant in zone A. With an increase in fluoride concentration in drinking water there was an increase in concentration of fluoride in cow's and buffalo's milk. We conclude that this association is seen in conjunction to not only a single factor but rather due to culmination of several other aspects. So, there is a need to elucidate the other factors that might be contributing to this increase and dental fluorosis.

  12. The Differential Expression of Immune Genes between Water Buffalo and Yellow Cattle Determines Species-Specific Susceptibility to Schistosoma japonicum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianmei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Yang; Wu, Haiwei; Jin, Yamei; Zhu, Chuangang; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Shi, Yaojun; Yuan, Chunxiu; Cheng, Guofeng; Feng, Xingang; Liu, Jinming; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    Water buffalo are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection than yellow cattle. The factors that affect such differences in susceptibility remain unknown. A Bos taurus genome-wide gene chip was used to analyze gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood of water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection with S. japonicum. This study showed that most of the identified differentially expressed genes(DEGs) between water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection were involved in immune-related processes, and the expression level of immune genes was lower in water buffalo. The unique DEGs (390) in yellow cattle were mainly associated with inflammation pathways, while the unique DEGs (2,114) in water buffalo were mainly associated with immune-related factors. The 83 common DEGs may be the essential response genes during S. japonicum infection, the highest two gene ontology (GO) functions were associated with the regulation of fibrinolysis. The pathway enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs constituted similar immune-related pathways pre- and post-infection between the two hosts. This first analysis of the transcriptional profiles of natural hosts has enabled us to gain new insights into the mechanisms that govern their susceptibility or resistance to S. japonicum infections. PMID:26125181

  13. Sequence characterization of S100A8 gene reveals structural differences of protein and transcriptional factor binding sites in water buffalo and yak.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, P; Goyal, S; Kataria, R S; Mishra, B P; Jayakumar, S; Joshi, B K

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize the structure of S100A8 gene and its promoter in water buffalo and yak. Sequence data of 2.067 kb, 2.071 kb, and 2.052 kb with respect to complete S100A8 gene including 5' flanking region was generated in river buffalo, swamp buffalo, and yak, respectively. BLAST analysis of coding DNA sequences (CDS) of S100A8 gene revealed 95% homology of buffalo sequence with cattle, 85% with pig and horse, 83% with dog, 72-73% with murines, and around 79% with primates and humans. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted CDS revealed distinct clustering of murines, primates, and domestic animals with bovines and bubalines forming a subcluster among farm animals. In silico translation of predicted CDS revealed a sequence of 89 amino acids with 7 amino acid changes between cattle and buffalo and 2 changes between cattle and yak. The search for Pfam family revealed the N-terminal calcium binding domain and the noncanonical EF hand domain in the carboxy terminus, with more variations being observed in the N-terminal domain among different species. Two amino acid changes observed in carboxy terminal EF hand domain resulted in altered secondary structure of yak S100A8 protein. Analysis of S100A8 gene promoter revealed 14 putative motifs for transcriptional factor binding sites. Two putative motifs viz. C/EBP and v-Myb were found to be absent in swamp buffalo as compared to river buffalo and cattle. Differences in the structure of S100A8 protein and the transcriptional factor binding sites identified in the present study need to be analyzed further for their functional significance in yak and swamp buffalo respectively. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  14. Label-free proteome of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Brito, Mayara F; Auler, Patrícia A; Tavares, Guilherme C; Rezende, Cristiana P; Almeida, Gabriel M F; Pereira, Felipe L; Leal, Carlos A G; Moura, Arlindo de Alencar; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Henry, Marc

    2018-06-11

    The study aimed to describe the Bubalus bubalis seminal plasma proteome using a label-free shotgun UDMS E approach. A total of 859 nonredundant proteins were identified across five biological replicates with stringent identification. Proteins specifically related to sperm maturation and protection, capacitation, fertilization and metabolic activity were detected in the buffalo seminal fluid. In conclusion, we provide a comprehensive proteomic profile of buffalo seminal plasma, which establishes a foundation for further studies designed to understand regulation of sperm function and discovery of novel biomarkers for fertility. MS data are available in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003728. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Impact of livestock hygiene education programs on mastitis in smallholder water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Chitwan, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ng, Linda; Jost, Christine; Robyn, Misha; Dhakal, I P; Bett, Bernard; Dhakal, Pramod; Khadka, Rupak

    2010-09-01

    A project implemented from 2003 to 2005 trained women in Chitwan District, Nepal, in hygienic dairy production using a process of social mobilization. The aim of this research was to assess if the prevalence of mastitis in water buffalo in the households of women who were trained was lower one year after training than in untrained households, if the training influenced knowledge and practices for the prevention or control of mastitis, and if these practices and knowledge were associated with a lower prevalence of mastitis. A total of 202 households from Eastern and Western Chitwan District were included in the study. Of these, 60 households had participated in the project and 142 had not. Milk samples were collected from 129 households (33 project households and 96 non-project households). Clinical mastitis was determined using visual inspection of udders and detection of macroscopic clots and flakes in milk. The California Mastitis Test was used to diagnose sub-clinical mastitis from milk samples, and the IDEXX SNAP test to identify the presence of tetracycline residues. The prevalence of mastitis in trained households (39.4%) was 43.78% of that in untrained households (60.4%), lower but not significantly so (p=0.08, 95% CI 0.17-1.12). Thirteen indicators of knowledge or practice for the control or prevention of mastitis were more likely to occur in trained households, four significantly so (not consuming milk from sick buffalo (p=0.001), using soap to wash hands before milking (p=0.001), discarding milk after antibiotic usage (p=0.01), and choosing appropriate flooring for their livestock (p=0.03)). Trained households that discarded milk from sick buffalo were 2.96 times more likely to have at least one animal with mastitis in the household (p=0.03, 95% CI 1.15-7.65). Trained households that knew to wash buffalos' teats after milking were less likely (OR 0.25) to have mastitis in their herd (p=0.02, 95% CI 0.08-0.80). Of the 138 buffalos tested, only one tested

  16. Effects of Smallmouth Buffalo and Potassium Permanganate Treatment on Plankton ans Pond Water Quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Removal of intermediate hosts is one option for control of disease in channel catfish production systems. We evaluated use of predaceous fish (smallmouth buffalo) and chemical treatment (potassium permanganate) to remove snails that serve as hosts protecting Dero worms. Both methods of treatment r...

  17. Habitat selection by African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in response to landscape-level fluctuations in water availability on two temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Bennitt, Emily; Bonyongo, Mpaphi Casper; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in water availability cause predictable changes in the profitability of habitats in tropical ecosystems, and animals evolve adaptive behavioural and spatial responses to these fluctuations. However, stochastic changes in the distribution and abundance of surface water between years can alter resource availability at a landscape scale, causing shifts in animal behaviour. In the Okavango Delta, Botswana, a flood-pulsed ecosystem, the volume of water entering the system doubled between 2008 and 2009, creating a sudden change in the landscape. We used African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) to test the hypotheses that seasonal habitat selection would be related to water availability, that increased floodwater levels would decrease forage abundance and affect habitat selection, and that this would decrease buffalo resting time, reduce reproductive success and decrease body condition. Buffalo selected contrasting seasonal habitats, using habitats far from permanent water during the rainy season and seasonally-flooded habitats close to permanent water during the early and late flood seasons. The 2009 water increase reduced forage availability in seasonally-flooded habitats, removing a resource buffer used by the buffalo during the late flood season, when resources were most limited. In response, buffalo used drier habitats in 2009, although there was no significant change in the time spent moving or resting, or daily distance moved. While their reproductive success decreased in 2009, body condition increased. A protracted period of high water levels could prove detrimental to herbivores, especially to smaller-bodied species that require high quality forage. Stochastic annual fluctuations in water levels, predicted to increase as a result of anthropogenically-induced climate change, are likely to have substantial impacts on the functioning of water-driven tropical ecosystems, affecting environmental conditions within protected areas. Buffer zones around

  18. Habitat Selection by African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Response to Landscape-Level Fluctuations in Water Availability on Two Temporal Scales

    PubMed Central

    Bennitt, Emily; Bonyongo, Mpaphi Casper; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in water availability cause predictable changes in the profitability of habitats in tropical ecosystems, and animals evolve adaptive behavioural and spatial responses to these fluctuations. However, stochastic changes in the distribution and abundance of surface water between years can alter resource availability at a landscape scale, causing shifts in animal behaviour. In the Okavango Delta, Botswana, a flood-pulsed ecosystem, the volume of water entering the system doubled between 2008 and 2009, creating a sudden change in the landscape. We used African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) to test the hypotheses that seasonal habitat selection would be related to water availability, that increased floodwater levels would decrease forage abundance and affect habitat selection, and that this would decrease buffalo resting time, reduce reproductive success and decrease body condition. Buffalo selected contrasting seasonal habitats, using habitats far from permanent water during the rainy season and seasonally-flooded habitats close to permanent water during the early and late flood seasons. The 2009 water increase reduced forage availability in seasonally-flooded habitats, removing a resource buffer used by the buffalo during the late flood season, when resources were most limited. In response, buffalo used drier habitats in 2009, although there was no significant change in the time spent moving or resting, or daily distance moved. While their reproductive success decreased in 2009, body condition increased. A protracted period of high water levels could prove detrimental to herbivores, especially to smaller-bodied species that require high quality forage. Stochastic annual fluctuations in water levels, predicted to increase as a result of anthropogenically-induced climate change, are likely to have substantial impacts on the functioning of water-driven tropical ecosystems, affecting environmental conditions within protected areas. Buffer zones around

  19. In silico mining of putative microsatellite markers from whole genome sequence of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and development of first BuffSatDB

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though India has sequenced water buffalo genome but its draft assembly is based on cattle genome BTau 4.0, thus de novo chromosome wise assembly is a major pending issue for global community. The existing radiation hybrid of buffalo and these reported STR can be used further in final gap plugging and “finishing” expected in de novo genome assembly. QTL and gene mapping needs mining of putative STR from buffalo genome at equal interval on each and every chromosome. Such markers have potential role in improvement of desirable characteristics, such as high milk yields, resistance to diseases, high growth rate. The STR mining from whole genome and development of user friendly database is yet to be done to reap the benefit of whole genome sequence. Description By in silico microsatellite mining of whole genome, we have developed first STR database of water buffalo, BuffSatDb (Buffalo MicroSatellite Database (http://cabindb.iasri.res.in/buffsatdb/) which is a web based relational database of 910529 microsatellite markers, developed using PHP and MySQL database. Microsatellite markers have been generated using MIcroSAtellite tool. It is simple and systematic web based search for customised retrieval of chromosome wise and genome-wide microsatellites. Search has been enabled based on chromosomes, motif type (mono-hexa), repeat motif and repeat kind (simple and composite). The search may be customised by limiting location of STR on chromosome as well as number of markers in that range. This is a novel approach and not been implemented in any of the existing marker database. This database has been further appended with Primer3 for primer designing of the selected markers enabling researcher to select markers of choice at desired interval over the chromosome. The unique add-on of degenerate bases further helps in resolving presence of degenerate bases in current buffalo assembly. Conclusion Being first buffalo STR database in the world , this would not only

  20. In silico mining of putative microsatellite markers from whole genome sequence of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and development of first BuffSatDB.

    PubMed

    Sarika; Arora, Vasu; Iquebal, Mir Asif; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-19

    Though India has sequenced water buffalo genome but its draft assembly is based on cattle genome BTau 4.0, thus de novo chromosome wise assembly is a major pending issue for global community. The existing radiation hybrid of buffalo and these reported STR can be used further in final gap plugging and "finishing" expected in de novo genome assembly. QTL and gene mapping needs mining of putative STR from buffalo genome at equal interval on each and every chromosome. Such markers have potential role in improvement of desirable characteristics, such as high milk yields, resistance to diseases, high growth rate. The STR mining from whole genome and development of user friendly database is yet to be done to reap the benefit of whole genome sequence. By in silico microsatellite mining of whole genome, we have developed first STR database of water buffalo, BuffSatDb (Buffalo MicroSatellite Database (http://cabindb.iasri.res.in/buffsatdb/) which is a web based relational database of 910529 microsatellite markers, developed using PHP and MySQL database. Microsatellite markers have been generated using MIcroSAtellite tool. It is simple and systematic web based search for customised retrieval of chromosome wise and genome-wide microsatellites. Search has been enabled based on chromosomes, motif type (mono-hexa), repeat motif and repeat kind (simple and composite). The search may be customised by limiting location of STR on chromosome as well as number of markers in that range. This is a novel approach and not been implemented in any of the existing marker database. This database has been further appended with Primer3 for primer designing of the selected markers enabling researcher to select markers of choice at desired interval over the chromosome. The unique add-on of degenerate bases further helps in resolving presence of degenerate bases in current buffalo assembly. Being first buffalo STR database in the world , this would not only pave the way in resolving current

  1. Identity of Sarcocystis species of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle (Bos taurus) and the suppression of Sarcocystis sinensis as a nomen nudum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are uncertainties concerning the identity and host species specificity of Sarcocystis species of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle (Bos taurus). Currently, in cattle three species are recognized with known endogenous stages, viz.: S. cruzi (with canine definitive host), S. hirsuta...

  2. Genome assembly and transcriptome resource for river buffalo, Bubalus bubalis (2n = 50)

    PubMed Central

    Iamartino, Daniela; Pruitt, Kim D; Sonstegard, Tad; Smith, Timothy P L; Low, Wai Yee; Biagini, Tommaso; Bomba, Lorenzo; Capomaccio, Stefano; Castiglioni, Bianca; Coletta, Angelo; Corrado, Federica; Ferré, Fabrizio; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo; Lawley, Cynthia; Macciotta, Nicolò; McClure, Matthew; Mancini, Giordano; Matassino, Donato; Mazza, Raffaele; Milanesi, Marco; Moioli, Bianca; Morandi, Nicola; Ramunno, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo; Pilla, Fabio; Ramelli, Paola; Schroeder, Steven; Strozzi, Francesco; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Zicarelli, Luigi; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Valentini, Alessio; Chillemi, Giovanni; Zimin, Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Water buffalo is a globally important species for agriculture and local economies. A de novo assembled, well-annotated reference sequence for the water buffalo is an important prerequisite for studying the biology of this species, and is necessary to manage genetic diversity and to use modern breeding and genomic selection techniques. However, no such genome assembly has been previously reported. There are 2 species of domestic water buffalo, the river (2n = 50) and the swamp (2n = 48) buffalo. Here we describe a draft quality reference sequence for the river buffalo created from Illumina GA and Roche 454 short read sequences using the MaSuRCA assembler. The assembled sequence is 2.83 Gb, consisting of 366 983 scaffolds with a scaffold N50 of 1.41 Mb and contig N50 of 21 398 bp. Annotation of the genome was supported by transcriptome data from 30 tissues and identified 21 711 predicted protein coding genes. Searches for complete mammalian BUSCO gene groups found 98.6% of curated single copy orthologs present among predicted genes, which suggests a high level of completeness of the genome. The annotated sequence is available from NCBI at accession GCA_000471725.1. PMID:29048578

  3. Genome assembly and transcriptome resource for river buffalo, Bubalus bubalis (2n = 50).

    PubMed

    Williams, John L; Iamartino, Daniela; Pruitt, Kim D; Sonstegard, Tad; Smith, Timothy P L; Low, Wai Yee; Biagini, Tommaso; Bomba, Lorenzo; Capomaccio, Stefano; Castiglioni, Bianca; Coletta, Angelo; Corrado, Federica; Ferré, Fabrizio; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo; Lawley, Cynthia; Macciotta, Nicolò; McClure, Matthew; Mancini, Giordano; Matassino, Donato; Mazza, Raffaele; Milanesi, Marco; Moioli, Bianca; Morandi, Nicola; Ramunno, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo; Pilla, Fabio; Ramelli, Paola; Schroeder, Steven; Strozzi, Francesco; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Zicarelli, Luigi; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Valentini, Alessio; Chillemi, Giovanni; Zimin, Aleksey

    2017-10-01

    Water buffalo is a globally important species for agriculture and local economies. A de novo assembled, well-annotated reference sequence for the water buffalo is an important prerequisite for studying the biology of this species, and is necessary to manage genetic diversity and to use modern breeding and genomic selection techniques. However, no such genome assembly has been previously reported. There are 2 species of domestic water buffalo, the river (2 n = 50) and the swamp (2 n = 48) buffalo. Here we describe a draft quality reference sequence for the river buffalo created from Illumina GA and Roche 454 short read sequences using the MaSuRCA assembler. The assembled sequence is 2.83 Gb, consisting of 366 983 scaffolds with a scaffold N50 of 1.41 Mb and contig N50 of 21 398 bp. Annotation of the genome was supported by transcriptome data from 30 tissues and identified 21 711 predicted protein coding genes. Searches for complete mammalian BUSCO gene groups found 98.6% of curated single copy orthologs present among predicted genes, which suggests a high level of completeness of the genome. The annotated sequence is available from NCBI at accession GCA_000471725.1. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Effects of smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus biomass on water transparency, nutrients, and productivity in shallow experimental ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goetz, Daniel B.; Kroger, Robert; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2014-01-01

    The smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus is a native benthivore to floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin, USA. Based on evidence from other benthivorous fish studies we hypothesized high biomasses of I. bubalus contribute to poor water quality conditions. We tested this hypothesis in shallow (< 1.5 m) 0.05 ha earthen ponds at three stocking biomasses over a 10-week period during the summer of 2012. The most notable results from the permutational multivariate analysis of variance suggest I. bubalus at high and moderate biomasses significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced turbidity and suspended solid levels while decreasing Secchi depth. Our results suggest that effects of I. bubalus on water clarity may have considerable ecological implications in natural habitats such as shallow floodplain lakes.

  5. Effects of smallmouth buffalo, Ictiobus bubalus biomass on water transparency, nutrients, and productivity in shallow experimental ponds.

    PubMed

    Goetz, D; Kröger, R; Miranda, L E

    2014-05-01

    The smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus is a native benthivore to floodplain lakes in the Yazoo River Basin, USA. Based on evidence from other benthivorous fish studies we hypothesized high biomasses of I. bubalus contribute to poor water quality conditions. We tested this hypothesis in shallow (<1.5 m) 0.05 ha earthen ponds at three stocking biomasses over a 10-week period during the summer of 2012. The most notable results from the permutational multivariate analysis of variance suggest I. bubalus at high and moderate biomasses significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced turbidity and suspended solid levels while decreasing Secchi depth. Our results suggest that effects of I. bubalus on water clarity may have considerable ecological implications in natural habitats such as shallow floodplain lakes.

  6. Evaluation of indirect TaSP enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for diagnosis of tropical theileriosis in cattle (Bos indicus) and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amr M; Abdel-Rady, Ahmed; Ahmed, Laila S; El-Hosary, Amira

    2012-05-25

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the validity of Theileria annulata surface protein (TaSP)-ELISA, in comparison with traditional microscopic test, for the diagnosis of T. annulata infection among Egyptian baladi cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). Molecular confirmation of infection using T. annulata merozoite surface (Tams-1) target amplification by PCR was used as a gold standard. A total of 76 clinically suspected animals including 64 baladi cattle and 12 water buffaloes were investigated in the current study by the three methods. Based on the PCR-confirmed results, the evaluation study revealed higher sensitivity of TaSP-ELISA (72.9% and 75%) as compared to microscopic examination (58.3% and 50%) among cattle and buffaloes, respectively. On the other hand, the specificity of TaSP-ELISA in diagnosis of T. annulata infection was higher (87.5%) in baladi cattle as compared to water buffaloes (37.5%). In conclusion, TaSP-ELISA was shown to be suitable for the diagnosis of T. annulata infection in cattle under field conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of pseudocowpox virus in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) with vesicular disease in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in 2016.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ferreira; Fernandes, Fernanda Rodas Pires; Rivetti, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2017-12-01

    Parapoxviruses are zoonotic viruses that infect cattle, goats and sheep; there have also been reports of infections in camels, domestic cats and seals. The objective of this report was to describe a case of vesicular disease caused by pseudocowpox virus (PCPV) in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Brazil. Sixty buffalo less than 6 months old exhibited ulcers and widespread peeling of the tongue epithelium. There were no cases of vesicular disease in pigs or horses on the same property. Samples were analysed by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis in MEGA 7.01 was reconstructed using major envelope protein (B2L) by the Tamura three-parameter nucleotide substitution model and the maximum likelihood and neighbor joining models, both with 1000 bootstrap replicates. The genetic distance between the groups was analysed in MEGA using the maximum composite likelihood model. The rate variation among sites was modeled using gamma distribution. The presence of PCPV in the buffalo herd could be demonstrated in epithelium and serum. The minimum genetic distance between the isolated PCPV strain (262-2016) and orf virus and bovine papular stomatitis virus was 6.7% and 18.4%, respectively. The maximum genetic distance calculated was 4.6% when compared with a PCPV detected in a camel. Conclusions/Clinical Importance: The peculiar position of the isolated strain in the phylogenetic trees does not necessarily indicate a different kind of PCPV that infects buffalo. More samples from cattle and buffalo in Brazil must be sequenced and compared to verify if PCPV from buffalo are genetically different from samples derived from cattle.

  8. Water Resources and Related Land Management, Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    4,797,800 and $2,566,500, respectively. In January 1986, the Buffalo District completed a letter report addressing ice- jam related flood problems at the...opposition to construction of an ice-retentlon structure at Versailles, New York, to reduce damages due to ice- jam flooding at the mouth of the creek. The...consists of two low earth dams In tandem, e:ach with its ,own outle!t works and energJency spillway, and four training dikes. 17 Snags and debris jams

  9. Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York Water Resources Management. Feasibility of Comprehensive Water and Related Land Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    of these is the Lake Plain, a relatively flat and fertile agricultural belt which is wide in the northern portion of the region but narrow in the south...acres, occurs only during large flood events. Evidence of this can be seen in numerous highway relocations where secondary roads follow stream courses...obstructions of flow caused by fallen trees and shrub and tree growth encroaching on the high water stream channel can be seen immediately upstream of the

  10. Cholesterol and fatty acid composition of longissimus thoracis from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and Brahman-influenced cattle raised under savannah conditions.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida-Mendoza, Maria; Arenas de Moreno, Lilia; Huerta-Leidenz, Nelson; Uzcátegui-Bracho, Sojan; Valero-Leal, Kutchynskaya; Romero, Sonia; Rodas-González, Argenis

    2015-08-01

    Male (n=66) water buffalo (Buffalo) and Brahman-influenced cattle (Brahman) were born, raised, weaned, fattened on grazing savannah and harvested at two different ages (19 and 24months) to compare lipid composition of the longissimus thoracis muscle. Half of the animals were castrated at seven months of age (MOA) to examine the castration effects. At 24 MOA Brahman steers showed the highest content of total lipids (P<0.05). No significant variation was detected in cholesterol content for either the main or interaction effects in the age groups. Some individual fatty acids varied with the species (P<0.05), however, interspecific similarities were found in fatty acid ratios. For health-related indices, only atherogenic index (AI) showed lower values in favor of Buffalo meat (P<0.05) at both harvesting ages. Although, meat derived from both bovid groups was leaner and showed lower cholesterol level, AI indicates that Buffalo meat might be beneficial from a human health standpoint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Freezability of water buffalo bull (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa is improved with the addition of curcumin (diferuoyl methane) in semen extender.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A H; Andrabi, S M H; Qureshi, I Z

    2017-10-01

    Effects of curcumin as antioxidant in extender were evaluated on freezability of buffalo spermatozoa. Semen from each of the five bulls (n = 3 replicates, six ejaculates/bull, a total of 30 ejaculates) was diluted in Tris-citric acid extender containing curcumin (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 or 2.0 mM) or control. At pre-freezing and post-thawing, total antioxidant contents (μM/L) and lipid peroxidation levels (μM/ml) were higher (p < .05) and lower (p < .05) respectively, with 1.5 and 2.0 mM compared to 0.5 and 1.0 mM curcumin and control. At post-thawing, progressive motility (PM, %) and rapid velocity (RV, %) were higher (p < .05) with 1.5 mM compared to other doses of curcumin and control (except in case of RV, 1.5 was similar with 1.0 mM). Kinematics (average path velocity, μm/s; straight-line velocity, μm/s; curved-line velocity, μm/s; straightness, %; linearity, %), in vitro longevity (%, PM and RV) and DNA integrity (%) at post-thawing were higher (p < .05) with 1.5 mM compared to control. At post-thawing, supravital plasma membrane integrity (%) and viable spermatozoa with intact acrosome (%) were higher with 1.5 compared to 2.0 mM curcumin and control. We concluded that freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa is improved with the addition of 1.5 mM curcumin in extender. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Effect of supplemental light on growth, prolactin, progesterone and luteinizing hormone in water buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, K. S.; Gwazdauskas, F. C.; Akers, R. M.; McGilliard, M. L.

    1989-06-01

    Fifty non-pregnant Surti buffalo heifers aged between 17 and 42 months ( n=24, <24 months; n=26, >24 months) were randomly assigned to groups subject to either natural daylight +4h supplemental light ( n=25) or natural day light ( n=25), to study changes in growth, serum prolactin (Prl), progesterone (P4) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to supplemental lighting. Ambient temperatures (T) and relative humidity (RH) generally were >27° C and <70% during the day-time, respectively. Light-supplemented heifers had 16.2 kg net body weight (BW) gain at 9 weeks compared to 20.8 kg for controls, but higher mean Prl after 6.5 weeks ( P<0.01), and higher P4 (0.41 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.06) than control heifers. Older heifers had 39.7% greater BW ( P<0.01), but a net 4.3% BW gain compared to a 10.1% gain for younger heifers at 10 weeks. Older, light-supplemented heifers had higher mean P4 (0.63 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.07) than the other groups. These weight and hormonal changes suggest that 4 h supplemental light can alter growth and endocrine function in buffaloes under similar planes of nutrition. While light supplementation did not have a positive effect on body wieght during the 10 week study, body weight and endocrine changes due to supplemental light may be important factors for initiation of reproductive cyclicity.

  13. Petroleum Hydrocarbon Fingerprints of Water and Sediment Samples of Buffalo River Estuary in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Okoh, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon status of the Buffalo River Estuary in East London, South Africa, was evaluated from January to May, 2016. Surface water and sediment samples were collected from five points in the estuary and extracted using standard methods. The extracts were subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. Results showed that total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) varied from 7.65 to 477 μg/L in the water and 12.59 to 1,100 mg/kg in the sediments, with mean values of 146.50 ± 27.96 μg/L and 209.81 ± 63.82 mg/kg, respectively. Concentrations of TPH in the sediments correlated significantly with organic carbon (OC) in both seasons. TPH and OC levels were slightly lower in summer than in autumn in the two environmental matrices, and the average amount of TPH in the water samples collected from all the sampling stations was generally lower than the EU standard limit of 300 μg/L. However, the levels in the sediments exceeded the EGASPIN target value (50 mg/kg) for mineral oil but were below the intervention value (5,000 mg/kg), indicating a serious impact of industrial growth and urbanization on the area, although the n-alkane ratios and indexes used for source tracking revealed excessive flow from both natural and anthropogenic sources. PMID:28638675

  14. Interim Report on Feasibility of Improving Recreation Access and Related Water and Land Management in the Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    Buffalo Metropolitan Study Area. One of these is the Lake Plain, a relatively flat and fertile agricultural belt which is wide in the northern portion of...events. Evidence of this can be seen in numerous highway relocations where secondary roads follow stream courses closely. A field reconnaissance was made...shrub and tree growth encroaching on the high water stream channel can be seen immediately upstream of the eroding area. The SCS has provided technical

  15. Pheno- and genotyping of Brucella abortus biovar 5 isolated from a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus: First case reported in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Diana; Thompson, Carolina; Draghi, Graciela; Canavesio, Vilma; Jacobo, Roberto; Zimmer, Patricia; Elena, Sebastián; Nicola, Ana M; de Echaide, Susana Torioni

    2014-09-17

    An isolate of Brucella spp. from an aborted water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus was characterized based on its pheno- and genotype. The phenotype was defined by carbon dioxide requirement, hydrogen sulfide production, sensitivity to thionin and basic fuchsin and agglutination with Brucella A and M monospecific antisera. The genotype was based on the amplification of the following genes: bcsp31, omp2ab, and eri and the species-specific localization of the insertion sequence IS711 in the Brucella chromosome via B. abortus-B. melitensis-B. ovis-B. suis (AMOS)-PCR. Unexpectedly, the isolate showed a phenotype different from B. abortus bv 1, the most prevalent strain in cattle in Argentina, and from vaccine strain 19, currently used in bovines and water buffaloes. Genotyping supported the phenotypic results, as the analysis of the omp2ab gene sequence showed an identical pattern to either B. abortus bv 5 or B. melitensis. Finally, the AMOS PCR generated a 1700-bp fragment from the isolate, different than those amplified from B. abortus bv 1 (498bp) and B. melitensis (731bp), confirming the presence of B. abortus bv 5. The OIE/FAO Reference Laboratory for Brucellosis confirmed this typing. This is the first report of B. abortus bv 5 from a water buffalo in the Americas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tick- and fly-borne bacteria in ungulates: the prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, haemoplasmas and rickettsiae in water buffalo and deer species in Central Europe, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Sugár, László; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; de la Fuente, José; Horváth, Gábor; Kovács, Tibor; Micsutka, Attila; Gönczi, Enikő; Flaisz, Barbara; Takács, Nóra; Farkas, Róbert; Meli, Marina L; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2018-03-20

    Hunting constitutes an important industry in Europe. However, data on the prevalence of vector-borne bacteria in large game animal species are lacking from several countries. Blood or spleen samples (239 and 270, respectively) were taken from red, fallow and roe deer, as well as from water buffaloes, mouflons and wild boars in Hungary, followed by DNA extraction and molecular analyses for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, haemoplasmas and rickettsiae. Based on blood samples, the prevalence rate of A. phagocytophilum infection was significantly higher in red deer (97.9%) than in fallow deer (72.7%) and roe deer (60%), and in all these compared to mouflons (6.3%). In addition, 39.2% of the spleen samples from wild boars were PCR positive for A. phagocytophilum, but none of the buffalos. Based on blood samples, the prevalence rates of both Mycoplasma wenyonii (Mw) and 'Candidatus M. haemobos' (CMh) infections were significantly higher in buffaloes (Mw: 91.2%; CMh: 73.3%) than in red deer (Mw: 64.6%; CMh: 45.8%), and in both of them compared to fallow deer (Mw: 30.3%; CMh: 9.1%) and roe deer (Mw: 20%; CMh: 1.5%). The prevalence of Mw and CMh infection significantly correlated with the body sizes of these hosts. Furthermore, Mw was significantly more prevalent than CMh in buffaloes, red and roe deer. Mycoplasma ovis was detected in mouflons, M. suis in wild boars, R. helvetica in one fallow deer and one mouflon, and an unidentified Rickettsia sp. in a fallow deer. Forest-dwelling game animal species were found to be important carriers of A. phagocytophilum. In contrast, animals grazing grassland (i.e. buffaloes) were less likely to get infected with this Ixodes ricinus-borne pathogen. Water buffaloes, deer species, mouflons and wild boars harbored haemoplasmas that may affect domestic ungulates. Evaluated animals with larger body size had significantly higher prevalence of infection with haemoplasmas compared to smaller deer species. The above host species rarely carried

  17. Buffalo complete streets.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    Buffalo, NY formally adopted a local Complete Streets ordinance in 2008; however, implementation has yet : to become institutionalized. Buffalos Complete Streets Coalition, a multi-sector partnership was convened : to implement a Summit and Neighb...

  18. Simultaneously tracing the geographical origin and presence of bovine milk in Italian water buffalo Mozzarella cheese using MALDI-TOF data of casein signature peptides.

    PubMed

    Caira, Simonetta; Pinto, Gabriella; Nicolai, Maria Adalgisa; Chianese, Lina; Addeo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Water buffalo (WB) casein (CN) and curd samples from indigenous Italian and international breeds were examined with the objective of identifying signature peptides that could function as an indicator to determine the origin of their milk products. CN in complex mixtures were digested with trypsin, and peptide fragments were subsequently identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The unique presence of a β-CN A variant and an internally deleted αs1-CN (f35-42) variant in international WB milk samples was ascertained by identifying signature tryptic peptides from either dephosphorylated or native CN. Four signature unphosphorylated peptides derived from β-CN A, i.e. (f49-68) Asn(68) (2223.6 Da), (f1-28) Ser(10) (3169.4 Da), (f1-29) Ser(10) (3297.4 Da) and (f33-48) Thr(41) (1982 Da) and two from αs1-CN (f35-42) deleted fragments, i.e. (f23-34) Met(31) (1415.7 Da) and (f43-58) Val(44) (1752.7 Da), were identified. Two signature casein phosphopeptides (CPPs), i.e. β-CN (f1-28) 4P (3489.1 Da) and β-CN (f33-48) 1P (2062.0 Da), were identified in the tryptic hydrolysate of native casein or curd and cheese samples using in-batch hydroxyapatite (HA) chromatography. All these fragments functioned as analytical surrogates of two αs1- and β-casein variants that specifically occur in the milk of international WB breeds. Furthermore, the bovine peptide β-CN (f1-28) 4P had a distinct and lower molecular mass compared with the WB counterpart and functioned as a species-specific marker for all breeds of WB. Advantages of this analytical approach are that (i) peptides are easier to separate than proteins, (ii) signature peptide probes originating from specific casein variants allow for the targeting of all international WB milk, curd and cheese samples and (iii) bovine and WB casein in mixtures can be simultaneously determined in protected designation of origin (PDO) "Mozzarella di Bufala Campana" cheese

  19. Sustained delivery of exogenous melatonin influences biomarkers of oxidative stress and total antioxidant capacity in summer-stressed anestrous water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Mehrotra, S; Singh, G; Narayanan, K; Das, G K; Soni, Y K; Singh, Mahak; Mahla, A S; Srivastava, N; Verma, M R

    2015-06-01

    High ambient temperature during summer in tropical and subtropical countries predisposes water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) to develop oxidative stress having antigonadotropic and antisteroidogenic actions. Melatonin is a regulator of seasonal reproduction in photoperiodic species and highly effective antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the effect of sustained-release melatonin on biomarkers of oxidative stress i.e., the serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC). For the study, postpartum buffaloes diagnosed as summer anestrus (absence of overt signs of estrus, concurrent rectal examination, and RIA for serum progesterone) were grouped as treated (single subcutaneous injection of melatonin at 18 mg/50 kg body weight dissolved in sterilized corn oil as vehicle, n = 20) and untreated (subcutaneous sterilized corn oil, n = 8). Blood sampling for estimation of serum TAC and MDA (mmol/L) and NO (μmol/L) was carried out at 4 days of interval from 8 days before treatment till 28 days after treatment or for the ensuing entire cycle length. Results showed serum TAC concentration was higher in the treatment group with a significant (P < 0.05) increasing trend, whereas MDA and NO revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decline. Serum MDA and NO were higher in control compared with those of treatment group. Moreover, buffaloes in the treatment group showed 90% estrus induction with 18.06 ± 1.57 days mean interval from treatment to the onset of estrus. These results report that melatonin has a protective effect by elevating antioxidant status and reducing oxidative stress resulting in the induction of cyclicity in summer-stressed anestrous buffaloes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  1. Effect of sexual excitation on testosterone and nitric oxide levels of water buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) with different categories of sexual behavior and their correlation with each other.

    PubMed

    Swelum, Ayman Abdel-Aziz; Saadeldin, Islam M; Zaher, Hany A; Alsharifi, Sawsan A M; Alowaimer, Abdullah N

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effect of sexual excitation on serum testosterone and nitric oxide (NO) levels in water buffalo bulls with different categories of sexual behavior and their correlation with each other. Buffalo bulls were classified according to their sexual behavior (including reaction time, sexual aggressiveness and mating ability): acceptable (good to excellent) (n=5), fair (n=5), and unacceptable (poor) (n=5) sexual behavior. Blood samples were collected from all animals immediately before and after sexual teasing and/or mounting to estimate the testosterone and NO levels using a commercial radioimmunoassay kit and Griess reaction test, respectively. Comparisons among groups were evaluated using a mixed-design analysis of variance. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship between testosterone and NO levels before and after sexual excitation besides sexual behavior. The level of testosterone before sexual excitation was higher (p≤0.05) in bulls with acceptable and fair sexual behavior than in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior (0.86±0.01, 0.69±0.02, and 0.29±0.02ng/mL, respectively). The level of NO was higher (p≤0.05) in bulls with acceptable and fair sexual behavior than in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior (8.00±0.03, 7.66±0.19, and 6.29±0.33μM, respectively). Sexual excitation significantly (p<0.05) increase testosterone and NO levels in bulls with acceptable (1.45±0.01ng/mL and 19.04±0.32μM, respectively) or fair (0.92±0.02ng/mL and 14.95±0.34μM, respectively) sexual behavior, but not in bulls with unacceptable sexual behavior. The unacceptable sexual behavior bulls had significantly lower testosterone and NO levels than the other bulls. There was a strong correlation and association between serum testosterone and NO levels besides sexual behavior of buffalo bulls. In conclusion, the alteration in the testosterone and NO levels after sexual excitation depends on the sexual behavior category

  2. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...

  3. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...

  4. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. OFFGEL electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry approach compared with DNA-based PCR method for authentication of meat species from raw and cooked ground meat mixtures containing cattle meat, water buffalo meat and sheep meat.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Basappa M; Jagadeesh, Deepak S; Jagadeesh Babu, A; Madhava Rao, T; Kamuni, Veeranna; Vaithiyanathan, S; Kulkarni, Vinayak V; Rapole, Srikanth

    2017-10-15

    The present study compared the accuracy of an OFFGEL electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach with a DNA-based method for meat species identification from raw and cooked ground meat mixes containing cattle, water buffalo and sheep meat. The proteomic approach involved the separation of myofibrillar proteins using OFFGEL electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE and protein identification by MALDI-TOF MS. Species-specific peptides derived from myosin light chain-1 and 2 were identified for authenticating buffalo meat spiked at a minimum 0.5% level in sheep meat with high confidence. Relative quantification of buffalo meat mixed with sheep meat was done by quantitative label-free mass spectrometry using UPLC-QTOF and PLGS search engine to substantiate the confidence level of the data. In the DNA-based method, PCR amplification of mitochondrial D loop gene using species specific primers found 226bp and 126bp product amplicons for buffalo and cattle meat, respectively. The method was efficient in detecting a minimum of 0.5% and 1.0% when buffalo meat was spiked with cattle meat in raw and cooked meat mixes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of a novel SNP in exon 10 of the IGF2 gene with growth traits in Egyptian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Abo-Al-Ela, Haitham G; El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; El-Nahas, Abeer F; Mansour, Ali A

    2014-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) plays an important role in muscle growth and it might be used as a marker for the growth traits selection strategies in farm animals. The objectives of this study were to detect polymorphisms in exon 10 of IGF2 and to determine associations between these polymorphisms and growth traits in Egyptian water buffalo. PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing methods were used to detect any prospective polymorphism. A novel single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), C287A, was detected. It was a non-synonymous mutation and led to replacement of glutamine (Q) amino acid (aa) by histidine (H) aa. Three different SSCP patterns were observed: AA, AC, and CC, with frequencies of 0.540, 0.325, and 0.135, respectively. Association analyses revealed that the AA individuals had a higher average daily gain (ADG) than other individuals (CC and AC) from birth to 9 months of age. We conclude that the AA genotype in C287A SNP in the exon 10 of the IGF2 gene is associated with the ADG during the age from birth to 9 months and could be used as a potential genetic marker for selection of growth traits in Egyptian buffalo.

  7. Effect of water availability in opening containers of breeding site on Aedes aegypti life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokachil, Najir; Yusoff, Nuraini; Saaid, Alif; Appandi, Najwa; Harun, Farhana

    2017-11-01

    The distribution of rainfall is one of the factors which contribute to the development of Aedes aegypti life cycle. The fluctuation of rainfall might influence the acceleration of Aedes aegypti growth by providing sufficient breeding sites. In this research, the availability of water in an opening container of the breeding site is considered as a significant variable which affects the distinct stages structure in mosquito life cycle which egg, larva, pupa, and adult. A stage-structured Lefkovitch matrix model was used by considering the quantity of water contains in an opening container and life cycle of Aedes aegypti. The maximum depth of water in the container was also taken into account in order to find the time duration of mosquito life cycle to complete. We found that the maximum depth of water availability in mosquito breeding site influenced the abundance of the mosquito population. Hence, the containers are filled with sufficient water be able to stand from hot temperature for several days before drying out might continue to provide mosquito breeding site. In the future, it is recommended to consider other factors which affect the quantity of water in mosquito breeding sites such as heavy rain and wind blows.

  8. Response of captive, breeding mallards to oiled water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Albers, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    Behavioral response of mallard ducks to Prudhoe Bay crude oil slicks on water basins. Water basins were oiled with either 5 or 100 ul of oil and monitored with time-lapse cameras for 24 hr before and after water treatment. Measured time of first entry and amount of time spent on the water.

  9. The first serological evidence for Rift Valley fever infection in the camel, goitered gazelle and Anatolian water buffaloes in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gür, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Erol, Nural; Yapici, Orhan; Mamak, Nuri; Yavru, Sibel

    2017-10-01

    Rift valley fever (RVF), a vector-borne zoonotic disease, is caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae). The virus was initially characterized approximately 80 years ago in Kenya and disseminated to many countries in the continental Africa, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. The infection has not been reported in Turkey. In this study, blood serum samples collected from camel (Camelus dromedairus), goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa), and buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis linneaus) from 2000 to 2006 were investigated for RVF using C-ELISA. Camel samples (n = 72) were obtained from private small enterprises in Aydın province in theAegean region. Gazella samples (82) were taken from the biggest captive gazelle herd in Şanlıurfa province in the southeast Anatolia. Buffalo samples were collected mostly from small private family type farms in Afyon (168), Amasya (80), Samsun (69), Ankara (35), Sivas (21), Tokat (19), Konya (10), and Elazığ (8) provinces in the central, north, west, and east Anatolia. All of the gazella samples were negative; whereas, one of the 71 camel samples (1.3%) was positive for RVF-specific antibodies. Buffalos from Sivas, Tokat, Konya, and Elazığ provinces were negative. However, 35 of the 410 samples (8.5%) from rural areas in the following four provinces were positive: Amasya (12/80, 15%), Ankara (5/35, 14.2%), Samsun (8/69, 11.5%), and Afyon (10/168, 5.9%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of presence of RVF infection in Turkey.

  10. Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York Water Resources Management. Detailed Project Report for Flood Management in Cayuga Creek Watershed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    present within Cheektowaga’s industrial base implies that their markets and custo- mers extend throughout the Buffalo SNSA. Although the flood plain does...They include the growth of markets in the south and west, a high level of taxes, a low level of value added per dollar labor costs, older plants, and...and organic materials. 5.4 Possible Sources 5.4.1 General - Those sources listed on Plates C-9 through C-17 and contain suitable inplace stone to

  11. Chicken egg yolk plasma in tris-citric acid extender improves the quality and fertility of cryopreserved water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Hussain Shah, S Aftab; Hassan Andrabi, S Murtaza; Ahmed, Hussain; Qureshi, Irfan Zia

    2017-02-01

    This study was primarily designed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of ultraviolet (UV)-C-irradiated chicken egg yolk plasma (EYP; v:v; 10%, P1; 15%, P2; 20%, P3) or 20% (v:v) of whole chicken egg yolk (WCEY) in tris-citric acid (TCA) extender on water buffalo sperm quality during cryopreservation (postdilution, PD; postequilibration, PE; post-thawing, PT). Also the effect of best evolved concentration of UV-C-irradiated EYP in extender on in vivo fertility of buffalo spermatozoa was evaluated. At PE and PT, computer-assisted sperm analysis progressive motility (PM, %) was significantly higher in P3 compared with P1 and WCEY. Rapid velocity (RV, %) was higher (P < 0.05) in P3 compared with P1 and WCEY during cryopreservation (PD, PE, and PT). Average path velocity (μm/s) and straight line velocity (μm/s) were higher (P < 0.05) in P2 and P3 than WCEY at PE and PT. The decline percentage (%, longevity) in PM and RV was lower (P < 0.05) in P3 compared with WCEY during 2 hours incubation under in vitro condition at PT. Supravital plasma membrane integrity (%) was higher (P < 0.05) in P2 and P3 compared with control at different stages (PE and PT). Mitochondrial transmembrane potential (%) was higher (P < 0.05) in P2 and P3 compared with P1 and WCEY at different stages (PD and PT). Percentage of viable sperm with intact acrosome, and sperm DNA integrity (%) were higher (P < 0.05) in P2 and P3 compared with WCEY at PT. The in vivo fertility rate (%) was significantly higher with P3 compared with WCEY (76.61 vs. 64.49). In conclusion, WCEY (20%) can be replaced with UV-C-irradiated chicken EYP (20%) in TCA extender for cryopreservation of water buffalo spermatozoa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass spectrometry detection of fraudulent use of cow whey in water buffalo, sheep, or goat Italian ricotta cheese.

    PubMed

    Camerini, Serena; Montepeloso, Emanuela; Casella, Marialuisa; Crescenzi, Marco; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Fuselli, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    Ricotta cheese is a typical Italian product, made with whey from various species, including cow, buffalo, sheep, and goat. Ricotta cheese nominally manufactured from the last three species may be fraudulently produced using the comparatively cheaper cow whey. Exposing such food frauds requires a reliable analytical method. Despite the extensive similarities shared by whey proteins of the four species, a mass spectrometry-based analytical method was developed that exploits three species-specific peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin. This method can detect as little as 0.5% bovine whey in ricotta cheese from the other three species. Furthermore, a tight correlation was found (R(2)>0.99) between cow whey percentages and mass spectrometry measurements throughout the 1-50% range. Thus, this method can be used for forensic detection of ricotta cheese adulteration and, if properly validated, to provide quantitative evaluations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Buffalo Color Corporation in Buffalo, New York

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Buffalo Color Corporation, located in an industrial area in Buffalo, New York, occupies approximately 42 acres adjacent to the Buffalo River, along Elk and Lee streets. The plant has produced dyestuffs and organic chemicals since 1879, when it was built by

  14. Reduced nighttime transpiration is a relevant breeding target for high water-use efficiency in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Coupel-Ledru, Aude; Lebon, Eric; Christophe, Angélique; Gallo, Agustina; Gago, Pilar; Pantin, Florent; Doligez, Agnès; Simonneau, Thierry

    2016-08-09

    Increasing water scarcity challenges crop sustainability in many regions. As a consequence, the enhancement of transpiration efficiency (TE)-that is, the biomass produced per unit of water transpired-has become crucial in breeding programs. This could be achieved by reducing plant transpiration through a better closure of the stomatal pores at the leaf surface. However, this strategy generally also lowers growth, as stomatal opening is necessary for the capture of atmospheric CO2 that feeds daytime photosynthesis. Here, we considered the reduction in transpiration rate at night (En) as a possible strategy to limit water use without altering growth. For this purpose, we carried out a genetic analysis for En and TE in grapevine, a major crop in drought-prone areas. Using recently developed phenotyping facilities, potted plants of a cross between Syrah and Grenache cultivars were screened for 2 y under well-watered and moderate soil water deficit scenarios. High genetic variability was found for En under both scenarios and was primarily associated with residual diffusion through the stomata. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected that underlay genetic variability in En Interestingly, four of them colocalized with QTLs for TE. Moreover, genotypes with favorable alleles on these common QTLs exhibited reduced En without altered growth. These results demonstrate the interest of breeding grapevine for lower water loss at night and pave the way to breeding other crops with this underexploited trait for higher TE.

  15. Reduced nighttime transpiration is a relevant breeding target for high water-use efficiency in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Coupel-Ledru, Aude; Lebon, Eric; Christophe, Angélique; Gallo, Agustina; Gago, Pilar; Pantin, Florent; Doligez, Agnès; Simonneau, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Increasing water scarcity challenges crop sustainability in many regions. As a consequence, the enhancement of transpiration efficiency (TE)—that is, the biomass produced per unit of water transpired—has become crucial in breeding programs. This could be achieved by reducing plant transpiration through a better closure of the stomatal pores at the leaf surface. However, this strategy generally also lowers growth, as stomatal opening is necessary for the capture of atmospheric CO2 that feeds daytime photosynthesis. Here, we considered the reduction in transpiration rate at night (En) as a possible strategy to limit water use without altering growth. For this purpose, we carried out a genetic analysis for En and TE in grapevine, a major crop in drought-prone areas. Using recently developed phenotyping facilities, potted plants of a cross between Syrah and Grenache cultivars were screened for 2 y under well-watered and moderate soil water deficit scenarios. High genetic variability was found for En under both scenarios and was primarily associated with residual diffusion through the stomata. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected that underlay genetic variability in En. Interestingly, four of them colocalized with QTLs for TE. Moreover, genotypes with favorable alleles on these common QTLs exhibited reduced En without altered growth. These results demonstrate the interest of breeding grapevine for lower water loss at night and pave the way to breeding other crops with this underexploited trait for higher TE. PMID:27457942

  16. Neutronics Comparison Analysis of the Water Cooled Ceramics Breeding Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Xiaokang; Gao, Fangfang; Pu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is an ITER-like fusion engineering test reactor that is intended to fill the scientific and technical gaps between ITER and DEMO. One of the main missions of CFETR is to achieve a tritium breeding ratio that is no less than 1.2 to ensure tritium self-sufficiency. A concept design for a water cooled ceramics breeding blanket (WCCB) is presented based on a scheme with the breeder and the multiplier located in separate panels for CFETR. Based on this concept, a one-dimensional (1D) radial built breeding blanket was first designed, and then several three-dimensional models were developed with various neutron source definitions and breeding blanket module arrangements based on the 1D radial build. A set of nuclear analyses have been carried out to compare the differences in neutronics characteristics given by different calculation models, addressing neutron wall loading (NWL), tritium breeding ratio (TBR), fast neutron flux on inboard side and nuclear heating deposition on main in-vessel components. The impact of differences in modeling on the nuclear performance has been analyzed and summarized regarding the WCCB concept design. supported by the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2014GB122000, and 2014GB119000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  17. The Productivity and Natural Increase of Swamp Buffalo in District Malang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarto, A.; Ciptadi, G.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to collect the basic information needed to develop a sustainable breeding program, which includes the potential for production and reproduction of buffaloes. This research was conducted on swamp buffalo in Malang Regency East Java. The research method used was survey method. Primary data was obtained from direct observation on 323 tails owned by 98 breeders. Variables observed were population growth and reproductive performance. The data obtained were analyzed descriptively. The result showed that the initial population study of swamp Buffaloes in Malang as many as 1155 with male and female ratio 1: 2. The ratios of male and female swamp Buffalo 20 percent male and 80 percent female. Overall, the buffalo reproduction performance was still low. Service per conception 2.06 ± 0.88; Anestrus Postpartum 7.46 ± 3.83 months; calving interval distance 17.82 ± 4.86 months; 20.43 % birth rate and 4.33% mortality rate of Natural Increase (NI) population was about 16,1%. In conclusion, the value of NI of swamp Buffalo in Malang Regency is still low. To increase buffalo productivity, buffalo breeding program is continuously based on reproduction control.

