Science.gov

Sample records for water field measurements

  1. Field measurements of the spectral response of natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolucci, L. A.; Robinson, B. F.; Silva, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral response (air-water interface reflectance and water-volume scattering) of turbid river water (99 mg/liter suspended solids) and relatively clear lake water (10 mg/liter suspended solids) was measured in situ with a field spectroradiometer. The influence of the river bottom on the spectral response of the water also was determined by using a modified Secchi disc approach. The results indicated that turbid river water had a higher spectral response than clear lake water (about 6 percent) in the red (0.6-0.7 micron) and near-infrared (0.7-0.9 micron) portions of the spectrum. Also, the reflectance characteristics of the river bottom did not influence the spectral response of the turbid river water when the water was deeper than 30 cm

  2. A Portable, Field-Deployable Analyzer for Isotopic Water Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, E. S.; Gupta, M.; Huang, Y. W.; Lacelle, D.; McKay, C. P.; Fortson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have for many years been used to study the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate among other applications. Typically, discrete water samples are collected and transported to a laboratory for isotope analysis. Due to the expense and labor associated with such sampling, isotope studies have generally been limited in scope and time-resolution. Field sampling of water isotopes has been shown in recent years to provide dense data sets with the increased time resolution illuminating substantially greater short term variability than is generally observed during discrete sampling. A truly portable instrument also opens the possibility to utilize the instrument as a tool for identifying which water samples would be particularly interesting for further laboratory investigation. To make possible such field measurements of liquid water isotopes, Los Gatos Research has developed a miniaturized, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer. The prototype miniature liquid water isotope analyzer (mini-LWIA) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology in a rugged, Pelican case housing for easy transport and field operations. The analyzer simultaneously measures both δ2H and δ18O from liquid water, with both manual and automatic water introduction options. The laboratory precision for δ2H is 0.6 ‰, and for δ18O is 0.3 ‰. The mini-LWIA was deployed in the high Arctic during the summer of 2015 at Inuvik in the Canadian Northwest Territories. Samples were collected from Sachs Harbor, on the southwest coast of Banks Island, including buried basal ice from the Lurentide Ice Sheet, some ice wedges, and other types of ground ice. Methodology and water analysis results from this extreme field deployment will be presented.

  3. Psychrometric Field Measurement of Water Potential Changes following Leaf Excision.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Cass, A

    1984-01-01

    In situ measurement of sudden leaf water potential changes has not been performed under field conditions. A laboratory investigation involving the measurement of leaf water potential prior to and 2 to 200 minutes after excision of citrus leaves (Citrus jambhiri) showed good linear correlation (r = 0.99) between in situ leaf psychrometer and Scholander pressure chamber measurements. Following this, a field investigation was conducted which involved psychrometric measurement prior to petiole excision and 1 minute after excision. Simultaneous pressure chamber measurements were performed on neighboring leaves prior to the time of excision and then on the psychrometer leaf about 2 minutes after excision. These data indicate that within the first 2 minutes after excision, psychrometer and pressure chamber measurements were linearly correlated (r = 0.97). Under high evaporative demand conditions, the rate of water potential decrease was between 250 and 700 kilopascals in the first minute after excision. These results show that the thermocouple psychrometer can be used as a dynamic and nondestructive field technique for monitoring leaf water potential.

  4. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  5. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  6. Heat pulse probe measurements of soil water evaporation in a corn field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Latent heat fluxes from cropped fields consist of soil water evaporation and plant transpiration. It is difficult to accurately separate evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration. Heat pulse probes have been used to measure bare field subsurface soil water evaporation, however, the appl...

  7. Water absorption tests for measuring permeability of field concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-09-01

    The research results from CFIRE Project 04-06 were communicated to engineers and researchers in this project. : Specifically, the water absorption of concrete samples (i.e., 2-in. thick, 4-in. diameter discs cut from concrete : cylinders) was found s...

  8. Analysis of Ozone and Water Vapor Field Measurement Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    the excellent measurements made at Arosa (8 = 470 N) first by G6tz and later by Ditsch, because it is the longest series in existence starting in 1926...with some minor interruptions. Similar studies should be made for the U.S. network. The Arosa data are characteristic for midlatitudes and should apply...some days. The change from one day to the next, or the interdiurnal variation has been computed for Arosa and Tromso. Its average variability is about

  9. Short chain aliphatic acid anions in oil field waters and their contribution to the measured alkalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willey, L.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Presser, T.S.; Rapp, J.B.; Barnes, I.

    1975-01-01

    High alkalinity values found in some formation waters from Kettleman North Dome oil field are due chiefly to acetate and propionate ions, with some contribution from higher molecular weight organic acid ions. Some of these waters contain no detectable bicarbonate alkalinity. For waters such as these, high supersaturation with respect to calcite will be incorrectly indicated by thermodynamic calculations based upon carbonate concentrations inferred from traditional alkalinity measurements. ?? 1975.

  10. Development of a rotating electric field conductance sensor for measurement of water holdup in vertical oil–gas–water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Yang; Jin, Ning-De; Zhuang, Lian-Xin; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Ren, Ying-Yu

    2018-07-01

    Three types of rotating electric field conductance sensors (REFCSs) with four, six, and eight electrodes are designed and optimized in this paper to measure the water holdup of oil–gas–water three-phase flow in vertical upward 20 mm inner diameter pipe. The geometric parameters of the REFCSs are optimized using finite element method to access highly sensitive and homogeneous detection fields. The performance of the REFCSs in the water holdup measurement of three-phase flows is experimentally evaluated by generalizing the Maxwell equation. Based on the measured water holdup from the REFCSs, the slippage behaviors in oil–gas–water are uncovered and the superficial velocity of the water phase is determined. The results show that the REFCSs present a high resolution in the water holdup measurement. The REFCS with eight electrodes has better performance than those with four- and six-electrodes, which indicates that its configuration and geometric parameters are more suitable for vertical oil–gas–water three-phase flow measurement in 20 mm inner diameter pipe.

  11. Electric field measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in air over liquid water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Baratte, Edmond; Zhang, Cheng; Frederickson, Kraig; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2018-01-01

    Electric field in nanosecond pulse discharges in ambient air is measured by picosecond four-wave mixing, with absolute calibration by a known electrostatic field. The measurements are done in two geometries, (a) the discharge between two parallel cylinder electrodes placed inside quartz tubes, and (b) the discharge between a razor edge electrode and distilled water surface. In the first case, breakdown field exceeds DC breakdown threshold by approximately a factor of four, 140 ± 10 kV cm-1. In the second case, electric field is measured for both positive and negative pulse polarities, with pulse durations of ˜10 ns and ˜100 ns, respectively. In the short duration, positive polarity pulse, breakdown occurs at 85 kV cm-1, after which the electric field decreases over several ns due to charge separation in the plasma, with no field reversal detected when the applied voltage is reduced. In a long duration, negative polarity pulse, breakdown occurs at a lower electric field, 30 kV cm-1, after which the field decays over several tens of ns and reverses direction when the applied voltage is reduced at the end of the pulse. For both pulse polarities, electric field after the pulse decays on a microsecond time scale, due to residual surface charge neutralization by transport of opposite polarity charges from the plasma. Measurements 1 mm away from the discharge center plane, ˜100 μm from the water surface, show that during the voltage rise, horizontal field component (Ex ) lags in time behind the vertical component (Ey ). After breakdown, Ey is reduced to near zero and reverses direction. Further away from the water surface (≈0.9 mm), Ex is much higher compared to Ey during the entire voltage pulse. The results provide insight into air plasma kinetics and charge transport processes near plasma-liquid interface, over a wide range of time scales.

  12. Psychrometric Field Measurement of Water Potential Changes following Leaf Excision 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Cass, Alfred

    1984-01-01

    In situ measurement of sudden leaf water potential changes has not been performed under field conditions. A laboratory investigation involving the measurement of leaf water potential prior to and 2 to 200 minutes after excision of citrus leaves (Citrus jambhiri) showed good linear correlation (r = 0.99) between in situ leaf psychrometer and Scholander pressure chamber measurements. Following this, a field investigation was conducted which involved psychrometric measurement prior to petiole excision and 1 minute after excision. Simultaneous pressure chamber measurements were performed on neighboring leaves prior to the time of excision and then on the psychrometer leaf about 2 minutes after excision. These data indicate that within the first 2 minutes after excision, psychrometer and pressure chamber measurements were linearly correlated (r = 0.97). Under high evaporative demand conditions, the rate of water potential decrease was between 250 and 700 kilopascals in the first minute after excision. These results show that the thermocouple psychrometer can be used as a dynamic and nondestructive field technique for monitoring leaf water potential. PMID:16663394

  13. Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Zahra; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna A.; Buckley, Thomas J.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Gilberry, Jerome U.; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Uptake of water by biological aerosols can impact their physical and chemical characteristics. The water content in a bioaerosol can affect the backscatter cross-section as measured by LIDAR systems. Better understanding of the water content in controlled-release clouds of bioaerosols can aid in the development of improved standoff detection systems. This study includes three methods to improve understanding of how bioaerosols take up water. The laboratory method measures hygroscopic growth of biological material after it is aerosolized and dried. Hygroscopicity curves are created as the humidity is increased in small increments to observe the deliquescence point, then the humidity is decreased to observe the efflorescence point. The field component of the study measures particle size distributions of biological material disseminated into a large humidified chamber. Measurements are made with a Twin-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI, Inc), -Relative Humidity apparatus where two APS units measure the same aerosol cloud side-by-side. The first operated under dry conditions by sampling downstream of desiccant dryers, the second operated under ambient conditions. Relative humidity was measured within the sampling systems to determine the difference in the aerosol water content between the two sampling trains. The water content of the bioaerosols was calculated from the twin APS units following Khlystov et al. 2005 [1]. Biological material is measured dried and wet and compared to laboratory curves of the same material. Lastly, theoretical curves are constructed from literature values for components of the bioaerosol material.

  14. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  15. Soil Water Measurement Using Actively Heated Fiber Optics at Field Scale.

    PubMed

    Vidana Gamage, Duminda N; Biswas, Asim; Strachan, Ian B; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I

    2018-04-06

    Several studies have demonstrated the potential of actively heated fiber optics (AHFO) to measure soil water content (SWC) at high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study tested the feasibility of the AHFO technique to measure soil water in the surface soil of a crop grown field over a growing season using an in-situ calibration approach. Heat pulses of five minutes duration were applied at a rate of 7.28 W m -1 along eighteen fiber optic cable transects installed at three depths (0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 m) at six-hour intervals. Cumulative temperature increase (T cum ) during heat pulses was calculated at locations along the cable. While predicting commercial sensor measurements, the AHFO showed root mean square errors (RMSE) of 2.8, 3.7 and 3.7% for 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 m depths, respectively. Further, the coefficients of determination (R²) for depth specific relationships were 0.87 (0.05 m depth), 0.46 (0.10 m depth), 0.86 (0.20 m depth) and 0.66 (all depths combined). This study showed a great potential of the AHFO technique to measure soil water at high spatial resolutions (<1 m) and to monitor soil water dynamics of surface soil in a crop grown field over a cropping season with a reasonable compromise between accuracy and practicality.

  16. Partitioning evapotranspiration fluxes with water stable isotopic measurements: from the lab to the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, M. E.; Brueggemann, N.; Graf, A.; Rothfuss, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Water stable isotopes are powerful tools for partitioning net into raw water fluxes such as evapotranspiration (ET) into soil evaporation (E) and plant transpiration (T). The isotopic methodology for ET partitioning is based on the fact that E and T have distinct water stable isotopic compositions, which in turn relies on the fact that each flux is differently affected by isotopic kinetic effects. An important work to be performed in parallel to field measurements is to better characterize these kinetic effects in the laboratory under controlled conditions. A soil evaporation laboratory experiment was conducted to retrieve characteristic values of the kinetic fractionation factor (αK) under varying soil and atmospheric water conditions. For this we used a combined soil and atmosphere column to monitor the soil and atmospheric water isotopic composition profiles at a high temporal and vertical resolution in a nondestructive manner by combining micro-porous membranes and laser spectroscopy. αK was calculated by using a well-known isotopic evaporation model in an inverse mode with the isotopic composition of E as one input variable, which was determined using a micro-Keeling regression plot. Knowledge on αK was further used in the field (Selhausen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) to partition ET of catch crops and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during one growing season. Soil and atmospheric water isotopic profiles were measured automatically across depths and heights following a similar modus operandi as in the laboratory experiment. Additionally, a newly developed continuously moving elevator was used to obtain water vapor isotopic composition profiles with a high vertical resolution between soil surface, plant canopy and atmosphere. Finally, soil and plant samples were collected destructively to provide a comparison with the traditional isotopic methods. Our results illustrate the changing proportions of T and E along the growing season and demonstrate the

  17. Analysis of field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Shashi B.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes is discussed. These data were examined in conjunction with reflectance obtained from helicopter mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale (10 to 100 m)(exp 2) and provide a good basis for investigating the hypotheses/relationship potentially useful in remote sensing applications. All the micrometeorological data collected during FIFE-89 were processed and fluxes of CO2, water vapor, and sensible heat were calculated. Soil CO2 fluxes were also estimated. Employing these soil CO2 flux values, in conjunction with micrometeorological measurements, canopy photosynthesis is being estimated. A biochemical model of leaf photosynthesis was adapted to the prairie vegetation. The modeled leaf photosynthesis rates were scaled up to the canopy level. This model and a multiplicative stomatal conductance model are also used to calculate canopy conductance.

  18. Effects of field storage method on E. coli concentrations measured in storm water runoff.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Daren; Wagner, Kevin; Martin, Emily; Smith, Doug; Wanjugi, Pauline; Gentry, Terry; Gregory, Lucas; Hendon, Tina

    2016-03-01

    Storm water runoff is increasingly assessed for fecal indicator organisms (e.g., Escherichia coli, E. coli) and its impact on contact recreation. Concurrently, use of autosamplers along with logistic, economic, technical, and personnel barriers is challenging conventional protocols for sample holding times and storage conditions in the field. A common holding time limit for E. coli is 8 h with a 10 °C storage temperature, but several research studies support longer hold time thresholds. The use of autosamplers to collect E. coli water samples has received little field research attention; thus, this study was implemented to compare refrigerated and unrefrigerated autosamplers and evaluate potential E. coli concentration differences due to field storage temperature (storms with holding times ≤24 h) and due to field storage time and temperature (storms >24 h). Data from 85 runoff events on four diverse watersheds showed that field storage times and temperatures had minor effects on mean and median E. coli concentrations. Graphs and error values did, however, indicate a weak tendency for higher concentrations in the refrigerated samplers, but it is unknown to what extent differing die-off and/or regrowth rates, heterogeneity in concentrations within samples, and laboratory analysis uncertainty contributed to the results. The minimal differences in measured E. coli concentrations cast doubt on the need for utilizing the rigid conventional protocols for field holding time and storage temperature. This is not to say that proper quality assurance and quality control is not important but to emphasize the need to consider the balance between data quality and practical constraints related to logistics, funding, travel time, and autosampler use in storm water studies.

  19. In-situ field capacity and soil water retention measurements in two contrasting soil textures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of the in-situ field capacity and soil-water retention curve for soils is important for effective irrigation management and scheduling. The primary objective of this study was to estimate in-situ field capacity and soil water retention curves in the field using continually monitoring soil ...

  20. In-situ Field Capacity and Soil Water Retention Measurements in Two Contrasting Soil Textures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of the in-situ field capacity and soil-water retention curve for soils is important for effective irrigation management and scheduling. The primary objective of this study was to estimate in-situ field capacity and soil water retention curves in the field using continually monitoring soil ...

  1. Field and laboratory determination of water-surface elevation and velocity using noncontact measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Schmeeckle, Mark Walter; McDonald, Richard R.; Minear, Justin T.

    2016-01-01

    Noncontact methods for measuring water-surface elevation and velocity in laboratory flumes and rivers are presented with examples. Water-surface elevations are measured using an array of acoustic transducers in the laboratory and using laser scanning in field situations. Water-surface velocities are based on using particle image velocimetry or other machine vision techniques on infrared video of the water surface. Using spatial and temporal averaging, results from these methods provide information that can be used to develop estimates of discharge for flows over known bathymetry. Making such estimates requires relating water-surface velocities to vertically averaged velocities; the methods here use standard relations. To examine where these relations break down, laboratory data for flows over simple bumps of three amplitudes are evaluated. As anticipated, discharges determined from surface information can have large errors where nonhydrostatic effects are large. In addition to investigating and characterizing this potential error in estimating discharge, a simple method for correction of the issue is presented. With a simple correction based on bed gradient along the flow direction, remotely sensed estimates of discharge appear to be viable.

  2. Tidally driven pore water exchange in offshore intertidal sandbanks: Part I. Field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbes, B.; Robinson, C.; Carey, H.; Li, L.; Lockington, D.

    2008-08-01

    In recent years blooms of the toxic marine cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula have been frequently observed in a system of offshore intertidal sandbanks in Moreton Bay, Australia. Past research suggests that these blooms are linked to the presence of bio-available forms of iron. Using hydraulic and pore water chemistry data collected from a shore normal transect at an offshore bloom site, the role of tidally driven exchange as a potential mechanism for delivery of bio-available iron across the sediment-water interface was examined. Field data revealed a residual pore water flow system in the sandbank, with seawater entering the upper sandbank platform and discharging through the bank edge. Upward flow and elevated near-surface dissolved Fe(II) concentrations (>20 μM Fe(II) at -0.05 m depth) were measured simultaneously in the discharge zones at the sandbank edge. The measured concentrations were more than four times greater than concentrations previously shown to stimulate L. majuscula growth. These results suggest that the tidally driven exchange mechanism might be capable of delivering dissolved Fe(II) to sites within offshore intertidal sandbanks where blooms of L. majuscula have been observed. While the source of the iron was not identified, potential candidates are discussed. These findings have implications for the current conceptual model for L. majuscula blooms in offshore intertidal sandbanks within Moreton Bay. Further investigations are required to fully understand the role of tidally driven exchange in controlling the export of bio-available iron to coastal waters at the field site. In particular there is a need to better assess the link between the pore water flows and the geochemical reactions that might occur along the flow path.

  3. Measuring edge-of-field water quality: Where we have been and the path forward

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heightened pressure to demonstrate the resource benefits of conservation practices and continued high-profile water quality impairments and concerns are increasing the need to quantify edge-of-field water quality. With this in mind, this manuscript summarizes previous developments in edge-of-field ...

  4. Bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters: A comparison of modeled and measured upward radiance fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, Andre; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gentili, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    The bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters is conveniently described in a normalized way by forming the ratio of the upwelling irradiance E(sub u) to any upwelling radiance L(sub u)(theta prime, phi). This ratio, Q (theta prime, theta(sub 0), (phi(sub 0) - phi), where theta prime, phi are the nadir and azimuth angles for the upward radiance and theta(sub 0), phi(sub 0) are the zenith and azimuth angles of the Sun, has been determined from measurements at sea and computed via Monte Carlo simulations using the inherent optical properties measured in the field and appropriate boundary conditions (clear sky, no wind, varying Sun angle). Experimental ad computed Q values are in excellent agreement. This successful comparison confirms the importance of the bidirectional character of ocean reflectance, already pointed out from a purely numerical approach without field validation, and corroborates the extended range of the Q variations. The later point is of importance when interpreting the marine signals detected by an ocean color satellite-borne sensor. The validation is extended by considering the historical data for the radiance distributions in Lake Pend Oreille determined at various depths. The closure issue in ocean optics is examined by solving the direct problem of radiative transfer and through a model-data comparison in terms of radiance field.

  5. Measurement and numerical simulation of high intensity focused ultrasound field in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the acoustic field of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer in water was measured by using a commercially available needle hydrophone intended for HIFU use. To validate the results of hydrophone measurements, numerical simulations of HIFU fields were performed by integrating the axisymmetric Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation from the frequency-domain perspective with the help of a MATLAB-based software package developed for HIFU simulation. Quantitative values for the focal waveforms, the peak pressures, and the size of the focal spot were obtained in various regimes of linear, quasilinear, and nonlinear propagation up to the source pressure levels when the shock front was formed in the waveform. The numerical results with the HIFU simulator solving the KZK equation were compared with the experimental data and found to be in good agreement. This confirms that the numerical simulation based on the KZK equation is capable of capturing the nonlinear pressure field of therapeutic HIFU transducers well enough to make it suitable for HIFU treatment planning.

  6. Determination of threshold value of soil water content for field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoblauch, S.

    2009-04-01

    Both the potential water consumption of plants and their ability to withdraw soil water are necessary in order to estimate actual evapotranspiration and to predict irrigation timing and amount. In relating to root water uptake the threshold value at which plants reducing evapotranspiration is an important parameter. Since transpiration is linearly correlated to dry matter production, under the condition that the AET/PET-Quotient is smaller than 1.0 (de Wit 1958, Tanner & Sinclair 1983), the dry matter production begins to decline too. Plants respond to drought with biochemical, physiological and morphological modifications in order to avoid damages, for instance by increasing the root water uptake. The objective of the study is to determine threshold values of soil water content and pressure head respectively for different field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements and to derive so called reduction functions. Both parameter, potenzial water demand in several growth stages and threshold value of soil water content or pressure head can be determined with weighable field lysimeter. The threshold value is reached, when the evapotranspiration under natural rainfall condition (AET) drop clearly (0.8 PET) below the value under well watered condition (PET). Basis for the presented results is the lysimeter plant Buttelstedt of the Thuringian State Institute of Agriculture. It consist of two lysimeter cellars, each with two weighable monolithic lysimeters. The lysimeter are 2.5 m deep with a surface area of 2 m2 to allow a non-restrictive root growth and to arrange a representative number of plants. The weighing accuracy amounts to 0.05 mm. The percolating water is collected by ceramic suction cups with suction up to 0.3 MPa at a depth of 2.3 m. The soil water content is measured by using neutron probe. One of the two lysimeter cellars represents the will irrigated, the other one the non irrigated and/or reduced irrigated part of field. The soil is a Haplic

  7. Numerical modeling of thermal regime in inland water bodies with field measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladskikh, D.; Sergeev, D.; Baydakov, G.; Soustova, I.; Troitskaya, Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Modification of the program complex LAKE, which is intended to compute the thermal regimes of inland water bodies, and the results of its validation in accordance with the parameters of lake part of Gorky water reservoir are reviewed in the research. The modification caused changing the procedure of input temperature profile assignment and parameterization of surface stress on air-water boundary in accordance with the consideration of wind influence on mixing process. Also the innovation consists in combined methods of gathering meteorological parameters from files of global meteorological reanalysis and data of hydrometeorological station. Temperature profiles carried out with CTD-probe during expeditions in the period 2014-2017 were used for validation of the model. The comparison between the real data and the numerical results and its assessment based on time and temperature dependences in control points, correspondence of the forms of the profiles and standard deviation for all performed realizations are provided. It is demonstrated that the model reproduces the results of field measurement data for all observed conditions and seasons. The numerical results for the regimes with strong mixing are in the best quantitative and qualitative agreement with the real profiles. The accuracy of the forecast for the ones with strong stratification near the surface is lower but all specificities of the forms are correctly reproduced.

  8. Field tests of a down-hole TDR profiling water content measurement system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate soil profile water content monitoring at multiple depths has previously been possible only using the neutron probe (NP), but with great effort and at unsatisfactory intervals. Despite the existence of several capacitance systems for profile water content measurements, accuracy and spatial r...

  9. In situ field measurement of leaf water potential using thermocouple psychrometers.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J; Wiebe, H H; Cass, A

    1983-11-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential.

  10. In Situ Field Measurement of Leaf Water Potential Using Thermocouple Psychrometers 1

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.; Wiebe, Herman H.; Cass, Alfred

    1983-01-01

    Thermocouple psychrometers are the only instruments which can measure the in situ water potential of intact leaves, and which can possibly be used to monitor leaf water potential. Unfortunately, their usefulness is limited by a number of difficulties, among them fluctuating temperatures and temperature gradients within the psychrometer, sealing of the psychrometer chamber to the leaf, shading of the leaf by the psychrometer, and resistance to water vapor diffusion by the cuticle when the stomates are closed. Using Citrus jambhiri, we have tested several psychrometer design and operational modifications and showed that in situ psychrometric measurements compared favorably with simultaneous Scholander pressure chamber measurements on neighboring leaves when the latter were corrected for the osmotic potential. PMID:16663267

  11. Future water supply management adaptation measures - case study of Ljubljana field aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čenčur Curk, B.; Zajc Benda, T.; Souvent, P.; Bračič Železnik, B.; Bogardi, I.

    2012-04-01

    The main drinking water supply problems are related to the significant change of groundwater quantity and quality observed in the last decades as an effect of land use practices and very likely also climate change. The latter may affect the ability of drinking water suppliers to provide enough water of sufficient quality to the consumers. These topics were studied in the frame of SEE project CC-WaterS (Climate Change and Impact on Water Supply) with the main goal to develop a water supply management system regarding optimisation of water extraction and land use restrictions under climate change scenarios for water suppliers, since existing management practices are mostly inadequate to reduce impacts of CC on water supply reliability. The main goal was a designation of appropriate measures and risk assessment to adapt water supply to changing climate and land use activities considering socio-economic aspects. This was accomplished by using 'Fuzzy Decimaker', which is a tool for selecting and ranking risk reduction measures or management actions for local waterworks or water authorities under the pressure of climate change. Firstly, management options were selected and ranked. For public water supply of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, several management options were selected. For improvement of water supply and preservation of water resource quantities there is a need for engineering interventions, such as reducing water losses on pipelines. For improving drinking water safety and preserving water resource quality farmers are not allowed to use fertilisers in the first safeguarding zone and they get compensations for income reduction because of lower farming production. Compensations for farming restrictions in the second safeguarding zone were applied as additional management option. On the other hand, drinking water treatment is another management option to be considered. Trends in groundwater level are decreasing, above all recharge areas of waterworks

  12. Mustiscaling Analysis applied to field Water Content through Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Buelga, Javier; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sanchez, Raul; Gil, Maria; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    signal variation, or to see at which scales signals are most correlated. This can give us an insight into the dominant processes An alternative to both of the above methods has been described recently. Relative entropy and increments in relative entropy has been applied in soil images (Bird et al., 2006) and in soil transect data (Tarquis et al., 2008) to study scale effects localized in scale and provide the information that is complementary to the information about scale dependencies found across a range of scales. We will use them in this work to describe the spatial scaling properties of a set of field water content data measured in an extension of a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 and an spatial resolution of 25 cm. These measurements are based on an optics cable (BruggSteal) buried on a ziz-zag deployment at 30cm depth. References Bird, N., M.C. Díaz, A. Saa, and A.M. Tarquis. 2006. A review of fractal and multifractal analysis of soil pore-scale images. J. Hydrol. 322:211-219. Kravchenko, A.N., R. Omonode, G.A. Bollero, and D.G. Bullock. 2002. Quantitative mapping of soil drainage classes using topographical data and soil electrical conductivity. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 66:235-243. Lark, R.M., A.E. Milne, T.M. Addiscott, K.W.T. Goulding, C.P. Webster, and S. O'Flaherty. 2004. Scale- and location-dependent correlation of nitrous oxide emissions with soil properties: An analysis using wavelets. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 55:611-627. Lark, R.M., S.R. Kaffka, and D.L. Corwin. 2003. Multiresolution analysis of data on electrical conductivity of soil using wavelets. J. Hydrol. 272:276-290. Lark, R. M. and Webster, R. 1999. Analysis and elucidation of soil variation using wavelets. European J. of Soil Science, 50(2): 185-206. Mandelbrot, B.B. 1982. The fractal geometry of nature. W.H. Freeman, New York. Percival, D.B., and A.T. Walden. 2000. Wavelet methods for time series analysis. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK. Tarquis, A.M., N.R. Bird, A.P. Whitmore, M.C. Cartagena, and

  13. Field evaluation of shallow-water acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water staff and USGS Water Science employees began testing the StreamPro, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for shallow-water discharge measurements. Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro in December of 2003. The StreamPro is designed to make a "moving boat" discharge measurement in streams with depths between 0.15 and 2 m. If the StreamPro works reliably in these conditions, it will allow for use of ADCPs in a greater number of streams than previously possible. Evaluation sites were chosen to test the StreamPro over a range of conditions. Simultaneous discharge measurements with mechanical and other acoustic meters, along with stable rating curves at established USGS streamflow-gaging stations, were used for comparisons. The StreamPro measurements ranged in mean velocity from 0.076 to 1.04 m/s and in discharge from 0.083 m 3/s to 43.4 m 3/s. Tests indicate that discharges measured with the StreamPro compare favorably to the discharges measured with the other meters when the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. When the mean channel velocity is less than 0.25 m/s, the StreamPro discharge measurements for individual transects have greater variability than those StreamPro measurements where the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. Despite this greater variation in individual transects, there is no indication that the StreamPro measured discharges (the mean discharge for all transects) are biased, provided that enough transects are used to determine the mean discharge. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  14. LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles during the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Butler, C. F.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Ismail, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment, which was conducted during June-July 2015 over the central and southern plains. LASE is an active remote sensor that employs the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to measure range resolved profiles of water vapor and aerosols above and below the aircraft. The DC-8 conducted nine local science flights from June 30- July 14 where LASE sampled water vapor and aerosol fields in support of the PECAN primary science objectives relating to better understanding nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs), Convective Initiation (CI), the Low Level Jet (LLJ), bores, and to compare different airborne and ground based measurements. LASE observed large spatial and temporal variability in water vapor and aerosol distributions in advance of nocturnal MCSs, across bores resulting from MCS outflow boundaries, and across the LLJ associated with the development of MCSs and CI. An overview of the LASE data collected during the PECAN field experiment will be presented where emphasis will be placed on variability of water vapor profiles in the vicinity of severe storms and intense convection in the central and southern plains. Preliminary comparisons show good agreement between coincident LASE and radiosonde water vapor profiles. In addition, an advanced water vapor DIAL system being developed at NASA Langley will be discussed.

  15. Total body water measurements in adolescent athletes: a comparison of six field methods with deuterium dilution.

    PubMed

    Quiterio, Ana L; Silva, Analiza M; Minderico, Cláudia S; Carnero, Elvis A; Fields, David A; Sardinha, Luis B

    2009-07-01

    -Assessing hydration, that is, total body water (TBW) in adolescent athletes should be part of a comprehensive training program. However, there are no specific methods to assess TBW in young athletes. Moreover, the use of traditional techniques developed in healthy youths, based on a 2-compartment model, may yield inaccurate TBW estimates in young athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of TBW non-reference field methods with a criterion method (i.e., deuterium dilution) in 118 adolescent athletes. Body volume was assessed by air displacement plethysmography, bone mineral was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and TBW by deuterium dilution. Non-reference TBW methods included 2 bioelectrical impedance analysis techniques (Tanita Body Composition Analyzer, model TBF-310) and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) (model 4000B); the Lohman's hydration constants of fat-free mass (FFM); and 3 derived anthropometric equations developed, respectively, by Kushner et al., Wells et al., and Morgenstern et al. The highest accuracy between TBW estimates and the reference model in both girls and boys was observed using the Lohman's constants (r2= 0.94, SEE = 1.56 kg; r2 = 0.92, SEE = 2.42 kg, respectively; p < 0.001), followed by both foot-to-foot Tanita (r2 = 0.88, SEE = 2.15 kg; r2 = 0.87, SEE = 3.01 kg, respectively; p < 0.001) and BIS (r2 = 0.92, SEE = 1.70 kg; r2 = 0.87, SEE = 3.04 kg, respectively; p < 0.001) with slopes and intercepts not significantly different from the line of identity. The regressions between anthropometric equations and the criterion method deviated from the line of identity (p < 0.05). The practical application of this study is that the specific constants of FFM hydration developed by Lohman seem to accurately estimate TBW in adolescent athletes. Foot-to-foot Tanita and BIS were also found to be valid and non-biased tools for predicting TBW. It would appear that the 3 anthropometric equations used are

  16. A Multi-Wavelength Mini Lidar for Measurements of Marine Boundary Layer Aerosol and Water Vapor Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    from the Hawaii Kilauea Volcano Pu’u O’o vent: Aerosol flux and SO2 lifetime, Geophys. Res. Lett., in press A. Clarke, V. Kapustin, S. Howell, K...A Multi-Wavelength Mini Lidar for Measurements of Marine Boundary Layer Aerosol and Water Vapor Fields Shiv K. Sharma Hawaii Institute of...Lienert Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology phone: (808) 956-7815 fax: (808) 956-3188 email: lienert@soest.hawaii.edu John N. Porter

  17. Impact of cover crop, irrigation and season on nutrient and sediment in the runoff water measured at the edge-of-fields in northeast Arkansas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improved understanding of water quality at the edge-of-field (EOF) from production-size fields is needed to better inform agriculture and resource managers regarding sustainable farming practices and environmental stewardship. We measured runoff water quality at EOF of paired commercial fields in Mi...

  18. FieldSpec: A field portable mass spectrometer prototype for high frequency measurements of δ (2) H and δ (18) O ratios in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Días, Veneranda; Quang Hoang, Hung; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Barnich, François; Wirtz, Tom; Pfister, Laurent; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological studies relying on stable water isotopes to better understand water sources, flowpaths and transit times are currently limited by the coarse temporal resolution of sampling and analysis protocols. At present, two kinds of lab-based instruments are used : (i) the standard isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS) [1] and (ii) the laser-based instruments [2, 3]. In both cases, samples need to be collected in the field and then transferred to the laboratory for the water isotopic ratio measurements (even further complex sample preparation is required for the IRMS). Hence, past and ongoing research targets the development of field deployable instruments for measuring stable water isotopes at high temporal frequencies. While recent studies have demonstrated that laser-based instruments may be taken to the field [4, 5], their size and power consumption still restrict their use to sites equipped with mains power or generators. Here, we present progress on the development of a field portable mass spectrometer (FieldSpec) for direct high frequency measurements of δ2H and δ18O ratios in water. The FieldSpec instrument is based upon the use of a double focusing magnetic sector mass spectrometer in combination with an electron impact ion source and a membrane dual inlet system. The instrument directly collects liquid water samples in the field, which are then converted into water vapour before being injected into the mass spectrometer for the stable isotope analysis. δ2H and δ18O are derived from the measured mass spectra. All the components are arranged in a vacuum case having a suit case type dimension with portable electronics and battery. Proof-of-concept experiments have been carried out to characterize the instrument. The results show that the FieldSpec instrument has good linearity (R2 = 0.99). The reproducibility of the instrument ranges between 1 and 4 ‰ for δ2H and between 0.1 and 0.4 ‰ for δ18O isotopic ratio measurements. A measurement

  19. Identification, measurement, and assessment of water cycle of unhusked rice agricultural phases: Case study at Tangerang paddy field, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartono, N.; Laurence; Johannes, H. P.

    2017-11-01

    According to one of UN reports, water scarcity has happened all around the world, including Indonesia. Irrigation sector takes up 70% of world water consumption and potentially increases 20% due to the population explosion. Rice is accounted for 69% of agricultural products contributions in Indonesia’s water footprint. Therefore, evaluation of water cycle was essential to raise awareness among practitioners. Data collections were conducted in the functional unit of one-hectare rice field located in Tangerang. This study used CropWat 8.0 and SimaPro software. Identification involved data such as climate, crop, and soil. Nursery became the highest water consumed phase, requiring 419 mm in height. Measurement through water footprint resulted in consumption of green water footprint for 8,183,618.5 liters (62.9%), followed by grey for 4,805,733.2 liters (36.9%) and blue for 23,902.36 liters (0.2%). The grey consumption was exceeding the average, which indicated high doses of pesticides. Life Cycle Assessment showed negative impacts of fertilizers that caused damages like fossil depletion, respiratory health, and eutrophication.

  20. Calibration procedures to test the feasibility of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content in field conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Javier; Sayde, Chadi; Rodríguez Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Gil, María; Selker, John

    2013-04-01

    This research provides insights of the calibration procedures carried out at the agricultural field of La Nava de Arévalo (Spain). The suitability of the heat pulse theory applied to fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in field conditions, is here analyzed. In addition, it highlights the major findings obtained and the weakness to be addressed in future studies. Within a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 of bare soil, 600 m of fiber optic cable (BruggSteal) were buried on a ziz-zag deployment at two depths, 30cm and 60cm. Various electrical heat pulses of 20W/m were applied to the stainless steel shield of the fiber optic cable during 2 minutes. The resulting thermal response was captured by means of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing (DFOT), within a spatial and temporal resolution up to 25 cm and 1 s, respectively. The soil thermal response was then correlated to the soil water content by using undisturbed soil samples and soil moisture sensors (Decagon ECHO 5TM). The process was also modeled by applying the numerical methods software Hydrus 2D. Also, the soil thermal properties were measured in situ by using a dual heat pulse probe (Decagon Kd2Pro). For an ongoing process, first results obtained show the suitability of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in real field conditions. Also, they highlight the usefulness of Hydrus 2D as a complementary tool for calibration purposes and for reducing uncertainty in addressing soil spatial variability.

  1. Who has to pay for measures in the field of water management? A proposal for applying the polluter pays principle.

    PubMed

    Grünebaum, Thomas; Schweder, Heinrich; Weyand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt about the fact that the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the pursuit of its goal of good ecological status will give rise to measures in different fields of water management. However, a conclusive and transparent method of financing these measures is still missing up to now. Measures in the water management sector are no mere end in themselves; instead, they serve specific ends directed at human activities or they serve general environment objectives. Following the integrative approach of the WFD on looking upon river basins as a whole and its requirement to observe the polluter pays principle, all different groups within a river basin should contribute to the costs according to their cost-bearer roles as polluters, stakeholders with vested interests or beneficiaries via relevant yardsticks. In order to quantify the financial expenditure of each cost bearer, a special algorithm was developed and tested in the river basin of a small tributary of the Ruhr River. It was proved to be generally practicable with regard to its handling and the comprehension of the results. Therefore, the application of a cost bearer system based on the polluter-pays principle and thus in correspondence with the WFD's requirements should appear possible in order to finance future measures.

  2. Effects of field storage method on E. coli concentrations measured in storm water runoff

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Storm water runoff is increasingly assessed for fecal indicator organisms (e.g., Escherichia coli, E. coli) and its impact on contact recreation. Concurrently, use of autosamplers along with logistic, economic, technical, and personnel barriers are challenging conventional protocols for sample hold...

  3. Catalase measurement: A new field procedure for rapidly estimating microbial loads in fuels and water-bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Passman, F.J.; Daniels, D.A.; Chesneau, H.F.

    1995-05-01

    Low-grade microbial infections of fuel and fuel systems generally go undetected until they cause major operational problems. Three interdependent factors contribute to this: mis-diagnosis, incorrect or inadequate sampling procedures and perceived complexity of microbiological testing procedures. After discussing the first two issues, this paper describes a rapid field test for estimating microbial loads in fuels and associated water. The test, adapted from a procedure initially developed to measure microbial loads in metalworking fluids, takes advantage of the nearly universal presence of the enzyme catalase in the microbes that contaminated fuel systems. Samples are reacted with a peroxide-based reagent; liberating oxygenmore » gas. The gas generates a pressure-head in a reaction tube. At fifteen minutes, a patented, electronic pressure-sensing device is used to measure that head-space pressure. The authors present both laboratory and field data from fuels and water-bottoms, demonstrating the excellent correlation between traditional viable test data (acquired after 48-72 hours incubation) and catalase test data (acquired after 15 min.-4 hours). We conclude by recommending procedures for developing a failure analysis data-base to enhance our industry`s understanding of the relationship between uncontrolled microbial contamination and fuel performance problems.« less

  4. Continuous field measurements of δD in water vapor by open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianshu

    2012-12-01

    The stable isotopes in atmospheric water vapor contain rich information on the hydrologic cycles and gaseous exchange processes between biosphere and atmosphere. About one-week field experiment was conducted to continuously measure the isotope composition of water vapor in ambient air using an open-path FTIR system. Mixing ratios of H2 16O and HD16O were measured simultaneously. Analysis of water vapor isotopes revealed that the variations of H2 16O and HD16O were highly related. Mixing ratios of both isotopes varied considerably on a daily timescale or between days, with no obvious diurnal cycle, whereas the deuterium isotopic [delta]D showed clear diel cycle. The results illustrated that the correlation between [delta]D and H2O mixing ratio was relatively weak, which was also demonstrated by the Keeling plot analysis with the whole data. Yet the further Keeling analysis on a daily timescale displayed more obvious linear relationship between [delta]D and the total H2O concentration. All daily isotopic values of evapotranspiration source were obtained, with the range between -113.93±10.25‰ and -245.63±17.61‰ over the observation period.

  5. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  6. Snow water equivalent measured with cosmic-ray neutrons: reviving a little known but highly successful field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilets, D.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary cosmic-ray neutrons are attenuated strongly by water in either solid or liquid form, suggesting a method for measuring snow water equivalent that has several advantages over alternative technologies. The cosmic-ray attenuation method is passive, portable, highly adaptable, and operates over an exceptionally large range of snow pack thicknesses. But despite promising initial observations made in the 1970s, the technique today remains practically unknown to snow hydrologists. Side-by-side measurements performed over the past several years with a snow pillow and a submerged cosmic-ray probe demonstrate that the cosmic-ray attenuation method merits consideration for a wide range of applications—especially those where alternative methods are made problematic by dense vegetation, rough terrain, deep snowpack or a lack of vehicular access. During the snow-free season, the instrumentation can be used to monitor soil moisture, thus providing another widely sought field measurement. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, C.A., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.

  7. Measuring and modeling the effects of drainage water management on soil greenhouse gas fluxes from corn and soybean fields.

    PubMed

    Nangia, V; Sunohara, M D; Topp, E; Gregorich, E G; Drury, C F; Gottschall, N; Lapen, D R

    2013-11-15

    Controlled tile drainage can boost crop yields and improve water quality, but it also has the potential to increase GHG emissions. This study compared in-situ chamber-based measures of soil CH4, N2O, and CO2 fluxes for silt loam soil under corn and soybean cropping with conventional tile drainage (UTD) and controlled tile drainage (CTD). A semi-empirical model (NEMIS-NOE) was also used to predict soil N2O fluxes from soils using observed soil data. Observed N2O and CH4 fluxes between UTD and CTD fields during the farming season were not significantly different at 0.05 level. Soils were primarily a sink for CH4 but in some cases a source (sources were associated exclusively with CTD). The average N2O fluxes measured ranged between 0.003 and 0.028 kg N ha(-1) day(-1). There were some significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) CO2 fluxes associated with CTD relative to UTD during some years of study. Correlation analyses indicated that the shallower the water table, the greater the CO2 fluxes. Higher corn plant C for CTD tended to offset estimated higher CTD CO2 C losses via soil respiration by ∼100-300 kg C ha(-1). There were good fits between observed and predicted (NEMIS-NOE) N2O fluxes for corn (R(2) = 0.70) and soybean (R(2) = 0.53). Predicted N2O fluxes were higher for CTD for approximately 70% of the paired-field study periods suggesting that soil physical factors, such as water-filled pore space, imposed by CTD have potentially strong impacts on net N fluxes. Model predictions of daily cumulative N2O fluxes for the agronomically-active study period for corn-CTD and corn-UTD, as a percentage of total N fertilizer applied, were 3.1% and 2.6%, respectively. For predicted N2O fluxes on basis of yield units, indices were 0.0005 and 0.0004 (kg N kg(-1) crop grain yield) for CTD and UTD corn fields, respectively, and 0.0011 and 0.0005 for CTD and UTD soybean fields, respectively. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ozone and Water Vapor Measurements by Raman Lidar in the Planetary Boundary Layer: Error Sources and Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzarotto, Benoit; Frioud, Max; Larcheveque, Gilles; Mitev, Valentin; Quaglia, Philippe; Simeonov, Valentin; Thompson, Anne; VandenBergh, Hubert; Calpini, Bertrand; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Why do we need time series of ozone and water vapor profiles at low altitude? The degradation of air quality is a very serious environmental problem that affects urban and industrial areas worldwide. Air pollution injures human health and ecosystems, diminishes crop yield, and spoils patrimony and materials. The phenomena involved in air pollution are very complex. Once emitted into the atmosphere, (primary) pollutants are transported, dispersed, transformed by gas/solid phase change and chemical reaction, and finally removed by dry and wet deposition. Most challenging is the fact that the health and environmental impacts of secondary pollutants (formed in the atmosphere) are frequently more severe than those of their precursors (primary pollutants). This is the case of ozone and other photochemical pollutants, such as peroxyacetil nitrate (PAN) and secondary particles, produced in the atmosphere by the photo-oxidation volatile organic compounds (VOC) catalyzed by nitrogen oxides (NO(sub x)). Photochemical air pollution is a complex science because of the non-linearity of its response to changes in primary emission.