  18. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of In Vitro Zinc Sulphate Additive to The Semen Extender on Water Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Spermatozoa before and after Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Dorostkar, Kamran; Alavi Shoushtari, Sayed Mortaza; Khaki, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of in vitro zinc sulphate additive to semen extender on sperm parameters (progressive motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA stability) after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods In this Prospective longitudinal laboratory study, semen samples of 5 buffalo bulls of 3-5 years old were collected at 5 different occasions from Iran, Urmia during summer and autumn 2011, 25 samples were used in each treatment. Sperm progressive motility, viability and abnormal morphology were measured before and at 0.5 (T0), 1(T1) and 2(T2) hours after diluting semen(1:10 v/v) in Tris-citric acid based extender (without egg yolk and glycerol) at 37˚C containing none (control group), 0.072, 0.144, 0.288, 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate to investigate dose and time effects. Next, a Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol extender (20% egg yolk and 7% glycerol) containing the same amount of zinc sulphate was prepared, diluted semen (1:10 v/v) was cooled and kept into a refrigerated chamber (4˚C) for 4 hours to equilibrate. Sperm progressive motility, viability, abnormal morphology, membrane integrity and DNA damage were estimated.The equilibrated semen was loaded in 0.5 ml French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Later, the frozen semen was thawed and the same parameters as well as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the frozen-thawed semen were determined. Results The results showed that zinc sulphate additive at the rate of 0.288 mg/L gave a higher protection of sperm progressive motility (53.7 ± 1.8% vs. 40.5 ± 1.7%), viability (70.8 ± 1.8% vs. 60.1 ± 1.5%), membrane integrity (67.3 ± 1.6% vs. 56.6 ± 1.7%), DNA stability (10.1 ± 0.47% vs. 11.8 ± 0.33% damaged DNA) through the process of dilution, equilibration and freeze-thawing and caused a higher TAC level (81 ± 3.3% vs. 63 ± 3.2 µmol/L) after freez-thawing compared to the control group. Adding 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate, however

  20. Crisis water management and ibis breeding at Narran Lakes in arid Australia.

    PubMed

    Brandis, K J; Kingsford, R T; Ren, S; Ramp, D

    2011-09-01

    Narran Lakes is a Ramsar site recognised for its importance for colonial waterbird breeding, which only occurs after large highly variable flooding events. In 2008, 74,095 pairs of ibis bred for the first time in seven years, establishing two contiguous colonies, a month apart. Most (97%) of the colony consisted of the straw-necked ibis (Threskiornis spinicollis) with the remainder consisting of glossy ibis (2%, Plegadis falcinellus) and Australian white ibis (1%, T. molucca). Following cessation of river flows, water levels fell rapidly in the colony site, resulting in a crisis management decision by governments to purchase and deliver water (10,423 Ml) to avert mass desertion of the colonies. There were significant differences in the reproductive success of each colony. In colony 1 60% of eggs hatched and 94% of chicks fledged, while in colony 2 40% of eggs hatched with only 17% of chicks fledging. Statistical analyses found that water depth was a significant variable in determining reproductive success. Rapid falls in water level during the chick stage in colony 2 resulted in decreased chick and overall offspring success. The results of this study identify the impact of upstream water resource development on colonial waterbird breeding and have implications for water management policies.

  1. Population structure and phylogeography of Toda buffalo in Nilgiris throw light on possible origin of aboriginal Toda tribe of South India.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, P; Kataria, R S; Mishra, B P; Dubey, P K; Sadana, D K; Joshi, B K

    2011-08-01

    We report the genetic structure and evolutionary relationship of the endangered Toda buffalo of Nilgiris in South India with Kanarese and two other riverine buffalo breeds. The upgma phylogeny drawn using Nei's distance grouped South Kanara and Toda buffaloes at a single node while Marathwada and Murrah together formed a separate node. Principal component analysis was performed with pairwise interindividual chord distances which revealed clustering of Murrah and Marathwada buffaloes distinctly, while individuals of Toda and South Kanara breeds completely intermingled with each other. Furthermore, there were highly significant group variances (p < 0.01) when the breeds were grouped based on phylogeny, thus revealing the existence of cryptic genetic structure within these buffalo breeds. To know the evolutionary relationship among these breeds, 537-bp D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA was analysed. The phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA haplotypes following NJ algorithm with Chinese swamp buffalo as outgroup revealed a major cluster that included haplotypes from all the four investigated breeds and two minor clusters formed by South Kanara and Toda haplotypes. Reduced median network analysis revealed haplotypes of South Kanara and Toda to be quite distinct from the commonly found haplotypes indicating that these might have been ancestral to all the present-day haplotypes. Few mutations in two of the haplotypes of South Kanara buffalo were found to have contributed to ancestral haplotypes of Toda buffalo suggesting the possible migration of buffaloes from Kanarese region towards Nilgiris along the Western Ghats. Considering the close social, economic and cultural association of Todas with their buffaloes, the present study supports the theory of migration of Toda tribe from Kanarese/Mysore region along with their buffaloes. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. 29. At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. At 1050 Gallery, Block 12, two centrifugal pumps, Buffalo Pumps, Buffalo, NY, driven by Allis Chalmers motors (size 3 HSO, head 230, 120 cpm, 1750, rpm, Impulse dia. 15) installed in the 1960s and used for water-cooling system for 230-kv cable; the cables have been removed and the pumps are not currently used. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  3. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-12-23

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period hasmore » been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore

  4. Paratuberculosis in buffaloes in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias Brito, Marilene; Dos Santos Belo-Reis, Alessandra; Barbosa, José Diomedes; Ubiali, Daniel Guimarães; de Castro Pires, Ana Paula; de Medeiros, Elizabeth Sampaio; de Melo, Renata Pimentel Bandeira; de Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa; Yamasaki, Elise; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido

    2016-10-01

    Several farms in the Northeast of Brazil were investigated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in order to identify the occurrence of paratuberculosis in buffaloes. Samples were obtained from 17 farms, two slaughter houses, and a quarantine area in the Northeast. About 15,000 buffaloes of the Murrah, Mediterranean, and Jafarabadi breed as well as their crossbreeds were evaluated for meat, dairy, and mixed farms with semi-intensive or extensive breeding practices. For diagnostic purposes, postmortem and histopathological examination, including Ziehl-Neelsen test of fecal smears and scraped intestinal mucosa were performed. PCR was applied for fecal samples, mesenteric lymph nodes, and intestines. Six Johne's disease-positive farms, which together with those previously identified, indicate that the disease is spread through the Brazilian Northeast, similar to what occurs in cattle herds in other regions of the country. The increase in prevalence of paratuberculosis is a consequence of introduction of animals from other regions without adequate veterinary assistance and due to the little official attention paid to this initially silent and chronic disease.

  5. 33 CFR 162.165 - Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, New York. 162.165 Section 162.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... and Rochester Harbors, New York. In Buffalo and Rochester Harbors, no vessel may exceed 6 miles per...

  6. 33 CFR 162.175 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. 162.175 Section 162.175 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. In the Black Rock Canal and Lock, no vessel may exceed 6...

  7. 33 CFR 162.175 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. 162.175 Section 162.175 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. In the Black Rock Canal and Lock, no vessel may exceed 6...

  8. 33 CFR 162.175 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. 162.175 Section 162.175 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. In the Black Rock Canal and Lock, no vessel may exceed 6...

  9. 33 CFR 162.175 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. 162.175 Section 162.175 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. In the Black Rock Canal and Lock, no vessel may exceed 6...

  10. 33 CFR 162.175 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. 162.175 Section 162.175 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, New York. In the Black Rock Canal and Lock, no vessel may exceed 6...

  11. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use...

  12. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  13. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  14. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  15. 33 CFR 165.911 - Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. 165.911 Section 165.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Security Zones; Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone. (a) Location. The following are security zones: (1) Nine...

  16. The fishes of Buffalo National River, Arkansas, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    and most of these ten are restricted to the White River Basin. For some species the Buffalo River is a population stronghold. The yoke darter and Ozark bass are especially abundant in the Buffalo River. In Arkansas, the Ozark shiner is most abundant in the Buffalo River and, although populations of Ozark shiners are declining in Arkansas, this is not typically the case in the Buffalo River. Data from 2001-2003 indicate that gilt darters currently (2005) are less common in the Buffalo River than during the 1970's. Populations of channel catfish (and any other fish species whose movements are inhibited by the cold water temperatures of the White River) may continue to decline without remedial efforts.

  17. Bovine papillomavirus type 2 infects the urinary bladder of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and plays a crucial role in bubaline urothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Maiolino, Paola; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Marcus, Ioan; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Roperto, Franco

    2013-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) has been shown to infect and play a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes grazed on pastures with ferns from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey. BPV-2 DNA has been found in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder. Furthermore, this virus may be a normal inhabitant of the urinary bladder since BPV-2 DNA has also been detected in clinically normal buffaloes. The viral activation by fern immunosuppressant or carcinogen may trigger the urothelial cell transformation. The E5 oncoprotein was solely detected in urothelial tumours and appeared to be co-localized with the overexpressed and phosphorylated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptor in a double-colour immunofluorescence assay. Our results indicate that the E5-PDGF β receptor interaction also occurs in spontaneous tumours of the bubaline urinary bladder, revealing an additional role of BPV-2 in bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes.

  18. Breeding crop plants with deep roots: their role in sustainable carbon, nutrient and water sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The soil represents a reservoir that contains at least twice as much carbon as does the atmosphere, yet (apart from ‘root crops’) mainly just the above-ground plant biomass is harvested in agriculture, and plant photosynthesis represents the effective origin of the overwhelming bulk of soil carbon. However, present estimates of the carbon sequestration potential of soils are based more on what is happening now than what might be changed by active agricultural intervention, and tend to concentrate only on the first metre of soil depth. Scope Breeding crop plants with deeper and bushy root ecosystems could simultaneously improve both the soil structure and its steady-state carbon, water and nutrient retention, as well as sustainable plant yields. The carbon that can be sequestered in the steady state by increasing the rooting depths of crop plants and grasses from, say, 1 m to 2 m depends significantly on its lifetime(s) in different molecular forms in the soil, but calculations (http://dbkgroup.org/carbonsequestration/rootsystem.html) suggest that this breeding strategy could have a hugely beneficial effect in stabilizing atmospheric CO2. This sets an important research agenda, and the breeding of plants with improved and deep rooting habits and architectures is a goal well worth pursuing. PMID:21813565

  19. Breeding crop plants with deep roots: their role in sustainable carbon, nutrient and water sequestration.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B

    2011-09-01

    The soil represents a reservoir that contains at least twice as much carbon as does the atmosphere, yet (apart from 'root crops') mainly just the above-ground plant biomass is harvested in agriculture, and plant photosynthesis represents the effective origin of the overwhelming bulk of soil carbon. However, present estimates of the carbon sequestration potential of soils are based more on what is happening now than what might be changed by active agricultural intervention, and tend to concentrate only on the first metre of soil depth. Breeding crop plants with deeper and bushy root ecosystems could simultaneously improve both the soil structure and its steady-state carbon, water and nutrient retention, as well as sustainable plant yields. The carbon that can be sequestered in the steady state by increasing the rooting depths of crop plants and grasses from, say, 1 m to 2 m depends significantly on its lifetime(s) in different molecular forms in the soil, but calculations (http://dbkgroup.org/carbonsequestration/rootsystem.html) suggest that this breeding strategy could have a hugely beneficial effect in stabilizing atmospheric CO(2). This sets an important research agenda, and the breeding of plants with improved and deep rooting habits and architectures is a goal well worth pursuing.

  20. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  1. The BUFFALO HST Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles; Jauzac, Mathilde; Capak, Peter; Koekemoer, Anton; Oesch, Pascal; Richard, Johan; Sharon, Keren q.; BUFFALO

    2018-01-01

    Beyond Ultra-deep Frontier Fields And Legacy Observations (BUFFALO) is an astronomical survey built around the six Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Fields clusters designed to learn about early galactic assembly and clustering and prepare targets for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope. BUFFALO will place significant new constraints on how and when the most massive and luminous galaxies in the universe formed and how early galaxy formation is linked to dark matter assembly. The same data will also probe the temperature and cross section of dark matter in the massive Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, and tell us how the dark matter, cluster gas, and dynamics of the clusters influence the galaxies in and around them. These studies are possible because the Spitzer Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, and ground based telescopes have already invested heavily in deep observations around the Frontier Fields, so that the addition of HST observations can yield significant new results.

  2. Water quality in Reedy Fork and Buffalo Creek basins in the Greensboro area, North Carolina, 1986-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davenport, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from April 1986 through September 1987 at 19 sites in Guilford County and the City of Greensboro, North Carolina. Sampling locations included 13 stream sites, two lakes that supply the City of Greensboro with drinking water, two City of Greensboro finished drinking-water filtration plants, and effluent from the two municipal wastewater plants prior to outfall into receiving streams. Water sampling consisted of six surveys during various stages of steady ground-water flow at all sites and high-flow-event sampling during two storms at six sites. Bottom-sediment samples were collected at three sites during two routine sampling surveys. A summary of nearly 22, 000 separate chemical or physical analyses of water samples or bottom sediment is presented and discussed as individual values, ranges of values, or median values with respect to the locations of sampling sites, streamflow conditions, or other information bearing on water-quality conditions under discussion. The results include discussions of general water-quality indicators; major ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations; acid and base/neutral extractable organic compounds; volatile organic compounds; and organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides detected at each sampling site. Loadings of selected constituents are also estimated on a yearly and daily basis. The quality of the raw and finished water, municipal effluents, and streams in the Greensboro area are characterized by using State and Federal water-quality standards. Inorganic constituents most commonly found in excess of standards were iron, copper, zinc, arsenic, phosphorus, manganese, cyanide, and mercury. Relatively few organic compounds were detected; however, those consistently reported were phthalate, thihalomethane, organophosphorus pesticide, benzol, and phenolic compounds. Selected inorganic, physical, and total organic carbon data are used in a Wilcoxon test for two independent

  3. Analysis of 22 Elements in Milk, Feed, and Water of Dairy Cow, Goat, and Buffalo from Different Regions of China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuewei; Qu, Xueyin; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Li, Songli; Zheng, Nan

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the concentrations of elements in raw milk by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and evaluate differences in element concentrations among animal species and regions of China. Furthermore, drinking water and feed samples were analyzed to investigate whether the element concentrations in raw milk are correlated with those in water and feed. All samples were analyzed by ICP-MS following microwave-assisted acid digestion. The mean recovery of the elements was 98.7 % from milk, 103.7 % from water, and 93.3 % from a certified reference material (cabbage). Principal component analysis results revealed that element concentrations differed among animal species and regions. Correlation analysis showed that trace elements Mn, Fe, Ni, Ga, Se, Sr, Cs, U in water and Co, Ni, Cu, Se, U in feed were significantly correlated with those in milk (p < 0.05). Toxic and potential toxic elements Cr, As, Cd, Tl, Pb in water and Al, Cr, As, Hg, Tl in feed were significantly correlated with those in milk (p < 0.05). Results of correlation analysis revealed that elements in water and feed might contribute to the elements in milk.

  4. Buffalo Public Schools Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reville, Eugene T.

    This report discusses improvements in Buffalo, New York, public schools since 1976, the first year of a court-ordered desegregation plan. Problems, solved and ongoing, are identified and programs addressing them are described. Recommendations are offered for further advancement, and projections about the future of Buffalo schools are also…

  5. Programmable fast-freezing method improves the post-thaw motion dynamics, integrities of plasmalemma, mitochondrial transmembrane, DNA and, acrosome, and in vivo fertility of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Khalil Ur Rehman, H; Andrabi, S M H; Ahmed, H; Shah, S A H

    2017-10-01

    The effects of freezing methods (FR1, nonprogrammable/static, 5 cm above liquid nitrogen [LN 2 ] for 10 min, plunging in LN 2 ; FR2, programmable medium, +4°C to -15°C at 3°C min -1 , from -15 to -80°C at 10°C min -1 and final holding for 1 min at -80°C, plunging in LN 2 ; FR3, programmable fast, from initial holding at +4°C for 2 min, from +4°C to -20°C at 10°C min -1 , from -20°C to -100°C at 30°C min -1 , final holding for 1 min at -100°C and plunging in LN 2 ) were assessed on post-thaw in vitro quality and in vivo fertility of water buffalo spermatozoa. Mean sperm progressive motility (%), rapid velocity (%), average path velocity (μm s -1 ), straight line velocity (μm s -1 ), curved line velocity (μm s -1 ), integrities (%) of plasmalemma, mitochondrial transmembrane, DNA and acrosome were higher (p < .05) in samples cryopreserved with FR3 compared to FR1 and FR2. Similarly, in vivo fertility (%) of buffalo spermatozoa was higher (p < .05) with FR3 than FR1 (%; 68.0 versus 50.0). We concluded that programmable fast-freezing method (FR3) improves the post-thaw in vitro quality and in vivo fertility of water buffalo spermatozoa. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Breeding of {sup 233}U in the thorium–uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Marshalkin, V. E., E-mail: marshalkin@vniief.ru; Povyshev, V. M.

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the {sup 233}U–{sup 232}Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) that ensures breeding of the {sup 233}U and {sup 235}U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement.

  7. Breeding of 233U in the thorium-uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the 233U-232Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D2O, H2O) that ensures breeding of the 233U and 235U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement.

  8. Comparison of quality attributes of buffalo meat curry at different storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Kandeepan, Gurunathan; Anjaneyulu, Anne Seet Ram; Kondaiah, Napa; Mendiratta, Sanjod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The product quality of curry is determined by the food animal source, raw materials and the method of processing. Moreover the scientific information on processing and quality of traditional buffalo meat curry from different groups of buffaloes is not available. This study was undertaken to develop processed curry from different buffalo groups and to compare its quality during storage at ambient and refrigeration temperature. The meat samples were collected from the longissimus dorsi muscle of the carcasses from each group of buffaloes slaughtered according to the traditional halal method. Buffalo meat curry was prepared in a pressure cooker with the standardized formulation. This final product was subjected to evaluation of quality and shelf life. To evaluate the effect of different groups of meat samples on the quality of curry, product yield, pH, proximate composition, water activity (aw), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), calorific value, sensory attributes and microbiological assay were determined The energy of meat curry from young buffaloes was significantly lower than the meat curry from spent animal groups. The overall acceptability of curry decreased significantly during 3 days ambient storage compared to refrigeration storage. Scientific processing by adopting good manufacturing practices and suitable packaging helped greatly to improve the shelf life of the ambient temperature stored buffalo meat curry. Buffalo meat curry from young male group showed better product characteristics and overall acceptability scores than spent buffalo group.

  9. Slightly acidic electrolyzed water for reducing airborne microorganisms in a layer breeding house.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoxia; Cao, Wei; Li, Baoming; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chaoyuan; Ge, Liangpeng

    2014-04-01

    Reducing airborne microorganisms may potentially improve the environment in layer breeding houses. The effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW; pH 5.29-6.30) in reducing airborne microorganisms was investigated in a commercial layer house in northern China. The building had a tunnel-ventilation system, with an evaporative cooling. The experimental area was divided into five zones along the length of the house, with zone 1 nearest to an evaporative cooling pad and zone 5 nearest to the fans. The air temperature, relative humidity, dust concentration, and microbial population were measured at the sampling points in the five zones during the study period. The SAEW was sprayed by workers in the whole house. A six-stage air microbial sampler was used to measure airborne microbial population. Results showed that the population of airborne bacteria and fungi were sharply reduced by 0.71 x 10(5) and 2.82 x 10(3) colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3) after 30 min exposure to SAEW, respectively. Compared with the benzalkonium chloride (BC) solution and povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution treatments, the population reductions of airborne fungi treated by SAEW were significantly (P < 0.05) more, even though the three disinfectants can decrease both the airborne bacteria and fungi significantly (P < 0.05) 30 min after spraying. There are no effective methods for reducing airborne microbial levels in tunnel-ventilated layer breeding houses; additionally, there is limited information available on airborne microorganism distribution. This research investigated the spatial distribution of microbial population, and the effectiveness of spraying slightly acidic electrolyzed water in reducing microbial levels. The research revealed that slightly acidic electrolyzed water spray was a potential method for reducing microbial presence in layer houses. The knowledge gained in this research about the microbial population variations in the building may assist producers in managing

  10. Incubation of spermatozoa with Anandamide prior to cryopreservation reduces cryocapacitation and improves post-thaw sperm quality in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneeth; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Nag, Pradeep; Saraf, Kaustubh Kishor; Kumar, Vimlesh; Lathika, Sreela; Nayak, Samiksha; Bhakat, Mukesh

    2018-02-01

    Anandamide (AEA), an endocannabinoid, has been shown to reduce capacitation and acrosomal exocytosis in human spermatozoa. Because buffalo spermatozoa are highly susceptible to cryopreservation induced damage, AEA was assessed as to whether it could protect spermatozoa from cryo-damage. Six ejaculates from six Murrah buffalo bulls (total 36 ejaculates) were utilized for the study. Each ejaculate was divided into four aliquots; spermatozoa in Aliquot 1 were extended in Tris-Citrate-Egg Yolk and frozen as per the standard protocol. Spermatozoa in Aliquots 2, 3 and 4 were incubated with AEA at 1 nM, 1 μM and 10 μM, respectively in Tris-Citrate extender for 15 min at 37 °C before cryopreservation. Cryopreserved spermatozoa were thawed at 37 °C for 30 s before assessment of sperm motility, membrane integrity, capacitation, acrosome reaction, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and lipid peroxidation status. The proportion of motile and membrane intact spermatozoa were greater (P < 0.05) with use of 1 μM AEA incorporated group compared with other groups. The proportion of un-capacitated and acrosome intact spermatozoa was greater (P < 0.05) with use of 1 or 10 μM of AEA compared with the other groups. When compared to the control group, use of 1 μM AEA resulted in a greater proportion of spermatozoa with high MMP (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the lipid peroxidation status of spermatozoa among any of the four groups. It was inferred that the protective role of AEA during cryopreservation of buffalo spermatozoa was dose dependent and incubation of spermatozoa with AEA at 1 μM concentration prior to cryopreservation reduced cryo-capacitation and improved post-thaw sperm quality in buffalo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The behaviour and welfare of buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in modern dairy enterprises.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, F; Pacelli, C; Grasso, F; Braghieri, A; De Rosa, G

    2013-10-01

    This review deals with the behaviour of river buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), in confinement and in extensive conditions, also focusing on the effects of different housing and rearing conditions on their welfare. The behavioural repertoire expressed by buffaloes in extensive and intensive conditions is similar to those displayed by other domestic ruminants. However, through natural selection, buffaloes have also acquired several morphological, physiological and behavioural (i.e. wallowing) adaptations to hot climatic conditions. Buffaloes kept in intensive conditions and having no access to pasture and water for wallowing extend their periods of idling and are less often involved in investigative activities. Confinement is also associated with a reduction of space; however, no specific studies have been carried out to determine the specific requirements of this species. Space restriction can adversely affect various aspects of buffalo welfare, such as health (increased levels of lesions and injuries), social behaviour (increased number of agonistic interactions) and heat dissipation. The buffaloes, originating from tropical areas, are well adapted to large variations in food availability and quality, and to dietetic unbalances. As to human animal relationship, it has been observed that the incidence of stepping and kicking behaviour of buffaloes in the milking parlour is positively correlated with the frequency of oxytocin injections, whereas the frequency of positive stockperson interactions with the animals such as talking quietly, petting and gentle touching are negatively correlated with the number of kicks during milking. Data from farms where both dairy cattle and buffaloes are present show that avoidance distance measured in the pen is lower in buffaloes than in cattle. This may be attributed to the fact that buffaloes are generally recognised to be curious animals. Finally, the effects of different farming practices on animal-related indicators are described

  12. Integration of selective breeding and vaccination to improve disease resistance in aquaculture: Application to control bacterial cold water disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. A goal of the NCCCWA breeding program is to produce germplasm with superior growth and survival following exposure to infe...

  13. Genomic structural differences between cattle and river buffalo identified through a combination and genomic and transcriptomic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis L.) is an important livestock species worldwide. Like many other livestock species, water buffalo lacks high quality and continuous reference genome assembly required for fine-scale comparative genomics studies. In this work, we present a dataset, which characterizes g...

  14. Improving proliferation resistance of high breeding gain generation 4 reactors using blankets composed of light water reactor waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Grape, S.; Haakanson, A.

    2013-07-01

    Fertile blankets can be used in fast reactors to enhance the breeding gain as well as the passive safety characteristics. However, such blankets typically result in the production of weapons grade plutonium. For this reason they are often excluded from Generation IV reactor designs. In this paper we demonstrate that using blankets manufactured directly from spent light water (LWR) reactor fuel it is possible to produce a plutonium product with non-proliferation characteristics on a par with spent LWR fuel of 30-50 MWd/kg burnup. The beneficial breeding and safety characteristics are retained. (authors)

  15. Comparison of CNVs in Buffalo with other species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a read-depth (RD) and a hybrid read-pair, split-read (RAPTR-SV) CNV detection method, we identified over 1425 unique CNVs in 14 Water Buffalo individual compared to the cattle genome sequence. Total variable sequence of the CNV regions (CNVR) from the RD method approached 59 megabases (~ 2% of...

  16. Karyotypic evolution of ribosomal sites in buffalo subspecies and their crossbreed

    PubMed Central

    Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; Pita, Sebastian; Panzera, Yanina; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano C.; Marques, José Ribamar Felipe; Figueiró, Marivaldo Rodrigues; Marques, Larissa Coêlho; Vinadé, Lucia; Gunski, Ricardo José; Garnero, Analía Del Valle

    2014-01-01

    Domestic buffaloes are divided into two group based on cytogenetic characteristics and habitats: the “river buffaloes” with 2n = 50 and the “swamp buffaloes”, 2n = 48. Nevertheless, their hybrids are viable, fertile and identified by a 2n = 49. In order to have a better characterization of these different cytotypes of buffaloes, and considering that NOR-bearing chromosomes are involved in the rearrangements responsible for the karyotypic differences, we applied silver staining (Ag-NOR) and performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments using 18S rDNA as probe. Metaphases were obtained through blood lymphocyte culture of 21 individuals, including river, swamp and hybrid cytotypes. Ag-NOR staining revealed active NORs on six chromosome pairs (3p, 4p, 6, 21, 23, 24) in the river buffaloes, whereas the swamp buffaloes presented only five NOR-bearing pairs (4p, 6, 20, 22, 23). The F1 cross-breed had 11 chromosomes with active NORs, indicating expression of both parental chromosomes. FISH analysis confirmed the numerical divergence identified with Ag-NOR. This result is explained by the loss of the NOR located on chromosome 4p in the river buffalo, which is involved in the tandem fusion with chromosome 9 in this subspecies. A comparison with the ancestral cattle karyotype suggests that the NOR found on the 3p of the river buffalo may have originated from a duplication of ribosomal genes, resulting in the formation of new NOR sites in this subspecies. PMID:25071402

  17. Spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential and low tyrosine phosphorylation preferentially bind to oviduct explants in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Saraf, Kaustubh Kishor; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Chhillar, Shivani; Nayak, Samiksha; Lathika, Sreela; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; Gahlot, Subhash Chand; Karan, Prabha; Verma, Kiran; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Although it is understood that spermatozoa are subjected to selection processes to form a functional sperm reservoir in the oviduct, the mechanism remains obscure. With the aim to understand the sperm selection process in the oviduct, in the present in vitro study, we analyzed mitochondrial membrane potential and tyrosine phosphorylation status in oviduct-explants bound and unbound spermatozoa. Frozen semen from Murrah buffalo bulls (n=10) used under progeny testing programme were utilized for the study. Oviduct explants were prepared by overnight culture of epithelial cells in TCM- 199 and washed spermatozoa were added to the oviduct explants and incubated for 4h. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and tyrosine phosphorylation status of bound and unbound spermatozoa were assessed at 1h and 4h of incubation. The proportion of spermatozoa with high MMP was significantly higher (P<0.001) among the bound spermatozoa (range 84.67-96.56%) compared to unbound (range 8.70-21.03%) spermatozoa. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa was significantly higher (P<0.001) among unbound population as compared to bound population. The proportion of spermatozoa displaying tyrosine phosphorylation at acrosomal area was significantly (P<0.05) lower in bound sperm population compared to unbound population. It was inferred that spermatozoa with high MMP and low tyrosine phosphorylation were preferred for oviduct-explants binding in the buffalo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84 Section 110.84 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock... Triangulation Marker “N-5” on Bird Island Pier; thence southeasterly along the pier a distance of approximately...

  19. Comparative in vitro toll-like receptor ligand induced cytokine profiles of Toda and Murrah buffaloes-Identification of tumour necrosis factor alpha promoter polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, A R; Dhinakar Raj, G; Dhanasekaran, S; Tirumurugaan, K G; Raja, A

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study was to assess cytokine production upon activation of pattern recognition receptors responsible for sensing bacterial and viral pathogen associated molecular patterns in two genetically diverse buffalo breeds, Toda and Murrah. A very limited molecular-epidemiological analysis showed a higher prevalence of Anaplasma and Theileria in Murrah than Toda buffaloes. Toda buffalo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) produced significantly higher levels of IFN γ and/or TNF α mRNAs in response to peptidoglycan, poly I:C, lipopolysaccharide, imiquimod and CpG. Flagellin stimulation did not result in any significant differences in the expression levels of the cytokines tested between these breeds. The levels of ligand induced IFN γ and TNF α mRNA and proteins also correlated except when induced with CpG. The proximal promoter region of TNF α across these two breeds were also sequenced to detect SNPs and promoter assay performed to determine their role in altering the transcriptional activity. Two polymorphisms were identified at -737 (T/A) and -1092 (G/T) positions in Toda buffalo TNF α promoter and promoter assay revealed higher transcription activity in Toda buffalos than in Murrah. This suggests that disease tolerance of these buffalo breeds could be due to the differences in their cytokine transcription levels in response to the respective PAMPs that may be at least in part determined by polymorphisms in the cytokine promoter regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of the dairy characters of lactating Murrah buffaloes on the basis of body parts measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dhillod, Sandeep; Kar, Dipankar; Patil, C. S.; Sahu, Subhasish; Singh, Narender

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to correlate the milk yield of Murrah buffaloes with certain body parts measurements. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 lactating Murrah buffaloes were selected from Buffalo Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Science, Hisar and were randomly selected in a range from first to fifth parity. Traits studied were 305 days milk yield (MY), body weight (BW), body length (BL), muzzle width (MW), height at wither (HW), abdominal girth (AG), chest girth (CG), body depth fore, body depth rear, hip bone distance (HBD), pin bone distance (PBD), skin thickness (STK), and tail length (TL). Data were collected and statically analyzed by Pearson’s correlation method. Result: The result of this study showed that Murrah buffaloes had the average 2604.8±39.5 kg for MY, 556.1±4.9 kg for BW, and 152.2±0.8 cm for BL. This study showed that buffaloes had positive significant (p<0.05) correlation between MY and BW (0.26). Highly significant (p<0.01) correlation was observed between MY and AG (0.64), MW (0.42). Significant (p<0.01) negative correlation was observed between MY and STK (−0.79). Different body part measurements (BW, BL, HW, AG, CG, MW, TL, BD, PBD, HBD, STK) were significantly correlated with each other. Conclusion: This study can be helpful as a selection tool to enhance and evaluate the production potential by setting standards of Murrah buffalo breed. BW, abdominal growth, muzzle thickness, and STK were found key factors while selecting a dairy Murrah buffalo. PMID:28246443

  1. Study of the dairy characters of lactating Murrah buffaloes on the basis of body parts measurements.

    PubMed

    Dhillod, Sandeep; Kar, Dipankar; Patil, C S; Sahu, Subhasish; Singh, Narender

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate the milk yield of Murrah buffaloes with certain body parts measurements. A total of 70 lactating Murrah buffaloes were selected from Buffalo Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Science, Hisar and were randomly selected in a range from first to fifth parity. Traits studied were 305 days milk yield (MY), body weight (BW), body length (BL), muzzle width (MW), height at wither (HW), abdominal girth (AG), chest girth (CG), body depth fore, body depth rear, hip bone distance (HBD), pin bone distance (PBD), skin thickness (STK), and tail length (TL). Data were collected and statically analyzed by Pearson's correlation method. The result of this study showed that Murrah buffaloes had the average 2604.8±39.5 kg for MY, 556.1±4.9 kg for BW, and 152.2±0.8 cm for BL. This study showed that buffaloes had positive significant (p<0.05) correlation between MY and BW (0.26). Highly significant (p<0.01) correlation was observed between MY and AG (0.64), MW (0.42). Significant (p<0.01) negative correlation was observed between MY and STK (-0.79). Different body part measurements (BW, BL, HW, AG, CG, MW, TL, BD, PBD, HBD, STK) were significantly correlated with each other. This study can be helpful as a selection tool to enhance and evaluate the production potential by setting standards of Murrah buffalo breed. BW, abdominal growth, muzzle thickness, and STK were found key factors while selecting a dairy Murrah buffalo.

  2. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...[deg]51'47.61'' W (NAD 83). (b) Effective period. This regulation will be effective and the safety zone...-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the Buffalo Outer...

  3. Breeding short-tailed shearwaters buffer local environmental variability in south-eastern Australia by foraging in Antarctic waters.

    PubMed

    Berlincourt, Maud; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Establishing patterns of movements of free-ranging animals in marine ecosystems is crucial for a better understanding of their feeding ecology, life history traits and conservation. As central place foragers, the habitat use of nesting seabirds is heavily influenced by the resources available within their foraging range. We tested the prediction that during years with lower resource availability, short-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus tenuirostris) provisioning chicks should increase their foraging effort, by extending their foraging range and/or duration, both when foraging in neritic (short trips) and distant oceanic waters (long trips). Using both GPS and geolocation data-loggers, at-sea movements and habitat use were investigated over three breeding seasons (2012-14) at two colonies in southeastern Australia. Most individuals performed daily short foraging trips over the study period and inter-annual variations observed in foraging parameters where mainly due to few individuals from Griffith Island, performing 2-day trips in 2014. When performing long foraging trips, this study showed that individuals from both colonies exploited similar zones in the Southern Ocean. The results of this study suggest that individuals could increase their foraging range while exploiting distant feeding zones, which could indicate that short-tailed shearwaters forage in Antarctic waters not only to maintain their body condition but may also do so to buffer against local environmental stochasticity. Lower breeding performances were associated with longer foraging trips to distant oceanic waters in 2013 and 2014 indicating they could mediate reductions in food availability around the breeding colonies by extending their foraging range in the Southern Ocean. This study highlights the importance of foraging flexibility as a fundamental aspect of life history in coastal/pelagic marine central place foragers living in highly variable environments and how these foraging strategies are use to

  4. Identification and evaluation of reference genes for accurate gene expression normalization of fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ashish, Shende; Bhure, S K; Harikrishna, Pillai; Ramteke, S S; Muhammed Kutty, V H; Shruthi, N; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Manish, Mahawar; Ghosh, S K; Mihir, Sarkar

    2017-04-01

    The quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) has become an important tool for gene-expression analysis for a selected number of genes in life science. Although large dynamic range, sensitivity and reproducibility of qRT-PCR is good, the reliability majorly depend on the selection of proper reference genes (RGs) employed for normalization. Although, RGs expression has been reported to vary considerably within same cell type with different experimental treatments. No systematic study has been conducted to identify and evaluate the appropriate RGs in spermatozoa of domestic animals. Therefore, this study was conducted to analyze suitable stable RGs in fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We have assessed 13 candidate RGs (BACT, RPS18s, RPS15A, ATP5F1, HMBS, ATP2B4, RPL13, EEF2, TBP, EIF2B2, MDH1, B2M and GLUT5) of different functions and pathways using five algorithms. Regardless of the approach, the ranking of the most and the least candidate RGs remained almost same. The comprehensive ranking by RefFinder showed GLUT5, ATP2B4 and B2M, MDH1 as the top two stable and least stable RGs, respectively. The expression levels of four heat shock proteins (HSP) were employed as a target gene to evaluate RGs efficiency for normalization. The results demonstrated an exponential difference in expression levels of the four HSP genes upon normalization of the data with the most stable and the least stable RGs. Our study, provides a convenient RGs for normalization of gene-expression of key metabolic pathways effected during freezing and thawing of spermatozoa of buffalo and other closely related bovines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling lactation curve for milk fat to protein ratio in Iranian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using non-linear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Hossein-Zadeh, Navid Ghavi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare seven non-linear mathematical models (Brody, Wood, Dhanoa, Sikka, Nelder, Rook and Dijkstra) to examine their efficiency in describing the lactation curves for milk fat to protein ratio (FPR) in Iranian buffaloes. Data were 43 818 test-day records for FPR from the first three lactations of Iranian buffaloes which were collected on 523 dairy herds in the period from 1996 to 2012 by the Animal Breeding Center of Iran. Each model was fitted to monthly FPR records of buffaloes using the non-linear mixed model procedure (PROC NLMIXED) in SAS and the parameters were estimated. The models were tested for goodness of fit using Akaike's information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and log maximum likelihood (-2 Log L). The Nelder and Sikka mixed models provided the best fit of lactation curve for FPR in the first and second lactations of Iranian buffaloes, respectively. However, Wood, Dhanoa and Sikka mixed models provided the best fit of lactation curve for FPR in the third parity buffaloes. Evaluation of first, second and third lactation features showed that all models, except for Dijkstra model in the third lactation, under-predicted test time at which daily FPR was minimum. On the other hand, minimum FPR was over-predicted by all equations. Evaluation of the different models used in this study indicated that non-linear mixed models were sufficient for fitting test-day FPR records of Iranian buffaloes.

  6. In Buffalo, Opening Doors for the Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Buffalo Prep program. Housed at University of Buffalo, the program identifies disadvantaged but talented minority children, places them in academic-enrichment classes, and then finds them spots at private schools and a more selective public high school in the area to complete their precollegiate careers. In addition to…

  7. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the 233U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium-uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D2O, H2O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the 233U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  8. Depolymerization degree of water-extractable arabinoxylans in rye bread: characteristics of inbred lines used for breeding of bread cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cyran, Malgorzata R; Ceglińska, Alicja; Kolasińska, Irena

    2012-09-05

    The water-extractable arabinoxylans (WE AXs) present in rye bread govern its viscous properties, which may be related to reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Breads made from rye cultivars generally exhibit higher AX-dependent extract viscosities (Cyran, M. R.; Saulnier, L. Food Chemistry2012, 131, 667-676) when compared with those produced from inbred lines used for their breeding. To give further details about this trend, the WE AXs were isolated from breads of lines and structurally characterized by HPSEC and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The extract viscosities of endosperm and whole-meal breads were usually comparable, in contrast to those made from rye cultivars with higher viscosity of endosperm bread. The WE AXs present in breads obtained from inbred lines were characterized by the higher degradation degrees than those in breads from cultivars, as indicated by their HPSEC-RI profiles. This was associated with considerably lower proportions of 2-Xylp in their backbones. Besides, a level of endoxylanase activity in flours from inbred lines was much higher than that in flours from cultivars. Breeding of hybrid rye cultivars for production of high-viscosity bread requires the proper components. They may be preliminarily selected from populations with high WE AX contents and relatively low levels of endoxylanase activity by using the overall viscosity test for starting flours. However, further measurement of AX-dependent extract viscosity in test breads made from such lines may verify their usefulness completely.

  9. Chapter 21: Oceanographic Processes and Marine Productivity in Waters Offshore of Marbled Murrelet Breeding Habitat

    Treesearch

    Jr. Hunt

    1995-01-01

    Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) occupy nearshore waters in the eastern North Pacific Ocean from central California to the Aleutian Islands. The offshore marine ecology of these waters is dominated by a series of currents roughly parallel to the coast that determine marine productivity of shelf waters by influencing the rate of nutrient...

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and subclinical mastitis in cattle and water buffaloes from different farms of Sadat City in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Mohamed Sabry; Mahmoud El-Bagoury, Abd Elrahman; Dawoud, Mai Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To characterize Staphylococcus aureus from clinical and subclinical mastitis and identify virulence factors. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and two milk samples were collected, 143 from mastitic cattle and buffaloes 94 and 49, respectively, and 59 from apparently healthy cattle and buffaloes 35 and 24, respectively. Results: California mastitis test was applied and positive prevalence were 91.48% and 75.51% for cattle and buffalo with clinical mastitis and 37.14% and 45.83% for cattle and buffalo with subclinical mastitis. S. aureus was isolated from clinically mastitic cattle and buffaloes were 39.29% and 50%, respectively. While, from subclinical mastitic cattle and buffaloes were 80% and 72.73%, respectively. Hemolytic activity was assessed for S. aureus isolated from clinically and subclinical mastitic cases with prevalences of 100% and 56.25%, respectively. Thermo nuclease production from clinically and subclinical mastitic cases was 25% and 56.25%, respectively. Simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conducted on S. aureus using 16S rRNA, clumping factor A, Panton valentine leukocidin, coagulase (Coa), alpha-hemolysin and beta-hemolysin those proved existence in 100%, 46.9%, 65.6%, 100%, 34.4%, and 43.75% of the isolates, respectively. While, multiplex PCR is utilized for detection of enterotoxins and proved that 12.5% was positive for enterotoxine Type D. Conclusions: It is concluded that simplex and multiplex PCR assays can be used as rapid and sensitive diagnostic tools to detect the presence of S. aureus and characterize its virulence factors that help in detection of severity of infection, distribution and stating preventive and control strategies. PMID:27047197

  11. Field metabolism and water flux of carolina chickadees during breeding and nonbreeding seasons: A test of the "peak-demand" and "reallocation" hypotheses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Williams, J.B.; Grubb, T.C.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the "peak-demand" and "reallocation" hypotheses of seasonal energy expenditure which predict, respectively, that energy expenditure is greatest during the breeding season or varies little seasonally. We tested these predictions by utilizing the doubly labeled water technique to estimate energy expenditure and water flux of Carolina Chickadees (Poecile carolinensis) in both the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. Similar to Weathers et al. (1999), we did not find support for either of these hypotheses, finding instead that energy expenditure was greater during the nonbreeding season. The fact that our study site was at the northern edge of the species' range, where winters are severe, may have influenced this result. Comparisons with other parid studies were equivocal because body size was an important factor in explaining seasonal energetics, and only the larger species have been examined during the breeding season.

  12. Breeding implications of boll distribution responses to water stress deficits in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To identify the impact of different water stress deficits on the boll distribution of elite Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars in the Texas High Plains, cultivars which represent the diverse gene-pools of the private sector were subjected to three different water deficit regimes. This s...

  13. Spatial and temporal changes in group dynamics and range use enable anti-predator responses in African buffalo.

    PubMed

    Tambling, Craig J; Druce, Dave J; Hayward, Matt W; Castley, J Guy; Adendorff, John; Kerley, Graham I H

    2012-06-01

    The reintroduction of large predators provides a framework to investigate responses by prey species to predators. Considerable research has been directed at the impact that reintroduced wolves (Canis lupus) have on cervids, and to a lesser degree, bovids, in northern temperate regions. Generally, these impacts alter feeding, activity, and ranging behavior, or combinations of these. However, there are few studies on the response of African bovids to reintroduced predators, and thus, there is limited data to compare responses by tropical and temperate ungulates to predator reintroductions. Using the reintroduction of lion (Panthera leo) into the Addo Elephant National Park (AENP) Main Camp Section, South Africa, we show that Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) responses differ from northern temperate ungulates. Following lion reintroduction, buffalo herds amalgamated into larger, more defendable units; this corresponded with an increase in the survival of juvenile buffalo. Current habitat preference of buffalo breeding herds is for open habitats, especially during the night and morning, when lion are active. The increase in group size and habitat preference countered initial high levels of predation on juvenile buffalo, resulting in a return in the proportion of juveniles in breeding herds to pre-lion levels. Our results show that buffalo responses to reintroduced large predators in southern Africa differ to those of northern temperate bovids or cervids in the face of wolf predation. We predict that the nature of the prey response to predator reintroduction is likely to reflect the trade-off between the predator selection and hunting strategy of predators against the life history and foraging strategies of each prey species.

  14. Germplasm-regression-combined (GRC) marker-trait association identification in plant breeding: a challenge for plant biotechnological breeding under soil water deficit conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Cheng-Jiang; Xu, Xue-Xuan; Shao, Hong-Bo; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul

    2010-09-01

    In the past 20 years, the major effort in plant breeding has changed from quantitative to molecular genetics with emphasis on quantitative trait loci (QTL) identification and marker assisted selection (MAS). However, results have been modest. This has been due to several factors including absence of tight linkage QTL, non-availability of mapping populations, and substantial time needed to develop such populations. To overcome these limitations, and as an alternative to planned populations, molecular marker-trait associations have been identified by the combination between germplasm and the regression technique. In the present preview, the authors (1) survey the successful applications of germplasm-regression-combined (GRC) molecular marker-trait association identification in plants; (2) describe how to do the GRC analysis and its differences from mapping QTL based on a linkage map reconstructed from the planned populations; (3) consider the factors that affect the GRC association identification, including selections of optimal germplasm and molecular markers and testing of identification efficiency of markers associated with traits; and (4) finally discuss the future prospects of GRC marker-trait association analysis used in plant MAS/QTL breeding programs, especially in long-juvenile woody plants when no other genetic information such as linkage maps and QTL are available.

  15. Breeding for Increased Water Use Efficiency in Corn (Maize) Using a Low-altitude Unmanned Aircraft System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Veeranampalayam-Sivakumar, A. N.; Li, J.; Ge, Y.; Schnable, J. C.; Rodriguez, O.; Liang, Z.; Miao, C.

    2017-12-01

    Low-altitude aerial imagery collected by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) at centimeter-level spatial resolution provides great potential to collect high throughput plant phenotyping (HTP) data and accelerate plant breeding. This study is focused on UAS-based HTP for breeding increased water use efficiency in corn in eastern Nebraska. The field trail is part of an effort by the Genomes to Fields consortium effort to grow and phenotype many of the same corn (maize) hybrids at approximately 40 locations across the United States and Canada in order to stimulate new research in crop modeling, the development of new plant phenotyping technologies and the identification of genetic loci that control the adaptation of specific corn (maize) lines to specific environments. It included approximately 250 maize hybrids primary generated using recently off patent material from major seed companies. These lines are the closest material to what farmers are growing today which can be legally used for research purposes and genotyped by the public sector. During the growing season, a hexacopter equipped with a multispectral and a RGB cameras was flown and used to image this 1-hectare field trial near Mead, NE. Sensor data from the UAS were correlated directly with grain yield, measured at the end of the growing season, and were also be used to quantify other traits of interest to breeders including flowering date, plant height, leaf orientation, canopy spectral, and stand count. The existing challenges of field data acquisition (to ensure data quality) and development of effective image processing algorithms (such as detecting corn tassels) will be discussed. The success of this study and others like it will speed up the process of phenotypic data collection, and provide more accurate and detailed trait data for plant biologists, plant breeders, and other agricultural scientists. Employing advanced UAS-based machine vision technologies in agricultural applications have the potential

  16. Similar effects of QTL Haplotypes for Bacterial Cold Water Disease resistance across two generations in a commercial rainbow trout breeding population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously we have demonstrated that genomic selection (GS) for bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance can double the accuracy of traditional pedigree-based selection in a commercial rainbow trout breeding population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of marker ...

  17. 33 CFR 117.773 - Buffalo River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.773 Buffalo River. (a) The draw of the... Sundays, and on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day...

  18. Buffalo Air Traffic Control Tower Operations Analysis.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-09-01

    This report provides a description of the non-surveillance aspects of the FAA air traffic control facility operation at Greater Buffalo International Airport from the air traffic controller's point of view. It includes photographs of all controller c...

  19. Atlantic salmon and eastern oyster breeding programs at the National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center (NCWMAC) focuses on the coldwater marine aquaculture industry’s highest priority research needs including development of improved genetic stocks. Coldwater aquaculture production has potential for expansion, and both Atlantic salmon and Eas...

  20. Atlantic salmon and eastern oyster breeding programs at the National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center (NCWMAC) focuses on the coldwater marine aquaculture industry's highest priority research needs including development of improved genetic stocks. Coldwater aquaculture production has potential for expansion, and both Atlantic salmon and East...

  1. Update to the Atlantic salmon breeding program at the National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center (NCWMAC) in Franklin, ME has been supporting the U.S. coldwater marine aquaculture industry for the past thirteen years by developing a genetically improved North American Atlantic salmon. The St. John's River stock was chosen as the focal ...

  2. Atlantic salmon breeding program at the National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center (NCWMAC) in Franklin, ME has been supporting the U.S. coldwater marine aquaculture industry for the past thirteen years by developing a genetically improved North American Atlantic salmon. The St. John's River stock was chosen as the focal ...

  3. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    SciTech Connect

    Marshalkin, V. E., E-mail: marshalkin@vniief.ru; Povyshev, V. M.

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium–uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  4. Thermal comfort indices of female Murrah buffaloes reared in the Eastern Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Jamile Andréa Rodrigues; de Araújo, Airton Alencar; Lourenço Júnior, José de Brito; dos Santos, Núbia de Fátima Alves; Garcia, Alexandre Rossetto; de Oliveira, Raimundo Parente

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to develop new and more specific thermal comfort indices for buffaloes reared in the Amazon region. Twenty female Murrah buffaloes were studied for a year. The animals were fed in pasture with drinking water and mineral supplementation ad libitum. The following parameters were measured twice a week in the morning (7 AM) and afternoon (1 PM): air temperature (AT), relative air humidity (RH), dew point temperature (DPT), wet bulb temperature (WBT), black globe temperature (BGT), rectal temperature (RT), respiratory rate (RR), and body surface temperature (BST). The temperature and humidity index (THI), globe temperature and humidity index (GTHI), Benezra's comfort index (BTCI), and Ibéria's heat tolerance index (IHTI) were calculated so they could be compared to the new indices. Multivariate regression analyses were carried out using the canonical correlation model, and all indices were correlated with the physiological and climatic variables. Three pairs of indices (general, effective, and practical) were determined comprising the buffalo comfort climatic condition index (BCCCI) and the buffalo environmental comfort index (BECI). The indices were validated and a great agreement was found among the BCCCIs (general, effective, and practical), with 98.3 % between general and effective a.nd 92.6 % between general and practical. A significant correlation ( P < 0.01) was found between the new indices and the physiological and climatic variables, which indicated that these may be used in pairs to diagnose thermal stress in buffaloes reared in the Amazon.