  9. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  10. Evaluation of Two Soil Water Redistribution Models (Finite Difference and Hourly Cascade Approach) Through The Comparison of Continuous field Sensor-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreyra, R.; Stockle, C. O.; Huggins, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water storage and dynamics are of critical importance for a variety of processes in terrestrial ecosystems, including agriculture. Many of those systems are under significant pressure in terms of water availability and use. Therefore, assessing alternative scenarios through hydrological models is an increasingly valuable exercise. Soil water holding capacity is defined by the concepts of soil field capacity and plant available water, which are directly related to soil physical properties. Both concepts define the energy status of water in the root system and closely interact with plant physiological processes. Furthermore, these concepts play a key role in the environmental transport of nutrients and pollutants. Soil physical parameters (e.g. saturated hydraulic conductivity, total porosity and water release curve) are required as input for field-scale soil water redistribution models. These parameters are normally not easy to measure or monitor, and estimation through pedotransfer functions is often inadequate. Our objectives are to improve field-scale hydrological modeling by: (1) assessing new undisturbed methodologies for determining important soil physical parameters necessary for model inputs; and (2) evaluating model outputs, making a detailed specification of soil parameters and the particular boundary condition that are driving water movement under two contrasting environments. Soil physical properties (saturated hydraulic conductivity and determination of water release curves) were quantified using undisturbed laboratory methodologies for two different soil textural classes (silt loam and sandy loam) and used to evaluate two soil water redistribution models (finite difference solution and hourly cascade approach). We will report on model corroboration results performed using in situ, continuous, field measurements with soil water content capacitance probes and digital tensiometers. Here, natural drainage and water redistribution were monitored

  11. TH-CD-BRA-05: First Water Calorimetric Dw Measurement and Direct Measurement of Magnetic Field Correction Factors, KQ,B, in a 1.5 T B-Field of An MRI Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Prez, L de; Pooter, J de; Jansen, B

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Reference dosimetry in MR-guided radiotherapy is performed in the presence of a B-field. As a consequence the response of ionization chambers changes considerably and depends on parameters not considered in traditional reference dosimetry. Therefore future Codes of Practices need ionization chamber correction factors to correct for both the change in beam quality and the presence of a B-field. The objective was to study the feasibility of water calorimetric absorbed-dose measurements in a 1.5 T B-field of an MRLinac and the direct measurement of kQ,B calibration of ionization chambers. Methods: Calorimetric absorbed dose to water Dw was measured with amore » new water calorimeter in the bore of an MRLinac (TPR20,10 of 0.702). Two waterproof ionization chambers (PTW 30013, IBA FC-65G) were calibrated inside the calorimeter phantom (ND,w,Q,B). Both measurements were normalized to a monitor ionization chamber. Ionization chamber measurements were corrected for conventional influence parameter. Based on the chambers’ Co-60 calibrations (ND,w,Q0), measured directly against the calorimeter. In this study the correction factors kQ,B was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients in the MRLinac and in Co-60. Additionally, kB was determined based on kQ values obtained with the IAEA TRS-398 Code of Practice. Results: The kQ,B factors of the ionization chambers mentioned above were respectively 0.9488(8) and 0.9445(8) with resulting kB factors of 0.961(13) and 0.952(13) with standard uncertainties on the least significant digit(s) between brackets. Conclusion: Calorimetric Dw measurements and calibration of waterproof ionization chambers were successfully carried out in the 1.5 T B-field of an MRLinac with a standard uncertainty of 0.7%. Preliminary kQ,B and kB factors were determined with standard uncertainties of respectively 0.8% and 1.3%. The kQ,B agrees with an alternative method within 0.4%. The feasibility of water calorimetry in the presence

  12. Comparison of intracellular water content measurements by dark-field imaging and EELS in medium voltage TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terryn, C.; Michel, J.; Kilian, L.; Bonhomme, P.; Balossier, G.

    2000-09-01

    Knowledge of the water content at the subcellular level is important to evaluate the intracellular concentration of either diffusible or non-diffusible elements in the physiological state measured by the electron microprobe methods. Water content variations in subcellular compartments are directly related to secretion phenomena and to transmembrane exchange processes, which could be attributed to pathophysiological states. In this paper we will describe in details and compare two local water measurement methods using analytical electron microscopy. The first one is based on darkfield imaging. It is applied on freeze-dried biological cryosections; it allows indirect measurement of the water content at the subcellular level from recorded maps of darkfield intensity. The second method uses electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is applied to hydrated biological cryosections. It is based on the differences that appear in the electron energy loss spectra of macromolecular assemblies and vitrified ice in the 0-30 eV range. By a multiple least squares (MLS) fit between an experimental energy loss spectrum and reference spectra of both frozen-hydrated ice and macromolecular assemblies we can deduce directly the local water concentration in biological cryosections at the subcellular level. These two methods are applied to two test specimens: human erythrocytes in plasma, and baker's yeast (Saccharomyses Cerevisiae) cryosections. We compare the water content measurements obtained by these two methods and discuss their advantages and drawbacks.

  13. Crop Field Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Schinca, Daniel C.; Tocho, Jorge O.; Videla, Fabian

    2008-04-01

    We present in this paper the results of reflectance measurements performed with a three-band passive radiometer with independent channels for solar irradiance reference. The comparative operation of the traditional method that alternatively uses measurements of the field (downward-looking) and a white panel for reference (downard-looking) and the new approach that involves duplicated spectral channels, each one with its own difuser that point upwards to the zenith direction (upward-looking) is analyzed. The results indicated that the latter method is more suitable for use with passive sensors under rapid changing atmospheric conditions (such as clouds, dust, mist, smog and other scatterers), since a more reliable synchronic record of reference and incident light is achieved. Besides, having separate channels for the reference and the signal allow a better balancing of gains in the amplifiers for each spectral channel. We show the results obtained in the determination of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) corresponding to 2006 and 2007 field experiments concerning weeds detection and fertilizer levels assessing in wheat, to refine sensor-based fertilizer nitrogen rate recommendations. It is also shown the variation of the radiometric normalization measurements taken at noon (nadir solar position) for the whole culture cycle corresponding to two seasons (winter and spring).

  14. Passive field reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Schinca, Daniel C.; Tocho, Jorge O.; Videla, Fabian

    2008-10-01

    The results of reflectance measurements performed with a three-band passive radiometer with independent channels for solar irradiance reference are presented. Comparative operation between the traditional method that uses downward-looking field and reference white panel measurements and the new approach involving duplicated downward- and upward-looking spectral channels (each latter one with its own diffuser) is analyzed. The results indicate that the latter method performs in very good agreement with the standard method and is more suitable for passive sensors under rapidly changing atmospheric conditions (such as clouds, dust, mist, smog and other scatterers), since a more reliable synchronous recording of reference and incident light is achieved. Besides, having separate channels for the reference and the signal allows a better balancing of gains in the amplifiers for each spectral channel. We show the results obtained in the determination of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) corresponding to the period 2004-2007 field experiments concerning weed detection in soybean stubbles and fertilizer level assessment in wheat. The method may be used to refine sensor-based nitrogen fertilizer rate recommendations and to determine suitable zones for herbicide applications.

  15. Clearing the waters: Evaluating the need for site-specific field fluorescence corrections based on turbidity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saraceno, John F.; Shanley, James B.; Downing, Bryan D.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    In situ fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) measurements have gained increasing popularity as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams. One challenge to accurate fDOM measurements in many streams is light attenuation due to suspended particles. Downing et al. (2012) evaluated the need for corrections to compensate for particle interference on fDOM measurements using a single sediment standard in a laboratory study. The application of those results to a large river improved unfiltered field fDOM accuracy. We tested the same correction equation in a headwater tropical stream and found that it overcompensated fDOM when turbidity exceeded ∼300 formazin nephelometric units (FNU). Therefore, we developed a site-specific, field-based fDOM correction equation through paired in situ fDOM measurements of filtered and unfiltered streamwater. The site-specific correction increased fDOM accuracy up to a turbidity as high as 700 FNU, the maximum observed in this study. The difference in performance between the laboratory-based correction equation of Downing et al. (2012) and our site-specific, field-based correction equation likely arises from differences in particle size distribution between the sediment standard used in the lab (silt) and that observed in our study (fine to medium sand), particularly during high flows. Therefore, a particle interference correction equation based on a single sediment type may not be ideal when field sediment size is significantly different. Given that field fDOM corrections for particle interference under turbid conditions are a critical component in generating accurate DOC estimates, we describe a way to develop site-specific corrections.

  16. Chapter A6. Field Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A6 presents procedures and guidelines for the collection of data on air and water temperature, and on dissolved-oxygen concentrations, specific electrical conductance, pH, reduction-oxidation potential, alkalinity, and turbidity in water. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A (accessed August 6, 2005).

  17. Water Quality Field Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Nonpoint source pollution is both a relatively recent concern and a complex phenomenon with many unknowns. Knowing the extent to which agricultural sources contribute to the total pollutant load, the extent to which various control practices decrease this load, and the effect of reducing the pollutants delivered to a water body are basic to the…

  18. A field study of selected U.S. Geological Survey analytical methods for measuring pesticides in filtered stream water, June - September 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Norman, Julia E.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Rose, Claire E.

    2017-09-06

    U.S. Geological Survey monitoring programs extensively used two analytical methods, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, to measure pesticides in filtered water samples during 1992–2012. In October 2012, the monitoring programs began using direct aqueous-injection liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as a new analytical method for pesticides. The change in analytical methods, however, has the potential to inadvertently introduce bias in analysis of datasets that span the change.A field study was designed to document performance of the new method in a variety of stream-water matrices and to quantify any potential changes in measurement bias or variability that could be attributed to changes in analytical methods. The goals of the field study were to (1) summarize performance (bias and variability of pesticide recovery) of the new method in a variety of stream-water matrices; (2) compare performance of the new method in laboratory blank water (laboratory reagent spikes) to that in a variety of stream-water matrices; (3) compare performance (analytical recovery) of the new method to that of the old methods in a variety of stream-water matrices; (4) compare pesticide detections and concentrations measured by the new method to those of the old methods in a variety of stream-water matrices; (5) compare contamination measured by field blank water samples in old and new methods; (6) summarize the variability of pesticide detections and concentrations measured by the new method in field duplicate water samples; and (7) identify matrix characteristics of environmental water samples that adversely influence the performance of the new method. Stream-water samples and a variety of field quality-control samples were collected at 48 sites in the U.S. Geological Survey monitoring networks during June–September 2012. Stream sites were located across the United States and included sites in agricultural and urban land

  19. Water Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  20. Cost-Effective, Insitu Field Measurements for Determining the Water Retention Quantification onBehavior of Individual Right-of-Way Bioswales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; McGillis, W. R.; Hu, R.; Culligan, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Green infrastructure (GI) interventions, such as right-of-way bioswales, are being implemented in many urban areas, including New York City, to help mitigate the negative impacts of stormwater runoff. To understand the storm water retention capacity of bioswales, hydrological models, at scales ranging from the tributary area of a single right-of-way bioswale to an entire watershed, are often invoked. The validation and calibration of these models is, however, currently hampered by lack of extensive field measurements that quantify bioswale stormwater retention behaviors for different storm sizes and bioswale configurations. To overcome this problem, three field methods to quantify the water retention capacity of individual bioswales were developed. The methods are potentially applicable to other applications concerned with quantifying flow regimes in urban area. Precise measurements with high time resolutions and low environmental impacts are desired for gauging the hydraulic performance of bioswales, and similar GI configurations. To satisfy these requirements, an in-field measurement method was developed which involved the deployment of acoustic water-level sensors to measure the upstream and downstream water levels of flow into and out of a bioswale located in the Bronx areas of New York City. The measurements were made during several individual storm events. To provide reference flow rates to enable accurate calibration of the acoustic water level measurements, two other conductometry-based methods, which made use of YSI sensors and injected calcium chloride solutions, were also developed and deployed simultaneously with the water level measurements. The suite of data gathered by these methods enabled the development of a relationship between stage-discharge and rainfall intensity, which was then used to obtain the upstream and downstream hydrographs for the individual bioswale for the different storm events. This presentation will describe in detail the

  1. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ≈ 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water

  2. Field methods and quality-assurance plan for water-quality activities and water-level measurements, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Maimer, Neil V.; Wehnke, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    Water-quality activities and water-level measurements by the personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Project Office coincide with the USGS mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation’s water resources. The activities are carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office. Results of the water-quality and hydraulic head investigations are presented in various USGS publications or in refereed scientific journals and the data are stored in the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. The results of the studies are used by researchers, regulatory and managerial agencies, and interested civic groups. In the broadest sense, quality assurance refers to doing the job right the first time. It includes the functions of planning for products, review and acceptance of the products, and an audit designed to evaluate the system that produces the products. Quality control and quality assurance differ in that quality control ensures that things are done correctly given the “state-of-the-art” technology, and quality assurance ensures that quality control is maintained within specified limits.

  3. Electric Field Fluctuations in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Dayton; Limmer, David; Chandler, David

    2013-03-01

    Charge transfer in solution, such as autoionization and ion pair dissociation in water, is governed by rare electric field fluctuations of the solvent. Knowing the statistics of such fluctuations can help explain the dynamics of these rare events. Trajectories short enough to be tractable by computer simulation are virtually certain not to sample the large fluctuations that promote rare events. Here, we employ importance sampling techniques with classical molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water to study statistics of electric field fluctuations far from their means. We find that the distributions of electric fields located on individual water molecules are not in general gaussian. Near the mean this non-gaussianity is due to the internal charge distribution of the water molecule. Further from the mean, however, there is a previously unreported Bjerrum-like defect that stabilizes certain large fluctuations out of equilibrium. As expected, differences in electric fields acting between molecules are gaussian to a remarkable degree. By studying these differences, though, we are able to determine what configurations result not only in large electric fields, but also in electric fields with long spatial correlations that may be needed to promote charge separation.

  4. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  5. Simultaneous PLIF and PIV measurement of a near field turbulent immiscible buoyant oil jet fragmentation in water using liquid-liquid refractive index matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xinzhi; Katz, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Very little experimental data exits on the flow structure in the near field of a crude oil jet fragmenting in water because of inability to probe dense droplet cloud. Refractive index-matching is applied to overcome this challenge by using silicone oil and sugar water as a surrogate liquid pair. Their density ratio, viscosity ratio, and interfacial tension are closely matched with those of crude oil and seawater. Simultaneous PLIF and PIV measurements are conducted by fluorescently tagging the oil and seeding both phases with particles. With increasing jet Reynolds and Weber numbers, the oil plume breakup occurs closer to the nozzle, the spreading angle of the jet increases, and the droplet sizes decrease. The varying spread rate is attributed to differences in droplet size distributions. The location of primary oil breakup is consistent with the region of high strain rate fluctuations. What one may perceive as oil droplets in opaque fluids actually consists of multi-layers containing water droplets, which sometimes encapsulate smaller oil droplets, creating a ``Russian Doll'' like phenomenon. This system forms as ligaments of oil and water wrap around each other during entrainment. Results include profiles of mean velocity and turbulence parameters along with energy spectra. Gulf of Mexico Research Inititave.

  6. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  7. Biological Field and Laboratory Methods for Measuring the Quality of Surface Waters and Effluents. Program Element 1BA027.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Cornelius I., Ed.

    This Environmental Protection Agency manual was developed to provide pollution biologists with the most recent methods for measuring the effects of environmental contaminants on freshwater and marine organisms. The sections of this manual include: (1) Biometrics; (2) Plankton; (3) Periphyton; (4) Macrophyton; (5) Macroinvertebrates; (6) Fish; and…

  8. Microdosimetry measurements characterizing the radiation fields of 300 MeV/u 12C and 185 MeV/u 7Li pencil beams stopping in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, G.; Durante, M.; Schardt, D.

    2010-06-01

    In order to characterize the complex radiation field produced by heavy-ion beams in water, in particular the lateral dose fall-off and the radiation quality, microdosimetry measurements were performed at GSI Darmstadt using pencil-like beams of 300 MeV/u 12C and 185 MeV/u 7Li ions delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-18. The ion beams (range in water about 17 cm) were stopped in the center of a 30 × 30 × 30 cm3 water phantom and their radiation field was investigated by in-phantom measurements using a tissue-equivalent proportional chamber (TEPC). The chamber was placed at 35 different positions in the central plane at various depths along the beam axis and at radial distances of 0, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm. The off-axis measurements for both 12C and 7Li ions show very similar distributions of the lineal energy, all peaking between 1 and 10 \\rm keV\\,\\mu m^{-1} which is a typical range covered by secondary hydrogen fragments and neutrons. The radiation quality given by the dose-mean lineal energy \\overline{y}_D was found to be at a constant level of 1-2 \\rm keV\\,\\mu m^{-1} at radial distances larger than 2 cm. The relative absorbed dose at each position was obtained by integration of the measured spectra normalized to the number of incident primary beam particles. The results confirm that the lateral dose profile of heavy ions shows an extremely steep fall-off, with relative values of about 10-3, 10-4 and 10-5 at the 2, 5 and 10 cm distance from the beam axis, respectively. The depth-dose curves at a fixed distance from the beam axis slowly rise until they reach the depth of the Bragg peak, reflecting the build-up of secondary fragments with increasing penetration depth. The measured 12C dose profiles were found to be in good agreement with a similar experimental study at HIMAC (Japan).

  9. A Self-Powered and Autonomous Fringing Field Capacitive Sensor Integrated into a Micro Sprinkler Spinner to Measure Soil Water Content.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eduardo Ferreira; de Oliveira, Nestor E; Morais, Flávio J O; Carvalhaes-Dias, Pedro; Duarte, Luis Fernando C; Cabot, Andreu; Siqueira Dias, J A

    2017-03-12

    We present here the design and fabrication of a self-powered and autonomous fringing field capacitive sensor to measure soil water content. The sensor is manufactured using a conventional printed circuit board and includes a porous ceramic. To read the sensor, we use a circuit that includes a 10 kHz triangle wave generator, an AC amplifier, a precision rectifier and a microcontroller. In terms of performance, the sensor's capacitance (measured in a laboratory prototype) increases up to 5% when the volumetric water content of the porous ceramic changed from 3% to 36%, resulting in a sensitivity of S = 15.5 pF per unity change. Repeatability tests for capacitance measurement showed that the θ v sensor's root mean square error is 0.13%. The average current consumption of the system (sensor and signal conditioning circuit) is less than 1.5 μ A, which demonstrates its suitability for being powered by energy harvesting systems. We developed a complete irrigation control system that integrates the sensor, an energy harvesting module composed of a microgenerator installed on the top of a micro sprinkler spinner, and a DC/DC converter circuit that charges a 1 F supercapacitor. The energy harvesting module operates only when the micro sprinkler spinner is irrigating the soil, and the supercapacitor is fully charged to 5 V in about 3 h during the first irrigation. After the first irrigation, with the supercap fully charged, the system can operate powered only by the supercapacitor for approximately 23 days, without any energy being harvested.

  10. A Self-Powered and Autonomous Fringing Field Capacitive Sensor Integrated into a Micro Sprinkler Spinner to Measure Soil Water Content

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Eduardo Ferreira; de Oliveira, Nestor E.; Morais, Flávio J. O.; Carvalhaes-Dias, Pedro; Duarte, Luis Fernando C.; Cabot, Andreu; Siqueira Dias, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present here the design and fabrication of a self-powered and autonomous fringing field capacitive sensor to measure soil water content. The sensor is manufactured using a conventional printed circuit board and includes a porous ceramic. To read the sensor, we use a circuit that includes a 10 kHz triangle wave generator, an AC amplifier, a precision rectifier and a microcontroller. In terms of performance, the sensor’s capacitance (measured in a laboratory prototype) increases up to 5% when the volumetric water content of the porous ceramic changed from 3% to 36%, resulting in a sensitivity of S=15.5 pF per unity change. Repeatability tests for capacitance measurement showed that the θv sensor’s root mean square error is 0.13%. The average current consumption of the system (sensor and signal conditioning circuit) is less than 1.5 μA, which demonstrates its suitability for being powered by energy harvesting systems. We developed a complete irrigation control system that integrates the sensor, an energy harvesting module composed of a microgenerator installed on the top of a micro sprinkler spinner, and a DC/DC converter circuit that charges a 1 F supercapacitor. The energy harvesting module operates only when the micro sprinkler spinner is irrigating the soil, and the supercapacitor is fully charged to 5 V in about 3 h during the first irrigation. After the first irrigation, with the supercap fully charged, the system can operate powered only by the supercapacitor for approximately 23 days, without any energy being harvested. PMID:28287495

  11. Enhance field water-color measurements with a Secchi disk and its implication for fusion of active and passive ocean-color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhongping; Shang, Shaoling; Du, Keping; Liu, Bingyi; Lin, Gong; Wei, Jianwei; Li, Xiaolong

    2018-05-01

    Inversion of the total absorption (a) and backscattering coefficients of bulk water through a fusion of remote sensing reflectance (R rs ) and Secchi disk depth (Z SD ) is developed. An application of such a system to a synthesized wide-range dataset shows a reduction of ∼3 folds in the uncertainties of inverted a(λ) (in a range of ∼0.01-6.8  m -1 ) from R rs (λ) for the 350-560 nm range. Such a fusion is further proposed to process concurrent active (ocean LiDAR) and passive (ocean-color) measurements, which can lead to nearly "exact" analytical inversion of an R rs spectrum. With such a fusion, it is found that the uncertainty in the inverted total a in the 350-560 nm range could be reduced to ∼2% for the synthesized data, which can thus significantly improve the derivation of a coefficients of other varying components. Although the inclusion of Z SD places an extra constraint in the inversion of R rs , no apparent improvement over the quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) was found when the fusion of Z SD and R rs was applied to a field dataset, which calls for more accurate determination of the absorption coefficients from water samples.

  12. Cloud Liquid Water Path Comparisons from Passive Microwave and Solar Reflectance Satellite Measurements: Assessment of Sub-Field-of-View Cloud Effects in Microwave Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Thomas J.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Chou, Joyce

    1997-01-01

    Satellite observations of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) are compared from special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) measurements and GOES 8 imager solar reflectance (SR) measurements to ascertain the impact of sub-field-of-view (FOV) cloud effects on SSM/I 37 GHz retrievals. The SR retrievals also incorporate estimates of the cloud droplet effective radius derived from the GOES 8 3.9-micron channel. The comparisons consist of simultaneous collocated and full-resolution measurements and are limited to nonprecipitating marine stratocumulus in the eastern Pacific for two days in October 1995. The retrievals from these independent methods are consistent for overcast SSM/I FOVS, with RMS differences as low as 0.030 kg/sq m, although biases exist for clouds with more open spatial structure, where the RMS differences increase to 0.039 kg/sq m. For broken cloudiness within the SSM/I FOV the average beam-filling error (BFE) in the microwave retrievals is found to be about 22% (average cloud amount of 73%). This systematic error is comparable with the average random errors in the microwave retrievals. However, even larger BFEs can be expected for individual FOVs and for regions with less cloudiness. By scaling the microwave retrievals by the cloud amount within the FOV, the systematic BFE can be significantly reduced but with increased RMS differences of O.046-0.058 kg/sq m when compared to the SR retrievals. The beam-filling effects reported here are significant and are expected to impact directly upon studies that use instantaneous SSM/I measurements of cloud LWP, such as cloud classification studies and validation studies involving surface-based or in situ data.

  13. A field method for measurement of infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The determination of infiltration--the downward entry of water into a soil (or sediment)--is receiving increasing attention in hydrologic studies because of the need for more quantitative data on all phases of the hydrologic cycle. A measure of infiltration, the infiltration rate, is usually determined in the field by flooding basins or furrows, sprinkling, or measuring water entry from cylinders (infiltrometer rings). Rates determined by ponding in large areas are considered most reliable, but the high cost usually dictates that infiltrometer rings, preferably 2 feet in diameter or larger, be used. The hydrology of subsurface materials is critical in the study of infiltration. The zone controlling the rate of infiltration is usually the least permeable zone. Many other factors affect infiltration rate--the sediment (soil) structure, the condition of the sediment surface, the distribution of soil moisture or soil- moisture tension, the chemical and physical nature of the sediments, the head of applied water, the depth to ground water, the chemical quality and the turbidity of the applied water, the temperature of the water and the sediments, the percentage of entrapped air in the sediments, the atmospheric pressure, the length of time of application of water, the biological activity in the sediments, and the type of equipment or method used. It is concluded that specific values of the infiltration rate for a particular type of sediment are probably nonexistent and that measured rates are primarily for comparative use. A standard field-test method for determining infiltration rates by means of single- or double-ring infiltrometers is described and the construction, installation, and operation of the infiltrometers are discussed in detail.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF NANOPARTICLES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring nanoparticles in water differs from traditional dissolved solute measurement in several ways. The most salient difference is that nanoparticles are colloids rather than solutes and therefore are subject to the interparticle interactions (mainly electrostatic and Van de...

  15. Endoscope field of view measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanzeng; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Leiner, Dennis; Shafer, David; Zobel, Jurgen

    2017-03-01

    The current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard (ISO 8600-3: 1997 including Amendment 1: 2003) for determining endoscope field of view (FOV) does not accurately characterize some novel endoscopic technologies such as endoscopes with a close focus distance and capsule endoscopes. We evaluated the endoscope FOV measurement method (the FOV WS method) in the current ISO 8600-3 standard and proposed a new method (the FOV EP method). We compared the two methods by measuring the FOV of 18 models of endoscopes (one device for each model) from seven key international manufacturers. We also estimated the device to device variation of two models of colonoscopes by measuring several hundreds of devices. Our results showed that the FOV EP method was more accurate than the FOV WS method, and could be used for all endoscopes. We also found that the labelled FOV values of many commercial endoscopes are significantly overstated. Our study can help endoscope users understand endoscope FOV and identify a proper method for FOV measurement. This paper can be used as a reference to revise the current endoscope FOV measurement standard.

  16. Endoscope field of view measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanzeng; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Leiner, Dennis; Shafer, David; Zobel, Jurgen

    2017-01-01

    The current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard (ISO 8600-3: 1997 including Amendment 1: 2003) for determining endoscope field of view (FOV) does not accurately characterize some novel endoscopic technologies such as endoscopes with a close focus distance and capsule endoscopes. We evaluated the endoscope FOV measurement method (the FOVWS method) in the current ISO 8600-3 standard and proposed a new method (the FOVEP method). We compared the two methods by measuring the FOV of 18 models of endoscopes (one device for each model) from seven key international manufacturers. We also estimated the device to device variation of two models of colonoscopes by measuring several hundreds of devices. Our results showed that the FOVEP method was more accurate than the FOVWS method, and could be used for all endoscopes. We also found that the labelled FOV values of many commercial endoscopes are significantly overstated. Our study can help endoscope users understand endoscope FOV and identify a proper method for FOV measurement. This paper can be used as a reference to revise the current endoscope FOV measurement standard. PMID:28663840

  17. Small field depth dose profile of 6 MV photon beam in a simple air-water heterogeneity combination: A comparison between anisotropic analytical algorithm dose estimation with thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Ram, Chhape; Mourya, Ankur; Singh, Navin

    2017-01-01

    To establish trends of estimation error of dose calculation by anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) with respect to dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in air-water heterogeneity for small field size photon. TLDs were irradiated along the central axis of the photon beam in four different solid water phantom geometries using three small field size single beams. The depth dose profiles were estimated using AAA calculation model for each field sizes. The estimated and measured depth dose profiles were compared. The over estimation (OE) within air cavity were dependent on field size (f) and distance (x) from solid water-air interface and formulated as OE = - (0.63 f + 9.40) x2+ (-2.73 f + 58.11) x + (0.06 f2 - 1.42 f + 15.67). In postcavity adjacent point and distal points from the interface have dependence on field size (f) and equations are OE = 0.42 f2 - 8.17 f + 71.63, OE = 0.84 f2 - 1.56 f + 17.57, respectively. The trend of estimation error of AAA dose calculation algorithm with respect to measured value have been formulated throughout the radiation path length along the central axis of 6 MV photon beam in air-water heterogeneity combination for small field size photon beam generated from a 6 MV linear accelerator.

  18. Measuring the Heats of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James L.; Tegart, Tracy L.

    1994-01-01

    Uses common equipment (tea kettle and vacuum bottles) to precisely measure the specific heat, latent heat of fusion, and latent heat of vaporization of water. Provides descriptions for all three experiments. (MVL)

  19. Seismoelectric field measurements in unconsolidated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbel, Wolfgang; Iwanowski-Strahser, Katja; Strahser, Matthias; Dzieran, Laura; Thorwart, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Seismoelectric (SE) prospecting has the potential of determining hydraulic permeability in situ. However, the SE response of geological interfaces (IR) is influenced also by porosity, saturation and salinity. We present examples of SE surveys of near-surface unconsolidated sediments showing clear IR arrivals from the shallow groundwater table and laterally consistent IR arrivals from interfaces inside the vadoze zone. Theses measurements are complemented by seismic, GPR and geoelectric surveys for constraining bulk porosity, water saturation and salinity. They show that porosity and water content change at the interfaces generating IR arrivals. The combination of these methods enables us to estimate permeability contrast associated with major IR arrivals via numerical modeling of SE waveform amplitudes. In case of the analyzed field example this contrast is estimated to be of the order of 10 within the vadoze zone and of 100 at the aquifer-aquitard interface.

  20. A tool for cost-effectiveness analysis of field scale sediment-bound phosphorus mitigation measures and application to analysis of spatial and temporal targeting in the Lunan Water catchment, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Vinten, Andy; Sample, James; Ibiyemi, Adekunle; Abdul-Salam, Yakubu; Stutter, Marc

    2017-05-15

    The cost-effectiveness of six edge-of-field measures for mitigating diffuse pollution from sediment bound phosphorus (P) runoff from temperate arable farmland is analysed at catchment/field scales. These measures were: buffer strips, permanent grassland in the lowest 7% of arable fields, dry detention bunds, wetlands, and temporary barriers such as sediment fences. Baseline field P export was estimated using export coefficients (low risk crops) or a modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (high risk crops). The impact of measures was estimated using simple equations. Costs were estimated from gross margin losses or local data on grants. We used a net cost:benefit (NCB) factor to normalise the costs and impacts of each measure over time. Costs minimisation for target impact was done using PuLP, a linear programming module for Python, across 1634 riparian and non-riparian fields in the Lunan Water, a mixed arable catchment in Eastern Scotland. With all measures in place, average cost-effectiveness increases from £9 to £48/kg P as target P mitigation increases from 500 to 2500kg P across the catchment. Costs increase significantly when the measures available are restricted only to those currently eligible for government grants (buffers, bunds and wetlands). The assumed orientation of the average field slope makes a strong difference to the potential for storage of water by bunds and overall cost-effectiveness, but the non-funded measures can substitute for the extra expense incurred by bunds, where the slope orientation is not suitable. Economic discounting over time of impacts and costs of measures favours those measures, such as sediment fences, which are strongly targeted both spatially and temporally. This tool could be a useful guide for dialogue with land users about the potential fields to target for mitigation to achieve catchment targets. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    TD water can be sampled for infiltrating water measurement. We installed monitoring wells to measure ground water level and water quality. Inflow, outflow, flooding water, infiltrating water, and ground water were measured and sampled. Regarding to parameters, temperature, pH, EC, DO and COD, main ions were measured to understand characteristic of water quality and transformation processes. Inorganic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus were also measured, as behavior and balance of nitrogen and phosphorus are focused on. We observed following points by taking data of water quality; seasonal trend, changes occurred according to agricultural events like irrigation and fertilization. Nitrogen in ground water tends to high in June due to fertilizer. It is thought because farmers fertilize the filed before transplanting at the beginning of flooding season. Regarding to dissolved inorganic nitrogen, higher concentrations were observed in inflow water than in flooding water and outflow water. Though it needs discussion in loads as well as flow measurement, this suggests that nutrients are absorbed in paddy field and less nutrients are emitted after irrigation water passing through paddy field. Based on this research we are planning continuous investigation to assess environmental impact from paddy field.

  2. Application of the satellite system of the earth's gravity field measurement (GRACE) for the evaluation of water balance in large Russian river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, Natalia; Zotov, Leonid; Grigoriev, Vadim; Sazonov, Alexey; Kireeva, Maria; Krylenko, Inna

    2017-04-01

    Space-based Earth observing systems provided a substantially large amount of information to the scientific community in recent decades. Cumulative effects of redistribution of masses in the Earth system can be seen in the changes of the gravity field of the Earth. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, launched 17.03.2002 from Plesetsk, provide a set of monthly Earth's gravity field observations. GRACE data is very useful for hydrological and climatological studies, especially over large territory, not completely covered by the meteorological and hydrological networks, like Russia. Possible application of the satellite gravity survey data obtained under the GRACE for solving various hydrological problems is discussed. The GRACE-based monthly gravity field data are transformed into the maps of water level equivalent and averaged for the catchments of the largest rivers of Russia. The temporal variability of the parameter is analyzed. Possible application of the GRACE data for the evaluation of particular components of water balance within the largest river basins of the European part of Russia is discussed. After averaging over 15 large Russian rivers basins annual component shows amplitude increase since 2009. Trend component grows until 2009 and then reaches a plateau. It is mostly dominated by Siberian rivers. Map for the trend show gravity field increase in Siberia, at Back Sea and decrease over Caspian Sea since 2003. GRACE satellite gravimetry data can be used for estimating terrestrial water storage (TWS) in a river basin scale. Terrestrial water storage (TWS) is the integrated sum of all basin storages (surface water bodies, soil and ground aquifer, snowpack and glaciers) and the ability to estimate TWS dynamics is useful for understanding the basin's water cycle, its interconnection with the local climate, physics of predictability of extreme hydrological events. Despite the importance of the TWS estimates, reliable ground

  3. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  4. Comparing Laboratory and Field Measured Bioaccumulation Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an approach that allows comparisons of all laboratory and field bioaccumulation endpoints measurements. The approach will enable the inclusion of large amounts of field data into evaluations of bioaccumulation potential for legacy chemicals. Currently, these...

  5. Measurement of vortex flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdevitt, T. Kevin; Ambur, Todd A.; Orngard, Gary M.; Owen, F. Kevin

    1992-01-01

    A 3-D laser fluorescence anemometer (LFA) was designed, built, and demonstrated for use in the Langley 16 x 24 inch Water Tunnel. Innovative optical design flexibility combined with compact and portable data acquisition and control systems were incorporated into the instrument. This will allow its use by NASA in other test facilities. A versatile fiber optic system facilities normal and off-axis laser beam alignment, removes mirror losses and improves laser safety. This added optical flexibility will also enable simple adaptation for use in the adjacent jet facility. New proprietary concepts in transmitting color separation, light collection, and novel prism separation of the scattered light was also designed and built into the system. Off-axis beam traverse and alignment complexity led to the requirement for a specialized, programmable transverse controller, and the inclusion of an additional traverse for the off-axis arm. To meet this challenge, an 'in-house' prototype unit was designed and built and traverse control software developed specifically for the water tunnel traverse applications. A specialized data acquisition interface was also required. This was designed and built for the LFA system.

  6. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  7. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  8. Damping measurements in flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, A.; Seeley, C.; Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Marmont, H.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Water added mass and damping are both critical quantities in evaluating the dynamic response of the turbine component. Although the effect of fluid added mass is well documented, fluid damping, a critical quantity to limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore to help avoiding possible failure of the turbines, has received much less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. The experimental setup, designed to create dynamic characteristics similar to the ones of Francis turbine blades is discussed, together with the experimental protocol and examples of measurements obtained. The paper concludes with the calculated damping values and a discussion on the impact of the observed damping behaviour on the response of hydraulic turbine blades to FSI.

  9. Remote measurements of water pollution with a lidar polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheives, T. C.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Mayo, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    This paper examines a dual polarization laser backscatter system as a method for remote measurements of certain water quality parameters. Analytical models for describing the backscatter from turbid water and oil on turbid water are presented and compared with experimental data. Laser backscatter field measurements from natural waterways are presented and compared with simultaneous ground observations of the water quality parameters: turbidity, suspended solids, and transmittance. The results of this study show that the analytical models appear valid and that the sensor investigated is applicable to remote measurements of these water quality parameters and oil spills on water.-

  10. Measure for Measure: Urban Water and Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, C.; Stillwell, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    Urban environments in the United States account for a majority of the population and, as such, require large volumes of treated drinking water supply and wastewater removal, both of which need energy. Despite the large share of water that urban environments demand, there is limited accounting of these water resources outside of the city itself. In this study, we provide and analyze a database of drinking water and wastewater utility flows and energy that comprise anthropogenic fluxes of water through the urban environment. We present statistical analyses of the database at an annual, spatial, and intra-annual scale. The average daily per person water flux is estimated as 563 liters of drinking water and 496 liters of wastewater, requiring 340 kWh/1000 m3 and 430 kWh/1000 m3 of energy, respectively, to treat these resources. This energy demand accounts for 1% of the total annual electricity production of the United States. Additionally, the water and embedded energy loss associated with non-revenue water (estimated at 15.8% annually) accounts for 9.1 km3of water and 3600 GWh, enough electricity to power 300,000 U.S. households annually. Through the analysis and benchmarking of the current state of urban water fluxes, we propose the term `blue city,' which promotes urban sustainability and conservation policy focusing on water resources. As the nation's water resources become scarcer and more unpredictable, it is essential to include water resources in urban sustainability planning and continue data collection of these vital resources.

  11. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  12. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  13. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  14. Techniques to measure complex-plane fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Angela; Majola, Nombuso; Chetty, Naven; Forbes, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    In this work we construct coherent superpositions of Gaussian and vortex modes which can be described to occupy the complex-plane. We demonstrate how these fields can be experimentally constructed in a digital, controllable manner with a spatial light modulator. Once these fields have been generated we illustrate, with three separate techniques, how the constituent components of these fields can be extracted, namely by measuring the intensity of the field at two adjacent points; performing a modal decomposition and a new digital Stokes measurement.

  15. Improving the estimation of complete field soil water characteristic curves through field monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoni, M.; Bittelli, M.; Valentino, R.; Chersich, S.; Meisina, C.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, Soil Water Characteristic Curves (SWCCs) were reconstructed through simultaneous field measurements of soil pore water pressure and water content. The objective was to evaluate whether field-based monitoring can allow for the improvement of the accuracy in SWCCs estimation with respect to the use of laboratory techniques. Moreover, field assessment of SWCCs allowed to: a) quantify the hydrological hysteresis affecting SWCCs through field data; b) analyze the effect of different temporal resolution of field measures; c) highlight the differences in SWCCs reconstructed for a particular soil during different hydrological years; d) evaluate the reliability of field reconstructed SWCCs, by the comparison between assessed and measured trends of a component of the soil water balance. These aspects were fundamental for assessing the reliability of the field reconstructed SWCCs. Field data at two Italian test-sites were measured. These test-sites were used to evaluate the goodness of field reconstructed SWCCs for soils characterized by different geomorphological, geological, physical and pedological features. Field measured or laboratory measured SWCCs data of 5 soil horizons (3 in a predominantly silty soil, 2 in a predominantly clayey one) were fitted by Van Genuchten model. Different field drying and wetting periods were identified, based on monthly meteorological conditions, in terms of rainfall and evapotranspiration amounts, of different cycles. This method allowed for a correct discrimination of the main drying and the main wetting paths from field data related and for a more reliable quantification of soil hydrological properties with respect to laboratory methodologies. Particular patterns of changes in SWCCs forms along depth could be also identified. Field SWCCs estimation is not affected by the temporal resolution of the acquisition (hours or days), as testified by similar values of Van Genuchten equation fitting parameters. Instead, hourly data

  16. Attracting Students to the Field of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Sara J.; Pastor, Dena A.

    2012-01-01

    To address the shortage of professionals in measurement, it is essential that we make young career-seekers aware that measurement is an option as a profession. In this paper, we discuss how creating a strong pipeline of students into our field involves personal interactions between faculty representing the graduate programs in measurement and…

  17. Aserpiado - an ancient water conservation measure revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duifhuizen, Wolfgang; Baartman, Jantiene EM; Guzman, Gema; Gomez, Jose A.

    2017-04-01

    In Andalucía, southern Spain, farmers have been applying a water conservation measure in vineyards called 'Aserpiado' (plural: Aserpias) for centuries. This measure consists of creating multiple micro-depressions within a field in either all or in every second inter vines rows, using a tillage tool. The main objective of implementing aserpiado is to let water infiltrate on-site, thereby increasing soil moisture and plant available water, and decreasing runoff and associated losses of water and soil. Even though this system has traditionally been used in dryland areas, the functioning and efficiency of the system are still not well known. This study aimed at investigating the functioning of the aserpiado system at hillslope scale in a commercial vineyard belonging to the Appellation of Origin Montilla-Moriles in Córdoba. For this purpose, rainfall simulations at micro-plot scale and infiltration tests were performed in the field at different positions of the hillslope to determine the runoff coefficient of the untreated rows and the infiltration rate at the aserpias, respectively. These trials were complemented with a detailed description of the soil profile and aserpias and a sampling survey to describe and characterize some soil properties, relevant for this study. Preliminary results and field observations indicate that high-intensity rainstorms cause high runoff coefficients in the untreated rows. Further analysis of the data obtained from the different trials would quantify the degree in which aserpias, if well made, would be able to decrease hortonian runoff in vineyards. As this study is ongoing, more detailed results will be presented on the poster.

  18. Measuring water properties from a moving boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Modification of commercial water analyzer permits measurement of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and turbidity for continuous water flow. Ram pressure on inlet tube mounted below power boat drives water through modified sample chamber where it is analyzed.

  19. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  20. Simulations and field observations of root water uptake in plots with different soil water availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaochao; Vanderborght, Jan; Couvreur, Valentin; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Root water uptake is a main process in the hydrological cycle and vital for water management in agronomy. In most models of root water uptake, the spatial and temporal soil water status and plant root distributions are required for water flow simulations. However, dynamic root growth and root distributions are not easy and time consuming to measure by normal approaches. Furthermore, root water uptake cannot be measured directly in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate monitoring data of soil water content and potential and root distributions within a modeling framework to explore the interaction between soil water availability and root water uptake. But, most models are lacking a physically based concept to describe water uptake from soil profiles with vertical variations in soil water availability. In this contribution, we present an experimental setup in which root development, soil water content and soil water potential are monitored non-invasively in two field plots with different soil texture and for three treatments with different soil water availability: natural rain, sheltered and irrigated treatment. Root development is monitored using 7-m long horizontally installed minirhizotubes at six depths with three replicates per treatment. The monitoring data are interpreted using a model that is a one-dimensional upscaled version of root water uptake model that describes flow in the coupled soil-root architecture considering water potential gradients in the system and hydraulic conductances of the soil and root system (Couvreur et al., 2012). This model approach links the total root water uptake to an effective soil water potential in the root zone. The local root water uptake is a function of the difference between the local soil water potential and effective root zone water potential so that compensatory uptake in heterogeneous soil water potential profiles is simulated. The root system conductance is derived from inverse modelling using

  1. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  2. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well formore » removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.« less

  3. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor,Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Wire degradation has resulted in aircraft fatalities and critical space launches being delayed. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power is wirelessly provided to the sensing element by using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency, resistance and amplitude has been developed and is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be near the acquisition hardware. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed. Examples of magnetic field response sensors and the respective measurement characterizations are presented. Implementation of this method on an aerospace system is discussed.

  4. DC-magnetic field vector measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    A magnetometer experiment was designed to determine the local magnetic field by measuring the total of the Earth's magnetic field and that of an unknown spacecraft. The measured field vector components are available to all onboard experiments via the Spacelab command and data management system. The experiment consists of two parts, an electronic box and the magnetic field sensor. The sensor includes three independent measuring flux-gate magnetometers, each measuring one component. The physical background is the nonlinearity of the B-H curve of a ferrite material. Two coils wound around a ferrite rod are necessary. One of them, a tank coil, pumps the ferrite rod at approximately 20 kilohertz. As a consequence of the nonlinearity, many harmonics can be produced. The second coil (i.e., the detection coil) resonates to the first harmonic. If an unknown dc or low-frequency magnetic field exists, the amplitude of the first harmonic is a measure for the unknown magnetic field. The voltages detected by the sensors are to be digitized and transferred to the command and data management system.

  5. Measurement Of Multiphase Flow Water Fraction And Water-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Cheng-gang

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes a microwave transmission multiphase flow water-cut meter that measures the amplitude attenuation and phase shift across a pipe diameter at multiple frequencies using cavity-backed antennas. The multiphase flow mixture permittivity and conductivity are derived from a unified microwave transmission model for both water- and oil-continuous flows over a wide water-conductivity range; this is far beyond the capability of microwave-resonance-based sensors currently on the market. The water fraction and water cut are derived from a three-component gas-oil-water mixing model using the mixture permittivity or the mixture conductivity and an independently measured mixture density. Water salinity variations caused, for example, by changing formation water or formation/injection water breakthrough can be detected and corrected using an online water-conductivity tracking technique based on the interpretation of the mixture permittivity and conductivity, simultaneously measured by a single-modality microwave sensor.

  6. A FIELD STUDY TO COMPARE PERFORMANCE OF STAINLESS STEEL RESEARCH MONITORING WELLS WITH EXISTING ON-FARM DRINKING WATER WELLS IN MEASURING PESTICIDE AND NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing drinking wells are widely used for the collection of ground water samples to evaluate chemical contamination. A well comparison study was conducted to compare pesticide and nitrate-N data from specially designed stainless steel research monitoring wells with data from ne...

  7. Small fields measurements with radiochromic films

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Antonio; Vera-Sanchez, Juan-Antonio; Lago-Martin, Jose-Domingo

    2015-01-01

    The small fields in radiotherapy are widely used due to the development of techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radio surgery. The measurement of the dose distributions for small fields is a challenge. A perfect dosimeter should be independent of the radiation energy and the dose rate and should have a negligible volume effect. The radiochromic (RC) film characteristics fit well to these requirements. However, the response of RC films and their digitizing processes present a significant spatial inhomogeneity problem. The present work uses a method for two-dimensional (2D) measurement with RC films based on the reduction of the spatial inhomogeneity of both the film and the film digitizing process. By means of registering and averaging several measurements of the same field, the inhomogeneities are mostly canceled. Measurements of output factors (OFs), dose profiles (in-plane and cross-plane), and 2D dose distributions are presented. The field sizes investigated are 0.5 × 0.5 cm2, 0.7 × 0.7 cm2, 1 × 1 cm2, 2 × 2 cm2, 3 × 3 cm2, 6 × 6 cm2, and 10 × 10 cm2 for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The OFs measured with the RC film are compared with the measurements carried out with a PinPoint ionization chamber (IC) and a Semiflex IC, while the measured transversal dose profiles were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained for the OFs measurements show a good agreement with the values obtained from RC films and the PinPoint and Semiflex chambers when the field size is greater or equal than 2 × 2 cm2. These agreements give confidence on the accuracy of the method as well as on the results obtained for smaller fields. Also, good agreement was found between the measured profiles and the Monte Carlo calculated profiles for the field size of 1 × 1 cm2. We expect, therefore, that the presented method can be used to perform accurate measurements of small fields. PMID:26170551

  8. Small fields measurements with radiochromic films.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Antonio; Vera-Sanchez, Juan-Antonio; Lago-Martin, Jose-Domingo

    2015-01-01

    The small fields in radiotherapy are widely used due to the development of techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radio surgery. The measurement of the dose distributions for small fields is a challenge. A perfect dosimeter should be independent of the radiation energy and the dose rate and should have a negligible volume effect. The radiochromic (RC) film characteristics fit well to these requirements. However, the response of RC films and their digitizing processes present a significant spatial inhomogeneity problem. The present work uses a method for two-dimensional (2D) measurement with RC films based on the reduction of the spatial inhomogeneity of both the film and the film digitizing process. By means of registering and averaging several measurements of the same field, the inhomogeneities are mostly canceled. Measurements of output factors (OFs), dose profiles (in-plane and cross-plane), and 2D dose distributions are presented. The field sizes investigated are 0.5 × 0.5 cm(2), 0.7 × 0.7 cm(2), 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2 cm(2), 3 × 3 cm(2), 6 × 6 cm(2), and 10 × 10 cm(2) for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The OFs measured with the RC film are compared with the measurements carried out with a PinPoint ionization chamber (IC) and a Semiflex IC, while the measured transversal dose profiles were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained for the OFs measurements show a good agreement with the values obtained from RC films and the PinPoint and Semiflex chambers when the field size is greater or equal than 2 × 2 cm(2). These agreements give confidence on the accuracy of the method as well as on the results obtained for smaller fields. Also, good agreement was found between the measured profiles and the Monte Carlo calculated profiles for the field size of 1 × 1 cm(2). We expect, therefore, that the presented method can be used to perform accurate measurements of small fields.

  9. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  10. Field testing hot water temperature reduction as an energy-saving measure--does the Legionella presence change in a clinic's plumbing system?

    PubMed

    Völker, Sebastian; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. represent a significant health risk for humans. To ensure hygienically safe drinking water, technical guidelines recommend a central potable water hot (PWH) supply temperature of at least 60°C at the calorifier. In a clinic building we monitored whether slightly lowered temperatures in the PWH system led to a systemic change in the growth of these pathogens. In four separate phases we tested different scenarios concerning PWH supply temperatures and disinfection with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). In each phase, we took 5 sets of samples at 17 representative sampling points in the building's drinking water plumbing system. In total we collected 476 samples from the PWH system. All samples were tested (culture-based) for Legionella spp. and serogroups. Additionally, quantitative parameters at each sampling point were collected, which could possibly be associated with the presence of Legionella spp. (Pseudomonas aeruginsoa, heterotrophic plate count at 20°C and 36°C, temperatures, time until constant temperatures were reached, and chlorine dioxide concentration). The presence of Legionella spp. showed no significant reactions after reducing the PWH supply temperature from 63°C to 60°C and 57°C, as long as disinfection with ClO2 was maintained. After omitting the disinfectant, the PWH system showed statistically significant growth rates at 57°C. PWH temperatures which are permanently lowered to less than recommended values should be carefully accompanied by frequent testing, a thorough evaluation of the building's drinking water plumbing system, and hygiene expertise.

  11. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  12. Sound-field measurement with moving microphones

    PubMed Central

    Katzberg, Fabrice; Mazur, Radoslaw; Maass, Marco; Koch, Philipp; Mertins, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Closed-room scenarios are characterized by reverberation, which decreases the performance of applications such as hands-free teleconferencing and multichannel sound reproduction. However, exact knowledge of the sound field inside a volume of interest enables the compensation of room effects and allows for a performance improvement within a wide range of applications. The sampling of sound fields involves the measurement of spatially dependent room impulse responses, where the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem applies in the temporal and spatial domains. The spatial measurement often requires a huge number of sampling points and entails other difficulties, such as the need for exact calibration of a large number of microphones. In this paper, a method for measuring sound fields using moving microphones is presented. The number of microphones is customizable, allowing for a tradeoff between hardware effort and measurement time. The goal is to reconstruct room impulse responses on a regular grid from data acquired with microphones between grid positions, in general. For this, the sound field at equidistant positions is related to the measurements taken along the microphone trajectories via spatial interpolation. The benefits of using perfect sequences for excitation, a multigrid recovery, and the prospects for reconstruction by compressed sensing are presented. PMID:28599533

  13. Electric field measurements from Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a unique location for the study of atmospheric electricity. Not only is it one of the most pollutant free places on Earth, but its proximity to the south magnetic pole means that it is an ideal location to study the effects of solar variability on the atmospheric electric field. This is due to the reduced shielding effect of the geomagnetic field at the poles which leads to a greater flux of incoming Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) as well as an increased probability of energetic particle precipitation from SEPs and relativistic electrons. To investigate such effects, two electric field mills of different design were installed at the British Antarctic Survey Halley base in February 2015 (75. 58 degrees south, 26.66 degrees west). Halley is situated on the Brunt Ice Shelf in the south east of the Weddell Sea and has snow cover all year round. Preliminary analysis has focused on selection of fair weather criteria using wind speed and visibility measurements which are vital to assess the effects of falling snow, blowing snow and freezing fog on the electric field measurements. When the effects of such adverse weather conditions are removed clear evidence of the characteristic Carnegie Curve diurnal cycle exists in the Halley electric field measurements (with a mean value of 50V/m and showing a 40% peak to peak variation in comparison to the 34% variation in the Carnegie data). Since the Carnegie Curve represents the variation in thunderstorm activity across the Earth, its presence in the Halley data confirms the presence of the global atmospheric electric circuit signal at Halley. The work presented here will discuss the details of the Halley electric field dataset, including the variability in the fair weather measurements, with a particular focus on magnetic field fluctuations.

  14. Water-Leaving Contribution to Polarized Radiation Field Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Ibrahim, Amir; Franz, Bryan A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Gao, Meng; Frouin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation field from a coupled atmosphere-ocean system (CAOS) includes contributions from the atmosphere, surface, and water body. Atmo-spheric correction of ocean color imagery is to retrieve water-leaving radiance from the TOA measurement, from which ocean bio-optical properties can be obtained. Knowledge of the ab-solute and relative magnitudes of water-leaving signal in the TOA radiation field is important for designing new atmospheric correction algorithms and developing retrieval algorithms for new ocean biogeochemical parameters. In this paper we present a systematic sensitivity study of water-leaving contribution to the TOA radiation field, from 340 nm to 865 nm, with polarization included. Ocean water inherent optical properties are derived from bio-optical models for two kinds of waters, one dominated by phytoplankton (PDW) and the other by non-algae particles (NDW). In addition to elastic scattering, Raman scattering and fluorescence from dissolved organic matter in ocean waters are included. Our sensitivity study shows that the polarized reflectance is minimized for both CAOS and ocean signals in the backscattering half plane, which leads to numerical instability when calculating water leaving relative contribution, the ratio between polarized water leaving and CAOS signals. If the backscattering plane is excluded, the water-leaving polarized signal contributes less than 9% to the TOA polarized reflectance for PDW in the whole spectra. For NDW, the polarized water leaving contribution can be as much as 20% in the wavelength range from 470 to 670 nm. For wavelengths shorter than 452 nm or longer than 865 nm, the water leaving contribution to the TOA polarized reflectance is in general smaller than 5% for NDW. For the TOA total reflectance, the water-leaving contribution has maximum values ranging from 7% to 16% at variable wavelengths from 400 nm to 550 nm from PDW. The water leaving contribution to the TOA total reflectance

  15. Water-leaving contribution to polarized radiation field over ocean.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Ibrahim, Amir; Franz, Bryan A; Hu, Yongxiang; Gao, Meng; Frouin, Robert

    2017-08-07

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation field from a coupled atmosphere-ocean system (CAOS) includes contributions from the atmosphere, surface, and water body. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery is to retrieve water-leaving radiance from the TOA measurement, from which ocean bio-optical properties can be obtained. Knowledge of the absolute and relative magnitudes of water-leaving signal in the TOA radiation field is important for designing new atmospheric correction algorithms and developing retrieval algorithms for new ocean biogeochemical parameters. In this paper we present a systematic sensitivity study of water-leaving contribution to the TOA radiation field, from 340 nm to 865 nm, with polarization included. Ocean water inherent optical properties are derived from bio-optical models for two kinds of waters, one dominated by phytoplankton (PDW) and the other by non-algae particles (NDW). In addition to elastic scattering, Raman scattering and fluorescence from dissolved organic matter in ocean waters are included. Our sensitivity study shows that the polarized reflectance is minimized for both CAOS and ocean signals in the backscattering half plane, which leads to numerical instability when calculating water leaving relative contribution, the ratio between polarized water leaving and CAOS signals. If the backscattering plane is excluded, the water-leaving polarized signal contributes less than 9% to the TOA polarized reflectance for PDW in the whole spectra. For NDW, the polarized water leaving contribution can be as much as 20% in the wavelength range from 470 to 670 nm. For wavelengths shorter than 452 nm or longer than 865 nm, the water leaving contribution to the TOA polarized reflectance is in general smaller than 5% for NDW. For the TOA total reflectance, the water-leaving contribution has maximum values ranging from 7% to 16% at variable wavelengths from 400 nm to 550 nm from PDW. The water leaving contribution to the TOA total reflectance can

  16. Vorticity field measurement using digital inline holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallery, Kevin; Hong, Jiarong

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate the direct measurement of a 3D vorticity field using digital inline holographic microscopy. Microfiber tracer particles are illuminated with a 532 nm continuous diode laser and imaged using a single CCD camera. The recorded holographic images are processed using a GPU-accelerated inverse problem approach to reconstruct the 3D structure of each microfiber in the imaged volume. The translation and rotation of each microfiber are measured using a time-resolved image sequence - yielding velocity and vorticity point measurements. The accuracy and limitations of this method are investigated using synthetic holograms. Measurements of solid body rotational flow are used to validate the accuracy of the technique under known flow conditions. The technique is further applied to a practical turbulent flow case for investigating its 3D velocity field and vorticity distribution.

  17. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor- capacit or circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequenci es correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induc tion. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic fi eld used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for disce rning changes in sensor's response frequency, resistance and amplitud e is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminat ing the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each se nsor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to a ny form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  18. The significance of vector magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of four flaring solar active regions, obtained during 1980-1986 with the NASA Marshall vector magnetograph (Hagyard et al., 1982 and 1985), are presented graphically and characterized in detail, with reference to nearly simultaneous Big Bear Solar Observatory and USAF ASW H-alpha images. It is shown that the flares occurred where local photospheric magnetic fields differed most from the potential field, with initial brightening on either side of a magnetic-neutral line near the point of maximum angular shear (rather than that of maximum magnetic-field strength, typically 1 kG or greater). Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that these significant nonpotential features were detected only by measuring all three components of the vector magnetic field.

  19. Section summary: Ground-based field measurements

    Treesearch

    Nophea Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Although deforestation has been the main focus of international debate in REDD+, forest degradation could emit even more carbon emissions because forest degradation can take place in any accessible forest. Accounting for emission factors requires the use of stockchange or gain-loss approach depending on the forests in questions. Ground based field measurements are a...

  20. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  1. Effect of magnetic field on the physical properties of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youkai; Wei, Huinan; Li, Zhuangwen

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the effect of magnetic field (MF) on the partial physical properties of water are reported, tap water (TW) and 4 types of magnetized water (MW) were measured in the same condition. It was found that the properties of TW were changed following the MF treatment, shown as the increase of evaporation amount, the decrease of specific heat and boiling point after magnetization, the changes depend on the magnetization effect. In addition, magnetic field strength (MFS) has a marked influence on the magnetization effect, the optimal magnetizing condition was determined as the MFS of 300 mT. The findings of this study offered a facile approach to improve cooling and power generation efficiency in industrial.

  2. Measuring water potential (activity) from free water to oven dryness.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, H H

    1981-12-01

    Water activities (potentials) in plant materials were measured over the range from free water to oven dryness with a Spanner thermocouple psychrometer. In a two-step procedure, water was first condensed on the thermocouple junction for several minutes. The sample was then inserted under the wet thermocouple and the maximum psychrometric cooling was measured in about 10 seconds. Calibration was with saturated salt slurries of known water activities. Psychrometric cooling was a nearly linear function of the water activity and of the negative log of the water potential. The psychrometric cooling to water activity relationship agreed with wetbulb temperature depression to relative humidity relationships given in tables. Water activities of wheat grains and leaves decreased sharply in a curvilinear fashion as their water contents decreased. Some problems of the procedure are discussed.

  3. General field and office procedures for indirect discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, M.A.; Dalrymple, Tate

    2001-04-01

    The discharge of streams is usually measured by the current-meter method. During flood periods, however, it is frequently impossible or impractical to measure the discharges by this method when they occur. Consequently, many peak discharges must be determined after the passage of the flood by indirect methods, such as slope-area, contracted-opening, flow-over-dam, and flow-through-culvert, rather than by direct current-meter measurement. Indirect methods of determining peak discharge are based on hydraulic equations which relate the discharge to the water-surface profile and the geometry of the channel. A field survey is made after the flood to determine the location and elevation of high-water marks and the characteristics of the channel. Detailed descriptions of the general procedures used in collecting the field data and in computing the discharge are given in this report. Each of the methods requires special procedures described in subsequent chapters.

  4. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  5. Comparison of simulated and measured nonlinear ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-03-01

    In this paper results from a non-linear AS (angular spectrum) based ultrasound simulation program are compared to water-tank measurements. A circular concave transducer with a diameter of 1 inch (25.4 mm) is used as the emitting source. The measured pulses are first compared with the linear simulation program Field II, which will be used to generate the source for the AS simulation. The generated non-linear ultrasound field is measured by a hydrophone in the focal plane. The second harmonic component from the measurement is compared with the AS simulation, which is used to calculate both fundamental and second harmonic fields. The focused piston transducer with a center frequency of 5 MHz is excited by a waveform generator emitting a 6-cycle sine wave. The hydrophone is mounted in the focal plane 118 mm from the transducer. The point spread functions at the focal depth from Field II and measurements are illustrated. The FWHM (full width at half maximum) values are 1.96 mm for the measurement and 1.84 mm for the Field II simulation. The fundamental and second harmonic components of the experimental results are plotted compared with the AS simulations. The RMS (root mean square) errors of the AS simulations are 7.19% and 10.3% compared with the fundamental and second harmonic components of the measurements.

  6. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  7. Systems Measures of Water Distribution System Resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Katherine A.; Murray, Regan; Walker, La Tonya Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that is being used increasingly to refer to the capacity of infrastructure systems to be prepared for and able to respond effectively and rapidly to hazardous events. In Section 2 of this report, drinking water hazards, resilience literature, and available resilience tools are presented. Broader definitions, attributes and methods for measuring resilience are presented in Section 3. In Section 4, quantitative systems performance measures for water distribution systems are presented. Finally, in Section 5, the performance measures and their relevance to measuring the resilience of water systems to hazards is discussed along with needed improvements tomore » water distribution system modeling tools.« less

  8. Active Raman sounding of the earth's water vapor field.

    PubMed

    Tratt, David M; Whiteman, David N; Demoz, Belay B; Farley, Robert W; Wessel, John E

    2005-08-01

    The typically weak cross-sections characteristic of Raman processes has historically limited their use in atmospheric remote sensing to nighttime application. However, with advances in instrumentation and techniques, it is now possible to apply Raman lidar to the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the diurnal cycle. Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements of water vapor using Raman lidar are also possible but are limited to nighttime and require long integration times. However, boundary layer studies of water vapor variability can now be performed with high temporal and spatial resolution. This paper will review the current state-of-the-art of Raman lidar for high-resolution measurements of the atmospheric water vapor, aerosol and cloud fields. In particular, we describe the use of Raman lidar for mapping the vertical distribution and variability of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the evolution of dynamic meteorological events. The ability of Raman lidar to detect and characterize water in the region of the tropopause and the importance of high-altitude water vapor for climate-related studies and meteorological satellite performance are discussed.

  9. Does deficit irrigation of field crops increase water use efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Deficit irrigation is often proposed as a method to stretch limited irrigation water supply and increase water use efficiency. A field study of field crops in the high plains shows that water use efficiency, in terms of irrigation water applied, often increases with deficit irrigation. However, in t...

  10. Radiometry of water turbidity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An examination of a number of measurements of turbidity reported in the literature reveals considerable variability in the definitions, units, and measurement techniques used. Many of these measurements differ radically in the optical quantity measured. The radiometric basis of each of the most common definitions of turbidity is examined. Several commercially available turbidimeters are described and their principles of operation are evaluated radiometrically. It is recommended that the term turbidity be restricted to measurements based upon the light scattered by the sample with that scattered by standard suspensions of known turbidity. It is also recommended that the measurement procedure be standardized by requiring the use of Formazin as the turbidity standardizing material and that the Formazin Turbidity Unit (FTU) be adopted as the standard unit of turbidity.

  11. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Carl; Puttagunta, Srikanth

    2016-02-05

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumptionmore » for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publically available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring(TM), A.O. Smith Voltex(R), and Stiebel Eltron Accelera(R) 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).« less

  12. Ultrasound field measurement using a binary lens

    PubMed Central

    Clement, G.T.; Nomura, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Field characterization methods using a scattering target in the absence of a point-like receiver have been well described in which scattering is recorded by a relatively large receiver located outside the field of measurement. Unfortunately, such methods are prone to artifacts due to averaging across the receiver surface. To avoid this problem while simultaneously increasing the gain of a received signal, the present study introduces a binary plate lens designed to focus spherically-spreading waves onto a planar region having a nearly-uniform phase proportional to that of the target location. The lens is similar to a zone plate, but modified to produce a biconvex-like behavior, such that it focuses both planar and spherically spreading waves. A measurement device suitable for characterizing narrowband ultrasound signals in air is designed around this lens by coupling it to a target and planar receiver. A prototype device is constructed and used to characterize the field of a highly-focused 400 kHz air transducer along 2 radial lines. Comparison of the measurements with numeric predictions formed from nonlinear acoustic simulation showed good relative pressure correlation, with mean differences of 10% and 12% over center 3dB FWHM drop and 12% and 17% over 6dB. PMID:25643084

  13. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  14. Structure of the floating water bridge and water in an electric field

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J.; Shyam, Badri; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The floating water bridge phenomenon is a freestanding rope-shaped connection of pure liquid water, formed under the influence of a high potential difference (approximately 15 kV). Several recent spectroscopic, optical, and neutron scattering studies have suggested that the origin of the bridge is associated with the formation of anisotropic chains of water molecules in the liquid. In this work, high energy X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on a series of floating water bridges as a function of applied voltage, bridge length, and position within the bridge. The two-dimensional X-ray scattering data showed no direction-dependence, indicating that the bulk water molecules do not exhibit any significant preferred orientation along the electric field. The only structural changes observed were those due to heating, and these effects were found to be the same as for bulk water. These X-ray scattering measurements are supported by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations which were performed under electric fields of 106 V/m and 109 V/m. Directional structure factor calculations were made from these simulations parallel and perpendicular to the E-field. The 106 V/m model showed no significant directional-dependence (anisotropy) in the structure factors. The 109 V/m model however, contained molecules aligned by the E-field, and had significant structural anisotropy. PMID:23010930

  15. Healthy Water Healthy People Field Monitoring Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This 100-page manual serves as a technical reference for the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" and the "Healthy Water Healthy People Testing Kits". Yielding in-depth information about ten water quality parameters, it answers questions about water quality testing using technical overviews, data interpretation guidelines,…

  16. Field Techniques for Estimating Water Fluxes Between Surface Water and Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; LaBaugh, James W.

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on measuring the flow of water across the interface between surface water and ground water, rather than the hydrogeological or geochemical processes that occur at or near this interface. The methods, however, that use hydrogeological and geochemical evidence to quantify water fluxes are described herein. This material is presented as a guide for those who have to examine the interaction of surface water and ground water. The intent here is that both the overview of the many available methods and the in-depth presentation of specific methods will enable the reader to choose those study approaches that will best meet the requirements of the environments and processes they are investigating, as well as to recognize the merits of using more than one approach. This report is designed to make the reader aware of the breadth of approaches available for the study of the exchange between surface and ground water. To accomplish this, the report is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 describes many well-documented approaches for defining the flow between surface and ground waters. Subsequent chapters provide an in-depth presentation of particular methods. Chapter 2 focuses on three of the most commonly used methods to either calculate or directly measure flow of water between surface-water bodies and the ground-water domain: (1) measurement of water levels in well networks in combination with measurement of water level in nearby surface water to determine water-level gradients and flow; (2) use of portable piezometers (wells) or hydraulic potentiomanometers to measure hydraulic gradients; and (3) use of seepage meters to measure flow directly. Chapter 3 focuses on describing the techniques involved in conducting water-tracer tests using fluorescent dyes, a method commonly used in the hydrogeologic investigation and characterization of karst aquifers, and in the study of water fluxes in karst terranes. Chapter 4 focuses on heat as a tracer in hydrological

  17. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagg, Andreas; Lites, Bruce; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Consequently, inference of magnetic fields in the photosphere, and especially in the chromosphere, is crucial to deepen our understanding not only for solar phenomena such as chromospheric and coronal heating, flares or coronal mass ejections, but also for fundamental physical topics like dynamo theory or atomic physics. In this review, we present an overview of significant advances during the last decades in measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the availability of observatories, together with some selected results. We discuss the problems of determining magnetic fields at smallest spatial scales, connected with increasing demands on polarimetric sensitivity and temporal resolution, and highlight some promising future developments for their solution.

  18. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  19. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures) and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation), are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  20. Water Rockets and Indirect Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Duane

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity that teaches a number of scientific concepts including indirect measurement, Newton's third law of motion, manipulating and controlling variables, and the scientific method of inquiry. Uses process skills such as observation, inference, prediction, mensuration, and communication as well as problem solving and higher-order…

  1. Field-scale water transport in unsaturated crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmi, T.; Schneebeli, M.; Flühler, H.; Wydler, H.; Baer, T.

    1997-04-01

    Safe disposal of toxic wastes in geologic formations requires minimal water and gas movement in the vicinity of storage areas. Ventilation of repository tunnels or caverns built in solid rock can desaturate the near field up to a distance of meters from the rock surface, even when the surrounding geological formation is saturated and under hydrostatic pressures. A tunnel segment at the Grimsel test site located in the Aare granite of the Bernese Alps (central Switzerland) has been subjected to a resaturation and, subsequently, to a controlled desaturation. Using thermocouple psychrometers (TP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR), the water potentials ψ and water contents θ were measured within the unsaturated granodiorite matrix near the tunnel wall at depths between 0 and 160 cm. During the resaturation the water potentials in the first 30 cm from the rock surface changed within weeks from values of less than -1.5 MPa to near saturation. They returned to the negative initial values during desaturation. The dynamics of this saturation-desaturation regime could be monitored very sensitively using the thermocouple psychrometers. The TDR measurements indicated that water contents changed close to the surface, but at deeper installation depths the observed changes were within the experimental noise. The field-measured data of the desaturation cycle were used to test the predictive capabilities of the hydraulic parameter functions that were derived from the water retention characteristics ψ(θ) determined in the laboratory. A depth-invariant saturated hydraulic conductivity ks = 3.0 × 10-11m s-1 was estimated from the ψ(t) data at all measurement depths, using the one-dimensional, unsaturated water flow and transport model HYDRUS [Vogel et al., 1996]. For individual measurement depths, the estimated ks varied between 9.8 × 10-12 and 6.1 × 10-11 m s-1. The fitted ks values fell within the range of previously estimated s for this location and led to a satisfactory

  2. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE - ACCURACY OF DEPTH TO WATER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge of discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of aquifers, or the effects of manmade...

  3. Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience: Water at Meridiani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Million, C.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Ross, R. M.; St Clair, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility (SPIF) at Cornell University, in collaboration with Million Concepts and the Paleontological Research Institute (PRI), has developed the Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience (EVFE), a web-based, game-like and inquiry-driven classroom activity targeted to middle school through undergraduate introductory Earth science classrooms. Students play the role of mission scientists for a NASA rover mission, tasked with targeting the rover's scientific instruments to investigate a specific scientific question about the landing site. As with the real mission, the student operators must optimize the efficient use of limited resources and time against the need to make observations to address working hypotheses. The activity uses only real--not artificial or simulated--mission data, and students are guided throughout by a "Mission Manager" who provides hints and advice about the scientific meaning of observations within the broader context of the mission objectives. The MER Opportunity EVFE is a pilot effort, the first of five EVFE modules planned a rate of one per year that will feature different NASA missions and scientific topics. The MER Opportunity EVFE has already been developed and focuses on the investigation of the history of water on Mars at the Meridiani landing site of the Opportunity rover. The module includes a teacher guide and is currently available to educators through the SPIF website.

  4. A Portable FTIR Analyser for Field Measurements of Trace Gases and their Isotopologues: CO2, CH4, N2O, CO, del13C in CO2 and delD in water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, D. W.; Bryant, G. R.; Deutscher, N. M.; Wilson, S. R.; Kettlewell, G.; Riggenbach, M.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a portable Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) analyser capable of simultaneous high precision analysis of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO in air, as well as δ13C in CO2 and δD in water vapour. The instrument is based on a commercial 1 cm-1 resolution FTIR spectrometer fitted with a mid-IR globar source, 26 m multipass White cell and thermoelectrically-cooled MCT detector operating between 2000 and 7500 cm-1. Air is passed through the cell and analysed in real time without any pre-treatment except for (optional) drying. An inlet selection manifold allows automated sequential analysis of samples from one or more inlet lines, with typical measurement times of 1-10 minutes per sample. The spectrometer, inlet sampling sequence, real-time quantitative spectrum analysis, data logging and display are all under the control of a single program running on a laptop PC, and can be left unattended for continuous measurements over periods of weeks to months. Selected spectral regions of typically 100-200 cm-1 width are analysed by a least squares fitting technique to retrieve concentrations of trace gases, 13CO2 and HDO. Typical precision is better than 0.1% without the need for calibration gases. Accuracy is similar if measurements are referenced to calibration standard gases. δ13C precision is typically around 0.1‰, and for δD it is 1‰. Applications of the analyser include clean and polluted air monitoring, tower-based flux measurements such as flux gradient or integrated horizontal flux measurements, automated soil chambers, and field-based measurements of isotopic fractionation in soil-plant-atmosphere systems. The simultaneous multi-component advantages can be exploited in tracer-type emission measurements, for example of CH4 from livestock using a co-released tracer gas and downwind measurement. We have also developed an open path variant especially suited to tracer release studies and measurements of NH3 emissions from agricultural sources. An illustrative

  5. Accuracy of Depth to Water Measurements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge or discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of...

  6. Miscellaneous methods for measuring matric or water potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Andraski, Brian J.; Bilskie, Jim; Dane, Jacob H.; Topp, G. Clarke

    2002-01-01

    A variety of techniques to measure matric potential or water potential in the laboratory and in the field are described in this section. The techniques described herein require equilibration of some medium whose matric or water potential can be determined from previous calibration or can be measured directly. Under equilibrium conditions the matric or water potential of the medium is equal to that of the soil. The techniques can be divided into: (i) those that measure matric potential and (ii) those that measure water potential (sum of matric and osmotic potentials). Matric potential is determined when the sensor matrix is in direct contact with the soil, so salts are free to diffuse in or out of the sensor matrix, and the equilibrium measurement therefore reflects matric forces acting on the water. Water potential is determined when the sensor is separated from the soil by a vapor gap, so salts are not free to move in or out of the sensor, and the equilibrium measurement reflects the sum of the matric and osmotic forces acting on the water.Seven different techniques are described in this section. Those that measure matric potential include (i) heat dissipation sensors, (ii) electrical resistance sensors, (iii) frequency domain and time domain sensors, and (iv) electro-optical switches. A method that can be used to measure matric potential or water potential is the (v) filter paper method. Techniques that measure water potential include (vi) the Dew Point Potentiameter (Decagon Devices, Inc., Pullman, WA1) (water activity meter) and (vii) vapor equilibration.The first four techniques are electronically based methods for measuring matric potential. Heat dissipation sensors and electrical resistance sensors infer matric potential from previously determined calibration relations between sensor heat dissipation or electrical resistance and matric potential. Frequency-domain and timedomain matric potential sensors measure water content, which is related to matric

  7. Electric Field Measurements At The Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, P.-A.; Dunlop, M.

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) is due to the thermal motions of the particles, which produce electrostatic fluctuations. This noise is detected by any sensitive receiver at the ports of an electric antenna immersed in a plasma and can be used to measure in-situ the plasma density, temperature and bulk velocity. The basic reason is that this noise can be formally calculated as a function of both the particle velocity distribu- tions and the antenna geometry. So, conversely, the "spectroscopy" of this noise re- veals the local plasma properties. This method is routinely used on various spacecraft (Ulysses, Wind) in the solar wind or in planetary magnetospheres/ionospheres (Image at Earth, Cassini at Venus, Earth and soon at Saturn). This method has the advantage of being relatively immune to spacecraft potential and photoelectrons pertubations, since it senses a large plasma volume. It provides an accurate measurement of the electron density (a few %) because it is based on the detection of the strong signal peak near the local plasma frequency (which is close to a resonance for electrostatic waves). We will show that QTN may be as well adapted to measure 1) magnetized (anisotropic) plasmas (and deduce the magnetic field strength), 2) suprathermal or non-thermal component (as for example a kappa distribution), and 3) a wide range of core temperature, i.e from ~10 eV, as in the solar wind, to rather low temperatures (<0.1 eV), as encountered in planetary ionospheres, with a single instrument. We will finally focus on the thermal noise analysis we might perform using an electric dipole on the bepiColombo/MMO probe, with the aim to get accurate measurements of elec- tron density and temperature for comparison with our models of Mercury/solar wind interaction.

  8. Solar Polarimetry and Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2001-05-01

    The magnetic nature of most solar (spatially resolved or unresolved) structures is amply recognized. Magnetic fields of the Sun play a paramount rôle in the overall thermodynamic and dynamic state of our star. The main observable manifestation of solar magnetic fields is the polarization of light either through the Zeeman effect on spectral lines or through the Hanle effect (depolarization by very weak magnetic fields of light previously polarized by scattering). Hence, one can easily understand the increasing importance that polarimetry is experimenting continuously in solar physics. Under the title of this contribution a six-hour course was given during the summer school. Clearly, the limited extension allocated for the notes in these proceedings avoids an extensive account of the several topics discussed: 1) a description of light as an electromagnetic wave and the polarization properties of monochromatic, time-harmonic, plane waves; 2) the polarization properties of polychromatic light and, in particular, of quasi-monochromatic light; 3) the transformations of (partially) polarized light by linear optical systems and a description of the ways we measure the Stokes parameters by spatially and/or temporally modulating the polarimetric signal; 4) a discussion on specific problems relevant to solar polarimetry like seeing-induced and instrumental polarization, or modulation and demodulation, along with a brief description of current solar polarimeters; 5) the vector radiative transfer equation for polarized light and its links to the scalar one for unpolarized light, together with a summary of the Zeeman effect and its consequences on line formation in a magnetized stellar atmosphere; 7) an introduction of the paramount astrophysical problem, i.e., that of finding diagnostics that enable the solar physicist to interpret the observables in terms of the solar atmospheric quantities, including a discussion on contribution and response functions; and 8) a brief

  9. Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Lin, Robert P.; Sanchez, Hugo; Jaroux, Belgacem A.; Bester, Manfred; Brown, Patrick; Cosgrove, Daniel; Dougherty, Michele K.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Hemingway, Doug; Lozano, Paulo C.; Martel, Francois; Whitlock, Caleb W.

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon's surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact trajectories to strongly magnetic regions on the surface, and transmitting measurements in real-time to a nearby spacecraft, or directly to the Earth, up until milliseconds before impact. The cubesats and their instruments are partly based on the NSF-funded CINEMA cubesat now in Earth orbit. Two methods of reaching the Moon as a secondary payload are discussed: 1) After launching into geostationary transfer orbit with a communication satellite, a small mother-ship travels into lunar orbit and releases the cubesats on impact trajectories, and 2) The cubesats travel to the Moon using their own propulsion after release into geosynchronous orbit. This latter version would also enable other near-Earth missions, such as constellations for studying magnetospheric processes, and observations of close-approaching asteroids.

  10. Measuring the Speed of Sound in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper begins with an early measurement of the speed of sound in water. A historical overview of the consequent development of SONAR and medical imaging is given. A method of measuring the speed suitable for demonstration to year 10 students is described in detail, and an explanation of its systematic error examined.

  11. Field Measurements of Reynolds Stress near a Riverbank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Smith, J.D.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The Reynolds stress field was measured near the bank of the Powder River in southeastern Montana. The measurements were made from the bank using an aluminum I-beam cantilevered over the water to support a carriage system for positioning an acoustic doppler velocimeter in a vertical plane perpendicular to 1) the bank and 2) the streamwise velocity field. During quasi-steady flow at the peak (71 m3s-1) of the spring snowmelt runoff in May 1996, turbulent velocities were measured at 25 Hertz along six vertical locations spaced 0.5 m apart and within about 3.5 m of the riverbank. When the turbulent velocities are transformed to the ray-isovel coordinate system appropriate for this two-dimension problem, the turbulent characteristics near the bed are consistent with similar field measurements made by others for the one-dimensional problem of uniform flow over a horizontal bed far from lateral boundaries. The three turbulent intensities, (u???2) 1/2, (v???2)1/2 and (w??? 2)1/2, normalized by the local shear velocity, u*, were essentially constant with distance above the bed along a ray and the average values were 2.1, 1.4, and 1.2. Future turbulence measurements could be improved by measuring the streamwise flow first, then determining the approximate location of the rays and isovels so that the turbulence measurements could be made along the approximated rays rather than along verticals. In addition, to improve the possibility making turbulence measurements during steady, uniform flow, the site should be carefully selected to minimize local flow accelerations caused by spatial variability of the riverbank. Also, the measurements should be made at times when the stage is constant, no local erosion or deposition of sediment occurs, and when wind velocities are small.

  12. Simulating the fate of water in field soil crop environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameira, M. R.; Fernando, R. M.; Ahuja, L.; Pereira, L.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the Root Zone Water Quality Model(RZWQM) for assessing the fate of water in the soil-crop environment at the field scale under the particular conditions of a Mediterranean region. The RZWQM model is a one-dimensional dual porosity model that allows flow in macropores. It integrates the physical, biological and chemical processes occurring in the root zone, allowing the simulation of a wide spectrum of agricultural management practices. This study involved the evaluation of the soil, hydrologic and crop development sub-models within the RZWQM for two distinct agricultural systems, one consisting of a grain corn planted in a silty loam soil, irrigated by level basins and the other a forage corn planted in a sandy soil, irrigated by sprinklers. Evaluation was performed at two distinct levels. At the first level the model capability to fit the measured data was analyzed (calibration). At the second level the model's capability to extrapolate and predict the system behavior for conditions different than those used when fitting the model was assessed (validation). In a subsequent paper the same type of evaluation is presented for the nitrogen transformation and transport model. At the first level a change in the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) formulation was introduced, based upon the definition of the effective leaf area, resulting in a 51% decrease in the root mean square error of the ETc simulations. As a result the simulation of the root water uptake was greatly improved. A new bottom boundary condition was implemented to account for the presence of a shallow water table. This improved the simulation of the water table depths and consequently the soil water evolution within the root zone. The soil hydraulic parameters and the crop variety specific parameters were calibrated in order to minimize the simulation errors of soil water and crop development. At the second level crop yield was predicted with an error of 1.1 and 2.8% for

  13. Measure Guideline: Combined Space and Water Heating Installation and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.

    Combined space and water heater (combi or combo) systems are defined by their dual functionality. Combi systems provide both space heating and water heating capabilities with a single heat source. This guideline will focus on the installation and operation of residential systems with forced air heating and domestic hot water (DHW) functionality. Past NorthernSTAR research has used a combi system to replace a natural gas forced air distribution system furnace and tank type water heater (Schoenbauer et al. 2012; Schoenbauer, Bohac, and McAlpine 2014). The combi systems consisted of a water heater or boiler heating plant teamed with a hydronicmore » air handler that included an air handler, water coil, and water pump to circulate water between the heating plant and coil. The combi water heater or boiler had a separate circuit for DHW. Past projects focused on laboratory testing, field characterization, and control optimization of combi systems. Laboratory testing was done to fully characterize and test combi system components; field testing was completed to characterize the installed performance of combi systems; and control methodologies were analyzed to understand the potential of controls to simplify installation and design and to improve system efficiency and occupant comfort. This past work was relied upon on to create this measure guideline.« less

  14. Aircraft electric field measurements: Calibration and ambient field retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Bailey, Jeff; Christian, Hugh J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    An aircraft locally distorts the ambient thundercloud electric field. In order to determine the field in the absence of the aircraft, an aircraft calibration is required. In this work a matrix inversion method is introduced for calibrating an aircraft equipped with four or more electric field sensors and a high-voltage corona point that is capable of charging the aircraft. An analytic, closed form solution for the estimate of a (3 x 3) aircraft calibration matrix is derived, and an absolute calibration experiment is used to improve the relative magnitudes of the elements of this matrix. To demonstrate the calibration procedure, we analyze actual calibration date derived from a Lear jet 28/29 that was equipped with five shutter-type field mill sensors (each with sensitivities of better than 1 V/m) located on the top, bottom, port, starboard, and aft positions. As a test of the calibration method, we analyze computer-simulated calibration data (derived from known aircraft and ambient fields) and explicitly determine the errors involved in deriving the variety of calibration matrices. We extend our formalism to arrive at an analytic solution for the ambient field, and again carry all errors explicitly.