  5. Thermal comfort indices of female Murrah buffaloes reared in the Eastern Amazon.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jamile Andréa Rodrigues; de Araújo, Airton Alencar; Lourenço Júnior, José de Brito; dos Santos, Núbia de Fátima Alves; Garcia, Alexandre Rossetto; de Oliveira, Raimundo Parente

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to develop new and more specific thermal comfort indices for buffaloes reared in the Amazon region. Twenty female Murrah buffaloes were studied for a year. The animals were fed in pasture with drinking water and mineral supplementation ad libitum. The following parameters were measured twice a week in the morning (7 AM) and afternoon (1 PM): air temperature (AT), relative air humidity (RH), dew point temperature (DPT), wet bulb temperature (WBT), black globe temperature (BGT), rectal temperature (RT), respiratory rate (RR), and body surface temperature (BST). The temperature and humidity index (THI), globe temperature and humidity index (GTHI), Benezra's comfort index (BTCI), and Ibéria's heat tolerance index (IHTI) were calculated so they could be compared to the new indices. Multivariate regression analyses were carried out using the canonical correlation model, and all indices were correlated with the physiological and climatic variables. Three pairs of indices (general, effective, and practical) were determined comprising the buffalo comfort climatic condition index (BCCCI) and the buffalo environmental comfort index (BECI). The indices were validated and a great agreement was found among the BCCCIs (general, effective, and practical), with 98.3 % between general and effective a.nd 92.6 % between general and practical. A significant correlation (P < 0.01) was found between the new indices and the physiological and climatic variables, which indicated that these may be used in pairs to diagnose thermal stress in buffaloes reared in the Amazon.

  6. The African buffalo: a villain for inter-species spread of infectious diseases in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L; Bengis, Roy G

    2012-06-20

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a large wild bovid which until recently ranged across all but the driest parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and their local range being limited to about 20 km from surface water. They are of high ecological value due to their important role as bulk feeders in the grazing hierarchy. They also have high economic value, because they are one of the sought after 'Big Five' in the eco-tourism industry. In Africa, buffaloes have been recognised for some time as an important role player in the maintenance and transmission of a variety of economically important livestock diseases at the wildlife and/or livestock interface. These include African strains of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Corridor disease (theileriosis), bovine tuberculosis and bovine brucellosis. For a number of other diseases of veterinary importance, African buffaloes may also serve as amplifier or incidental host, whereby infection with the causative pathogens may cause severe clinical signs such as death or abortion as in the case of anthrax and Rift Valley fever, or remain mild or subclinical for example heartwater. The long term health implications of most of those infections on the buffalo at a population level is usually limited, and they do not pose a threat on the population's survival. Because of their ability to harbour and transmit important diseases to livestock, their sustainable future in ecotourism, trade and transfrontier conservation projects become complex and costly and reliable diagnostic tools are required to monitor these infections in buffalo populations.

  7. Diversity, Antimicrobial Action and Structure-Activity Relationship of Buffalo Cathelicidins

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Biswajit; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Karri, Satyanagalakshmi; Chopra, Meenu; Mishra, Purusottam; De, Bidhan Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Mahanty, Sourav; Thakur, Kiran; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Cathelicidins are an ancient class of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with broad spectrum bactericidal activities. In this study, we investigated the diversity and biological activity of cathelicidins of buffalo, a species known for its disease resistance. A series of new homologs of cathelicidin4 (CATHL4), which were structurally diverse in their antimicrobial domain, was identified in buffalo. AMPs of newly identified buffalo CATHL4s (buCATHL4s) displayed potent antimicrobial activity against selected Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria. These peptides were prompt to disrupt the membrane integrity of bacteria and induced specific changes such as blebing, budding, and pore like structure formation on bacterial membrane. The peptides assumed different secondary structure conformations in aqueous and membrane-mimicking environments. Simulation studies suggested that the amphipathic design of buCATHL4 was crucial for water permeation following membrane disruption. A great diversity, broad-spectrum antimicrobial action, and ability to induce an inflammatory response indicated the pleiotropic role of cathelicidins in innate immunity of buffalo. This study suggests short buffalo cathelicidin peptides with potent bactericidal properties and low cytotoxicity have potential translational applications for the development of novel antibiotics and antimicrobial peptidomimetics. PMID:26675301

  8. Trade-offs of predation and foraging explain sexual segregation in African buffalo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, C.T.; Cross, P.C.; Funston, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    1. Many studies have investigated why males and females segregate spatially in sexually dimorphic species. These studies have focused primarily on temperate zone ungulates in areas lacking intact predator communities, and few have directly assessed predation rates in different social environments. 2. Data on the movement, social affiliation, mortality and foraging of radio-collared African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) were collected from 2001-06 in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. 3. The vast majority of mortality events were due to lion (Panthera leo) predation, and the mortality hazard associated with being an adult male buffalo in a male-only 'bachelor' group was almost four times higher than for adult females in mixed herds. The mortality rates of adult males and females within mixed herds were not statistically different. Mortality sites of male and female buffalo were in areas of low visibility similar to those used by bachelor groups, while mixed herds tended to use more open habitats. 4. Males in bachelor groups ate similar or higher quality food (as indexed by percentage faecal nitrogen), and moved almost a third less distance per day compared with mixed herds. As a result, males in bachelor groups gained more body condition than did males in breeding herds. 5. Recent comparative analyses suggest the activity-budget hypothesis as a common underlying cause of social segregation. However, our intensive study, in an area with an intact predator community showed that male and female buffalo segregated by habitat and supported the predation-risk hypothesis. Male African buffalo appear to trade increased predation risk for additional energy gains in bachelor groups, which presumably leads to increased reproductive success. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  9. Effect of feed intake restriction on reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Abdel-Raheem, Sherief Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present experiment is to study the effect of feed intake restriction on the reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers. Thirty anestrus buffalo heifers were randomly divided into two equal groups. The low feed intake (LFI, n=15, 50 % restriction) group was fed a diet that consists of 3 kg concentrate, 1 kg wheat straw, and 3 kg fresh alfalfa, while the high feed intake (HFI, n=15) group was fed double the amount given to the LFI group for 4 months. All animals were weighed, transrectally examined, and visually checked for the signs of estrus, and blood samples were collected. Heifers in heat were mated with one fertile bull. The number of heifers showing estrus activity was 93.3 % in HFI vs. 20 % in LFI (P<0.01). Ovarian activity started earlier (P=0.03) in the HFI than LFI group. The weight at breeding, the diameter of the dominant follicle, number of heifers showing ovulations, number of services per conception, pregnancy rate, and overall mean of progesterone and estrogen concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01) in the HFI than in the LFI group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, globulin, glucose, total cholesterol, and calcium were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the HFI group. Restriction of the daily feed intake to 50 % from NRC recommendations impair reproductive performance in terms of increasing the age at first service and reducing the pregnancy rate in buffalo heifers. In conclusion, feed intake could be effective in improvement of reproductive performance in buffalo heifers and further studies should be done on large scale of buffaloes in this point.

  10. Application of slightly acidic electrolyzed water for inactivating microbes in a layer breeding house.

    PubMed

    Hao, X X; Li, B M; Wang, C Y; Zhang, Q; Cao, W

    2013-10-01

    Lots of microorganisms exist in layer houses can cause bird diseases and worker health concerns. Spraying chemical disinfectants is an effective way to decontaminate pathogenic microorganisms in the air and on surfaces in poultry houses. Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW, pH 5.0-6.5) is an ideal, environmentally friendly broad-spectrum disinfectant to prevent and control bacterial or viral infection in layer farms. The purpose of this work was to investigate the cleaning effectiveness of SAEW for inactivating the microbes in layer houses. The effect of SAEW was evaluated by solid materials and surface disinfection in a hen house. Results indicate that SAEW with an available chlorine concentration of 250 mg/L, pH value of 6.19, and oxygen reduction potential of 974 mV inactivated 100% of bacteria and fungi in solid materials (dusts, feces, feather, and feed), which is more efficient than common chemical disinfectant such as benzalkonium chloride solution (1:1,000 vol/vol) and povidone-iodine solution (1:1,000 vol/vol). Also, it significantly reduced the microbes on the equipment or facility surfaces (P < 0.05), including floor, wall, feed trough, and water pipe surfaces. Moreover, SAEW effectively decreased the survival rates of Salmonella and Escherichia coli by 21 and 16 percentage points. In addition, spraying the target with tap water before disinfection plays an important role in spray disinfection.

  11. Comparative sequence alignment reveals River Buffalo genomic structural differences compared with cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis L.) represent a significant livestock species with high economic importance and promising characteristics for production; however, like many other livestock species, they lack a highly polished and contiguous reference genome assembly for use in high-resolution compara...

  12. Sarcocystis cafferi, n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four species of Sarcocystis are currently recognized in the Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): Sarcocystis fusiformis with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. buffalonis also with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. levinei with microcysts and dogs as definitive hosts, and S. dub...

  13. Analysis of humpback whale sounds in shallow waters of the Southeastern Arabian Sea: An indication of breeding habitat.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, Madan M; Latha, G; Thirunavukkarasu, A

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this work was to present the acoustical identification of humpback whales, detected by using an autonomous ambient noise measurement system, deployed in the shallow waters of the Southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) during the period January to May 2011. Seven types of sounds were detected. These were characteristically upsweeps and downsweeps along with harmonics. Sounds produced repeatedly in a specific pattern were referred to as phrases (PQRS and ABC). Repeated phrases in a particular pattern were referred to as themes, and from the spectrographic analysis, two themes (I and II) were identified. The variation in the acoustic characteristics such as fundamental frequency, range, duration of the sound unit, and the structure of the phrases and themes are discussed. Sound units were recorded from mid-January to mid-March, with a peak in February, when the mean SST is approx. 28 degree C, and no presence was recorded after mid-March. The temporal and thematic structures strongly determine the functions of the humpback whale song form. Given the use of song in the SEAS, this area is possibly used as an active breeding habitat by humpback whales during the winter season.

  14. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  15. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  16. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  17. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  18. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude 78°51...

  19. Cross-cultural management of pest animal damage: a case study of feral buffalo control in Australia's Kakadu National Park.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Cathy J; Whitehead, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Government agencies responsible for pest animal management often assume that their views and assumptions about the benefits of control are widely shared, especially if these pests are exotics. This was certainly the case when tens of thousands of feral Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were to be culled in Australia's Kakadu National Park as part of a national Brucellosis and Tuberculosis Eradication Campaign (BTEC). Implementation of the campaign sparked considerable dispute between officials and aboriginal and non-aboriginal interests about the risks posed by buffalo relative to their value as a potential resource. Drawing upon a variety of written and oral sources relating to the era of buffalo control in Kakadu, this paper critically analyzes the way in which detriment caused by buffalo was appraised and managed under the BTEC program. In particular, the paper focuses the ways in which the BTEC program affected aboriginal people in Kakadu, who view buffalo as a source of customary and economic benefit as well as a source of change on their lands. The paper then considers what lessons can be learned from the BTEC for the development of sensible feral management objectives and strategies. It is argued that effective management of feral animals such as buffalo will require environmental managers to engage with local people and involve them in the definition and management of pest animal damage and methods of control.

  20. High seroprevalence of Rift Valley fever phlebovirus in domestic ruminants and African Buffaloes in Mozambique shows need for intensified surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Moiane, Belisário; Mapaco, Lourenço; Thompson, Peter; Berg, Mikael; Albihn, Ann; Fafetine, José

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne disease that affects both animals and humans. RVF phlebovirus (RVFPV) is widespread in Africa and Arabian Peninsula. In Mozambique, outbreaks were reported in South; seroprevalence studies performed in livestock and water buffaloes were limited to central and south regions. We evaluated the seroprevalence of RVFPV among domestic ruminants and African buffaloes from 7 of 10 provinces of Mozambique, to understand the distribution of RVFPV and provide data for further RVF control programs. Materials and methods: A total of 1581 blood samples were collected in cattle, 1117 in goats, 85 in sheep and 69 in African buffaloes, between 2013 and 2014, and the obtained sera were analyzed by ELISA. Results and discussion: The overall seroprevalence of RVFPV domestic ruminants and African buffaloes was 25.6%. The highest was observed in cattle (37.3%) and African buffaloes (30.4%), which were higher than in previous studies within Mozambique. In south and central regions, the overall seroprevalences were higher (14.9%–62.4%) than in the north. Conclusion: This study showed the presence of anti-RVFPV antibodies in animals from all sampled provinces, suggesting that RVFPV is actively circulating among domestic ruminants and African buffaloes in Mozambique, therefore surveillance should be intensified. PMID:29321827

  1. Relative gene expression of fatty acid synthesis genes at 60 days postpartum in bovine mammary epithelial cells of Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Janmeda, Mamta; Kharadi, Vishnu; Pandya, Gaurav; Brahmkshtri, Balkrishna; Ramani, Umed; Tyagi, Kuldeep

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Aim of the study was to study the relative gene expression of genes associated with fatty acid synthesis at 60 days postpartum (pp) in bovine mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 healthy Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes of each breed were selected at random from Livestock Research Station, Navsari and Cattle Breeding Farm, Junagadh, Gujarat, respectively, for this study. Milk sample was collected from each selected buffalo at day 60 pp from these two breeds to study relative gene expression of major milk fat genes using non-invasive approach of obtaining primary bovine MECs (pBMEC) from milk samples. Results: In this study overall, the relative expression of the six major milk lipogenic genes butyrophilin subfamily 1 member A1 (BTN1A1), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase mitochondrial (GPAM), acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACACA), and lipin (LPIN) did not show changes in expression patterns at 60th day of lactation in both Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes. Conclusion: The pBMEC can be successfully recovered from 1500 ml of milk of Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes using antibody-mediated magnetic bead separation and can be further used for recovering RNA for down step quantification of major milk lipogenic gene expression. The relative expression of the six major milk lipogenic genes BTN1A1, SCD, LPL, GPAM, ACACA, and LPIN did not show changes in expression patterns in both Surti and Jafarabadi buffaloes, suggesting expression levels of lipogenic genes are maintained almost uniform till peak lactation without any significant difference. PMID:28620248

  2. Casting the Buffalo Commons: A Rhetorical Analysis of Print Media Coverage of the Buffalo Commons Proposal for the Great Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umberger, Mary L.

    2002-01-01

    In 1987, Frank and Deborah Popper, a planner/geographer team from Rutgers University, proposed the Buffalo Commons. If implemented, the Buffalo Commons would have preserved a large area of the Great Plains, including land in ten states, in a national park to be used by exiting Native American reservations, and for the reintroduction of buffalo.

  3. Ketosis in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): clinical findings and the associated oxidative stress level.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Mohamed A; El-Khodery, Sabry Ahmed; El-deeb, Wael M; Abou El-Amaiem, Waleed E E

    2010-12-01

    As little is known about the oxidant/antioxidant status in buffalo with ketosis, the present study was delineated to assess the oxidative stress level associated with clinical ketosis in water buffalo. A total of 91 parturient buffalo at smallholder farms were studied (61 suspected to be ketotic and 30 healthy). Clinical and biochemical investigations were carried out for each buffalo. Based on clinical findings and the level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), buffalo were allocated into ketotic (42), subclinical cases (19). Clinically, there was an association between clinical ketosis and anorexia (p<0.001), constipation (p<0.001), decreased milk yield (p<0.001), ruminal stasis (p<0.001), and loss of body condition (p<0.01). Biochemically, in clinical ketosis compared with subclinical and control cases, there was a significant increase (p<0.05) of BHB, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), L-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). However, there was a significant decrease of glucose, phosphorus, magnesium,total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol. There was a positive correlation between BHB and MDA (r=0.433), BHB and NO (r=0.37), MDA and NO (r=0.515), and Glucose and phosphorus(r=0.521). However, there was a negative correlation between BHB and glucose (r= -0.341) and HDL and NO (r= -0.379). The result of the present study indicates that hyperketonemia in buffalo is associated with an increase of oxidative stress levels. Further studies need to be done on the efficacy of antioxidants as an ancillary treatment to relief the oxidative stress caused by ketosis.

  4. Time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries, Houston, Texas, August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Schaer, Jasper D.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a time-of-travel study in the Buffalo Bayou watershed during low flow in August 1999. The study was done as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Monitoring for Public Access and Community Tracking (EMPACT) program. The EMPACT program was designed for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with communities to “make timely, accurate, and understandable environmental information available to millions of people in the largest metropolitan areas across the country.” (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2000). Buffalo Bayou, located in Houston, Texas, was chosen as a pilot project because it is a frequently used recreational water source, it has many water-treatment facilities located along its stream segments, and it has a history of water-quality problems (Houston-Galveston Area Council, 2000). One component of the pilot project is to develop a water-quality simulation model that can be used to assess the effects of noncompliance events on Buffalo Bayou. Because accurate estimates of time of travel during low flow are required to develop the model, the time of travel of solutes in Buffalo Bayou and selected tributaries was determined using dye tracing methods. The study was conducted during low flow in a 38.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou, a 9.6-mile reach of Whiteoak Bayou, a 5.9-mile reach of Mason Creek, and a 6.6-mile reach of Bear Creek. Efforts to determine the time of travel in a 7.5-mile reach of Horsepen Creek were unsuccessful. This report explains the approach used to conduct the study and presents the results of the study

  5. Physiological breeding.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Langridge, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Physiological breeding crosses parents with different complex but complementary traits to achieve cumulative gene action for yield, while selecting progeny using remote sensing, possibly in combination with genomic selection. Physiological approaches have already demonstrated significant genetic gains in Australia and several developing countries of the International Wheat Improvement Network. The techniques involved (see Graphical Abstract) also provide platforms for research and refinement of breeding methodologies. Recent examples of these include screening genetic resources for novel expression of Calvin cycle enzymes, identification of common genetic bases for heat and drought adaptation, and genetic dissection of trade-offs among yield components. Such information, combined with results from physiological crosses designed to test novel trait combinations, lead to more precise breeding strategies, and feed models of genotype-by-environment interaction to help build new plant types and experimental environments for future climates. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Willingness to pay for cattle and buffalo insurance: an analysis of dairy farmers in central India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Ameer; Chander, Mahesh; Bardhan, Dwaipayan

    2013-02-01

    In India, insurance market especially in agricultural sector is usually underdeveloped. The idea of livestock insurance emerged in India before three decades, yet, it has not operated in a significant way till date. It is well noted that livestock insurance scheme is the relevant strategy in managing different risks related to livestock farming but very little attention has been paid to address the livestock insurance needs of the dairy farmers. This study, therefore, addresses the basic question that how many people and to what extent they are willing to pay for livestock insurance and determine the main factors which influence insurance participation of dairy farmers. The data was collected from Gorakhpur district of Uttar Pradesh in India with a sample survey of 120 cattle and buffalo farmers. For eliciting willingness to pay, a contingent valuation scenario was presented to dairy animal owners in the group of five to six. A logit discrete binary regression model was used to know the factors influencing adoption of livestock insurance. The results suggest that most of the farmers were willing to participate in cattle and buffalo insurance. The amount of premium varies across different breeds of dairy animals. The low level of education of many dairy farmers have negatively influenced the decision to purchase livestock insurance. Farmers having more experience in rearing dairy animals are more likely to be willing to pay for cattle and buffalo insurance.

  7. GRoW Buffalo Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, Martha

    This document provides final reporting on the GRoW Home, University at Buffalo's entry to the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition in Irvine, CA. The report summarizes fundraising efforts, documents media outreach, lists online presence, analyzes the organizer's communication, describes post-competition life of the house and future employment plans for student team members. Last, it suggests improvements for future decathlons.

  8. Discrimination in Elite Public Schools: Investigating Buffalo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Gary, Ed.; Ayscue, Jennifer B., Ed.

    2018-01-01

    School choice is an increasingly important part of today's educational landscape and this timely volume presents fresh research about the competitive admissions policies of choice systems. Based on their investigation of a unique civil rights challenge to school choice admissions policies in politically and racially divided Buffalo, New York, and…

  9. Simulated Breeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unemi, Tatsuo

    This chapter describes a basic framework of simulated breeding, a type of interactive evolutionary computing to breed artifacts, whose origin is Blind Watchmaker by Dawkins. These methods make it easy for humans to design a complex object adapted to his/her subjective criteria, just similarly to agricultural products we have been developing over thousands of years. Starting from randomly initialized genome, the solution candidates are improved through several generations with artificial selection. The graphical user interface helps the process of breeding with techniques of multifield user interface and partial breeding. The former improves the diversity of individuals that prevents being trapped at local optimum. The latter makes it possible for the user to fix features he/she already satisfied. These methods were examined through artistic applications by the author: SBART for graphics art and SBEAT for music. Combining with a direct genome editor and exportation to another graphical or musical tool on the computer, they can be powerful tools for artistic creation. These systems may contribute to the creation of a type of new culture.

  10. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A. K.; Singh, Avtar; Upadhyay, Arpan; Singh, Manvendra; Yousuf, Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI) is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The objective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ) (October to March) is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September) and critical HSZ (CHSZ) (May and June). Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate. PMID:27057105

  11. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review.

    PubMed

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A K; Singh, Avtar; Upadhyay, Arpan; Singh, Manvendra; Yousuf, Saleem

    2016-03-01

    Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI) is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The objective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ) (October to March) is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September) and critical HSZ (CHSZ) (May and June). Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate.

  12. Effects of feeding Mediterranean buffalo sorghum silage versus maize silage on the rumen microbiota and milk fatty acid content.

    PubMed

    Ann Huws, Sharon; Chiariotti, Antonella; Sarubbi, Fiorella; Carfì, Francesca; Pace, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    Sorghum presents a sustainable feedstock for Mediterranean buffaloes due to its reduced water and nitrogen requirements compared with maize, which is currently fed primarily. We investigated the effects of feeding sorghum as opposed to maize on Mediterranean buffalo rumen microbial diversity and milk fatty acid content. Four cannulated lactating Mediterranean buffalo cows were fed a basal diet for one month before switching either to maize or sorghum-silage based diets for a 3-month period. Buffaloes were then changed over to the contrasting diet for a further one month. Rumen and milk samples were collected at the end of each month. DGGE- and T-RFLP-based dendrograms generated from rumen samples did not show an effect of diet on rumen bacterial diversity. Milk samples also did not differ in terms of their fatty acid content post sorghum feeding as compared with maize feeding. Thus, sorghum provides an environmentally beneficial alternative to maize for feeding Mediterranean buffalo with little effect on rumen microbial diversity or milk fatty acid composition compared with maize feeding.

  13. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal” when used in this section will mean all of the Black Rock Waterway, including Black Rock Lock, and all...

  14. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black Rock Channel opposite foot..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84 Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock...

  15. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black Rock Channel opposite foot..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84 Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock...

  16. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal” when used in this section will mean all of the Black Rock Waterway, including Black Rock Lock, and all...

  17. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal” when used in this section will mean all of the Black Rock Waterway, including Black Rock Lock, and all...

  18. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black Rock Channel opposite foot..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84 Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock...

  19. 33 CFR 110.84 - Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black Rock Channel opposite foot..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84 Black Rock Channel opposite foot of Porter Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. An area extending northwesterly between Black Rock...

  20. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black Rock Canal and Lock at... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal” when used in this section will mean all of the Black Rock Waterway, including Black Rock Lock, and all...

  1. Virtual Plants Need Water Too: Functional-Structural Root System Models in the Context of Drought Tolerance Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, Adama; Vadez, Vincent; Pradal, Christophe; Lucas, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    Developing a sustainable agricultural model is one of the great challenges of the coming years. The agricultural practices inherited from the Green Revolution of the 1960s show their limits today, and new paradigms need to be explored to counter rising issues such as the multiplication of climate-change related drought episodes. Two such new paradigms are the use of functional-structural plant models to complement and rationalize breeding approaches and a renewed focus on root systems as untapped sources of plant amelioration. Since the late 1980s, numerous functional and structural models of root systems were developed and used to investigate the properties of root systems in soil or lab-conditions. In this review, we focus on the conception and use of such root models in the broader context of research on root-driven drought tolerance, on the basis of root system architecture (RSA) phenotyping. Such models result from the integration of architectural, physiological and environmental data. Here, we consider the different phenotyping techniques allowing for root architectural and physiological study and their limits. We discuss how QTL and breeding studies support the manipulation of RSA as a way to improve drought resistance. We then go over the integration of the generated data within architectural models, how those architectural models can be coupled with functional hydraulic models, and how functional parameters can be measured to feed those models. We then consider the assessment and validation of those hydraulic models through confrontation of simulations to experimentations. Finally, we discuss the up and coming challenges facing root systems functional-structural modeling approaches in the context of breeding. PMID:29018456

  2. Virtual Plants Need Water Too: Functional-Structural Root System Models in the Context of Drought Tolerance Breeding.

    PubMed

    Ndour, Adama; Vadez, Vincent; Pradal, Christophe; Lucas, Mikaël

    2017-01-01

    Developing a sustainable agricultural model is one of the great challenges of the coming years. The agricultural practices inherited from the Green Revolution of the 1960s show their limits today, and new paradigms need to be explored to counter rising issues such as the multiplication of climate-change related drought episodes. Two such new paradigms are the use of functional-structural plant models to complement and rationalize breeding approaches and a renewed focus on root systems as untapped sources of plant amelioration. Since the late 1980s, numerous functional and structural models of root systems were developed and used to investigate the properties of root systems in soil or lab-conditions. In this review, we focus on the conception and use of such root models in the broader context of research on root-driven drought tolerance, on the basis of root system architecture (RSA) phenotyping. Such models result from the integration of architectural, physiological and environmental data. Here, we consider the different phenotyping techniques allowing for root architectural and physiological study and their limits. We discuss how QTL and breeding studies support the manipulation of RSA as a way to improve drought resistance. We then go over the integration of the generated data within architectural models, how those architectural models can be coupled with functional hydraulic models, and how functional parameters can be measured to feed those models. We then consider the assessment and validation of those hydraulic models through confrontation of simulations to experimentations. Finally, we discuss the up and coming challenges facing root systems functional-structural modeling approaches in the context of breeding.

  3. Strong and stable geographic differentiation of swamp buffalo maternal and paternal lineages indicates domestication in the China/Indochina border region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Yongfang; Yindee, Marnoch; Li, Kuan-Yi; Kuo, Hsiao-Yun; Ju, Yu-Ten; Ye, Shaohui; Faruque, Md Omar; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yachun; Cuong, Vu Chi; Pham, Lan Doan; Bouahom, Bounthong; Yang, Bingzhuang; Liang, Xianwei; Cai, Zhihua; Vankan, Dianne; Manatchaiworakul, Wallaya; Kowlim, Nonglid; Duangchantrasiri, Somphot; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Colenbrander, Ben; Zhang, Yuan; Beerli, Peter; Lenstra, Johannes A; Barker, J Stuart F

    2016-04-01

    The swamp type of the Asian water buffalo is assumed to have been domesticated by about 4000 years BP, following the introduction of rice cultivation. Previous localizations of the domestication site were based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation within China, accounting only for the maternal lineage. We carried out a comprehensive sampling of China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Nepal and Bangladesh and sequenced the mtDNA Cytochrome b gene and control region and the Y-chromosomal ZFY, SRY and DBY sequences. Swamp buffalo has a higher diversity of both maternal and paternal lineages than river buffalo, with also a remarkable contrast between a weak phylogeographic structure of river buffalo and a strong geographic differentiation of swamp buffalo. The highest diversity of the swamp buffalo maternal lineages was found in south China and north Indochina on both banks of the Mekong River, while the highest diversity in paternal lineages was in the China/Indochina border region. We propose that domestication in this region was later followed by introgressive capture of wild cows west of the Mekong. Migration to the north followed the Yangtze valley as well as a more eastern route, but also involved translocations of both cows and bulls over large distances with a minor influence of river buffaloes in recent decades. Bayesian analyses of various migration models also supported domestication in the China/Indochina border region. Coalescence analysis yielded consistent estimates for the expansion of the major swamp buffalo haplogroups with a credibility interval of 900 to 3900 years BP. The spatial differentiation of mtDNA and Y-chromosomal haplotype distributions indicates a lack of gene flow between established populations that is unprecedented in livestock. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. "Just Following the Buffalo": Origins of a Montana Metis Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Martha Harroun

    2006-01-01

    By 1879 the vast buffalo herds were all but gone from the Great Plains. Many of the remaining animals had moved south from the Milk River of northern Montana and Alberta into the Judith Basin of central Montana. In these rich grasslands, for a few more years, life went on as it had for centuries. Following the buffalo came many Indian bands, as…

  5. 76 FR 60962 - Noise Exposure Map Update for Buffalo Niagara International Airport, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... International Airport, under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act...''), effective September 20, 2011. Under 49 U.S.C. section 47503 of the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Update for Buffalo...

  6. Effect of ammonium hydroxide on ultrastructure and tenderness of buffalo meat.

    PubMed

    Naveena, B M; Kiran, M; Reddy, K Sudhakar; Ramakrishna, C; Vaithiyanathan, S; Devatkal, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    This study was conducted with an objective to improve the tenderness of tough buffalo meat using ammonium hydroxide. Buffalo meat chunks from Biceps femoris muscle were marinated with distilled water (control), 0.1%, 0.5% and 1.0% solution of ammonium hydroxide for 48 h at 4±1 °C and subjected to various physico-chemical analysis and ultrastructural studies. Ammonium hydroxide increased (P<0.05) the pH, water holding capacity (WHC), collagen solubility, total and salt soluble protein extractability and cooking yield. Reduction (P<0.05) in Warner-Bratzler shear force values were observed in all ammonium hydroxide treated samples compared to non-treated control. Electrophoretic pattern of muscle proteins exhibited reduction in the intensity and number of certain protein bands for 0.1% and 0.5% ammonium hydroxide treated samples compared to control. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy also revealed breakdown of endothelium layers surrounding muscle fibers and weakening of Z-discs respectively, in treated samples compared to controls. These results suggest that ammonium hydroxide might be used to tenderize tough buffalo meat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oocyte recovery by ovum pick up and embryo production in river buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, B M; Ravindra, J P; Gupta, P S P; Devaraj, M; Nandi, S

    2008-08-01

    Ovum pick up (OPU) was conducted twice a week for 12 weeks in six cycling, non-descriptive (local breed), Indian buffaloes to study the efficiency of OPU on recovery of oocytes for embryo production. OPU was performed using an ultrasound equipment with a 5-MHz transvaginal transducer, a single-lumen, 18-gauge, 55-cm-long needle and a constant vacuum pressure of 110 mmHg. The number and size of follicles were determined before puncture. The recovered oocytes were graded, washed, matured for 24 h and then fertilized with frozen-thawed semen, followed by embryo culture on the oviductal monolayer. The mean number of follicles observed per animal per session did not differ between animals or between puncture sessions. A mean number of 3.62 +/- 0.32 mm follicles were observed, 2.90 +/- 0.15 mm follicles were punctured and 1.21 +/- 0.07 oocytes were recovered per animal per session, with an average recovery rate of 42%. Of the total oocytes recovered, 64% were suitable for in vitro embryo production (grade A + B) whereas 36% were classified to be of grades C + D. A mean number of 0.25 +/- 0.2 transferable embryos was produced in vitro per buffalo per session with a transferable embryo production rate of 32%. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that twice-a-week OPU could be applied repeatedly, without any adverse effects on the follicular growth and oocyte recovery and that recovered oocytes could be used for in vitro embryo production in buffaloes.

  8. A new extinct dwarfed buffalo from Sulawesi and the evolution of the subgenus Anoa: An interdisciplinary perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozzi, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The fossil and extant faunas of Sulawesi, the largest island within the Wallacea biogeographic region, exhibit a high degree of endemism. The lowland anoa Bubalus depressicornis and the mountain anoa Bubalus quarlesi, two closely-related dwarfed buffaloes, are among the most peculiar endemic mammals of the region. Here, I describe a new species, Bubalus grovesi, from the Late Pleistocene/Holocene of South Sulawesi and I give a revised diagnosis of Anoa. Bubalus grovesi sp. nov. differs from all previously described Bubalus in both the size and proportions of the skeleton and in possessing a unique combination of discrete character states. Body mass estimates suggest an average mass of 117 kg for Bubalus grovesi sp. nov. and a body size reduction of about 90% with respect to a typical water buffalo. A comprehensive overview of body mass estimates of dwarfed buffaloes and differences in their dental and postcranial features is included. Finally, new evidence on the taxonomy and island dwarfing of the anoas and available data from different disciplines are used to discuss the timing and mode of their evolution. The representatives of the subgenus Anoa would be dwarfed forms of the Asian water buffalo that arose following dispersal to Sulawesi during the Middle/Late Pleistocene.

  9. Effect of incorporation of calcium lactate on physico-chemical, textural, and sensory properties of restructured buffalo meat loaves

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, A.; Sharma, B. D.; Ahmed, S. R.; Talukder, S.; Malav, O. P.; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to develop a functional meat product by fortifying calcium (in the form of calcium lactate) with restructured buffalo meat loaf (RBML). Materials and Methods: Deboned buffalo meat obtained from the carcass of adult female buffalo within 5-6 h of slaughter and stored under frozen condition. Calcium fortified RBML were prepared by replacing the lean buffalo meat with calcium lactate powder at 0%, 1%, 1.25%, and 1.5% level through the pre-standardized procedure. The developed products were evaluated for physico-chemical properties, proximate composition, calcium concentration (mg/100 g), water activity (aw), Lovibond® tintometer color units, texture profile analysis (TPA), and sensory qualities as per-standard procedures. Results: Of the various product quality parameters evaluated, cooking yield (%), product pH, moisture (%), protein (%), fat (%), and water activity (aw) decreases significantly with increasing level of calcium lactate. Calcium content of fortified functional RBMLs was 135.02, 165.73, and 203.85 mg/100 g as compared to 6.48 mg/100 g in control. Most of the sensory scores at 1% and 1.25% levels of calcium lactate in treatment products remained comparable among themselves and control product, with a gradual decline. Conclusions: The present study concluded that 1.25% calcium lactate was the optimum level for the fortification of calcium in RBML without affecting the textural and sensory properties which could meet out 15% of recommended dietary allowance for calcium. PMID:27051201

  10. Effect of incorporation of calcium lactate on physico-chemical, textural, and sensory properties of restructured buffalo meat loaves.

    PubMed

    Irshad, A; Sharma, B D; Ahmed, S R; Talukder, S; Malav, O P; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-02-01

    The present study was conducted to develop a functional meat product by fortifying calcium (in the form of calcium lactate) with restructured buffalo meat loaf (RBML). Deboned buffalo meat obtained from the carcass of adult female buffalo within 5-6 h of slaughter and stored under frozen condition. Calcium fortified RBML were prepared by replacing the lean buffalo meat with calcium lactate powder at 0%, 1%, 1.25%, and 1.5% level through the pre-standardized procedure. The developed products were evaluated for physico-chemical properties, proximate composition, calcium concentration (mg/100 g), water activity (aw), Lovibond(®) tintometer color units, texture profile analysis (TPA), and sensory qualities as per-standard procedures. Of the various product quality parameters evaluated, cooking yield (%), product pH, moisture (%), protein (%), fat (%), and water activity (aw) decreases significantly with increasing level of calcium lactate. Calcium content of fortified functional RBMLs was 135.02, 165.73, and 203.85 mg/100 g as compared to 6.48 mg/100 g in control. Most of the sensory scores at 1% and 1.25% levels of calcium lactate in treatment products remained comparable among themselves and control product, with a gradual decline. The present study concluded that 1.25% calcium lactate was the optimum level for the fortification of calcium in RBML without affecting the textural and sensory properties which could meet out 15% of recommended dietary allowance for calcium.

  11. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Dennis L.

    1985-01-01

    The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese leftmore » the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.« less

  12. Human taenaisis and cysticercosis in slaughtered cattle, buffaloes and pigs in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haridy, F M; Ibrahim, B B; Morsy, T A; Ramadan, N I

    1999-08-01

    Human taeniasis and cysticercosis are zoonotic parasites of considerable public health problem. A total of 6434039 slaughtered animals over a period of four years (1994-1997) showed 0.72% cysticercosis (bovis and cellulosae) infections. Individual animal species infection was 0.23% in native breed cattle, 7.25% in imported cattle, 0.14 in buffaloes and 0.09% in pigs. The highly infested parts were the heart (64.2%) followed by the head (34.5%), the whole body (1.1%) and lastly, the quarter (0.2%) in both types of cattle and the heart (64.3%), the head (34.9%), the whole body (0.6%) and the quarter (0.2%) in buffaloes. In pigs, the highly infested parts were the whole body (55.4%) followed by the heart (37.8%) and lastly the head (6.8%). Some interesting cysticercosis were macroscopically and microscopically parasitologically and histopathologically studied. A general discussion on taeniasis and cysticercosis was given.

  13. Minimum number of spermatozoa per dose in Mediterranean Italian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using sexed frozen semen and conventional artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Gaviraghi, A; Puglisi, R; Balduzzi, D; Severgnini, A; Bornaghi, V; Bongioni, G; Frana, A; Gandini, L M; Lukaj, A; Bonacina, C; Galli, A

    2013-05-01

    In buffaloes, AI with sexed semen is not fully optimized, and the procedure has only been performed using the approach currently in use for cattle. The objective of the present work was to compare the pregnancy rates in Mediterranean Italian buffalo cows inseminated with sexed frozen-thawed semen at 2, 4, 6, and 8 million sperm per dose, using the Ovsynch protocol and conventional AI at a fixed time. Fresh ejaculates from three buffalo bulls were processed according to Beltsville sperm sorting technology, and packaged in 0.25-mL straws with two total concentrations of 2 and 4 million live sorted sperm per straw. After thawing, semen was evaluated for total motility, forward motility, average path velocity, membrane and DNA integrity, and membrane fluidity. Sorting efficiency was estimated using a real time polymerase chain reaction method developed and validated in our laboratory. The artificial inseminations were conducted during the breeding season on 849 Italian Mediterranean buffalo heifers and cows distributed in 13 farms in northern and central Italy. No significant difference in quality parameters was reported between nonsexed and sexed straws produced with 2 and 4 million sperm. Lower pregnancy rate (P < 0.001) was reported when inseminating doses of sexed semen at 2 million were used (53/170; 31.2%), with respect to conventional nonsexed (78/142; 54.9%), and sexed doses at 4, 6, and 8 million spermatozoa (102/205, 49.8%; 84/175, 48.0%; and 74/157, 47.1%, respectively). No differences were evident using conventional doses and sexed semen with sperm numbers equal or higher than 4 million per dose. Pregnancies were not affected by the sire; 39/82 (47.6%), 120/270 (44.4%), and 151/355 (42.5%), respectively, for the three bulls. Variability in pregnancy rates observed in different herds was not significant. Furthermore, no significant difference was reported between pregnancies obtained with sexed semen in heifers and multiparous, respectively, 179/407 (44

  14. Behaviour-Related Scalar Habitat Use by Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

    PubMed Central

    Bennitt, Emily; Bonyongo, Mpaphi Casper; Harris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Studies of habitat use by animals must consider behavioural resource requirements at different scales, which could influence the functional value of different sites. Using Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana, we tested the hypotheses that behaviour affected use between and within habitats, hereafter referred to as macro- and microhabitats, respectively. We fitted GPS-enabled collars to fifteen buffalo and used the distances and turning angles between consecutive fixes to cluster the resulting data into resting, grazing, walking and relocating behaviours. Distance to water and six vegetation characteristic variables were recorded in sites used for each behaviour, except for relocating, which occurred too infrequently. We used multilevel binomial and multinomial logistic regressions to identify variables that characterised seasonally-preferred macrohabitats and microhabitats used for different behaviours. Our results showed that macrohabitat use was linked to behaviour, although this was least apparent during the rainy season, when resources were most abundant. Behaviour-related microhabitat use was less significant, but variation in forage characteristics could predict some behaviour within all macrohabitats. The variables predicting behaviour were not consistent, but resting and grazing sites were more readily identifiable than walking sites. These results highlight the significance of resting, as well as foraging, site availability in buffalo spatial processes. Our results emphasise the importance of considering several behaviours and scales in studies of habitat use to understand the links between environmental resources and animal behavioural and spatial ecology. PMID:26673623

  15. Comparative Analysis of V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 3 (AKT3) Gene between Cow and Buffalo Reveals Substantial Differences for Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Farman; Bhattarai, Dinesh; Cheng, Zhangrui; Liang, Xianwei; Deng, Tingxian; Rehman, Zia Ur; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Worku, Tesfaye; Brohi, Rahim Dad; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Jamil; Salim, Mohammad; Khan, Momen; Ahmad, Hafiz Ishfaq; Zhang, Shujun

    2018-01-01

    AKT3 gene is a constituent of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and plays a crucial role in synthesis of milk fats and cholesterol by regulating activity of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). AKT3 is highly conserved in mammals and its expression levels during the lactation periods of cattle are markedly increased. AKT3 is highly expressed in the intestine followed by mammary gland and it is also expressed in immune cells. It is involved in the TLR pathways as effectively as proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of this study were to investigate the sequences differences between buffalo and cow. Our results showed that there were substantial differences between buffalo and cow in some exons and noteworthy differences of the gene size in different regions. We also identified the important consensus sequence motifs, variation in 2000 upstream of ATG, substantial difference in the "3'UTR" region, and miRNA association in the buffalo sequences compared with the cow. In addition, genetic analyses, such as gene structure, phylogenetic tree, position of different motifs, and functional domains, were performed to establish their correlation with other species. This may indicate that a buffalo breed has potential resistance to disease, environment changes, and airborne microorganisms and some good production and reproductive traits.

  16. Comparative Analysis of V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 3 (AKT3) Gene between Cow and Buffalo Reveals Substantial Differences for Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Dinesh; Cheng, Zhangrui; Liang, Xianwei; Deng, Tingxian; Rehman, Zia Ur; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Worku, Tesfaye; Brohi, Rahim Dad; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Jamil; Salim, Mohammad; Khan, Momen; Ahmad, Hafiz Ishfaq

    2018-01-01

    AKT3 gene is a constituent of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and plays a crucial role in synthesis of milk fats and cholesterol by regulating activity of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). AKT3 is highly conserved in mammals and its expression levels during the lactation periods of cattle are markedly increased. AKT3 is highly expressed in the intestine followed by mammary gland and it is also expressed in immune cells. It is involved in the TLR pathways as effectively as proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of this study were to investigate the sequences differences between buffalo and cow. Our results showed that there were substantial differences between buffalo and cow in some exons and noteworthy differences of the gene size in different regions. We also identified the important consensus sequence motifs, variation in 2000 upstream of ATG, substantial difference in the “3′UTR” region, and miRNA association in the buffalo sequences compared with the cow. In addition, genetic analyses, such as gene structure, phylogenetic tree, position of different motifs, and functional domains, were performed to establish their correlation with other species. This may indicate that a buffalo breed has potential resistance to disease, environment changes, and airborne microorganisms and some good production and reproductive traits. PMID:29862252

  17. WEST ELEVATION OF USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR AT GREATER BUFFALO INTERNATIONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST ELEVATION OF USAIR MAINTENANCE HANGAR AT GREATER BUFFALO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. A BOEING 737-200 HAS BEEN TOWED IN FOR AN OVERNIGHT (BALANCE) CHECK. THE TAIL DOCK STANDS ARE IN POSITION AT THE REAR OF THE AIRCRAFT TO FACILITATE INSPECTION. MAINTENANCE CREWS PERFORM NIGHTLY SERVICE ON UP TO 6 AIRCRAFT. THE NORMAL SEQUENCE OF 12 ROUTINE CHECKS COVERS SEVEN BASIC AREAS: INTERIOR, EXTERIOR, WINGS, LANDING GEAR, TAIL, AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), AND ENGINES. THE WORK FORCE CONSISTS OF 5 INSPECTORS, 3 LEAD MECHANICS, AND 24 MECHANICS; NIGHTLY SCHEDULES ARE COORDINATED BY A PLANNER. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  18. Marker-assisted selection for resistance to bacterial cold water disease in a commercial rainbow trout breeding population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD), caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum, is an endemic and problematic disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) aquaculture. Previously, we have identified SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) associated with BCWD resistance in rainbow trout. The objective...

  19. Genomic selection models double the accuracy of predicted breeding values for bacterial cold water disease resistance compared to a traditional pedigree-based model in rainbow trout aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Roger L; Leeds, Timothy D; Gao, Guangtu; Parsons, James E; Martin, Kyle E; Evenhuis, Jason P; Fragomeni, Breno O; Wiens, Gregory D; Palti, Yniv

    2017-02-01

    Previously, we have shown that bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout can be improved using traditional family-based selection, but progress has been limited to exploiting only between-family genetic variation. Genomic selection (GS) is a new alternative that enables exploitation of within-family genetic variation. We compared three GS models [single-step genomic best linear unbiased prediction (ssGBLUP), weighted ssGBLUP (wssGBLUP), and BayesB] to predict genomic-enabled breeding values (GEBV) for BCWD resistance in a commercial rainbow trout population, and compared the accuracy of GEBV to traditional estimates of breeding values (EBV) from a pedigree-based BLUP (P-BLUP) model. We also assessed the impact of sampling design on the accuracy of GEBV predictions. For these comparisons, we used BCWD survival phenotypes recorded on 7893 fish from 102 families, of which 1473 fish from 50 families had genotypes [57 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array]. Naïve siblings of the training fish (n = 930 testing fish) were genotyped to predict their GEBV and mated to produce 138 progeny testing families. In the following generation, 9968 progeny were phenotyped to empirically assess the accuracy of GEBV predictions made on their non-phenotyped parents. The accuracy of GEBV from all tested GS models were substantially higher than the P-BLUP model EBV. The highest increase in accuracy relative to the P-BLUP model was achieved with BayesB (97.2 to 108.8%), followed by wssGBLUP at iteration 2 (94.4 to 97.1%) and 3 (88.9 to 91.2%) and ssGBLUP (83.3 to 85.3%). Reducing the training sample size to n = ~1000 had no negative impact on the accuracy (0.67 to 0.72), but with n = ~500 the accuracy dropped to 0.53 to 0.61 if the training and testing fish were full-sibs, and even substantially lower, to 0.22 to 0.25, when they were not full-sibs. Using progeny performance data, we showed that the accuracy of genomic predictions is substantially higher

  20. Genetic Evaluation of Dual-Purpose Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Colombia Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Gómez, Divier; Pineda-Sierra, Sebastian; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Genealogy and productive information of 48621 dual-purpose buffaloes born in Colombia between years 1996 and 2014 was used. The following traits were assessed using one-trait models: milk yield at 270 days (MY270), age at first calving (AFC), weaning weight (WW), and weights at the following ages: first year (W12), 18 months (W18), and 2 years (W24). Direct additive genetic and residual random effects were included in all the traits. Maternal permanent environmental and maternal additive genetic effects were included for WW and W12. The fixed effects were: contemporary group (for all traits), sex (for WW, W12, W18, and W24), parity (for WW, W12, and MY270). Age was included as covariate for WW, W12, W18 and W24. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted using the genetic values of 133 breeding males whose breeding-value reliability was higher than 50% for all the traits in order to define the number of principal components (PC) which would explain most of the variation. The highest heritabilities were for W18 and MY270, and the lowest for AFC; with 0.53, 0.23, and 0.17, respectively. The first three PCs represented 66% of the total variance. Correlation of the first PC with meat production traits was higher than 0.73, and it was -0.38 with AFC. Correlations of the second PC with maternal genetic component traits for WW and W12 were above 0.75. The third PC had 0.84 correlation with MY270. PCA is an alternative approach for analyzing traits in dual-purpose buffaloes and reduces the dimension of the traits. PMID:26230093

  1. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  2. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. BUFFALO HUNTER 1970 - 1972

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-07-24

    era, however, the drone’s use was no longer a secret. This report examines the entire BUFFALO HUNTER operation -- management , targeting, drone capabilities, mission planning and execution, and operational results.

  3. Study on the Evaluation of Economic Support Index for Pig Breeding in Water Network Area of Middle Reaches of Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Bi-Bin; Zhang, Qi-zhen; Lai, Wen-wei; Tang, Xin-Fan

    2018-06-01

    The central region of China boasts a long history, abundant resources, convenient transportation, advanced economy, a strong industrial and agricultural foundation and a rapid development of modern service industry, with about 10.7% of the country's total land area, 26.5% of the country's population and a GDP of about 21.4% of the country's total . As the population center, transportation hub, economic hinterland and important market, it is the second echelon of China's economic development; the central region of China plays an important role in the division of labor in China. The middle reaches of the Yangtze River water network includes four neighboring provinces- Hubei, Hunan, Anhui and Jiangxi. Although all four provinces are located in the middle of the Yangtze River Basin, there are still quite some differences. Based on the 2017 Statistical Yearbook data, this paper studies the economic supportive index of pig breeding in four provinces located in the water network area of the middle reaches of the Yangtze River in Jiangxi, Hubei, Hunan and Anhui. The evaluation results show that among the four provinces, the socio-economic conditions of Hubei Province can most support the large-scale cultivation of live pigs, and the support of Jiangxi Province is the weakest.

  4. Selection for water-soluble carbohydrate accumulation and investigation of genetic × environment interactions in an elite wheat breeding population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potential to increase the genetic capacity for water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) accumulation is an opportunity to improve the drought tolerance capability of rainfed wheat varieties, particularly in Australia where terminal drought is a significant constraint to wheat production. A population of...

  5. Wildfire effects on water temperature and selection of breeding sites by the boreal toad (Bufo boreas) in seasonal wetlands

    Treesearch

    Blake R. Hossack; Paul Stephen Corn

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances can significantly affect the thermal regime and community structure of wetlands. We investigated the effect of a wildfire on water temperature of seasonal, montane wetlands after documenting the colonization of recently burned wetlands by the Boreal Toad (Bufo boreas boreas). We compared the daily mean temperature, daily maximum...

  6. Variable regions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum strains identified by comparative genomics: application to selective breeding for cold water disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease is one of the most frequent causes of elevated loss in juvenile salmonids, and the development of effective control strategies is a high priority to aquaculturists, management agencies, and conservationists. Since 2005, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) have been bred ...