  15. Probing The Temperature Field, Concentration Field and Effect of Air in Water Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqiang

    As we know, water is one of the most important substances on earth. It is indispensable for the survival of all creatures, including animals and plants. Despite such an enormous significance, nevertheless, a deep understanding of the physical behaviors of water freezing, including characterization from different scales and the dynamic temperature behaviors are stilling missing. On the other hand, currently, the main focus on developing anti-icing methods is super-hydrophobic surface. But it is well known that, the expanse is large and the efficiency is low. In this thesis, we primarily investigate two important issues concerned with water freezing, which are the characterization of water freezing from molecule-scale to macro-scale and the corresponding temperature field, and the promotion of a novel promising anti-icing method, respectively. In the first part, we lay emphasis on the temperature field behaviors and the physical characteristics in different scales during water freezing. We mainly use the Fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, mapping temperature field) and a series of thermal-couples (in situ bulk site) to directly measure and characterize the temperature field of water freezing. On the other hand, by combining the high-speed camera, X-ray diffractometer and also the confocal microscopy, we are able to directly visualize its physical behaviors in dynamic way. Based on these methods, we found that the freezing process can be divided into two stages, the first stage and the second stage which have totally distinct behaviors. Here we will elucidate them explicitly. Before getting the exact temperature field, We first noticed the concentration dependence of fluorescence lifetime and thus made an elaborate calibration of the relation between them which has never been reported before. And then we developed an innovative method to acquire the temperature of each pixel in the field of view, and thus derived the distinct temperature field. Through

  16. Measurement of total organic concentration in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, E.

    1978-01-01

    Instrument for determining total organic concentration in water uses no corrosive reagents or gases. Instead continuous ultraviolet photolysis process converts organic compounds to carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 electrode is used to measure CO2 content. Only reagent necessary is oxygen, generated in situ by electrolyzing some water. In addition to application in aerospace industry, system has potential uses in pollution monitoring and in laboratory analyses.

  17. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  18. Measuring water ingestion from spray exposures.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Martha; Roddick, Felicity; Nguyen, Thang; O'Toole, Joanne; Leder, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Characterisation of exposure levels is an essential requirement of health risk assessment; however for water exposures other than drinking, few quantitative exposure data exist. Thus, regulatory agencies must use estimates to formulate policy on treatment requirements for non-potable recycled water. We adapted the use of the swimming pool chemical cyanuric acid as a tracer of recreational water ingestion to permit detection of small water volumes inadvertently ingested from spray exposures. By using solutions of 700-1000 mg/L cyanuric acid in an experimental spray exposure scenario, we were able to quantify inadvertent water ingestion in almost 70% of participants undertaking a 10 min car wash activity using a high pressure spray device. Skin absorption was demonstrated to be negligible under the experimental conditions, and the measured ingestion volumes ranged from 0.06 to 3.79 mL. This method could be applied to a range of non-potable water use activities to generate exposure data for risk assessment processes. The availability of such empirical measurements will provide greater assurance to regulatory agencies and industry that potential health risks from exposure to non-potable water supplies are well understood and adequately managed to protect public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ways to measure body temperature in the field.

    PubMed

    Langer, Franz; Fietz, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    Body temperature (Tb) represents one of the key parameters in ecophysiological studies with focus on energy saving strategies. In this study we therefore comparatively evaluated the usefulness of two types of temperature-sensitive passive transponders (LifeChips and IPTT-300) and one data logger (iButton, DS1922L) mounted onto a collar to measure Tb in the field. First we tested the accuracy of all three devices in a water bath with water temperature ranging from 0 to 40°C. Second, we evaluated the usefulness of the LifeChips and the modified iButtons for measuring Tb of small heterothermic mammals under field conditions. For this work we subcutaneously implanted 14 male edible dormice (Glis glis) with transponders, and equipped another 14 males with data loggers to simultaneously record Tb and oxygen consumption with a portable oxygen analyzer (Oxbox). In one individual we recorded Tb with both devices and analyzed recorded Tb patterns. LifeChips are able to measure temperature within the smallest range from 25 to 40°C with an accuracy of 0.07±0.12°C. IPTT-300 transponders measured temperature between 10 and 40°C, but accuracy decreased considerably at values below 30°C, with maximal deviations of nearly 7°C. An individual calibration of each transponder is therefore needed, before using it at low Tbs. The accuracy of the data logger was comparatively good (0.12±0.25°C) and stable over the whole temperature range tested (0-40°C). In all three devices, the repeatability of measurements was high. LifeChip transponders as well as modified iButtons measured Tb reliably under field conditions. Simultaneous Tb-recordings in one edible dormouse with an implanted LifeChip and a collar-mounted iButton revealed that values of both measurements were closely correlated. Taken together, we conclude that implanted temperature-sensitive transponders represent an appropriate and largely non-invasive method to measure Tb also under field conditions. Copyright © 2014

  20. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ANALYSIS: FIELD STUDIES, MODELING AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The user‘s guide entitled “Water Distribution System Analysis: Field Studies, Modeling and Management” is a reference guide for water utilities and an extensive summarization of information designed to provide drinking water utility personnel (and related consultants and research...

  1. The Action of a Magnetic Field on Water,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The effect of a low intensity magnetic field on water as a flotation medium with the enrichment of coal and dressing of copper sulfied ore is studied...magnetic field with flotation is expressed. The imposition of an external magnetic field disturbs the energy state of water, which leads to a change in...intermolecular interaction, stability of hydrogen bonds, deterioration in the wettability of rigid surfaces, and a change in the technological indices of flotation enrichment. (Author)

  2. Portable field kit for determining uranium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, John B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressing need for on-site field analyses of the uranium content of surface and ground waters has promoted the development of a simple, light-weight, relatively cheap, portable kit to make such determinations in the field. Forty to sixty water samples per day can be analyzed for uranium to less than 0.2 parts per billion. The kit was tested in the field with excellent results.

  3. Water Pollution Detection by Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, A. D.

    1971-01-01

    Measurement of the intensity of light reflected from various planar liquid surfaces has been performed. The results of this brief study show that the presence of a film of foreign material floating on a reference substrate is easily detected by reflectance measurement if the two liquids possess significantly different refractive indices, for example, oil (n = 1.40) and water (n = 1.33). Additional study of various optical configurations, and the building and testing of a prototype monitoring device revealed that the method is sufficiently practical for application to continuous water quality monitoring.

  4. Tower-Perturbation Measurements in Above-Water Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; DAlimonte, Davide; vanderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities which took place during June 2001 and June 2002 on the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea. The primary objective of these field campaigns was to quantify the effect of platform perturbations (principally reflections of sunlight onto the sea surface) on above-water measurements of water-leaving radiances. The deployment goals documented in this report were to: a) collect an extensive and simultaneous set of above- and in-water optical measurements under predominantly clear-sky conditions; b) establish the vertical properties of the water column using a variety of ancillary measurements, many of which were taken coincidently with the optical measurements; and c) determine the bulk properties of the environment using a diversity of atmospheric, biogeochemical, and meteorological techniques. A preliminary assessment of the data collected during the two field campaigns shows the perturbation in above-water radiometry caused by a large offshore structure is very similar to that caused by a large research vessel.

  5. Development of microcontroller based water flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Surachman, Arif; Fathonah, Indra Wahyudin; Billah, Muhammad Aziz; Khairurrijal, Mahfudz, Hernawan; Rimawan, Ririn; Lestari, Slamet

    2015-04-01

    A digital instrument for measuring water flow was developed using an AT89S52 microcontroller, DS1302 real time clock (RTC), and EEPROM for an external memory. The sensor used for probing the current was a propeller that will rotate if immersed in a water flow. After rotating one rotation, the sensor sends one pulse and the number of pulses are counted for a certain time of counting. The measurement data, i.e. the number of pulses per unit time, are converted into water flow velocity (m/s) through a mathematical formula. The microcontroller counts the pulse sent by the sensor and the number of counted pulses are stored into the EEPROM memory. The time interval for counting is provided by the RTC and can be set by the operator. The instrument was tested under various time intervals ranging from 10 to 40 seconds and several standard propellers owned by Experimental Station for Hydraulic Structure and Geotechnics (BHGK), Research Institute for Water Resources (Pusair). Using the same propellers and water flows, it was shown that water flow velocities obtained from the developed digital instrument and those found by the provided analog one are almost similar.

  6. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  7. Measuring biogeochemical responses to pulses of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-05-01

    Hydrologic pulses, temporary increases in water inputs such as bouts of precipitation, can affect biogeochemical processes in ecosystems by providing water and nutrient resources. However, ecosystem responses to the water vary. Harms and Grimm conducted experiments to determine how hydrologic pulses and existing moisture conditions interact to affect the biogeochemistry of desert floodplains. During dry and monsoon seasons at their study site in the floodplains of the San Pedro River in Arizona, the researchers experimentally added pulses of water and then measured emissions of several trace gases that are indicators of biological processes. They found that the size of the added hydrologic pulse strongly interacted with existing soil moisture conditions in determining emissions of some trace gases. For instance, following dry conditions, pulses of water stimulated carbon dioxide, methane, and nitric oxide emissions, with larger water pulses stimulating more emissions. However, when soil was already wet, the addition of water pulses had less effect on the emission of these gases. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, doi:10.1029/2011JG001775, 2012)

  8. Measurement of tritium in natural water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen

    1985-06-01

    A detergent-scintillation liquid mixture applied to measure low specific activity of tritium in natural water was studied. The DYS-1 low level liquid scintillation counter designed and manufactured by our institute was employed. In comparing the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture with the dioxane-based-scintillation liquid, a better formula for Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture was determined, the mixture possesses the quality of high water content; high efficiency and low back-ground in measuring tritium in water. Chemiluminescence of the Triton X-100 scintillation liquid mixture can be totally de-excited in short time. It can be employed at ambient temperature 11 28°C. For 20ml sample in quartz vials, counting efficiency is 15% with a background 2.17 cpm, Y=31 TU (t=30 min).

  9. Measuring magnetic field vector by stimulated Raman transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenli; Wei, Rong, E-mail: weirong@siom.ac.cn; Lin, Jinda

    2016-03-21

    We present a method for measuring the magnetic field vector in an atomic fountain by probing the line strength of stimulated Raman transitions. The relative line strength for a Λ-type level system with an existing magnetic field is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field vector measured by our proposed method is consistent well with that by the traditional bias magnetic field method with an axial resolution of 6.1 mrad and a radial resolution of 0.16 rad. Dependences of the Raman transitions on laser polarization schemes are also analyzed. Our method offers the potential advantages for magnetic field measurement without requiring additional bias fields,more » beyond the limitation of magnetic field intensity, and extending the spatial measurement range. The proposed method can be widely used for measuring magnetic field vector in other precision measurement fields.« less

  10. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  11. Water quality parameter measurement using spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to the problem of measuring water quality parameters from remote sensing spectral signature data. The equations necessary to perform regression analysis are presented and methods of testing the strength and reliability of a regression are described. An efficient algorithm for selecting an optimal subset of the independent variables available for a regression is also presented.

  12. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  13. Polarization Lidar for Shallow Water Supraglacial Lake Depth Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S.; Adler, J.; Thayer, J. P.; Hayman, M.

    2010-12-01

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nanometers and using a single photomultiplier tube is developed for applications of shallow water depth measurement, in particular those often found in supraglacial lakes of the ablation zone on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system’s laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than an order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, a Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator and a time to digital converter are used to target various water depths, using ice as the floor to simulate a supraglacial lake. Measurement of 1 centimeter water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 millimeters are demonstrated using the technique. This novel technique enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement, and will support comprehensive hydrodynamic studies of supraglacial lakes. Additionally, the compact size and low weight (<15 kg) of the field system currently in development presents opportunities for use in small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for large areal surveys of the ablation zone.

  14. Field Assessment of Acoustic-Doppler Based Discharge Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of equipment based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun a field validation of the instruments currently (2002) available for making discharge measurements from a moving boat in streams of various sizes. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI2 and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made by the use of a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures with the acoustic instruments at each site during data collection. The discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with the discharges measured with Price AA meters and the current USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating. Additional analysis of the data collected indicates that the coefficient of variation of the discharge measurements consistently was less for the RD Instruments, Inc. Rio Grandes than it was for the SonTek/YSI RiverSurveyors. The bottom-tracking referenced measurement had a lower coefficient of variation than the differentially corrected global positioning system referenced measurements. It was observed that the higher frequency RiverSurveyors measured a moving bed more often than the lower frequency Rio Grandes. The detection of a moving bed caused RiverSurveyors to be consistently biased low when referenced to bottom tracking. Differentially corrected global positioning system data may be used to remove the bias observed in the bottom-tracking referenced measurements.

  15. Field Deployable Method for Arsenic Speciation in Water.

    PubMed

    Voice, Thomas C; Flores Del Pino, Lisveth V; Havezov, Ivan; Long, David T

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water supplies by arsenic is a world-wide problem. Total arsenic measurements are commonly used to investigate and regulate arsenic in water, but it is well understood that arsenic occurs in several chemical forms, and these exhibit different toxicities. It is problematic to use laboratory-based speciation techniques to assess exposure as it has been suggested that the distribution of species is not stable during transport in some types of samples. A method was developed in this study for the on-site speciation of the most toxic dissolved arsenic species: As (III), As (V), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA). Development criteria included ease of use under field conditions, applicable at levels of concern for drinking water, and analytical performance.The approach is based on selective retention of arsenic species on specific ion-exchange chromatography cartridges followed by selective elution and quantification using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Water samples can be delivered to a set of three cartridges using either syringes or peristaltic pumps. Species distribution is stable at this point, and the cartridges can be transported to the laboratory for elution and quantitative analysis. A set of ten replicate spiked samples of each compound, having concentrations between 1 and 60 µg/L, were analyzed. Arsenic recoveries ranged from 78-112 % and relative standard deviations were generally below 10%. Resolution between species was shown to be outstanding, with the only limitation being that the capacity for As (V) was limited to approximately 50 µg/L. This could be easily remedied by changes in either cartridge design, or the extraction procedure. Recoveries were similar for two spiked hard groundwater samples indicating that dissolved minerals are not likely to be problematic. These results suggest that this methodology can be use for analysis of the four primary arsenic species of concern in

  16. Field Deployable Method for Arsenic Speciation in Water

    PubMed Central

    Voice, Thomas C.; Flores del Pino, Lisveth V.; Havezov, Ivan; Long, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water supplies by arsenic is a world-wide problem. Total arsenic measurements are commonly used to investigate and regulate arsenic in water, but it is well understood that arsenic occurs in several chemical forms, and these exhibit different toxicities. It is problematic to use laboratory-based speciation techniques to assess exposure as it has been suggested that the distribution of species is not stable during transport in some types of samples. A method was developed in this study for the on-site speciation of the most toxic dissolved arsenic species: As (III), As (V), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA). Development criteria included ease of use under field conditions, applicable at levels of concern for drinking water, and analytical performance. The approach is based on selective retention of arsenic species on specific ion-exchange chromatography cartridges followed by selective elution and quantification using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Water samples can be delivered to a set of three cartridges using either syringes or peristaltic pumps. Species distribution is stable at this point, and the cartridges can be transported to the laboratory for elution and quantitative analysis. A set of ten replicate spiked samples of each compound, having concentrations between 1 and 60 µg/L, were analyzed. Arsenic recoveries ranged from 78–112 % and relative standard deviations were generally below 10%. Resolution between species was shown to be outstanding, with the only limitation being that the capacity for As (V) was limited to approximately 50 µg/L. This could be easily remedied by changes in either cartridge design, or the extraction procedure. Recoveries were similar for two spiked hard groundwater samples indicating that dissolved minerals are not likely to be problematic. These results suggest that this methodology can be use for analysis of the four primary arsenic species of concern in

  17. Sensible heat balance measurements of soil water evaporation beneath a maize canopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the water budget in a cropped field. Few methods are available for continuous and independent measurement of soil water evaporation. A sensible heat balance (SHB) approach has recently been demonstrated for continuously determining soil water evapo...

  18. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  19. Evaporation Rate of Water as a Function of a Magnetic Field and Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

  20. Evaporation rate of water as a function of a magnetic field and field gradient.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-12-11

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air.

  1. Field studies of the effect of chemical fertilizers on the quality of ground- and drainage waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratas, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    This article describes a field study of the effect of a variety of fertilizers--superphosphates, potassium chlorides, and ammonium nitrates--used in the cultivation of corn on the ground and runoff waters comprising a regional water resource. The experiment establishes that the fertilizers have a substantial effect on runoff waters--the formation of their chemical composition and mineralization--and a lesser effect on ground water. The study accounts for meteorological factors as well as dispersion behavior of the water in the soil and its eventual transport to the water resource and supply system. Conservation measures are indicated based on the results.

  2. Water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the water depth measurement using an airborne pulsed neon laser system. The results of initial base-line field test results of NASA airborne oceanographic lidar in the bathymetry mode are given, with water-truth measurements of depth and beam attenuation coefficients by boat taken at the same time as overflights to aid in determining the system's operational performance. The nadir-angle tests and field-of-view data are presented; this laser bathymetry system is an improvement over prior models in that (1) the surface-to-bottom pulse waveform is digitally recorded on magnetic tape, and (2) wide-swath mapping data may be routinely acquired using a 30 deg full-angle conical scanner.

  3. Study of magnetic fields from power-frequency current on water lines.

    PubMed

    Lanera, D; Zapotosky, J E; Colby, J A

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic fields from power-frequency current flowing on water lines were investigated in a new approach that involved an area-wide survey in a small town. Magnetic fields were measured outside the residence under power cables and over water lines, and each residence was characterized as to whether it received water from a private well or the municipal water system. The magnetic field data revealed two statistical modes when they were related to water supply type. The data also showed that in the case of the high mode, the magnetic field remained constant along the line formed by power drop wires, at the back of the house, and the water hookup service, in front of the house, all the way to the street. The patterns are explained by the coincidence of measurement points and the presence of net current flowing on power mains, power drop conductors, residential plumbing, water service hookups, and water mains. These patterns, together with other characteristics of this magnetic field source, such as the gradual spatial fall-off of this field and the presence of a constant component in the time sequence, portray a magnetic field more uniform and constant in the residential environment than has been thought to exist. Such characteristics make up for the weakness of the source and make net current a significant source of exposure in the lives of individuals around the house, when human exposure to magnetic fields is assumed to be a cumulative effect over time. This, together with the bimodal statistical distribution of the residential magnetic field (related to water supply type), presents opportunities for retrospective epidemiological analysis. Water line type and its ability to conduct power-frequency current can be used as the historical marker for a bimodal exposure inference, as Wertheimer et al. have shown.

  4. Field and laboratory analyses of water from the Columbia aquifer in Eastern Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachman, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Field and laboratory analyses of pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance from water samples collected from the Columbia aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula in eastern Maryland were compared to determine if laboratory analyses could be used for making regional water-quality interpretations. Kruskal-Wallis tests of field and laboratory data indicate that the difference between field and laboratory values is usually not enough to affect the outcome of the statistical tests. Thus, laboratory measurements of these constituents may be adequate for making certain regional water-quality interpretations, although they may result in errors if used for geochemical interpretations.

  5. Polarization impacts on the water-leaving radiance retrieval from above-water radiometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Tristan; Gilerson, Alexander; Tonizzo, Alberto; Chowdhary, Jacek; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-12-10

    Above-water measurements of water-leaving radiance are widely used for water-quality monitoring and ocean-color satellite data validation. Reflected skylight in above-water radiometry needs to be accurately estimated prior to derivation of water-leaving radiance. Up-to-date methods to estimate reflection of diffuse skylight on rough sea surfaces are based on radiative transfer simulations and sky radiance measurements. But these methods neglect the polarization state of the incident skylight, which is generally highly polarized. In this paper, the effects of polarization on the sea surface reflectance and the subsequent water-leaving radiance estimation are investigated. We show that knowledge of the polarization field of the diffuse skylight significantly improves above-water radiometry estimates, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum where the reflected skylight is dominant. A newly developed algorithm based on radiative transfer simulations including polarization is described. Its application to the standard Aerosol Robotic Network-Ocean Color and hyperspectral radiometric measurements of the 1.5-year dataset acquired at the Long Island Sound site demonstrates the noticeable importance of considering polarization for water-leaving radiance estimation. In particular it is shown, based on time series of collocated data acquired in coastal waters, that the azimuth range of measurements leading to good-quality data is significantly increased, and that these estimates are improved by more than 12% at 413 nm. Full consideration of polarization effects is expected to significantly improve the quality of the field data utilized for satellite data validation or potential vicarious calibration purposes.

  6. Linking plot, field, and watershed runoff and water quality in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most water quality studies are conducted at the plot, field, or watershed scale; however, studies that integrate the three scales provide information to scale results obtained at one scale to a greater area. The objective of this study was to analyze runoff and water quality measured (1997-2001) fr...

  7. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  8. Water Plume Temperature Measurements by an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)

    PubMed Central

    DeMario, Anthony; Lopez, Pete; Plewka, Eli; Wix, Ryan; Xia, Hai; Zamora, Emily; Gessler, Dan; Yalin, Azer P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development and testing of a proof of principle water temperature measurement system deployed on an unmanned aerial system (UAS), for field measurements of thermal discharges into water. The primary elements of the system include a quad-copter UAS to which has been integrated, for the first time, both a thermal imaging infrared (IR) camera and an immersible probe that can be dipped below the water surface to obtain vertical water temperature profiles. The IR camera is used to take images of the overall water surface to geo-locate the plume, while the immersible probe provides quantitative temperature depth profiles at specific locations. The full system has been tested including the navigation of the UAS, its ability to safely carry the sensor payload, and the performance of both the IR camera and the temperature probe. Finally, the UAS sensor system was successfully deployed in a pilot field study at a coal burning power plant, and obtained images and temperature profiles of the thermal effluent. PMID:28178215

  9. Water Plume Temperature Measurements by an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS).

    PubMed

    DeMario, Anthony; Lopez, Pete; Plewka, Eli; Wix, Ryan; Xia, Hai; Zamora, Emily; Gessler, Dan; Yalin, Azer P

    2017-02-07

    We report on the development and testing of a proof of principle water temperature measurement system deployed on an unmanned aerial system (UAS), for field measurements of thermal discharges into water. The primary elements of the system include a quad-copter UAS to which has been integrated, for the first time, both a thermal imaging infrared (IR) camera and an immersible probe that can be dipped below the water surface to obtain vertical water temperature profiles. The IR camera is used to take images of the overall water surface to geo-locate the plume, while the immersible probe provides quantitative temperature depth profiles at specific locations. The full system has been tested including the navigation of the UAS, its ability to safely carry the sensor payload, and the performance of both the IR camera and the temperature probe. Finally, the UAS sensor system was successfully deployed in a pilot field study at a coal burning power plant, and obtained images and temperature profiles of the thermal effluent.

  10. Landscape-Scale water balance of cotton fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Information on the temporal and spatial distribution of the components of the water balance of a production field is necessary to manage agronomic inputs. Furthermore, factors that determine crop yield require knowledge of the energy, water, nutrient and carbon balance and their interaction. The in...

  11. Force Field for Water Based on Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Weitao

    2018-05-18

    We developed a novel neural network based force field for water based on training with high level ab initio theory. The force field was built based on electrostatically embedded many-body expansion method truncated at binary interactions. Many-body expansion method is a common strategy to partition the total Hamiltonian of large systems into a hierarchy of few-body terms. Neural networks were trained to represent electrostatically embedded one-body and two-body interactions, which require as input only one and two water molecule calculations at the level of ab initio electronic structure method CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ embedded in the molecular mechanics water environment, making it efficient as a general force field construction approach. Structural and dynamic properties of liquid water calculated with our force field show good agreement with experimental results. We constructed two sets of neural network based force fields: non-polarizable and polarizable force fields. Simulation results show that the non-polarizable force field using fixed TIP3P charges has already behaved well, since polarization effects and many-body effects are implicitly included due to the electrostatic embedding scheme. Our results demonstrate that the electrostatically embedded many-body expansion combined with neural network provides a promising and systematic way to build the next generation force fields at high accuracy and low computational costs, especially for large systems.

  12. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL TOILET SYSTEMS AND GREY WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the field program was to determine the operational characteristics and overall acceptability of popular models of biological toilets and a few select grey water systems. A field observation scheme was devised to take advantage of in-use sites throughout the State...

  13. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  14. Improvements to measuring water flux in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Masarik, Kevin C; Norman, John M; Brye, Kristofor R; Baker, John M

    2004-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of land use practices on ground water quality has been difficult because few techniques are capable of monitoring the quality and quantity of soil water flow below the root zone without disturbing the soil profile and affecting natural flow processes. A recently introduced method, known as equilibrium tension lysimetry, was a major improvement but it was not a true equilibrium since it still required manual intervention to maintain proper lysimeter suction. We addressed this issue by developing an automated equilibrium tension lysimeter (AETL) system that continuously matches lysimeter tension to soil-water matric potential of the surrounding soil. The soil-water matric potential of the bulk soil is measured with a heat-dissipation sensor, and a small DC pump is used to apply suction to a lysimeter. The improved automated approach reported here was tested in the field for a 12-mo period. Powered by a small 12-V rechargeable battery, the AETLs were able to continuously match lysimeter suction to soil-water matric potential for 2-wk periods with minimal human attention, along with the added benefit of collecting continuous soil-water matric potential data. We also demonstrated, in the laboratory, methods for continuous measurement of water depth in the AETL, a capability that quantifies drainage on a 10-min interval, making it a true water-flux meter. Equilibrium tension lysimeters have already been demonstrated to be a reliable method of measuring drainage flux, and the further improvements have created a more effective device for studying water drainage and chemical leaching through the soil matrix.

  15. Cellular-enabled water quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Kerkez, B.

    2013-12-01

    While the past decade has seen significant improvements in our ability to measure nutrients and other water quality parameters, the use of these sensors has yet to gain traction due to their costprohibitive nature and deployment expertise required on the part of researchers. Furthermore, an extra burden is incurred when real-time data access becomes an experimental requirement. We present an open-source hardware design to facilitate the real-time, low-cost, and robust measurements of water quality across large urbanized areas. Our hardware platform interfaces an embedded, vastly configurable, high-precision, ultra-low power measurement system, with a low-power cellular module. Each sensor station is configured with an IP address, permitting reliable streaming of sensor data to off-site locations as measurements are made. We discuss the role of high-quality hardware components during extreme event scenarios, and present preliminary performance metrics that validate the ability of the platform to provide streaming access to sensor measurements.

  16. Field strength measurements of speed measuring radar units

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-06-01

    The objective of this project was to measure the microwave radiation emitted by speed measuring radar units to obtain a data base for evaluating the potential radiation hazards of these devices. Measurements were taken both in free-space and with the...

  17. Field Measurements and Modeling of the Southeast Greenland Firn Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, O. L.; Solomon, D. K.; Miège, C.; Voss, C. I.; Koenig, L.; Forster, R. R.; Schmerr, N. C.; Montgomery, L. N.; Legchenko, A.; Ligtenberg, S.

    2016-12-01

    An extensive firn aquifer forms in southeast Greenland as surface meltwater percolates through the upper seasonal snow and firn layers to depth and saturates open pore spaces. The firn aquifer is found at depths from about 10 to 35 m below the snow surface in areas with high accumulation rates and high melt rates. The firn aquifer retains significant volume of meltwater and heat within the ice sheet. The first-ever hydrologic and geochemical measurements from several boreholes drilled into the aquifer have been made 50 km upstream of Helheim Glacier terminus in SE Greenland. This field data is used with a version of the SUTRA groundwater simulator that represents the freeze/thaw process to model the hydrologic and thermal conditions of the ice sheet, including aquifer water recharge, lateral flow, and discharge. Meltwater generation during the summer season is modeled using degree day methods, and meltwater recharge to the aquifer (10-70 cm/year) is calculated using water level fluctuations and volumetric flow measurements (3e-7 to 5e-6 m3/s). Aquifer hydrologic parameters, including hydraulic conductivity (2e-5 to 4e -4 m/s), storativity, and specific discharge (3e-7 to 5e-6 m/s), are estimated from aquifer pumping tests and tracer experiments. In situ measurements were obtained using a novel heated piezometer, which advances downward through the unsaturated and saturated zones of the aquifer by melting the surrounding firn. Innovative modeling approaches blending unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow modeling and ice thermodynamics indicate the importance of surface topography controls on fluid flow within the aquifer, and forecast the nature and volume of aquifer water discharge into crevasses at the edge of the ice sheet. This pioneering study is crucial to understanding the aquifer's influence on mass balance estimates of the ice sheet.

  18. Measurements of vector fields with diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehr, E. J.; Scholiers, W.

    1985-01-01

    A polarimeter was designed for high spatial and spectral resolution. It consists of a quarter-wave plate alternately operating in two positions for Stoke-V measurements and an additional quarter-wave plate for Stokes-U and -Q measurements. The spatial range covers 75 arcsec, the spectral window of about 1.8 a allows the simultaneous observations of neighboring lines. The block diagram of the data processing and acquisition system consists of five memories each one having a capacity of 10 to the 4th power 16-bit words. The total time to acquire profiles of Stokes parameters can be chosen by selecting the number of successive measurements added in the memories, each individual measurement corresponding to an integration time of 0.5 sec. Typical values range between 2 and 60 sec depending on the brightness of the structure, the amount of polarization and a compromise between desired signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution.

  19. Field measurement of naturalistic backing behavior

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-02-01

    A series of observations and measurements were made as 21 subjects drove their own vehicles in an assortment of naturalistic backing tasks. The tasks were performed on public roads in real world driving conditions. As the subjects performed the eight...

  20. Wave directional spreading from point field measurements

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, V.; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2017-01-01

    Ocean waves have multidirectional components. Most wave measurements are taken at a single point, and so fail to capture information about the relative directions of the wave components directly. Conventional means of directional estimation require a minimum of three concurrent time series of measurements at different spatial locations in order to derive information on local directional wave spreading. Here, the relationship between wave nonlinearity and directionality is utilized to estimate local spreading without the need for multiple concurrent measurements, following Adcock & Taylor (Adcock & Taylor 2009 Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 3361–3381. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2009.0031)), with the assumption that directional spreading is frequency independent. The method is applied to measurements recorded at the North Alwyn platform in the northern North Sea, and the results compared against estimates of wave spreading by conventional measurement methods and hindcast data. Records containing freak waves were excluded. It is found that the method provides accurate estimates of wave spreading over a range of conditions experienced at North Alwyn, despite the noisy chaotic signals that characterize such ocean wave data. The results provide further confirmation that Adcock and Taylor's method is applicable to metocean data and has considerable future promise as a technique to recover estimates of wave spreading from single point wave measurement devices. PMID:28484326

  1. Wave directional spreading from point field measurements.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M L; Venugopal, V; Borthwick, A G L

    2017-04-01

    Ocean waves have multidirectional components. Most wave measurements are taken at a single point, and so fail to capture information about the relative directions of the wave components directly. Conventional means of directional estimation require a minimum of three concurrent time series of measurements at different spatial locations in order to derive information on local directional wave spreading. Here, the relationship between wave nonlinearity and directionality is utilized to estimate local spreading without the need for multiple concurrent measurements, following Adcock & Taylor (Adcock & Taylor 2009 Proc. R. Soc. A 465 , 3361-3381. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2009.0031)), with the assumption that directional spreading is frequency independent. The method is applied to measurements recorded at the North Alwyn platform in the northern North Sea, and the results compared against estimates of wave spreading by conventional measurement methods and hindcast data. Records containing freak waves were excluded. It is found that the method provides accurate estimates of wave spreading over a range of conditions experienced at North Alwyn, despite the noisy chaotic signals that characterize such ocean wave data. The results provide further confirmation that Adcock and Taylor's method is applicable to metocean data and has considerable future promise as a technique to recover estimates of wave spreading from single point wave measurement devices.

  2. Stable isotope measurements of evapotranspiration partitioning in a maize field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Patrick; Parajka, Juraj; Oismüller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Heng, Lee; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important processes in describing land surface - atmosphere interactions as it connects the energy and water balances. Furthermore knowledge of the individual components of evapotranspiration is important for ecohydrological modelling and agriculture, particularly for irrigation efficiency and crop productivity. In this study, we tested the application of the stable isotope method for evapotranspiration partitioning to a maize crop during the vegetative stage, using sap flow sensors as a comparison technique. Field scale ET was measured using an eddy covariance device and then partitioned using high frequency in-situ measurements of the isotopic signal of the canopy water vapor. The fraction of transpiration (Ft) calculated with the stable isotope method showed good agreement with the sap flow method. High correlation coefficient values were found between the two techniques, indicating the stable isotope method can successfully be applied in maize. The results show the changes in transpiration as a fraction of evapotranspiration after rain events and during the subsequent drying conditions as well as the relationship between transpiration and solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit.

  3. Earth's Magnetic Field Measurements for the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    Measurements of the earth's magnetic field at several locations at SLAC were conducted to determine the possible field error contribution from tuning the undulators in a location with a different magnetic field than that which will be found in the undulator hall. An average difference of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 Gauss has been measured between the downward earth's field components in the test facility and SLAC tunnel locations.

  4. Methods of measuring water levels in deep wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garber, M.S.; Koopman, F. C.

    1968-01-01

    Accurate measurement of water levels deeper than 1,000 feet in wells requires specialized equipment. Corrections for stretch and thermal expansion of measuring tapes must be considered, and other measuring devices must be calibrated periodically. Bore-hole deviation corrections also must be made. Devices for recording fluctuation of fluid level usually require mechanical modification for use at these depths. A multichannel recording device utilizing pressure transducers has been constructed. This device was originally designed to record aquifer response to nearby underground nuclear explosions but can also be used for recording data from multi-well pumping tests. Bottom-hole recording devices designed for oil-field use have been utilized in a limited manner. These devices were generally found to lack the precision required, in ground-water investigations at the Nevada Test Site but may be applicable in other areas. A newly developed bottom-hole recording pressure gauge of improved accuracy has been used with satisfactory results.

  5. Field-Measured Infiltration Properties of Mojave Desert Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, K. S.; Nimmo, J. R.; Winfield, K. A.; Schmidt, K. M.; Miller, D. M.; Stock, J. D.; Singha, K.

    2005-12-01

    Characteristics typical of alluvial desert soils, such as depositional stratification, desert pavement, biotic crusts, and vesicular horizons strongly influence soil moisture and its variability. Knowledge of infiltration capacity, water retention, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is central to the assessment of water availability to plants and animals after infiltration events. These hydraulic parameters are directly related to the degree of soil development. The frequency and magnitude of storm events in conjunction with degree of soil development also affect runoff and erosion. Our purpose is to examine field soil-water behavior and determine unsaturated hydraulic properties needed for large-scale modeling of soil moisture. The results of this study will be used in conjunction with surficial geologic mapping of the Mojave Desert in evaluations of ecological habitat quality. We conducted infiltration/redistribution experiments on three different-aged deposits in the Mojave National Preserve: (1) recently deposited wash sediments, (2) a soil of early Holocene age, and (3) a highly developed soil of late Pleistocene age. In each experiment we ponded water in a 1-m-diameter infiltration ring for 2.3 hr. For several weeks we monitored water content and matric pressure to depths of 1.5 m, and distances of 6 m from the infiltration ring. Measuring techniques included surface electrical resistance tomography, dielectric-constant probes, heat-dissipation probes, and tensiometers. Analysis of the subsurface measurements using an instantaneous-profile technique gives the retention and K properties that will be used in predictive modeling. In each experiment the infiltration rate was nearly constant in time, with infiltration capacity 4 times greater in the youngest than in the oldest soil. Average infiltration flux densities within the ring during the period of ponding were 0.80 m/hr in the active wash, 0.45 m/hr in the Holocene soil, and 0.21 m/hr in the Pleistocene

  6. Water mass changes inferred by gravity field variations with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagiolini, Elisa; Gruber, Christian; Apel, Heiko; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Güntner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Since 2002 the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has been measuring temporal variations of Earth's gravity field depicting with extreme accuracy how mass is distributed and varies around the globe. Advanced signal separation techniques enable to isolate different sources of mass such as atmospheric and oceanic circulation or land hydrology. Nowadays thanks to GRACE, floods, droughts, and water resources monitoring are possible on a global scale. At GFZ Potsdam scientists have been involved since 2000 in the initiation and launch of the GRACE precursor CHAMP satellite mission, since 2002 in the GRACE Science Data System and since 2009 in the frame of ESÁs GOCE High Processing Facility as well as projected GRACE FOLLOW-ON for the continuation of time variable gravity field determination. Recently GFZ has reprocessed the complete GRACE time-series of monthly gravity field spherical harmonic solutions with improved standards and background models. This new release (RL05) already shows significantly less noise and spurious artifacts. In order to monitor water mass re-distribution and fast moving water, we still need to reach a higher resolution in both time and space. Moreover, in view of disaster management applications we need to act with a shorter latency (current latency standard is 2 months). For this purpose, we developed a regional method based on radial base functions that is capable to compute models in regional and global representation. This new method localizes the gravity observation to the closest regions and omits spatial correlations with farther regions. Additionally, we succeeded to increase the temporal resolution to sub-monthly time scales. Innovative concepts such as Kalman filtering and regularization, along with sophisticated regional modeling have shifted temporal and spatial resolution towards new frontiers. We expect global hydrological models as WHGM to profit from such accurate outcomes. First results comparing the mass

  7. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji

    2015-03-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electricmore » field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.« less

  8. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  9. FIELD INTERCOMPARISON OF SULFATE DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT METHODS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Illinois State Water Survey hosted a three-week field intercomparison of several sulfate dry deposition measurement techniques during September 81. The site was an 80-acre grass field in a rural area 14 km southwest of Champaign, IL. The vegetation consisted of mixed grasses ...

  10. Temporal patterns of infiltration into a water repellent soil under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Phil; Roper, Margaret; Micin, Shayne; Jongepier, Ramona

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency causes substantial economic losses for farmers in southern Australia through impacts on crop growth and weed germination. However, recent research has demonstrated that laboratory measurements of water repellency may not be a reliable indicator of the severity of symptoms experienced in the field. In particular, crop residue retention and minimal soil disturbance led to increased water repellency, but was also associated with higher soil water contents measured at strategic times of the year. Little is known about the temporal patterns of soil water storage close to the soil surface in a water repellent sand. In this research we measured soil water content at a depth of 0.05 m at 15-minute intervals from June 2011 to October 2012, under various treatment combinations of residue retention and soil disturbance. Measurements were made in both 'crop row' and 'crop inter-row' positions. For a rainfall event (9.2 mm) in March 2012, prior to crop seeding, plots previously established with no-till absorbed significantly more water (increase in soil water content of 0.074 v/v) than plots conventionally cultivated (0.038 v/v). In June 2012 (12.6 mm), 4 weeks after crop seeding, tillage was again significant, and there was a significant interaction between tillage and 'row' or 'inter-row' position. These results demonstrate the importance of crop management in modifying the response of water repellent soils to rainfall in the field.

  11. Comparison of Field Measurements to Methane Emissions ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to both technical and economic limitations, estimates of methane emissions from landfills rely primarily on models. While models are easy to implement, there is uncertainty due to the use of parameters that are difficult to validate. The objective of this research was to compare modeled emissions using several greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reporting protocols including: (1) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); (2) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (EPA GHGRP); (3) California Air Resources Board (CARB); (4) Solid Waste Industry for Climate Solutions (SWICS); and (5) an industry model from the Dutch waste company Afvalzorg, with measured data collected over 3 calendar years from a young landfill with no gas collection system. By working with whole landfill measurements of fugitive methane emissions and methane oxidation, the collection efficiency could be set to zero, thus eliminating one source of parameter uncertainty. The models consistently overestimated annual methane emissions by a factor ranging from 4 – 32.Varying input parameters over reasonable ranges reduced this range to 1.3 - 8. Waste age at the studied landfill was less than four years and the results suggest the need for measurements at additional landfills to evaluate the accuracy of the tested models to young landfills. This is a submission to a peer reviewed journal. The paper discusses landfill emission measurements and models for a new la

  12. Water intensity assessment of shale gas resources in the Wattenberg field in northeastern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Stephen; Carlson, Ken; Knox, Ken; Douglas, Caleb; Rein, Luke

    2014-05-20

    Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. As the population increases and agriculture and energy needs continue to rise, the pressure on water and other natural resources is expected to intensify. Recent advances in technology have stimulated growth in oil and gas development, as well as increasing the industry's need for water resources. This study provides an analysis of how efficiently water resources are used for unconventional shale development in Northeastern Colorado. The study is focused on the Wattenberg Field in the Denver-Julesberg Basin. The 2000 square mile field located in a semiarid climate with competing agriculture, municipal, and industrial water demands was one of the first fields where widespread use of hydraulic fracturing was implemented. The consumptive water intensity is measured using a ratio of the net water consumption and the net energy recovery and is used to measure how efficiently water is used for energy extraction. The water and energy use as well as energy recovery data were collected from 200 Noble Energy Inc. wells to estimate the consumptive water intensity. The consumptive water intensity of unconventional shale in the Wattenberg is compared with the consumptive water intensity for extraction of other fuels for other energy sources including coal, natural gas, oil, nuclear, and renewables. 1.4 to 7.5 million gallons is required to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells before energy is extracted in the Wattenberg Field. However, when the large short-term total freshwater-water use is normalized to the amount of energy produced over the lifespan of a well, the consumptive water intensity is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2.7 gal/MMBtu and is similar to surface coal mining.