  7. Sequence diversity and molecular evolutionary rates between buffalo and cattle.

    PubMed

    Moaeen-ud-Din, M; Bilal, G

    2015-02-01

    Identification of genes of importance regarding production traits in buffalo is impaired by a paucity of genomic resources. Choice to fill this gap is to exploit data available for cow. The cross-species application of comparative genomics tools is potential gear to investigate the buffalo genome. However, this is dependent on nucleotide sequences similarity. In this study, gene diversity between buffalo and cattle was determined using 86 gene orthologues. There was approximately 3% difference in all genes in terms of nucleotide diversity and 0.267 ± 0.134 in amino acids, indicating the possibility for successfully using cross-species strategies for genomic studies. There were significantly higher non-synonymous substitutions both in cattle and buffalo; however, there was similar difference in terms of dN- dS (4.414 versus 4.745) in buffalo and cattle, respectively. Higher rate of non-synonymous substitutions at similar level in buffalo and cattle indicated a similar positive selection pressure. Results for relative rate test were assessed with the chi-squared test. There was no significance difference on unique mutations between cattle and buffalo lineages at synonymous sites. However, there was a significance difference on unique mutations for non-synonymous sites, indicating ongoing mutagenic process that generates substitutional mutation at approximately the same rate at silent sites. Moreover, despite of common ancestry, our results indicate a different divergent time among genes of cattle and buffalo. This is the first demonstration that variable rates of molecular evolution may be present within the family Bovidae. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. BUFFALO PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Wood, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colorado. On the basis of this study there is a probable mineral-resource potential for silver vein and bedding replacement deposits along the Weston Pass fault zone, for hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits in the vicinity of the Parkdale iron pit, and for gold vein deposits in the parts of the Granite and Four Mile districts that are within the wilderness study area. A probable barite resource potential occurs at Rough and Tumbling Creek and near Spring Creek on the east side of the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  9. Buffalo plasma fibronectin: a physico-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Chandra, R; Raj, H G

    2001-12-01

    Plasma fibronectin (FN) of buffalo (Babulis babulis) was purified to apparent homogeneity, using gelatin-Sepharose and heparin-Sepharose affinity columns. It was found to have two subunits of molecular mass 246 kDa and 228 kDa, on SDS-gel. Its immunological cross-reactivity with anti-human plasma FN was confirmed by Western blotting. The amino acid composition was found to be similar to that of human and bovine plasma FNs. Buffalo plasma FN contained 2.23% neutral hexoses and 1.18% sialic acids. No titrable sulfhydryl group could be detected in the absence of denaturant. Reaction with DTNB indicated 3.4 sulfhydryl groups in the molecule, whereas BDC-OH titration gave a value of 3.8 -SH groups in buffalo plasma FN. Stoke's radius, intrinsic viscosity, diffusion coefficient and frictional ratio indicated that buffalo plasma FN did not have a compact globular conformation at physiological pH and ionic strength. Molecular dimensions (average length, 120 nm; molar mass to length ratio, 3950 nm(-1) and mean diameter, 2.4 nm) as revealed by rotary shadowing electron microscopy further supported the extended conformation of buffalo plasma FN. These results show that buffalo plasma FN has similar properties as that of human plasma FN.

  10. The effects of high temperature and roof modification on physiological responses of swamp buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis) in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongdee, Titaporn; Sripoon, S.; Vajrabukka, C.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the experiments reported here was to measure the effects of cooling techniques (Modified roof vs Normal roof) on the performance and physiology of 12 young male buffaloes with a similar live weight of 160 kg. The study was conducted at Chainat Agriculture and Technology College, Chainat Province, Thailand. The animals were divided randomly into two groups, each group comprising six buffaloes, and the two groups were studied to evaluate the effects of modified roofing (normal roof fitted with woven polypropylene shade cloth) on the subjects' physiological responses to heat stress under hot humid conditions. The modified roof resulted in lowered heat stress in buffaloes compared to those under a standard roof. The difference was shown by the buffaloes having a significantly lower mean rectal temperature (39.14 ± 0.07 vs 40.00 ± 0.10°C) and plasma cortisol (2.14 ± 0.24 vs 3.38 ± 0.37 ng/ml). The average daily water consumption was significantly lower in the MR group (MR, 29.71 ± 0.86 vs NR, 34.14 ± 1.06 L head -1 day-1), while there was a tendency for the roughage intake to be higher in the MR group compared to that of the NR group (MR, 5.88 ± 0.18 vs NR, 6.44 ± 0.19 kg head-1 -1 day-1; P = 0.0508). It was concluded that roof modification facilitated a reduction in heat load from roof re-radiation, and was an effective means of alleviating thermal stress in young buffaloes.

  11. The effect of stillbirth on reproductive and productive performance of pure Egyptian buffaloes and their crosses with Italian buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Mohammed A F

    2017-11-01

    High rates of stillbirth in buffaloes are not only emotionally and economically undesirable but also contrary to animal welfare practices. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate risk factors for stillbirth and analyze its effects on the productive and reproductive performance of pure Egyptian buffaloes (PE) and their crossing with the Italian buffaloes (F 1 crosses 50%PE and 50%Italian buffaloes and Back cross (BC) 75%PE and 25%Italian buffaloes) under subtropical environmental conditions. Records of a total of 8388 (5169PE, 1494F 1 and 1725BC) were used in this study with 1965 actual first parity records (489, 621 and 855, respectively). The incidence of stillbirth in the farms was 12.4% and 9.2% for primiparous and multiparous cows, respectively. It did not vary among seasons or due to gestation length, calf sex and conception after first insemination in BC buffaloes. BC buffaloes with stillbirths had shorter gestation length, first service post-partum and longer dry period (300.32, 33.67 and 207.05days, respectively) compared to those live births (311.28, 33.90 and 140.22days, respectively), implying that these animals could better adapt to the tough circumstances following stillbirth as reproductive indices were only slightly affected due to stillbirths. Contrarily, the productivity and reproductive performance of PE buffaloes were markedly decreased after stillbirth. Their milk yield, average daily milk yield and lactation length were decreased by 6.27, 10.29 and 6.36%, respectively after stillbirth, while days open, dry period and first service post-partum were increased after stillbirth by 14.28, 13.54 and 12.78%, respectively. The results from this study suggest that producers should be promoted to increase the BC animals in their farms with the intention of increasing milk production and ensure superior reproduction efficiencies with lower stillbirth incidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic Selection For Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance In Rainbow Trout Reveals Large Within-Family Variation That Cannot Be Exploited In Traditional Family-based Selective Breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding is an effective strategy to improve resistance to specific pathogens, and thus has the potential to mitigate antibiotic use in aquaculture. Large family sizes of aquaculture species permits family-based selective breeding programs, but the need for specific-pathogen-free nucleus p...

  13. Twelve-Year Analysis of Cattle and Buffalo Slaughtering in Lazio Region (2000-2012): Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Public Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Marozzi, Selene; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, beef meat chain has undergone major transformations due to Community legislation and market changes. The purpose of this work is to analyse the information recorded in Banca Dati Nazionale (BDN; Italian computerised database for the identification and registration of bovine animals) on cattle and buffaloes slaughtered between 2000 and 2012 and related to Lazio Region as a result of breeding and/or slaughtering place. The analysis of the data showed a negative trend (-20.7%) for cattle slaughtered from 2000 to 2012. Most of this animals had been raised in Lazio Region (86%) and in particular in the province of Frosinone. The average age at slaughter for female is about 4 years (1417 days) and for males of 547 days. The buffaloes, however, are intended for slaughter at an average age of about 8 years, if female, and about one year if male. PMID:27800314

  14. Estimating the impact of Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) on buffalo population dynamics in southern Philippines using data from cross-sectional surveys.

    PubMed

    Dargantes, A P; Mercado, R T; Dobson, R J; Reid, S A

    2009-08-01

    Despite the widespread problem with surra (Trypanosoma evansi) in livestock, there are no published studies on its impact on host populations, probably because of the large financial and time cost involved in performing longitudinal studies. During 2002-6, a cross-sectional survey for T. evansi infection involving 1732 buffaloes from 71 villages in southern Philippines was carried out. Other livestock animals (horses, cattle and goats) in every surveyed village were also tested for infection with T. evansi but domestic buffaloes were the primary survey target. Seroprevalence ranged from 6% to 21% and 13% to 100% for buffaloes in low and high risk areas, respectively. Key demographic parameters were estimated from the age structured distributions of the sampled buffalo population for each sex. All areas were dominated by females (69%) and the annual calving rate for areas of 100% and low seroprevalence was 15% and 47%, respectively. Males were removed at a relatively high annual rate of 27% in all areas. In the main reproductive years (4-10) female removal/mortality was <1% and 10% for low and high risk areas, respectively. Older females were removed/died at a rate similar to males regardless of area. In high risk areas there were consistently more 2-year than 1-year old females and the reverse was true for the low risk areas. This implies that females were imported to the high risk areas for breeding. By assuming a stable age structure and similar size populations in each area, it was estimated that 28% of female calves need to be moved from low to high risk areas to maintain the observed age structure. In high risk areas, surra imposes significant financial losses due to reduced fertility, high mortality/removal rate and the necessity to import replacement buffaloes.

  15. Mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus maculosus ) spatial distribution, breeding water depth, and use of artificial spawning habitat in the Detroit River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Jaquelyn M.; Mifsud, David A.; Briggs, Andrew S.; Boase, James C.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus maculosus) populations have been declining in the Great Lakes region of North America. However, during fisheries assessments in the Detroit River, we documented Mudpuppy reproduction when we collected all life stages from egg through adult as by-catch in fisheries assessments. Ten years of fisheries sampling resulted in two occurrences of Mudpuppy egg collection and 411 Mudpuppies ranging in size from 37–392 mm Total Length, collected from water 3.5–15.1 m deep. Different types of fisheries gear collected specific life stages; spawning females used cement structures for egg deposition, larval Mudpuppies found refuge in eggmats, and we caught adults with baited setlines and minnow traps. Based on logistic regression models for setlines and minnow traps, there was a higher probability of catching adult Mudpuppies at lower temperatures and in shallower water with reduced clarity. In addition to documenting the presence of all life stages of this sensitive species in a deep and fast-flowing connecting channel, we were also able to show that standard fisheries research equipment can be used for Mudpuppy research in areas not typically sampled in herpetological studies. Our observations show that typical fisheries assessments and gear can play an important role in data collection for Mudpuppy population and spawning assessments.

  16. Application of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Cow Components Adulterated in Buffalo Milk/Meat.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Singh, Umesh; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R R; Alex, Rani; Raja, T V; Das, A K; Prakash, B

    2016-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a diagnostic method for amplification of DNA with rapid and minimal equipment requirement. In the present study, we applied the LAMP assay for rapid detection of cow components adulteration in buffalo milk/meat samples. The test can be completed within around 1 h 40 min starting from DNA extraction and can be performed in water bath without requirement of thermocycler. The cow DNA in buffalo samples were identified in the developed LAMP assay by either visualizing with SYBR Green I/HNB dyes or observing the typical ladder pattern on gel electrophoresis. The test can detect up to 5 % level of cow milk/meat mixed in buffalo counterparts. Due to the simplicity and specificity, the developed LAMP test can be easily adapted in any laboratory for rapid detection of cow species identification in livestock by products.

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Service and Research--Present Status and Future Goals at SUNY-Buffalo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koup, Jeffrey R.

    1976-01-01

    Two Clinical Pharmacokinetics Laboratories at Buffalo are described: one at the Millard Fillmore Hospital and the other at the Buffalo Children's Hospital. Their research efforts are reviewed and their scientific contributions to clinical therapeutics and pharmaceutical research are noted. (LBH)

  18. Greater Buffalo-Niagara Regional Transportation Council Scenario Planning Workshop : Sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-04-01

    This report summarizes noteworthy practices and key recommendations shared during a scenario planning workshop, hosted by the Greater Buffalo-Niagara Regional Transportation Council, on April 19-20, 2016, in Buffalo, New York. The Federal Highway Adm...

  19. Fish communities of the Buffalo River Basin and nearby basins of Arkansas and their relation to selected environmental factors, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River lies in north-central Arkansas and is a tributary of the White River. Most of the length of the Buffalo River lies within the boundaries of Buffalo National River, a unit of the National Park Service; the upper 24 river kilometers lie within the boundary of the Ozark National Forest. Much of the upper and extreme lower parts of the basin on the south side of the Buffalo River is within the Ozark National Forest. During the summers of 2001 and 2002, fish communities were sampled at 52 sites in the study area that included the Buffalo River Basin and selected smaller nearby basins within the White River Basin in north-central Arkansas. Water quality (including nutrient and bacteria concentrations) and several other environmental factors (such as stream size, land use, substrate size, and riparian shading) also were measured. A total of 56 species of fish were collected from sites within the Buffalo River Basin in 2001 and 2002. All 56 species also were collected from within the boundaries of Buffalo National River. Twenty-two species were collected from headwater sites on tributaries of the Buffalo River; 27 species were collected from sites within or immediately adjacent to the Ozark National Forest. The list of species collected from Buffalo National River is similar to the list of species reported by previous investigators. Species richness at sites on the mainstem of the Buffalo River generally increased in a downstream direction. The number of species collected (both years combined) increased from 17 at the most upstream site to 38 near the mouth of the Buffalo River. In 2001 and 2002, a total of 53 species of fish were collected from sites outside the Buffalo River Basin. Several fish community metrics varied among sites in different site categories (mainstem, large tributary, small tributary, headwater, and developed out-of-basin sites). Median relative abundances of stonerollers ranged from about 25 to 55 percent and were highest at

  20. Effect of species, breed, and age on bacterial load in bovine and bubaline semen

    PubMed Central

    Sannat, Chandrahas; Nair, Ajit; Sahu, S. B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. A.; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shende, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of species, breed and age on bacterial load in fresh and frozen semen of Cattle and Buffalo bull. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 56 cow and 10 buffalo bulls stationed at Central Semen Station Anjora, Durg (Chhattisgarh). Impact of breeds on bacterial load in semen was assessed using six breeds of cattle viz. Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi, Tharparkar, Jersey and Holstein Friesian (HF) cross. Cow bulls were categorized into four different groups based on their age (<4 years, 4-5 years, 5-6 years and > 6 years) to study variation among age groups. Bacterial load was measured in fresh and frozen semen samples from these bulls using the standard plate count (SPC) method and count was expressed as colony forming unit (CFU) per ml of semen. Results: Higher bacterial load was reported in fresh (2.36 × 104 ± 1943 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.00 × 10 ± 90 CFU/ml) semen of cow bulls as compared to buffalo bulls (1.95 × 104 ± 2882 and 7.75 × 102 ± 160 CFU/ml in fresh and frozen semen, respectively). Jersey bull showed significantly higher bacterial count (p < 0.05) both in fresh (4.07 × 104 ± 13927 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.92 × 103 ± 178 CFU/ml) semen followed by HF cross, Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi and Tharparkar bull. Bulls aged < 4 years and more than 6 years yielded increased bacterial load in their semen. Although a minor variation was reported between species and among age groups, no significant differences were measured. Conclusion: Bacterial load in semen did not differ significantly between species and age groups; however significant variation was reported among different breeds. Bulls of Jersey breed showed significantly higher bacterial load in semen as compared to the crossbred and indigenous bull. PMID:27047115

  1. Structure of the buffalo secretory signalling glycoprotein at 2.8 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Srivastava, Devendra B.; Kumar, Janesh

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of a signalling glycoprotein isolated from buffalo dry secretions (SPB-40) has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. Two unique residues, Tyr120 and Glu269, found in SPB-40 distort the shape of the sugar-binding groove considerably. The water structure in the groove is also different. The conformations of three flexible loops, His188–His197, Phe202–Arg212 and Tyr244–Pro260, also differ from those found in other structurally similar proteins. The crystal structure of a 40 kDa signalling glycoprotein from buffalo (SPB-40) has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. SPB-40 acts as a protective signalling factor by binding to viable cells during the earlymore » phase of involution, during which extensive tissue remodelling occurs. It was isolated from the dry secretions of Murrah buffalo. It was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with 19% ethanol as the precipitant. The protein was also cloned and its complete nucleotide and amino-acid sequences were determined. When compared with the sequences of other members of the family, the sequence of SPB-40 revealed two very important mutations in the sugar-binding region, in which Tyr120 changed to Trp120 and Glu269 changed to Trp269. The structure showed a significant distortion in the shape of the sugar-binding groove. The water structure in the groove is also drastically altered. The folding of the protein chain in the flexible region comprising segments His188–His197, Phe202–Arg212 and Tyr244–Pro260 shows large variations when compared with other proteins of the family.« less

  2. Where buffalo and cattle meet: Modelling interspecific contact risk using cumulative resistant kernels

    Treesearch

    Zaneta Kaszta; Samuel A. Cushman; Claudio Sillero-Zubiri; Eleonore Wolff; Jorgelina Marino

    2018-01-01

    African buffalo the primary source of foot and mouth disease (FMD) infection for livestock in South Africa. Predicting the spatial drivers and patterns of buffalo–cattle contact risk is crucial for developing effective FMD mitigation strategies. Therefore, the goal of this study was to predict fine-scale, seasonal contact risk between cattle and buffaloes straying into...

  3. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization.

    PubMed

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive.

  4. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive. PMID:26880872

  5. Hormonal profile and follicular dynamics concurrent with CIDR and insulin modified Ovsync TAI programs and their impacts on the fertility response in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Ramoun, A A; Emara, A M; Heleil, B A; Darweish, S A; Abou-Ghait, H A

    2017-12-01

    -pregnant buffaloes, but in CIDR-sync, the diameter of the (LF) was larger (p < 0.01) in non-pregnant compared with pregnant buffaloes. Also, the results showed that the greatest diameter of LF was observed in pregnant buffaloes in Insulin-sync compared with either pregnant or non-pregnant buffaloes in all groups. It is concluded that modified CIDR-sync and Insulin-sync could improve fertility response through modulating hormonal profile and follicular dynamics in buffaloes during low breeding season. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Swamp Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) Fattened at Different Feeding Intensities.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, C; Panprasert, P; Holtz, W; Moors, E; Jaturasitha, S; Wicke, M; Gauly, M

    2014-04-01

    Twenty-four male 1-year old swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were randomly allocated to 4 groups. One group grazed on guinea grass (GG) and another on guinea grass and the legume Stylosanthes guianensis (GL). The other two groups were kept in pens and fed freshly cut guinea grass and concentrate at an amount of 1.5% (GC1.5) and 2.0% (GC2.0) of body weight, respectively. The effect of the different feeding intensities on carcass characteristics and meat quality were assessed. The mean body weight at slaughter was 398 (±16) kg. Average daily gain was higher in concentrate-supplemented groups (570 and 540 g/d in GC1.5 and GC2.0, respectively) when compared to GG (316 g/d) and GL (354 g/d) (p<0.01). Likewise, the warm carcass weight was higher in GC1.5 and GC2.0 compared to GG and GL. Dressing percentage was 48.1% and 49.5% in GC1.5 and GC2.0 in comparison to 42.9% and 44.8% observed in GG and GL, respectively. Meat of Longissimus throracis from GC1.5 and GC2.0 was redder in color (p<0.01), while water holding capacity (drip and thawing loss) was improved in pasture-fed groups (p<0.05). Protein and fat content of Longissimus thoracis was higher in animals supplemented with concentrate (p<0.01), as was cholesterol content (p<0.05), whereas PUFA:SFA ratio was higher and n-6/n-3 ratio lower (p<0.01) in pasture-fed buffaloes. Results of the present study showed that the supplementation of pasture with concentrate enhances the growth and carcass characteristics of swamp buffaloes expressed in superior dressing percentage, better muscling, and redder meat with a higher content of protein and fat, whereas animals grazing only on pasture had a more favorable fatty acid profile and water holding capacity. In conclusion, the supplementation of concentrate at a rate of about 1.5% of body weight is recommended to improve the performance and carcass quality of buffaloes.

  7. Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Swamp Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) Fattened at Different Feeding Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Lambertz, C.; Panprasert, P.; Holtz, W.; Moors, E.; Jaturasitha, S.; Wicke, M.; Gauly, M.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four male 1-year old swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were randomly allocated to 4 groups. One group grazed on guinea grass (GG) and another on guinea grass and the legume Stylosanthes guianensis (GL). The other two groups were kept in pens and fed freshly cut guinea grass and concentrate at an amount of 1.5% (GC1.5) and 2.0% (GC2.0) of body weight, respectively. The effect of the different feeding intensities on carcass characteristics and meat quality were assessed. The mean body weight at slaughter was 398 (±16) kg. Average daily gain was higher in concentrate-supplemented groups (570 and 540 g/d in GC1.5 and GC2.0, respectively) when compared to GG (316 g/d) and GL (354 g/d) (p<0.01). Likewise, the warm carcass weight was higher in GC1.5 and GC2.0 compared to GG and GL. Dressing percentage was 48.1% and 49.5% in GC1.5 and GC2.0 in comparison to 42.9% and 44.8% observed in GG and GL, respectively. Meat of Longissimus throracis from GC1.5 and GC2.0 was redder in color (p<0.01), while water holding capacity (drip and thawing loss) was improved in pasture-fed groups (p<0.05). Protein and fat content of Longissimus thoracis was higher in animals supplemented with concentrate (p<0.01), as was cholesterol content (p<0.05), whereas PUFA:SFA ratio was higher and n-6/n-3 ratio lower (p<0.01) in pasture-fed buffaloes. Results of the present study showed that the supplementation of pasture with concentrate enhances the growth and carcass characteristics of swamp buffaloes expressed in superior dressing percentage, better muscling, and redder meat with a higher content of protein and fat, whereas animals grazing only on pasture had a more favorable fatty acid profile and water holding capacity. In conclusion, the supplementation of concentrate at a rate of about 1.5% of body weight is recommended to improve the performance and carcass quality of buffaloes. PMID:25049987

  8. Similar Genetic Architecture with Shared and Unique Quantitative Trait Loci for Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance in Two Rainbow Trout Breeding Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Roger L.; Liu, Sixin; Gao, Guangtu; Fragomeni, Breno O.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Leeds, Timothy D.; Parsons, James E.; Martin, Kyle E.; Evenhuis, Jason P.; Welch, Timothy J.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Palti, Yniv

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a 57 K SNP array and a reference genome assembly have enabled us to conduct genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that overcome several experimental limitations from our previous work. In the current study, we conducted GWAS for BCWD resistance in two rainbow trout breeding populations using two genotyping platforms, the 57 K Affymetrix SNP array and restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. Overall, we identified 14 moderate-large effect QTL that explained up to 60.8% of the genetic variance in one of the two populations and 27.7% in the other. Four of these QTL were found in both populations explaining a substantial proportion of the variance, although major differences were also detected between the two populations. Our results confirm that BCWD resistance is controlled by the oligogenic inheritance of few moderate-large effect loci and a large-unknown number of loci each having a small effect on BCWD resistance. We detected differences in QTL number and genome location between two GWAS models (weighted single-step GBLUP and Bayes B), which highlights the utility of using different models to uncover QTL. The RAD-SNPs detected a greater number of QTL than the 57 K SNP array in one population, suggesting that the RAD-SNPs may uncover polymorphisms that are more unique and informative for the specific population in which they were discovered. PMID:29109734

  9. Similar Genetic Architecture with Shared and Unique Quantitative Trait Loci for Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance in Two Rainbow Trout Breeding Populations.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Roger L; Liu, Sixin; Gao, Guangtu; Fragomeni, Breno O; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Leeds, Timothy D; Parsons, James E; Martin, Kyle E; Evenhuis, Jason P; Welch, Timothy J; Wiens, Gregory D; Palti, Yniv

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ). However, the recent availability of a 57 K SNP array and a reference genome assembly have enabled us to conduct genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that overcome several experimental limitations from our previous work. In the current study, we conducted GWAS for BCWD resistance in two rainbow trout breeding populations using two genotyping platforms, the 57 K Affymetrix SNP array and restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. Overall, we identified 14 moderate-large effect QTL that explained up to 60.8% of the genetic variance in one of the two populations and 27.7% in the other. Four of these QTL were found in both populations explaining a substantial proportion of the variance, although major differences were also detected between the two populations. Our results confirm that BCWD resistance is controlled by the oligogenic inheritance of few moderate-large effect loci and a large-unknown number of loci each having a small effect on BCWD resistance. We detected differences in QTL number and genome location between two GWAS models (weighted single-step GBLUP and Bayes B), which highlights the utility of using different models to uncover QTL. The RAD-SNPs detected a greater number of QTL than the 57 K SNP array in one population, suggesting that the RAD-SNPs may uncover polymorphisms that are more unique and informative for the specific population in which they were discovered.

  10. Production of nuclear transfer embryos by using somatic cells isolated from milk in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Golla, K; Selokar, N L; Saini, M; Chauhan, M S; Manik, R S; Palta, P; Singla, S K

    2012-10-01

    Somatic cells in milk are a potential source of nuclei for nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical animals; this is especially important in animals that are susceptible to risks of bacterial infection on biopsy collection. In this study, a minimum of 10 milk samples were collected from each of the three buffaloes representing Murrah breed. All the samples were processed immediately and cell colonies were obtained. Cell colonies from one buffalo (MU-442) survived beyond 10 passages and were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and used in nuclear transfer experiments. In culture, these cells expressed vimentin, indicating they were of fibroblast origin similar to ear cells. We compared the effectiveness of cloning using those milk-derived fibroblast (MDF) cells and fibroblast cells derived from the ear derived fibroblast (EDF). Fusion and cleavage rates of MDF-NT and EDF-NT embryos were found to be similar (92.43 ± 1.28% vs 94.98 ± 1.24%, and 80.27 ± 1.75% vs 84.56 ± 3.73%, respectively; p > 0.01); however, development to blastocyst stage and total cell number was higher for EDF-NT embryos (50.24 ± 2.54%, 227.14 ± 13.04, respectively, p < 0.01), than for MDF-NT embryos (16.44 ± 0.75%, 170.57 ± 4.50 respectively). We conclude that somatic cells from milk can be cultured effectively and used as nucleus donor to produce cloned blastocyst-stage embryos. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Ecological implications of bovine tuberculosis in African Buffalo herds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caron, Alex; Cross, Paul C.; du Toit, Johan T.

    2003-01-01

    Following the recent invasion of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) into the Kruger National Park, South Africa, we conducted a study on the maintenance host, African buffalo, to investigate associations between BTB prevalence and calf:cow ratio, age structure, body condition, and endoparasite load. Statistical analyses compared herds of zero, medium (1–40%), and high (>40%) BTB prevalence. To control for ecological variation across the park we collected data in northern, central, and southern regions and restricted some analyses to particular regions of the park. Body condition declined over the course of the 2001 dry season, and buffaloes in the southern region of the park, with the highest BTB prevalence, were in worse condition than buffaloes in the northern region (which receives less annual rainfall but is still virtually BTB-free). Herd-level analyses of the entire park, the south and central regions, and just the southern region all indicated that herds of higher BTB prevalence were in worse condition and lost condition faster through the dry season than herds of lower BTB prevalence. Fecal endoparasite egg counts increased during the dry season and were associated with both decreased body condition and increased BTB prevalence. Although we did not detect any obvious effect of BTB on the age structure of the buffalo population, our findings indicate early symptoms of wider scale BTB-related ecological disturbances: buffalo herds with high BTB prevalence appear more vulnerable to drought (because of a decrease in body condition and an increase in endoparasite load), and because lions selectively kill weak buffaloes their prey base is accumulating a disproportionately high prevalence of BTB, to which lions are susceptible.Rea10.1890/02-5266d More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs

  12. Effect of homogenization on the properties and microstructure of Mozzarella cheese from buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Gawad, Mona A M; Ahmed, Nawal S; El-Abd, M M; Abd El-Rafee, S

    2012-04-02

    The name pasta filata refers to a unique plasticizing and texturing treatments of the fresh curd in hot water that imparts to the finished cheese its characteristic fibrous structure and melting properties. Mozzarella cheese made from standardized homogenized and non-homogenized buffalo milk with 3 and 1.5%fat. The effect of homogenization on rheological, microstructure and sensory evaluation was carried out. Fresh raw buffalo milk and starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus were used. The coagulants were calf rennet powder (HA-LA). Standardized buffalo milk was homogenized at 25 kg/cm2 pressure after heating to 60°C using homogenizer. Milk and cheese were analysed. Microstructure of the cheese samples was investigated either with an application of transmission or scanning electron microscope. Statistical analyses were applied on the obtained data. Soluble nitrogen total volatile free fatty acids, soluble tyrosine and tryptophan increased with using homogenized milk and also, increased with relatively decrease in case of homogenized Mozzarella cheese. Meltability of Mozzarella cheese increased with increasing the fat content and storage period and decrease with homogenization. Mozzarella cheese firmness increased with homogenization and also, increased with progressing of storage period. Flavour score, appearance and total score of Mozzarella cheese increased with homogenization and storage period progress, while body and texture score decreased with homogenization and increased with storage period progress. Microstructure of Mozzarella cheese showed the low fat cheese tends to be harder, more crumbly and less smooth than normal. Curd granule junctions were prominent in non-homogenized milk cheese. Homogenization of milk cheese caused changes in the microstructure of the Mozzarella cheese. Microstructure studies of cheese revealed that cheese made from homogenized milk is smoother and has a finer texture than

  13. Hypothyroidism in an African forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus).

    PubMed

    Allender, Matthew C; Briggs, Michael; Shipley, Clifford F

    2007-03-01

    An adult female African forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus) of unknown age was presented with signs of recurrent hoof overgrowth, persistent anestrous, obesity, dull hair coat, and decreased activity level. Complete blood counts and serum biochemistry values were unremarkable. Decreased concentrations of total triiodothyronine and total thyroxine were noted compared with values for normal domestic cattle and a healthy African forest buffalo. Treatment with oral levothyroxine increased blood concentrations of total triiodothyronine and total thyroxine, and subsequent improvement in clinical signs included weight loss, hair regrowth, and reproductive cycling.

  14. Rapid discrimination between buffalo and cow milk and detection of adulteration of buffalo milk with cow milk using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Durakli Velioglu, Serap; Ercioglu, Elif; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2017-05-01

    This research paper describes the potential of synchronous fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy for authentication of buffalo milk, a favourable raw material in the production of some premium dairy products. Buffalo milk is subjected to fraudulent activities like many other high priced foodstuffs. The current methods widely used for the detection of adulteration of buffalo milk have various disadvantages making them unattractive for routine analysis. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess the potential of SF spectroscopy in combination with multivariate methods for rapid discrimination between buffalo and cow milk and detection of the adulteration of buffalo milk with cow milk. SF spectra of cow and buffalo milk samples were recorded between 400-550 nm excitation range with Δλ of 10-100 nm, in steps of 10 nm. The data obtained for ∆λ = 10 nm were utilised to classify the samples using principal component analysis (PCA), and detect the adulteration level of buffalo milk with cow milk using partial least square (PLS) methods. Successful discrimination of samples and detection of adulteration of buffalo milk with limit of detection value (LOD) of 6% are achieved with the models having root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) and the root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) values of 2, 7, and 4%, respectively. The results reveal the potential of SF spectroscopy for rapid authentication of buffalo milk.

  15. Ovum pick up, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cattle, buffalo and horses: from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Duchi, Roberto; Colleoni, Silvia; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques developed for cattle in the last 25 years, like ovum pick up (OPU), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and somatic cell nuclear transfer, have been transferred and adapted to buffalo and horses. The successful clinical applications of these techniques require both the clinical skills specific to each animal species and an experienced laboratory team to support the in vitro phase of the work. In cattle, OPU can be considered a consolidated technology that is rapidly outpacing conventional superovulation for embryo transfer. In buffalo, OPU represents the only possibility for embryo production to advance the implementation of embryo-based biotechnologies in that industry, although it is still mainly in the developmental phase. In the horse, OPU is now an established procedure for breeding from infertile and sporting mares throughout the year. It requires ICSI that in the horse, contrary to what happens in cattle and buffalo, is very efficient and the only option because conventional IVF does not work. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is destined to fill a very small niche for generating animals of extremely high commercial value. The efficiency is low, but because normal animals can be generated it is likely that advancing our knowledge in that field might improve the technology and reduce its cost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of a locus characteristic of male individuals of buffalo grass [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] by using an RAPD marker.

    PubMed

    Li, Y X; Wang, X G; Yang, C H; Cong, L L; Wu, F F; Xue, J G; Han, Y H

    2013-09-27

    Buffalo grass [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] plants can be either male, female, or hermaphrodite (monoecious). As there is no morphological difference in the early vegetative growth of these three classes of plants, it is worthwhile to use molecular biological methods to attempt to identify the sex of a plant at this early growth period. In this study, we identified 23 plants that had a stable sex for over at least 3 years. Of these, 9 were male plants, 10 were female plants, and 4 were hermaphrodites. Screening of 300 RAPD primers identified a primer, namely S211 (5'-ttccccgcga-3'), which is capable of identifying male plants. The specific fragment was cloned, sequenced, and submitted to the GenBank database (accession No. JN982469). When used to identify the sex of 188 plants during their first growing season, the S211 primer correctly identified 85.8% of all male plants. Our results showed that the S211 primer can identify the male, and in doing so, it facilitates buffalo grass breeding work.

  17. Sero-prevalence of bovine Johne's disease in buffaloes and cattle population of North India using indigenous ELISA kit based on native Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis 'Bison type' genotype of goat origin.

    PubMed

    Singh, S V; Singh, A V; Singh, R; Sharma, S; Shukla, N; Misra, S; Singh, P K; Sohal, J S; Kumar, H; Patil, P K; Misra, P; Sandhu, K S

    2008-09-01

    ) in south and west UP, respectively. Of the 699 serum samples screened from Ludhiana, Punjab, sero-prevalence of BJD was 23.0%. Sero-prevalence was 23.3% (12.1% in young and 24.4% in adults) and 26.9% (27.2% in young and 26.8% in adults) in buffaloes and cattle, respectively. High prevalence of BJD in buffaloes in native tract of Murrah breed, and Hariana breed of cattle correlated with poor per-animal productivity and BJD may be the major cause. Indigenous ELISA kit was rapid, economic and sensitive test for large-scale screening of buffaloes and cattle population against incurable BJD.

  18. Respondent driven sampling in a biomonitoring study of refugees from Burma in Buffalo, New York who eat Great Lakes fish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; McCann, Molly; Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth; Hwang, Syni-An

    2018-06-01

    Refugees from Burma who consume fish caught from local waterbodies have increased risk of exposure to environmental contaminants. We used respondent driven sampling (RDS) to sample this hard-to-reach population for the first Biomonitoring of Great Lakes Populations program. In the current study, we examined the interview data and assessed the effectiveness of RDS to sample the unique population. In 2013, we used RDS to sample 205 Burmese refugees and immigrants residing in Buffalo, New York who consumed fish caught from Great Lakes waters. RDS-adjusted population estimates of sociodemographic characteristics, residential history, fish consumption related behaviors, and awareness of fish advisories were obtained. We also examined sample homophily and equilibrium to assess how well the RDS assumptions were met in the study. Our sample was diverse with respect to sex, age, years residing in Buffalo, years lived in a refugee camp, education, employment, and fish consumption behaviors, and each of these variables reached equilibrium by the end of recruitment. Burmese refugees in Buffalo consumed Great Lakes fish throughout the year; a majority of them consumed the fish more than two times per week during summer, and about one third ate local fish more than once per week in winter. An estimated 60% of Burmese refugees in Buffalo had heard about local fish advisories. RDS has the potential to be an effective methodology for sampling refugees and immigrants in conducting biomonitoring and environmental exposure assessment. Due to high fish consumption and limited awareness and knowledge of fish advisories, some refugee and immigrant populations are more susceptible to environmental contaminants. Increased awareness on local fish advisories is needed among these populations. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. AROMATIC AMINES IN AND NEAR THE BUFFALO RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three sediment samples taken from the Buffalo River and two soil samples taken near its bank have been analyzed for 2-propanol-extractable, basic organic compounds by using GC/MS. Eleven aromatic amines related to the commercial production of malachite green and crystal violet we...

  20. Little Blaze and the Buffalo Jump. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    The reader is one in a series of stories of the Blackfeet Indians which take place when the people were at the height of their power, hunting buffalo north to the North Saskatchewan River, south to the Yellowstone River, east to the Montana-North Dakota border, and west to the Rocky Mountains. The story is about Little Blaze, a young Blackfeet…

  1. Biological nitrogen fixation and habitat of running buffalo clover

    Treesearch

    D.R. Morris; V.S. Baligar; T.M. Schuler; P.J. Harmon

    2002-01-01

    Running buffalo clover (RBC) [Trifolium stoloniferum (Muhl. ex Eat.)] is an endangered species whose survival is uncertain. An experiment was conducted on extant RBC sites to investigate biological nitrogen (N2) fixation, associated plant species, and soil conditions under natural mountain settings. Isotope (15...

  2. Spatial-temporal and phylogeographic characterization of Trypanosoma spp. in cattle (Bos taurus) and buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) reveals transmission dynamics of these parasites in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Dueñez, Jeiczon; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M

    2018-01-15

    Animal Trypanosomiasis (AT) is one of the most important problems in the Colombian livestock industry reducing its production around 30%. Caribbean and Orinoquia regions play a significant role in the development of this industry, having about 6.9 million cattle and 113,000 buffaloes. Considering the paucity in studies to understand the epidemiological features and control of AT in Colombia, the present study reports the seasonal transmission patterns and phylogeographic traits of the causal agents of AT in cattle and buffaloes from these regions. Between 2014 and 2016, a three-point longitudinal survey was designed to evaluate the mentioned characteristics. Molecular analysis in cattle showed an AT prevalence of 39.2% (T. theileri 38.6%, T. evansi 6.7% and T. vivax 0.2%), with higher values during wet and late wet seasons, while in buffaloes the prevalence was 28.2% (T. theileri 28.2% and T. evansi 1.3%), with higher values during the dry season. Additionally, variables such as tabanid abundance, vector control, breeding system, age and anemia signs were significantly associated with AT prevalence (P<0.05). Only T. theileri infection was higher in cattle with anemia signs than those with normal packed cell volume. Finally, phylogeographic analysis revealed that Colombian T. theileri isolates were associated to specific host genotypes IA and IIB, described worldwide; T. vivax isolates were related to the genotype from West Africa; while T. evansi isolates are related to the South American genotypes and to new genotypes. This is the first longitudinal survey that evaluates through molecular methods, the infection of Trypanosoma spp. in two important livestock regions from Colombia, showing that the clinical effects and prevalence of these trypanosomes in cattle and buffaloes are modulated by seasonal variations, host factors, and parasite traits. The results suggest that these factors have to be taken into account to successfully control AT in these regions

  3. Breeding bird communities

    Treesearch

    Vanessa L. Artman; Randy Dettmers

    2003-01-01

    Prescribed burning is being applied on an experimental basis to restore and maintain mixed-oak communities in southern Ohio. This chapter describes baseline conditions for the breeding bird community prior to prescribed burning. We surveyed breeding bird populations at four study areas using the territory-mapping method. We observed 35 bird species during the surveys....

  4. TILLING for plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Peter; Dong, Chongmei

    2014-01-01

    TILLING is widely used in plant functional genomics. Mutagenesis and SNP detection is combined to allow for the isolation of mutations in genes of interest. It can also be used as a plant breeding tool, whereby variation in known or candidate genes of interest to breeding programs is generated. Here we describe a simple low-cost TILLING procedure.

  5. Teat anatomy affects requirements for udder preparation in Mediterranean buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Ambord, Sarah; Stoffel, Michael H; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2010-11-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the interrelation between teat anatomy and machine milking in dairy buffaloes raised in Switzerland. A 3-min pre-stimulation induced milk ejection before cluster attachment in most cases and caused an optimal milk removal during machine milking. In an additional experiment, longitudinal cross-section ultrasound was obtained before and after a 3-min pre-stimulation. Teat wall thickness, teat diameter, cisternal diameter and teat canal length were evaluated. It was observed that 3-min pre-stimulation dramatically reduced teat canal length whereas all the other anatomical parameters remained unchanged. The vacuum needed to open the teat canal was also measured before and after a 3-min pre-stimulation by using a special teat cup with only the mouthpiece of the liner remaining on the top of the teat cup (no liner, no pulsation). Without pre-stimulation but after wetting the teat canal by stripping one squirt of milk out of the teat, no milk could be withdrawn with a vacuum up to 39 kPa. However, after pre-stimulation, milk flow occurred in all buffaloes at a vacuum between 16 and 38 kPa. In the last experiment, the teat tissue was examined in slaughtered buffaloes and compared with teat tissue of cows. No difference was noted in histological sections and teat canal length was similar in cows and buffaloes. Proximal to the teat canal, the teat did not pass into an open cistern but the lumen was collapsed. In conclusion, buffaloes need to be well pre-stimulated because the tissue above the teat canal provides additional teat closure before milk ejection. Therefore, milk can only be obtained after pre-stimulation.

  6. Can non-breeding be a cost of breeding dispersal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danchin, E.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Breeding habitat selection and dispersal are crucial processes that affect many components of fitness. Breeding dispersal entails costs, one of which has been neglected: dispersing animals may miss breeding opportunities because breeding dispersal requires finding a new nesting site and mate, two time- and energy-consuming activities. Dispersers are expected to be prone to non-breeding. We used the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) to test whether breeding dispersal influences breeding probability. Breeding probability was associated with dispersal, in that both were negatively influenced by private information (previous individual reproductive success) and public information (average reproductive success of conspecifics) about patch quality. Furthermore, the probability of skipping breeding was 1.7 times higher in birds that settled in a new patch relative to those that remained on the same patch. Finally, non-breeders that resumed breeding were 4.4 times more likely to disperse than birds that bred in successive years. Although private information may influence breeding probability directly, the link between breeding probability and public information may be indirect, through the influence of public information on breeding dispersal, non-breeding thus being a cost of dispersal. These results support the hypothesis that dispersal may result in not being able to breed. More generally, non-breeding (which can be interpreted as an extreme form of breeding failure) may reveal costs of various previous activities. Because monitoring the non-breeding portion of a population is difficult, non-breeders have been neglected in many studies of reproduction trade-offs.

  7. Cloning of Buffalo, a Highly Valued Livestock Species of South and Southeast Asia: Any Achievements?

    PubMed

    Selokar, Naresh L; Saini, Monika; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Manik, Radhey S; Singla, Suresh K

    2018-04-01

    Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is a major source of milk, meat, and draught power in many developing countries in Asia. Animal cloning holds a lot of potential for fast multiplication of elite buffaloes and conservation of their valuable germplasm. Although the progress of buffalo cloning has been slow in comparison to cattle or pig, several breakthroughs were reported in buffalo cloning such as the production of cloned calves from somatic cells isolated from over one-decade old frozen-thawed semen or from urine-derived cells. Since the initiation of buffalo cloning, several approaches have been tried to refine nuclear transfer protocols. This has resulted in increasing the blastocyst production rate and improving their quality leading to an increase in live birth rate. In this review, we discuss current developments in buffalo cloning, its challenges, and the future roadmap.

  8. The African buffalo parasite Theileria. sp. (buffalo) can infect and immortalize cattle leukocytes and encodes divergent orthologues of Theileria parva antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, R.P.; Hemmink, J.D.; Morrison, W.I.; Weir, W.; Toye, P.G.; Sitt, T.; Spooner, P.R.; Musoke, A.J.; Skilton, R.A.; Odongo, D.O.

    2015-01-01

    African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the wildlife reservoir of multiple species within the apicomplexan protozoan genus Theileria, including Theileria parva which causes East coast fever in cattle. A parasite, which has not yet been formally named, known as Theileria sp. (buffalo) has been recognized as a potentially distinct species based on rDNA sequence, since 1993. We demonstrate using reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing of 18S rDNA genes, that in an area where buffalo and cattle co-graze and there is a heavy tick challenge, T. sp. (buffalo) can frequently be isolated in culture from cattle leukocytes. We also show that T. sp. (buffalo), which is genetically very closely related to T. parva, according to 18s rDNA sequence, has a conserved orthologue of the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that forms the basis of the diagnostic ELISA used for T. parva serological detection. Closely related orthologues of several CD8 T cell target antigen genes are also shared with T. parva. By contrast, orthologues of the T. parva p104 and the p67 sporozoite surface antigens could not be amplified by PCR from T. sp. (buffalo), using conserved primers designed from the corresponding T. parva sequences. Collectively the data re-emphasise doubts regarding the value of rDNA sequence data alone for defining apicomplexan species in the absence of additional data. ‘Deep 454 pyrosequencing’ of DNA from two Theileria sporozoite stabilates prepared from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on buffalo failed to detect T. sp. (buffalo). This strongly suggests that R. appendiculatus may not be a vector for T. sp. (buffalo). Collectively, the data provides further evidence that T. sp. (buffalo). is a distinct species from T. parva. PMID:26543804

  9. The complete coding region sequence of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Feligini, Maria; Greppi, Gianfranco; Enne, Giuseppe

    2004-02-01

    The Y-linked SRY gene is responsible for testis determination in mammals. Mutations in this gene can lead to XY Gonadal Dysgenesis, an abnormal sexual phenotype described in humans, cattle, horses and river buffalo. We report here the complete river buffalo SRY sequence in order to enable the genetic diagnosis of this disease. The SRY sequence was also used to confirm the evolutionary divergence time between cattle and river buffalo 10 million years ago.

  10. The role of grazing land on the buffalo population dynamics in Brebes regency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumanto

    2017-04-01

    Brebes District is one of the centre of grazing buffalo in Indonesia that involve thousands of rearers usually kept as a family savings. This paper highlighted the availability of land and the role of the grazing land for the durability of the maintenance of buffalo in Brebes Regency. The information obtained is from interviewed the livestock facilitators in the sub-district (primary data) and from statistic of agriculture in Brebes Regency 2014 (secondary data). Generally the buffalo kept semi-intensively and commonly the buffaloes graze in the fields that are not used from morning until evening and during nights buffaloes are placed in the stalls. Rearers chose the semi-intensive system in rearing the buffalo because it is considered easy to manage and they do not need to provide fresh money to prepare the roughage for feed, because commonly the grazing buffalo are shepherd by herdman that will receive buffalo as their payment. The population density is very high (1.056 heads/km2), the buffalo ownership is between 2-4 head/households; generally the location of the grazing land is in the forest, rice fields fallow, and sleeping land, and estimated that greenfeed stock is still available abunandtly, on the other hand the urban land is less capacity of feed. The spread of buffalo is only in 125 villages from 297 villages in Brebes. The acceptance of buffalo business is around IDR 3.5 million to IDR 7.5 million/family/year. The availability of grazing land strongly influence the maintaining of buffalo farming by rearers.

  11. Buffalo Harbor Study. Preliminary Feasibility Report. Volume I. Main Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    to usually narrow strips of riparian vegetation, which is composed of various trees and shrubs of the Salix genus (willow), sumac, aspen, boxelder...reptiles were found. Species included, leopard frogs, snapping turtles, painted turtle, and garter snakes (SUNY Brockport: 1982). (7) Endangered Species...vessel traffic on the Buffalo River causes interrupted truck service. Firms have also cited snow removal as a problem. The harbor area road service

  12. Phragmites Management at Times Beach, Buffalo, New York

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    mechanical cutting and herbicide applications to control invasive phragmites at Times Beach, a 56-acre nature preserve located in Buffalo, New York...and chemical control. From 2005-2009, the U.S. spent more than $4.6 million on phragmites control, primarily via herbicides (Martin and Blossey 2013...The purpose of the current work is to evaluate mechanical cutting and herbicide applications to control phragmites at Times Beach; however, the

  13. Potential for Loss of Breeding Habitat for Imperiled Mountain Yellow-legged Frog ( Rana muscosa) in High Sierra Nevada Mountain Water Bodies due to Reduced Snowpack: Interaction of Climate Change and an Introduced Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacan, I.; Matthews, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Year to year variation in snowpack (20-200% average) and summer rain create large fluctuations in the volume of water in ponds and small lakes of the higher elevation (> 3000 m) Sierra Nevada. These water bodies are critical habitat for the imperiled mountain yellow-legged frog, Rana muscosa, which has decreased in abundance by 90% during the past century, due in part to the loss of suitable habitat and introduction of a fish predator (trout, Oncorhynchus spp.). Climate change is predicted to reduce the amount of snowpack, potentially impacting amphibian habitats throughout the Sierra Nevada by further reducing the lake and pond water levels and resulting in drying of small lakes during the summer. Mountain yellow-legged frogs are closely tied to water during all life stages, and are unique in having a three- to four-year tadpole phase. Thus, tadpole survival and future recruitment of adult frogs requires adequate water in lakes and ponds throughout the year, but larger lakes are populated with fish that prey on frogs and tadpoles. Thus, most successful frog breeding occurs in warm, shallow, fishless ponds that undergo wide fluctuations in volume. These water bodies would be most susceptible to the potential climate change effects of reduced snowpack, possibly resulting in lower tadpole survival. This study explores the link between the changes in water availability -- including complete pond drying -- and the abundance and recruitment of mountain yellow-legged frog in Dusy Basin, Kings Canyon National Park, California, USA. We propose using the low-snowpack years (1999, 2002, 2004) as comparative case studies to predict future effects of climate change on aquatic habitat availability and amphibian abundance and survival. To quantify the year to year variation and changes in water volume available to amphibians, we initiated GPS lake mapping in 2002 to quantify water volumes, water surface area, and shoreline length. We tracked these changes by repeated mapping of

  14. Buffalo Metropolitan Area, New York, Water Resources Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    fertile agricultural belt which is wide in the northern portion of the region but narrow in the south. The other is the Allegheny Plateau, an upland...during large flood events. Evidence of this can be seen in numerous highway relocations where secondary roads follow stream courses closely. A field...represents an economically viable service that can be developed as a franchise or concession by the appro- priate local authority. Implementation of

  15. Short communication: Variations in major mineral contents of Mediterranean buffalo milk and application of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for their prediction.

    PubMed

    Stocco, G; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bonfatti, V; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess variability in the major mineral components of buffalo milk, (2) to estimate the effect of certain environmental sources of variation on the major minerals during lactation, and (3) to investigate the possibility of using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as an indirect, noninvasive tool for routine prediction of the mineral content of buffalo milk. A total of 173 buffaloes reared in 5 herds were sampled once during the morning milking. Milk samples were analyzed for Ca, P, K, and Mg contents within 3h of sample collection using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. A Milkoscan FT2 (Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) was used to acquire milk spectra over the spectral range from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber/cm. Prediction models were built using a partial least square approach, and cross-validation was used to assess the prediction accuracy of FTIR. Prediction models were validated using a 4-fold random cross-validation, thus dividing the calibration-test set in 4 folds, using one of them to check the results (prediction models) and the remaining 3 to develop the calibration models. Buffalo milk minerals averaged 162, 117, 86, and 14.4mg/dL of milk for Ca, P, K, and Mg, respectively. Herd and days in milk were the most important sources of variation in the traits investigated. Parity slightly affected only Ca content. Coefficients of determination of cross-validation between the FTIR-predicted and the measured values were 0.71, 0.70, and 0.72 for Ca, Mg, and P, respectively, whereas prediction accuracy was lower for K (0.55). Our findings reveal FTIR to be an unsuitable tool when milk mineral content needs to be predicted with high accuracy. Predictions may play a role as indicator traits in selective breeding (if the additive genetic correlation between FTIR predictions and measures of milk minerals is high enough) or in monitoring the milk of buffalo populations for dairy industry purposes. Copyright

  16. Breeding-assisted genomics.

    PubMed

    Poland, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The revolution of inexpensive sequencing has ushered in an unprecedented age of genomics. The promise of using this technology to accelerate plant breeding is being realized with a vision of genomics-assisted breeding that will lead to rapid genetic gain for expensive and difficult traits. The reality is now that robust phenotypic data is an increasing limiting resource to complement the current wealth of genomic information. While genomics has been hailed as the discipline to fundamentally change the scope of plant breeding, a more symbiotic relationship is likely to emerge. In the context of developing and evaluating large populations needed for functional genomics, none excel in this area more than plant breeders. While genetic studies have long relied on dedicated, well-structured populations, the resources dedicated to these populations in the context of readily available, inexpensive genotyping is making this philosophy less tractable relative to directly focusing functional genomics on material in breeding programs. Through shifting effort for basic genomic studies from dedicated structured populations, to capturing the entire scope of genetic determinants in breeding lines, we can move towards not only furthering our understanding of functional genomics in plants, but also rapidly improving crops for increased food security, availability and nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective breeding of food sized rainbow trout against Flavobacteriosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding of rainbow trout is an important component of an integrated fish health management program. The current goals of our selective breeding program are to improve disease resistance, growth and survival in a reuse water environment. To improve these traits, data are recorded on thousa...