  13. OPSATCOM Field Measurements. Volume II. Supplemental Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    amplitude is to be expected. Long-term stability is determined by how well the output control system compensates for changes in the output of the flashlamp...a remotely processed S-20 photocathode. The responsivity of tile photocathode was measured at 0,039 A/W for a quantum efficiency of approximately 9...gives operator control over thle size of, thle array as well , allowinig sia 11r fraimes to be taken tmnic rap idly. 2- 25 CALIBRATION The purpose of

  14. Water Quality Index for measuring drinking water quality in rural Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Akter, Tahera; Jhohura, Fatema Tuz; Akter, Fahmida; Chowdhury, Tridib Roy; Mistry, Sabuj Kanti; Dey, Digbijoy; Barua, Milan Kanti; Islam, Md Akramul; Rahman, Mahfuzar

    2016-02-09

    Public health is at risk due to chemical contaminants in drinking water which may have immediate health consequences. Drinking water sources are susceptible to pollutants depending on geological conditions and agricultural, industrial, and other man-made activities. Ensuring the safety of drinking water is, therefore, a growing problem. To assess drinking water quality, we measured multiple chemical parameters in drinking water samples from across Bangladesh with the aim of improving public health interventions. In this cross-sectional study conducted in 24 randomly selected upazilas, arsenic was measured in drinking water in the field using an arsenic testing kit and a sub-sample was validated in the laboratory. Water samples were collected to test water pH in the laboratory as well as a sub-sample of collected drinking water was tested for water pH using a portable pH meter. For laboratory testing of other chemical parameters, iron, manganese, and salinity, drinking water samples were collected from 12 out of 24 upazilas. Drinking water at sample sites was slightly alkaline (pH 7.4 ± 0.4) but within acceptable limits. Manganese concentrations varied from 0.1 to 5.5 mg/L with a median value of 0.2 mg/L. The median iron concentrations in water exceeded WHO standards (0.3 mg/L) at most of the sample sites and exceeded Bangladesh standards (1.0 mg/L) at a few sample sites. Salinity was relatively higher in coastal districts. After laboratory confirmation, arsenic concentrations were found higher in Shibchar (Madaripur) and Alfadanga (Faridpur) compared to other sample sites exceeding WHO standard (0.01 mg/L). Of the total sampling sites, 33 % had good-quality water for drinking based on the Water Quality Index (WQI). However, the majority of the households (67 %) used poor-quality drinking water. Higher values of iron, manganese, and arsenic reduced drinking water quality. Awareness raising on chemical contents in drinking water at household level is required to

  15. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    In Phase II, the analyzers were deployed in field conditions at three diferent USGS sites. The measured nitrate concentrations were compared to discrete (reference) samples analyzed by the Direct UV method on a Shimadzu UV1800 bench top spectrophotometer, and by the National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI) method I-2548-11 at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. The first deployment at USGS site 0249620 on the East Pearl River in Hancock County, Mississippi, tested the ability of the TriOs ProPs (10-mm path length), Hach NITRATAX (5 mm), Satlantic SUNA (10 mm), and the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5 mm) to accurately measure low-level (less than 2 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations while observing the effect turbidity and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) would have on the analyzers' measurements. The second deployment at USGS site 01389005 Passaic River below Pompton River at Two Bridges, New Jersey, tested the analyzer's accuracy in mid-level (2-8 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations. This site provided the means to test the analyzers' performance in two distinct matrices—the Passaic and the Pompton Rivers. In this deployment, three instruments tested in Phase I (TriOS, Hach, and SUNA) were deployed with the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (35 mm) already placed by the New Jersey Water Science Center (WSC). The third deployment at USGS site 05579610 Kickapoo Creek at 2100E Road near Bloomington, Illinois, tested the ability of the analyzers to measure high nitrate concentrations (greater than 8 mg-N/L) in turbid waters. For Kickapoo Creek, the HIF provided the TriOS (10 mm) and S::CAN (5 mm) from Phase I, and a SUNA V2 (5 mm) to be deployed adjacent to the Illinois WSC-owned Hach (2 mm). A total of 40 discrete samples were collected from the three deployment sites and analyzed. The nitrate concentration of the samples ranged from 0.3–22.2 mg-N/L. The average absolute difference between the TriOS measurements and discrete samples was 0.46 mg-N/L. For the combined data

  16. NASA JSC water monitor system: City of Houston field demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Jeffers, E. L.; Fricks, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    A water quality monitoring system with on-line and real time operation similar to the function in a spacecraft was investigated. A system with the capability to determine conformance to future high effluent quality standards and to increase the potential for reclamation and reuse of water was designed. Although all system capabilities were not verified in the initial field trial, fully automated operation over a sustained period with only routine manual adjustments was accomplished. Two major points were demonstrated: (1) the water monitor system has great potential in water monitoring and/or process control applications; and (2) the water monitor system represents a vast improvement over conventional (grab sample) water monitoring techniques.

  17. Field Studies Measuring the aerosolization of Endotoxin ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Endotoxin is a component of the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria and is known to be present in biosolids. Endotoxins have been shown to be a potent stimulator of the innate immune response causing airway irritation and shortness of breath. Class B biosolids are routinely applied to agricultural lands in the US to enhance soil properties and can be used as an alternative to chemical fertilizers. This study investigated the aerosolized endotoxin produced during the land application of Class B biosolids from various wastewater treatment plants on agricultural land and a concrete surface at two sites in Colorado, USA. Aerosolized endotoxin was captured using HiVol sampler fitted with glass fiber filter, polycarbonate filter cassette (both open and closed), and BioSampler impinger air samplers. Endotoxins were also measured in the bulk biosolids to allow for correlating bulk biosolids concentrations with aerosol emission rates. Endotoxin concentrations in biosolids, impinger solutions, and filter extracts were determined using the kinetic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Aerosolized endotoxin concentration was detected from all sites with levels ranging from 0.5 to 642 EU/m3. The four types of sampling apparatus were compared and the HiVol and open-faced cassette samplers used produced higher TWA measurements (EU/m3) than the impinger and closed cassette samplers. Ambient wind speed at the sites was found to be the variable best describing the results wit

  18. Brief: Field measurements of casing tension forces

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, M.S.; Lewis, D.B.; Boswell, R.S.

    1995-02-01

    Tension forces acting on individual casing joints were accurately measured during installation of 10,158 ft of 9 5/8-in. {times} 47-lbm/ft casing and 11,960 ft of 11 7/8-in. {times} 71.8-lbm/ft casing. A unique casing load table (CLT) weighed the casing string after the addition of each casing joint. Strain gauges attached inside the pin ends of instrumented casing joints (ICJ`s) directly measured tension force on those joints. A high-speed computer data-acquisition system (DAS) automatically recorded data from all the sensors. Several casing joints were intentionally subjected to extreme deceleration to determine upper limits for dynamic tension forces. Data from these testsmore » clearly show effects of wellbore friction and casing handling conditions. In every case, tension forces in the casing during maximum deceleration were considerably less than expected. In some cases, the highest tension forces occurred when the casing lifted out of the slips. Peak tension forces caused by setting the casing slips were typically no more than 5% greater than tension forces in the casing at rest. This dynamic amplification was far less than the 60% value used in the previous casing design method. Reducing the safety factor for installation loads has permitted use of lighter, less-expensive casing than dictated by older design criteria.« less

  19. Continuous-flow water sampler for real-time isotopic water measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Dennis, K.

    2013-12-01

    continuous-flow water sample employs active control for all pertinent parameters, significantly increasing its stability and usability. We will present data from controlled laboratory experiments demonstrating sample-to-sample precision and long-term stability. We will also show experimental data that highlights the instrumental sample-to-sample memory, which we have decreased significantly from previous implementations of this technology. Additionally, we will present field results from the Sacramento River, CA. Dansgaard, W. (1964) 'Stable isotopes in precipitation', Tellus, 16(4), p. 436-468. Munksgaard, N.C., Wurster, C.M., Bass, A., Zagorskis, I., and Bird, M.I. (2012) 'First continuous shipboard d18O and dD measurements in seawater by diffusion sampling--cavity ring-down spectrometry', Environmental Chemistry Letters, 10, p.301-307. Munksgaard, N.C., Wurster, C.M., and Bird, M.I., (2011), 'Continuous analysis of δ18O and δD values of water by diffusion sampling cavity ring-down spectrometry: a novel sampling device for unattended field monitoring of precipitation, ground and surface waters', Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 25, p. 3706-3712.

  20. Field Measurements of Respiratory Del13CO2 and Photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, H.; Sabbatini, S.; Nicolini, G.; Warneke, T.; Papale, D.; Notholt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon decomposition dynamics have been studied in a variety of ecosystems and its variation can mostly be explained in terms of environmental variables (e.g. temperature and precipitation). However, carbon dynamics in arid, water limited regions have shown to be very different and are still largely unknown. Several studies have indicated the importance of photodegradation, the direct breakdown of organic matter by sunlight, in these arid regions. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure concentrations of CO2, CH4, N2O, CO as well as del13C in CO2. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurement systems: a Flux Gradient system and 2 flux chambers, providing a continuous data set of gas concentrations and biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes at different heights and scales. Field measurements showed photodegradation induced carbon fluxes. Also, respiratory del13CO2 was determined by use of Keeling plots, and was determined to vary between -25‰ and -21‰. A clear diurnal pattern in respiratory del13CO2 was found, suggesting either different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night or the effect of diffusive fractionation.

  1. Estimating soil water evaporation using radar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, Ali M.; Scott, H. D.; Waite, W. P.; Asrar, G.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to evaluate the application of radar reflectivity as compared with the shortwave reflectivity (albedo) used in the Idso-Jackson equation for the estimation of daily evaporation under overcast sky and subhumid climatic conditions. Soil water content, water potential, shortwave and radar reflectivity, and soil and air temperatures were monitored during three soil drying cycles. The data from each cycle were used to calculate daily evaporation from the Idso-Jackson equation and from two other standard methods, the modified Penman and plane of zero-flux. All three methods resulted in similar estimates of evaporation under clear sky conditions; however, under overcast sky conditions, evaporation fluxes computed from the Idso-Jackson equation were consistently lower than the other two methods. The shortwave albedo values in the Idso-Jackson equation were then replaced with radar reflectivities and a new set of total daily evaporation fluxes were calculated. This resulted in a significant improvement in computed soil evaporation fluxes from the Idso-Jackson equation, and a better agreement between the three methods under overcast sky conditions.

  2. Measuring mercury in coastal fog water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    Mercury, a heavy metal neurotoxin, accumulates in sea life, in some cases reaching levels that make seafood unsafe for humans to eat. How mercury gets into aquatic organisms is debated, but part of the pathway could include mercury carried in precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog. The contribution of mercury in fog water in particular is not well known, especially in foggy coastal areas such as coastal California. To learn more, Weiss-Penzias et al. measured total mercury and monomethyl mercury concentrations in fog water and rainwater samples taken from four locations around Monterey Bay, California, during spring and summer 2011. They found that the mean monomethyl mercury concentrations in their fog water samples were about 34 times higher than the mean concentrations in their rainwater samples. Therefore, the authors believe that fog is an important, previously unrecognized source of mercury to coastal ecosystems. They also explored potential sources of mercury, finding that biotically formed monomethyl mercury from oceanic upwelling may contribute to monomethyl mercury in fog. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL050324, 2012)

  3. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining andmore » losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.« less

  4. Field measurements of cloud droplet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molacek, Jan; Bagheri, Gholamhossein; Bertens, Augustinus; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2017-11-01

    We present an in-situ experiment investigating the dynamics of cloud droplets and its dependence on the turbulent flow properties. This dynamics plays a major role in the rate of growth of cloud particles by coalescence and the resulting precipitation rate. The experiment takes place at a mountain research station at an altitude of 2650m, and will make use of a movable platform that can travel with the mean wind velocity. Here we present preliminary results using a stationary setup. Simultaneous measurements of other variables such as droplet size distribution and humidity fluctuations are done in order to develop a more complete picture of the microphysical conditions within clouds. We thank the Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Consumer Protection for their generous financial support. We also acknowledge funding from European Union Horizon 2020 Programme via the COMPLETE project.

  5. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  6. Temperature field study of hot water circulation pump shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Y.; Kong, F. Y.; Daun, X. H.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    In the process of engineering application under the condition of hot water circulation pump, problems of stress concentration caused by the temperature rise may happen. In order to study the temperature field in bearing and electric motor chamber of the hot water circulation pump and optimize the structure, in present paper, the model of the shaft system is created through CREO. The model is analyzed by ANSYS workbench, in which the thermal boundary conditions are applied to calculate, which include the calorific values from the bearings, the thermal loss from electric motor and the temperature from the transporting medium. From the result, the finite element model can reflect the distribution of thermal field in hot water circulation pump. Further, the results show that the maximum temperature locates in the bearing chamber.The theoretical guidance for the electric motor heat dissipation design of the hot water circulation pump can be achieved.

  7. Application of optical interferometry in focused acoustic field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuebing; Sun, Min; Cao, Yonggang; Zhu, Jiang

    2018-07-01

    Optical interferometry has been successfully applied in measuring acoustic pressures in plane-wave fields and spherical-wave fields. In this paper, the "effective" refractive index for focused acoustic fields was developed, through numerical simulation and experiments, the feasibility of the optical method in measuring acoustic fields of focused transducers was proved. Compared with the results from a membrane hydrophone, it was concluded that the optical method has good spatial resolution and is suitable for detecting focused fields with fluctuant distributions. The influences of a few factors (the generated lamb wave, laser beam directivity, etc.) were analyzed, and corresponding suggestions were proposed for effective application of this technology.

  8. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  9. Non-uniform refractive index field measurement based on light field imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaokun; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Mengjie; Xu, Dong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a method for measuring the non-uniform refractive index field based on the light field imaging technique is proposed. First, the light field camera is used to collect the four-dimensional light field data, and then the light field data is decoded according to the light field imaging principle to obtain image sequences with different acquisition angles of the refractive index field. Subsequently PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique is used to extract ray offset of each image. Finally, the distribution of non-uniform refractive index field can be calculated by inversing the deflection of light rays. Compared with traditional optical methods which require multiple optical detectors from multiple angles to synchronously collect data, the method proposed in this paper only needs a light field camera and shoot once. The effectiveness of the method has been verified by the experiment which quantitatively measures the distribution of the refractive index field above the flame of the alcohol lamp.

  10. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... earth radius, of the largest available scale. (c) Collection of field strength data to determine... through the measurement area. (iii) Antenna elevation. When field strength is being measured for a one....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO...

  11. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... earth radius, of the largest available scale. (c) Collection of field strength data to determine... through the measurement area. (iii) Antenna elevation. When field strength is being measured for a one....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO...

  12. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... earth radius, of the largest available scale. (c) Collection of field strength data to determine... through the measurement area. (iii) Antenna elevation. When field strength is being measured for a one....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO...

  13. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... earth radius, of the largest available scale. (c) Collection of field strength data to determine... through the measurement area. (iii) Antenna elevation. When field strength is being measured for a one....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO...

  14. On the measurement of stationary electric fields in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.

    2002-01-01

    Applications and measurement methods for field measurements are reviewed. Recent developments using optical technology are examined. The various methods are compared. It is concluded that the best general purpose instrument is the isolated cylindrical field mill, but MEMS technology could furnish better instruments in the future.

  15. A field measure of the shade fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Smith, Milton O.; Sabol, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    'Shade' has a technical definition peculiar to linear spectral mixture analysis of imaging spectrometer data: it is the reduction in radiance from a surface due to lighting conditions and geometry, and includes topographic shading described by photometric functions as well as shadowing at all scales. 'Shade' is an important constituent of nearly all remotely sensed images, and is one endmember resolved in spectral mixture analysis, where it is represented as a fraction of the measured radiance and a characteristic spectrum. This spectrum is typically the null vector, provided the data have been corrected for atmospheric and instrument effects: i.e., 'shade' is the radiance from an ideal black surface. In topographic shading, irradiance is reduced - typically in proportion to cos(i), where i (incidence angle) is the angle between the sun and the local surface normal vectors. Therefore, the radiance is lowered by a multiplicative factor. Shadowing occurs when i is greater than 90 deg, or when sunlight is blocked by adjacent high terrain; the only irradiance is down-welling skylight and bounce light from adjacent terrain. In spectral mixture analysis, 'shade' is regarded as an additive term. In this regard, it is an accurate description of the proportion of a scene that consists of ideal shadows ('checkerboard mixing'); however, 'shade' represents the multiplicative cos(i) factor as well, as here it should be interpreted as the proportion of shadow that would darken the scene an equivalent amount. In either case, the 'shade' fraction is lessened by adjacency effects, because the scene has a non-zero reflectivity instead of the ideal black surface generally assumed.

  16. Measurement of Nanoplasmonic Field Enhancement with Ultrafast Photoemission.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Péter; Pápa, Zsuzsanna; Márton, István; Budai, Judit; Wróbel, Piotr; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Prietl, Christine; Krenn, Joachim R; Dombi, Péter

    2017-02-08

    Probing nanooptical near-fields is a major challenge in plasmonics. Here, we demonstrate an experimental method utilizing ultrafast photoemission from plasmonic nanostructures that is capable of probing the maximum nanoplasmonic field enhancement in any metallic surface environment. Directly measured field enhancement values for various samples are in good agreement with detailed finite-difference time-domain simulations. These results establish ultrafast plasmonic photoelectrons as versatile probes for nanoplasmonic near-fields.

  17. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  18. Ground-water field trip, Tucson to Nogales, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, D.R.; Halpenny, L.C.

    1954-01-01

    A field excursion following the route described herein was conducted as a part of the curriculum of the 6th Ground Water Short Course, which was held by the Geological Survey at the University of Arizona in April 1954. The route log and descriptive text were designed to provide a general background of the ground-water situation in the Upper Santa Cruz Basin, a few of the geologic features that affect the occurrence of ground water, and some of the historical highlights of the region. 

  19. Quantum mechanical force field for water with explicit electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Han, Jaebeom; Mazack, Michael J M; Zhang, Peng; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

    2013-08-07

    A quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) for water is described. Unlike traditional approaches that use quantum mechanical results and experimental data to parameterize empirical potential energy functions, the present QMFF uses a quantum mechanical framework to represent intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in an entire condensed-phase system. In particular, the internal energy terms used in molecular mechanics are replaced by a quantum mechanical formalism that naturally includes electronic polarization due to intermolecular interactions and its effects on the force constants of the intramolecular force field. As a quantum mechanical force field, both intermolecular interactions and the Hamiltonian describing the individual molecular fragments can be parameterized to strive for accuracy and computational efficiency. In this work, we introduce a polarizable molecular orbital model Hamiltonian for water and for oxygen- and hydrogen-containing compounds, whereas the electrostatic potential responsible for intermolecular interactions in the liquid and in solution is modeled by a three-point charge representation that realistically reproduces the total molecular dipole moment and the local hybridization contributions. The present QMFF for water, which is called the XP3P (explicit polarization with three-point-charge potential) model, is suitable for modeling both gas-phase clusters and liquid water. The paper demonstrates the performance of the XP3P model for water and proton clusters and the properties of the pure liquid from about 900 × 10(6) self-consistent-field calculations on a periodic system consisting of 267 water molecules. The unusual dipole derivative behavior of water, which is incorrectly modeled in molecular mechanics, is naturally reproduced as a result of an electronic structural treatment of chemical bonding by XP3P. We anticipate that the XP3P model will be useful for studying proton transport in solution and solid phases as well as across

  20. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Urban, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2 σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  1. Sondrestrom radar measurements of the reconnection electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, O.; Lyons, L. R.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of using Sondrestrom incoherent radar scatter to estimate the rate of solar-wind energy transfer is examined by using plasma-velocity measurements in the separatrix reference frame. The separatrix is the boundary between open and closed field lines, and its orientation is deduced from all-sky images. The radar observations are used to determine the separatrix location and the ionospheric plasma drift. Measurements of the reconnection electric field in the midnight sector for one night are taken, revealing that the field is less than 15 mV/m during the time of local polar-cap extension. During polar-cap contraction the field range is 30-40 mV/m, and these periods correspond to substorm expansive phases. The limitations associated with measuring ionospheric plasma drift, the boundary orientation, and boundary location are enumerated. The measurements in the experimental case demonstrate the possibility of plasma transfer from closed to open field lines.

  2. [A focused sound field measurement system by LabVIEW].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhan; Bai, Jingfeng; Yu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, according to the requirement of the focused sound field measurement, a focused sound field measurement system was established based on the LabVIEW virtual instrument platform. The system can automatically search the focus position of the sound field, and adjust the scanning path according to the size of the focal region. Three-dimensional sound field scanning time reduced from 888 hours in uniform step to 9.25 hours in variable step. The efficiency of the focused sound field measurement was improved. There is a certain deviation between measurement results and theoretical calculation results. Focal plane--6 dB width difference rate was 3.691%, the beam axis--6 dB length differences rate was 12.937%.

  3. Water vapor isotopic measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site on Graciosa Island, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delp, J. M.; Galewsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    Stable isotopic measurements of water vapor can potentially constrain the processes that govern the formation of low-clouds and how their distribution may change as the climate warms. Using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy, in-situ water vapor isotopic measurements will be collected for a period of one year (beginning August 2017) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) located on Graciosa Island, Azores. The Azores location within the ENA is a prime setting for studying low-cloud processes. After correcting for humidity-dependent biases and normalizing the measurements to the VSMOW-SLAP scale, the measurements from the first several months of the water vapor isotopic analyzer's deployment will be compared to complementary datasets from the suite of instruments at the DOE site, including twice-daily soundings, aerosol instrumentation, and cloud radars, with the purpose of determining links between local stratocumulus and precipitation processes and their impact on the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor. The results of this study will potentially provide a new approach for linking field observations with climate models and may help better constrain the uncertainties associated with low-cloud feedbacks.

  4. MEASURING & MODELING VARIATIONS IN DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently most interest in drinking water quality has been in the finished water as it leaves the treatment plant. he Safe Drinking Water requires that MCLs be met at the consumers tap. ecause finished water may undergo substantial changes while being transported through the...

  5. Measurements and simulations of water transport in maize plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, Florian; Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Priesack, Eckart

    2017-04-01

    In Central Europe climate change will become manifest in the increase of extreme weather events like flash floods, heat waves and summer droughts, and in a shift of precipitation towards winter months. Therefore, regional water availability will alter which has an effect on future crop growth, water use efficiency and yields. To better estimate these effects accurate model descriptions of transpiration and other parts of the water balance are important. In this study, we determined transpiration of four maize plants on a field of the research station Scheyern (about 40km North of Munich) by means of sap flow measurement devices (ICQ International Pty Ltd, Australia) using the Heat-Ratio-Method: two temperature probes, 0.5 cm above and below a heater, detect a heat pulse and its speed which facilitates the calculation of sap flow. Additionally, high resolution changes of stem diameters were measured with dendrometers (DD-S, Ecomatik). The field was also situated next to an eddy covariance station which provided latent heat fluxes from the soil-plant system. We also performed terrestrial laser scans of the respective plants to extract the plant architectures. These structures serve as input for our mechanistic transpiration model simulating the water transport within the plant. This model, which has already been successfully applied to single Fagus sylvatica L. trees, was adapted to agricultural plants such as maize. The basic principle of this model is to solve a 1-D Richards equation along the graph of the single plants. A comparison between the simulations and the measurements is presented and discussed.

  6. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    's 20 trading partner countries, for a time frame from 1995 to 2013. The calculations -implemented for each country and each crop- display a network that illustrates the gravity of virtual water trade. It is then possible for us to model the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field, via the statistical examination of its spatial fragmentation or continuity for each traded crop and for each water footprint type. Hence, with the distribution's entropy we may conduct a targeted analysis on the comparative advantages of the Egyptian agriculture. Keywords: entropy, virtual water trade, gravity model, agricultural trade, water footprint, water subsidies, comparative advantage References 1. Antonelli, Marta and Martina Sartori (2014), Unfolding the potential of the Virtual Water concept. What is still under debate?, MPRA Paper No. 60501, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60501/ 2. Fracasso, Andrea (2014), A gravity model of virtual water trade, Ecological Economics, Vol. 108, p. 215-228 3. Fracasso, Andrea; Martina Sartori and Stefano Schiavo (2014), Determinants of virtual water flows in the Mediterranean, MPRA Paper No. 60500, https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60500/ 4. Yang, H. et al. (2006), Virtual water trade: An assessment of water use efficiency in the international food trade, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 10, p. 443-454

  7. A portable device for the measurement of evaporative water loss.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1967-08-01

    A portable device has been developed for the precise measurement of evaporative water loss. Under appropriate conditions the measurement of evaporative water loss may be used as an index of 'emotional stress' in flying personnel. The apparatus incorp...

  8. Tunable lasers for water vapor measurements and other lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. W.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable dye laser suitable for differential absorption (DIAL) measurements of water vapor in the troposphere was constructed. A multi-pass absorption cell for calibration was also constructed for use in atmospheric DIAL measurements of water vapor.

  9. Introduction to Field Water-Quality Methods for the Collection of Metals - 2007 Project Summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Region VI of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and the Osage Nation presented three 3-day workshops, in June-August 2007, entitled ?Introduction to Field Water-Quality Methods for the Collection of Metals.? The purpose of the workshops was to provide instruction to tribes within USEPA Region VI on various USGS surface-water measurement methods and water-quality sampling protocols for the collection of surface-water samples for metals analysis. Workshop attendees included members from over 22 tribes and pueblos. USGS instructors came from Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Georgia. Workshops were held in eastern and south-central Oklahoma and New Mexico and covered many topics including presampling preparation, water-quality monitors, and sampling for metals in surface water. Attendees spent one full classroom day learning the field methods used by the USGS Water Resources Discipline and learning about the complexity of obtaining valid water-quality and quality-assurance data. Lectures included (1) a description of metal contamination sources in surface water; (2) introduction on how to select field sites, equipment, and laboratories for sample analysis; (3) collection of sediment in surface water; and (4) utilization of proper protocol and methodology for sampling metals in surface water. Attendees also were provided USGS sampling equipment for use during the field portion of the class so they had actual ?hands-on? experience to take back to their own organizations. The final 2 days of the workshop consisted of field demonstrations of current USGS water-quality sample-collection methods. The hands-on training ensured that attendees were exposed to and experienced proper sampling procedures. Attendees learned integrated-flow techniques during sample collection, field-property documentation, and discharge measurements and calculations. They also used enclosed chambers for sample processing and collected quality

  10. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to confidently measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in ground water is a key aspect of remedial selection and assessment. Presented here is a comparison of the commonly practiced methods for determining D.O. concentrations in ground water, including c...

  11. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement and interpretation of geochemical redox parameters are key components of ground water remedial investigations. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is perhaps the most robust geochemical parameter in redox characterization; however, recent work has indicated a need for proper da...

  12. NASA-JSC antenna near-field measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W. P.; Friederich, P. G.; Jenkins, B. M.; Jameson, C. R.; Estrada, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Work was completed on the near-field range control software. The capabilities of the data processing software were expanded with the addition of probe compensation. In addition, the user can process the measured data from the same computer terminal used for range control. The design of the laser metrology system was completed. It provides precise measruement of probe location during near-field measurements as well as position data for control of the translation beam and probe cart. A near-field range measurement system was designed, fabricated, and tested.

  13. Measurement of the gravity-field curvature by atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-09

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed.

  14. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design and operating experience are extremely limited. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the second phase of operation of an advanced oxidation-based NZW pilot system designed, constructed, and operated for a period of two years, serving an occupied four-person apartment. System water was monitored, either continuously or thrice daily, for routine water quality parameters, minerals, and MicroTox® in-vitro toxicity, and intermittently for somatic and male-specific coliphage, adenovirus, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, emerging organic constituents (non-quantitative), and the Florida drinking water standards. All 115 drinking water standards with the exception of bromate were met in this phase. Neither virus nor protozoa were detected in the treated water, with the exception of measurement of adenovirus genome copies attributed to accumulation of inactive genetic material in hydraulic dead zones. Chemical oxygen demand was mineralized to 90% in treatment. Total dissolved solids were maintained at ∼500 mg/L at steady state, partially through aerated aluminum electrocoagulation. Bromate accumulation is projected to be controlled by aluminum electrocoagulation with separate dispo

  15. Measuring average angular velocity with a smartphone magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, Unofre; Violanda, Renante

    2018-02-01

    The angular velocity of a spinning object is, by standard, measured using a device called a tachometer. However, by directly using it in a classroom setting, the activity is likely to appear as less instructive and less engaging. Indeed, some alternative classroom-suitable methods for measuring angular velocity have been presented. In this paper, we present a further alternative that is smartphone-based, making use of the real-time magnetic field (simply called B-field in what follows) data gathering capability of the B-field sensor of the smartphone device as the timer for measuring average rotational period and average angular velocity. The in-built B-field sensor in smartphones has already found a number of uses in undergraduate experimental physics. For instance, in elementary electrodynamics, it has been used to explore the well-known Bio-Savart law and in a measurement of the permeability of air.

  16. Weak-field H3O+ ion cyclotron resonance alters water refractive index.

    PubMed

    D'Emilia, E; Ledda, M; Foletti, A; Lisi, A; Giuliani, L; Grimaldi, S; Liboff, A R

    2017-01-01

    Heretofore only observed in living systems, we report that weak-field ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) also occurs in inanimate matter. Weak magnetic field (50 nT) hydronium ICR at the field combination (7.84 Hz, 7.5 µT) markedly changes water structure, as evidenced by finding an altered index of refraction exactly at this combined field. This observation utilizes a novel technique which measures the scattering of a He-Ne laser beam as the sample is exposed to a ramped magnetic field frequency. In addition to the hydronium resonance, we find evidence of ICR coupling to a more massive structure, possibly a tetrahedral combination of three waters and a single hydronium ion. To check our observations, we extended this technique to D 2 O, successfully predicting the specific ICR charge-to-mass ratio for D 3 O + that alters the index of refraction.

  17. Altimeter measurements for the determination of the Earth's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Shum, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in the following areas is described: refining altimeter and altimeter crossover measurement models for precise orbit determination and for the solution of the earth's gravity field; performing experiments using altimeter data for the improvement of precise satellite ephemerides; and analyzing an optimal relative data weighting algorithm to combine various data types in the solution of the gravity field.

  18. MEASURING AND MODELING VARIATIONS IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors describe a field study that examined the effects of hydraulic mixing on water quality variations in a distribution system. Conducted at the North Penn Water Authority (average production of 5 mgd and 225 mi of distribution pipe), the study incorporated a field samplin...

  19. Luminescence imaging of water during uniform-field irradiation by spot scanning proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, Masataka; Sekihara, Eri; Yabe, Takuya; Horita, Ryo; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2018-06-01

    Luminescence was found during pencil-beam proton irradiation to water phantom and range could be estimated from the luminescence images. However, it is not yet clear whether the luminescence imaging is applied to the uniform fields made of spot-scanning proton-beam irradiations. For this purpose, imaging was conducted for the uniform fields having spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) made by spot scanning proton beams. We designed six types of the uniform fields with different ranges, SOBP widths and irradiation fields. One of the designed fields was irradiated to water phantom and a cooled charge coupled device camera was used to measure the luminescence image during irradiations. We estimated the ranges, field widths, and luminescence intensities from the luminescence images and compared those with the dose distribution calculated by a treatment planning system. For all types of uniform fields, we could obtain clear images of the luminescence showing the SOBPs. The ranges and field widths evaluated from the luminescence were consistent with those of the dose distribution calculated by a treatment planning system within the differences of  ‑4 mm and  ‑11 mm, respectively. Luminescence intensities were almost proportional to the SOBP widths perpendicular to the beam direction. The luminescence imaging could be applied to uniform fields made of spot scanning proton beam irradiations. Ranges and widths of the uniform fields with SOBP could be estimated from the images. The luminescence imaging is promising for the range and field width estimations in proton therapy.

  20. ELF Field Strength Measurements Made in Connecticut During 1974

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Ionospheric Phenomena on Extremely Low Frequency ( ELF ) Propagation," IEEE Transactions on Communications , vol. COM-22, no. 4, 1974, pp. 484-492...34f" ""WW" I I W»*-«P ’^ AD-A016 795 ELF FIELD STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS MADE IN CONNECTICUT DURING 1974 Peter R. Bannister...Report 4927 CD rH O ELF Field Strength Measurements Made In Connecticut During 1974 PETER R. BANNISTER FREDERICK J. WILLIAMS Submarin

  1. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  2. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  3. Measuring the Large-scale Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.; Peterson, E.; Svalgaard, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Sun's large-scale magnetic field is important for determining global structure of the corona and for quantifying the evolution of the polar field, which is sometimes used for predicting the strength of the next solar cycle. Having confidence in the determination of the large-scale magnetic field of the Sun is difficult because the field is often near the detection limit, various observing methods all measure something a little different, and various systematic effects can be very important. We compare resolved and unresolved observations of the large-scale magnetic field from the Wilcox Solar Observatory, Heliseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Solis. Cross comparison does not enable us to establish an absolute calibration, but it does allow us to discover and compensate for instrument problems, such as the sensitivity decrease seen in the WSO measurements in late 2016 and early 2017.

  4. Air-borne shape measurement of parabolic trough collector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Christoph; Röger, Marc; Hilgert, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    The optical and thermal efficiency of parabolic trough collector solar fields is dependent on the performance and assembly accuracy of its components such as the concentrator and absorber. For the purpose of optical inspection/approval, yield analysis, localization of low performing areas, and optimization of the solar field, it is essential to create a complete view of the optical properties of the field. Existing optical measurement tools are based on ground based cameras, facing restriction concerning speed, volume and automation. QFly is an airborne qualification system which provides holistic and accurate information on geometrical, optical, and thermal properties of the entire solar field. It consists of an unmanned aerial vehicle, cameras and related software for flight path planning, data acquisition and evaluation. This article presents recent advances of the QFly measurement system and proposes a methodology on holistic qualification of the complete solar field with minimum impact on plant operation.

  5. The Hanle effect applied to magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Hanle effect is the modification by a local magnetic field of the polarization due to coherent scattering in spectral lines. It results from the precession of a classical oscillator about the magnetic field direction. The sophisticated quantum-mechanical treatment, which is required to compute the polarization parameters of scattered light, was developed. The main features of the Hanle effect concerning magnetic field measurements are: (1) a good sensitivity within the approximate range 0.1 B gamma rho to 10 B gamma rho where B gamma rho is the field strength yielding a Larmor period equal to the radiative lifetime, (2) there is no Hanle effect for field vectors parallel to the excitating beam, (3) the Hanle effect refers essentially to the linear polarization in a spectral line, (4) various points in the line profile are affected in the same way by change of linear polarization so that polarization parameters can be measured on the integrated line profile.

  6. Laboratory and field tests of the Sutron RLR-0003-1 water level sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Bryars, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Three Sutron RLR-0003-1 water level sensors were tested in laboratory conditions to evaluate the accuracy of the sensor over the manufacturer’s specified operating temperature and distance-to-water ranges. The sensor was also tested for compliance to SDI-12 communication protocol and in field conditions at a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgaging site. Laboratory results were compared to the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for water level and to the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) policy requirement that water level sensors have a measurement uncertainty of no more than 0.01 foot or 0.20 percent of the indicated reading. Except for one sensor, the differences for the temperature testing were within 0.05 foot and the average measurements for the sensors were within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification. Two of the three sensors were within the manufacturer’s specified accuracy and met the USGS accuracy requirements for the laboratory distance to water testing. Three units passed a basic SDI-12 communication compliance test. Water level measurements made by the Sutron RLR-0003-1 during field testing agreed well with those made by the bubbler system and a Design Analysis Associates (DAA) H3613 radar, and they met the USGS accuracy requirements when compared to the wire-weight gage readings.

  7. Cold Water Cleaning and Sanitizing of Kitchenware in the Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    product would not be expected Product may result in irritat tact dermatitis have been rep benzalkonium chloride compoun mists or vapors may result in...CONSERVATION COLD WATER 19. ABSTRACT {Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) In emergency situations in the field, where reduction ...MATERIAL: <CAS#) ! % Bv Wt. I TLV I PEL n-Alkyl Dimethyl Benzyl Ammonium Chloride (68424-85-1) Octyl decy I dimethyl

  8. Hot-water aquifer storage: A field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, A. D.; Molz, F. J.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-03-01

    The basic water injection cycle used in a large-scale field study of heat storage in a confined aquifer near Mobile, Alabama is described. Water was pumped from an upper semi-confined aquifer, passed through a boiler where it was heated to a temperature of about 55 C, and injected into a medium sand confined aquifer. The injection well has a 6-inch (15-cm) partially-penetrating steel screen. The top of the storage formation is about 40 meters below the surface and the formation thickness is about 21 meters. In the first cycle, after a storage period of 51 days, the injection well was pumped until the temperature of the recovered water dropped to 33 c. At that point 55,300 cubic meters of water had been withdrawn and 66 percent of the injected energy had been recovered. The recovery period for the second cycle continued until the water temperature was 27.5 C and 100,100 cubic meters of water was recovered. At the end of the cycle about 90 percent of the energy injected during the cycle had been recovered.

  9. Measurement of Anisotropic Particle Interactions with Nonuniform ac Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Bradley; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Hua, Xiaoqing; Bevan, Michael A

    2018-02-20

    Optical microscopy measurements are reported for single anisotropic polymer particles interacting with nonuniform ac electric fields. The present study is limited to conditions where gravity confines particles with their long axis parallel to the substrate such that particles can be treated using quasi-2D analysis. Field parameters are investigated that result in particles residing at either electric field maxima or minima and with long axes oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the electric field direction. By nonintrusively observing thermally sampled positions and orientations at different field frequencies and amplitudes, a Boltzmann inversion of the time-averaged probability of states yields kT-scale energy landscapes (including dipole-field, particle-substrate, and gravitational potentials). The measured energy landscapes show agreement with theoretical potentials using particle conductivity as the sole adjustable material property. Understanding anisotropic particle-field energy landscapes vs field parameters enables quantitative control of local forces and torques on single anisotropic particles to manipulate their position and orientation within nonuniform fields.

  10. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials ofmore » UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.« less

  11. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  12. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... earth radius, of the largest available scale. (c) Collection of field strength data to determine... measurements in inclement weather or when major weather fronts are moving through the measurement area. (iii....686 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO...

  13. Real-World Physics: A Portable MBL for Field Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albergotti, Clifton

    1994-01-01

    Uses a moderately priced digital multimeter that has output and software compatible with personal computers to make a portable, computer-based data-acquisition system. The system can measure voltage, current, frequency, capacitance, transistor hFE, and temperature. Describes field measures of velocity, acceleration, and temperature as function of…

  14. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water- Crop-Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Brinkhoff, James; Hornbuckle, John; Dowling, Thomas

    2017-12-26

    Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs) have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth). Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC) characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor.

  15. The Water Vapor Variability - Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Adam, M.; Barnet, C.; Bojkov, B.; Delgado, R.; Demoz, B.; Fitzgibbon, J.; Forno, R.; Herman, R.; Hoff, E.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Three NASA-funded field campaigns have been hosted at the Howard University Research Campus in Beltsville, MD. In each of the years 2006, 2007 and 2008, WAVES field campaigns have coordinated ozonesonde launches, lidar operations and other measurements with A-train satellite overpasses for the purposes of satellite validation. The unique mix of measurement systems, physical location and the interagency, international group of researchers and students has permitted other objectives, such as mesoscale meteorological studies, to be addressed as well. We review the goals and accomplishments of the three WAVES missions with the emphasis on the nonsatellite validation component of WAVES, as the satellite validation activities have been reported elsewhere.

  16. Auditory evoked field measurement using magneto-impedance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K., E-mail: o-kabou@echo.nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Tajima, S.; Song, D.

    The magnetic field of the human brain is extremely weak, and it is mostly measured and monitored in the magnetoencephalography method using superconducting quantum interference devices. In this study, in order to measure the weak magnetic field of the brain, we constructed a Magneto-Impedance sensor (MI sensor) system that can cancel out the background noise without any magnetic shield. Based on our previous studies of brain wave measurements, we used two MI sensors in this system for monitoring both cerebral hemispheres. In this study, we recorded and compared the auditory evoked field signals of the subject, including the N100 (ormore » N1) and the P300 (or P3) brain waves. The results suggest that the MI sensor can be applied to brain activity measurement.« less

  17. Field gamma-ray spectrometer GS256: measurements stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojzeš, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    The stability of in situ readings of the portable gamma-ray spectrometer GS256 during the field season of 2006 was studied. The instrument is an impulse detector of gamma rays based on NaI(Tl) 3" × 3" scintillation unit and 256-channel spectral analyzer which allows simultaneous assessment of up to 8 radioisotopes in rocks. It is commonly used in surface geophysical survey for the measurement of natural 40K, 238U and 232Th but also artificial 137Cs quantities. The statistical evaluation is given of both repeated measurements - in the laboratory and at several field control points in different survey areas. The variability of values shows both the instrument stability and also the relative influence of some meteorological factors, mainly rainfalls. The analysis shows an acceptable level of instrument measurements stability, the necessity to avoid measurement under unfavourable meteorological conditions and to keep detailed field book information about time, position and work conditions.

  18. Partitioning evaporation and transpiration in a maize field using heat pulse sensors for evaporation measurement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the sum of soil water evaporation (E) and plant transpiration (T). E and T occur simultaneously in many systems with varying levels of importance, yet it is often very challenging to distinguish these fluxes separately in the field. Few studies have measured all three term...

  19. Quantifying variability in field scale evapotranspiration measurements in an irrigated agricultural region under advection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compares the evapotranspiration (ET) measurements from eddy covariance, lysimetry, and water balance using a network of neutron probe sensors and investigates the role of within-field variability in the vegetation density in explaining the differences among the ET estimates from the vario...

  20. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA- 00160 Wilkin*, R.T., McNeil*, M.S., Adair*, C.J., and Wilson*, J.T. Field Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen: A Comparison of Methods. Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation (Fall):124-132 (2001). EPA/600/J-01/403. The abili...

  1. Development and Deployment of a Portable Water Isotope Analyzer for Accurate, Continuous and High-Frequency Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Measurements in Water Vapor and Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotopes of water in liquid and vapor samples are powerful tracers to investigate the hydrological cycle and ecological processes. Therefore, continuous, in-situ and accurate measurements of del_18O and del_2H are critical to advance the understanding of water cycle dynamics around the globe. Furthermore, the combination of meteorological techniques and high-frequency isotopic water measurements can provide detailed time-resolved information on the eco-physiological performance of plants and enable improved understanding of water fluxes at ecosystem scales. In this work, we present recent laboratory development and field deployment of a novel Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy, capable of simultaneous in-situ measurements of del_18O and del_2H and water mixing ratio with high precision and high frequency (up to 10 Hz measurement rate). In addition, to ensure the accuracy of the water vapor isotope measurements, a novel Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source (WVISS), based on the instantaneous evaporation of micro-droplets of liquid water (with known isotope composition), has been developed to provide the reference water vapor with widely adjustable mixing ratio (500-30,000 ppmv) for real-time calibration of the WVIA. The comprehensive system that includes the WVIA and WVISS has been validated in extensive laboratory and field studies to be insensitive to ambient temperature changes (5-40 C) and to changes in water mixing ratio over a wide range of mixing ratios. In addition, by operating in the dual inlet mode, measurement drift has essentially been eliminated. The system (WVIA+WVISS) has also been deployed for long-term unattended continuous measurements in the field. In addition to water vapor isotope measurements, the new Water Vapor Isotopic Standard Source (WVISS) may be combined with the WVIA to provide continuous isotopic measurements of liquid water samples at rapid data rate. The availability of

  2. Fiber-optic evanescent-field sensor for attitude measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Zigeng; Guang, Jianye; Peng, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We proposed a new approach to attitude measurement by an evanescent field-based optical fiber sensing device and demonstrated a liquid pendulum. The device consisted of three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors which were fabricated by tapered single mode fibers and immersed in liquid. Three fiber Bragg gratings were used to measure the changes in evanescent field. And their reflection peaks were monitored in real time as measurement signals. Because every set of reflection responses corresponded to a unique attitude, the attitude of the device could be measured by the three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors. After theoretical analysis, computerized simulation and experimental verification, regular responses were obtained using this device for attitude measurement. The measurement ranges of dihedral angle and direction angle were 0°-50° and 0°-360°. The device is based on cost-effective power-referenced scheme. It can be used in electromagnetic or nuclear radiation environment.

  3. Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement-acquisition system uses magnetic fields to power sensors and to acquire measurements from sensors. The system alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement-acquisition systems, which include a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with wires, use limited to a single type of measurement, wire degradation due to wear or chemical decay, and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Eliminating wiring for acquiring measurements can alleviate potential hazards associated with wires, such as damaged wires becoming ignition sources due to arcing. The sensors are designed as electrically passive inductive-capacitive or passive inductive-capacitive-resistive circuits that produce magnetic-field-responses. One or more electrical parameters (inductance, capacitance, and resistance) of each sensor can be variable and corresponds to a measured physical state of interest. The magnetic-field- response attributes (frequency, amplitude, and bandwidth) of the inductor correspond to the states of physical properties for which each sensor measures. For each sensor, the measurement-acquisition system produces a series of increasing magnetic-field harmonics within a frequency range dedicated to that sensor. For each harmonic, an antenna electrically coupled to an oscillating current (the frequency of which is that of the harmonic) produces an oscillating magnetic field. Faraday induction via the harmonic magnetic fields produces an electromotive force and therefore a current in the sensor. Once electrically active, the sensor produces its own harmonic magnetic field as the inductor stores and releases magnetic energy. The antenna of the measurement- acquisition system is switched from a transmitting to a receiving mode to acquire the magnetic-field response of the sensor. The rectified amplitude of the received response is compared to previous responses to prior transmitted harmonics, to ascertain if the measurement system has detected a

  4. Electric-field distribution near rectangular microstrip radiators for hyperthermia heating: theory versus experiment in water.

    PubMed

    Underwood, H R; Peterson, A F; Magin, R L

    1992-02-01

    A rectangular microstrip antenna radiator is investigated for its near-zone radiation characteristics in water. Calculations of a cavity model theory are compared with the electric-field measurements of a miniature nonperturbing diode-dipole E-field probe whose 3 mm tip was positioned by an automatic three-axis scanning system. These comparisons have implications for the use of microstrip antennas in a multielement microwave hyperthermia applicator. Half-wavelength rectangular microstrip patches were designed to radiate in water at 915 MHz. Both low (epsilon r = 10) and high (epsilon r = 85) dielectric constant substrates were tested. Normal and tangential components of the near-zone radiated electric field were discriminated by appropriate orientation of the E-field probe. Low normal to transverse electric-field ratios at 3.0 cm depth indicate that the radiators may be useful for hyperthermia heating with an intervening water bolus. Electric-field pattern addition from a three-element linear array of these elements in water indicates that phase and amplitude adjustment can achieve some limited control over the distribution of radiated power.

  5. Electron heat transport measured in a stochastic magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Biewer, T M; Forest, C B; Anderson, J K; Fiksel, G; Hudson, B; Prager, S C; Sarff, J S; Wright, J C; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Terry, S D

    2003-07-25

    New profile measurements have allowed the electron thermal diffusivity profile to be estimated from power balance in the Madison Symmetric Torus where magnetic islands overlap and field lines are stochastic. The measurements show that (1) the electron energy transport is conductive not convective, (2) the measured thermal diffusivities are in good agreement with numerical simulations of stochastic transport, and (3) transport is greatly reduced near the reversal surface where magnetic diffusion is small.

  6. A Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor for Portable Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongping; Ma, Qichao; Xie, Yutong; Zheng, Qi; Zhang, Zhanlong

    2018-03-31

    In this paper, a new type of electric field sensor is proposed for the health and safety protection of inspection staff in high-voltage environments. Compared with the traditional power frequency electric field measurement instruments, the portable instrument has some special performance requirements and, thus, a new kind of double spherical shell sensor is presented. First, the mathematical relationships between the induced voltage of the sensor, the output voltage of the measurement circuit, and the original electric field in free space are deduced theoretically. These equations show the principle of the proposed sensor to measure the electric field and the effect factors of the measurement. Next, the characteristics of the sensor are analyzed through simulation. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The influencing rules of the size and material of the sensor on the measurement results are summarized. Then, the proposed sensor and the matching measurement system are used in a physical experiment. After calibration, the error of the measurement system is discussed. Lastly, the directional characteristic of the proposed sensor is experimentally tested.

  7. A Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor for Portable Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongping; Ma, Qichao; Xie, Yutong; Zheng, Qi

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of electric field sensor is proposed for the health and safety protection of inspection staff in high-voltage environments. Compared with the traditional power frequency electric field measurement instruments, the portable instrument has some special performance requirements and, thus, a new kind of double spherical shell sensor is presented. First, the mathematical relationships between the induced voltage of the sensor, the output voltage of the measurement circuit, and the original electric field in free space are deduced theoretically. These equations show the principle of the proposed sensor to measure the electric field and the effect factors of the measurement. Next, the characteristics of the sensor are analyzed through simulation. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The influencing rules of the size and material of the sensor on the measurement results are summarized. Then, the proposed sensor and the matching measurement system are used in a physical experiment. After calibration, the error of the measurement system is discussed. Lastly, the directional characteristic of the proposed sensor is experimentally tested. PMID:29614753

  8. General introduction for the “National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2018-02-28

    BackgroundAs part of its mission, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects data to assess the quality of our Nation’s water resources. A high degree of reliability and standardization of these data are paramount to fulfilling this mission. Documentation of nationally accepted methods used by USGS personnel serves to maintain consistency and technical quality in data-collection activities. “The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data” (NFM) provides documented guidelines and protocols for USGS field personnel who collect water-quality data. The NFM provides detailed, comprehensive, and citable procedures for monitoring the quality of surface water and groundwater. Topics in the NFM include (1) methods and protocols for sampling water resources, (2) methods for processing samples for analysis of water quality, (3) methods for measuring field parameters, and (4) specialized procedures, such as sampling water for low levels of mercury and organic wastewater chemicals, measuring biological indicators, and sampling bottom sediment for chemistry. Personnel who collect water-quality data for national USGS programs and projects, including projects supported by USGS cooperative programs, are mandated to use protocols provided in the NFM per USGS Office of Water Quality Technical Memorandum 2002.13. Formal training, for example, as provided in the USGS class, “Field Water-Quality Methods for Groundwater and Surface Water,” and field apprenticeships supplement the guidance provided in the NFM and ensure that the data collected are high quality, accurate, and scientifically defensible.

  9. An algorithm to estimate unsteady and quasi-steady pressure fields from velocity field measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Bose, Sanjeeb; Gemmell, Brad J; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H

    2014-02-01

    We describe and characterize a method for estimating the pressure field corresponding to velocity field measurements such as those obtained by using particle image velocimetry. The pressure gradient is estimated from a time series of velocity fields for unsteady calculations or from a single velocity field for quasi-steady calculations. The corresponding pressure field is determined based on median polling of several integration paths through the pressure gradient field in order to reduce the effect of measurement errors that accumulate along individual integration paths. Integration paths are restricted to the nodes of the measured velocity field, thereby eliminating the need for measurement interpolation during this step and significantly reducing the computational cost of the algorithm relative to previous approaches. The method is validated by using numerically simulated flow past a stationary, two-dimensional bluff body and a computational model of a three-dimensional, self-propelled anguilliform swimmer to study the effects of spatial and temporal resolution, domain size, signal-to-noise ratio and out-of-plane effects. Particle image velocimetry measurements of a freely swimming jellyfish medusa and a freely swimming lamprey are analyzed using the method to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach when applied to empirical data.

  10. Measure Guideline. Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

    2012-09-01

    This measure guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters.

  11. Measuring domestic water use: a systematic review of methodologies that measure unmetered water use in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Tamason, Charlotte C; Bessias, Sophia; Villada, Adriana; Tulsiani, Suhella M; Ensink, Jeroen H J; Gurley, Emily S; Mackie Jensen, Peter Kjaer

    2016-11-01

    To present a systematic review of methods for measuring domestic water use in settings where water meters cannot be used. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, Water Intelligence Online, Water Engineering and Development Center, IEEExplore, Scielo, and Science Direct databases for articles that reported methodologies for measuring water use at the household level where water metering infrastructure was absent or incomplete. A narrative review explored similarities and differences between the included studies and provide recommendations for future research in water use. A total of 21 studies were included in the review. Methods ranged from single-day to 14-consecutive-day visits, and water use recall ranged from 12 h to 7 days. Data were collected using questionnaires, observations or both. Many studies only collected information on water that was carried into the household, and some failed to mention whether water was used outside the home. Water use in the selected studies was found to range from two to 113 l per capita per day. No standardised methods for measuring unmetered water use were found, which brings into question the validity and comparability of studies that have measured unmetered water use. In future studies, it will be essential to define all components that make up water use and determine how they will be measured. A pre-study that involves observations and direct measurements during water collection periods (these will have to be determined through questioning) should be used to determine optimal methods for obtaining water use information in a survey. Day-to-day and seasonal variation should be included. A study that investigates water use recall is warranted to further develop standardised methods to measure water use; in the meantime, water use recall should be limited to 24 h or fewer. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  13. The Electron Drift Technique for Measuring Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschmann, G.; McIlwain, C. E.; Quinn, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Whipple, E. C.; Christensen, John (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The electron drift technique is based on sensing the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that is caused by electric fields and/or gradients in the magnetic field. These quantities can, by use of different electron energies, in principle be determined separately. Depending on the ratio of drift speed to magnetic field strength, the drift velocity can be determined either from the two emission directions that cause the electrons to gyrate back to detectors placed some distance from the emitting guns, or from measurements of the time of flight of the electrons. As a by-product of the time-of-flight measurements, the magnetic field strength is also determined. The paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the method as well as technical constraints.

  14. Measuring scarce water saving from interregional virtual water flows in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Li, Y. P.; Yang, H.; Liu, W. F.; Tillotson, M. R.; Guan, D.; Yi, Y.; Wang, H.

    2018-05-01

    Trade of commodities can lead to virtual water flows between trading partners. When commodities flow from regions of high water productivity to regions of low water productivity, the trade has the potential to generate water saving. However, this accounting of water saving does not account for the water scarcity status in different regions. It could be that the water saving generated from this trade occurs at the expense of the intensified water scarcity in the exporting region, and exerts limited effect on water stress alleviation in importing regions. In this paper, we propose an approach to measure the scarce water saving associated with virtual water trade (measuring in water withdrawal/use). The scarce water is quantified by multiplying the water use in production with the water stress index (WSI). We assessed the scarce water saving/loss through interprovincial trade within China using a multi-region input-output table from 2010. The results show that interprovincial trade resulted in 14.2 km3 of water loss without considering water stress, but only 0.4 km3 scarce water loss using the scarce water concept. Among the 435 total connections of virtual water flows, 254 connections contributed to 20.2 km3 of scarce water saving. Most of these connections are virtual water flows from provinces with lower WSI to that with higher WSI. Conversely, 175 connections contributed to 20.6 km3 of scarce water loss. The virtual water flow connections between Xinjiang and other provinces stood out as the biggest contributors, accounting for 66% of total scarce water loss. The results show the importance of assessing water savings generated from trade with consideration of both water scarcity status and water productivity across regions. Identifying key connections of scarce water saving is useful in guiding interregional economic restructuring towards water stress alleviation, a major goal of China’s sustainable development strategy.

  15. Difficulties in the evaluation and measuring of soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2013-04-01

    conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the soil before and during the measurement. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case to indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, or through the use of stochastic models such as the SCS Curve Number Method, or of other models using empirical or physical approaches, which have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. References Philip, J. R., 1954., An infiltration equation with physical significance: Soil Sci..,v. 77, p. 153-157. Philip, J. R., 1958. The theory of infiltration, pt. 7: Soil Sci., v. 85, no. 6, p. 333-337. Pla, I.1981. Simuladores de lluvia para el estudio de relaciones suelo-agua bajo agricultura de secano en los trópicos. Rev. Fac. Agron. XII(1-2):81-93.Maracay (Venezuela) Pla, I. 1986. A routine laboratory index to predict the effects of soil sealing on soil and water conservation. En "Assesment of Soil Surface Sealing and Crusting". 154-162.State Univ. of Ghent.Gante (Bélgica Pla, I., 1997. A soil water balance model for monitoring soil erosion processes and effects on steep lands in the tropics. Soil Technology. 11(1):17-30. Elsevier Pla, I., M.C. Ramos, S. Nacci, F. Fonseca y X. Abreu. 2005. Soil moisture regime in dryland vineyards of Catalunya (Spain) as influenced by climate, soil and land management. "Integrated Soil and Water Management for Orchard Development". FAO Land and Water Bulletin 10. 41-49. Roma (Italia). Pla, I., 2006. Hydrological approach for assessing desertification processes in the Mediterranean region. In W.G. Kepner et al. (Editors), Desertification in the Mediterranean Region. A Security Issue. 579-600 Springer. Heidelberg (Germany) Pla, I. 2011. Evaluación y Modelización Hidrológica para el Diagnóstico y Prevención de "Desastres Naturales". Gestión y Ambiente 14 (3): 17-22. UN

  16. Measuring Water Storage in the Amazon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-07

    This image is from data taken by NASA Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment showing the Amazon basin in South America. The amount of water stored in the Amazon basin varies from month to month. Animations are available at the Photojournal.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF WATER INGESTION BY SWIMMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Action Plan for Beaches and Recreational Waters describes research needs for exposure assessment related to swimming activities which include characterizing swimming populations with regard to routes of exposure and the magnitude of thei...

  18. Measuring temperature and field profiles in heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohlfeld, J.; Zheng, X.; Benakli, M.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a theoretical and experimental framework that enables quantitative measurements of the temperature and magnetic field profiles governing the thermo-magnetic write process in heat assisted magnetic recording. Since our approach allows the identification of the correct temperature dependence of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy field in the vicinity of the Curie point as well, it provides an unprecedented experimental foundation to assess our understanding of heat assisted magnetic recording.

  19. Water Vapour Effects in Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khélifa, N.

    2008-01-01

    Water vapour density inside the mass comparator enclosure is a critical parameter whose fluctuations during mass weighing can lead to errors in the determination of an unknown mass. To monitor them, a method using DFB laser diode in the near infrared has been proposed and tested. Preliminary results of our observation of water vapour sorption and de-sorption processes from the walls and the mass standard are reported.

  20. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging velocimetry for flow-field measurement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songbo; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2010-05-10

    We present the photoacoustic imaging velocimetry (PAIV) method for flow-field measurement based on a linear transducer array. The PAIV method is realized by using a Q-switched pulsed laser, a linear transducer array, a parallel data-acquisition equipment and dynamic focusing reconstruction. Tracers used to track liquid flow field were real-timely detected, two-dimensional (2-D) flow visualization was successfully reached, and flow parameters were acquired by measuring the movement of the tracer. Experimental results revealed that the PAIV method would be developed into 3-D imaging velocimetry for flow-field measurement, and potentially applied to research the security and targeting efficiency of optical nano-material probes. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  2. On the Foundations of the Two Measures Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, E. I.; Kaganovich, A. B.

    2006-11-03

    Two Measures Field Theory (TMT) uses both the Riemannian volume element {radical}(-g)d{sup 4}x and a new one Fcy d4x where the new measure of integration Fcy can be build of four scalar fields. Arguments in favor of TMT, both from the point of view of first principles and from the TMT results are summarized. Possible origin of the TMT and symmetries that protect the structure of TMT are reviewed. It appears that four measure scalar fields treated as 'physical coordinates' allow to define local observables in quantum gravity. The resolution of the old cosmological constant problem as a possible directmore » consequence of the TMT structure is discussed. Other applications of TMT to cosmology and particle physics are also mentioned.« less

  3. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements In Magnetized Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Showera; Wallace, Matthew; Presura, Radu; Neill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. This method is limited when plasma conditions are such that the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. We have measured magnetic fields in magnetized laser plasmas under conditions where the Zeeman splitting was not spectrally resolved. The magnetic field strength was determined from the difference in widths of two doublet components, using an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011). Time-gated spectra with one-dimensional space-resolution were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for laser plasmas created by 20 J, 1 ns Leopard laser pulses, and expanding in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. We explore the response of the Al III 4s 2S1/2 - 4p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components to the external magnetic field spatially along the plasma. Radial magnetic field and electron density profiles were measured within the plasma plume. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES Grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  5. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  6. Measurements of lunar magnetic field interaction with the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Snyder, C. W.; Clay, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the compression of the remanent lunar magnetic field by the solar wind, based on measurements of remanent magnetic fields at four Apollo landing sites and of the solar wind at two of these sites. Available data show that the remanent magnetic field at the lunar surface is compressed as much as 40% above its initial value by the solar wind, but the total remanent magnetic pressure is less than the stagnation pressure by a factor of six, implying that a local shock is not formed.

  7. A corotation electric field model of the Earth derived from Swarm satellite magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Rotation of the Earth in its own geomagnetic field sets up a primary corotation electric field, compensated by a secondary electric field of induced electrical charges. For the geomagnetic field measured by the Swarm constellation of satellites, a derivation of the global corotation electric field inside and outside of the corotation region is provided here, in both inertial and corotating reference frames. The Earth is assumed an electrical conductor, the lower atmosphere an insulator, followed by the corotating ionospheric E region again as a conductor. Outside of the Earth's core, the induced charge is immediately accessible from the spherical harmonic Gauss coefficients of the geomagnetic field. The charge density is positive at high northern and southern latitudes, negative at midlatitudes, and increases strongly toward the Earth's center. Small vertical electric fields of about 0.3 mV/m in the insulating atmospheric gap are caused by the corotation charges located in the ionosphere above and the Earth below. The corotation charges also flow outward into the region of closed magnetic field lines, forcing the plasmasphere to corotate. The electric field of the corotation charges further extends outside of the corotating regions, contributing radial outward electric fields of about 10 mV/m in the northern and southern polar caps. Depending on how the magnetosphere responds to these fields, the Earth may carry a net electric charge.

  8. Measurement of electromagnetic fields over a small electrolytic tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffey, T. W. H.; Morris, H. E.

    1990-12-01

    In 1986, Hart proposed a large, hemispherical electrolytic tank and the use of the Surface Electrical Potential method with which to study resistivity changes due to energy-extraction processes in the earth. A second method for the inference of underground resistivity changes, the Controlled Source Audio-MagnetoTelluric method, has been widely used in the field. This method uses measurements of the electromagnetic field from a surface dipole, rather than the surface potential distribution from a buried vertical electrode, as the basis of the technique. If both SEP and CSAMT could be applied to the same model structure in the same electrolytic tank, it would seem that the diagnostic information would be enhanced over the use of each technique separately. Accordingly, the specific objectives were: to determine to what radial extent the bowl could be used as a homogeneous half-space; and to demonstrate acceptable accuracy by measuring the effect of a conducting target immersed in the bowl and comparing the measurements with numerical modeling. Electromagnetic fields over an electrolytic tank have been measured by others, and this report begins with a comparative summary of both prior and present work. The next section presents the formulas for the electromagnetic fields, and explains the choice of a particular method of measuring apparent resistivity. The field theory is also used in the subsequent section to provide error estimates needed for design guidance. The following sections describe the measurements, and the considerations for a larger facility. The appendices include the derivatives of the fields, the electrolyte characteristics, a description of the apparatus, and calibration methods.

  9. Detection of reflector surface from near field phase measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ida, Nathan

    1991-01-01

    The deviation of a reflector antenna surface from a perfect parabolic shape causes degradation of the performance of the antenna. The problem of determining the shape of the reflector surface in a reflector antenna using near field phase measurements is not a new one. A recent issue of the IEEE tansactions on Antennas and Propagation (June 1988) contained numerous descriptions of the use of these measurements: holographic reconstruction or inverse Fourier transform. Holographic reconstruction makes use of measurement of the far field of the reflector and then applies the Fourier transform relationship between the far field and the current distribution on the reflector surface. Inverse Fourier transformation uses the phase measurements to determine the far field pattern using the method of Kerns. After the far field pattern is established, an inverse Fourier transform is used to determine the phases in a plane between the reflector surface and the plane in which the near field measurements were taken. These calculations are time consuming since they involve a relatively large number of operations. A much faster method can be used to determine the position of the reflector. This method makes use of simple geometric optics to determine the path length of the ray from the feed to the reflector and from the reflector to the measurement point. For small physical objects and low frequencies, diffraction effects have a major effect on the error, and the algorithm provides incorrect results. It is believed that the effect is less noticeable for large distortions such as antenna warping, and more noticeable for small, localized distortions such as bumps and depressions such as might be caused by impact damage.

  10. On the accuracy of palaeopole estimations from magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervelidou, F.; Lesur, V.; Morschhauser, A.; Grott, M.; Thomas, P.

    2017-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed for palaeopole position estimation based on magnetic field measurements. Such estimates can offer insights into the rotational dynamics and the dynamo history of moons and terrestrial planets carrying a crustal magnetic field. Motivated by discrepancies in the estimated palaeopole positions among various studies regarding the Moon and Mars, we examine the limitations of magnetic field measurements as source of information for palaeopole position studies. It is already known that magnetic field measurements cannot constrain the null space of the magnetization nor its full spectral content. However, the extent to which these limitations affect palaeopole estimates has not been previously investigated in a systematic way. In this study, by means of the vector Spherical Harmonics formalism, we show that inferring palaeopole positions from magnetic field measurements necessarily introduces, explicitly or implicitly, assumptions about both the null space and the full spectral content of the magnetization. Moreover, we demonstrate through synthetic tests that if these assumptions are inaccurate, then the resulting palaeopole position estimates are wrong. Based on this finding, we make suggestions that can allow future palaeopole studies to be conducted in a more constructive way.

  11. Aquaporins are major determinants of water use efficiency of rice plants in the field.

    PubMed

    Nada, Reham M; Abogadallah, Gaber M

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed at specifying the reasons of unbalanced water relations of rice in the field at midday which results in slowing down photosynthesis and reducing water use efficiency (WUE) in japonica and indica rice under well-watered and droughted conditions. Leaf relative water content (RWC) decreased in the well-watered plants at midday in the field, but more dramatically in the droughted indica (75.6 and 71.4%) than japonica cultivars (85.5 and 80.8%). Gas exchange was measured at three points during the day (9:00, 13:00 and 17:00). Leaf internal CO2 (Ci) was not depleted when midday stomatal depression was highest indicating that Ci was not limiting to photosynthesis. Most aquaporins were predominantly expressed in leaves suggesting higher water permeability in leaves than in roots. The expression of leaf aquaporins was further induced by drought at 9:00 without comparable responses in roots. The data suggest that aquaporin expression in the root endodermis was limiting to water uptake. Upon removal of the radial barriers to water flow in roots, transpiration increased instantly and photosynthesis increased after 4h resulting in increasing WUE after 4h, demonstrating that WUE in rice is largely limited by the inadequate aquaporin expression profiles in roots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, Brian R.; Kaushik, Sumanth

    1999-01-01

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations.

  13. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  14. A lab in the field: high-frequency analysis of water quality and stable isotopes in stream water and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James W.

    2017-03-01

    High-frequency measurements of solutes and isotopes (18O and 2H) in rainfall and streamflow can shed important light on catchment flow pathways and travel times, but the workload and sample storage artifacts involved in collecting, transporting, and analyzing thousands of bottled samples severely constrain catchment studies in which conventional sampling methods are employed. However, recent developments towards more compact and robust analyzers have now made it possible to measure chemistry and water isotopes in the field at sub-hourly frequencies over extended periods. Here, we present laboratory and field tests of a membrane-vaporization continuous water sampler coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer for real-time measurements of δ18O and δ2H combined with a dual-channel ion chromatograph (IC) for the synchronous analysis of major cations and anions. The precision of the isotope analyzer was typically better than 0.03 ‰ for δ18O and 0.17 ‰ for δ2H in 10 min average readings taken at intervals of 30 min. Carryover effects were less than 1.2 % between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30 min sampling intervals, and instrument drift could be corrected through periodic analysis of secondary reference standards. The precision of the ion chromatograph was typically ˜ 0.1-1 ppm or better, with relative standard deviations of ˜ 1 % or better for most major ions in stream water, which is sufficient to detect subtle biogeochemical signals in catchment runoff. We installed the coupled isotope analyzer/IC system in an uninsulated hut next to a stream of a small catchment and analyzed stream water and precipitation samples every 30 min over 28 days. These high-frequency measurements facilitated a detailed comparison of event-water fractions via endmember mixing analysis with both chemical and isotope tracers. For two events with relatively dry antecedent moisture conditions, the event-water fractions were < 21 % based on isotope tracers but were

  15. Increased dielectric constant in the water treated by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field and its possible biological implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xun

    2011-12-01

    Water is the most abundant compound on the surface of the Earth, and can be considered to be the most important molecule in living systems. Water plays a variety of cellular functions, being the solvent of most biological molecules, a substrate and product of enzymatic catalysis, an important component of macromolecules, and more. Because of importance of water in life, many physical and chemical treatments were invented to improve the quality of drinking water. Among them, the treatment with electromagnetic field is a well-known, but much debatable physical method. Although electromagnetic field has been utilized for treating water for 80 years, many reports on beneficial biological effect of electromagnetic field-treated water were either anecdotal or less convincing. To explore if there is any physical base for understanding possible biological effects of electromagnetic field-treated water, dielectric relaxation spectra of deionized water treated with an extremely low frequency electromagnetic (ELFEM) field were measured and compared with that of untreated water. It was surprisingly found that the dielectric constant of the ELFEM field-treated water was 3.7% higher than the control over the frequency range of 1-10 GHz, which indicates a higher molecular polarization occurs in the ELFEM field-treated water. Electrostatic and thermodynamic analysis shows that proteins or other biomacromolecules would have more reduced free energy when they are hydrated in high dielectric constant water. Since free energy is of crucial importance for stability of proteins, protein folding and its conformational change, as well as catalytic activity of enzymes, the free energy reduction of the biomacromolecules hydrated with higher dielectric constant water may be responsible for many possible biological effects of electromagnetic field treated water.

  16. Can dust emission mechanisms be determined from field measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martina; Webb, Nicholas; Gill, Thomas E.; Van Pelt, Scott; Okin, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    Field observations are needed to develop and test theories on dust emission for use in dust modeling systems. The dust emission mechanism (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) as well as the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under sediment supply- and transport-limited conditions. This variability, which is caused by heterogeneity of the surface and the atmosphere, cannot be fully captured in either field measurements or models. However, uncertainty in dust emission modeling can be reduced through more detailed observational data on the dust emission mechanism itself. To date, most measurements do not provide enough information to allow for a determination of the mechanisms leading to dust emission and often focus on a small variety of soil and atmospheric settings. Additionally, data sets are often not directly comparable due to different measurement setups. As a consequence, the calibration of dust emission schemes has so far relied on a selective set of observations, which leads to an idealization of the emission process in models and thus affects dust budget estimates. Here, we will present results of a study which aims to decipher the dust emission mechanism from field measurements as an input for future model development. Detailed field measurements are conducted, which allow for a comparison of dust emission for different surface and atmospheric conditions. Measurements include monitoring of the surface, loose erodible material, transported sediment, and meteorological data, and are conducted in different environmental settings in the southwestern United States. Based on the field measurements, a method is developed to differentiate between the different dust emission mechanisms.

  17. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Analysis of Surface Electric Field Measurements from an Array of Electric Field Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G.; Thayer, J. P.; Deierling, W.

    2016-12-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has operated an distributed array of over 30 electric field mills over the past 18 years, providing a unique data set of surface electric field measurements over a very long timespan. In addition to the electric field instruments there are many meteorological towers around KSC that monitor the local meteorological conditions. Utilizing these datasets we have investigated and found unique spatial and temporal signatures in the electric field data that are attributed to local meteorological effects and the global electric circuit. The local and global scale influences on the atmospheric electric field will be discussed including the generation of space charge from the ocean surf, local cloud cover, and a local enhancement in the electric field that is seen at sunrise.

  19. Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhen; Schwanz, Derek; Narayanan, Badri

    Designing materials to function in harsh environments, such as conductive aqueous media, is a problem of broad interest to a range of technologies, including energy, ocean monitoring and biological applications(1-4). The main challenge is to retain the stability and morphology of the material as it interacts dynamically with the surrounding environment. Materials that respond to mild stimuli through collective phase transitions and amplify signals could open up new avenues for sensing. Here we present the discovery of an electric-field-driven, water-mediated reversible phase change in a perovskite-structured nickelate, SmNiO35-7. This prototypical strongly correlated quantum material is stable in salt water, doesmore » not corrode, and allows exchange of protons with the surrounding water at ambient temperature, with the concurrent modification in electrical resistance and optical properties being capable of multi-modal readout. Besides operating both as thermistors and pH sensors, devices made of this material can detect sub-volt electric potentials in salt water. We postulate that such devices could be used in oceanic environments for monitoring electrical signals from various maritime vessels and sea creatures« less

  20. Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Schwanz, Derek; Narayanan, Badri; Kotiuga, Michele; Dura, Joseph A.; Cherukara, Mathew; Zhou, Hua; Freeland, John W.; Li, Jiarui; Sutarto, Ronny; He, Feizhou; Wu, Chongzhao; Zhu, Jiaxin; Sun, Yifei; Ramadoss, Koushik; Nonnenmann, Stephen S.; Yu, Nanfang; Comin, Riccardo; Rabe, Karin M.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2018-01-01

    Designing materials to function in harsh environments, such as conductive aqueous media, is a problem of broad interest to a range of technologies, including energy, ocean monitoring and biological applications. The main challenge is to retain the stability and morphology of the material as it interacts dynamically with the surrounding environment. Materials that respond to mild stimuli through collective phase transitions and amplify signals could open up new avenues for sensing. Here we present the discovery of an electric-field-driven, water-mediated reversible phase change in a perovskite-structured nickelate, SmNiO3. This prototypical strongly correlated quantum material is stable in salt water, does not corrode, and allows exchange of protons with the surrounding water at ambient temperature, with the concurrent modification in electrical resistance and optical properties being capable of multi-modal readout. Besides operating both as thermistors and pH sensors, devices made of this material can detect sub-volt electric potentials in salt water. We postulate that such devices could be used in oceanic environments for monitoring electrical signals from various maritime vessels and sea creatures.

  1. Airborne discrimination between ice and water - Application to the laser measurement of chlorophyll-in-water in a marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1989-01-01

    The concurrent active-passive measurement capabilities of the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar have been used to (1) discriminate between ice and water in a large ice field within the Greenland Sea and (2) achieve the detection and measurement of chlorophyll-in-water by laser-induced and water-Raman-normalized pigment fluorescence. Passive upwelled radiances from sea ice are significantly stronger than those from the neighboring water, even when the optical receiver field-of-view is only partially filled with ice. Thus, weaker passive upwelled radiances, together with concurrently acquired laser-induced spectra, can rather confidently be assigned to the intervening water column. The laser-induced spectrum can then be processed using previously established methods to measure the chlorophyll-in-water concentration. Significant phytoplankton patchiness and elevated chlorophyll concentrations were found within the waters of the melting ice compared to ice-free regions just outside the ice field.

  2. Microcoulometric measurement of water in minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cremer, M.; Elsheimer, H.N.; Escher, E.E.

    1972-01-01

    A DuPont Moisture Analyzer is used in a microcoulometric method for determining water in minerals. Certain modifications, which include the heating of the sample outside the instrument, protect the system from acid gases and insure the conversion of all hydrogen to water vapor. Moisture analyzer data are compared to concurrent data obtained by a modified Penfield method. In general, there is a positive bias of from 0.1 to 0.2% in the moisture analyzer results and a similarity of bias in minerals of the same kind. Inhomogeneity, sample size, and moisture pick-up are invoked to explain deviations. The method is particularly applicable to small samples. ?? 1972.

  3. Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric wind fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of wind fields in the earth's troposphere with daily global coverage is widely considered as a significant advance for forecasting and transport studies. For optimal use by NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) models the horizontal and vertical resolutions should be approximately 100 km and 1 km, respectively. For boundary layer studies vertical resolution of a few hundred meters seems essential. Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar has a unique capability to measure global winds in the troposphere with the high vertical resolution required. The lidar approach depends on transmission of pulses with high spectral purity and backscattering from the atmospheric aerosol particles or layered clouds to provide a return signal. Recent field measurement campaigns using NASA research aircraft have resulted in collection of aerosol and cloud data which can be used to optimize the Doppler lidar instrument design and measurement strategy.

  4. Methods of measuring soil moisture in the field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1962-01-01

    For centuries, the amount of moisture in the soil has been of interest in agriculture. The subject of soil moisture is also of great importance to the hydrologist, forester, and soils engineer. Much equipment and many methods have been developed to measure soil moisture under field conditions. This report discusses and evaluates the various methods for measurement of soil moisture and describes the equipment needed for each method. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and an extensive list of references is provided for those desiring to study the subject in more detail. The gravimetric method is concluded to be the most satisfactory method for most problems requiring onetime moisture-content data. The radioactive method is normally best for obtaining repeated measurements of soil moisture in place. It is concluded that all methods have some limitations and that the ideal method for measurement of soil moisture under field conditions has yet to be perfected.

  5. Field Soil Water Retention of the Prototype Hanford Barrier and Its Variability with Space and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    Engineered surface barriers are used to isolate underlying contaminants from water, plants, animals, and humans. To understand the flow processes within a barrier and the barrier’s ability to store and release water, the field hydraulic properties of the barrier need to be known. In situ measurement of soil hydraulic properties and their variation over time is challenging because most measurement methods are destructive. A multiyear test of the Prototype Hanford Barrier (PHB) has yielded in situ soil water content and pressure data for a nine-year period. The upper 2 m layer of the PHB is a silt loam. Within thismore » layer, water content and water pressure were monitored at multiple depths at 12 water balance stations using a neutron probe and heat dissipation units. Valid monitoring data from 1995 to 2003 for 4 depths at 12 monitoring stations were used to determine the field water retention of the silt loam layer. The data covered a wide range of wetness, from near saturation to the permanent wilt point, and each retention curve contained 51 to 96 data points. The data were described well with the commonly used van Genuchten water retention model. It was found that the spatial variation of the saturated and residual water content and the pore size distribution parameter were relatively small, while that of the van Genuchten alpha was relatively large. The effects of spatial variability of the retention properties appeared to be larger than the combined effects of added 15% w/w pea gravel and plant roots on the properties. Neither of the primary hydrological processes nor time had a detectible effect on the water retention of the silt loam barrier.« less

  6. Non-destructive assessment of grapevine water status in the field using a portable NIR spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Tardaguila, Javier; Fernández-Novales, Juan; Gutiérrez, Salvador; Diago, Maria Paz

    2017-08-01

    Until now, the majority of methods employed to assess grapevine water status have been destructive, time-intensive, costly and provide information of a limited number of samples, thus the ability of revealing within-field water status variability is reduced. The goal of this work was to evaluate the capability of non-invasive, portable near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy acquired in the field, to assess the grapevine water status in diverse varieties, grown under different environmental conditions, in a fast and reliable way. The research was conducted 2 weeks before harvest in 2012, in two commercial vineyards, planted with eight different varieties. Spectral measurements were acquired in the field on the adaxial and abaxial sides of 160 individual leaves (20 leaves per variety) using a commercially available handheld spectrophotometer (1600-2400 nm). Principal component analysis (PCA) and modified partial least squares (MPLS) were used to interpret the spectra and to develop reliable prediction models for stem water potential (Ψ s ) (cross-validation correlation coefficient (r cv ) ranged from 0.77 to 0.93, and standard error of cross validation (SECV) ranged from 0.10 to 0.23), and leaf relative water content (RWC) (r cv ranged from 0.66 to 0.81, and SECV between 1.93 and 3.20). The performance differences between models built from abaxial and adaxial-acquired spectra is also discussed. The capability of non-invasive NIR spectroscopy to reliably assess the grapevine water status under field conditions was proved. This technique can be a suitable and promising tool to appraise within-field variability of plant water status, helpful to define optimised irrigation strategies in the wine industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Mobile Phone-Based Field Monitoring for Satsuma Mandarin and Its Application to Watering Advice System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Toshiyuki; Numano, Nagisa; Yagyu, Hiroyuki; Shimazu, Hideo

    This paper describes a mobile phone-based data logging system for monitoring the growing status of Satsuma mandarin, a type of citrus fruit, in the field. The system can provide various feedback to the farm producers with collected data, such as visualization of related data as a timeline chart or advice on the necessity of watering crops. It is important to collect information on environment conditions, plant status and product quality, to analyze it and to provide it as feedback to the farm producers to aid their operations. This paper proposes a novel framework of field monitoring and feedback for open-field farming. For field monitoring, it combines a low-cost plant status monitoring method using a simple apparatus and a Field Server for environment condition monitoring. Each field worker has a simple apparatus to measure fruit firmness and records data with a mobile phone. The logged data are stored in the database of the system on the server. The system analyzes stored data for each field and is able to show the necessity of watering to the user in five levels. The system is also able to show various stored data in timeline chart form. The user and coach can compare or analyze these data via a web interface. A test site was built at a Satsuma mandarin field at Kumano in Mie Prefecture, Japan using the framework, and farm workers monitor in the area used and evaluated the system.

  8. Assessing Gaussian Assumption of PMU Measurement Error Using Field Data

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shaobu; Zhao, Junbo; Huang, Zhenyu; ...

    2017-10-13

    Gaussian PMU measurement error has been assumed for many power system applications, such as state estimation, oscillatory modes monitoring, voltage stability analysis, to cite a few. This letter proposes a simple yet effective approach to assess this assumption by using the stability property of a probability distribution and the concept of redundant measurement. Extensive results using field PMU data from WECC system reveal that the Gaussian assumption is questionable.

  9. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W.; Swanson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical foundation of the field electron retarding potential method, and review of its experimental application to the measurement of single crystal face work functions. The results obtained from several substrates are discussed. An interesting and useful fallout from the experimental approach described is the ability to accurately measure the elastic and inelastic reflection coefficient for impinging electrons to near zero-volt energy.

  10. Recent tectonic stress field, active faults and geothermal fields (hot-water type) in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tianfeng

    1984-10-01

    It is quite probable that geothermal fields of the hot-water type in China do not develop in the absence of recently active faults. Such active faults are all controlled by tectonic stress fields. Using the data of earthquake fault-plane solutions, active faults, and surface thermal manifestations, a map showing the recent tectonic stress field, and the location of active faults and geothermal fields in China is presented. Data collected from 89 investigated prospects with geothermal manifestations indicate that the locations of geothermal fields are controlled by active faults and the recent tectonic stress field. About 68% of the prospects are controlled by tensional or tensional-shear faults. The angle between these faults and the direction of maximum compressive stress is less than 45°, and both tend to be parallel. About 15% of the prospects are controlled by conjugate faults. Another 14% are controlled by compressive-shear faults where the angle between these faults and the direction maximum compressive stress is greater than 45°.

  11. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  12. Field hearing measurements of the Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae.

    PubMed

    Casper, B M; Mann, D A

    2009-12-01

    Field measurements of hearing thresholds were obtained from the Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae using the auditory evoked potential method (AEP). The fish had most sensitive hearing at 20 Hz, the lowest frequency tested, with decreasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. Hearing thresholds were lower than AEP thresholds previously measured for the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum and yellow stingray Urobatis jamaicensis at frequencies <200 Hz, and similar at 200 Hz and above. Rhizoprionodon terraenovae represents the closest comparison in terms of pelagic lifestyle to the sharks which have been observed in acoustic field attraction experiments. The sound pressure levels that would be equivalent to the particle acceleration thresholds of R. terraenovae were much higher than the sound levels which attracted closely related sharks suggesting a discrepancy between the hearing threshold experiments and the field attraction experiments.

  13. AMoN Site Characterization Study: Phase I Field Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reduced inorganic nitrogen (NH3 + NH4+) is an increasingly important contributor to the total nitrogen deposition budget, yet the bi-directional nature of NH3 air-surface exchange makes incorporation of NH3 measurements into dry deposition schemes in field-scale and regional chem...

  14. Functional Measurement in the Field of Empirical Bioethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullet, Etienne; Sorum, Paul C.; Teysseire, Nathalie; Nann, Stephanie; Martinez, Guadalupe Elizabeth Morales; Ahmed, Ramadan; Kamble, Shanmukh; Olivari, Cecilia; Sastre, Maria Teresa Munoz

    2012-01-01

    We present, in a synthetic way, some of the main findings from five studies that were conducted in the field of empirical bioethics, using the Functional Measurement framework. These studies were about (a) the rationing of rare treatments, (b) adolescents' abortions, (c) end-of-life decision-making regarding damaged neonates, (d) end-of-life…

  15. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    Using the field emission retarding potential method true work functions have been measured for the following monocrystalline substrates: W(110), W(111), W(100), Nb(100), Ni(100), Cu(100), Ir(110) and Ir(111). The electron elastic and inelastic reflection coefficients from several of these surfaces have also been examined near zero primary beam energy.

  16. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  17. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  18. Simple System to Measure the Earth's Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akoglu, R.; Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib

    2010-01-01

    Our aim in this proposal is to use Faraday's law of induction as a simple lecture demonstration to measure the Earths magnetic field (B). This will also enable the students to learn about how electric power is generated from rotational motion. Obviously the idea is not original, yet it may be attractive in the sense that no sophisticated devices…

  19. Measuring surface magnetic fields of red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessore, B.; Lèbre, A.; Morin, J.; Mathias, P.; Josselin, E.; Aurière, M.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Red supergiant (RSG) stars are very massive cool evolved stars. Recently, a weak magnetic field was measured at the surface of α Ori and this is so far the only M-type supergiant for which a direct detection of a surface magnetic field has been reported. Aims: By extending the search for surface magnetic field in a sample of late-type supergiants, we want to determine whether the surface magnetic field detected on α Ori is a common feature among the M-type supergiants. Methods: With the spectropolarimeter Narval at Télescope Bernard-Lyot we undertook a search for surface magnetic fields in a sample of cool supergiant stars, and we analysed circular polarisation spectra using the least-squares deconvolution technique. Results: We detect weak Zeeman signatures of stellar origin in the targets CE Tau, α1 Her and μ Cep. For the latter star, we also show that cross-talk from the strong linear polarisation signals detected on this star must be taken into account. For CE Tau and μ Cep, the longitudinal component of the detected surface fields is at the Gauss-level, such as in α Ori. We measured a longitudinal field almost an order of magnitude stronger for α1 Her. We also report variability of the longitudinal magnetic field of CE Tau and α1 Her, with changes in good agreement with the typical atmospheric dynamics time-scales. We also report a non-detection of magnetic field at the surface of the yellow supergiant star ρ Cas. Conclusions: The two RSG stars of our sample, CE Tau and μ Cep, display magnetic fields very similar to that of α Ori. The non-detection of a magnetic field on the post-RSG star ρ Cas suggests that the magnetic field disappears, or at least becomes undetectable with present methods, at later evolutionary stages. Our analysis of α1 Her supports the proposed reclassification of the star as an M-type asymptotic giant branch star. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) at the Observatoire du Pic du Midi

  20. A simple technique for measuring buoyant weight increment of entire, transplanted coral colonies in the field.

    PubMed

    Herler, Jürgen; Dirnwöber, Markus

    2011-10-31

    Estimating the impacts of global and local threats on coral reefs requires monitoring reef health and measuring coral growth and calcification rates at different time scales. This has traditionally been mostly performed in short-term experimental studies in which coral fragments were grown in the laboratory or in the field but measured ex situ. Practical techniques in which growth and measurements are performed over the long term in situ are rare. Apart from photographic approaches, weight increment measurements have also been applied. Past buoyant weight measurements under water involved a complicated and little-used apparatus. We introduce a new method that combines previous field and laboratory techniques to measure the buoyant weight of entire, transplanted corals under water. This method uses an electronic balance fitted into an acrylic glass underwater housing and placed atop of an acrylic glass cube. Within this cube, corals transplanted onto artificial bases can be attached to the balance and weighed at predetermined intervals while they continue growth in the field. We also provide a set of simple equations for the volume and weight determinations required to calculate net growth rates. The new technique is highly accurate: low error of weight determinations due to variation of coral density (< 0.08%) and low standard error (< 0.01%) for repeated measurements of the same corals. We outline a transplantation technique for properly preparing corals for such long-term in situ experiments and measurements.