  18. Selective breeding of food size rainbow trout against Flavobacteriosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding of rainbow trout is an important component of an integrated fish health management program. The current goals of our selective breeding program are to improve disease resistance, growth and survival in a reuse water environment. To improve these traits, data are recorded on thousa...

  19. 77 FR 27487 - License Amendment Request From The State University of New York, University of Buffalo Reactor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... State University of New York, University of Buffalo Reactor Facility AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... staff at 1-800-397-4209, 301-415- 4737, or by email to [email protected] . The University of Buffalo... license amendment application from the State University of New York, University of Buffalo requesting...

  20. Validating selective breeding approaches for disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective breeding of rainbow trout at the USDA/ARS National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture (NCCCWA) in Leetown, West Virginia is designed to accomplish four goals: 1) define commercially important traits such as disease resistance, growth rate, stress response, and feed efficiency; 2) d...

  1. Numerical Modeling of Wave Overtopping of Buffalo Harbor Confined Disposal Facility (CDF4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 Under Wave Structures Work Unit 280H46 ERDC/CHL TR-17-18...11 2.2 Structure data...33 3.2 Type and condition of structures

  2. 76 FR 27182 - Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price increase of the American Eagle/Buffalo Bullion...

  3. 78 FR 26416 - Environmental Impact Statement: City of Buffalo, Erie County, New York

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: City... statement will be prepared for a proposed highway project in the City of Buffalo, Erie County, New York. FOR... from the US Border Port of Entry/Peace Bridge Plaza (Plaza), in the City of Buffalo, Erie County, New...

  4. Mechanism of resistance to synthetic pyrethroids in buffalo flies in south-east Queensland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Buffalo fly (Haematobia irritans exigua) and horn fly (Haematobia irritans irritans) cause irritation and production loss in much of the cattle producing area of the world. In Australia losses from buffalo fly were recently estimated at A$78m per year. Control is largely performed by using organoph...

  5. Soil water capture trends over 50 years of single-cross maize (Zea mays L.) breeding in the US corn-belt

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Andres; Messina, Carlos D.; Hammer, Graeme L.; Liu, Lu; van Oosterom, Erik; Lafitte, Renee; Cooper, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Breeders have successfully improved maize (Zea mays L.) grain yield for the conditions of the US corn-belt over the past 80 years, with the past 50 years utilizing single-cross hybrids. Long-term improvement for grain yield under water-limited conditions has also been reported. Grain yield under water-limited conditions depends on water use, water use efficiency, and harvest index. It has been hypothesized that long-term genetic gain for yield could be due, in part, to increased water capture from the soil. This hypothesis was tested using a set of elite single-cross hybrids that were released by DuPont Pioneer between 1963 and 2009. Eighteen hybrids were grown in the field during 2010 and 2011 growing seasons at Woodland, CA, USA. Crops grew predominantly on stored soil water and drought stress increased as the season progressed. Soil water content was measured to 300cm depth throughout the growing season. Significant water extraction occurred to a depth of 240–300cm and seasonal water use was calculated from the change in soil water over this rooting zone. Grain yield increased significantly with year of commercialization, but no such trend was observed for total water extraction. Therefore, the measured genetic gain for yield for the period represented by this set of hybrids must be related to either increased efficiency of water use or increased carbon partitioning to the grain, rather than increased soil water uptake. PMID:26428065

  6. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  7. Comparative community structure of archaea in rumen of buffaloes and cattle.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Dey, Avijit; Baro, Daoharu; Punia, Balbir S

    2017-08-01

    Detailed knowledge of the community structure of methanogens is essential for amelioration of methane emission from livestock species. Several studies have indicated that predominant methanogens of buffalo rumen are different from those in cattle. However, predominant genera of methanogens reported by individual studies varied primarily because of limited scope of sampling, sequencing of limited number of sequences and potential PCR bias in individual studies. In this study, the collective comparative diversity of methanogenic archaea in the rumen of cattle and buffaloes was examined by performing a meta-analysis of all the 16S rRNA (rrn) sequences deposited in GenBank. Ruminal methanogen sequences of buffalo were clustered into 900 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and ruminal methanogen sequences of cattle were clustered into 1522 species level OTUs. The number of species-level OTUs shared between cattle and buffaloes was 229 (10.4% of all OTUs), comprising 1746 sequences (27% of the total 6447 sequences). According to taxonomic classification by three different classifiers, Methanobrevibacter was found to be the most predominant genus both in cattle (69-71% of sequences) as well as buffaloes (65.1-68.9% of sequences). Percentage of Methanomicrobium was much higher (P < 0.05) in the case of buffalo (18%) than that of cattle (4.5%). On the other hand, percentages of Methanosphaera- and Methanomassiliicoccus-like methanogens were much higher (P < 0.05) in cattle than in buffaloes. This study indicated that there is a substantial difference in community structure of ruminal methanogens of cattle and buffaloes. The study has also indicated that the percent of species-level operational taxonomic units shared between cattle and buffalo is very low, and thus host species-specific methane mitigation strategies need to be developed for cattle and buffaloes. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Multiple-trait random regression models for the estimation of genetic parameters for milk, fat, and protein yield in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Borquis, Rusbel Raul Aspilcueta; Neto, Francisco Ribeiro de Araujo; Baldi, Fernando; Hurtado-Lugo, Naudin; de Camargo, Gregório M F; Muñoz-Berrocal, Milthon; Tonhati, Humberto

    2013-09-01

    In this study, genetic parameters for test-day milk, fat, and protein yield were estimated for the first lactation. The data analyzed consisted of 1,433 first lactations of Murrah buffaloes, daughters of 113 sires from 12 herds in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, with calvings from 1985 to 2007. Ten-month classes of lactation days were considered for the test-day yields. The (co)variance components for the 3 traits were estimated using the regression analyses by Bayesian inference applying an animal model by Gibbs sampling. The contemporary groups were defined as herd-year-month of the test day. In the model, the random effects were additive genetic, permanent environment, and residual. The fixed effects were contemporary group and number of milkings (1 or 2), the linear and quadratic effects of the covariable age of the buffalo at calving, as well as the mean lactation curve of the population, which was modeled by orthogonal Legendre polynomials of fourth order. The random effects for the traits studied were modeled by Legendre polynomials of third and fourth order for additive genetic and permanent environment, respectively, the residual variances were modeled considering 4 residual classes. The heritability estimates for the traits were moderate (from 0.21-0.38), with higher estimates in the intermediate lactation phase. The genetic correlation estimates within and among the traits varied from 0.05 to 0.99. The results indicate that the selection for any trait test day will result in an indirect genetic gain for milk, fat, and protein yield in all periods of the lactation curve. The accuracy associated with estimated breeding values obtained using multi-trait random regression was slightly higher (around 8%) compared with single-trait random regression. This difference may be because to the greater amount of information available per animal. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plant Breeding Goes Microbial.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong; Jousset, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Plant breeding has traditionally improved traits encoded in the plant genome. Here we propose an alternative framework reaching novel phenotypes by modifying together genomic information and plant-associated microbiota. This concept is made possible by a novel technology that enables the transmission of endophytic microbiota to the next plant generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sugar beet breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar beet is a recent crop developed solely for extraction of the sweetener sucrose. Breeding and improvement of Beta vulgaris for sugar has a rich historical record. Sugar beet originated from fodder beet in the 1800s, and selection has increased sugar content from 4 to 6% then to over 18% today. ...

  11. Plant breeding and genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ultimate goal of plant breeding is to develop improved crops. Improvements can be made in crop productivity, crop processing and marketing, and/or consumer quality. The process of developing an improved cultivar begins with intercrossing lines with high performance for the traits of interest, th...

  12. Lettuce and spinach breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lettuce and spinach production is beset by numerous biotic an abiotic challenges. This report to the California Leafy Greens Research Program annual meeting provides an update by the ‘Genetic Enhancement of Lettuce, Spinach, Melon, and Related Species’ project at Salinas on the genetics and breeding...

  13. Soil water capture trends over 50 years of single-cross maize (Zea mays L.) breeding in the US corn-belt.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Andres; Messina, Carlos D; Hammer, Graeme L; Liu, Lu; van Oosterom, Erik; Lafitte, Renee; Cooper, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Breeders have successfully improved maize (Zea mays L.) grain yield for the conditions of the US corn-belt over the past 80 years, with the past 50 years utilizing single-cross hybrids. Long-term improvement for grain yield under water-limited conditions has also been reported. Grain yield under water-limited conditions depends on water use, water use efficiency, and harvest index. It has been hypothesized that long-term genetic gain for yield could be due, in part, to increased water capture from the soil. This hypothesis was tested using a set of elite single-cross hybrids that were released by DuPont Pioneer between 1963 and 2009. Eighteen hybrids were grown in the field during 2010 and 2011 growing seasons at Woodland, CA, USA. Crops grew predominantly on stored soil water and drought stress increased as the season progressed. Soil water content was measured to 300cm depth throughout the growing season. Significant water extraction occurred to a depth of 240-300cm and seasonal water use was calculated from the change in soil water over this rooting zone. Grain yield increased significantly with year of commercialization, but no such trend was observed for total water extraction. Therefore, the measured genetic gain for yield for the period represented by this set of hybrids must be related to either increased efficiency of water use or increased carbon partitioning to the grain, rather than increased soil water uptake. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Antioxidant capacity and fatty acids characterization of heat treated cow and buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran Taj; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ajmal, Muhammad; Ellahi, Muhammad Yaqoob; Khalique, Anjum

    2017-08-24

    Antioxidant capacity of milk is largely due to vitamins A, E, carotenoids, zinc, selenium, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and enzyme systems. Cow milk has antioxidant capacity while the antioxidant capacity of buffalo milk has been studied in a limited way. The information regarding the effect of pasteurization and boiling on antioxidant capacity of cow and buffalo milk is also scared. Cow and buffalo milk was exposed to two different heat treatments i.e. 65 °C for 30 min and boiling for 1 min. After heat treatments, milk samples were cooled down to 4 °C packaged in transparent 250 ml polyethylene PET bottles and stored at 4 °C for 6 days. Milk composition, total flavonoid content, total antioxidant capacity, reducing power, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, antioxidant activity in linoleic acid, vitamin C, A, E, selenium, Zinc, fatty acid profile, peroxide value and sensory characteristics were studied in raw, pasteurized and boiled cow and buffalo milk at 0, 3 and 6 days of storage period. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of raw, pasteurized and boiled milk for cow (42.1, 41.3 and 40.7%) and buffalo (58.4, 57.6 and 56.5%) samples was found, respectively. Reducing power (RP) of raw cow and buffalo milk was 6.74 and 13.7 while pasteurization and boiling did not showed significant effect on RP of both cow and buffalo milk. DPPH activity of raw, pasteurized and boiled milk for cow (24.3, 23.8 and 23.6%) and buffalo (31.8, 31.5 and 30.4%) samples was noted, respectively. Storage period up to 3 days was non-significant while DPPH assay after 6 days of storage period indicated significant decline in antioxidant activity of milk samples. Antioxidant activity in linoleic acid (AALA) of buffalo and cow milk were recorded 11.7 and 17.4%, respectively. Pasteurization and boiling did not showed any impact on antioxidant capacity of cow and buffalo milk. The Loss of vitamin C in pasteurization (40 and 42%) and boiling (82 and 61%) of

  15. Accelerating plant breeding.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, Gerald N; Frei, Ursula K; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The growing demand for food with limited arable land available necessitates that the yield of major food crops continues to increase over time. Advances in marker technology, predictive statistics, and breeding methodology have allowed for continued increases in crop performance through genetic improvement. However, one major bottleneck is the generation time of plants, which is biologically limited and has not been improved since the introduction of doubled haploid technology. In this opinion article, we propose to implement in vitro nurseries, which could substantially shorten generation time through rapid cycles of meiosis and mitosis. This could prove a useful tool for speeding up future breeding programs with the aim of sustainable food production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of polymorphism in exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene and its association with incidence of clinical mastitis in Murrah buffalo.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Krishanender; Verma, Archana; Das Gupta, Ishwar; Thakur, Yash Pal; Verma, Nishant; Arya, Ashwani

    2015-04-01

    Lactoferrin gene is one of the important candidate genes for mastitis resistance. The gene is located on chromosome BTA 22 and consists of 17 exons spanning over 34.5 kb of genomic DNA. The present study was undertaken with the objectives to identify allelic variants in exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene and to analyze association between its genetic variants and incidence of clinical mastitis in Murrah buffalo. The amplification of exons 7 and 12 of lactoferrin gene yielded amplicons of 232- and 461-bp sizes. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 232-bp amplicon using BccI restriction enzyme revealed three genotypes (AA, AB, and BB) with frequencies of 0.62, 0.22, and 0.16, respectively. The frequencies of two alleles, A and B, were estimated as 0.73 and 0.27. Hpy188I-RFLP for 461-bp amplicon revealed polymorphism with three genotypes, CC, CD, and DD, with respective frequencies of 0.06, 0.39, and 0.56, whereas frequencies for C and D alleles were 0.25 and 0.75. The chi-square (χ(2)) analysis revealed a significant association between incidence of clinical mastitis and genetic variants of exon 7, and animals of AA genotype of exon 7 were found to be least susceptible to mastitis. The findings indicate potential scope for incorporation of lactoferrin gene in selection and breeding of Murrah buffaloes for improved genetic resistance to mastitis.

  17. Principal Milk Components in Buffalo, Holstein Cross, Indigenous Cattle and Red Chittagong Cattle from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. A.; Alam, M. K.; Islam, M. N.; Khan, M. A. S.; Ekeberg, D.; Rukke, E. O.; Vegarud, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to get a total physical and chemical characterization and comparison of the principal components in Bangladeshi buffalo (B), Holstein cross (HX), Indigenous cattle (IC) and Red Chittagong Cattle (RCC) milk. Protein and casein (CN) composition and type, casein micellar size (CMS), naturally occurring peptides, free amino acids, fat, milk fat globule size (MFGS), fatty acid composition, carbohydrates, total and individual minerals were analyzed. These components are related to technological and nutritional properties of milk. Consequently, they are important for the dairy industry and in the animal feeding and breeding strategies. Considerable variation in most of the principal components of milk were observed among the animals. The milk of RCC and IC contained higher protein, CN, β-CN, whey protein, lactose, total mineral and P. They were more or less similar in most of the all other components. The B milk was found higher in CN number, in the content of αs2-, κ-CN and α-lactalbumin, free amino acids, unsaturated fatty acids, Ca and Ca:P. The B milk was also lower in β-lactoglobulin content and had the largest CMS and MFGS. Proportion of CN to whey protein was lower in HX milk and this milk was found higher in β-lactoglobulin and naturally occuring peptides. Considering the results obtained including the ratio of αs1-, αs2-, β- and κ-CN, B and RCC milk showed best data both from nutritional and technological aspects. PMID:25050028

  18. Sericin supplementation improves semen freezability of buffalo bulls by minimizing oxidative stress during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar, Dharmendra; Sikka, P; Singh, P

    2015-01-01

    The variety of mammalian cells has been successfully cryopreserved by use of the silk protein sericin due to its strong free-radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to examine the protective role of sericin on buffalo spermatozoa during cryopreservation. Semen of four breeding bulls was collected twice a week using artificial vagina technique. The ejaculates of four bulls were pooled, divided into five equal fractions, diluted with the extender supplemented with different concentrations of sericin (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.5 and 2%) and then cryopreserved. Post-thawed motility was objectively assessed by computer assisted sperm analyzer. Sperm plasma membrane integrity was assessed by hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST). Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in frozen-thawed extended seminal plasma by spectrophotometry. The extender supplemented with 0.25, 0.5 and 1% sericin resulted in the higher sperm motility and GPx acivity. Furthermore, plasma membrane integrity and SOD activity were found to be higher (P<0.05) in group supplemented with 0.25 and 0.5% sericin (P<0.05). The MDA concentration was found to be significantly lower (P<0.05) in 0.25 and 0.5% sericin treated groups than control and other treated groups. In conclusion, the supplementation of 0.25-0.5% sericin in semen extender improves frozen-thawed semen quality through protecting sperm from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The complete genome sequence of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Glanzmann, Brigitte; Möller, Marlo; le Roex, Nikki; Tromp, Gerard; Hoal, Eileen G; van Helden, Paul D

    2016-12-07

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is an important role player in the savannah ecosystem. It has become a species of relevance because of its role as a wildlife maintenance host for an array of infectious and zoonotic diseases some of which include corridor disease, foot-and-mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis. To date, no complete genome sequence for S. caffer had been available for study and the genomes of other species such as the domestic cow (Bos taurus) had been used as a proxy for any genetics analysis conducted on this species. Here, the high coverage genome sequence of the African buffalo (S. caffer) is presented. A total of 19,765 genes were predicted and 19,296 genes could be successfully annotated to S. caffer while 469 genes remained unannotated. Moreover, in order to extend a detailed annotation of S. caffer, gene clusters were constructed using twelve additional mammalian genomes. The S. caffer genome contains 10,988 gene clusters, of which 62 are shared exclusively between B. taurus and S. caffer. This study provides a unique genomic perspective for the S. caffer, allowing for the identification of novel variants that may play a role in the natural history and physiological adaptations.

  20. Molecular dynamics studies on the buffalo prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng; Chatterjee, Subhojyoti

    2016-01-01

    It was reported that buffalo is a low susceptibility species resisting to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) (same as rabbits, horses, and dogs). TSEs, also called prion diseases, are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of species (except for rabbits, dogs, horses, and buffalo), manifesting as scrapie in sheep and goats; bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or "mad-cow" disease) in cattle; chronic wasting disease in deer and elk; and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal familial insomnia, and Kulu in humans etc. In molecular structures, these neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), predominantly with α-helices, into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (PrP(Sc)), rich in β-sheets. In this article, we studied the molecular structure and structural dynamics of buffalo PrP(C) (BufPrP(C)), in order to understand the reason why buffalo is resistant to prion diseases. We first did molecular modeling of a homology structure constructed by one mutation at residue 143 from the NMR structure of bovine and cattle PrP(124-227); immediately we found that for BufPrP(C)(124-227), there are five hydrogen bonds (HBs) at Asn143, but at this position, bovine/cattle do not have such HBs. Same as that of rabbits, dogs, or horses, our molecular dynamics studies also revealed there is a strong salt bridge (SB) ASP178-ARG164 (O-N) keeping the β2-α2 loop linked in buffalo. We also found there is a very strong HB SER170-TYR218 linking this loop with the C-terminal end of α-helix H3. Other information, such as (i) there is a very strong SB HIS187-ARG156 (N-O) linking α-helices H2 and H1 (if mutation H187R is made at position 187, then the hydrophobic core of PrP(C) will be exposed (L.H. Zhong (2010). Exposure of hydrophobic core in human prion protein pathogenic mutant H187R. Journal of

  1. Effect of different antioxidant additives in semen diluent on cryopreservability (-196°C) of buffalo semen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hardik A; Siddiquee, G M; Chaudhari, Dinesh V; Suthar, Vishal S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different antioxidant additives in standard tris-fructose-egg yolk-glycerol (TFYG) extender on the cryopreservability of buffalo semen. Semen collection using artificial vagina, twice weekly for 5 weeks from three pedigreed health breeding bulls of Mehsani breed, aged between 6 and 8 years. Immediately after initial evaluation all 30 qualifying ejaculates (10/bull) were split into three aliquots and diluted at 34°C keeping the concentration of 100 million spermatozoa/ml with standard TFYG extender as control and TFYG having two antioxidant additives - Cysteine HCl at 1 mg/ml and ascorbic acid at 0.2 mg/ml to study their comparative performance. Semen filled in French Mini straws using IS-4 system and gradually cooled to 4°C and equilibrated for 4 h in cold handing cabinet. After completion of equilibration, straws were cryopreserved in LN2 by Programmable Bio-freezer. Semen was examined at post-dilution, post-equilibration, and post-thaw stages for sperm quality parameters, and at each stage plasma was separated for enzymatic analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and alkaline phosphatase (AKP). The mean percentage of sperms in TFYG, TFYG + cysteine HCl and TFYG + ascorbic acid diluents at post-thaw stage in terms of progressive motility (52.83±0.52, 57.83±0.52, 57.83±0.52), livability (78.70±0.21, 82.33±0.23, 81.73±0.22), and abnormality (5.43±0.21, 5.03±0.17, 5.23±0.18) varied significantly (p<0.05) between control TFYG and TFYG having antioxidant additives. The mean U/L activities of AST (78.70±0.47, 72.80±0.48, 73.30±0.54), LDH (172.70±0.41, 155.78±0.42, 156.33±0.41), and AKP (103.61±0.34, 90.20±0.34, 91.03±0.34) in semen diluted with TFYG, TFYG + cysteine HCl and TFYG + ascorbic acid diluents at post-thaw stage, respectively, which showed significantly (p<0.05) higher leakage of enzymes in control TFYG than TFYG incorporated with additives. Incorporation

  2. Reverse breeding: a novel breeding approach based on engineered meiosis.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Rob; van Dun, Kees; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; van den Berg, Mark; Lelivelt, Cilia L C; Voermans, William; Woudenberg, Leo; de Wit, Jack P C; Reinink, Kees; Schut, Johan W; van der Zeeuw, Eveline; Vogelaar, Aat; Freymark, Gerald; Gutteling, Evert W; Keppel, Marina N; van Drongelen, Paul; Kieny, Matthieu; Ellul, Philippe; Touraev, Alisher; Ma, Hong; de Jong, Hans; Wijnker, Erik

    2009-12-01

    Reverse breeding (RB) is a novel plant breeding technique designed to directly produce parental lines for any heterozygous plant, one of the most sought after goals in plant breeding. RB generates perfectly complementing homozygous parental lines through engineered meiosis. The method is based on reducing genetic recombination in the selected heterozygote by eliminating meiotic crossing over. Male or female spores obtained from such plants contain combinations of non-recombinant parental chromosomes which can be cultured in vitro to generate homozygous doubled haploid plants (DHs). From these DHs, complementary parents can be selected and used to reconstitute the heterozygote in perpetuity. Since the fixation of unknown heterozygous genotypes is impossible in traditional plant breeding, RB could fundamentally change future plant breeding. In this review, we discuss various other applications of RB, including breeding per chromosome.

  3. Reverse breeding: a novel breeding approach based on engineered meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, Rob; van Dun, Kees; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; van den Berg, Mark; Lelivelt, Cilia L C; Voermans, William; Woudenberg, Leo; de Wit, Jack P C; Reinink, Kees; Schut, Johan W; van der Zeeuw, Eveline; Vogelaar, Aat; Freymark, Gerald; Gutteling, Evert W; Keppel, Marina N; van Drongelen, Paul; Kieny, Matthieu; Ellul, Philippe; Touraev, Alisher; Ma, Hong; de Jong, Hans; Wijnker, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Reverse breeding (RB) is a novel plant breeding technique designed to directly produce parental lines for any heterozygous plant, one of the most sought after goals in plant breeding. RB generates perfectly complementing homozygous parental lines through engineered meiosis. The method is based on reducing genetic recombination in the selected heterozygote by eliminating meiotic crossing over. Male or female spores obtained from such plants contain combinations of non-recombinant parental chromosomes which can be cultured in vitro to generate homozygous doubled haploid plants (DHs). From these DHs, complementary parents can be selected and used to reconstitute the heterozygote in perpetuity. Since the fixation of unknown heterozygous genotypes is impossible in traditional plant breeding, RB could fundamentally change future plant breeding. In this review, we discuss various other applications of RB, including breeding per chromosome. PMID:19811618

  4. Geographic distribution of Theileria sp. (buffalo) and Theileria sp. (bougasvlei) in Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa: implications for speciation.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Ronel; Latif, Abdalla A; Thekisoe, Oriel M M; Mans, Ben J

    2014-03-01

    Strict control measures apply to movement of buffalo in South Africa including testing for Theileria parva, the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle. The official test is a real-time hybridization PCR assay that amplifies the 18S rRNA V4 hyper-variable region of T. parva, T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei). Mixed infections with the latter organisms affect diagnostic sensitivity due to PCR suppression. While the incidence of mixed infections in the Corridor disease endemic region of South Africa is significant, little information is available on the specific distribution and prevalence of T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei). Specific real-time PCR assays were developed and a total of 1211 samples known to harbour these parasites were screened. Both parasites are widely distributed in southern Africa and the incidence of mixed infections with T. parva within the endemic region is similar (∼25-50%). However, a significant discrepancy exists in regard to mixed infections of T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei) (∼10%). Evidence for speciation between T. sp. (buffalo) and T. sp. (bougasvlei) is supported by phylogenetic analysis of the COI gene, and their designation as different species. This suggests mutual exclusion of parasites and the possibility of hybrid sterility in cases of mixed infections.

  5. Genomic selection models double the accuracy of predicted breeding values for bacterial cold water disease resistance compared to a traditional pedigree-based model in rainbow trout aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously we have shown that bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout can be improved using traditional family-based selection, but progress has been limited to exploiting only between-family genetic variation. Genomic selection (GS) is a new alternative enabling exploitation...

  6. Genome-enabled selection doubles the accuracy of predicted breeding values for bacterial cold water disease resistance compared to traditional family-based selection in rainbow trout aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have shown previously that bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout can be improved using traditional family-based selection, but progress has been limited to exploiting only between-family genetic variation. Genomic selection (GS) is a new alternative enabling exploitation...

  7. Similar genetic architecture with shared and unique quantitative trait loci for bacterial cold water disease resistance in two rainbow trout breeding populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect QTL for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a 57K SNP array and a genome phys...

  8. Genome-wide association studies reveal similar genetic architecture with shared and unique QTL for Bacterial Cold Water Disease resistance in two rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) breeding populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect QTL for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a 57K SNP array and a genome phys...

  9. Cadmium Accumulation in Periphyton from an Abandoned Mining District in the Buffalo National River, Arkansas.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Jacob R; Bouldin, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    The Rush Mining District along the Buffalo River in Arkansas has a significant history of zinc and lead mining operations. The tails and spoils of these operations deposit heavy amounts of raw ore into streams. One element commonly found in the earth's crust that becomes a minor constituent of the deposition is cadmium. Periphyton samples from Rush Creek and Clabber Creek, two creeks within the Rush Mining District were measured for cadmium as well as two creeks with no history of mining, Spring Creek and Water Creek. Periphyton samples from Rush and Clabber Creek contained mean cadmium concentrations of 436.6 ± 67.3 and 93.38 ± 8.67 µg/kg, respectively. Spring Creek and Water Creek had a mean cadmium concentration of 40.49 ± 3.40 and 41.78 ± 3.99 µg/kg within periphyton. The results indicate increased metal concentrations in algal communities from mined areas. As periphyton is the base of the aquatic food chain, it acts as a conduit for movement of cadmium in the food web.

  10. Soil Biogeochemical Properties and Erosion Source Prediction Model Summary for the Buffalo Bayou Watershed, Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I.

    2015-12-01

    We draw conclusions on the research output and findings from a 4-year multidisciplinary USDA-CBG collaborative program in sustainable integrated monitoring of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss prediction via erosion. The underlying method uses the state-of-the-art stable isotope science of sediment tracing under uncertain hydrologic influences. The research finds are rooted in the (i) application of Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo statistical models to assess the relationship between rainfall-runoff and soil erosion in space and time, (ii) capture of the episodic nature of rainfall events and its role in the spatial distribution of SOC loss from water erosion, (iii) stable isotope composition guided fingerprinting (source and quantity) of eroded soil, and (iv) the creation of an integrated watershed scale statistical soil loss monitoring model driven by spatial and temporal correlation of flow and stable isotope composition. The research theme was successfully applied on the urbanized Buffalo Bayou Watershed in Houston, Texas. The application brought to light novel future research conceptual outlines which will also be discussed in this deliverable to the AGU meeting. These include but not limited to: regional rainfall cluster research, physics of muddy river-bank soil and suspended sediment interaction, and friction & mobility that together make up the plasticity of soil aggregates that control erosion processes and landscape changes in a riparian corridor. References: Ahmed, I., Karim, A., Boutton, T.W., and Strom, K.B. (2013a). "Monitoring Soil Organic Carbon Loss from Erosion Using Stable Isotopes." Proc., Soil Carbon Sequestration, International Conference, May 26-29, Reykjavik, Iceland. Ahmed, I, Bouttom, T.W., Strom, K. B., Karim, A., and Irvin-Smith, N. (2013b). "Soil carbon distribution and loss monitoring in the urbanized Buffalo Bayou watershed, Houston, Texas." Proc., 4th Annual All Investigators Meeting of the North American Carbon Program, February 4

  11. Molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in cattle and buffaloes: a cause for public health concern.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamed, Osman; Fouad, Heba

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a re-emerging disease causing a growing public health burden. The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among cattle and buffaloes with tuberculous lesions. Typical tuberculous lesions were collected from 34 cattle and 34 buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) through postmortem examination of slaughtered animals in abattoirs. DNAs were extracted from samples, and M. tuberculosis was identified by PCR. Positive samples were examined for resistance against rifampicin and isoniazid using GenoType MTBDRplus. Moreover, sera from 90 slaughterhouse workers, butchers, or meat inspectors were examined for the presence of M. tuberculosis antibodies using ELISA. Five cattle (14.7 %) and three buffaloes (8.8 %) tested positive. M. tuberculosis from one cattle was resistant to rifampicin and another was resistant to isoniazid. In addition, the seroprevalence of M. tuberculosis IgG among examined humans was 5.6 %. The occurrence of M. tuberculosis in cattle and buffaloes is a public health concern.

  12. Choice, Stability and Excellence: Parent and Professional Choice in Buffalo's Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinchy, Evans

    1986-01-01

    Reports on teacher, principal, parent, and student reactions to a desegregation plan implemented in Buffalo, New York, which permits teachers to choose the magnet schools in which they desire to teach and parents to select their children's schools. (GC)

  13. Real-time simulation program for De Havilland (Canada) "Buffalo" and "Twin Otter" STOL transports

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-25

    Simulation models of two representative STOL aircraft - the DeHavilland (Canada) "Buffalo" and "Twin Otter" transports - have been generated. The aircraft are described by means of nonlinear equations that will accommodate gross changes in angle of a...

  14. Linearized mathematical models for De Havilland Canada "Buffalo & Twin Otter" STOL transports.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-06-01

    Linearized six degree of freedom rigid body aircraft equations of motion are presented in a stability axes system. Values of stability derivatives are estimated for two representative STOL aircraft - the DeHavilland of Canada 'Buffalo' and 'Twin Otte...

  15. Buffalo's Center for Immunology: A New Answer to an Old Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Noel R.; Bogazzi, Pierluigi E.

    1972-01-01

    The Center for Immunology at the University of Buffalo provides a viable resource for educating medical students in immunology until a department of immunology can be developed within the medical school. (HS)

  16. 78 FR 18777 - Establishment of the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... reverse the decision. The War Department's action in this matter was controversial, especially within the... Indians called the black cavalry troops ``buffalo soldiers'' because of their dark, curly hair, which...

  17. An integrated regional planning/microsimulation model for the Buffalo/Niagara Falls area

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-04-01

    This presentation examines the major planning issues facing the Buffalo and Niagara Falls area, which include freight, cross border congestion, and domestic issues. A Transportation Analysis and Simulation System (TRANSIMS) model is discussed that co...

  18. Somatic cell cloning in Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): effects of interspecies cytoplasmic recipients and activation procedures.

    PubMed

    Kitiyanant, Y; Saikhun, J; Chaisalee, B; White, K L; Pavasuthipaisit, K

    2001-01-01

    Successful nuclear transfer (NT) of somatic cell nuclei from various mammalian species to enucleated bovine oocytes provides a universal cytoplast for NT in endangered or extinct species. Buffalo fetal fibroblasts were isolated from a day 40 fetus and were synchronized in presumptive G(0) by serum deprivation. Buffalo and bovine oocytes from abattoir ovaries were matured in vitro and enucleated at 22 h. In the first experiment, we compared the ability of buffalo and bovine oocyte cytoplasm to support in vitro development of NT embryos produced by buffalo fetal fibroblasts as donor nuclei. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the NT embryos derived from buffalo and bovine oocytes, in fusion (74% versus 71%) and cleavage (77% versus 75%) rates, respectively. No significant differences were also observed in blastocyst development (39% versus 33%) and the mean cell numbers of day 7 cloned blastocysts (88.5 +/- 25.7 versus 51.7 +/- 5.4). In the second experiment, we evaluated the effects of activation with calcium ionophore A23187 on development of NT embryos after electrical fusion. A significantly higher (p < 0.05) percentage of blastocyst development was observed in the NT embryos activated by calcium ionophore and 6-DMAP when compared with 6-DMAP alone (33% versus 17%). The results indicate that the somatic nuclei from buffalo can be reprogrammed after transfer to enucleated bovine oocytes, resulting in the production of cloned buffalo blastocysts similar to those transferred into buffalo oocytes. Calcium ionophore used in conjunction with 6-DMAP effectively induces NT embryo development.

  19. Canine Breed-Specific Hepatopathies.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2017-05-01

    Canine hepatopathies, both congenital and acquired, arise from an interaction between genes and environment. Many show increased breed prevalences. This article reviews the current understanding on breed predispositions for congenital portosystemic shunts; microvascular dysplasia and portal vein hypoplasia; ductal plate abnormalities (congenital hepatic fibrosis and Caroli disease); chronic hepatitis (both copper associated and idiopathic); vacuolar hepatopathies; and gallbladder mucocele. Although all these diseases can occur in many breeds and crossbreeds, understanding breed predispositions helps recognition and will guide future research to improve understanding of causes and treatments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic characteristic of swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) from Pampangan, South Sumatra based on blood protein profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windusari, Yuanita; Hanum, Laila; Wahyudi, Rizki

    2017-11-01

    Swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is an endemic species and one of the genetic wealth of South Sumatra with a distribution area in the district of Pampangan (OganIlir and OganOganIlir). Suspected inbreeding causes decreased phenotypic properties. Inbreeding among various swamp buffalo is certainly not only lower the qualities but also genotypes and phenotypes. It is of interest to determine kinship variants swamp buffaloes from Pampangan through the analysis of a blood protein profile. Blood protein profile of four variants swamps buffalo was studied by using five electrophoresis system i.e. pre-albumin (Palb), albumin (Alb), ceruloplasmin (Cp), transferrin (Tf) and transferrin post (Ptf). In this paper, it is obtained that there was no significant differences among the four variants of the buffaloes were used as a sample. Prealbumin has two alleles (Palb1 and Palb2), albumin has three alleles (Alba, AlbB, AlbC), ceruloplasmin has one allele (BPA), post-transferrin has one allele (PTFA) with an allele frequency 1.0000 at any time transferrin has two alleles (TFA and TFB) with the allele frequency of 0.7500 and 1.0000. Characteristics prealbumin (Palb), albumin (Alb), ceruloplasmin (Cp), and post-transferrin (P-tf) is monomorphic, while transferrin is polymorphic average heterozygosity values all loci (H) 0.1286. Based on average heterozygosity, the swamp buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) from Pampangan has low genetic variation and closest genetic relationship.

  1. Identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Harshan, Hiron M; Sankar, Surya; Singh, L P; Singh, Manish Kumar; Sudharani, S; Ansari, M R; Singh, S K; Majumdar, A C; Joshi, P

    2009-10-01

    The FN-2 family of seminal plasma proteins represents the major protein fraction of bovine seminal plasma. These proteins also constitute the major seminal plasma proteins fraction in horse, goat and bison seminal plasma and are present in pig, rat, mouse, hamster and human seminal plasma. BSP-A1 and BSP-A2, the predominant proteins of the FN-2 family, are collectively termed as PDC-109. Fn-2 proteins play an important role in fertilization, including sperm capacitation and formation of oviductal sperm reservoirs. Significantly, BSP proteins were also shown to have negative effects in the context of sperm storage. No conclusive evidence for the presence of buffalo seminal plasma protein(s) similar to PDC-109 exists. Studies with buffalo seminal plasma indicated that isolation and identification of PDC-109-like protein(s) from buffalo seminal plasma by conventional methods might be difficult. Thus, antibodies raised against PDC-109 isolated, and purified from cattle seminal plasma, were used for investigating the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma. Buffalo seminal plasma proteins were resolved on SDS-PAGE, blotted to nitro cellulose membranes and probed for the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) using the PDC-109 antisera raised in rabbits. A distinct immunoreactive band well below the 20-kDa regions indicated the presence of PDC-109-like protein(s) in buffalo seminal plasma.

  2. Comparative study of Anaplasma parasites in tick carrying buffaloes and cattle

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Z.I.; Hu, Song-hua; Arijo, A.G.; Habib, M.; Khalid, M.

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study on the prevalence of Anaplasma parasite was conducted on ticks carrying buffaloes and cattle. Five hundred blood samples of both animals (250 of each) were collected during February, March and April. Thin blood smears on glass slides were made, fixed in 100% methyl alcohol and examined. Microscopic examination revealed that 205 (41%) animals had Anaplasma parasites, out of which 89, 44 and 72 animals had Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale and mixed infection respectively. Infected buffaloes and cattle were 75 and 130 respectively. The infection in female was 53 and 92 in buffaloes and cattle respectively. Twenty-two and 92 blood samples of male were found positive in buffaloes and cattle respectively. Comparative study revealed that the cattle were 26.82% more susceptible than buffaloes. The parasite prevailing percentage in female of both animals was slightly higher than that of the male. This investigation was aimed at studying the comparative prevalence of Anaplasma parasite in tick carrying buffaloes and cattle. PMID:16252338

  3. Blood gas and serum biochemical RIs for healthy newborn Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Santana, André M; Silva, Daniela G; Clemente, Virna; Pizauro, Lucas J L; Bernardes, Priscila A; Santana, Clarissa H; Eckersall, Peter D; Fagliari, José J

    2018-03-01

    There is a lack of published work on RIs for newborn buffaloes. Establishing blood gas and serum biochemical RIs for newborn buffaloes is important for monitoring health. This study establishes blood gas and serum biochemical RIs of newborn buffaloes. Twenty-eight newborn buffaloes, 10-30 days old, were selected. Thirty blood biochemical variables were analyzed. The Anderson-Darling test was used to assess the normality of the distribution. The Dixon test and the Tukey test were used to identify outliers. The RI and 90% CI were determined using standard and robust methods and the Box-Cox transformation. A total of 30 RIs for healthy buffalo calves have been reported in this study. RIs for blood gas variables were reported for pH, partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO 2 ), saturation of O 2 (SO 2 ), bicarbonate (cHCO 3 - ), base excess (BE), total carbon dioxide (ctCO 2 ), and anion gap (AG). RIs for serum biochemical variables were reported for glucose (GLU), direct bilirubin (DB), total bilirubin (TB), AST, ALP, GGT, CK, LDH, creatinine (CREA), urea, cholesterol (CHOL), triglycerides (TG), Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, iCa, Cl, iron, total protein (TP), and albumin (ALB). This is the first reported study covering complete serum chemistry and blood gas RIs for healthy 1-month-old Murrah buffaloes. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Detomidine-diazepam-ketamine anaesthesia in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves.

    PubMed

    Pawde, A M; Amarpal; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Pratap, K; Bisht, G S

    2000-04-01

    Eight buffalo calves (8-12 months, 70-100 kg) were randomly assigned to two groups of four animals each. Animals of group I were given detomidine (100 micrograms/kg), whereas animals of group II received a mixture of detomidine (100 micrograms/kg), diazepam (100 micrograms/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (DDK) intravenously. Various clinical parameters, such as weak time, down time, pedal and pinprick reflexes, muscle relaxation and extent of sedation, as well as heart and respiratory rates and electrocardiograms were measured before (time 0) and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 min after treatment. In all the animals of group II (DDK), the pedal reflex was completely abolished (score: 3.00 +/- 0.00) within 5 min, the pinprick response was either very weak or it was completely abolished at this interval. Muscle relaxation and sedation were excellent within 5 min of DDK administration. The depth of sedation and analgesia was maximum from 5 to 15 min postinjection. Detomidine alone, however, failed to produce appropriate depression of the pedal and pinprick reflexes, sedation was mild and muscle relaxation was inadequate. Heart rate showed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in group I, but the decrease was non-significant in group II. A more pronounced increase in respiratory rate was observed in group I as compared to group II. Animals of both groups recovered within 90 min without any complication. Minimal changes in the cardiovascular system in the group given the DDK combination were an advantage over the group given detomidine. The results indicated that DDK combination is safe and suitable for 15 min of anaesthesia with excellent muscle relaxation and has only limited cardiorespiratory effects in buffaloes.

  5. Population genetic analysis of Theileria parva isolated in cattle and buffaloes in Tanzania using minisatellite and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Rukambile, Elpidius; Machuka, Eunice; Njahira, Moses; Kyalo, Martina; Skilton, Robert; Mwega, Elisa; Chota, Andrew; Mathias, Mkama; Sallu, Raphael; Salih, Diaeldin

    2016-07-15

    A population genetic study of Theileria parva was conducted on 103 cattle and 30 buffalo isolates from Kibaha, Lushoto, Njombe Districts and selected National parks in Tanzania. Bovine blood samples were collected from these study areas and categorized into 5 populations; Buffalo, Cattle which graze close to buffalo, Kibaha, Lushoto and Njombe. Samples were tested by nested PCR for T. parva DNA and positives were compared for genetic diversity to the T. parva Muguga vaccine reference strain, using 3micro and 11 minisatellite markers selected from all 4 chromosomes of the parasite genome. The diversity across populations was determined by the mean number of different alleles, mean number of effective alleles, mean number of private allele and expected heterozygosity. The mean number of allele unique to populations for Cattle close to buffalo, Muguga, Njombe, Kibaha, Lushoto and Buffalo populations were 0.18, 0.24, 0.63, 0.71, 1.63 and 3.37, respectively. The mean number of different alleles ranged from 6.97 (Buffalo) to 0.07 (Muguga). Mean number of effective alleles ranged from 4.49 (Buffalo) to 0.29 (Muguga). The mean expected heterozygosity were 0.07 0.29, 0.45, 0.48, 0.59 and 0.64 for Muguga, cattle close to buffalo, Kibaha, Njombe, Lushoto and Buffalo populations, respectively. The Buffalo and Lushoto isolates possessed a close degree of diversity in terms of mean number of different alleles, effective alleles, private alleles and expected heterozygosity. The study revealed more diversity in buffalo isolates and further studies are recommended to establish if there is sharing of parasites between cattle and buffaloes which may affect the effectiveness of the control methods currently in use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from buffalo, bovine, ovine, and caprine milk samples collected in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aires-de-Sousa, Marta; Parente, Carlos E S R; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney; Bonna, Isabel C F; Silva, Denise A; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2007-06-01

    Eighty-four staphylococcal isolates were obtained from milk samples from cows, sheep, goats, and buffalo with subclinical mastitis and from colonization samples from ostriches. The animals were hosted in 18 small dairy herds and an ostrich breeding located in 10 municipalities of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Thirty isolates were identified as Staphylococcus aureus by biochemical and molecular techniques and were comparatively characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods. The molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed five clonal types (PFGE A, spa type t359, sequence type 747 [ST747]; PFGE B, spa type t1180, ST750; PFGE C, spa type t605, ST126; PFGE D, spa type t127, ST751; and PFGE F, spa type t002, ST5). None of the isolates harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin or exfoliative toxin D gene. The detection of major clone A (in 63% of the isolates) in different herds, among all animal species studied, and in infection and colonization samples evidenced its geographical spread among Rio de Janeiro State and no host preference among the animal species. Comparison with S. aureus from a human origin suggested that all but one clone found in the present study might be animal specific.

  7. Breeding productivity of Smith Island black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, Dennis G.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Stotts, D.B.; Harrison, M.K.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the breeding performance of American black ducks (Anas rubripes) on Smith Island, Chesapeake Bay, to improve our understanding of island black duck breeding ecology and to make management recommendations to enhance productivity. During 1995-96, we implanted 56 female black ducks with 20-g radio transmitters and tracked 35 of the individuals through the breeding season to locate nests, determine nest fate, and identify brood habitat. We also increased preseason banding efforts and compared capture characteristics over 12 years with those from the Deal Island Wildlife Management Area, a banding site on the mainland of Tangier Sound. A low rate of nesting (37%), lack of renesting, and poor hatching success (31%) indicated that island salt marsh habitats present a harsh environment for breeding black ducks. Black ducks located 11 of 13 nests (85%) in black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus) marsh where they were vulnerable to flooding from extreme tides and to egg predators. No nests were found on forested tree hammocks, a feature that distinguishes Smith Island from nearby South Marsh and Bloodsworth Islands. Nest predators included red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), herring gulls (Larus argentams), fish crows (Corvus ossifragus), and, potentially, Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). Unlike mainland red foxes, foxes radio tracked on Smith Island were found to be capable swimmers and effective low marsh predators. We found shoreline meadows of widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima) to be important foraging sites for black ducks and suspected that the virtual absence of fresh water in this high salinity environment (1217+ ppt) to incur some cost in terms of growth and survival of ducklings. Preseason bandings revealed a high proportion of banded adults and a strong positive correlation in age ratios with the Deal Island banding site. This latter finding strongly suggests a negative universal effect of storm tides on nest success for Tangier Sound black ducks. Management to

  8. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and Methods for Mitigation and Management in the Southern Flathead Valley, Montana, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Dennis L.; Gregory, Shari K.; Matthews, William C. Jr.

    Kerr Hydroelectric Dam is located at the south end of Flathead Lake, controls water levels on the lake and the Flathead River below the dam, and is currently operated as a load control facility. Current operation of Kerr Dam creates the greatest yearly water level fluctuations on both the lake and river during the Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffitti) brood and nesting period. Data collected from 1980-1982 indicated that goose nest numbers on the river were lower than during the 1950's, and that brood habitat on the lake may be limiting the goose population there. Our study was conducted frommore » 1983-1987 to determine the effects of Kerr Dam operation on Canada goose populations and habitat on the south half of Flathead Lake and the Flathead River, and to formulate management and mitigation recommendations. Nesting geese on the river appeared to be negatively affected by a lack of nest sites free from predators, and responded to available artificial nest structures with an increase in nest numbers and nesting success. Under current dam operation, river channel depths and widths do not discourage access to nesting islands by mammalian predators during some years and high predation on ground nests occurs. Intensively used brood areas on the lake and river were identified and described. Brood habitat on the lake was lower in quality and quantity than on the river due to dam operations. Gosling mortality on the lake was high, almost 2 times higher than on the river. Lake broods expended more energy obtaining food than river broods. Losses of brood habitat in the form of wet meadow marshes were documented and mitigation options developed. Management/mitigation alternatives and monitoring methods for nesting and brooding geese were identified.« less

  9. Breeding cassava for higher yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cassava is a root crop grown for food and for starch production. Breeding progress is slowed by asexual production and high levels of heterozygosity. Germplasm resources are rich and accessible to breeders through genebanks worldwide. Breeding objectives include high root yield, yield stability, dis...

  10. Persian walnut breeding in California

    Treesearch

    Charles A. Leslie; Gale H. McGranahan

    2004-01-01

    For over 50 years the University of California Davis Walnut Breeding Program has worked to address the needs of California walnut growers by identifying genetic approaches to problems and developing improved cultivars. The breeding program is a cooperative endeavor that draws on the efforts and resources of university researchers and facilities, USDA germplasm programs...

  11. Intelligent transportation system (ITS) study for the Buffalo and Niagara Falls metropolitan area, Erie and Niagara Counties, New York : functional requirements, working paper #4

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-06-18

    This paper is the fourth in a series that together will comprise an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Study for the Buffalo / Niagara Falls region. This document presents the market packages for the deployment of the Buffalo/Niagara Falls area ...

  12. Modeling the spatial distribution of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kristen; Budke, Christine M.; Ward, Michael P.; Kerry, Ruth; Ingram, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The population density of wildlife reservoirs contributes to disease transmission risk for domestic animals. The objective of this study was to model the African buffalo distribution of the Kruger National Park. A secondary objective was to collect field data to evaluate models and determine environmental predictors of buffalo detection. Spatial distribution models were created using buffalo census information and archived data from previous research. Field data were collected during the dry (August 2012) and wet (January 2013) seasons using a random walk design. The fit of the prediction models were assessed descriptively and formally by calculating the root mean square error (rMSE) of deviations from field observations. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effects of environmental variables on the detection of buffalo herds and linear regression was used to identify predictors of larger herd sizes. A zero-inflated Poisson model produced distributions that were most consistent with expected buffalo behavior. Field data confirmed that environmental factors including season (P = 0.008), vegetation type (P = 0.002), and vegetation density (P = 0.010) were significant predictors of buffalo detection. Bachelor herds were more likely to be detected in dense vegetation (P = 0.005) and during the wet season (P = 0.022) compared to the larger mixed-sex herds. Static distribution models for African buffalo can produce biologically reasonable results but environmental factors have significant effects and therefore could be used to improve model performance. Accurate distribution models are critical for the evaluation of disease risk and to model disease transmission. PMID:28902858

  13. Ovum pick-up interval in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) managed under wetland conditions in Argentina: Effect on follicular population, oocyte recovery, and in vitro embryo development.