  1. A method for the measurement of physiologic evaporative water loss.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-10-01

    The precise measurement of evaporative water loss is essential to an accurate evaluation of this avenue of heat loss in acute and chronic exposures to heat. In psychological studies, the quantitative measurement of palmar sweating plays an equally im...

  2. Assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Remote measurement of chlorophyll concentrations to determine extent of water pollution is discussed. Construction and operation of radiometer to provide measurement capability are explained. Diagram of equipment is provided.

  3. Water consumption, grain yield, and water productivity in response to field water management in double rice systems in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Wei; Yin, Chun Mei; Hou, Hai Jun; Xie, Ke Jun; Xie, Xiao Li

    2017-01-01

    Rice cultivation has been challenged by increasing food demand and water scarcity. We examined the responses of water use, grain yield, and water productivity to various modes of field water managements in Chinese double rice systems. Four treatments were studied in a long-term field experiment (1998-2015): continuous flooding (CF), flooding-midseason drying-flooding (F-D-F), flooding-midseason drying-intermittent irrigation without obvious standing water (F-D-S), and flooding-rain-fed (F-RF). The average precipitation was 483 mm in early-rice season and 397 mm in late-rice season. The irrigated water for CF, F-D-F, F-D-S, and F-RF, respectively, was 263, 340, 279, and 170 mm in early-rice season, and 484, 528, 422, and 206 mm in late-rice season. Grain yield for CF, F-D-F, F-D-S, and F-RF, respectively, was 4,722, 4,597, 4,479, and 4,232 kgha-1 in early-rice season, and 5,420, 5,402, 5,366, and 4,498 kgha-1 in late-rice season. Compared with CF, F-D-F consumed more irrigated water, which still decreased grain yield, leading to a decrease in water productivity by 25% in early-rice season and by 8% in late-rice season. Compared with F-D-F, F-D-S saved much irrigated water with a small yield reduction, leading to an increase in water productivity by 22% in early-rice season and by 26% in late-rice season. The results indicate that CF is best for early-rice and FDS is best for late-rice in terms of grain yield and water productivity.

  4. Cost effective modular unit for cleaning oil and gas field waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Zinberg, M.B.; Nenasheva, M.N.; Gafarov, N.A.

    1996-12-31

    Problems of environmental control involving conservation of water resources are vital for the development of giant oil and gas condensate fields near Caspian Sea (Russia) characterized by water shortages. One of the urgent tasks of oil production industry is to use all field waste water consisting of underground, processing and rain water. It was necessary to construct a new highly effective equipment which could be used in local waste water treatment. Now we have at our disposal a technology and equipment to meet the requirements to the treated water quality. Thus we have installed a modular unit of 100 m{supmore » 3}/a day capacity to clean waste water from oil products, suspended matter and other organic pollutants at Orenburg oil and gas condensate field, Russia. The unit provides with a full treatment of produced water and comprises a settling tank with adhesive facility, the number of sorption filters, Trofactor bioreactors and a disinfecting facility. The equipment is fitted into three boxes measuring 9 x 3.2 x 2.7 in each. The equipment is simple in design that enables to save money, time and space. Sorption filters, bioreactors as well as the Trofactor process are a part of know-how. While working on the unit construction we applied well known methods of settling and sorption. The process of mechanic cleaning is undergoing in the following succession: (1) the gravitational separation in a settling tank where the floated film oil products are constantly gathered and the sediment is periodically taken away, (2) the settled water treatment in sorption Filters of a special kind.« less

  5. Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic Signature Using Multiple AUVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    been equipped with a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer and used to perform preliminary magnetic field measurements. Measurements of this type will be...mounted on the AUVs, shown in Fig. 1, was a three-axis fluxgate type [16] magnetometer with a range of ±100,000 nT and a sensitivity of 100μV/nT. The...surface ship. The system will employ a formation of multiple AUVs, each equipped with a magnetometer . The objective is to measure total magnetic

  6. Summary of Global Ozone Measurements Collected from Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, J.; Salazar, V.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory data services is to advance science through delivering high-quality project data and meta data in ways that are as transparent, secure, and easily accessible as possible. By using EOL's existing infrastructure and applying data mining techniques, we explored global ozone measurements collected during EOL supported airborne field campaigns. This study highlights ozone concentrations addressing a diverse set of science objectives, and how these timed measurements contribute to the understanding of the state of the atmosphere and evolution of the different measuring techniques.

  7. Assessing Counter-Terrorism field training with multiple behavioral measures.

    PubMed

    Spiker, V Alan; Johnston, Joan H

    2013-09-01

    Development of behavioral pattern recognition and analysis skills is an essential element of Counter-Terrorism training, particularly in the field. Three classes of behavioral measures were collected in an assessment of skill acquisition during a US Joint Forces Command-sponsored course consisting of Combat Tracking and Combat Profiling segments. Measures included situational judgment tests, structured behavioral observation checklists, and qualitative assessments of the emergence of specific knowledge-skills-attitudes over the course of the training. The paper describes statistical evidence across the three types of measures that indicate that behavioral pattern recognition and analysis skills were successfully acquired by most students (a mix of Army and civilian law enforcement personnel) during the field training exercises. Implications for broader training of these critical skills are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic field measurements near stand-alone transformer stations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Shaiela; Hareuveny, Ronen; Yitzhak, Nir-Mordechay; Ruppin, Raphael

    2013-12-01

    Extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) measurements around and above three stand-alone 22/0.4-kV transformer stations have been performed. The low-voltage (LV) cables between the transformer and the LV switchgear were found to be the major source of strong ELF MFs of limited spatial extent. The strong fields measured above the transformer stations support the assessment method, to be used in future epidemiological studies, of classifying apartments located right above the transformer stations as highly exposed to MFs. The results of the MF measurements above the ground around the transformer stations provide a basis for the assessment of the option of implementing precautionary procedures.

  9. Optimum Water Chemistry in radiation field buildup control

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien, C.

    1995-03-01

    Nuclear utilities continue to face the challenGE of reducing exposure of plant maintenance personnel. GE Nuclear Energy has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC) to reduce the radiation field buildup and minimize the radioactive waste production. It is believed that reduction of radioactive sources and improvement of the water chemistry quality should significantly reduce both the radiation exposure and radwaste production. The most important source of radioactivity is cobalt and replacement of cobalt containing alloy in the core region as well as in the entire primary system is considered the first priority to achieve the goal of lowmore » exposure and minimized waste production. A plant specific computerized cobalt transport model has been developed to evaluate various options in a BWR system under specific conditions. Reduction of iron input and maintaining low ionic impurities in the coolant have been identified as two major tasks for operators. Addition of depleted zinc is a proven technique to reduce Co-60 in reactor water and on out-of-core piping surfaces. The effect of HWC on Co-60 transport in the primary system will also be discussed.« less

  10. Oil Spill Field Trial at Sea: Measurements of Benzene Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gjesteland, Ingrid; Hollund, Bjørg Eli; Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Daling, Per; Bråtveit, Magne

    2017-07-01

    Characterize personal exposure to airborne hydrocarbons, particularly carcinogenic benzene, during spill of two different fresh crude oils at sea. The study included 22 participants taking part in an «oil on water» field trial in the North Sea. Two types of fresh crude oils (light and heavy) were released six times over two consecutive days followed by different oil spill response methods. The participants were distributed on five boats; three open sampling boats (A, B, and C), one release ship (RS), and one oil recovery (OR) vessel. Assumed personal exposure was assessed a priori, assuming high exposure downwind and close to the oil slick (sampling boats), low exposure further downwind (100-200 m) and upwind from the oil slick (main deck of RS and OR vessel), and background exposure indoors (bridge of RS/OR vessel). Continuous measurements of total volatile organic compounds in isobutylene equivalents were performed with photoionization detectors placed in all five boats. Full-shift personal exposure to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, and n-hexane was measured with passive thermal desorption tubes. Personal measurements of benzene, averaged over the respective sample duration, on Day 1 showed that participants in the sampling boats (A, B, and C) located downwind and close to the oil slick were highest exposed (0.14-0.59 ppm), followed by participants on the RS main deck (0.02-0.10 ppm) and on the bridge (0.004-0.03 ppm). On Day 2, participants in sampling boat A had high benzene exposure (0.87-1.52 ppm) compared to participants in sampling boat B (0.01-0.02 ppm), on the ships (0.06-0.10 ppm), and on the bridge (0.004-0.01 ppm). Overall, the participants in the sampling boats had the highest exposure to all of the compounds measured. The light crude oil yielded a five times higher concentration of total volatile organic compounds in air in the sampling boats (max 510 ppm) than the heavy crude oil (max 100 ppm) but rapidly declined to <20 ppm

  11. Measuring Energy Scaling of Laser Driven Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jackson; Goyon, Clement; Mariscal, Derek; Pollock, Brad; Patankar, Siddharth; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven magnetic fields are of interest in particle confinement, fast ignition, and ICF platforms as an alternative to pulsed power systems to achieve many times higher fields. A comprehensive model describing the mechanism responsible for creating and maintaining magnetic fields from laser-driven coils has not yet been established. Understanding the scaling of key experimental parameters such as spatial and temporal uniformity and duration are necessary to implement coil targets in practical applications yet these measurements prove difficult due to the highly transient nature of the fields. We report on direct voltage measurements of laser-driven coil targets in which the laser energy spans more than four orders of magnitude. Results suggest that at low energies, laser-driven coils can be modeled as an electric circuit; however, at higher energies plasma effects dominate and a simple circuit treatment is insufficient to describe all observed phenomenon. The favorable scaling with laser power and pulse duration, observed in the present study and others at kilojoule energies, has positive implications for sustained, large magnetic fields for applications on the NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Dynamic Pressure Probes Developed for Supersonic Flow-Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow-field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow-field probes include pitot and static pressure probes that can capture fast-acting flow-field pressure transients occurring on a millisecond timescale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The flow-field pressure probe contains four major components: 1) Static pressure aerodynamic tip; 2) Pressure-sensing cartridge assembly; 3) Pitot pressure aerodynamic tip; 4) Mounting stem. This modular design allows for a variety of probe tips to be used for a specific application. Here, the focus is on flow-field pressure measurements in supersonic flows, so we developed a cone-cylinder static pressure tip and a pitot pressure tip. Alternatively, probe tips optimized for subsonic and transonic flows could be used with this design. The pressure-sensing cartridge assembly allows the simultaneous measurement of steady-state and transient pressure which allows continuous calibration of the dynamic pressure transducer.

  13. Measurement of Chlorine Dioxide in Water by DPD Colorimetric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Min; Yan, Panping; Yao, Jun

    2018-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of chlorine dioxide in water by DPD colorimetric method, this paper discusses the effects of the formulation, temperature, color development time and amount of color reagent on the measurement process, improving the on-line instrument for domestic and drinking water in chlorine dioxide measurement precision and accuracy.

  14. Gas, water, and oil production from Wattenberg field in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Santus, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from selected wells in two tight gas reservoirs-the Codell-Niobrara interval, comprised of the Codell Sandstone Member of the Carlile Shale and the Niobrara Formation; and the Dakota J interval, comprised mostly of the Muddy (J) Sandstone of the Dakota Group; both intervals are of Cretaceous age-in the Wattenberg field in the Denver Basin of Colorado. Production from each well is represented by two samples spaced five years apart, the first sample typically taken two years after production commenced, which generally was in the 1990s. For each producing interval, summary diagrams and tables of oil-versus-gas production and water-versus-gas production are shown with fluid-production rates, the change in production over five years, the water-gas and oil-gas ratios, and the fluid type. These diagrams and tables permit well-to-well and field-to-field comparisons. Fields producing water at low rates (water dissolved in gas in the reservoir) can be distinguished from fields producing water at moderate or high rates, and the water-gas ratios are quantified. The Dakota J interval produces gas on a per-well basis at roughly three times the rate of the Codell-Niobrara interval. After five years of production, gas data from the second samples show that both intervals produce gas, on average, at about one-half the rate as the first sample. Oil-gas ratios in the Codell-Niobrara interval are characteristic of a retrograde gas and are considerably higher than oil-gas ratios in the Dakota J interval, which are characteristic of a wet gas. Water production from both intervals is low, and records in many wells are discontinuous, particularly in the Codell-Niobrara interval. Water-gas ratios are broadly variable, with some of the variability possibly due to the difficulty of measuring small production rates. Most wells for which water is reported have water-gas ratios exceeding the amount that could exist dissolved in gas at reservoir

  15. Instantaneous temperature field measurements using planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Seitzman, J M; Kychakoff, G; Hanson, R K

    1985-09-01

    A single-pulse, laser-induced-fluorescence diagnostic for the measurement of two-dimensional temperature fields in combustion flows is described. The method uses sheet illumination from a tunable laser to excite planar laserinduced fluorescence in a stable tracer molecule, seeded at constant mole fraction into the flow field. The temporal resolution of this technique is determined by the laser pulse length. Experimental results are presented for a rodstabilized, premixed methane-air flame, using the Q(1) (22) line of the nitric oxide A(2) Sigma(+) (v = 0) ? X(2)II((1/2))(v = 0) transition (lambda approximately 225.6 nm).

  16. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  17. Comparison of on-site field measured inorganic arsenic in rice with laboratory measurements using a field deployable method: Method validation.

    PubMed

    Mlangeni, Angstone Thembachako; Vecchi, Valeria; Norton, Gareth J; Raab, Andrea; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Joerg

    2018-10-15

    A commercial arsenic field kit designed to measure inorganic arsenic (iAs) in water was modified into a field deployable method (FDM) to measure iAs in rice. While the method has been validated to give precise and accurate results in the laboratory, its on-site field performance has not been evaluated. This study was designed to test the method on-site in Malawi in order to evaluate its accuracy and precision in determination of iAs on-site by comparing with a validated reference method and giving original data on inorganic arsenic in Malawian rice and rice-based products. The method was validated by using the established laboratory-based HPLC-ICPMS. Statistical tests indicated there were no significant differences between on-site and laboratory iAs measurements determined using the FDM (p = 0.263, ά = 0.05) and between on-site measurements and measurements determined using HPLC-ICP-MS (p = 0.299, ά = 0.05). This method allows quick (within 1 h) and efficient screening of rice containing iAs concentrations on-site. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Energy saving and recovery measures in integrated urban water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, Gabriele; Sambito, Mariacrocetta

    2017-11-01

    The present paper describes different energy production, recovery and saving measures which can be applied in an integrated urban water system. Production measures are often based on the installation of photovoltaic systems; the recovery measures are commonly based on hydraulic turbines, exploiting the available pressure potential to produce energy; saving measures are based on substitution of old pumps with higher efficiency ones. The possibility of substituting some of the pipes of the water supply system can be also considered in a recovery scenario in order to reduce leakages and recovery part of the energy needed for water transport and treatment. The reduction of water losses can be obtained through the Active Leakage Control (ALC) strategies resulting in a reduction in energy consumption and in environmental impact. Measures were applied to a real case study to tested it the efficiency, i.e., the integrated urban water system of the Palermo metropolitan area in Sicily (Italy).

  19. Uniocular and binocular fields of rotation measures: Octopus versus Goldmann.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Fiona J; Hanif, Sahira

    2011-06-01

    To compare the range of ocular rotations measured by Octopus versus Goldmann perimetry. Forty subjects (20 controls and 20 patients with impaired ocular movements) were prospectively recruited, age range 21-83 years. Range of uniocular rotations was measured in six vectors corresponding to extraocular muscle actions: 0°, 67°, 141°, 180°, 216°, 293°. Fields of binocular single vision were assessed at 30° intervals. Vector measurements were utilised to calculate an area score for the field of uniocular rotations or binocular field of single vision. Two test speeds were used for Octopus testing: 3°/ and 10°/second. Test duration was two thirds quicker for Octopus 10°/second than for 3°/second stimulus speed, and slightly quicker for Goldmann. Mean area for control subjects for uniocular field was 7910.45 degrees(2) for Goldmann, 7032.14 for Octopus 3°/second and 7840.66 for Octopus 10°/second. Mean area for patient subjects of right uniocular field was 8567.21 degrees(2) for Goldmann, 5906.72 for Octopus 3°/second and 8806.44 for Octopus 10°/second. Mean area for left uniocular field was 8137.49 degrees(2) for Goldmann, 8127.9 for Octopus 3°/second and 8950.54 for Octopus 10°/second. Range of measured rotation was significantly larger for Octopus 10°/second speed. Our results suggest that the Octopus perimeter is an acceptable alternative method of assessment for uniocular ductions and binocular field of single vision. Speed of stimulus significantly alters test duration for Octopus perimetry. Comparisons of results from both perimeters show that quantitative measurements differ, although qualitatively the results are similar. Differences per mean vectors were less than 5° (within clinically accepted variances) for both controls and patients when comparing Goldmann to Octopus 10°/second speed. However, differences were almost 10° for the patient group when comparing Goldmann to Octopus 3°/second speed. Thus, speed of stimulus must be considered

  20. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Jacob, E-mail: jlyoder@lanl.gov; Malone, Michael W.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (∼1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach – keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable formore » bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.« less

  1. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  2. Inferring Discharge at River Mouths from Water Surface Height Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, R.; Horner-Devine, A.; Chickadel, C. C.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical model results suggest that a relationship exists between river discharge and surface height anomalies near the mouth of rivers, which presents an opportunity to use satellite elevation data to measure discharge remotely. Here we investigate whether such a relationship can be observed in the field using airborne lidar data at the mouth of the Columbia River. Airborne Lidar data were used because current NASA altimeter data does not have high enough spatial resolution to image surface elevation along a river. NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography, SWOT, sensor is planned to have a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and maximum height precision of 1 cm. The magnitude and temporal duration of the elevation signal found in the lidar data will be used to determine if SWOT will have the resolution and precision capabilities to measure discharge from space. Lidar data were acquired during a range of tidal conditions and discharge rates from May through September of 2013. Our results suggest that there is a measurable surface height anomaly at the river mouth during part of the tidal cycle. A 0.7 m surface depression was found during ebb tide and a uniform surface tilt was found at slack tide. The variation of the anomaly over the tidal period presents a challenge for decoupling the tidal component from that due to the discharge.

  3. Leaf water potentials measured with a pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J S

    1967-01-01

    Leaf water potentials were estimated from the sum of the balancing pressure measured with a pressure chamber and the osmotic potential of the xylem sap in leafy shoots or leaves. When leaf water potentials in yew, rhododendron, and sunflower were compared with those measured with a thermocouple psychrometer known to indicate accurate values of leaf water potential, determinations were within +/- 2 bars of the psychrometer measurements with sunflower and yew. In rhododendron. water potentials measured with the pressure chamber plus xylem sap were 2.5 bars less negative to 4 bars more negative than psychrometer measurements.The discrepancies in the rhododendron measurements could be attributed, at least in part, to the filling of tissues other than xylem with xylem sap during measurements with the pressure chamber. It was concluded that, although stem characteristics may affect the measurements, pressure chamber determinations were sufficiently close to psychrometer measurements that the pressure chamber may be used for relative measurements of leaf water potentials, especially in sunflower and yew. For accurate determinations of leaf water potential, however, pressure chamber measurements must be calibrated with a thermocouple psychrometer.

  4. Leaf Water Potentials Measured with a Pressure Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    Leaf water potentials were estimated from the sum of the balancing pressure measured with a pressure chamber and the osmotic potential of the xylem sap in leafy shoots or leaves. When leaf water potentials in yew, rhododendron, and sunflower were compared with those measured with a thermocouple psychrometer known to indicate accurate values of leaf water potential, determinations were within ± 2 bars of the psychrometer measurements with sunflower and yew. In rhododendron. water potentials measured with the pressure chamber plus xylem sap were 2.5 bars less negative to 4 bars more negative than psychrometer measurements. The discrepancies in the rhododendron measurements could be attributed, at least in part, to the filling of tissues other than xylem with xylem sap during measurements with the pressure chamber. It was concluded that, although stem characteristics may affect the measurements, pressure chamber determinations were sufficiently close to psychrometer measurements that the pressure chamber may be used for relative measurements of leaf water potentials, especially in sunflower and yew. For accurate determinations of leaf water potential, however, pressure chamber measurements must be calibrated with a thermocouple psychrometer. PMID:16656476

  5. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  6. Measurement and prediction of model-rotor flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.; Tauber, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper shows that a laser velocimeter can be used to measure accurately the three-component velocities induced by a model rotor at transonic tip speeds. The measurements, which were made at Mach numbers from 0.85 to 0.95 and at zero advance ratio, yielded high-resolution, orthogonal velocity values. The measured velocities were used to check the ability of the ROT22 full-potential rotor code to predict accurately the transonic flow field in the crucial region around and beyond the tip of a high-speed rotor blade. The good agreement between the calculated and measured velocities established the code's ability to predict the off-blade flow field at transonic tip speeds. This supplements previous comparisons in which surface pressures were shown to be well predicted on two different tips at advance ratios to 0.45, especially at the critical 90 deg azimuthal blade position. These results demonstrate that the ROT22 code can be used with confidence to predict the important tip-region flow field, including the occurrence, strength, and location of shock waves causing high drag and noise.

  7. Automated water monitor system field demonstration test report. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Perreira, J.; Poel, J. D.; Nibley, D.; Nuss, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA Automatic Water Monitor System was installed in a water reclamation facility to evaluate the technical and cost feasibility of producing high quality reclaimed water. Data gathered during this field demonstration test are reported.

  8. Calculated and measured fields in superferric wiggler magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.; Solomon, L.

    1995-02-01

    Although Klaus Halbach is widely known and appreciated as the originator of the computer program POISSON for electromagnetic field calculation, Klaus has always believed that analytical methods can give much more insight into the performance of a magnet than numerical simulation. Analytical approximations readily show how the different aspects of a magnet`s design such as pole dimensions, current, and coil configuration contribute to the performance. These methods yield accuracies of better than 10%. Analytical methods should therefore be used when conceptualizing a magnet design. Computer analysis can then be used for refinement. A simple model is presented for the peakmore » on-axis field of an electro-magnetic wiggler with iron poles and superconducting coils. The model is applied to the radiator section of the superconducting wiggler for the BNL Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured field and the results from POISSON.« less

  9. Measuring and modeling the temporal dynamics of nitrogen balance in an experimental-scale paddy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C.; Lin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen balance involves many mechanisms and plays an important role to maintain the function of nature. Fertilizer application in agriculture activity is usually seen as a common and significant nitrogen input to environment. Improper fertilizer application on paddy field can result in great amount of various types of nitrogen losses. Hence, it is essential to understand and quantify the nitrogen dynamics in paddy field for fertilizer management and pollution control. In this study, we develop a model which considers major transformation processes of nitrogen (e.g. volatilization, nitrification, denitrification and plant uptake). In addition, we measured different types of nitrogen in plants, soil and water at plant growth stages in an experimental-scale paddy field in Taiwan. The measurement includes total nitrogen in plants and soil, and ammonium-N (NH4+-N), nitrate-N (NO3--N) and organic nitrogen in water. The measured data were used to calibrate the model parameters and validate the model for nitrogen balance simulation. The results showed that the model can accurately estimate the temporal dynamics of nitrogen balance in paddy field during the whole growth stage. This model might be helpful and useful for future fertilizer management and pollution control in paddy field.

  10. Pressure-Water Content Relations for a Sandy, Granitic Soil Under Field and Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, D. G.; McNamara, J. M.; Gribb, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    A new sensor was developed to measure soil water potential in order to determine the predominant mechanisms of snowmelt delivery to streamflow. The sensors were calibrated for +50 to -300 cm for application on steep granitic slopes and deployed at three depths and 2 locations on a slope in a headwater catchment of the Idaho Batholith throughout the 2001 snowmelt season. Soil moisture was measured simultaneously with Water Content Reflectometers (Cambell Scientific, Logan, UT), that were calibrated in situ with Time Domain Reflectometry measurements. Sensor performance was evaluated in a laboratory soil column via side-by-side monitoring during injection of water with a cone permeameter. Soil characteristic curves were also determined for the field site by multi-step outflow tests. Comparison of the results from the field study to those from the laboratory experiment and to the characteristic curves demonstrate the utility of the new sensor for recording dynamic changes in soil water status. During snowmelt, the sensor responded to both matric potential and bypass-flow pore potential. Large shifts in the pressure record that correspond to changes in the infiltration flux indicate initiation and cessation of macropore flow. The pore pressure records may be used to document the frequency, timing and duration of bypass flow that are not apparent from the soil moisture records.

  11. Modelling of underwater light fields in turbid and eutrophic waters: application and validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, B.; Shanmugam, P.

    2014-09-01

    A reliable radiative transfer model is an essential and indispensable tool for understanding of the radiative transfer processes in homogenous and layered waters, analyzing measurements made by radiance sensors and developing remote sensing algorithms to derive meaningful physical quantities and biogeochemical variables in turbid and productive coastal waters. Existing radiative transfer models have been designed to be applicable to either homogenous waters or inhomogeneous waters. To overcome such constraints associated with these models, this study presents a radiative transfer model that treats a homogenous layer as a diffuse part and an inhomogeneous layer as a direct part in the water column and combines these two parts appropriately in order to generate more reliable underwater light field data such as upwelling radiance (Lu), downwelling irradiance (Ed) and upwelling irradiance (Eu). The diffuse model assumes the inherent optical properties (IOPs) to be vertically continuous and the light fields to exponentially decrease with the depth, whereas the direct part considers the water column to be vertically inhomogeneous (layer-by-layer phenomena) with the vertically varying phase function. The surface and bottom boundary conditions, source function due to chlorophyll and solar incident geometry are also included in the present RT model. The performance of this model is assessed in a variety of waters (clear, turbid and eutrophic) using the measured radiometric data. The present model shows an advantage in terms of producing accurate Lu, Ed and Eu profiles (in spatial domain) in different waters determined by both homogenous and inhomogeneous conditions. The feasibility of predicting these underwater light fields based on the remotely estimated IOP data is also examined using the present RT model. For this application, vertical profiles of the water constituents and IOPs are estimated by empirical models based on our in-situ data. The present RT model generates

  12. Modelling of underwater light fields in turbid and eutrophic waters: application and validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, B.; Shanmugam, P.

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiative transfer (RT) model is an essential and indispensable tool for understanding the radiative transfer processes in homogenous and layered waters, analyzing measurements made by radiance sensors and developing remote-sensing algorithms to derive meaningful physical quantities and biogeochemical variables in turbid and productive coastal waters. Existing radiative transfer models have been designed to be applicable to either homogenous waters or inhomogeneous waters. To overcome such constraints associated with these models, this study presents a radiative transfer model that treats a homogenous layer as a diffuse part and an inhomogeneous layer as a direct part in the water column and combines these two parts appropriately in order to generate more reliable underwater light-field data such as upwelling radiance (Lu), downwelling irradiance (Ed) and upwelling irradiance (Eu). The diffuse model assumes the inherent optical properties (IOPs) to be vertically continuous and the light fields to exponentially decrease with depth, whereas the direct part considers the water column to be vertically inhomogeneous (layer-by-layer phenomena) with the vertically varying phase function. The surface and bottom boundary conditions, source function due to chlorophyll and solar incident geometry are also included in the present RT model. The performance of this model is assessed in a variety of waters (clear, turbid and eutrophic) using the measured radiometric data. The present model shows an advantage in terms of producing accurate Lu, Ed and Eu profiles (in spatial domain) in different waters determined by both homogenous and inhomogeneous conditions. The feasibility of predicting these underwater light fields based on the remotely estimated IOP data is also examined using the present RT model. For this application, vertical profiles of the water constituents and IOPs are estimated by empirical models based on our in situ data. The present RT model generates Lu

  13. Ocean wind field measurement performance of the ERS-1 scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans, P.; Schuessler, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Active Microwave Instrumentation (AMI), which will be implemented on the ERS-1, is a 5.3 GHz multipurpose radar for land surface imaging, ocean wave spectrum measurement and wind observations over oceans. The imaging and wave measurements apply Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques, while wind field detection is performed by the Scatterometer as part of the AMI. The Scatterometer system design was developed and optimized with the aid of a performance simulator. This paper, aimed at giving an overview, is presented about the: (1) ERS-1 Scatterometer system design; (2) Error budget; and the (3) Overall calibration concept.

  14. Phase-shifting interference microscope with extendable field of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Hsu, Wei-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shiang

    2018-04-01

    An innovative phase-shifting interference microscope aimed at extending the field of measurement is proposed in this paper. The microscope comprises a light source module, a phase modulation module, and an interferometric module, which reconstructs the micro-structure contours of samples using the five-step phase-shifting algorithm. This paper discusses the measurement theory and outlines the configuration, experimental setup, and experimental results obtained using the proposed interference microscope. The results confirm the efficacy of the microscope, achieving a standard deviation of 2.4 nm from a step height of 86.2 nm in multiple examinations.

  15. Development of optical modulators for measurements of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of polarized light allows solar astronomers to infer the magnetic field on the Sun. The accuracy of these measurements is dependent on the stable retardation characteristics of the polarization modulators used to minimize the atmospheric effects seen in ground-based observations. This report describes the work by the Space Science Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to improve two types of polarization modulators. As a result, the timing characteristics for both electrooptic crystals (KD*Ps) and liquid crystal devices (LCDs) have been studied and will be used to enhance the capabilities of the MSFC Vector Magnetograph.

  16. Aircraft measurements and analysis of severe storms: 1975 field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Three aircraft and instrumentation systems were acquired in support of the severe storm surveillance program. The data results indicate that the original concept of a highly mobile research aircraft capability for obtaining detailed measurements of wind, temperature, dew point, etc., near and within specifically designated severe storms is entirely feasible and has been demonstrated for the first time by this program. This program is unique in that it is designed to be highly mobile in order to move to and/or with the developing storm systems to obtain the necessary measurements. Previous programs have all been fixed to a particular location and therefore have had to wait for the storms to come within their network. The present research is designed around a highly mobile aircraft measurements group in order to maximize the storm cases during the field measurements program.

  17. Ultrasonic measurements of the bulk flow field in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauber, Richard; Büttner, Lars; Eckert, Kerstin; Fröhlich, Jochen; Czarske, Jürgen; Heitkam, Sascha

    2018-01-01

    The flow field of moving foams is relevant for basic research and for the optimization of industrial processes such as froth flotation. However, no adequate measurement technique exists for the local velocity distribution inside the foam bulk. We have investigated the ultrasound Doppler velocimetry (UDV), providing the first two-dimensional, non-invasive velocity measurement technique with an adequate spatial (10 mm ) and temporal resolution (2.5 Hz ) that is applicable to medium scale foam flows. The measurement object is dry aqueous foam flowing upward in a rectangular channel. An array of ultrasound transducers is mounted within the channel, sending pulses along the main flow axis, and receiving echoes from the foam bulk. This results in a temporally and spatially resolved, planar velocity field up to a measurement depth of 200 mm , which is approximately one order of magnitude larger than those of optical techniques. A comparison with optical reference measurements of the surface velocity of the foam allows to validate the UDV results. At 2.5 Hz frame rate an uncertainty below 15 percent and an axial spatial resolution better than 10 mm is found. Therefore, UDV is a suitable tool for monitoring of industrial processes as well as the scientific investigation of three-dimensional foam flows on medium scales.

  18. Measurements of electric fields in the solar wind: Interpretation difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-06-01

    The traditionally measured electric fields in the solar wind plasma (about 1-10 mV/m) are not the natural, primordial ones but are the result of plasma-vehicle interaction. The theory of this interaction is not complete now and current interpretation of the measurements can fail. The state of fully ionized plasma depends on the entropy of the creating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The increasing twofold of a moving volume in the solar wind (with energy transfer across its surface which is comparable with its whole internal energy) is a more rapid process than the relaxation for the pressure. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma must be very far from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. The internal energy of plasma can be contained mainly in plasma waves, resonant plasma oscillations, and electric currents. The primordial microscopic oscillating electric fields could be about 1 V/m. It can be checked by special measurements, not ruining the natural plasma state. The tool should be a dielectrical microelectroscope outside the distortion zone of the spacecraft, having been observed from the latter.

  19. Measurements of electric fields in the solar wind: Interpretation difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The traditionally measured electric fields in the solar wind plasma (about 1-10 mV/m) are not the natural, primordial ones but are the result of plasma-vehicle interaction. The theory of this interaction is not complete now and current interpretation of the measurements can fail. The state of fully ionized plasma depends on the entropy of the creating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The increasing twofold of a moving volume in the solar wind (with energy transfer across its surface which is comparable with its whole internal energy) is a more rapid process than the relaxation for the pressure. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma must be very far from the state of thermodynamic equilibrium. The internal energy of plasma can be contained mainly in plasma waves, resonant plasma oscillations, and electric currents. The primordial microscopic oscillating electric fields could be about 1 V/m. It can be checked by special measurements, not ruining the natural plasma state. The tool should be a dielectrical microelectroscope outside the distortion zone of the spacecraft, having been observed from the latter.

  20. Particles and fields measurements at Neptune with Voyager 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-11-01

    The first results of measurements performed on the Voyager 2 spacecraft with the Neptune system on August 24-28, 1989 are summarized. These include measurements of the magnetic field, plasma, energetic and high energy particles, plasma waves and radio emissions, and additional information relating to UV emissions. The planetary magnetic field outside about 4 R(N) may be described by an offset, tilted, dipole of moment 0.133 Gauss-R(N) exp 3; inside that distance the field is dominated by higher order terms. Plasma densities are found to be generally low (about 5 exp -3/cu cm), except at magnetic equatorial crossings when densities are up to about 1/cu cm. A variety of plasma wave emissions were seen, including chorus, hiss, electroncyclotron waves, and upper hybrid resonance in the inner magnetosphere. The measured flux of soft electrons and ions over the polar region of about 2 x 10 exp -3 erg/sq cm sec results in an estimated power input of about 3 x 10 exp 7 W, which is substantially less than that at other planets.

  1. Active microwave measurement of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Cihlar, J.; Moore, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of radar backscatter from bare soil at 4.7, 5.9, and 7.1 GHz for incident angles of 0-70 deg have been analyzed to determine sensitivity to soil moisture. Because the effective depth of penetration of the radar signal is only about one skin depth, the observed signals were correlated with the moisture in a skin depth as characterized by the attenuation coefficient (reciprocal of skin depth). Since the attenuation coefficient is a monotonically increasing function of moisture density, it may also be used as a measure of moisture content over the distance involved, which varies with frequency and moisture content. The measurements show an approximately linear increase in scattering with attenuation coefficient of the soil at angles within 10 deg of vertical and all frequencies. At 4.7 GHz this increase continues relatively large out to 70 deg incidence, but by 7.1 GHz the sensitivity is much less even at 20 deg and practically gone at 50 deg.

  2. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  3. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging,T2, to the relaxation parameter T2* measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T2data were transformed to pseudo-T2* data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T2* obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources.

  4. Measurements of radon concentrations in Spa waters in Amasya, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Yigitoglu, I., E-mail: ibrahim.yigitoglu@gop.edu.tr; Ucar, B.; Oner, F.

    The aim of this study is to determine the radon concentrations in thermal waters in the Amasya basin in Turkey and to explore the relationship between radon anomalies and active geological faults. The radon concentration measurements were performed in four thermal Spas around Amasya basin. The water samples were collected from tap waters in thermal water sources. The obtained radon concentrations ranged from 0.15 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.32 BqL{sup −1} for Spa waters. The relationship between the radon concentration anomalies and earthquakes that occurred in the sampling period are discussed.

  5. Assessing the effects of adaptation measures on optimal water resources allocation under varied water availability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dedi; Guo, Shenglian; Shao, Quanxi; Liu, Pan; Xiong, Lihua; Wang, Le; Hong, Xingjun; Xu, Yao; Wang, Zhaoli

    2018-01-01

    Human activities and climate change have altered the spatial and temporal distribution of water availability which is a principal prerequisite for allocation of different water resources. In order to quantify the impacts of climate change and human activities on water availability and optimal allocation of water resources, hydrological models and optimal water resource allocation models should be integrated. Given that increasing human water demand and varying water availability conditions necessitate adaptation measures, we propose a framework to assess the effects of these measures on optimal allocation of water resources. The proposed model and framework were applied to a case study of the middle and lower reaches of the Hanjiang River Basin in China. Two representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP4.5) were employed to project future climate, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was used to simulate the variability of flows under historical (1956-2011) and future (2012-2099) conditions. The water availability determined by simulating flow with the VIC hydrological model was used to establish the optimal water resources allocation model. The allocation results were derived under an extremely dry year (with an annual average water flow frequency of 95%), a very dry year (with an annual average water flow frequency of 90%), a dry year (with an annual average water flow frequency of 75%), and a normal year (with an annual average water flow frequency of 50%) during historical and future periods. The results show that the total available water resources in the study area and the inflow of the Danjiangkou Reservoir will increase in the future. However, the uneven distribution of water availability will cause water shortage problems, especially in the boundary areas. The effects of adaptation measures, including water saving, and dynamic control of flood limiting water levels (FLWLs) for reservoir operation, were

  6. Measuring Water Potential (Activity) from Free Water to Oven Dryness 1

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Herman H.

    1981-01-01

    Water activities (potentials) in plant materials were measured over the range from free water to oven dryness with a Spanner thermocouple psychrometer. In a two-step procedure, water was first condensed on the thermocouple junction for several minutes. The sample was then inserted under the wet thermocouple and the maximum psychrometric cooling was measured in about 10 seconds. Calibration was with saturated salt slurries of known water activities. Psychrometric cooling was a nearly linear function of the water activity and of the negative log of the water potential. The psychrometric cooling to water activity relationship agreed with wetbulb temperature depression to relative humidity relationships given in tables. Water activities of wheat grains and leaves decreased sharply in a curvilinear fashion as their water contents decreased. Some problems of the procedure are discussed. Images PMID:16662081

  7. Soil specific re-calibration of water content sensors for a field-scale sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Brown, David J.; Anderson, Todd; Brooks, Erin S.; Yourek, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining accurate soil moisture data from a sensor network requires sensor calibration. Soil moisture sensors are factory calibrated, but multiple site specific factors may contribute to sensor inaccuracies. Thus, sensors should be calibrated for the specific soil type and conditions in which they will be installed. Lab calibration of a large number of sensors prior to installation in a heterogeneous setting may not be feasible, and it may not reflect the actual performance of the installed sensor. We investigated a multi-step approach to retroactively re-calibrate sensor water content data from the dielectric permittivity readings obtained by sensors in the field. We used water content data collected since 2009 from a sensor network installed at 42 locations and 5 depths (210 sensors total) within the 37-ha Cook Agronomy Farm with highly variable soils located in the Palouse region of the Northwest United States. First, volumetric water content was calculated from sensor dielectric readings using three equations: (1) a factory calibration using the Topp equation; (2) a custom calibration obtained empirically from an instrumented soil in the field; and (3) a hybrid equation that combines the Topp and custom equations. Second, we used soil physical properties (particle size and bulk density) and pedotransfer functions to estimate water content at saturation, field capacity, and wilting point for each installation location and depth. We also extracted the same reference points from the sensor readings, when available. Using these reference points, we re-scaled the sensor readings, such that water content was restricted to the range of values that we would expect given the physical properties of the soil. The re-calibration accuracy was assessed with volumetric water content measurements obtained from field-sampled cores taken on multiple dates. In general, the re-calibration was most accurate when all three reference points (saturation, field capacity, and wilting

  8. Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

    2012-09-01

    This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, bothmore » natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.« less

  9. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  10. Nonlinear Sound Field by Interdigital Transducers in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Miyuki; Kamada, Rui; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2008-05-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound beams in water radiated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device are examined experimentally and theoretically. SAWs on an 128° X-cut Y-propagation LiNbO3 substrate are excited by 50 pairs of interdigital transducers (IDTs). The device with a 2 ×10 mm2 rectangular aperture and a center frequency of 20 MHz radiate two ultrasound beams in the direction of the Rayleigh angle determined by the propagation speed of the SAW on the device and of the longitudinal wave in water. The Rayleigh angle becomes 22° in the present experimental situation. The fundamental and second harmonic sound pressures are respectively measured along and across the beam using a miniature hydrophone whose active element 0.4 mm in diameter and whose frequency response is calibrated up to 40 MHz. The Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is utilized to theoretically predict sound pressure amplitudes. The theoretical predictions of both the fundamental and second harmonic pressures agree well with the measured sound pressures.

  11. Optical surface pressure measurements: Accuracy and application field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukov, A.; Mosharov, V.; Orlov, A.; Pesetsky, V.; Radchenko, V.; Phonov, S.; Matyash, S.; Kuzmin, M.; Sadovskii, N.

    1994-07-01

    Optical pressure measurement (OPM) is a new pressure measurement method rapidly developed in several aerodynamic research centers: TsAGI (Russia), Boeing, NASA, McDonnell Douglas (all USA), and DLR (Germany). Present level of OPM-method provides its practice as standard experimental method of aerodynamic investigations in definite application fields. Applications of OPM-method are determined mainly by its accuracy. The accuracy of OPM-method is determined by the errors of three following groups: (1) errors of the luminescent pressure sensor (LPS) itself, such as uncompensated temperature influence, photo degradation, temperature and pressure hysteresis, variation of the LPS parameters from point to point on the model surface, etc.; (2) errors of the measurement system, such as noise of the photodetector, nonlinearity and nonuniformity of the photodetector, time and temperature offsets, etc.; and (3) methodological errors, owing to displacement and deformation of the model in an airflow, a contamination of the model surface, scattering of the excitation and luminescent light from the model surface and test section walls, etc. OPM-method allows getting total error of measured pressure not less than 1 percent. This accuracy is enough to visualize the pressure field and allows determining total and distributed aerodynamic loads and solving some problems of local aerodynamic investigations at transonic and supersonic velocities. OPM is less effective at low subsonic velocities (M less than 0.4), and for precise measurements, for example, an airfoil optimization. Current limitations of the OPM-method are discussed on an example of the surface pressure measurements and calculations of the integral loads on the wings of canard-aircraft model. The pressure measurement system and data reduction methods used on these tests are also described.

  12. Target thrust measurement for applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Yang, W.; Tang, H.; Li, Z.; Kitaeva, A.; Chen, Z.; Cao, J.; Herdrich, G.; Zhang, K.

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, we present a flat target thrust stand which is designed to measure the thrust of a steady-state applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (AF-MPDT). In our experiments we varied target-thruster distances and target size to analyze their influence on the target thrust measurement results. The obtained thrust-distance curves increase to local maximum and then decreases with the increasing distance, which means that the plume of the AF-MPDT can still accelerate outside the thruster exit. The peak positions are related to the target sizes: larger targets can make the peak positions further from the thruster and decrease the measurement errors. To further improve the reliability of measurement results, a thermal equilibrium assumption combined with Knudsen’s cosine law is adapted to analyze the error caused by the back stream of plume particles. Under the assumption, the error caused by particle backflow is no more than 3.6% and the largest difference between the measured thrust and the theoretical thrust is 14%. Moreover, it was verified that target thrust measurement can disturb the working of the AF-MPD thruster, and the influence on the thrust measurement result is no more than 1% in our experiment.