    PubMed

    Konrad, J; Clérico, G; Garrido, M J; Taminelli, G; Yuponi, M; Yuponi, R; Crudeli, G; Sansinena, M

    2017-08-01

    The excellent adaptation of water buffalo (Bubalis bubalis) to swampy environments means that animals are frequently managed in areas with restricted access for reproductive procedures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the ovum pick-up (OPU) interval on follicular population, oocyte recovery, oocyte quality and in vitro embryo production. Twelve Murrah buffaloes were subjected to two consecutive dominant follicle reductions, and randomly assigned to either 7-day (n=6) or 14-day (n=6) OPU interval groups. Although there was no significant difference in the average number of small (<3mm) and large (>8mm) diameter follicles available per OPU, a higher proportion of medium-sized follicles (3-8mm) were observed in the 14-day interval group (5.129 vs 3.267; p<0.05). The number of recovered oocytes per donor was also significantly higher (4.51 vs. 2.8; p<0.05) in the 14-day interval group, although this was attributed to an increase in the proportion of lower quality oocytes (grades III and IV). After in vitro fertilization, embryo developmental competence from grade I and II oocytes was superior to that from grade III and IV oocytes, irrespective of OPU interval group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of grade I and II oocytes cleaved after sperm co-incubation; however, there was a higher proportion of blastocysts produced in 14-day interval group (28 vs. 6%, p<0.05). No blastocysts were produced from grade III and IV oocytes. This study indicates it is possible to use a 14-day interval for oocyte collection in water buffalo; this approach could be considered as an alternative when access to animals is restricted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Water Intrusion Problems in Transit Tunnels

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-05-01

    This report presents the findings of five case studies in which an in-depth analysis was made of tunnel water intrusion problems in transit tunnels. Water intrusion parameters of transit systems in Atlanta, Boston, Buffalo, New York and Washington, D...

  15. Animal breeding and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Frank W

    2005-01-01

    Single-locus disorders in domesticated animals were among the first Mendelian traits to be documented after the rediscovery of Mendelism, and to be included in early linkage maps. The use of linkage maps and (increasingly) comparative genomics has been central to the identification of the causative gene for single-locus disorders of considerable practical importance. The ‘score-card’ in domestic animals is now more than 100 disorders for which the molecular lesion has been identified and hence for which a DNA test is available. Because of the limited lifespan of any such test, a cost-effective and hence popular means of protecting the intellectual property inherent in a DNA test is not to publish the discovery. While understandable, this practice creates a disconcerting precedent. For multifactorial disorders that are scored on an all-or-none basis or into many classes, the effectiveness of control schemes could be greatly enhanced by selection on estimated breeding values for liability. Genetic variation for resistance to pathogens and parasites is ubiquitous. Selection for resistance can therefore be successful. Because of the technical and welfare challenges inherent in the requirement to expose animals to pathogens or parasites in order to be able to select for resistance, there is a very active search for DNA markers for resistance. The first practical fruits of this research were seen in 2002, with the launch of a national scrapie control programme in the UK. PMID:16048793

  16. Best of Breed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason

    2004-01-01

    No team of engineers, no matter how much time they took or how many bottles of cabernet they consumed, would dream up an antenna that looked like a deer antler on steroids. Yet that's what a group at NASA Ames Research Center came up with-thanks to a little help from Darwin. NASA's Space Technology 5 nanosatellites, which are scheduled to start measuring Earth's magnetosphere in late 2004, requires an antenna that can receive a wide range of frequencies regardless of the spacecraft's orientation. Rather than leave such exacting requirements in the hands of a human, the engineers decided to breed a design using genetic algorithms and 32 Linux PCs. The computers generated small antenna-constructing programs (the genotypes) and executed them to produce designs (the phenotypes). Then the designs were evaluated using an antenna simulator. The team settled on the form pictured here. You won't find this kind of antenna in any textbook, design guide, or research paper. But its innovative structure meets a challenging set of specifications. If successfully deployed, it will be the first evolved antenna to make it out of the lab and the first piece of evolved hardware ever to fly in space.

  17. Isolation and characterization of EG-like cells from Chinese swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Huang, Ben; Xie, Ti-San; Shi, De-Shun; Li, Tong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Mo, Yi; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Meng-Mei

    2007-10-01

    There have been few studies done on the isolation and characterization of Chinese swamp buffalo embryonic germ cells (EG cells). Here, we first report on EG-like cells isolated from Chinese swamp buffalo fetuses. The results showed the cells grew in large, multilayered colonies, which were densely packed with an obvious border resembling mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and EG cells. The buffalo EG-like cells expressed AP, SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and OCT-4. By RT-PCR, we found that undifferentiated swamp buffalo EG-like cells expressed the OCT-4, NANOG, SOX2, FOXD3, GP130, STAT3, and HEB gene mRNA, but not Fgf4. When these cells were cultured for more than 2weeks without passage, they could differentiate into several types of cells including fibroblast-like, neuron-like, smooth muscle-like, and epithelial-like cells. Some cells formed simple embryoid bodies (EBs) and cystic EBs by suspension culture. By RT-PCR, we found cystic EBs expressed FOXD3, GP130, STAT3 and HEB gene mRNA, but not OCT-4, NANOG, and SOX2 gene mRNA, which could be detected in undifferentiated buffalo EG-like cells. At the same time, the expression of KERATIN-14 (Endoderm), GATA4, ACTA2 (Mesoderm) and TUBB3 (Ectoderm) gene mRNA were also detected in cystic EBs. The results suggested that these cells were capable of forming three germ layers in in vitro differentiation. The expression of OCT-4, NANOG and SOX2 might be essential for Chinese swamp buffalo EG-like cells in a pluripotent state. During the isolation and culture of Chinese swamp buffalo EG-like cells, we found the fetuses that were at 30-80days post-coitus were more efficient than others; and the mechanical method was better than trypsin digestion. The maximal passage of the mechanical method was eight, but the trypsin digestion was just three passages. So it seemed like that the buffalo EG-like cells were sensitive to trypsin. In summary, we were the first to isolate and characterize Chinese swamp buffalo EG-like cells that had

  18. Fertility following CIDR based synchronization regimens in anoestrous Nili-Ravi buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Z; Ahmad, E; Singh, J; Ahmad, N

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare oestrus expression and fertility rate in used and new controlled internal drug releasing (CIDR) device treated anoestrous buffaloes. Furthermore, to determine the timing of ovulation, and fertility rate in estradiol benzoate (EB) and GnRH-administered CIDR-treated anoestrous Nili-Ravi buffaloes. In experiment 1, buffaloes received either a used CIDR (UCIDR, n = 35) or a new CIDR (NCIDR, n = 36) for 7 day and PGF2α on day 6. Oestrous expression was similar (p > 0.05) between UCIDR (88.5%) and NCIDR (96.6%) buffaloes. The pregnancy rate did not differ (p > 0.05) because of treatment (37.1% in UCIDR vs 36.6% in NCIDR). In experiment 2, buffaloes (n = 55) received CIDR device for 7 days and PGF2α, on day 6 and randomly assigned into three treatment groups: (i) CIDR-EB (n = 17) received EB on day 8, (ii) CIDR-GnRH (n = 18) received GnRH on day 9 and (iii) control (n = 20) received no further treatment. Mean interval from CIDR removal to ovulation in CIDR-EB, CIDR-GnRH and CIDR group were 61.3 ± 0.8, 64.9 ± 1.8 and 65.1 ± 16.7 h, respectively. However, the buffaloes in the CIDR-EB and CIDR-GnRH group had lesser variability in the timing of ovulation compared to control. The pregnancy rate of both CIDR-EB group (58%) and CIDR-GnRH group (61%) were tended to be higher (p < 0.1) than control (30%). In conclusion, compared to NCIDR devices, previously UCIDR devices are equally effective to induce oestrus in anoestrous buffaloes resulting optimal pregnancy rate. Administration of EB and GnRH after CIDR removal results in tighter synchrony (less variability) and improved fertility in anoestrous buffaloes. CIDR based synchronization regimens have great potential in fertility improvement in anoestrous buffaloes. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Disease constraints for utilization of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) on game ranches in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Munag'andu, Hetron M; Siamudaala, Victor M; Nambota, Andrew; Bwalya, John M; Munyeme, Musso; Mweene, Aaron S; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Eco-tourism depending on wildlife is becoming increasingly profitable and landowners are beginning to favor game farming and ecotourism. In these areas, large-scale translocation of wildlife involves a diversity of species and large populations. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is one of the major tourist attractions in Zambia. It accounts for 8.7% and 12.4% of the total animal species hunted in the Game Management Areas and the total hunting revenue earned in Zambia, respectively. It is ecologically an important animal species essential for the purpose of habitat control and facilitating the provision of suitable grazing pastures. However, the rearing of the African buffalo on game ranches has been hampered by its carrier state of the Southern Africa Terroritory (SAT) serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (FMD). The African buffalo is also known to be a carrier of Theileria parva lawrencei, the causative agent of corridor disease (CD) that continues to have devastating effects on the livestock industry in Zambia. In addition, the importation of buffaloes from countries with populations endemic to bovine tuberculosis is highly restricted. Veterinary regulations in Zambia, strongly advocate against the translocation of buffaloes from protected areas to private ranches for disease control purposes thereby mounting a considerable constraint on the economic and ecological viability of the industry. It is hoped that this review will motivate the relevant government authorities in exploiting ways in which this animal species play a central role in eco-tourism.

  20. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  1. Identification of serum protein markers for early diagnosis of pregnancy in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Buragohain, Lukumoni; Nanda, Trilok; Ghosh, Arnab; Ghosh, Mayukh; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Sunil; Gupta, Sambhu Sharan; Bharali, Arpita; Mohanty, Ashok K; Singh, Inderjeet; Balhara, Ashok Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Improper or delayed pregnancy diagnosis has significant impact over animal production, particularly in buffaloes which inherently suffer from several reproductive inefficiencies. Thus the present study has undertaken to identify serum protein markers pertaining to early pregnancy diagnosis in buffaloes. Serum samples were collected from 10 pregnant Murrah Buffalo heifers at weekly intervals from days 0-35 post-artificial insemination and from 12 inseminated non-pregnant cyclic buffalo heifers on days 0, 7, 14 and 21. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and densitometric analysis revealed the presence of five protein spots showing average density fold change of ≥4 during early pregnancy. Mass spectrometry analysis identified these up-regulated proteins as anti-testosterone antibody light chain, apolipoprotein A-II precursor, serum amyloid A, cytokeratin type II, component IV isoform 1, which are have established roles in embryogenesis, but over-expression of the fifth identified protein immunoglobulin lambda light chain in pregnancy has been elucidated as a novel finding in the current study. Further, with bioinformatics analysis, potential antigenic B-cell epitopes were predicted for all these five proteins. An antibody cocktail-based approach involving antibodies against all these five up-regulated entire proteins or their epitopes could be developed for early detection of pregnancy in buffaloes. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Fractionation and identification of novel antioxidant peptides from buffalo and bovine casein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Shazly, Ahmed Behdal; He, Zhiyong; El-Aziz, Mahmoud Abd; Zeng, Maomao; Zhang, Shuang; Qin, Fang; Chen, Jie

    2017-10-01

    Buffalo and bovine caseins were hydrolysed by alcalase and trypsin to produce novel antioxidant peptides. The casein hydrolysates were purified using ultrafiltration (UF) and further characterized by RP-HPLC. The fractions produced higher antioxidant activities were identified for their peptides using LC MS/MS. All UF-VI (MW<1kDa) fractions showed higher antioxidant activity. Hydrolysate produced by alcalase for buffalo casein (UF-VI with 54.84-fold purification) showed higher antioxidant activity than that obtained by trypsin. Trypsin hydrolysate contained high amount of hydrophobic amino acids while alcalase hydrolysate consisted mainly of Ser, Arg, Ala and Leu. The antioxidant peptides identified by LC MS/MS were RELEE, MEDNKQ and TVA, EQL in buffalo casein hydrolysates produced by trypsin and alcalase, respectively. Mechanism and reaction pathways of selected antioxidant peptides with ABTS were proposed. Conclusively, buffalo casein provided antioxidant peptides similar to bovine, suggesting that buffalo casein is a novel source of antioxidant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex chromosome abnormalities and sterility in river buffalo.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Di Palo, R; Iannuzzi, A; Ciotola, F; Peretti, V; Neglia, G; Campanile, G; Zicarelli, L; Iannuzzi, L

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen male river buffaloes, 119 females with reproductive problems (which had reached reproductive age but had failed to become pregnant in the presence of bulls) and two male co-twins underwent both clinical and cytogenetic investigation. Clinical analyses performed by veterinary practitioners revealed normal body conformation and external genitalia for most females. However, some subjects showed some slight male traits such as large base horn circumference, prominent withers and tight pelvis. Rectal palpation revealed damage to internal sex adducts varying between atrophy of Mullerian ducts to complete lack of internal sex adducts (with closed vagina). All bulls had normal karyotypes at high resolution banding, while 25 animals (23 females and 2 male co-twins) (20.7%) with reproductive problems were found to carry the following sex chromosome abnormalities: X monosomy (2 females); X trisomy (1 female); sex reversal syndrome (2 females); and free-martinism (18 females and 2 males). All female carriers were sterile. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Tetraplex PCR assay involving double gene-sites discriminates beef and buffalo in Malaysian meat curry and burger products.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M A Motalib; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, S M Azad; Asing; Nizar, Nina Naquiah Ahmad; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Ali, Lokman; Asaduzzaman, Md; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque

    2017-06-01

    Replacement of beef by buffalo and vice versa is frequent in global markets, but their authentication is challenging in processed foods due to the fragmentation of most biomarkers including DNA. The shortening of target sequences through use of two target sites might ameliorate assay reliability because it is highly unlikely that both targets will be lost during food processing. For the first time, we report a tetraplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting two different DNA regions in beef (106 and 120-bp) and buffalo (90 and 138-bp) mitochondrial genes to discriminate beef and buffalo in processed foods. All targets were stable under boiling, autoclaving and microwave cooking conditions. A survey in Malaysian markets revealed 71% beef curries contained buffalo but there was no buffalo in beef burgers. The assay detected down to 0.01ng DNA and 1% meat in admixed and burger products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops.

    PubMed

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-07-17

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance.

  6. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance. PMID:26193269

  7. The natural resources supply indexes study of the pig breeding scale in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Bi-Bin; Zhang, Qi-Zhen; Ji, Xue-Qiang; Xu, Yue-Feng

    2017-08-01

    For the pollution problem of the pig breeding scale, we took three indexes as evaluation criterion, including arable land per capita, the water resource per capita and per capita share of grain. Then SPSS was used to synthesized the natural resources supply indexes of the pig breeding scale. The results show that with the fast development of technology and the steadily rising of grain production, the natural resources supply indexes of the pig breeding scale are raising constantly.

  8. Efficient Breeding by Genomic Mating.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Deniz; Sánchez, Julio I

    2016-01-01

    Selection in breeding programs can be done by using phenotypes (phenotypic selection), pedigree relationship (breeding value selection) or molecular markers (marker assisted selection or genomic selection). All these methods are based on truncation selection, focusing on the best performance of parents before mating. In this article we proposed an approach to breeding, named genomic mating, which focuses on mating instead of truncation selection. Genomic mating uses information in a similar fashion to genomic selection but includes information on complementation of parents to be mated. Following the efficiency frontier surface, genomic mating uses concepts of estimated breeding values, risk (usefulness) and coefficient of ancestry to optimize mating between parents. We used a genetic algorithm to find solutions to this optimization problem and the results from our simulations comparing genomic selection, phenotypic selection and the mating approach indicate that current approach for breeding complex traits is more favorable than phenotypic and genomic selection. Genomic mating is similar to genomic selection in terms of estimating marker effects, but in genomic mating the genetic information and the estimated marker effects are used to decide which genotypes should be crossed to obtain the next breeding population.

  9. Lice outbreak in buffaloes: evidence of Anaplasma marginale transmission by sucking lice Haematopinus tuberculatus.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Lopes, Leandro Sâmia; Diaz, Jorge Damian Stumpfs; Tonin, Alexandre Alberto; Stefani, Lenita Moura; Araújo, Denise Nunes

    2013-06-01

    Lice infestations are commonly seen in buffaloes, causing damage directly to the animal, i.e., itching, skin lesions, and anemia. In addition, these insects can also be vectors for infectious diseases. The present study describes an outbreak of lice in buffaloes as well as evidence for Haematopinus tuberculatus acting as a vector of anaplasmosis. Lice and blood were collected from 4 young buffaloes (2- to 4-mo-old) and a molecular analysis for the presence of Anaplasma marginale was conducted. DNA of A. marginale was detected in the blood of all 4 animals. Twelve lice were collected and separated in 4 groups, with 3 insects each, to comprise a pool of samples. After DNA extraction and molecular analysis, a positive PCR for A. marginale was found in all pooled samples. These results identify sucking lice as potential vectors of anaplasmosis. However, additional studies are necessary to fully evaluate the vector potential of H. tuberculatus for A. maginale transmission.

  10. Aflatoxin M1 in buffalo and cow milk in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kara, Recep; Ince, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Potential hazardous human exposure to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) via consumption of milk and milk products has been demonstrated by many researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of this mycotoxin in buffalo and cow milk samples in the city of Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. For this purpose, 126 buffalo and 124 cow milk samples were collected from dairy farms in Afyonkarahisar province. AFM1 levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. Although AFM1 was not detected in cow milk samples, AFM1 was found above the limit of detection (<0.008-0.032 µg/L) in 27% (34 out of 126) of the buffalo milk samples. The results of this study indicated the importance of continuous surveillance of commonly consumed milk or milk product samples for AFM1 contamination in Turkey.

  11. [Effect of comprehensive schistosomiasis control measures with focus on buffalo and sheep removal in Anxiang County].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Song; Li, Fei-Yue; Zhu, Shao-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Biao; Yi, Ping; Luo, Zhi-Hong; Ren, Guang-Hui; Li, Yi-Yi; Tang, Ling; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-06-01

    To understand the effect of comprehensive schistosomiasis control measures with focus on buffalo and sheep removal in Anxiang City, Dongting Lake area. The data of buffalo and sheep removal, routine schistosomiasis control measures such as disease detection and treatment, Oncomelania snail survey and control, as well as health education were collected and analyzed in Anxiang County, Hunan Province from 2004 to 2012. The schistosome infection rates of people, domestic animals and snails decreased from 11.23%, 17.06% and 1.07% in 2004 when the comprehensive measures had not been implemented to 0.58%, 0 and 0 in 2012, respectively. The average density of infected snails decreased from 0.003 4 snails/0.1 m2 to 0. The comprehensive control measures with focus on buffalo and sheep removal are significantly effective, and can control the transmission of schistosomiasis in marshland and lake regions.

  12. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine milk in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Kheirabadi, Elahe Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is one of the most common infections worldwide. However, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly explained. One of the suggested theories is transmission via raw milk from animals to human beings. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of H. pylori in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds in Iran. In the present study, 447 bulk milk samples from 230 dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds were collected in four provinces and tested for H. pylori by cultural method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of the ureC (glmM) gene. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Using the cultural method, three of 447 milk samples (0.67%), including two sheep (2.2%) and one buffalo (1.6%) milk samples, were found to be contaminated with H. pylori. H. pylori ureC gene was detected in 56 (12.5%) of milk samples, including 19 cow (14.1%), 11 sheep (12.2%), nine goat (8.7%), two camel (3.6%), and 15 buffalo (23.4%) milk samples. Using PCR method, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in the level of contamination with H. pylori between milk samples collected from different species. The present study is the first report of the isolation of H. pylori from raw sheep and buffalo milk in Iran and the first demonstration of H. pylori DNA in camel and buffalo milk.

  13. Soya-lecithin in extender improves the freezability and fertility of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Akhter, S; Ansari, M S; Andrabi, S M H; Rakha, B A; Ullah, N; Khalid, M

    2012-10-01

    Egg yolk is routinely used as a cryoprotectant in semen extenders. However, it may contain cryoprotective antagonists, and there are hygienic risks associated with its use. Proteins of plant origin, like soya-lecithin, lack these hazards. The aim of this study was to use soya-lecithin as a cryoprotectant in extender and to investigate its effects on in vitro quality and in vivo fertility of buffalo semen. Semen from three buffalo bulls was frozen in tris-citric extender containing 5.0%, 10% or 15% soya-lecithin or 20% egg yolk. Sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability were assessed post-dilution, pre-freezing and post-thaw. In Post-dilution and pre-freezing, the values for motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability remained higher (p ≤ 0.05) in extenders containing 10% soya-lecithin and control compared with extender containing 5% and 15% soya-lecithin. However, motility, plasma membrane integrity and viability were higher (p < 0.05) in extender containing 10% soya-lecithin compared with control and extenders containing 5% and 15% soya-lecithin. Semen from two buffalo bulls was frozen in tris-citric extender containing either 10% soya-lecithin or 20% egg yolk. Higher (p < 0.05) fertility rate was recorded in buffaloes inseminated with semen containing 10% soya-lecithin (56%) compared with 20% egg yolk (41.5%). The results suggest that 10% soya-lecithin in extender improves the freezability and fertility of buffalo bull spermatozoa and can be used as an alternate to egg yolk in cryopreservation of buffalo semen. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Buffalo, Bush Meat, and the Zoonotic Threat of Brucellosis in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kathleen Anne; Blackburn, Jason Kenna; Vandewalle, Mark Eric; Pesapane, Risa; Baipoledi, Eddie Kekgonne; Elzer, Phil H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of global importance infecting humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. Little is known about the epidemiology and persistence of brucellosis in wildlife in Southern Africa, particularly in Botswana. Methods Archived wildlife samples from Botswana (1995–2000) were screened with the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and included the African buffalo (247), bushbuck (1), eland (5), elephant (25), gemsbok (1), giraffe (9), hartebeest (12), impala (171), kudu (27), red lechwe (10), reedbuck (1), rhino (2), springbok (5), steenbok (2), warthog (24), waterbuck (1), wildebeest (33), honey badger (1), lion (43), and zebra (21). Human case data were extracted from government annual health reports (1974–2006). Findings Only buffalo (6%, 95% CI 3.04%–8.96%) and giraffe (11%, 95% CI 0–38.43%) were confirmed seropositive on both tests. Seropositive buffalo were widely distributed across the buffalo range where cattle density was low. Human infections were reported in low numbers with most infections (46%) occurring in children (<14 years old) and no cases were reported among people working in the agricultural sector. Conclusions Low seroprevalence of brucellosis in Botswana buffalo in a previous study in 1974 and again in this survey suggests an endemic status of the disease in this species. Buffalo, a preferred source of bush meat, is utilized both legally and illegally in Botswana. Household meat processing practices can provide widespread pathogen exposure risk to family members and the community, identifying an important source of zoonotic pathogen transmission potential. Although brucellosis may be controlled in livestock populations, public health officials need to be alert to the possibility of human infections arising from the use of bush meat. This study illustrates the need for a unified approach in infectious disease research that includes consideration of both domestic and wildlife

  15. Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis in Cattle and African Buffalo in the Limpopo National Park, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Tanner, M; Inlameia, O; Michel, A; Maxlhuza, G; Pondja, A; Fafetine, J; Macucule, B; Zacarias, M; Manguele, J; Moiane, I C; Marranangumbe, A S; Mulandane, F; Schönfeld, C; Moser, I; van Helden, P; Machado, A

    2015-12-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and brucellosis are prevalent in buffaloes of the Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa). Both diseases were considered to have no or a very low prevalence in wildlife and livestock in and around the Limpopo National Park (LNP, Mozambique). The same applies for tuberculosis in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP, Zimbabwe), but just recently, BTB was detected in buffaloes in the GNP and fears arose that the disease might also spread to the LNP as a result of the partial removal of the fences between the three parks to form the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. To assess the status of both diseases in and around LNP, 62 buffaloes were tested for bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and bovine brucellosis. The percentage of positive BTB reactors in buffalo was 8.06% using BovidTB Stat-Pak® and 0% with BOVIGAM® IFN-γ test and IDEXX ELISA. The brucellosis seroprevalence in buffalo was found to be 17.72% and 27.42% using Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and ELISA, respectively. In addition, 2445 cattle in and around the LNP were examined for BTB using the single intradermal cervical comparative tuberculin test (SICCT), and an apparent prevalence of 0.98% was found with no significant difference inside (0.5%) and outside (1.3%) the park. This is the first published report on the presence of positive reactors to BTB and bovine brucellosis in buffalo and cattle in and outside the LNP. Monitoring the wildlife-livestock-human interface of zoonotic high-impact diseases such as BTB and brucellosis is of outmost importance for the successful implementation and management of any transfrontier park that aims to improve the livelihoods of the local communities. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Evaluation of thermal comfort, physiological, hematological, and seminal features of buffalo bulls in an artificial insemination station in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barros, Daniel Vale; Silva, Lilian Kátia Ximenes; de Brito Lourenço, José; da Silva, Aluizio Otávio Almeida; E Silva, André Guimarães Maciel; Franco, Irving Montanar; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Tholon, Patrícia; Martorano, Lucieta Guerreiro; Garcia, Alexandre Rossetto

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the variation over time in thermal comfort indices and the behavior of physiological parameters related to thermolysis, blood parameters, and semen in natura of buffalo bulls reared in tropical climate. The study was carried out in an artificial insemination station under a humid tropical climate (Afi according to Köppen). Ten water buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) were used during the 5 months (April to August) of study. The environmental Temperature Humidity Index (THId) and the pen microclimate Temperature Humidity Index (THIp) were calculated. Every 25 days, respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), rectal temperature (RT), and Benezra's thermal comfort index (BTCI) were assessed in the morning and in the afternoon. A blood assay was performed every month, while semen was collected weekly. THIp did not vary over the months (P > 0.05) and was higher in the afternoon than in the morning (77.7 ± 2.6 versus 81.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.05). RR, HR, and BTCI significantly increased over the months and were different between the periods of the day (P > 0.05) but within the physiological limits. RT varied between the periods of the day and decreased over the months, being the lowest in August (37.8 ± 0.7 °C), time-impacted hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, hemoglobin levels, and spermatic gross motility and vigor (P < 0.05). Thus, buffalo bulls reared under a humid tropical climate may have variations in thermal comfort during the hotter periods but are able to efficiently activate thermoregulatory mechanisms and maintain homeothermy, hence preserving their physiological and seminal parameters at normal levels.

  17. Green nanoemulsion-laden glyphosate isopropylamine formulation in suppressing creeping foxglove (A. gangetica), slender button weed (D. ocimifolia) and buffalo grass (P. conjugatum).

    PubMed

    Lim, Chaw Jiang; Basri, Mahiran; Omar, Dzolkhifli; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Raja Abdul Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides are developed with carriers to improve their physicochemical properties and, accordingly, the bioefficacy of the applied formulation. For foliar-applied herbicide, generally less than 0.1% of the active ingredient reaching the target site could reduce pesticide performance. Recently, a carrier of nanoemulsion consisting of oil, surfactant and water, with a particle size of less than 200 nm, has been shown to enhance drug permeability for skin penetration in pharmaceutical delivery systems. In the present work, the aim was to formulate a water-soluble herbicide, glyphosate isopropylamine (IPA), using a green nanoemulsion system for a biological activity study against the weeds creeping foxglove, slender button weed and buffalo grass. The nanoemulsion formulations displayed a significantly lower spray deposition on creeping foxglove (2.9-3.5 ng cm(-2) ), slender button weed (2.6-2.9 ng cm(-2) ) and buffalo grass (1.8-2.4 ng cm(-2) ) than Roundup(®) (3.7-5.1 ng cm(-2) ). The visible injury rates of weeds treated with the nanoemulsion formulations were statistically equivalent to those relating to Roundup(®) at 14 days after treatment, with a control range of 86.67-96.67%. It was hypothesised that the significant difference in spray deposition with equal injury rates can be attributed to enhanced bioactivity of the nanoemulsion formulations. This initial discovery could be the platform for developing better penetration of agrochemical formulations in the future. Copyright © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. [Prospects of molecular breeding in medical plants].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Jun; Mo, Chang-Ming

    2017-06-01

    The molecular-assisted breeding, transgenic breeding and molecular designing breeding are three development directions of plant molecular breeding. Base on these three development directions, this paper summarizes developing status and new tendency of research field of genetic linkage mapping, QTL mapping, association mapping, molecular-assisted selections, pollen-mediated transformations, agrobacterium-mediated transformations, particle gun-mediated transformations, genome editing technologies, whole-genome sequencing, transcriptome sequencing, proteome sequencing and varietal molecular designing. The objective and existing problem of medical plant molecular breeding were discussed the prospect of these three molecular breeding technologies application on medical plant molecular breeding was outlooked. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. Expression and localization of insulin-like growth factor system in corpus luteum during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and the effect of insulin-like growth factor I on production of vascular endothelial growth factor and progesterone in luteal cells cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uniyal, S; Panda, R P; Chouhan, V S; Yadav, V P; Hyder, I; Dangi, S S; Gupta, M; Khan, F A; Sharma, G T; Bag, S; Sarkar, M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the expression and localization of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system at different stages of buffalo CL and the role of IGF-I in stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and progesterone (P4) production in cultured luteal cells. The mRNA expression of IGF system, VEGF, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450scc, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression of IGF was demonstrated by Western blot and localization by immunohistochemistry. Progesterone and VEGF production was assayed using RIA and ELISA. A relatively high mRNA expression of IGF-I and IGF-II in early, mid- and late luteal phases with immunoreactivity mostly restricted to cytoplasm of large luteal cells indicates their autocrine role, whereas very weak immunoreactivity in endothelial cells during the mid-luteal phase indicates their paracrine role. Insulin-like growth factor receptors, IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, were restricted to large luteal cells with high mRNA and protein expressions in the mid-luteal phase. The significantly higher expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, -3, -5, and -6 in the early or mid-luteal phase suggested their stimulatory role, whereas that of IGFBP-2 and -4 in mid-, late, and regressive luteal stages implied their inhibitory role. The mRNA expressions of key steroidogenic factors and VEGF were significantly higher (P < 0.05) when the culture medium was supplemented with 100 ng/mL of IGF-I for 72 hours. Moreover, IGF-I at a dose of 100 ng/mL increased P4 and VEGF production (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that IGF family members via their autocrine and paracrine effect play significant roles in promoting angiogenesis through the production of VEGF in luteal cells and steroid synthesis through the production of key steroidogenic factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phylogeny of Theileria buffeli genotypes identified in the South African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Collins, Nicola E; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2014-08-29

    Theileria buffeli/orientalis is a group of benign and mildly pathogenic species of cattle and buffalo in various parts of the world. In a previous study, we identified T. buffeli in blood samples originating from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Game Park (HIP) and the Addo Elephant Game Park (AEGP) in South Africa. The aim of this study was to characterise the 18S rRNA gene and complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) region of T. buffeli samples, and to establish the phylogenetic position of this species based on these loci. The 18S rRNA gene and the complete ITS region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples originating from buffalo in HIP and AEGP. The PCR products were cloned and the resulting recombinants sequenced. We identified novel T. buffeli-like 18S rRNA and ITS genotypes from buffalo in the AEGP, and novel Theileria sinensis-like 18S rRNA genotypes from buffalo in the HIP. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the T. buffeli-like sequences were similar to T. buffeli sequences from cattle and buffalo in China and India, and the T. sinensis-like sequences were similar to T. sinensis 18S rRNA sequences of cattle and yak in China. There was extensive sequence variation between the novel T. buffeli genotypes of the African buffalo and previously described T. buffeli and T. sinensis genotypes. The presence of organisms with T. buffeli-like and T. sinensis-like genotypes in the African buffalo could be of significant importance, particularly to the cattle industry in South Africa as these animals might act as sources of infections to naïve cattle. This is the first report on the characterisation of the full-length 18S rRNA gene and ITS region of T. buffeli and T. sinensis genotypes in South Africa. Our study provides invaluable information towards the classification of this complex group of benign and mildly pathogenic species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antigen based detection of cystic echinococcosis in buffaloes using ELISA and Dot-EIA.

    PubMed

    Sangaran, A; Bino Sundar, S T; Latha, Bhaskaran Ravi

    2017-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is caused by the larval stage of the dog tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus . The disease is recognized as one of the world's major zoonoses affecting human beings and domestic animals apart from its economic and public health importance. Development of the cysts in the intermediate host such as buffaloes occurs in the lungs, liver and other organs. In this study, detection of circulating antigen in the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis in buffaloes was done using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and Dot-Enzyme immunoassay (Dot-EIA). The sensitivity and specificity were determined as 89 and 92 % respectively, whereas those of Dot-EIA were determined as 94 and 96 %.

  2. Estimated ground-water use in Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties, Minnesota, for 2030 and 2050

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winterstein, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The estimated recharge to the Buffalo aquifer, Otter Tail surficial aquifer, and Pelican River sand-plain aquifer is 3,707, 51,000, and 4,900–8,900 Mgal/yr, respectively. The range of the estimated 2050 ground-water withdrawals from the Buffalo, Otter Tail surficial, and Pelican River sand-plain aquifers is 1,234–1,776 Mgal/yr from the Buffalo aquifer, 11,728–14,820 Mgal/yr from the Otter Tail surficial aquifer, and 3,385–4,298 Mgal/yr from the Pelican River sand-plain aquifer.

  3. BREEDING AND GENETICS SYMPOSIUM: Climate change and selective breeding in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lim, P; Kause, A; Mulder, H A; Olesen, I

    2017-04-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food production sector and it contributes significantly to global food security. Based on Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, aquaculture production must increase significantly to meet the future global demand for aquatic foods in 2050. According to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and FAO, climate change may result in global warming, sea level rise, changes of ocean productivity, freshwater shortage, and more frequent extreme climate events. Consequently, climate change may affect aquaculture to various extents depending on climatic zones, geographical areas, rearing systems, and species farmed. There are 2 major challenges for aquaculture caused by climate change. First, the current fish, adapted to the prevailing environmental conditions, may be suboptimal under future conditions. Fish species are often poikilothermic and, therefore, may be particularly vulnerable to temperature changes. This will make low sensitivity to temperature more important for fish than for livestock and other terrestrial species. Second, climate change may facilitate outbreaks of existing and new pathogens or parasites. To cope with the challenges above, 3 major adaptive strategies are identified. First, general 'robustness' will become a key trait in aquaculture, whereby fish will be less vulnerable to current and new diseases while at the same time thriving in a wider range of temperatures. Second, aquaculture activities, such as input power, transport, and feed production contribute to greenhouse gas emissions. Selection for feed efficiency as well as defining a breeding goal that minimizes greenhouse gas emissions will reduce impacts of aquaculture on climate change. Finally, the limited adoption of breeding programs in aquaculture is a major concern. This implies inefficient use of resources for feed, water, and land. Consequently, the carbon footprint per kg fish produced is greater than when fish from

  4. Behavioral profiles of dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Hart, B L; Miller, M F

    1985-06-01

    Breed behavior profiles were obtained by a method that was quantitative and free of personal biases. The profiles concerned 13 traits, eg, excitability, snapping at children, watchdog barking, and affection demand, which are of interest to people wanting dogs as pets. Authorities for the development of the profiles were 48 small animal veterinarians and 48 obedience judges, randomly selected from directories so as to represent equally men and women, and eastern, central, and western geographic regions of the United States. Each authority was asked to rank on each of the behavioral traits a list of 7 breeds chosen randomly from a list of 56 breeds. The data were analyzed in a custom-designed computer program that pooled the data and then ranked all 56 breeds on the basis of the 13 traits. The results indicated that some behavioral traits discriminate between breeds better than others. An examination of sample profiles indicated the feasibility of developing a statistically meaningful behavioral profile that integrates comparative rankings of several authorities balanced as to representation of geographic location, sex, and type of experience with dogs.

  5. Weather, hydroregime, and breeding effort influence juvenile recruitment of anurans: implications for climate change

    Treesearch

    C. H. Greenberg; S. J. Zarnoch; J. D. Austin

    2017-01-01

    Amphibians that primarily breed in ephemeral wetlands are especially vulnerable to climate change because they rely on rainfall or temperature to initiate breeding and create suitable hydroregimes (water duration, timing, frequency, depth) for reproductive success. Hydroregime effects on reproductive success are likely to differ among species because of differences in...

  6. Epizootic guinea pig herpes-like virus infection in a breeding colony.

    PubMed

    Connelly, B L; Keller, G L; Myers, M G

    1987-01-01

    A breeding colony of strain-2 guinea pigs which had been relatively free of indigenous caviid herpesviruses experienced an explosive outbreak of guinea pig herpes-like virus apparently as a consequence of intermixing groups and contamination of the water supply. A new breeding colony has been established and has been maintained apparently free of recognized caviid herpesviruses.

  7. Breeding potential of elite Pee Dee germplasm in Upland cotton breeding programs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Successful plant breeding programs begin with parental line selection. Effective parental line selection is facilitated when the breeding potential of candidate parental lines is known. Using topcross families involving germplasm representing eight US public cotton breeding programs, we evaluated th...

  8. Diet of canvasbacks during breeding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, J.E.; Serie, J.R.; Noyes, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    We examined diets of canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) breeding in southwestern Manitoba during 1977-81. Percent volume of animal foods consumed did not differ between males and females nor among prenesting, rapid follicle growth, laying, incubation, and renesting periods in females (mean = 50.1%). Tubers and shoots of fennelleaf pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus) and midge larvae (Chironomidae) were the predominant foods, comprising on average 45% and 23% of the diet volume, respectively. Continued importance of plant foods to canvasbacks throughout reproduction contrasts with the mostly invertebrate diets of other prairie-breeding ducks, and does not fit current theories of nutritional ecology of breeding anatids (i.e., females meet the protein requirements of reproduction by consuming a high proportion of animal foods).

  9. Effects of water temperature on breeding phenology, growth and timing of metamorphosis of foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) on the mainstem and selected tributaries of California's Trinity River - 2004-2009.

    Treesearch

    Clara Wheeler; James Bettaso; Donald Ashton; Hartwell Welsh

    2013-01-01

    The cold temperatures maintained in the Trinity River are beneficial to fish but may be problematic for foothill yellow-legged frogs. We examined the timing of breeding, reproductive output, and growth and development of tadpoles for populations of foothill yellow-legged frogs on the mainstem and six tributaries of the Trinity River. On the colder mainstem, onset of...

  10. Effects of water temperature on breeding phenology, growth, and metamorphosis of foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii): a case study of the regulated mainstem and unregulated tributaries of California's Trinity River

    Treesearch

    Clara Wheeler; James Bettaso; Donald Ashton; Hartwell Welsh

    2014-01-01

    Many riverine organisms are well adapted to seasonally dynamic environments, but extreme changes in flow and thermal regimes can threaten sustainability of their populations in regulated rivers. Altered thermal regimes may limit recruitment to populations by shifting the timing of breeding activities and affecting the growth and development of early life stages. Stream...

  11. Multiplex PCR to detect bacteriophages from natural whey cultures of buffalo milk and characterisation of two phages active against Lactococcus lactis, ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Giuseppe; Mullan, William Michael; Murru, Nicoletta; Fitzgerald, Gerald; Buonanno, Marialuisa; Cortesi, Maria Luisa; Prencipe, Vincenza Annunziata; Migliorati, Giacomo

    2017-09-30

    This work investigated bacteriophage induced starter failures in artisanal buffalo Mozzarella production plants in Southern Italy. Two hundred and ten samples of whey starter cultures were screened for bacteriophage infection. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed phage infection in 28.56% of samples, all showing acidification problems during cheese making. Based on DNA sequences, bacteriophages for Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), Lactobacillus delbruekii (L. delbruekii) and Streptococcus thermophilus (S. thermophilus) were detected. Two phages active against L. lactis, ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2, were isolated and characterised. The genomes, approximately 31.4 kb and 31 kb for ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2 respectively, consisted of double-stranded linear DNA with pac-type system. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS‑PAGE) showed one major structural protein of approximately 32.5 kDa and several minor proteins. This is the first report of phage isolation in buffalo milk and of the use of multiplex PCR to screen and study the diversity of phages against Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains in artisanal Water Buffalo Mozzarella starters.

  12. Breed base representation in dairy animals of 5 breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inheritance of DNA from different dairy breeds can be determined by genotyping, just as individual ancestors such as parents, grandparents, or even great grandparents can be identified correctly in a high percentage of the cases by genotyping even if not reported or reported incorrectly in pedigrees...

  13. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: GENERAL MAIL AND VEHICLE MAINTENANCE FACILITY, UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, BUFFALO, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) summarized here was conducted at a U.S.Postal Service (USPS) Facility in Buffalo, NY. The PPOA documented and quantified waste generation at the General Mail Facility (GMF) where mail is processed, and at the Vehicle Maintena...

  14. Exposure of vaccinated and naive cattle to natural challenge from buffalo-derived Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Poole, E Jane; Ndambuki, Gideon; Mwaura, Stephen; Njoroge, Thomas; Omondi, George P; Mutinda, Matthew; Mathenge, Joseph; Prettejohn, Giles; Morrison, W Ivan; Toye, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Integrative management of wildlife and livestock requires a clear understanding of the diseases transmitted between the two populations. The tick-borne protozoan parasite Theileria parva causes two distinct diseases in cattle, East Coast fever and Corridor disease, following infection with parasites derived from cattle or buffalo, respectively. In this study, cattle were immunized with a live sporozoite vaccine containing three T. parva isolates (the Muguga cocktail), which has been used extensively and successfully in the field to protect against cattle-derived T. parva infection. The cattle were exposed in a natural field challenge site containing buffalo but no other cattle. The vaccine had no effect on the survival outcome in vaccinated animals compared to unvaccinated controls: nine out of the 12 cattle in each group succumbed to T. parva infection. The vaccine also had no effect on the clinical course of the disease. A combination of clinical and post mortem observations and laboratory analyses confirmed that the animals died of Corridor disease. The results clearly indicate that the Muguga cocktail vaccine does not provide protection against buffalo-derived T. parva at this site and highlight the need to evaluate the impact of the composition of challenge T. parva populations on vaccine success in areas where buffalo and cattle are present.

  15. 75 FR 16204 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of open Federal advisory committee meeting... roundtable discussion on small business issues. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The meeting is open to the...

  16. 77 FR 20871 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of open federal advisory committee meeting... business issues. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The meeting is open to the public however advance notice...

  17. 76 FR 59480 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of open Federal advisory committee meeting... discussion on small business issues. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The meeting is open to the public...

  18. Microstructure and physicochemical properties reveal differences between high moisture buffalo and bovine Mozzarella cheeses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hanh T H; Ong, Lydia; Lopez, Christelle; Kentish, Sandra E; Gras, Sally L

    2017-12-01

    Mozzarella cheese is a classical dairy product but most research to date has focused on low moisture products. In this study, the microstructure and physicochemical properties of both laboratory and commercially produced high moisture buffalo Mozzarella cheeses were investigated and compared to high moisture bovine products. Buffalo and bovine Mozzarella cheeses were found to significantly differ in their microstructure, chemical composition, organic acid and proteolytic profiles but had similar hardness and meltability. The buffalo cheeses exhibited a significantly higher ratio of fat to protein and a microstructure containing larger fat patches and a less dense protein network. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry detected the presence of only β-casein variant A2 and a single β-lactoglobulin variant in buffalo products compared to the presence of both β-casein variants A1 and A2 and β-lactoglobulin variants A and B in bovine cheese. These differences arise from the different milk composition and processing conditions. The differences in microstructure and physicochemical properties observed here offer a new approach to identify the sources of milk used in commercial cheese products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Case Study in Master Planning the Learning Landscape Hub Concepts for the University at Buffalo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Shirley; Torino, Roger; Felix, Elliot

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes concepts for three types of learning spaces that grew out of a Learning Landscape planning process. The process was part of a master plan study for the three campuses of the University at Buffalo. It involved research into user needs and aspirations about future pedagogy, development of learning space strategy,…

  20. Bird mortality associated with wind turbines at the Buffalo Ridge wind resource area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osborn, R.G.; Higgins, K.F.; Usgaard, R.E.; Dieter, C.D.; Neiger, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    Recent technological advances have made wind power a viable source of alternative energy production and the number of windplant facilities has increased in the United States. Construction was completed on a 73 turbine, 25 megawatt windplant on Buffalo Ridge near Lake Benton, Minnesota in Spring 1994. The number of birds killed at existing windplants in California caused concern about the potential impacts of the Buffalo Ridge facility on the avian community. From April 1994 through Dec. 1995 we searched the Buffalo Ridge windplant site for dead birds. Additionally, we evaluated search efficiency, predator scavenging rates and rate of carcass decomposition. During 20 mo of monitoring we found 12 dead birds. Collisions with wind turbines were suspected for 8 of the 12 birds. During observer efficiency trials searchers found 78.8% of carcasses. Scavengers removed 39.5% of carcasses during scavenging trials. All carcasses remained recognizable during 7 d decomposition trials. After correction for biases we estimated that approximately 36 ?? 12 birds (<1 dead bird per turbine) were killed at the Buffalo Ridge windplant in 1 y. Although windplants do not appear to be more detrimental to birds than other man-made structures, proper facility sitting is an important first consideration in order to avoid unnecessary fatalities.

  1. 75 FR 57056 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Buffalo Resource Management Plan Amendment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... further information contact Thomas Bills, Buffalo RMPA Team Leader, telephone at 307-684-1133; mailing..., threatened and endangered species, visual resources, air quality, wilderness characteristics, and other.... Donald A. Simpson, State Director. [FR Doc. 2010-23330 Filed 9-16-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-22-P ...

  2. Summary Evaluation of Career Education Project for Buffalo Public School System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo Public Schools, NY.

    Evaluation of the three-year career education project in 12 of the Buffalo, New York public schools focuses on changes in pupils' knowledge of occupational information and the clarity, consistency, and reality of vocational interests. An occupational knowledge pre/post-test and occupational interest questionnaire were administered to 359 fourth…

  3. The effect of seasons on behaviour during milking in buffaloes ( Bos bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, P. C.

    1982-06-01

    An investigation on behaviour during milking involving 200 buffaloes was carried out to study the effect of climate on milking behaviour for a period of four years. The results obtained were: (1) In extremely docile animals (temperament score I) the mean distribution was least (33.5) in hot-dry summer as compared to winter (39.2) and hot-humid summer. (2) The number of buffaloes milked after oxytocin injections was maximum (11.1%) during the hot-dry summer against other seasons for the temperament score I over temperament scores III and IV, where all buffaloes were milked with oxytocin injections. (3) The mean flow rate was least in hot-dry summer in each temperament score. (4) Milking time was higher in all the temperament scored buffaloes during the hot-dry summer than during the other seasons. It is concluded that as environmental temperature increases, there occurs an increase in thermal stress, the milking behaviour changes and animals become more hostile and excited which leads to a decrease in milk production.

  4. 78 FR 45059 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-1084] Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: At various times throughout the month of July, the Coast...

  5. 78 FR 41846 - Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-1084] Safety Zones; Annual Fireworks Events in the Captain of the Port Buffalo Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: At various times throughout the month of July, the Coast...

  6. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized to predict genetic merit in differing breeds based on simulation studies have been reported, as have the efficacies of predictors trained using data from multiple breeds to predict the genetic merit of purebreds. However, comparable studies using beef cattle field data have not been reported. Methods Molecular breeding values for weaning and yearling weight were derived and evaluated using a database containing BovineSNP50 genotypes for 7294 animals from 13 breeds in the training set and 2277 animals from seven breeds (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, and Simmental) in the evaluation set. Six single-breed and four across-breed genomic predictors were trained using pooled data from purebred animals. Molecular breeding values were evaluated using field data, including genotypes for 2227 animals and phenotypic records of animals born in 2008 or later. Accuracies of molecular breeding values were estimated based on the genetic correlation between the molecular breeding value and trait phenotype. Results With one exception, the estimated genetic correlations of within-breed molecular breeding values with trait phenotype were greater than 0.28 when evaluated in the breed used for training. Most estimated genetic correlations for the across-breed trained molecular breeding values were moderate (> 0.30). When molecular breeding values were evaluated in breeds that were not in the training set, estimated genetic correlations clustered around zero. Conclusions Even for closely related breeds, within- or across-breed trained molecular breeding values have limited prediction accuracy for breeds that were not in the training set. For breeds in the training

  7. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kachman, Stephen D; Spangler, Matthew L; Bennett, Gary L; Hanford, Kathryn J; Kuehn, Larry A; Snelling, Warren M; Thallman, R Mark; Saatchi, Mahdi; Garrick, Dorian J; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Pollak, E John

    2013-08-16

    Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized to predict genetic merit in differing breeds based on simulation studies have been reported, as have the efficacies of predictors trained using data from multiple breeds to predict the genetic merit of purebreds. However, comparable studies using beef cattle field data have not been reported. Molecular breeding values for weaning and yearling weight were derived and evaluated using a database containing BovineSNP50 genotypes for 7294 animals from 13 breeds in the training set and 2277 animals from seven breeds (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, and Simmental) in the evaluation set. Six single-breed and four across-breed genomic predictors were trained using pooled data from purebred animals. Molecular breeding values were evaluated using field data, including genotypes for 2227 animals and phenotypic records of animals born in 2008 or later. Accuracies of molecular breeding values were estimated based on the genetic correlation between the molecular breeding value and trait phenotype. With one exception, the estimated genetic correlations of within-breed molecular breeding values with trait phenotype were greater than 0.28 when evaluated in the breed used for training. Most estimated genetic correlations for the across-breed trained molecular breeding values were moderate (> 0.30). When molecular breeding values were evaluated in breeds that were not in the training set, estimated genetic correlations clustered around zero. Even for closely related breeds, within- or across-breed trained molecular breeding values have limited prediction accuracy for breeds that were not in the training set. For breeds in the training set, across- and within-breed trained

  8. Effects of insecticides on a phytotelmata-breeding amphibian.

    PubMed

    Egea-Serrano, Andrés; Solé, Mirco

    2017-02-01

    Information on the impact of pesticides on amphibian species breeding in phytotelmata (water bodies within plants) is totally lacking. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of the insecticide malathion on larvae of Phyllodytes luteolus. Individuals were exposed to ecologically relevant concentrations of malathion (commercial formulation) for 16 d under laboratory conditions. Malathion had a lethal effect that allowed the authors to hypothesize that phtytotelmata-breeding species are likely as vulnerable to pollution as pond breeders. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:422-428. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal parasites in cattle and buffaloes in Jabalpur, India.

    PubMed

    Marskole, Priyanka; Verma, Yamini; Dixit, Alok Kumar; Swamy, Madhu

    2016-11-01

    The study was conducted to determine the prevalence and burden of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in cattle and buffaloes of Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. The presence of helminths eggs and coccidial oocysts in fecal samples were detected using standard qualitative and quantitative methods. Identification of eggs or oocysts was done on the basis of morphology and size of the eggs or oocysts. Out of 120 cattle and buffaloes examined, 73.33% were found positive for eggs of one or more species of GI parasite. The prevalence of parasitic infection was higher in cattle (75%) as compared to that of buffaloes (70.45%), but the difference was nonsignificant (p>0.05). Sex wise prevalence of GI parasites was higher in males as compared to that of females, but the difference was nonsignificant (p>0.05). The animals above 2 years of age were more affected by GI parasites as compared to animals of 6 months - 2 years of age, but the age wise differences were nonsignificant (p>0.05). Single parasitic infections were more common than mixed infections. The monthly prevalence of GI parasites in cattle and buffaloes were highest in the month of September (81.81%) and least in December (61.11%). The eggs/oocysts per gram in most of the animals, was in the range of 201-300. GI parasites are problem in cattle and buffaloes of Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. The prevalence rate of GI parasites varied with month. The burden of parasitic infection was moderate in most animals warranting treatment.

  10. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G., E-mail: gts553@gmail.com; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBsmore » from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as

  11. Characterisation of recent foot-and-mouth disease viruses from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and cattle in Kenya is consistent with independent virus populations.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Sangula, Abraham Kiprotich; Belsham, Graham J; Tjornehoj, Kirsten; Muwanika, Vincent B; Gakuya, Francis; Mijele, Dominic; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2015-02-03

    Understanding the epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), including roles played by different hosts, is essential for improving disease control. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a reservoir for the SAT serotypes of FMD virus (FMDV). Large buffalo populations commonly intermingle with livestock in Kenya, yet earlier studies have focused on FMD in the domestic livestock, hence the contribution of buffalo to disease in livestock is largely unknown. This study analysed 47 epithelia collected from FMD outbreaks in Kenyan cattle between 2008 and 2012, and 102 probang and serum samples collected from buffalo in three different Kenyan ecosystems; Maasai-Mara (MME) (n = 40), Tsavo (TSE) (n = 33), and Meru (ME) (n = 29). Antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins were found in 65 of 102 (64%) sera from buffalo with 44/102 and 53/102 also having neutralising antibodies directed against FMDV SAT 1 and SAT 2, respectively. FMDV RNA was detected in 42% of the buffalo probang samples by RT-qPCR (Cycle Threshold (Ct) ≤32). Two buffalo probang samples were positive by VI and were identified as FMDV SAT 1 and SAT 2 by Ag-ELISA, while the latter assay detected serotypes O (1), A (20), SAT 1 (7) and SAT 2 (19) in the 47 cattle epithelia. VP1 coding sequences were generated for two buffalo and 21 cattle samples. Phylogenetic analyses revealed SAT 1 and SAT 2 virus lineages within buffalo that were distinct from those detected in cattle. We found that FMDV serotypes O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2 were circulating among cattle in Kenya and cause disease, but only SAT 1 and SAT 2 viruses were successfully isolated from clinically normal buffalo. The buffalo isolates were genetically distinct from isolates obtained from cattle. Control efforts should focus primarily on reducing FMDV circulation among livestock and limiting interaction with buffalo. Comprehensive studies incorporating additional buffalo viruses are recommended.

  12. Improving the breeding bird survey

    Treesearch

    Jonathan Bart; Joseph B. Buchanan; Bob Altman

    2005-01-01

    We investigated increasing the number of Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes and reducing potential bias as ways to increase the number of species adequately monitored by the BBS in the Pacific Northwest. Estimates of place-to-place variance in trends were used to assess the effects of increasing the number of additional BBS routes. Increasing the number of BBS routes...

  13. Chapter 6: Breeding season ecology

    Treesearch

    Mark K. Sogge

    2000-01-01

    The willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds across much of the conterminous United States and in portions of extreme southern Canada. As might be expected in such a wide-ranging species, willow flycatchers in different portions of the range exhibit differences in appearance, song, and ecological characteristics. The intent of this chapter is to...

  14. Genomic selection in plant breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor ...

  15. Accuracies of genomically estimated breeding values from pure-breed and across-breed predictions in Australian beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Vinzent; Johnston, David J; Tier, Bruce

    2014-10-24

    The major obstacles for the implementation of genomic selection in Australian beef cattle are the variety of breeds and in general, small numbers of genotyped and phenotyped individuals per breed. The Australian Beef Cooperative Research Center (Beef CRC) investigated these issues by deriving genomic prediction equations (PE) from a training set of animals that covers a range of breeds and crosses including Angus, Murray Grey, Shorthorn, Hereford, Brahman, Belmont Red, Santa Gertrudis and Tropical Composite. This paper presents accuracies of genomically estimated breeding values (GEBV) that were calculated from these PE in the commercial pure-breed beef cattle seed stock sector. PE derived by the Beef CRC from multi-breed and pure-breed training populations were applied to genotyped Angus, Limousin and Brahman sires and young animals, but with no pure-breed Limousin in the training population. The accuracy of the resulting GEBV was assessed by their genetic correlation to their phenotypic target trait in a bi-variate REML approach that models GEBV as trait observations. Accuracies of most GEBV for Angus and Brahman were between 0.1 and 0.4, with accuracies for abattoir carcass traits generally greater than for live animal body composition traits and reproduction traits. Estimated accuracies greater than 0.5 were only observed for Brahman abattoir carcass traits and for Angus carcass rib fat. Averaged across traits within breeds, accuracies of GEBV were highest when PE from the pooled across-breed training population were used. However, for the Angus and Brahman breeds the difference in accuracy from using pure-breed PE was small. For the Limousin breed no reasonable results could be achieved for any trait. Although accuracies were generally low compared to published accuracies estimated within breeds, they are in line with those derived in other multi-breed populations. Thus PE developed by the Beef CRC can contribute to the implementation of genomic selection in

  16. Previous success and current body condition determine breeding propensity in Lesser Scaup: evidence for the individual heterogeneity hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warren, Jeffrey M.; Cutting, Kyle A.; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, Susan E. W.; Williams, Tony D.; Koons, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The decision to breed influences an individual's current and future reproduction, and the proportion of individuals that breed is an important determinant of population dynamics. Age, experience, individual quality, and environmental conditions have all been demonstrated to influence breeding propensity. To elucidate which of these factors exerts the greatest influence on breeding propensity in a temperate waterfowl, we studied female Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) breeding in southwestern Montana. Females were captured during the breeding seasons of 2007–2009, and breeding status was determined on the basis of (1) presence of an egg in the oviduct or (2) blood plasma vitellogenin (VTG) levels. Presence on the study site in the previous year, a proxy for adult female success, was determined with stable isotope signatures of a primary feather collected at capture. Overall, 57% of females had evidence of breeding at the time of capture; this increased to 86% for females captured on or after peak nest initiation. Capture date and size-adjusted body condition positively influenced breeding propensity, with a declining body-condition threshold through the breeding season. We did not detect an influence of age on breeding propensity. Drought conditions negatively affected breeding propensity, reducing the proportion of breeding females to 0.85 (SE = 0.05) from 0.94 (SE = 0.03) during normal-water years. A female that was present in the previous breeding season was 5% more likely to breed than a female that was not present then. The positive correlation between age and experience makes it difficult to differentiate the roles of age, experience, and individual quality in reproductive success in vertebrates. Our results indicate that individual quality, as expressed by previous success and current body condition, may be among the most important determinants of breeding propensity in female Lesser Scaup, providing further support for the individual heterogeneity hypothesis.

  17. Structural and Functional Insights into the Catalytic Inactivity of the Major Fraction of Buffalo Milk Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Gadave, Kaustubh S.; Panda, Santanu; Singh, Surender; Kalra, Shalini; Malakar, Dhruba; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Kaushik, Jai K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO), catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. Methods and Findings Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (k cat/K m) of 0.11 sec−1 µM−1 of buffalo XO was 8–10 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (Δε430 nm) of 46,000 M−1 cm−1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ∼30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum) were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. Conclusion A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way. PMID:24498153

  18. A simple language to script and simulate breeding schemes: the breeding scheme language

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is difficult for plant breeders to determine an optimal breeding strategy given that the problem involves many factors, such as target trait genetic architecture and breeding resource availability. There are many possible breeding schemes for each breeding program. Although simulation study may b...

  19. Emperor Penguins Breeding on Iceshelves

    PubMed Central

    Fretwell, Peter T.; Trathan, Phil N.; Wienecke, Barbara; Kooyman, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new breeding behaviour discovered in emperor penguins; utilizing satellite and aerial-survey observations four emperor penguin breeding colonies have been recorded as existing on ice-shelves. Emperors have previously been considered as a sea-ice obligate species, with 44 of the 46 colonies located on sea-ice (the other two small colonies are on land). Of the colonies found on ice-shelves, two are newly discovered, and these have been recorded on shelves every season that they have been observed, the other two have been recorded both on ice-shelves and sea-ice in different breeding seasons. We conduct two analyses; the first using synthetic aperture radar data to assess why the largest of the four colonies, for which we have most data, locates sometimes on the shelf and sometimes on the sea-ice, and find that in years where the sea-ice forms late, the colony relocates onto the ice-shelf. The second analysis uses a number of environmental variables to test the habitat marginality of all emperor penguin breeding sites. We find that three of the four colonies reported in this study are in the most northerly, warmest conditions where sea-ice is often sub-optimal. The emperor penguin’s reliance on sea-ice as a breeding platform coupled with recent concerns over changed sea-ice patterns consequent on regional warming, has led to their designation as “near threatened” in the IUCN red list. Current climate models predict that future loss of sea-ice around the Antarctic coastline will negatively impact emperor numbers; recent estimates suggest a halving of the population by 2052. The discovery of this new breeding behaviour at marginal sites could mitigate some of the consequences of sea-ice loss; potential benefits and whether these are permanent or temporary need to be considered and understood before further attempts are made to predict the population trajectory of this iconic species. PMID:24416381

  20. Hepatic photosensitization in buffaloes intoxicated by Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, C H S; Barbosa, J D; Oliveira, C M C; Bastianetto, E; Melo, M M; Haraguchi, M; Freitas, L G L; Silva, M X; Leite, R C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the study of hepatogenous photosensitization in buffaloes during two outbreaks provoked by ingestion of Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Ten young buffaloes in outbreak 1 and seven buffaloes in outbreak 2 were intoxicated by B. decumbens. Nine clinically healthy buffaloes raised under the same conditions as the sick animals served as the control group. All animals were subjected to clinical examination, and serum was collected to measure gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), direct bilirubin (DB), indirect bilirubin (IB) and total bilirubin (TB) as indicators of liver function and urea and creatinine as indicators of renal function. Histopathology of liver fragments from five different animals was carried out. During the outbreaks and every two months for one year, samples of grass from paddocks where the animals got sick were collected for quantitative evaluation of the saponin protodioscin, combined with observations of pasture characteristics and daily rainfall. Clinical signs included apathy, weight loss, restlessness, scar retraction of the ears and intense itching at the skin lesions, mainly on the rump, the tail head, neck and hindlimbs, similar to the signs observed in other ruminants. Only the GGT enzyme presented significantly different (P < 0.01) serum levels between intoxicated animals (n = 17) and healthy animals (n = 9), indicating liver damage in buffaloes bred in B. decumbens pastures. Microscopy of the liver showed foamy macrophages and lesions of liver disease associated with the presence of crystals in the bile ducts, which have also been found in sheep and cattle poisoned by grasses of the genus Brachiaria. During the outbreaks, protodioscin levels were higher than 3%, and shortly after, these levels were reduced to less than 0.80%, suggesting a hepatic injury etiology. The outbreaks took place at the beginning of the rainy season, and there was a positive

  1. Assortative mating and fragmentation within dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Björnerfeldt, Susanne; Hailer, Frank; Nord, Maria; Vilà, Carles

    2008-01-28

    There are around 400 internationally recognized dog breeds in the world today, with a remarkable diversity in size, shape, color and behavior. Breeds are considered to be uniform groups with similar physical characteristics, shaped by selection rooted in human preferences. This has led to a large genetic difference between breeds and a large extent of linkage disequilibrium within breeds. These characteristics are important for association mapping of candidate genes for diseases and therefore make dogs ideal models for gene mapping of human disorders. However, genetic uniformity within breeds may not always be the case. We studied patterns of genetic diversity within 164 poodles and compared it to 133 dogs from eight other breeds. Our analyses revealed strong population structure within poodles, with differences among some poodle groups as pronounced as those among other well-recognized breeds. Pedigree analysis going three generations back in time confirmed that subgroups within poodles result from assortative mating imposed by breed standards as well as breeder preferences. Matings have not taken place at random or within traditionally identified size classes in poodles. Instead, a novel set of five poodle groups was identified, defined by combinations of size and color, which is not officially recognized by the kennel clubs. Patterns of genetic diversity in other breeds suggest that assortative mating leading to fragmentation may be a common feature within many dog breeds. The genetic structure observed in poodles is the result of local mating patterns, implying that breed fragmentation may be different in different countries. Such pronounced structuring within dog breeds can increase the power of association mapping studies, but also represents a serious problem if ignored. In dog breeding, individuals are selected on the basis of morphology, behaviour, working or show purposes, as well as geographic population structure. The same processes which have

  2. Assortative mating and fragmentation within dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background There are around 400 internationally recognized dog breeds in the world today, with a remarkable diversity in size, shape, color and behavior. Breeds are considered to be uniform groups with similar physical characteristics, shaped by selection rooted in human preferences. This has led to a large genetic difference between breeds and a large extent of linkage disequilibrium within breeds. These characteristics are important for association mapping of candidate genes for diseases and therefore make dogs ideal models for gene mapping of human disorders. However, genetic uniformity within breeds may not always be the case. We studied patterns of genetic diversity within 164 poodles and compared it to 133 dogs from eight other breeds. Results Our analyses revealed strong population structure within poodles, with differences among some poodle groups as pronounced as those among other well-recognized breeds. Pedigree analysis going three generations back in time confirmed that subgroups within poodles result from assortative mating imposed by breed standards as well as breeder preferences. Matings have not taken place at random or within traditionally identified size classes in poodles. Instead, a novel set of five poodle groups was identified, defined by combinations of size and color, which is not officially recognized by the kennel clubs. Patterns of genetic diversity in other breeds suggest that assortative mating leading to fragmentation may be a common feature within many dog breeds. Conclusion The genetic structure observed in poodles is the result of local mating patterns, implying that breed fragmentation may be different in different countries. Such pronounced structuring within dog breeds can increase the power of association mapping studies, but also represents a serious problem if ignored. In dog breeding, individuals are selected on the basis of morphology, behaviour, working or show purposes, as well as geographic population structure. The same

  3. Genomic selection in plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mark A; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor and major marker effects. Thus, the GEBV may capture more of the genetic variation for the particular trait under selection.

  4. Cellular conservation of endangered midget buffalo (Lowland Anoa, Bubalus quarlesi) by establishment of primary cultured cell, and its immortalization with expression of cell cycle regulators.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomokazu; Iino, Yuuka; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Onuma, Manabu; Katayama, Masafumi; Murata, Koichi; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Hara, Kumiko; Isogai, Emiko; Kiyono, Tohru

    2016-10-01

    Lowland Anoa has become endangered due to hunting and human activity. Protection and breeding of endangered species in a controlled environment is the best way of conservation. However, it is not possible to adopt this approach for all endangered species because of the cost involved and the ever-increasing number of critically endangered species. In consideration of these limitations to the conventional conservation methods, we established a primary cell culture of endangered buffalo (Lowland Anoa, Bubalus quarlesi), for the preservation of this biological resource. In addition, we introduced human derived, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), Cyclin D, and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) into the primary cells. The successful introduction of these three genes was confirmed by western blot with specific antibodies, and enzymatic activity. We also showed that the expression of mutant CDK4, Cyclin D, and TERT allows us to efficiently establish an immortalized cell line, with an intact chromosome pattern, from Lowland Anoa. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation that established an immortalized cell line of an endangered wild animal species.

  5. Methods for Monitoring Fish Communities of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways in the Ozark Plateaus of Arkansas and Missouri: Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.; Dodd, H.R.; Bowles, D.E.; Morrison, L.W.; Williams, M.H.; Rowell, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Buffalo National River located in north-central Arkansas, and Ozark National Scenic Riverways, located in southeastern Missouri, are the two largest units of the National Park Service in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. The purpose of this report is to provide a protocol that will be used by the National Park Service to sample fish communities and collect related water-quality, habitat, and stream discharge data of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways to meet inventory and long-term monitoring objectives. The protocol includes (1) a protocol narrative, (2) several standard operating procedures, and (3) supplemental information helpful for implementation of the protocol. The protocol narrative provides background information about the protocol such as the rationale of why a particular resource or resource issue was selected for monitoring, information concerning the resource or resource issue of interest, a description of how monitoring results will inform management decisions, and a discussion of the linkages between this and other monitoring projects. The standard operating procedures cover preparation, training, reach selection, water-quality sampling, fish community sampling, physical habitat collection, measuring stream discharge, equipment maintenance and storage, data management and analysis, reporting, and protocol revision procedures. Much of the information in the standard operating procedures was gathered from existing protocols of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment program or other sources. Supplemental information that would be helpful for implementing the protocol is included. This information includes information on fish species known or suspected to occur in the parks, sample sites, sample design, fish species traits, index of biotic integrity metrics, sampling equipment, and field forms.

  6. Immune Response and Viral Persistence in Indian Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) Infected with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype Asia 1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Kishore, Subodh; Gopalakrishna, S.; Singh, Nem; Suryanarayana, V. V.; Gajendragad, Mukund R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite their potential role in the spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), the immune response and viral persistence in FMD virus (FMDV)-infected Indian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) have been unexplored. We found similar kinetics of neutralizing antibody responses in the sera and secretory fluids of buffaloes following experimental FMDV Asia 1 infection, but the lymphocyte-proliferative response in infected buffaloes was of low magnitude. Despite inducing a significant systemic and secretory immune response, viral persistence seems to be a common outcome in buffaloes following FMDV Asia 1 infection, which is associated with a weak cellular immune response. PMID:19828770

  7. Characterization of breeding habitats for black and surf scoters in the eastern boreal forest and subarctic regions of Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Kidwell, D.M.; Wells, A.M.; Lohnes, E.J.R.; Osenton, P.C.; Altmann, S.H.; Hanson, Alan; Kerekes, Joseph; Paquet, Julie

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed characteristics of wetland habitats used by breeding black scoters (Melanitta nigra) and surf scoters (M. perspicillata) in the eastern boreal forest and subarctic regions of Canada based on satellite telemetry data collected in the spring and summer. During 2002 and 2004, nine black scoters (four males, five females) were tracked to breeding areas in Quebec, Manitoba, and Northwest Territories. In addition, in 2001?04, seven surf scoters (three males, four females) were tracked to breeding areas in Labrador, Quebec, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Based on satellite telemetry data, locations of black and surf scoters in breeding areas were not significantly different in regard to latitude and longitude. Presumed breeding areas were manually plotted on topographic maps and percent cover type and water were estimated. Breeding habitat of black scoters was significantly different than that for surf scoters, with black scoters mainly using open (tundra) areas (44%) and surf scoters using mainly forest areas (66%). Surf scoters presumed breeding areas were at significantly higher elevations than areas used by black scoters. Some breeding areas were associated with islands, but the role of islands for breeding areas is equivocal. These results aid in the identification of potentially critical breeding areas and provide a baseline classification of breeding habitats used by these two species.

  8. Migratory double breeding in Neotropical migrant birds.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Sievert; Hobson, Keith A; Rohwer, Vanya G

    2009-11-10

    Neotropical migratory songbirds typically breed in temperate regions and then travel long distances to spend the majority of the annual cycle in tropical wintering areas. Using stable-isotope methodology, we provide quantitative evidence of dual breeding ranges for 5 species of Neotropical migrants. Each is well known to have a Neotropical winter range and a breeding range in the United States and Canada. However, after their first bout of breeding in the north, many individuals migrate hundreds to thousands of kilometers south in midsummer to breed a second time during the same summer in coastal west Mexico or Baja California Sur. They then migrate further south to their final wintering areas in the Neotropics. Our discovery of dual breeding ranges in Neotropical migrants reveals a hitherto unrealized flexibility in life-history strategies for these species and underscores that demographic models and conservation plans must consider dual breeding for these migrants.

  9. Prevalence and distribution of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in cattle, African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) and their environments in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gcebe, N; Rutten, V; Gey van Pittius, N C; Michel, A

    2013-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that a variety of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species to which livestock and wildlife species are naturally exposed induce broadly cross-reactive anti-mycobacterial immune responses which interfere with current standard diagnostic assays. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria have also been implicated in Mycobacterium bovis-specific immune responsiveness, hence potentially the development of tuberculosis. Cattle and African buffaloes are both maintenance hosts of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in South Africa, yet the effective diagnosis and control in these species may be hampered by adverse effects of NTM. As part of an investigation of the role of NTM in the immune responsiveness of cattle and African buffaloes to NTM, we conducted a countrywide survey to establish the prevalent NTM species and their distribution in the natural environments of these animals. A total of 1123 samples (water, soil, nasal and pharyngeal swabs) were collected for mycobacterium isolation. In addition, NTM isolated from tissue samples between 1991 and 2011 were included in the analysis. Mycobacteria were isolated from 56% of the samples from the countrywide survey. A total of 420 NTM isolates from soil, water, animal tissues and animal-derived swab samples were genotyped with the following results: 302 belonged to 40 known NTM species, 79 were found to be closely related to 23 known NTM species, and 38 isolates were found to be potentially novel species that are not currently listed in the RIDOM and NCBI BLAST databases. The four NTM species or closely related groups most frequently isolated in this survey included Mycobacterium terrae (11.2% of isolates), a group of mycobacteria closely related to Mycobacterium moriokaense (referred to as M. moriokaense-like) (8.1% of isolates), Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum (7.4% of isolates) and Mycobacterium vaccae/M. vanbaalenii (5.2% of isolates). The phylogenetic analysis of the M. moriokaense-like isolates, based on the 16S r

  10. Integrating association data and disease dynamics: an illustration using African Buffalo in Kruger National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; James O, Lloyd-Smith; Bowers, Justin A.; Hay, Craig T.; Hofmeyr, Markus; Getz, Wayne M.

    2004-01-01

    Recognition is a prerequisite for non-random association amongst individuals. We explore how non-random association patterns (i.e. who spends time with whom) affect disease dynamics. We estimated the amount of time individuals spent together per month using radio-tracking data from African buffalo and incorporated these data into a dynamic social network model. The dynamic nature of the network has a strong influence on simulated disease dynamics particularly for diseases with shorter infectious periods. Cluster analyses of the association data demonstrated that buffalo herds were not as well defined as previously thought. Associations were more tightly clustered in 2002 than 2003, perhaps due to drier conditions in 2003. As a result, diseases may spread faster during drought conditions due to increased population mixing. Association data are often collected but this is the first use of empirical data in a network disease model in a wildlife population.

  11. Comparison of the principal proteins in bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Katharina; O'Connor, Paula M; Huppertz, Thom; Ross, R Paul; Kelly, Alan L

    2012-05-01

    Proteomic analysis of bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk highlighted significant interspecies differences. Camel milk was found to be devoid of β-lactoglobulin, whereas β-lactoglobulin was the major whey protein in bovine, buffalo, caprine, and equine milk. Five different isoforms of κ-casein were found in camel milk, analogous to the micro-heterogeneity observed for bovine κ-casein. Several spots observed in 2D-electrophoretograms of milk of all species could tentatively be identified as polypeptides arising from the enzymatic hydrolysis of caseins. The understanding gained from the proteomic comparison of these milks may be of relevance both in terms of identifying sources of hypoallergenic alternatives to bovine milk and detection of adulteration of milk samples and products.

  12. Parameters-tuning of PID controller for automatic voltage regulators using the African buffalo optimization.

    PubMed

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam; Noraziah, A

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to apply the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) to tune the parameters of a PID controller for an effective Automatic Voltage Regulator (AVR). Existing metaheuristic tuning methods have been proven to be quite successful but there were observable areas that need improvements especially in terms of the system's gain overshoot and steady steady state errors. Using the ABO algorithm where each buffalo location in the herd is a candidate solution to the Proportional-Integral-Derivative parameters was very helpful in addressing these two areas of concern. The encouraging results obtained from the simulation of the PID Controller parameters-tuning using the ABO when compared with the performance of Genetic Algorithm PID (GA-PID), Particle-Swarm Optimization PID (PSO-PID), Ant Colony Optimization PID (ACO-PID), PID, Bacteria-Foraging Optimization PID (BFO-PID) etc makes ABO-PID a good addition to solving PID Controller tuning problems using metaheuristics.

  13. Trace elements in raw milk of buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Campania, Italy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Mauro; Miedico, Oto; Cavallo, Stefania; Pellicanò, Roberta; Rosato, Guido; Baldi, Loredana; Chiaravalle, A Eugenio

    2017-10-15

    The profile of 18 trace elements was traced in 68 milk samples collected from buffalo farms in the territory known as the "Land of Fires" in the Campania region (Italy). This area has been polluted by the illegal dumping in fields of industrial or domestic waste, wich is sometimes then burned spreading toxic contaminants. Milk from buffaloes raised on rural farms might be a good indicator of environmental contamination risk in the human food chain. Trace element analysis in milk was performed using mass spectrometry. One milk sample was found to be non-compliant due to high Pb concentration. In the absence of threshold values for the elements, established through legislation, the results were compared with similar studies from other countries, and in most cases the content determined in this study was in agreement with values reported elsewhere and do not represent a risk to human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasma hormonal and electrolyte alterations in cycling buffaloes ( Bubalus bubalis) during hot summer months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Narinder; Chaudhary, K. C.

    1992-09-01

    Plasma levels of progesterone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, and electrolytes were monitored by radioimmunoassay in ten cycling buffaloes maintained at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana during the hot summer months of June July. The plasma progesterone concentration ranged from 0.28±0.04 to 3.09±0.03 ng/ml at various stages of the oestrous cycle. Prolactin values ranged from 319±23 to 371±25 ng/ml and LH levels from 0.95±0.05 to 1.35±0.08 ng/ml. Concentrations differed significantly ( P⩽0.05) at various stages of the cycle. Levels of electrolytes, viz. Ca+ +, Na+ and K+, were well within the normal range. The high levels of prolactin, progesterone and LH during the hot summer were assessed in relation to poor reproductive efficiency in buffaloes.

  15. [Climatic factors influencing the performance of cattle and buffalos in Egypt].

    PubMed

    Legel, S

    1979-01-01

    Previous analogous investigations of climatic factors influencing the performance of cattle in Syria were continued for Egypt between August 1975 and July 1977. Temperature and humidity data were recorded and related to standard physiological compatibility ranges for cattle and buffalos, respectively. The values found for the two test years largely agreed. 23.3% of the average temperatures of the two years were above the 0 to 24 degrees C temperature range, which is physiologically compatible. Only 28.8% of the total hours were within the optimum temperature range for cattle and buffalos. The values of the relative humidity in the first year were up to 38.5% within the optimum compatibility range, whereas 11.0% were within the too dry and 50.5% within the too moist range. The percentage increased when the animals were in direct sunshine, which reduced their performance.

  16. Evaluation of salt, polyphosphates and their blends at different levels on physicochemical properties of buffalo meat and patties.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, A S; Sharma, N; Kondaiah, N

    1989-01-01

    The effects of sodium pyrophosphate (SPP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP), sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP) and their blends at different levels (0·3, 0·5 and 0·7%), along with 2% sodium chloride on certain quality parameters of buffalo meat and patties were evaluated. The SPP, STPP and phosphate blends significantly increased pH, water-holding capacity (WHC), emulsifying capacity (EC), extractability of salt soluble proteins (SSP), colour of ground meat, decreased cooking loss (CL), improved emulsion stability (ES) and enhanced yield, texture and moisture retention of cooked patties. Compared to these phosphates, SAPP and SHMP had significantly poorer effects on improving the quality of meat and patties. The order of effectiveness of phosphates was SPP > STPP > SHMP. In general, pH, WHC, SSP, ES, yield and moisture content of patties increased progressively with increasing level of phosphate while CL decreased. Among blends containing two polyphosphates, those of 90% SPP + 10% SHMP and 75% SPP + 25% STPP were relatively more effective. A phosphate blend consisting of 65% SPP, 17·5% STPP and 17·5% SAPP was equally effective as that of SPP in improving the functionality of hot and chilled meat and had the advantage of reducing the amount of sodium by 3%. Copyright © 1989. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Texture, flavor, and sensory quality of buffalo milk Cheddar cheese as influenced by reducing sodium salt content.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, M A; Huma, N; Sameen, A; Murtaza, M S; Mahmood, S; Mueen-ud-Din, G; Meraj, A

    2014-11-01

    The adverse health effects of dietary sodium demand the production of cheese with reduced salt content. The study was aimed to assess the effect of reducing the level of sodium chloride on the texture, flavor, and sensory qualities of Cheddar cheese. Cheddar cheese was manufactured from buffalo milk standardized at 4% fat level by adding sodium chloride at 2.5, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5% (wt/wt of the curd obtained). Cheese samples were ripened at 6 to 8 °C for 180 d and analyzed for chemical composition after 1 wk; for texture and proteolysis after 1, 60, 120, and 180 d; and for volatile flavor compounds and sensory quality after 180 d of ripening. Decreasing the salt level significantly reduced the salt-in-moisture and pH and increased the moisture-in-nonfat-substances and water activity. Cheese hardness, toughness, and crumbliness decreased but proteolysis increased considerably on reducing the sodium content and during cheese ripening. Lowering the salt levels appreciably enhanced the concentration of volatile compounds associated with flavor but negatively affected the sensory perception. We concluded that salt level in cheese can be successfully reduced to a great extent if proteolysis and development of off-flavors resulted by the growth of starter and nonstarter bacteria can be controlled. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of rumen protein degradability on productive and reproductive performance in buffalo cows.

    PubMed

    Campanile, Giuseppe; Di Palo, Rossella; Infascelli, Federico; Gasparrini, Bianca; Neglia, Gianluca; Zicarelli, Fabio; D'Occhio, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain the influence of crude protein (CP) digestibility in the rumen on the quantity and quality of milk production and reproductive performance, blood (BU) and milk (MU) urea, haematological profile and vaginal mucus urea, ammonia and potassium of buffalo cows. Lactating buffaloes (n = 84), 60 days in milk, were randomly subdivided into Group C (control, n = 42) and Group T (fed a diet supplemented with Aspergillus oryzae, n = 42). In three fistulated buffalo, the diet supplemented with Aspergillus oryzae showed a decrease (P < 0.01) in protein digestibility in the rumen (79.3 vs. 45.9%). No differences were registered in productive performance. Nine buffaloes not in oestrus during the dietary treatment (Groups T1 and C1), 30 days in milk, were used to study the haematological profile and to determine milk urea and ammonia in the vaginal mucus. The animals in Group T1 had higher ammonia values in the blood (P < 0.01) but not in the vaginal mucus than Group C1. A relationship was found between MU and BU. MU was influenced by CP intake and dry matter intake. No differences between the treatments were observed in reproductive performance and the conception rate and calving interval were 37.9% and 41.4% (90 trial-day) and 449 and 419 days respectively in Groups T and C. Reproductive performance was not influenced by high levels of BU nor by blood ammonia levels, although the latter were higher in the group fed the diet supplemented with Aspergillus oryzae.

  19. Effect of management practices and animal age on incidence of mastitis in Nili Ravi buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tariq; Rahman, Abdur; Qureshi, Muhammand Subhan; Hussain, Muhammad Tariq; Khan, Muhammad Shauib; Uddin, Siraj; Iqbal, Muhammad; Han, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Buffalo is an economically important dairy animal in South Asia but mostly ignored in research priorities. In this retrospective study, the effect of management practices and age of animal on the incidence of mastitis in Nili Ravi buffaloes was investigated. A total of 1,560 quarters of buffaloes (n = 390) were screened by visual examination of the udder and milk (clinical mastitis) and California mastitis test (subclinical mastitis). Household data was collected on a predesigned questionnaire and analyzed. The prevalence of subclinical mastitis, clinical mastitis, and blind quarters was 41.8, 13.6, and 9.7 %, respectively. The highest prevalence was noted in the hind quarters and left side as compared to that in the forequarters and right side. This data significantly (p < 0.05) supported the idea that larger herd size has more chances of mastitis, with the highest prevalence (40, 32, and 27 %) in the large, medium, and small herds, respectively. Stage of lactation was significantly (p < 0.01) involved in mastitis, and the highest incidence (43.3 %) was noted in early lactation. Milk production of lactating buffaloes that ranged 6-10 l/day showed a higher rate of mastitis occurrence (p < 0.05). The cleanliness condition of a farm also contributed significantly. Animal age significantly affected the incidence of mastitis. Results revealed that age of the animal has a positive correlation (R (2) = 0.772) with mastitis. This study concluded that some factors alone or in combination with other factors influence significantly the occurrence of mastitis, and to minimize the infection, these factors should be considered. The outcome of the study will be valuable for policy-making for positive management practices and implementation of preventive measures.

  20. Seroprevalence of Leptospira hardjo in cattle and African buffalos in southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atherstone, Christine; Picozzi, Kim; Kalema-Zikusoka, Gladys

    2014-02-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochete bacterium Leptospira spp. is a zoonosis, distributed worldwide and classified as an emerging infectious disease. Fatal outcomes to leptospiral infection do occur and the disease can cause abortion and other reproductive problems in cattle, goats, and pigs. In humans the symptoms range from subclinical infection to acute febrile illness, pulmonary hemorrhage and renal failure. Leptospirosis has never been officially reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) or the World Animal Health Organization in animals or humans in Uganda. However, favorable ecological conditions and suitable animal hosts can be found within the country. A commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) kit was used to screen sera samples from domesticated cattle and African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) at two locations in southwestern Uganda, collected over a 4-year period. Positive samples were found in both cattle and African buffalo samples, from both locations and across the sampling period. Overall seroprevalence was 42.39% in African buffalo and 29.35% in cattle.

  1. Home on the Range: Factors Explaining Partial Migration of African Buffalo in a Tropical Environment

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Robin; Du Preez, Pierre; Stuart-Hill, Greg; Jago, Mark; Wegmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Partial migration (when only some individuals in a population undertake seasonal migrations) is common in many species and geographical contexts. Despite the development of modern statistical methods for analyzing partial migration, there have been no studies on what influences partial migration in tropical environments. We present research on factors affecting partial migration in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in northeastern Namibia. Our dataset is derived from 32 satellite tracking collars, spans 4 years and contains over 35,000 locations. We used remotely sensed data to quantify various factors that buffalo experience in the dry season when making decisions on whether and how far to migrate, including potential man-made and natural barriers, as well as spatial and temporal heterogeneity in environmental conditions. Using an information-theoretic, non-linear regression approach, our analyses showed that buffalo in this area can be divided into 4 migratory classes: migrants, non-migrants, dispersers, and a new class that we call “expanders”. Multimodel inference from least-squares regressions of wet season movements showed that environmental conditions (rainfall, fires, woodland cover, vegetation biomass), distance to the nearest barrier (river, fence, cultivated area) and social factors (age, size of herd at capture) were all important in explaining variation in migratory behaviour. The relative contributions of these variables to partial migration have not previously been assessed for ungulates in the tropics. Understanding the factors driving migratory decisions of wildlife will lead to better-informed conservation and land-use decisions in this area. PMID:22570722

  2. Preliminary Crystallographic Study of Hemoglobin from Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): A Low Oxygen Affinity Species.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Moovarkumudalvan; Moorthy, Ponnuraj Sathya; Neelagandan, Kamariah; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappa Gounder

    2009-01-01

    Hemoglobin is a tetrameric, iron-containing metalloprotein, which plays a vital role in the transportation of oxygen from lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide back to lungs. Though good amount of work has already been done on hemoglobins, the scarcity of data on three dimensional structures pertaining to low oxygen affinity hemoglobins from mammalian species, motivated our group to work on this problem specifically. Herein, we report the preliminary crystallographic analysis of buffalo hemoglobin, which belongs to low oxygen affinity species. The buffalo blood was collected, purified by anion exchange chromatography and crystallized with PEG 3350 using 50mM phosphate buffer at pH 6.7 as a precipitant by hanging drop vapor diffusion method. Data collection was carried out using mar345dtb image plate detector system. Buffalo hemoglobin crystallizes in orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one whole biological molecule (alpha2beta2) in the asymmetric unit with cell dimensions a=63.064A, b=74.677A, c=110.224A.

  3. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of glycopyrrolate - xylazine - propofol anesthesia in buffalo calves

    PubMed Central

    Potliya, Sandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhbir; Kumar, Sarvan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycopyrrolate - xylazine - propofol anesthesia in buffalo calves. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on six clinically healthy male buffalo calves, 6-12 months of age, and weighing between 130 and 170 kg. In all the animals; glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg, IM), xylazine (0.1 mg/kg, IM) and 1% propofol as single bolus (1.5 mg/kg, intravenous), were administered. The parameters observed included behavioral changes, physiological; hematological and blood biochemical parameters. Results: Muzzle and nostrils became dry in all the animals after glycopyrrolate administration. A decrease in spontaneous activity and mild cutaneous analgesia was noticed after xylazine administration. After administration of propofol, loss of swallowing reflex, palpebral reflex, corneal reflexes, periosteal reflex and complete analgesia was observed. There was no significant change in rectal temperature and heart rate. However, heart rate remained elevated during anesthesia. Respiratory rate decreased significantly after propofol administration. There was a significant increase in plasma glucose after the xylazine and propofol administration which remained elevated till recovery. A significant decrease in chloride level was seen after propofol administration. Conclusions: Glycopyrrolate - xylazine - propofol anesthetic combination may safely be used for short duration anesthesia in buffalo calves. PMID:27047082

  4. Physical and nutritional properties of buffalo meat finished on hay or maize silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Cifuni, Giulia Francesca; Contò, Michela; Amici, Andrea; Failla, Sebastiana

    2014-04-01

    The current study examines the effect of different finishing diets (hay- vs. maize-silage on meal ration) on carcass quality, physical, chemical and sensory properties, and fatty acid profiles of buffalo meat. Twenty male Italian Mediterranean buffaloes (246 ± 9.00 kg live weight) were distributed at random into two groups at the beginning of the finishing period (368 ± 20 days). The buffaloes were offered two finishing diets: a maize silage (MS) or an alfalfa hay (AH) diet. No significant differences were found between dietary treatments for live and carcass weight. Meat chemical composition was influenced by dietary treatment. A higher fat content was detected in meat from animals finished with MS than AH (P < 0.05). Overall, the data indicated differences between the fatty acid profiles of meat as a consequence of different feeding systems. The higher fat deposition in the MS group resulted in meat with a less favorable fatty acid profile (i.e. a lower polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio and α-linolenic fatty acid content) in relation to human health compared with meat from animals fed the AH diet. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Comparative antinociceptive and sedative effects of epidural romifidine and detomidine in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Marzok, M A; El-Khodery, S A

    2017-07-01

    In this study, comparative antinociceptive and sedative effects of epidural administration of romifidine and detomidine in buffalo were evaluated. Eighteen healthy adult buffalo, allocated randomly in three groups (two experimental and one control; n=6) received either 50 μg/kg of romifidine or detomidine diluted in sterile saline (0.9 per cent) to a final volume of 20 ml, or an equivalent volume of sterile saline epidurally. Antinociception, sedation and ataxia parameters were recorded immediately after drug administration. Epidural romifidine and detomidine produced mild to deep sedation and complete antinociception of the perineum, inguinal area and flank, and extended distally to the coronary band of the hindlimbs and cranially to the chest area. Times to onset of antinociception and sedation were significantly shorter with romifidine than with detomidine. The antinociceptive and sedative effects were significantly longer with romifidine than with detomidine. Romifidine or detomidine could be used to provide a reliable, long-lasting and cost-effective method for achieving epidural anaesthesia for standing surgical procedures in buffalo. Romifidine induces a longer antinociceptive effect and a more rapid onset than detomidine. Consequently, epidural romifidine may offer better therapeutic benefits in the management of acute postoperative pain. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Effects of chemical immobilization on survival of African buffalo in the Kruger National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oosthuizen, W.C.; Cross, P.C.; Bowers, J.A.; Hay, C.; Ebinger, M.R.; Buss, P.; Hofmeyr, M.; Cameron, E.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Capturing, immobilizing, and fitting radiocollars are common practices in studies of large mammals, but success is based on the assumptions that captured animals are representative of the rest of the population and that the capture procedure has negligible effects. We estimated effects of chemical immobilization on mortality rates of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. We used a Cox proportional hazards approach to test for differences in mortality among age, sex, and capture classes of repeatedly captured radiocollared buffalo. Capture variables did not improve model fit and the Cox regression did not indicate increased risk of death for captured individuals up to 90 days postcapture [exp (??) = 1.07]. Estimated confidence intervals, however, span from a halving to a doubling of the mortality rate (95% CI = 0.56-2.02). Therefore, capture did not influence survival of captured individuals using data on 875 captures over a 5-year period. Consequently, long-term research projects on African buffalo involving immobilization, such as associated with research on bovine tuberculosis, should result in minimal capture mortality, but monitoring of possible effects should continue.

  7. Effect of organic and inorganic selenium supplementation on semen quality and blood enzymes in buffalo bulls.

    PubMed

    El-Sharawy, Mohamed; Eid, Entsar; Darwish, Samy; Abdel-Razek, Ibrahim; Islam, Md Rashedul; Kubota, Kaiyu; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; El-Shamaa, Ibrahim

    2017-07-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of organic and inorganic selenium (Se) supplementation on semen quality and blood serum profiles of buffalo bulls. Nine mature buffalo bulls were divided into three groups: control (non-supplemented); organic Se (10 mg Sel-Plex®/head twice weekly) and inorganic Se (10 mg sodium selenite/head twice weekly). Semen was collected twice a week for 3 months during Se supplementation. Semen properties were evaluated from fresh ejaculate. Moreover, fructose concentration, aspartate and alanine transaminase (AST and ALT) activities, total protein and total cholesterol were assayed in seminal plasma. Additionally AST, ALT, testosterone and Se levels were determined in the blood serum. Results showed that Se supplementation significantly (P < 0.05) influences the semen parameters during 3 months of treatment. Organic Se significantly (P < 0.05) increased the percentage of viable sperms compared to inorganic Se and the control group. Fructose concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the seminal plasma of organic Se-treated bulls. Serum testosterone and Se concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the Se supplemented groups than the control group. In conclusion, Se supplementation improved the parameters of buffalo bull semen and more precisely, organic Se was more effective for the improvement of semen quality and some blood components than inorganic Se. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Determinant of Household Business Scale of Moa Buffaloes at Moa Island Southwest Maluku Regency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainsamputty, J.; Roessali, W.; Santosa, S. I.; Eddy, B. T.

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this research was to analyze factors that affect the business scale of Moa buffaloes at Moa Island, Regency of Southwest Maluku. The research used a survey method with multistage random sampling. The location chosen was the District of Moa Lakor at Moa Island based on its largest buffalo population. Respondents were randomly drawn in a total of 120 respondents. The variables measured were years of experience in rearing animals, costs of production, farmer’s participation in group activities, animal housing systems, farmer’s income and farmer’s age. The statistical test used was the multiple linear regressions. The results showed that the mean of business scale in the area of high density of buffaloes population was 12.6 AU, in the moderate was 12.4 AU and in the low was 11.0 AU. The average of production cost was IDR 1.893.536.00/year, the average of revenue was IDR14.083.333.00/year, while the average of income was IDR 12.189.797.00/year. The independent variables simultaneously influence the business scale (P<0.01). Partially, experience, costs of production, participation and housing systems had highly significant influences on the business scale (P<0.01).

  9. Evaluation of total mixed ration silage with brewers grains for dairy buffalo in Tarai, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takashi; Devkota, Naba R; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effects of total mixed ration (TMR) silage, which contained brewers grain and rice straw as a substitute for conventional concentrate on feed intake and milk production in middle-to-late lactation buffaloes, four multiparous Murrah buffaloes were assigned to a 3 × 3 Latin square design experiment. The TMR silage, which had higher neutral and acid detergent fiber contents and digestibility than concentrate (P < 0.05) and similar crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrient (TDN) contents with concentrate were used for the lactation experiment. The treatments were control (CTL) fed concentrate at 0.6% of body weight (BW), and T1 and T2 fed the TMR silage at 0.6 and 1.2% of BW on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively, with rice straw ad libitum. Daily intakes of DM, CP and TDN, and BW change were higher in T2 than in CTL and T1 (P < 0.05). Although milk composition did not differ among the treatments, milk yield (MY) was higher in T2 (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in MY/DM intake and MY/TDN intake among the treatments. The increase of BW and MY in middle-to-late lactation buffaloes might have been due to high TDN intake from supplementary TMR silage. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Translating knowledge about abiotic stress tolerance to breeding programmes.

    PubMed

    Gilliham, Matthew; Able, Jason A; Roy, Stuart J

    2017-06-01

    Plant breeding and improvements in agronomic practice are making a consistent contribution to increasing global crop production year upon year. However, the rate of yield improvement currently lags behind the targets set to produce enough food to meet the demands of the predicted global population in 2050. Furthermore, crops that are exposed to harmful abiotic environmental factors (abiotic stresses, e.g. water limitation, salinity, extreme temperature) are prone to reduced yields. Here, we briefly describe the processes undertaken in conventional breeding programmes, which are usually designed to improve yields in near-optimal conditions rather than specifically breeding for improved crop yield stability under stressed conditions. While there is extensive fundamental research activity that examines mechanisms of plant stress tolerance, there are few examples that apply this research to improving commercial crop yields. There are notable exceptions, and we highlight some of these to demonstrate the magnitude of yield gains that could be made by translating agronomic, phenological and genetic solutions focused on improving or mitigating the effect of abiotic stress in the field; in particular, we focus on improvements in crop water-use efficiency and salinity tolerance. We speculate upon the reasons for the disconnect between research and research translation. We conclude that to realise untapped rapid gains towards food security targets new funding structures need to be embraced. Such funding needs to serve both the core and collaborative activities of the fundamental, pre-breeding and breeding research communities in order to expedite the translation of innovative research into the fields of primary producers. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Conceptual framework for drought phenotyping during molecular breeding.

    PubMed

    Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Reynolds, Matthew; Bennett, John; Boyer, John

    2009-09-01

    Drought is a major threat to agricultural production and drought tolerance is a prime target for molecular approaches to crop improvement. To achieve meaningful results, these approaches must be linked with suitable phenotyping protocols at all stages, such as the screening of germplasm collections, mutant libraries, mapping populations, transgenic lines and breeding materials and the design of OMICS and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) experiments. Here we present a conceptual framework for molecular breeding for drought tolerance based on the Passioura equation of expressing yield as the product of water use (WU), water use efficiency (WUE) and harvest index (HI). We identify phenotyping protocols that address each of these factors, describe their key features and illustrate their integration with different molecular approaches.

  12. Differential Persistence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in African Buffalo Is Related to Virus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Maree, Francois; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Gubbins, Simon; Zhang, Fuquan; Seago, Julian; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Reid, Liz; Scott, Katherine; van Schalkwyk, Louis; Bengis, Roy; Juleff, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) circulates as multiple serotypes and strains in many regions of endemicity. In particular, the three Southern African Territories (SAT) serotypes are maintained effectively in their wildlife reservoir, the African buffalo, and individuals may harbor multiple SAT serotypes for extended periods in the pharyngeal region. However, the exact site and mechanism for persistence remain unclear. FMD in buffaloes offers a unique opportunity to study FMDV persistence, as transmission from carrier ruminants has convincingly been demonstrated for only this species. Following coinfection of naive African buffaloes with isolates of three SAT serotypes from field buffaloes, palatine tonsil swabs were the sample of choice for recovering infectious FMDV up to 400 days postinfection (dpi). Postmortem examination identified infectious virus for up to 185 dpi and viral genomes for up to 400 dpi in lymphoid tissues of the head and neck, focused mainly in germinal centers. Interestingly, viral persistence in vivo was not homogenous, and the SAT-1 isolate persisted longer than the SAT-2 and SAT-3 isolates. Coinfection and passage of these SAT isolates in goat and buffalo cell lines demonstrated a direct correlation between persistence and cell-killing capacity. These data suggest that FMDV persistence occurs in the germinal centers of lymphoid tissue but that the duration of persistence is related to virus replication and cell-killing capacity. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious acute vesicular disease in domestic livestock and wildlife species. African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) are the primary carrier hosts of FMDV in African savannah ecosystems, where the disease is endemic. We have shown that the virus persists for up to 400 days in buffaloes and that there is competition between viruses during mixed infections. There was similar competition in cell culture: viruses that killed cells quickly

  13. Mastitis outcomes on pre-ovulatory follicle diameter, estradiol concentrations, subsequent luteal profiles and conception rate in Buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Mohsen; Zeitoun, Moustafa M; Hussein, Fekry M

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the outcome of mastitis, in its clinical or subclinical forms, on the mean diameter of pre-ovulatory follicle (POF), plasma estradiol concentration on the day of estrus, subsequent luteal profile and subsequent conception rate in buffaloes. Sixty dairy buffalo (Bubalus bubalus) conducted in this study were divided into three groups {healthy (H), n=20; subclinical mastitis (SCM), n=18; and clinical mastitis (CM), n=22}. Ultrasonography of ovaries revealed that mean diameter of POF was larger (P<0.05) in H buffalo (14.35mm) compared to SCM (12.40mm) and CM (10.25mm). Also, plasma estradiol concentration on the day of estrus was higher (P<0.05) in H buffalo compared to SCM and CM counterparts; 34.95 vs. 32.87 and 27.50pg/ml, respectively. Besides, positive correlation was observed between the POF diameter with plasma estradiol concentration in H, SCM and CM buffaloes (r=0.64, 0.74, 0.72 respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, positive correlations (P<0.01) were found on days 9, 12, 16, and 21 post-ovulation between POF diameter and luteal profile. Thus, the conception rate in H buffalo was higher (P<0.05) compared with SCM and CM counterparts; 55% vs. 38.89 and 18.18%, respectively. In conclusion, mastitis in its clinical or subclinical forms disrupts the functioning of the pre-ovulatory follicle on the day of estrus, associated with low follicular estradiol production, resulting in suppression to subsequent luteal profile leading to substantial decrease in pregnancy consequence of buffaloes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of nano-sized eggshell powder for calcium fortification of cow?s and buffalo?s milk yogurts.

    PubMed

    El-Shibiny, Safinaze; El-Gawad, Mona Abd El-Kader Mohamed Abd; Assem, Fayza Mohamed; El-Sayed, Samah Mosbah

    2018-01-01

    Calcium is an essential element for the growth, activity, and maintenance of the human body. Eggshells are a waste product which has received growing interest as a cheap and effective source of dietary calcium. Yogurt is a food which can be fortified with functional additives, including calcium. The aim of this study was to produce yogurt with a high calcium content by fortification with nano-sized eggshell powder (nano-ESP). Nano-sized ESP was prepared from pre-boiled and dried eggshell, using a ball mill. Yogurt was prepared from cow’s milk supplemented with 3% skimmed milk powder, and from buffalo’s milk fortified with 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% and 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5% nano-ESP respectively. Electron microscopic transmission showed that the powder consisted of nano-sized crystalline struc- tures (~10 nm). Laser scattering showed that particles followed a normal distribution pattern with z-average of 590.5 nm, and had negative zeta-potential of –9.33 ±4.2 mV. Results regarding changes in yogurt composi- tion, acid development, calcium distribution, biochemical changes, textural parameters and sensory attributes have been presented and discussed. The addition of up to 0.3% nano-ESP made cow and buffalo high-calcium yogurts with an acceptable composition and quality. High-calcium yogurt may offer better health benefits, such as combating osteoporosis.

  15. Predation and nutrients drive population declines in breeding waders.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Thorup, Ole; Laursen, Karsten

    2018-04-20

    Allee effects are defined as a decline in per capita fitness at low population density. We hypothesized that predation reduces population size of breeding waders and thereby the efficiency of predator deterrence, while total nitrogen through its effects on primary and secondary productivity increases population size. Therefore, nest predation could have negative consequences for population size because nest failure generally results in breeding dispersal and hence reduced local population density. To test these predictions, we recorded nest predation in five species of waders for 4,745 nests during 1987-2015 at the nature reserve Tipperne, Denmark. Predation rates were generally negatively related to conspecific and heterospecific population density, but positively related to overall population density of the entire wader community. Nest predation and population density were related to ground water level, management (grazing and mowing), and nutrients. High nest predation with a time lag of one year resulted in low overall breeding population density, while high nutrient levels resulted in higher population density. These two factors accounted for 86% of the variance in population size, presumably due to effects of nest predation on emigration, while nutrient levels increased the level of vegetation cover and the abundance of food in the surrounding brackish water. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that predation may reduce population density through negative density dependence, while total nitrogen at adjacent shallow water may increase population size. Nest predation rates were reduced by high ground water level in March, grazing by cattle and mowing that affected access to and susceptibility of nests to predators. These effects can be managed to benefit breeding waders. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Effects of propylene glycol on the metabolic status and milk production of dairy buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H A; Abdel-Raheem, S M; Abd-Allah, M; Senosy, W

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of drenching with propylene glycol (PG) on body condition, serum metabolites and milk production during the transition period of dairy buffaloes. Animals were randomly allocated to a control group (n=5) and a PG group of 10 buffaloes that were drenched with 500 ml of propylene glycol once daily from 10 (9±3) days prepartum until 2 weeks postpartum. Ultrasound measurements of backfat thickness (BFT) were performed weekly, while blood samples were taken at -4, -2, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks from parturition for estimation of hematological and biochemical metabolites. At -4, -3, and -2 weeks from calving, BFT did not differ between the two groups, but decreased after calving and was higher for the control group than the PG group at weeks -1 and 1. Hematological analysis revealed insignificant changes between the two groups. Serum concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) and glucose did not differ between the two groups before parturition. At 2 and 4 weeks from parturition, NEFA was higher for the control group than the PG group. Serum concentrations of BHBA were higher at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks in control animals than in treated buffaloes. In contrast, the glucose level was significantly increased in PG group when compared to the control group at week 2 postpartum (p<0.05). Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, total proteins, albumin, and globulins did not differ significantly between the two groups (p>0.05). Serum enzyme activities of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase were significantly higher in the control than in the PG group. In treated buffaloes significantly (p<0.05) higher average 60-day milk yields were recorded (8.4±0.22 vs. 10.7±0.40 kg/day). Milk composition did not differ between the two groups. Drenching of dairy buffaloes with propylene glycol may reduce the risk of ketosis, improve the metabolic status, and increase the milk

  17. Sperm preparation through Sephadex™ filtration improves in vitro fertilization rate of buffalo oocytes.

    PubMed

    Husna, A U; Azam, A; Qadeer, S; Awan, M A; Nasreen, S; Shahzad, Q; Fouladi-Nashta, A; Khalid, M; Akhter, S

    2018-04-01

    Routinely, swim-up method is used to separate high-quality sperm; however, long processing time and close cell-to-cell contact during the centrifugation step are inevitable elements of oxidative stress to sperm. The objective was to evaluate Sephadex ™ and glass wool filtration to separate motile, intact and viable sperm for in vitro fertilization in buffalo. The cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from ovaries of slaughtered buffaloes by aspiration and matured for 24 hr in CO 2 incubator at 38.5°C and 5% CO 2 . Matured COCs were rinsed twice in fertilization TALP and placed in the pre-warmed fertilization medium without sperm. Cryopreserved buffalo semen was thawed at 37°C for 30 s and processed through Sephadex ™ , glass wool filtration and swim-up (control). Total and motile sperm recovery rates were assessed, resuspended in fertilization TALP and incubated for 15-20 min in CO 2 incubator. Samples prepared by each method were divided into two aliquots: one aliquot was studied for sperm quality (progressive motility, membrane integrity, viability, liveability), while the other was subjected to co-incubation with sets of 10-15 in vitro matured oocytes. Data on sperm quality were analysed by ANOVA, while in vitro fertilizing rates were compared by chi-squared test using SPSS-20. Least significant difference (LSD) test was used to compare treatment means. Glass wool filtration yielded higher total and motile sperm recovery rate, while Sephadex ™ filtration improved (p < .05) sperm quality (progressive motility, membrane integrity, viability, liveability). Sperm preparation through Sephadex filtration yielded higher in vitro fertilization rate in terms of cleavage rate compared to glass wool filtration and swim-up (control). In conclusion, cryopreserved Nili-Ravi buffalo sperm selected through Sephadex filtration showed improved quality and yielded better fertilization rates (cleavage rate) of in vitro matured/fertilized oocytes. Sephadex

  18. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile in raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Jalali, Mohammad; Weese, J Scott

    2014-02-05

    Clostridium difficile has been shown to be a nosocomial pathogen associated with diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in hospitalised patients and the infection is believed to be acquired nosocomially. Recent studies have shown the occurrence of C. difficile in food animals which may act as a source of infection to humans.The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of C. difficile in retail raw beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo meat in Iran. From April to October 2012, a total of 660 raw meat samples from beef, cow, sheep, goat, camel and buffalo were purchased from 49 butcheries in Isfahan and Khuzestan provinces, Iran, and were evaluated for the presence of C. difficile using a method including selective enrichment in C. difficile broth, subsequent alcohol shock-treatment and plating onto C. difficile selective medium. C. difficile isolates were tested for the presence of toxin genes and were typed using PCR ribotyping. In this study, 13 of 660 meat samples (2%) were contaminated with C. difficile. The highest prevalence of C. difficile was found in buffalo meat (9%), followed by goat meat (3.3%), beef meat (1.7%), cow (0.94%) and sheep meat (0.9%). Seven of the 13C. difficile strains (53.9%) were positive for tcdA, tcdB and cdtB toxin genes and were classified as ribotype 078. Four strains (30.8%) were positive tcdA, and tcdB, and one strain (7.7%) was possessed only tcdB. The remaining isolate was non-toxigenic. Susceptibilities of 13C. difficile isolates were determined for 11 antimicrobial drugs using the disk diffusion assay. Resistance to clindamycin, gentamycin, and nalidixic acid was the most common finding. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of the isolation of C. difficile from raw buffalo meat. This study indicates the potential importance of food, including buffalo meat, as a source of transmission of C. difficile to humans.

  19. Significance of clinical observations and biochemical alterations in buffalo calves with dietary abomasal impaction.

    PubMed

    El-Ashker, Maged R; Salama, Mohamed F; El-Boshy, Mohamed E; Abo El-Fadle, Eman A

    2018-01-02

    The present study aimed to throw light on the clinical characteristics of abomasal impaction in buffalo calves and its associated biochemical alterations. For this reason, a total of 20 male buffalo calves (Bubalus bubalis) with abomasal impaction were studied. The investigated calves were at 6 to 12 months of age and were belonged to three private farms in Dakahlia Governorate besides sporadic cases admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt. Ten apparently healthy buffalo calves were also included as controls. According to the clinical outcome, the diseased calves were categorized into survivors (n = 11) and non-survivors (n = 9). Blood samples were collected from all animals to estimate blood gases besides a panel of selected biochemical parameters. The definitive diagnosis of dietary abomasal impaction was achieved by either left flank exploratory laparotomy or by necropsy. Both survivors and non-survivors demonstrated common clinical findings including distension of ventro-lateral aspect of the right abdomen, and varying degrees of dehydration. The great majority of survivors (81%) and 100% of non-survivors were anorexic and had rumen stasis as well as hard texture upon ballottement of the left flank. Approximately 45% of non-survivors had frothy salivation, expiratory grunting and were being tender when strong percussion was applied on the right flank. Diseased calves had metabolic alkalosis, while plasma potassium and chloride were significantly lower in non-survivors than those of survivors (P < 0.05). Serum malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and uric acid were significantly higher in diseased buffalo than controls and in non-survivors than survivors (P < 0.05). Serum total protein, albumin, creatinine, urea, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and total bilirubin levels were also higher in non-survivors than those of survivors (P < 0.05). Buffalo

  20. Effect of mastitis on luteal function and pregnancy rates in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Mohsen; Hendawy, Amin O; Zeitoun, Moustafa M

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mastitis on CL development and function and pregnancy rate in buffaloes. Sixty-six buffaloes (Bubalus bubalus) reared in a commercial farm at El-Beheira governorate, north of Egypt were used in this study. According to the visual observation of milk, physical examination of the udder and actual somatic cell count in milk, buffalo cows were divided into three groups: without mastitis (W), n = 23; subclinical mastitis (SC), n = 18; and clinical mastitis (C), n = 25. All buffalo cows were synchronized by double dose of PGF2α (11-day interval) and inseminated by frozen-thawed semen of fertile bull. Mean CL diameter was ultrasonically examined on Days 5, 9, 12, 16, 21, and 25 after artificial insemination (AI). Blood samples were taken on the days of ultrasonography for progesterone (P4) assay. Results indicated that pregnancy rates were lower (P < 0.05) in C (28.00%) and SC (55.56%) compared with W (69.57%) on Day 25 after first AI. Pregnancy rates reduced to 60.87%, 44.45%, and 16.00% in W, SC, and C, respectively, at Day 45 after insemination. Thus, the embryonic loss was 8.7%, 11.11%, and 12.00 % in W, SC, and C cows, respectively. Pregnancy rates decreased between 44.32% and 50.51% when mastitis occurred during Day -15 before to Day +30 after AI, compared with 59.22% in the uninfected cows. The diameter of CL was greater (P < 0.05) in W than SC and C cows starting at Day 9 postbreeding onward. Likewise, P4 concentrations on Days 9 through 25 after AI were greater (P < 0.05) in W cows as compared to SC and C cows. Positive correlations (P < 0.01) were found on Days 5, 9, 12, 16, 21, and 25 after AI between CL diameter and P4 concentrations. Similar trend was found among CL diameter, P4 concentrations, and pregnancy rate. Accordingly, incidence of mastitis revealed suppression to both CL diameter and function leading to significant reduction in pregnancy outcome of buffalo cows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  1. Genetic parameters for test-day yield of milk, fat and protein in buffaloes estimated by random regression models.

    PubMed

    Aspilcueta-Borquis, Rúsbel R; Araujo Neto, Francisco R; Baldi, Fernando; Santos, Daniel J A; Albuquerque, Lucia G; Tonhati, Humberto

    2012-08-01

    The test-day yields of milk, fat and protein were analysed from 1433 first lactations of buffaloes of the Murrah breed, daughters of 113 sires from 12 herds in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, born between 1985 and 2007. For the test-day yields, 10 monthly classes of lactation days were considered. The contemporary groups were defined as the herd-year-month of the test day. Random additive genetic, permanent environmental and residual effects were included in the model. The fixed effects considered were the contemporary group, number of milkings (1 or 2 milkings), linear and quadratic effects of the covariable cow age at calving and the mean lactation curve of the population (modelled by third-order Legendre orthogonal polynomials). The random additive genetic and permanent environmental effects were estimated by means of regression on third- to sixth-order Legendre orthogonal polynomials. The residual variances were modelled with a homogenous structure and various heterogeneous classes. According to the likelihood-ratio test, the best model for milk and fat production was that with four residual variance classes, while a third-order Legendre polynomial was best for the additive genetic effect for milk and fat yield, a fourth-order polynomial was best for the permanent environmental effect for milk production and a fifth-order polynomial was best for fat production. For protein yield, the best model was that with three residual variance classes and third- and fourth-order Legendre polynomials were best for the additive genetic and permanent environmental effects, respectively. The heritability estimates for the characteristics analysed were moderate, varying from 0·16±0·05 to 0·29±0·05 for milk yield, 0·20±0·05 to 0·30±0·08 for fat yield and 0·18±0·06 to 0·27±0·08 for protein yield. The estimates of the genetic correlations between the tests varied from 0·18±0·120 to 0·99±0·002; from 0·44±0·080 to 0·99±0·004; and from 0·41±0·080 to

  2. Ecological relationships of breeding blue-winged teal to prairie potholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewien, R.C.; Springer, P.F.

    1969-01-01

    Ecology of breeding blue-winged teal (Anas discors) was studied on the Waubay Study Area in Day County, South Dakota, in 1965 and 1966. Breeding pair use of the wetland habitat and importance of Type 1 ponds in the wetland complex were evaluated. Changes in breeding pair densities and wetland habitat conditions on the study area were compared for the 16-year period, 1950-66.Blue-winged teal pair densities of 30.7 and 33.0 per square mile in 1965 and 1966, respectively, were above the 16-year average from 1950 to 1966 and near the maximum for this period. Blue-winged teal comprised 46.7 per cent of the waterfowl breeding population in 1965 and 51.7 per cent in 1966. Number of water areas per square mile through mid-spring 1965 was comparable to the average for the 16-year period, whereas during late spring 1965 and throughout the 1966 spring breeding seasons the number of water areas increased to near optimum conditions.Annual breeding-pair densities from 1950 to 1966 appeared to be largely influenced by water conditions, and pair-density fluctuations resulted from changes in number of wet ponds from late April through mid-May. Variations in water conditions after this period did not appear to have as great an effect on numbers of breeding teal.Use of wetland habitat by pairs changed throughout the spring breeding seasons. During the post-arrival period, teal congregated on larger wetlands. With onset of egg-laying, pairs dispersed into ponds throughout the wetland complex to establish breeding home ranges. Other factors that influenced changes in habitat use included: 1) pond type and size, 2) breeding cycle phenology, 3) availability of wet ponds, and 4) land use. Number of blue-winged teal pairs per unit area of water was highest in 1965 and 1966 on Type 1B ponds, followed in decreasing order by Types 3, 1A, and 4 and 5. Greater use of Type 1B ponds was probably related to larger ratio of edge or shore line to unit area of water. Interspersion of many small

  3. Estrus induction and fertility rates in response to exogenous hormonal administration in postpartum anestrous and subestrus bovines and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Honparkhe, M; Singh, Jagir; Dadarwal, D; Dhaliwal, G S; Kumar, Ajeet

    2008-12-01

    A total of 130 animals (82 cattle, 48 buffaloes) with histories of anestrous 60-90 days post-partum and belonging to different agroclimatic zones of Punjab were subjected to rectal palpation and blood samplings at least three times at weekly intervals. The body condition score (BCS) of each animal was also recorded. The animals were divided into two groups; viz., true anestrous (Gp-I) and subestrus (Gp-II) through rectal palpation of ovaries and plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations. Furthermore, the Gp I and II animals were divided into treatment (Gp Ia, 40 cattle and 16 buffaloes; Gp IIa, 12 cattle and 14 buffaloes) and control groups (Gp Ib, 20 cattle and 8 buffaloes; Gp IIb, 10 cattle and 10 buffaloes). True anestrous animals (Gp Ia) were treated with 3 injections of hydroxyprogesterone caproate (750 mg, i.m.) at 72-hr intervals followed by injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG; 750 I.U., i.m.) 72 hr after the last progesterone injection. The animals were bred at the first estrus after the induced one. The first service conception rate (FSCR), overall conception rate (OCR), services per conception and pregnancy rate of the true anestrous treated cattle (Gp Ia) were 44.4%, 48.0%, 2.08 and 60.0%, respectively. In the true anestrous control cattle (Gp Ib), only five that were observed to be in estrus failed to conceive. In the anestrous treated buffaloes (Gp Ia), the FSCR, OCR, services per conception and pregnancy rate were 50.0%, 62.5%, 1.6 and 62.5%, respectively. No buffalo amongst true anestrous control (Gp Ib) showed estrus. The subestrus animals (Gp IIa) were administered Prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha); 25 mg Dinoprost, i.m.) and bred at induced estrus. Amongst the Gp IIa animals, all cattle (100%) and twelve buffaloes (85.7%) responded to treatment. Of these animals, the FSCR and pregnancy rate at induced estrus in the cattle were 50.0% each, whereas they were 66.6% and 57.1%, respectively, in the buffaloes. The subestrus control animals

  4. Loss of heat shock protein 70 from apical region of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) sperm head after freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tincy; Divyashree, Bannur C; Roy, Sudhir C; Roy, Kajal S

    2016-03-15

    The post-thaw fertility of frozen-thawed mammalian spermatozoa is substantially low as compared with that of fresh sperm. Furthermore, the post-thaw fertility of the cryopreserved buffalo sperm has been reported to be poor as compared with that of cattle sperm. Recently, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been found to play a critical role in mammalian fertilization and early embryonic development in boar and cattle. However, the presence of such fertility-related HSP70 in buffalo sperm and its status after cryopreservation has not been reported so far. Thus, a study was conducted to determine the effect of cryopreservation on the level and distribution pattern of HSP70 molecule in buffalo sperm after cryopreservation. Buffalo semen samples, after dilution in semen extender, were aliquoted in straws and divided into two groups. One group was not cryopreserved, and the other group was cryopreserved for 60 days. Sperm proteins were extracted from both non-cryopreserved (NC) and cryopreserved (C) sperm and subjected to Western blot analysis for detection of HSP70 using a monoclonal anti-HSP70 antibody. The distribution pattern of these proteins in buffalo sperm was also monitored before and after cryopreservation using indirect immunofluorescence technique. A prominent 70-kDa protein band of HSP70 protein was detected in protein extracts of both NC and C buffalo sperm. Densitometry analysis revealed that the intensity of 70-kDa HSP70 protein band of cryopreserved sperm decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with that of NC sperm. However, the level of HSP70 in cryopreserved extended seminal plasma (ESP) did not change as compared with that of NC samples indicating a possible degradation of HSP70 in the spermatozoa itself rather than leakage of the protein into the ESP. Furthermore, Western blot also confirmed that several HSP70 immunoreactive protein bands detected in the ESP were contributed by the egg yolk that was added to the extender. Immunocytochemistry

  5. [Polymorphisms of inhibin α gene exon 1 in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), gayal (Bos frontalis) and yak (Bos grunniens)].

    PubMed

    Miao, Yong-Wang; Ha, Fu; Gao, Hua-Shan; Yuan, Feng; Li, Da-Lin; Yuan, Yue-Yun

    2012-08-01

    To elucidate the genetic characteristics of the bovine Inhibin α subunit (INHA) gene, the polymorphisms in exon 1 of INHA and its bilateral sequences were assayed using PCR with direct sequencing in buffalo, gayal and yak. A comparative analysis was conducted by pooled the results in this study with the published data of INHA on some mammals including some bovine species together. A synonymous substitution c.73C>A was identified in exon 1 of INHA for buffalo, which results in identical encoding product in river and swamp buffalo. In gayal, two non-synonymous but same property substitutions in exon 1 of INHA, viz. c.62 C>T and c.187 G>A, were detected, which lead to p. P21L, p. V63M changes in INHA, respectively. In yak, nucleotide substitution c.62C> T, c.129A>G were found in exon 1 of INHA, the former still causes p. P21L substitution and the latter is synonymous. For the sequence of the 5'-flanking region of INHA examined, no SNPs were found within the species, but a substitution, c. -6T>G, was found. The nucleotide in this site in gayal, yak and cattle was c. -6G, whereas in buffalo it was c. -6T. Meanwhile, a 6-bp deletion, namely c. 262+31_262+36delTCTGAC, was found in the intron of buffalo INHA gene. For this deletion, wild types (+/+) account for main part in river buffalo while mutant types (-/-) are predominant in swamp buffalo. This deletion was not found in gayal, yak and cattle, though these all have another deletion in the intron of INHA, c. 262+78_262+79delTG. The results of sequence alignment showed that the substitutions c. 43A and c. 67G in exon 1 of INHA are specific to buffalo, whereas the substitutions c. 173A and c. 255G are exclusive to gayal, yak and cattle, and c. 24C, c. 47G, c. 174T and c. 206T are specific to goat. Furthermore, there are few differences among gayal, yak and cattle, but there relatively great differences between buffalo, goat and other bovine species regarding the sequences of INHA exon 1.

  6. The breeding bird survey, 1966

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Chandler S.; Van Velzen, Willet T.

    1967-01-01

    A Breeding Bird Survey of a large section on North America was conducted during June 1966. Cooperators ran a total of 585 Survey routes in 26 eastern States and 4 Canadian Provinces. Future coverage of established routes will enable changes in the abundance of North American breeding birds to be measured. Routes are selected at random on the basis of one-degree blocks of latitude and longitude. Each 241/2-mile route, with 3-minute stops spaced one-half mile apart, is driven by automobile. All birds heard or seen at the stops are recorded on special forms and the data are then transferred to machine punch cards. The average number of birds per route is tabulated by State, along with the total number of each species and the percent of routes and stops upon which they were recorded. Maps are presented showing the range and abundance of selected species. Also, a year-to-year comparison is made of populations of selected species on Maryland routes in 1965 and 1966.

  7. Breed structure of Senepol cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, A R; Hupp, H D; Thompson, C E; Grimes, L W

    1988-01-01

    Data were collected by the Virgin Islands Beef Cattle Improvement Program and the Virgin Islands Agricultural Experiment Station staff to establish the breed structure of the Senepol cattle. Data for the analysis were limited to the two Virgin Islands Senepol breeders with the most complete and largest set of records, representing approximately 65% of the entire Senepol population. Inbreeding (F) and coancestry relationship coefficients (rAB) and the theoretical inbreeding (FT) were determined from each data set and for the combined data from both farms, for each year, ranging from 1947 to 1984 for Annaly Farms, and from 1967 to 1984 for Castle Nugent Farm. The data sets for both farms were examined for the possibility of separation into families. Actual F within the Senepol population was relatively low, averaging less than 1.00%. Some separation into families occurred within Annaly Farms' cattle. The F and FT decreased (1.6 to 0.7% and 1.0 to 0.2%, respectively) as population numbers increased. The low F was accomplished through the breeding programs and exchanges of animals between farms on the island.

  8. Population ecology of the mallard: II. Breeding habitat conditions, size of the breeding populations, and production indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pospahala, Richard S.; Anderson, David R.; Henny, Charles J.

    1974-01-01

    production from the July Production Survey were studied in detail. Several indices relating to production showed marked declines from west to east in the Prairie-Parkland Area, these are: (1) density of breeding mallards (per square mile and per May pond), (2) brood density (per square mile and per July pond), (3) average brood size (all species combined), and (4) brood survival from class II to class III. An index to late nesting and renesting efforts was highest during years when midsummer water conditions were good. Production rates of many ducks breeding in North America appear to be regulated by both density-dependent and density-independent factors. Spacing of birds in the Prairie-Parkland Area appeared to be a key factor in the density-dependent regulation of the population. The spacing mechanism, in conjunction with habitat conditions, influenced some birds to overfly the primary breeding grounds into less favorable habitats to the north and northwest where the production rate may be suppressed. The production rate of waterfowl in the Prairie Parkland Area seems to be independent of density (after emigration has taken place) because the production index appears to be a linear function of the number of breeding birds in the area. Similarly, the production rate of waterfowl in northern Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba appeared to be independent of density. Production indices in these northern areas appear to be a linear function of the size of the breeding population. Thus, the density and distribution of breeding ducks is probably regulated through a spacing mechanism that is at least partially dependent on measurable environmental factors. The result is a density-dependent process operating to ultimately effect the production and production rate of breeding ducks on a continent-wide basis. Continental production, and therefore the size of the fall population, is probably partially regulated by the number of birds that are distributed north and northwest into

  9. Prevalence of fascioliasis (liver flukes) infection in cattle and buffaloes slaughtered at the municipal abattoir of El-Kharga, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Elshraway, Nagwa T.; Mahmoud, Wafaa G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of fascioliasis infections in cattle and buffaloes, slaughtered in El-Kharga city slaughterhouse at New Valley Governorate. Materials and Methods: The slaughtered animals were daily inspected for liver fascioliasis allover 2016. Macroscopic fascioliasis was detected from a total of 2251 basing on animals specie, sex, season, and Fasciola spp. in addition to microscopic examination of blood, fecal samples which collected from female cattle and buffalo (50 each). Results: The total prevalence rate of Fasciola sp. infection occurs in the study area were about 695/2251 (30.88%) from the total cattle and bovine slaughtered carcasses. The incidence of fascioliasis was 4/12 (33.33%) and 678/2200 (30.82%) for females and males cattle carcasses, respectively, while the infection rate in buffalo carcasses was 1/4 (25.00%) and 12/35 (34.29%) for females and males buffalo carcasses, respectively. Conclusion: The moderate fasciolosis infection in cattle and buffaloes slaughtered at the municipal abattoir of El-Kharga, Egypt. The highest fascioliasis infection was recorded during winter and autumn. It constitutes a major cause of economic losses at El-Kharga abattoir and threat public health. PMID:28919682

  10. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher ( P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  12. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  13. Characterisation and In Silico Analysis of Interleukin-4 cDNA of Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus) and Indian Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Saini, M.; Palai, T. K.; Das, D. K.; Hatle, K. M.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) produced from Th2 cells modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses. It is a common belief that wild animals possess better immunity against diseases than domestic and laboratory animals; however, the immune system of wild animals is not fully explored yet. Therefore, a comparative study was designed to explore the wildlife immunity through characterisation of IL-4 cDNA of nilgai, a wild ruminant, and Indian buffalo, a domestic ruminant. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of nilgai and Indian buffalo and reverse transcribed into cDNA. Respective cDNA was further cloned and sequenced. Sequences were analysed in silico and compared with their homologues available at GenBank. The deduced 135 amino acid protein of nilgai IL-4 is 95.6% similar to that of Indian buffalo. N-linked glycosylation sequence, leader sequence, Cysteine residues in the signal peptide region, and 3′ UTR of IL-4 were found to be conserved across species. Six nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions were found in Indian buffalo compared to nilgai amino acid sequence. Tertiary structure of this protein in both species was modeled, and it was found that this protein falls under 4-helical cytokines superfamily and short chain cytokine family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a single cluster of ruminants including both nilgai and Indian buffalo that was placed distinct from other nonruminant mammals. PMID:24348167

  14. Fish genome manipulation and directional breeding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ding; Zhu, ZuoYan; Sun, YongHua

    2015-02-01

    Aquaculture is one of the fastest developing agricultural industries worldwide. One of the most important factors for sustainable aquaculture is the development of high performing culture strains. Genome manipulation offers a powerful method to achieve rapid and directional breeding in fish. We review the history of fish breeding methods based on classical genome manipulation, including polyploidy breeding and nuclear transfer. Then, we discuss the advances and applications of fish directional breeding based on transgenic technology and recently developed genome editing technologies. These methods offer increased efficiency, precision and predictability in genetic improvement over traditional methods.

  15. Genomics-assisted breeding in fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Minamikawa, Mai F; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Ishimori, Motoyuki; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomic analysis technologies have opened up new avenues to promote the efficiency of plant breeding. Novel genomics-based approaches for plant breeding and genetics research, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS), are useful, especially in fruit tree breeding. The breeding of fruit trees is hindered by their long generation time, large plant size, long juvenile phase, and the necessity to wait for the physiological maturity of the plant to assess the marketable product (fruit). In this article, we describe the potential of genomics-assisted breeding, which uses these novel genomics-based approaches, to break through these barriers in conventional fruit tree breeding. We first introduce the molecular marker systems and whole-genome sequence data that are available for fruit tree breeding. Next we introduce the statistical methods for biparental linkage and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping as well as GWAS and GS. We then review QTL mapping, GWAS, and GS studies conducted on fruit trees. We also review novel technologies for rapid generation advancement. Finally, we note the future prospects of genomics-assisted fruit tree breeding and problems that need to be overcome in the breeding.

  16. Genomics-assisted breeding in fruit trees

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Minamikawa, Mai F.; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Ishimori, Motoyuki; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomic analysis technologies have opened up new avenues to promote the efficiency of plant breeding. Novel genomics-based approaches for plant breeding and genetics research, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS), are useful, especially in fruit tree breeding. The breeding of fruit trees is hindered by their long generation time, large plant size, long juvenile phase, and the necessity to wait for the physiological maturity of the plant to assess the marketable product (fruit). In this article, we describe the potential of genomics-assisted breeding, which uses these novel genomics-based approaches, to break through these barriers in conventional fruit tree breeding. We first introduce the molecular marker systems and whole-genome sequence data that are available for fruit tree breeding. Next we introduce the statistical methods for biparental linkage and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping as well as GWAS and GS. We then review QTL mapping, GWAS, and GS studies conducted on fruit trees. We also review novel technologies for rapid generation advancement. Finally, we note the future prospects of genomics-assisted fruit tree breeding and problems that need to be overcome in the breeding. PMID:27069395

  17. Ultrasonographic and macroscopic anatomy of the enucleated eyes of the buffalo (Bos bubalis) and the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) of different ages.

    PubMed

    Kassab, A

    2012-02-01

    The ultrasonographic appearance and measurements of the normal buffalo and camel eye globes were described in 60 buffaloes (Bos bubalis) aged 1 year (28 eyes) and 10 years (32 eyes), and in 51 humped camels (Camelus dromedarius) aged 1 year (26 eyes) and 10 years (24 eyes). Ocular measurements were recorded by A- and B-scan ultrasonographic examination of 40 buffalo eyes (18 young and 22 adult eyes) and 34 camel eyes (14 young and 20 adult eyes) using a KANGH ultrasound scanner equipped with 10 MHz probe. For gross measurements, 20 buffalo and 16 camel eye globes were frozen and dissected and the same measurements were made using fine callipers macroscopically. The aqueous and vitreous humour of the buffalo and camel eyes appeared anechoic. The cornea, anterior and posterior lens capsule and iris appeared hyperechoic. The ocular measurements for the axial length, vitreous chamber depth (VCD), corneal thickness, lens thickness and scleroretinal rim thickness increase with the advance of age in both buffaloes and camels. Except for the anterior chamber depth, VCD and lens thickness, which were larger in adult camels than in adult buffaloes, no other differences between ocular dimensions were observed in both species. The results of this study are valuable for comparative ocular anatomy and will be useful for ultrasonographic evaluation of ocular diseases in buffaloes and camels. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Serological & molecular diagnostic surveys combined with examining hematological profiles suggest increased levels of infection & hematological response of cattle to babesiosis infections compared to native buffaloes in Egypt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Babesiosis threatens the development of the cattle and buffaloes industries in Egypt and improved control is needed. The main objectives of this study are surveying the presence of bovine babesiosis in distinct selected bovine and buffalo populations in Egypt using novel molecular and pr...

  19. Characterization of the indigenous microflora in raw and pasteurized buffalo milk during storage at refrigeration temperature by high-throughput sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of refrigeration on bacterial communities within raw and pasteurized buffalo milk was studied using high-throughput sequencing. High quality samples of raw buffalo milk were obtained from five dairy farms in the Guangxi province of China. A sample of each milk was pasteurized, and both r...

  20. Myxobolus ictiobus n. sp. and Myxobolus minutus n. sp. (Cnidaria: Myxobolidae) from the gills of the smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus Rafinesque (Cypriniformes: Castostomidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The smallmouth buffalo Ictiobus bubalus Rafinesque (Catostomidae) is native to North American waterways and occasionally grown in pond aquaculture. Species of Myxobolus Bütschli, 1882 have been reported from the gills, integument, and intestinal tract of buffalo fish, although there is ambiguity in ...

  1. Miniaturized GPS Tags Identify Non-breeding Territories of a Small Breeding Migratory Songbird.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, Michael T; Marra, Peter P

    2015-06-09

    For the first time, we use a small archival global positioning system (GPS) tag to identify and characterize non-breeding territories, quantify migratory connectivity, and identify population boundaries of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla), a small migratory songbird, captured at two widely separated breeding locations. We recovered 15 (31%) GPS tags with data and located the non-breeding territories of breeding Ovenbirds from Maryland and New Hampshire, USA (0.50 ± 0.15 ha, mean ± SE). All non-breeding territories had similar environmental attributes despite being distributed across parts of Florida, Cuba and Hispaniola. New Hampshire and Maryland breeding populations had non-overlapping non-breeding population boundaries that encompassed 114,803 and 169,233 km(2), respectively. Archival GPS tags provided unprecedented pinpoint locations and associated environmental information of tropical non-breeding territories. This technology is an important step forward in understanding seasonal interactions and ultimately population dynamics of populations throughout the annual cycle.

  2. The Hybrid II assay: a sensitive and specific real-time hybridization assay for the diagnosis of Theileria parva infection in Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and cattle.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Ronel; Potgieter, Fred T; Latif, Abdalla A; Thekisoe, Oriel M M; Mans, Ben J

    2011-12-01

    Corridor disease is an acute, fatal disease of cattle caused by buffalo-adapted Theileria parva. This is a nationally controlled disease in South Africa and strict control measures apply for the movement of buffalo, which includes mandatory testing for the presence of T. parva and other controlled diseases. Accurate diagnosis of the T. parva carrier state in buffalo using the official real-time hybridization PCR assay (Sibeko et al. 2008), has been shown to be affected by concurrent infection with T. sp. (buffalo)-like parasites. We describe the Hybrid II assay, a real-time hybridization PCR method, which compares well with the official hybridization assay in terms of specificity and sensitivity. It is, however, not influenced by mixed infections of T. sp. (buffalo)-like parasites and is as such a significant improvement on the current hybridization assay.

  3. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized ...

  4. Nuclear reactor for breeding U.sup.233

    DOEpatents

    Bohanan, Charles S.; Jones, David H.; Raab, Jr., Harry F.; Radkowsky, Alvin

    1976-01-01

    A light-water-cooled nuclear reactor capable of breeding U.sup.233 for use in a light-water breeder reactor includes physically separated regions containing U.sup.235 fissile material and U.sup.238 fertile material and Th.sup.232 fertile material and Pu.sup.239 fissile material, if available. Preferably the U.sup.235 fissile material and U.sup.238 fertile material are contained in longitudinally movable seed regions and the Pu.sup.239 fissile material and Th.sup.232 fertile material are contained in blanket regions surrounding the seed regions.

  5. The epidemiology of tuberculosis in free-ranging African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    De Vos, V; Bengis, R G; Kriek, N P; Michel, A; Keet, D F; Raath, J P; Huchzermeyer, H F

    2001-06-01

    The presence of bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in the Kruger National Park (KNP) was determined for the first time in 1990. It was diagnosed in an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) bull, which was found recumbent and in an emaciated and moribund state near the south-western boundary fence. This prompted an investigation into the bovine tuberculosis (BTB) status of the KNP, with emphasis on its epidemiological determinants and risk factors. This report documents the findings of surveys that were conducted from 1990 to 1996. It was found that BTB had entered the KNP ecosystem relatively recently (+/- 1960), and has found favourable circumstances for survival and propagation in a fully susceptible and immunologically naive buffalo population. Indications are that it entered the KNP from across the southern river boundary, where the presence of infected domestic cattle herds had been documented. From there the infection spread through the southern buffalo population and is currently spreading in a northward direction. It was estimated that this northward spread took place at a rate of about 6 km per year; the prospect being that, if this rate of spread is maintained, the entire KNP may be affected in less than 30 years from now. Spillover from buffalo had already occurred in species such as chacma baboon (Papio ursinus), lion (Panthera leo), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) and leopard (Panthera pardus). Although there is no indication yet that these species act as maintenance hosts, the possibility is raised that these, or an as yet overlooked species, might assume such a role in future. In the KNP, BTB manifests itself as a chronic and predominantly subclinical disease in buffalo. It may take years for clinical signs to develop, and then only at a terminal stage, when emaciation is a constant feature. It is suspected that the time from infection to death is variable and dependent on the animal's immune response, which can be

  6. Factors affecting variations in the detailed fatty acid profile of Mediterranean buffalo milk determined by 2-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pegolo, S; Stocco, G; Mele, M; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-04-01

    Buffalo milk is the world's second most widely produced milk, and increasing attention is being paid to its composition, particularly the fatty acid profile. The objectives of the present study were (1) to characterize the fatty acid composition of Mediterranean buffalo milk, and (2) to investigate potential sources of variation in the buffalo milk fatty acid profile. We determined the profile of 69 fatty acid traits in 272 individual samples of Mediterranean buffalo milk using gas chromatography. In total, 51 individual fatty acids were identified: 24 saturated fatty acids, 13 monounsaturated fatty acids, and 14 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The major individual fatty acids in buffalo milk were in the order 16:0, 18:1 cis-9, 14:0, and 18:0. Saturated fatty acids were the predominant fraction in buffalo milk fat (70.49%); monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were at 25.95 and 3.54%, respectively. Adopting a classification based on carbon-chain length, we found that medium-chain fatty acids (11-16 carbons) represented the greater part (53.7%) of the fatty acid fraction of buffalo milk, whereas long-chain fatty acids (17-24 carbons) and short-chain fatty acids (4-10 carbons) accounted for 32.73 and 9.72%, respectively. The n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were 0.46 and 1.77%, respectively. The main conjugated linoleic acid, rumenic acid, represented 0.45% of total milk fatty acids. Herd/test date and stage of lactation were confirmed as important sources of variation in the fatty acid profile of buffalo milk. The percentages of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids in buffalo milk increased in early lactation (+0.6 and +3.5%, respectively), whereas long-chain fatty acids decreased (-4.2%). The only exception to this pattern was butyric acid, which linearly decreased from the beginning of lactation, confirmation that its synthesis is independent of malonyl-CoA. These results seem to suggest that in early lactation the mobilization of energy reserves may have less

  7. High Potential Source for Biomass Degradation Enzyme Discovery and Environmental Aspects Revealed through Metagenomics of Indian Buffalo Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K. M.; Reddy, Bhaskar; Patel, Dishita; Patel, A. K.; Patel, J. B.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    The complex microbiomes of the rumen functions as an effective system for plant cell wall degradation, and biomass utilization provide genetic resource for degrading microbial enzymes that could be used in the production of biofuel. Therefore the buffalo rumen microbiota was surveyed using shot gun sequencing. This metagenomic sequencing generated 3.9 GB of sequences and data were assembled into 137270 contiguous sequences (contigs). We identified potential 2614 contigs encoding biomass degrading enzymes including glycoside hydrolases (GH: 1943 contigs), carbohydrate binding module (CBM: 23 contigs), glycosyl transferase (GT: 373 contigs), carbohydrate esterases (CE: 259 contigs), and polysaccharide lyases (PE: 16 contigs). The hierarchical clustering of buffalo metagenomes demonstrated the similarities and dissimilarity in microbial community structures and functional capacity. This demonstrates that buffalo rumen microbiome was considerably enriched in functional genes involved in polysaccharide degradation with great prospects to obtain new molecules that may be applied in the biofuel industry. PMID:25136572

  8. Rift Valley fever virus infection in African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) herds in rural South Africa: Evidence of interepidemic transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBeaud, A.D.; Cross, P.C.; Getz, W.M.; Glinka, A.; King, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging biodefense pathogen that poses significant threats to human and livestock health. To date, the interepidemic reservoirs of RVFV are not well defined. In a longitudinal survey of infectious diseases among African buffalo during 2000-2006, 550 buffalo were tested for antibodies against RVFV in 820 capture events in 302 georeferenced locations in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Overall, 115 buffalo (21%) were seropositive. Seroprevalence of RVFV was highest (32%) in the first study year, and decreased progressively in subsequent years, but had no detectable impact on survival. Nine (7%) of 126 resampled, initially seronegative animals seroconverted during periods outside any reported regional RVFV outbreaks. Seroconversions for RVFV were detected in significant temporal clusters during 2001-2003 and in 2004. These findings highlight the potential importance of wildlife as reservoirs for RVFV and interepidemic RVFV transmission in perpetuating regional RVFV transmission risk. Copyright ?? 2011 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Buffalo River Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Flood Damages....oo........ 09 Environental Con eornso. **.o . . # 12 Recreation Problems . . . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Water Quality Proble s...Wastewater Management . . . . o o . . . . . . 0 . 16 IPublic Perception of Problem and Solutions. . o * * 18 IV DESCRIPTION OF SUBBASIN RESOURCES...Wildlife Management Areas. .... . . 0 . . . 48 Threatened or Endangered Species . . . . . . . . 48 other Important Species. .. .. .. .. . .. 50 Natural

  10. Genomic analyses of modern dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heidi G

    2012-02-01

    A rose may be a rose by any other name, but when you call a dog a poodle it becomes a very different animal than if you call it a bulldog. Both the poodle and the bulldog are examples of dog breeds of which there are >400 recognized worldwide. Breed creation has played a significant role in shaping the modern dog from the length of his leg to the cadence of his bark. The selection and line-breeding required to maintain a breed has also reshaped the genome of the dog, resulting in a unique genetic pattern for each breed. The breed-based population structure combined with extensive morphologic variation and shared human environments have made the dog a popular model for mapping both simple and complex traits and diseases. In order to obtain the most benefit from the dog as a genetic system, it is necessary to understand the effect structured breeding has had on the genome of the species. That is best achieved by looking at genomic analyses of the breeds, their histories, and their relationships to each other.

  11. Genomic Analyses of Modern Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.

    2013-01-01

    A rose may be a rose by any other name, but when you call a dog a poodle it becomes a very different animal than if you call it a bulldog. Both the poodle and the bulldog are examples of dog breeds of which there are >400 recognized world-wide. Breed creation has played a significant role in shaping the modern dog from the length of his leg to the cadence of his bark. The selection and line-breeding required to maintain a breed has also reshaped the genome of the dog resulting in a unique genetic pattern for each breed. The breed-based population structure combined with extensive morphologic variation and shared human environments have made the dog a popular model for mapping both simple and complex traits and diseases. In order to obtain the most benefit from the dog as a genetic system, it is necessary to understand the effect structured breeding has had on the genome of the species. That is best achieved by looking at genomic analyses of the breeds, their histories, and their relationships to each other. PMID:22231497

  12. Plant Breeding: Surprisingly, Less Sex Is Better.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Peter J; Rigola, Diana; Schauer, Stephen E

    2016-02-08

    Introduction of apomixis, asexual reproduction through seeds, into crop species has the potential to dramatically transform plant breeding. A new study demonstrates that traits can be stably transferred between generations in newly produced apomictic lines, and heralds a breeding revolution needed to increase food production for the growing planet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sugarcane Improvement Through Breeding and Biotechnology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The advancements in sugarcane breeding and the improvement of sugarcane through biotechnology have been reviewed by a team of leading sugarcane specialists from around the world. Topics covered in the breeding section include the evolution and origin of sugarcane, early history of conventional sugar...

  14. Genetic conservation in applied tree breeding programs.

    Treesearch

    R. Johnson; B. St. Clair; S. Lipow

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews how population size and structure impacts the maintenance of genetic variation in breeding and gene resource populations. We discuss appropriate population sizes for low frequency alleles and point out some examples of low frequency alleles in the literature. Development of appropriate breeding populations and gene resource populations are discussed...

  15. Breeding Perspectives and Programs at East Lansing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    USDA-ARS sugar beet breeding activities for both Aphanomyces resistance and CMS/O-type conversion at East Lansing reach back to the 1940’s, with variety testing activities at Michigan State University reaching back to circa 1911. Many of those contributions are well known in the sugar beet breeding ...

  16. Effects on colour characteristics of buffalo meat during blooming, retail display and using vitamin C during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Sen, A R; Muthukumar, M; Naveena, B M; Ramanna, D B V

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of blooming, retail display and vitamin C on colour changes/improvement of buffalo meat. To evaluate the effect of blooming, top round cuts of buffalo were allowed to bloom for 60 min. As colour bloomed, a* value increased from 6.47 to 10.01 at 45 min; no further changes occurred. In another study, top round cuts were kept at ambient temperature (36 ± 2 °C) and evaluated for instrumental colour during display. The instrumental redness value (a*) and chroma significantly increased (P < 0.05) after 12 h of display. During storage at refrigerated temperature, treatments consisted of injecting muscle section with 5 % by weight of 0.5, 1 and 2 % vitamin C solutions and a non-injected control (0 %). Each part was evaluated for instrumental colour changes and sensory traits (colour and discoloration score) at 0, 3, 6 and 9th day of refrigerated storage. The a* value (redness) increased significantly in all vitamin C treated buffalo meat samples as compared to control stored at 4 °C. The chroma was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in treated meat as compared to control. Buffalo meat containing vitamin C maintained the desired red meat colour throughout the storage period. The buffalo muscle treated with 2 % vitamin C was more effective in preventing discoloration than treated with 0.5 and 1 % vitamin C. In our study it is evident that as colour bloomed, a* value (redness) increased which indicated that buffalo muscles became redder immediately after exposure to air during blooming and retail display. Vitamin C at levels between 0.5 and 2 % will minimize the rapid discoloration that occurs at the muscle surface. However, 2 % concentration of vitamin C was more effective in minimizing the discoloration and improving colour stability.

  17. In vitro embryo production in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using sexed sperm and oocytes from ovum pick up.

    PubMed

    Liang, X W; Lu, Y Q; Chen, M T; Zhang, X F; Lu, S S; Zhang, M; Pang, C Y; Huang, F X; Lu, K H

    2008-04-15

    The objective was to explore the use of sexed sperm and OPU-derived oocytes in an IVP system to produce sex-preselected bubaline embryos. Oocytes were recovered from 20 fertile Murrah and Nili-Ravi buffalo cows by repeated (twice weekly) ultrasound-guided transvaginal ovum pick up (OPU), or by aspiration of abbatoir-derived bubaline ovaries, and subjected to IVF, using frozen-thawed sexed or unsexed bubaline semen. On average, 4.6 oocytes were retrieved per buffalo per session (70.9% were Grades A or B). Following IVF with sexed sperm, oocytes derived from OPU had similar developmental competence as those from abattoir-derived ovaries, in terms of cleavage rate (57.6 vs. 50.4%, P=0.357) and blastocyst development rate (16.0 vs. 23.9%, P=0.237). Furthermore, using frozen-thawed sexed versus unsexed semen did not affect rates of cleavage (50.5 vs. 50.9%, P=0.978) or blastocyst development (15.3 vs. 19.1%, P=0.291) after IVF using OPU-derived oocytes. Of the embryos produced in an OPU-IVP system, 9 of 34 sexed fresh embryos (26.5%) and 5 of 43 sexed frozen embryos (11.6%) transferred to recipients established pregnancies, whereas 7 of 26 unsexed fresh embryos (26.9%) and 6 out of 39 unsexed frozen embryos (15.4%) transferred to recipients established pregnancies. Eleven sex-preselected buffalo calves (10 females and one male) and 10 sexed buffalo calves (six females and four males) were born following embryo transfer. In the present study, OPU, sperm sexing technology, IVP, and embryo transfer, were used to produce sex-preselected buffalo calves. This study provided proof of concept for further research and wider field application of these technologies in buffalo.

  18. Effects of a novel SNP of IGF2R gene on growth traits and expression rate of IGF2R and IGF2 genes in gluteus medius muscle of Egyptian buffalo.

    PubMed

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Abo-Al-Ela, Haitham G; El-Nahas, Abeer; Saleh, Ayman A; Mansour, Ali A

    2014-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) is responsible for degradation of the muscle development initiator, IGF2, and thus it can be used as a marker for selection strategies in the farm animals. The aim of this study was to search for polymorphisms in three coding loci of IGF2R, and to analyze their effect on the growth traits and on the expression levels of IGF2R and IGF2 genes in the gluteus medius muscle of Egyptian buffaloes. A novel A266C SNP was detected in the coding sequences of the third IGF2R locus (at nucleotide number 51 of exon 23) among Egyptian water buffaloes. This SNP was non-synonymous mutation and led to replacement of Y (tyrosine) amino acid (aa) by D (aspartic acid) aa. Three different single-strand conformation polymorphism patterns were observed in the third IGF2R locus: AA, AC, and CC with frequencies of 0.555, 0.195, and 0.250, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the homozygous AA genotype significantly associated with the average daily gain than AC and CC genotypes from birth to 9 mo of age. Expression analysis showed that the A266C SNP was correlated with IGF2, but not with IGF2R, mRNA levels in the gluteus medius muscle of Egyptian buffaloes. The highest IGF2 mRNA level was estimated in the muscle of animals with the AA homozygous genotype as compared to the AC heterozygotes and CC homozygotes. We conclude that A266C SNP at nucleotide number 51 of exon 23 of the IGF2R gene is associated with the ADG during the early stages of life (from birth to 9 mo of age) and this effect is accompanied by, and may be caused by, increased expression levels of the IGF2 gene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. William; Chiu, Ing L.

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Ofmore » particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.« less

  20. Surgical treatment and histopathology of different forms of olecranon and presternal bursitis in cattle and buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Fathy, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Thirty seven cases of bursitis presented to our Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 2001 to 2005. There were 10 adult female buffalos with olecranon bursitis (one had bilateral bursitis) and 26 calves (7 cattle and 19 buffalos, 16 males and 10 females) with presternal bursitis. There were 10 out of 11 cases of olecranon bursitis and 21 out of 26 cases of presternal bursitis with different forms (cystic, proliferative and fibrous) that were removed surgically. The remaining 6 cases, cystic bursitis (olecranon = 1, presternal = 5), were treated by aspiration of their contents and injection of 4% iodine tincture intrabursally. Only 2 cases recovered, 3 cases progressed to fibrosis and required further surgical treatment 2 to 3 weeks later, and 1 case continued to have a cystic lesion. Histopathological examination of tissue specimens from different forms of bursitis revealed that the acquired bursae were generally lined with synovial-like membrane formed from 2-3 cellular layers that covered the connective tissue capsule. The connective tissue capsule differed from one type to another and consisted of fibrous tissues containing numerous small blood vessels, blood capillaries, lymphatics and nerves. There was also evidence for inflammation within the capsule represented by congestion of blood vessels and the presence of perivascular inflammatory cells, mostly mononuclear. In conclusion, surgical treatment was successful and effective for treatment of olecranon and presternal bursitis particularly for the chronic proliferative and fibrous form in cattle and buffalo. The histological structure of the acquired bursae was relatively similar consisting of a synovial-like membrane and a connective tissue capsule with varying degrees of the inflammatory process. PMID:16871025