  13. Tunneling Time and Weak Measurement in Strong Field Ionization.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Mishra, Siddhartha; Doran, Brent R; Gordon, Daniel F; Landsman, Alexandra S

    2016-06-10

    Tunneling delays represent a hotly debated topic, with many conflicting definitions and little consensus on when and if such definitions accurately describe the physical observables. Here, we relate these different definitions to distinct experimental observables in strong field ionization, finding that two definitions, Larmor time and Bohmian time, are compatible with the attoclock observable and the resonance lifetime of a bound state, respectively. Both of these definitions are closely connected to the theory of weak measurement, with Larmor time being the weak measurement value of tunneling time and Bohmian trajectory corresponding to the average particle trajectory, which has been recently reconstructed using weak measurement in a two-slit experiment [S. Kocsis, B. Braverman, S. Ravets, M. J. Stevens, R. P. Mirin, L. K. Shalm, and A. M. Steinberg, Science 332, 1170 (2011)]. We demonstrate a big discrepancy in strong field ionization between the Bohmian and weak measurement values of tunneling time, and we suggest this arises because the tunneling time is calculated for a small probability postselected ensemble of electrons. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of experiments in attosecond science, suggesting that tunneling is unlikely to be an instantaneous process.

  14. Altimeter measurements for the determination of the Earth's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Schutz, B. E.; Shum, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of satellite-borne radar altimeter data to measure the global ocean surface with high precision and dense spatial coverage provides a unique tool for the mapping of the Earth's gravity field and its geoid. The altimeter crossover measurements, created by differencing direct altimeter measurements at the subsatellite points where the orbit ground tracks intersect, have the distinct advantage of eliminating geoid error and other nontemporal or long period oceanographic features. In the 1990's, the joint U.S./French TOPEX/POSEIDON mission and the European Space Agency's ERS-1 mission will carry radar altimeter instruments capable of global ocean mapping with high precision. This investigation aims at the development and application of dynamically consistent direct altimeter and altimeter crossover measurement models to the simultaneous mapping of the Earth's gravity field and its geoid, the ocean tides and the quasi-stationary component of the dynamic sea surface topography. Altimeter data collected by SEASAT, GEOS-3, and GEOSAT are used for the investigation.

  15. The radial electric field as a measure for field penetration of resonant magnetic perturbations

    DOE PAGES

    Mordijck, Saskia; Moyer, Richard A.; Ferraro, Nathaniel M.; ...

    2014-06-18

    In this study, we introduce a new indirect method for identifying the radial extent of the stochastic layer due to applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in H-mode plasmas by measuring the spin-up of the plasma near the separatrix. This spin-up is a predicted consequence of enhanced loss of electrons due to magnetic stochastization. We find that in DIII-D H-mode plasmas with n = 3 RMPs applied for edge localized mode (ELM) suppression, the stochastic layer is limited to the outer 5% region in normalized magnetic flux, Ψ N. This is in contrast to vacuum modeling predictions where this layer canmore » penetrate up to 20% in Ψ N. Theoretical predictions of a stochastic red radial electric field, E r component exceed the experimental measurements by about a factor 3 close to the separatrix, suggesting that the outer region of the plasma is weakly stochastic. Linear response calculations with M3D-C1, a resistive two-fluid model, show that in this outer 5% region, plasma response often reduces the resonant magnetic field components by 67% or more in comparison with vacuum calculations. These results for DIII-D are in reasonable agreement with results from the MAST tokamak, where the magnetic field perturbation from vacuum field calculations needed to be reduced by 75% for agreement with experimental measurements of the x-point lobe structures.« less

  16. Accuracy and precision of stream reach water surface slopes estimated in the field and from maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Krueger, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of five tools used to measure stream water surface slope (WSS) were evaluated. Water surface slopes estimated in the field with a clinometer or from topographic maps used in conjunction with a map wheel or geographic information system (GIS) were significantly higher than WSS estimated in the field with a surveying level (biases of 34, 41, and 53%, respectively). Accuracy of WSS estimates obtained with an Abney level did not differ from surveying level estimates, but conclusions regarding the accuracy of Abney levels and clinometers were weakened by intratool variability. The surveying level estimated WSS most precisely (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.26%), followed by the GIS (CV = 1.87%), map wheel (CV = 6.18%), Abney level (CV = 13.68%), and clinometer (CV = 21.57%). Estimates of WSS measured in the field with an Abney level and estimated for the same reaches with a GIS used in conjunction with l:24,000-scale topographic maps were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but there was a tendency for the GIS to overestimate WSS. Detailed accounts of the methods used to measure WSS and recommendations regarding the measurement of WSS are provided.

  17. Validation of SMAP Radar Vegetation Data Cubes from Agricultural Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Liao, T.; Kim, S.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission will be launched in October 2014. The objective of the SMAP mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. In the active algorithm, the retrieval is performed based on the backscattering data cube, which are characterized by two surface parameters, which are soil moisture and soil surface rms height, and one vegetation parameter, the vegetation water content. We have developed a physical-based forward scattering model to generate the data cube for agricultural fields. To represent the agricultural crops, we include a layer of cylinders and disks on top of the rough surface. The scattering cross section of the vegetation layer and its interaction with the underground soil surface were calculated by the distorted Born approximation, which give explicitly three scattering mechanisms. A) The direct volume scattering B) The double bounce effect as, and C) The double bouncing effects. The direct volume scattering is calculated by using the Body of Revolution code. The double bounce effects, exhibited by the interaction of rough surface with the vegetation layer is considered by modifying the rough surface reflectivity using the coherent wave as computed by Numerical solution of Maxwell equations of 3 Dimensional simulations (NMM3D) of bare soil scattering. The rough surface scattering of the soil was calculated by NMM3D. We have compared the physical scattering models with field measurements. In the field campaign, the measurements were made on soil moisture, rough surface rms heights and vegetation water content as well as geometric parameters of vegetation. The three main crops lands are grassland, cornfield and soybean fields. The corresponding data cubes are validated using SGP99, SMEX02

  18. Direct measurement of nonlinear dispersion relation for water surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus Arnesen Taklo, Tore; Trulsen, Karsten; Elias Krogstad, Harald; Gramstad, Odin; Nieto Borge, José Carlos; Jensen, Atle

    2013-04-01

    The linear dispersion relation for water surface waves is often taken for granted for the interpretation of wave measurements. High-resolution spatiotemporal measurements suitable for direct validation of the linear dispersion relation are on the other hand rarely available. While the imaging of the ocean surface with nautical radar does provide the desired spatiotemporal coverage, the interpretation of the radar images currently depends on the linear dispersion relation as a prerequisite, (Nieto Borge et al., 2004). Krogstad & Trulsen (2010) carried out numerical simulations with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and its generalizations demonstrating that the nonlinear evolution of wave fields may render the linear dispersion relation inadequate for proper interpretation of observations, the reason being that the necessary domain of simultaneous coverage in space and time would allow significant nonlinear evolution. They found that components above the spectral peak can have larger phase and group velocities than anticipated by linear theory, and that the spectrum does not maintain a thin dispersion surface. We have run laboratory experiments and accurate numerical simulations designed to have sufficient resolution in space and time to deduce the dispersion relation directly. For a JONSWAP spectrum we find that the linear dispersion relation can be appropriate for the interpretation of spatiotemporal measurements. For a Gaussian spectrum with narrower bandwidth we find that the dynamic nonlinear evolution in space and time causes the directly measured dispersion relation to deviate from the linear dispersion surface in good agreement with our previous numerical predictions. This work has been supported by RCN grant 214556/F20. Krogstad, H. E. & Trulsen, K. (2010) Interpretations and observations of ocean wave spectra. Ocean Dynamics 60:973-991. Nieto Borge, J. C., Rodríguez, G., Hessner, K., Izquierdo, P. (2004) Inversion of marine radar images for surface wave

  19. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub θ}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter usedmore » in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.« less

  20. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  1. The measurement of water scarcity: Defining a meaningful indicator.

    PubMed

    Damkjaer, Simon; Taylor, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Metrics of water scarcity and stress have evolved over the last three decades from simple threshold indicators to holistic measures characterising human environments and freshwater sustainability. Metrics commonly estimate renewable freshwater resources using mean annual river runoff, which masks hydrological variability, and quantify subjectively socio-economic conditions characterising adaptive capacity. There is a marked absence of research evaluating whether these metrics of water scarcity are meaningful. We argue that measurement of water scarcity (1) be redefined physically in terms of the freshwater storage required to address imbalances in intra- and inter-annual fluxes of freshwater supply and demand; (2) abandons subjective quantifications of human environments and (3) be used to inform participatory decision-making processes that explore a wide range of options for addressing freshwater storage requirements beyond dams that include use of renewable groundwater, soil water and trading in virtual water. Further, we outline a conceptual framework redefining water scarcity in terms of freshwater storage.

  2. A geometric formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory. Measuring the curvature of scalar field space

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-03-01

    A geometric formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) is presented. Experimental observables are given in terms of geometric invariants of the scalar sigma model sector such as the curvature of the scalar field manifold M. Here we show how the curvature can be measured experimentally via Higgs cross-sections, WLscattering, and the Sparameter. The one-loop action of HEFT is given in terms of geometric invariants of M. Moreover, the distinction between the Standard Model (SM) and HEFT is whether Mis flat or curved, and the curvature is a signal of the scale of new physics.

  3. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  4. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  5. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  6. A magnetic field measurement technique using a miniature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and application of a magnetometer are described. The magnetometer has a miniature transducer and is capable of automatic scanning. The magnetometer described here is capable of detecting static magnetic fields as low as 1.6 A/m and its transducer has an active area 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. Thin and rugged, the transducer uses wire, 0.05 mm in diameter, which is plated with a magnetic film, enabling measurement of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from a surface. The magnetometer, which is simple to operate and has a fast response, uses an inexpensive clip-on milliammeter (commonly found in most laboratories) for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. A specially designed transducer holding mechanism replaces the XY recorder ink pen; this mechanism provides the basis for an automatic scanning technique. The instrument has been applied to the measurements of magnetic fields arising from remanent magnetization in experimental plated-wire memory planes and regions of magnetic activity in geological rock specimens.

  7. Use of Water Content Reflectometers in Bioinfiltration/Bioretention to Measure Water Movement and Estimate Evapotranspiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most bioinfiltration/bioretention models assume runoff is evenly distributed across the surface area and after the engineered fill media is no longer saturated, the volumetric water content (VWC) is constant throughout the media profile and at field capacity. Four to nine water ...

  8. Turbulence Measurements in the Near Field of a Wingtip Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Jim; Zilliac, Greg; Bradshaw, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The roll-up of a wingtip vortex, at Reynolds number based on chord of 4.6 million was studied with an emphasis on suction side and near wake measurements. The research was conducted in a 32 in. x 48 in. low-speed wind tunnel. The half-wing model had a semi-span of 36 in. a chord of 48 in. and a rounded tip. Seven-hole pressure probe measurements of the velocity field surrounding the wingtip showed that a large axial velocity of up to 1.77 U(sub infinity) developed in the vortex core. This level of axial velocity has not been previously measured. Triple-wire probes have been used to measure all components of the Reynolds stress tensor. It was determined from correlation measurements that meandering of the vortex was small and did not appreciably contribute to the turbulence measurements. The flow was found to be turbulent in the near-field (as high as 24 percent RMS w - velocity on the edge of the core) and the turbulence decayed quickly with streamwise distance because of the nearly solid body rotation of the vortex core mean flow. A streamwise variation of the location of peak levels of turbulence, relative to the core centerline, was also found. Close to the trailing edge of the wing, the peak shear stress levels were found at the edge of the vortex core, whereas in the most downstream wake planes they occurred at a radius roughly equal to one-third of the vortex core radius. The Reynolds shear stresses were not aligned with the mean strain rate, indicating that an isotropic-eddy-viscosity based prediction method cannot accurately model the turbulence in the cortex. In cylindrical coordinates, with the origin at the vortex centerline, the radial normal stress was found to be larger than the circumferential.

  9. Simulating soil-water movement through loess-veneered landscapes using nonconsilient saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lee, Brad D.; Schoeneberger, Philip J.; McCauley, W. M.; Indorante, Samuel J.; Owens, Phillip R.

    2014-01-01

    Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) data are available for the entire United States, so are incorporated in many regional and national models of hydrology and environmental management. However, SSURGO does not provide an understanding of spatial variability and only includes saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) values estimated from particle size analysis (PSA). This study showed model sensitivity to the substitution of SSURGO data with locally described soil properties or alternate methods of measuring Ksat. Incorporation of these different soil data sets significantly changed the results of hydrologic modeling as a consequence of the amount of space available to store soil water and how this soil water is moved downslope. Locally described soil profiles indicated a difference in Ksat when measured in the field vs. being estimated from PSA. This, in turn, caused a difference in which soil layers were incorporated in the hydrologic simulations using TOPMODEL, ultimately affecting how soil water storage was simulated. Simulations of free-flowing soil water, the amount of water traveling through pores too large to retain water against gravity, were compared with field observations of water in wells at five slope positions along a catena. Comparison of the simulated data with the observed data showed that the ability to model the range of conditions observed in the field varied as a function of three soil data sets (SSURGO and local field descriptions using PSA-derived Ksat or field-measured Ksat) and that comparison of absolute values of soil water storage are not valid if different characterizations of soil properties are used.

  10. Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Misun; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Voisin, Sophie

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scatteringmore » effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.« less

  11. Neighborhood walkability: field validation of geographic information system measures.

    PubMed

    Hajna, Samantha; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Halparin, Max; Ross, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    Given the health benefits of walking, there is interest in understanding how physical environments favor walking. Although GIS-derived measures of land-use mix, street connectivity, and residential density are commonly combined into indices to assess how conducive neighborhoods are to walking, field validation of these measures is limited. To assess the relationship between audit- and GIS-derived measures of overall neighborhood walkability and between objective (audit- and GIS-derived) and participant-reported measures of walkability. Walkability assessments were conducted in 2009. Street-level audits were conducted using a modified version of the Pedestrian Environmental Data Scan. GIS analyses were used to derive land-use mix, street connectivity, and residential density. Participant perceptions were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Audit, GIS, and participant-reported indices of walkability were calculated. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationships between measures. All analyses were conducted in 2012. The correlation between audit- and GIS-derived measures of overall walkability was high (R=0.7 [95% CI=0.6, 0.8]); the correlations between objective (audit and GIS-derived) and participant-reported measures were low (R=0.2 [95% CI=0.06, 0.3]; R=0.2 [95% CI=0.04, 0.3], respectively). For comparable audit and participant-reported items, correlations were higher for items that appeared more objective (e.g., sidewalk presence, R=0.4 [95% CI=0.3, 0.5], versus safety, R=0.1 [95% CI=0.003, 0.3]). The GIS-derived measure of walkability correlated well with the in-field audit, suggesting that it is reasonable to use GIS-derived measures in place of more labor-intensive audits. Interestingly, neither audit- nor GIS-derived measures correlated well with participants' perceptions of walkability. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ab-initio molecular dynamics in electric fields via Wannier functions: Dielectric properties of liquid water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manu; Resta, Raffaele; Car, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    We have implemented a modified Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics scheme in which maximally localized Wannier functions, instead of delocalized Bloch orbitals, are used to represent ``on the fly'' the electronic wavefunction of an insulating system. Within our scheme, we account for the effects of a finite homogeneous field applied to the simulation cell; we then use the ideas of the modern theory of polarization to investigate the system's response. The dielectric response (linear and nonlinear) of a given material is thus directly accessible at a reasonable computational cost. We have performed a thorough study of the behavior of a computational sample of liquid water under the effect of an electric field. We used norm-conserving pseudopotentials, the PBE exchange-correlation potential, and supercell containing water 64 molecules. Besides providing the static response of the liquid at a given temperature, our simulations yield microscopic insight into features wich are not easily measured in experiments, particularly regarding relaxation phenomena.

  13. A Rapid Leaf-Disc Sampler for Psychrometric Water Potential Measurements 1

    PubMed Central

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Oosterhuis, Derrick M.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument was designed which facilitates faster and more accurate sampling of leaf discs for psychrometric water potential measurements. The instrument consists of an aluminum housing, a spring-loaded plunger, and a modified brass-plated cork borer. The leaf-disc sampler was compared with the conventional method of sampling discs for measurement of leaf water potential with thermocouple psychrometers on a range of plant material including Gossypium hirsutum L., Zea mays L., and Begonia rex-cultorum L. The new sampler permitted a leaf disc to be excised and inserted into the psychrometer sample chamber in less than 7 seconds, which was more than twice as fast as the conventional method. This resulted in more accurate determinations of leaf water potential due to reduced evaporative water losses. The leaf-disc sampler also significantly reduced sample variability between individual measurements. This instrument can be used for many other laboratory and field measurements that necessitate leaf disc sampling. PMID:16664879

  14. A rapid leaf-disc sampler for psychrometric water potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, S D; Oosterhuis, D M

    1986-06-01

    An instrument was designed which facilitates faster and more accurate sampling of leaf discs for psychrometric water potential measurements. The instrument consists of an aluminum housing, a spring-loaded plunger, and a modified brass-plated cork borer. The leaf-disc sampler was compared with the conventional method of sampling discs for measurement of leaf water potential with thermocouple psychrometers on a range of plant material including Gossypium hirsutum L., Zea mays L., and Begonia rex-cultorum L. The new sampler permitted a leaf disc to be excised and inserted into the psychrometer sample chamber in less than 7 seconds, which was more than twice as fast as the conventional method. This resulted in more accurate determinations of leaf water potential due to reduced evaporative water losses. The leaf-disc sampler also significantly reduced sample variability between individual measurements. This instrument can be used for many other laboratory and field measurements that necessitate leaf disc sampling.

  15. Magsat vector magnetometer calibration using Magsat geomagnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, E. R.; Jennings, T.; Morrissey, M.; Langel, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of its launch on Oct. 30, 1979 into a nearly polar, Sun synchronous orbit, until it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 11, 1980, Magsat measured and transmitted more than three complete sets of global magnetic field data. The data obtained from the mission will be used primarily to compute a currently accurate model of the Earth's main magnetic field, to update and refine world and regional magnetic charts, and to develop a global scalar and vector crustal magnetic anomaly map. The in-flight calibration procecure used for 39 vector magnetometer system parameters is described as well as results obtained from some data sets and the numerical studies designed to evaluate the results.

  16. Measured iron-gallium alloy tensile properties under magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Flatau, Alison B.

    2004-07-01

    Tension testing is used to identify Galfenol material properties under low level DC magnetic bias fields. Dog bone shaped specimens of single crystal Fe100-xGax, where 17<=x<=33, underwent tensile testing along two crystalographic axis orientations, [110] and [100]. The material properties being investigated and calculated from measured quantities are: Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Data are presented that demonstrate the dependence of these material properties on applied magnetic field levels and provide a preliminary assessment of the trends in material properties for performance under varied operating conditions. The elastic properties of Fe-Ga alloys were observed to be increasingly anisotropic with rising Ga content for the stoichiometries examined. The largest elastic anisotropies were manifested in [110] Poisson's ratios of as low as -0.63 in one specimen. This negative Poisson's ratio creates a significant in-plane auxetic behavior that could be exploited in applications that capitalize on unique area effects produced under uniaxial loading.

  17. Nonlinear propagation in ultrasonic fields: measurements, modelling and harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    In high amplitude ultrasonic fields, such as those used in medical ultrasound, nonlinear propagation can result in waveform distortion and the generation of harmonics of the initial frequency. In the nearfield of a transducer this process is complicated by diffraction effects associated with the source. The results of a programme to study the nonlinear propagation in the fields of circular, focused and rectangular transducers are described, and comparisons made with numerical predictions obtained using a finite difference solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (or KZK) equation. These results are extended to consider nonlinear propagation in tissue-like media and the implications for ultrasonic measurements and ultrasonic heating are discussed. The narrower beamwidths and reduced side-lobe levels of the harmonic beams are illustrated and the use of harmonics to form diagnostic images with improved resolution is described.

  18. Measurement Of Water Sprays Generated By Airplane Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental investigation conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to measure rate of flow and trajectory of water spray generated by tire operating on flooded runway. Potential application to both aircraft and automotive industries, with particular application to manufacturers of tires.

  19. Sealing rice field boundaries in Bangladesh: a pilot study demonstrating reductions in water use, arsenic loading to field soils, and methane emissions from irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Pracht, Lara E; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf

    2014-08-19

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated and methane-rich groundwater loads arsenic into field soils and releases methane into the atmosphere. We tested the water-savings potential of sealing field bunds (raised boundaries around field edges) as a way to mitigate these negative outcomes. We found that, on average, bund sealing reduced seasonal water use by 52 ± 17% and decreased arsenic loading to field soils by 15 ± 4%; greater savings in both water use and arsenic loading were achieved in fields with larger perimeter-to-area ratios (i.e., smaller fields). Our study is the first to quantify emission of methane from irrigation water in Bangladesh, a currently unaccounted-for methane source. Irrigation water applied to unsealed fields at our site emits 18 to 31 g of methane per square-meter of field area per season, potentially doubling the atmospheric input of methane from rice cultivation. Bund sealing reduced the emission of methane from irrigation water by 4 to 19 g/m(2). While the studied outcomes of bund sealing are positive and compelling, widespread implementation of the technique should consider other factors, such as effect on yields, financial costs, and impact on the hydrologic system. We provide an initial and preliminary assessment of these implementation factors.

  20. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  1. Selected water-quality data from the Cedar River and Cedar Rapids well fields, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 2006-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littin, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    The Cedar River alluvial aquifer is the primary source of municipal water in the Cedar Rapids, Iowa area. Municipal wells are completed in the alluvial aquifer approximately 40 to 80 feet below land surface. The City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have been conducting a cooperative study of the groundwater-flow system and water quality of the aquifer since 1992. Cooperative reports between the City of Cedar Rapids and the U.S. Geological Survey have documented hydrologic and water-quality data, geochemistry, and groundwater models. Water-quality samples were collected for studies involving well field monitoring, trends, source-water protection, groundwater geochemistry, surface-water-groundwater interaction, and pesticides in groundwater and surface water. Water-quality analyses were conducted for major ions (boron, bromide, calcium, chloride, fluoride, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, silica, sodium, and sulfate), nutrients (ammonia as nitrogen, nitrite as nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen, and orthophosphate as phosphorus), dissolved organic carbon, and selected pesticides including two degradates of the herbicide atrazine. Physical characteristics (alkalinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance and water temperature) were measured in the field and recorded for each water sample collected. This report presents the results of routine water-quality data-collection activities from January 2006 through December 2010. Methods of data collection, quality-assurance, and water-quality analyses are presented. Data include the results of water-quality analyses from quarterly sampling from monitoring wells, municipal wells, and the Cedar River.

  2. Soil Respiration Controls Ionic Nutrient Concentration In Percolating Water In Rice Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.

    2004-12-01

    Soil water in the plow layer in rice fields contains various kinds of cations and anions, and they are lost from the plow layer by water percolation. Some portions of CO2 produced by respirations of rice roots and soil microorganisms are also leached by water percolation to the subsoil layer as HCO3-. As the electrical neutrality of inorganic substances in percolating water is maintained when they are assumed to be in the form of simple cations and anions, soil respiration accelerates the leaching of ionic nutrients from the plow layer by water percolation. The proportion of inorganic carbon (Σ CO2) originated from photosynthates in the total Σ CO2 in soil solution in the plow layer was from 28 to 36 % in the rice straw amended soil and from 16 to 31 % in the soil without rice straw amendment in a soil pot experiment with rice plant after the maximum tillering stage. Most of Σ CO2 in percolating water from the plow layer accumulates in the subsoil layer. Periodical measurement of Σ CO2 in percolating water at 13 and 40 cm soil depths indicated that 10 % of total soil organic C in the plow layer was leached down from the plow layer (13 cm), and that about 90 % of it was retained in the subsoil layer to the depth of 40 cm. Water soluble organic materials are also leached from the plow layer by water percolation, and the leaching is accelerated by soil reduction. Soil reduction decreased the content of organic materials that were bound with ferric iron in soil (extractable by 0.1M Na4P2O7 + NaBH4) and increased the content of organic materials that were extractable by the neutral chelating solution (0.1M Na4P2O7). In addition, water percolation transformed the latter organic materials to those that were extractable by water and a neutral salt. Considerable portions of organic materials in percolating water are adsorbed in the subsoil layer, and then partially decomposed and polymerized to specific soil organic materials in the subsoil. Organic materials that were

  3. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  4. Full-Field Indentation Damage Measurement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    López-Alba, Elías; Díaz-Garrido, Francisco A.

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach based on full-field indentation measurements to characterize and quantify the effect of contact in thin plates is presented. The proposed method has been employed to evaluate the indentation damage generated in the presence of bending deformation, resulting from the contact between a thin plate and a rigid sphere. For this purpose, the 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC) technique has been adopted to quantify the out of plane displacements at the back face of the plate. Tests were conducted using aluminum thin plates and a rigid bearing sphere to evaluate the influence of the thickness and the material behavior during contact. Information provided by the 3D-DIC technique has been employed to perform an indirect measurement of the contact area during the loading and unloading path of the test. A symmetrical distribution in the contact damage region due to the symmetry of the indenter was always observed. In the case of aluminum plates, the presence of a high level of plasticity caused shearing deformation as the load increased. Results show the full-field contact damage area for different plates’ thicknesses at different loads. The contact damage region was bigger when the thickness of the specimen increased, and therefore, bending deformation was reduced. With the proposed approach, the elastic recovery at the contact location was quantified during the unloading, as well as the remaining permanent indentation damage after releasing the load. Results show the information obtained by full-field measurements at the contact location during the test, which implies a substantial improvement compared with pointwise techniques. PMID:28773137

  5. Measuring microbial fitness in a field reciprocal transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Primrose J; Stelkens, Rike; Kowallik, Vienna; Greig, Duncan

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fitness is easy to measure in the laboratory, but difficult to measure in the field. Laboratory fitness assays make use of controlled conditions and genetically modified organisms, neither of which are available in the field. Among other applications, fitness assays can help researchers detect adaptation to different habitats or locations. We designed a competitive fitness assay to detect adaptation of Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates to the habitat they were isolated from (oak or larch leaf litter). The assay accurately measures relative fitness by tracking genotype frequency changes in the field using digital droplet PCR (DDPCR). We expected locally adapted S. paradoxus strains to increase in frequency over time when growing on the leaf litter type from which they were isolated. The DDPCR assay successfully detected fitness differences among S. paradoxus strains, but did not find a tendency for strains to be adapted to the habitat they were isolated from. Instead, we found that the natural alleles of the hexose transport gene we used to distinguish S. paradoxus strains had significant effects on fitness. The origin of a strain also affected its fitness: strains isolated from oak litter were generally fitter than strains from larch litter. Our results suggest that dispersal limitation and genetic drift shape S. paradoxus populations in the forest more than local selection does, although further research is needed to confirm this. Tracking genotype frequency changes using DDPCR is a practical and accurate microbial fitness assay for natural environments. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  7. Personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure measurements in Swiss adolescents.

    PubMed

    Roser, Katharina; Schoeni, Anna; Struchen, Benjamin; Zahner, Marco; Eeftens, Marloes; Fröhlich, Jürg; Röösli, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Adolescents belong to the heaviest users of wireless communication devices, but little is known about their personal exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). The aim of this paper is to describe personal RF-EMF exposure of Swiss adolescents and evaluate exposure relevant factors. Furthermore, personal measurements were used to estimate average contributions of various sources to the total absorbed RF-EMF dose of the brain and the whole body. Personal exposure was measured using a portable RF-EMF measurement device (ExpoM-RF) measuring 13 frequency bands ranging from 470 to 3600MHz. The participants carried the device for three consecutive days and kept a time-activity diary. In total, 90 adolescents aged 13 to 17years participated in the study conducted between May 2013 and April 2014. In addition, personal measurement values were combined with dose calculations for the use of wireless communication devices to quantify the contribution of various RF-EMF sources to the daily RF-EMF dose of adolescents. Main contributors to the total personal RF-EMF measurements of 63.2μW/m 2 (0.15V/m) were exposures from mobile phones (67.2%) and from mobile phone base stations (19.8%). WLAN at school and at home had little impact on the personal measurements (WLAN accounted for 3.5% of total personal measurements). According to the dose calculations, exposure from environmental sources (broadcast transmitters, mobile phone base stations, cordless phone base stations, WLAN access points, and mobile phones in the surroundings) contributed on average 6.0% to the brain dose and 9.0% to the whole-body dose. RF-EMF exposure of adolescents is dominated by their own mobile phone use. Environmental sources such as mobile phone base stations play a minor role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ionic contrast terahertz near-field imaging of axonal water fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Martin, Jean-Louis; Gallot, Guilhem

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the direct and noninvasive imaging of functional neurons by ionic contrast terahertz near-field microscopy. This technique provides quantitative measurements of ionic concentrations in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments and opens the way to direct noninvasive imaging of neurons during electrical, toxin, or thermal stresses. Furthermore, neuronal activity results from both a precise control of transient variations in ionic conductances and a much less studied water exchange between the extracellular matrix and the intraaxonal compartment. The developed ionic contrast terahertz microscopy technique associated with a full three-dimensional simulation of the axon-aperture near-field system allows a precise measurement of the axon geometry and therefore the direct visualization of neuron swelling induced by temperature change or neurotoxin poisoning. Water influx as small as 20 fl per μm of axonal length can be measured. This technique should then provide grounds for the development of advanced functional neuroimaging methods based on diffusion anisotropy of water molecules. PMID:16547134

  9. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D [Blue Springs, MO

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  10. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average <1/ T2, Sample> with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as

  11. Laboratory and field measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of suspended James River sediments near Hopewell, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whilock, C. H.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.; Usry, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of suspended Bermuda Hundred and Bailey Bay bottom sediments taken from the Hopewell, Va., area were measured in the laboratory for water mixture total suspended solids concentrations between 4 and 173 parts per million. Field spectral reflectance measurements were made of the James River waters near Bermuda Hundred on two occasions. The results of these tests indicate that both Bermuda Hundred and Bailey Bay suspended sediments produce their strongest reflectance in the green and red regions of the spectrum.

  12. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic field measurement in the analyzing magnet of NIS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, S. A.; Afanas'ev, S. V.; Voloshina, I. G.; Dolgii, S. A.; Yusupov, A. Yu.; Kalmykov, A. V.; Makoveev, V. K.; Nikolaevskii, G. P.; Ostrovskii, I. V.; Perepelkin, E. E.; Peresedov, V. F.; Plyashkevich, S. N.; Rossiiskaya, N. S.; Salmin, R. A.; Spodarets, V. K.; Strokovskii, E. A.; Yudin, I. P.

    2006-12-01

    The main goals of the Nucleon Intrinsic Strangeness experiment (NIS) are the search for the effects of hidden polarized strangeness in the nucleon and the exploration and study of exotic baryons (pentaquarks) in NN reactions. The setup is located in the Laboratory of High Energies at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in channel 4V of the Nuclotron extracted beam with the energy between 1 and 4 GeV. The 1SP-40-4V electromagnet of the spectrometer has the external dimensions 3.20 × 3.26 × 4.48 m and the aperture 2.74 × 0.68 m. The magnetic field measurement was performed using the three-component Hall magnetometer in the computer-controlled automated mode. The volume of measurements was 1.03 × 0.60 × 3.92 m. The description of the measuring equipment and measurement procedure is given. The results of the measurements are used for the Monte Carlo computer modeling of the experiment. These results will be used in the analysis of physical data after their acquisition.

  14. On the extraction of pressure fields from PIV velocity measurements in turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Arturo; Diez, Fancisco J.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the pressure field for a water turbine is derived from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Measurements are performed in a recirculating water channel facility. The PIV measurements include calculating the tangential and axial forces applied to the turbine by solving the integral momentum equation around the airfoil. The results are compared with the forces obtained from the Blade Element Momentum theory (BEMT). Forces are calculated by using three different methods. In the first method, the pressure fields are obtained from PIV velocity fields by solving the Poisson equation. The boundary conditions are obtained from the Navier-Stokes momentum equations. In the second method, the pressure at the boundaries is determined by spatial integration of the pressure gradients along the boundaries. In the third method, applicable only to incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, and steady flow, the pressure is calculated using the Bernoulli equation. This approximated pressure is known to be accurate far from the airfoil and outside of the wake for steady flows. Additionally, the pressure is used to solve for the force from the integral momentum equation on the blade. From the three methods proposed to solve for pressure and forces from PIV measurements, the first one, which is solved by using the Poisson equation, provides the best match to the BEM theory calculations.

  15. Characterization of biofilm formation in natural water subjected to low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Anne; Bertaux, Joanne; Lesobre, Jérôme; Gravouil, Kevin; Verdon, Julien; Imbert, Christine; Valette, Eric; Héchard, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) treatment has proven to be effective against mineral scaling in water systems. Therefore, it should be assessed for the treatment of other deposits such as biofilms. In this study, a commercial device producing low-frequency EMF (1-10 kHz) was applied to a reactor fed with natural water for 45 days. The treatment promoted the concentration of microorganisms in suspension and limited the amount of sessile microorganisms in the biofilm, as determined by the measurement of total DNA, qPCR and microscopy. The structure of the bacterial community was assessed by t-RFLP and pyrosequencing analysis. The results showed that EMF treatment affected both planktonic and sessile community composition. EMFs were responsible for a shift in classes of Proteobacteria during development of the biofilm. It may be speculated that the EMF treatment affected particle solubility and/or microorganism hydration. This study indicated that EMFs modulated biofilm formation in natural water.

  16. A lithospheric magnetic field model derived from the Swarm satellite magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Thebault, E.; Vigneron, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarm constellation of satellites was launched in November 2013 and has since then delivered high quality scalar and vector magnetic field measurements. A consortium of several research institutions was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to provide a number of scientific products which will be made available to the scientific community. Within this framework, specific tools were tailor-made to better extract the magnetic signal emanating from Earth's the lithospheric. These tools rely on the scalar gradient measured by the lower pair of Swarm satellites and rely on a regional modeling scheme that is more sensitive to small spatial scales and weak signals than the standard spherical harmonic modeling. In this presentation, we report on various activities related to data analysis and processing. We assess the efficiency of this dedicated chain for modeling the lithospheric magnetic field using more than one year of measurements, and finally discuss refinements that are continuously implemented in order to further improve the robustness and the spatial resolution of the lithospheric field model.

  17. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  18. Atmospheric water vapour over oceans from SSM/I measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schluessel, Peter; Emery, William J.

    1990-01-01

    A statistical retrieval technique is developed to derive the atmospheric water vapor column content from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) measurements. The radiometer signals are simulated by means of radiative-transfer calculations for a large set of atmospheric/oceanic situations. These simulated responses are subsequently summarized by multivariate analyses, giving water-vapor coefficients and error estimates. Radiative-transfer calculations show that the SSM/I microwave imager can detect atmospheric water vapor structures with an accuracy from 0.145 to 0.17 g/sq cm. The accuracy of the method is confirmed by globally distributed match-ups with radiosonde measurements.

  19. Measuring q/m for Water Drops--An Introduction to the Effects of Electrical Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Francis X.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses an experiment which introduces students to the effects of electrical forces on the motion of macroscopic objects. Included are the proecedures of measuring the charge-to-mass ratio from deflections of charged water drops in horizontal fields and the overall charges delivered in a Faraday cup. (CC)

  20. Terahertz Measurement of the Water Content Distribution in Wood Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensalem, M.; Sommier, A.; Mindeguia, J. C.; Batsale, J. C.; Pradere, C.

    2018-02-01

    Recently, THz waves have been shown to be an effective technique for investigating the water diffusion within porous media, such as biomaterial or insulation materials. This applicability is due to the sufficient resolution for such applications and the safe levels of radiation. This study aims to achieve contactless absolute water content measurements at a steady state case in semi-transparent solids (wood) using a transmittance THz wave range setup. First, a calibration method is developed to validate an analytical model based on the Beer-Lambert law, linking the absorption coefficient, the density of the solid, and its water content. Then, an estimation of the water content on a local scale in a transient-state case (drying) is performed. This study shows that THz waves are an effective contactless, safe, and low-cost technique for the measurement of water content in a porous medium, such as wood.

  1. Lunar properties from transient and steady magnetic field measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of the lunar interior has been determined from magnetic field step transients measured on the lunar dark side. The simplest model which best fits the data is a spherically symmetric three layer model having a nonconducting outer crust, an intermediate layer with electrical conductivity of .00035 mhos/m, and an inner core with conductivity of .01 mhos/m. Temperatures calculated from these conductivities in the three regions for an example of an olivine moon are as follows: crust, below 440 K; intermediate layer, 890 K; and core, 1240 K. The whole-moon relative permeability has been calculated from the measurements to be 1.03 plus or minus 0.13.

  2. Structure of the lunar interior from magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    A network of lunar surface and orbiting magnetometers was used to obtain measurements of electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability of the lunar interior. An exceptionally large solar transient event, when the moon was in a geomagnetic tail lobe, enabled the most accurate lunar electromagnetic sounding information to date to be obtained. A new analytical technique using a network of two surface magnetometers and a satellite magnetometer superimposes many time series measurements to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and uses both the amplitude and phase information of all three vector components of the magnetic field data. Size constraints on a hypothetical highly conducting lunar core are investigated with the aid of the permeability results.

  3. Near-field measurement facility plans at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The direction of future antenna technology will be toward antennas which are large, both physically and electrically, will operate at frequencies up to 60 GHz, and are non-reciprocal and complex, implementing multiple-beam and scanning beam concepts and monolithic semiconductor devices and techniques. The acquisition of accurate antenna performance measurements is a critical part of the advanced antenna research program and represents a substantial antenna measurement technology challenge, considering the special characteristics of future spacecraft communications antennas. Comparison of various antenna testing techniques and their relative advantages and disadvantages shows that the near-field approach is necessary to meet immediate and long-term testing requirements. The LeRC facilities, the 22 ft x 22 ft horizontal antenna boresight planar scanner and the 60 ft x 60 ft vertical antenna boresight plant scanner (with a 60 GHz frequency and D/lamdba = 3000 electrical size capabilities), will meet future program testing requirements.

  4. The Measurement of the Field of View from Airplane Cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Melvin N

    1936-01-01

    A method has been devised for the angular measurement and graphic portrayal of the view obtained from the pilot's cockpit of an airplane. The assumption upon which the method is based and a description of the instrument, designated a "visiometer", used in the measurement are given. Account is taken of the fact that the pilot has two eyes and two separate sources of vision. The view is represented on charts using an equal-area polar projection, a description and proof of which are given. The use of this chart, aside from its simplicity, may make possible the establishment of simple criterions of the field of view. Charts of five representative airplanes with various cockpit arrangements are included.

  5. Controlling radiation fields in siemans designed light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Riess, R.; Marchl, T.

    1995-03-01

    An essential item for the control of radiation fields is the minimization of the use of satellites in the reactor systems of Light Water Reactors (LWRs). A short description of the qualification of Co-replacement materials will be followed by an illustration of the locations where these materials were implemented in Siemens designed LWRs. Especially experiences in PWRs show the immense influence of reduction of cobalt sources on dose rate buildup. The corrosion and the fatique and wear behavior of the replacement materials has not created concern up to now. A second tool to keep occupational radiation doses at a lowmore » level in PWRs is the use of the modified B/Li-chemistry. This is practized in Siemens designed plants by keeping the Li level at a max. value of 2 ppm until it reaches a pH (at 300{degrees}C) of {approximately}7.4. This pH is kept constant until the end of the cycle. The substitution of cobalt base alloys and thus the removal of the Co-59 sources from the system had the largest impact on the radiation levels. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of the coolant chemistry should not be neglected either. Several years of successful operation of PWRs with the replacement materials resulted in an occupational radiation exposure which is below 0.5 man-Sievert/plant and year.« less

  6. Spatial attenuation of different sound field components in a water layer and shallow-water sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, G. N.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of spatial attenuation of low-frequency vector-scalar sound fields in shallow water. The experiments employed a towed pneumatic cannon and spatially separated four-component vector-scalar receiver modules. Narrowband analysis of received signals made it possible to estimate the attenuation coefficients of the first three modes in the frequency of range of 26-182 Hz and calculate the frequency dependences of the sound absorption coefficients in the upper part of bottom sediments. We analyze the experimental and calculated (using acoustic calibration of the waveguide) laws of the drop in sound pressure and orthogonal vector projections of the oscillation velocity. It is shown that the vertical projection of the oscillation velocity vector decreases significantly faster than the sound pressure field.

  7. The Role of Surface Water Flow in Gas Fluxes from a Subtropical Rice Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, K. T.; Suvocarev, K.; Reavis, C.; Runkle, B.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Wetlands are the single largest source of methane emissions, but the underlying processes behind this flux are not yet fully understood. Typically, methane fluxes from wetlands have been attributed to ebullition (bubbling) and to transport through vegetation. However, a third major pathway-hydrodynamic transport-has been seen in a temperate wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. We wish to explore whether this additional pathway is also important to a subtropical rice paddy site where the diel thermal cycle is less pronounced than in the temperate site. Measurements in the surface water of a rice field were collected over two weeks. Specific measurements collected included dissolved and atmospheric methane concentration, surface water velocity, and air and water temperature. These were used to augment a long-term dataset of micrometeorology and gas fluxes. Together, these data demonstrate the role that surface water motions play in the fluxes between soil and atmosphere. Data are analyzed to reveal the fraction of total methane flux that is governed by advective/diffusive transport through surface water, and daily cycles in this behavior. Results will be used to advance predictions of atmospheric methane gas concentrations and could be foundational for developing methane management solutions. Closing this gap in knowledge is key to improving calculations of current global greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Field Measurements of Inadvertent Ingestion Exposure to Metals.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; MacCalman, Laura; Semple, Sean; van Tongeren, Martie

    2017-11-10

    The determinants of inadvertent occupational ingestion exposure are poorly understood, largely due to a lack of available exposure measurement data. In this study, perioral exposure wipes were used as a surrogate for inadvertent ingestion exposure to measure exposure to eight metals (chromium, nickel, aluminium, cobalt, lead, arsenic, manganese, and tin) among 38 workers at 5 work sites in the UK. This work was done alongside a previously reported observational study of hand/object-to-mouth contact frequency. Systematic wipes of the perioral area, and of both hands were taken with proprietary cellulose wipes pre-moistened with deionized water. Measurements were taken at the beginning, middle and end of the shift. Mixed-effect models of exposure measurements were built with area of skin sampled, time during shift, and job group entered as fixed effects and worker identification as a random effect. Linear regression modelling was used to study the effect of hand/object-to-mouth contact frequency on perioral exposure, adjusting for the measured exposure on the hand and observed respirator use. Hand and perioral exposure measurements were correlated with one another (r = 0.79) but mass per unit area exposure was significantly higher on the perioral area than on the hands for seven of the metals (at P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between measurements taken at the middle or the end of the shift for five of the metals suggesting that dermal loading may remain relatively constant for much of the workday. This applies to both hand and perioral measurements. In linear regression modelling there was no relationship between hand/object-to-mouth contact frequency and perioral exposure, but hand exposure was significantly positively related to perioral exposure and workers who used respirators had significantly higher perioral exposure than those who did not. The results suggest the levels of exposure on the hand and respirator use are important determinants of

  9. Data measured on water collected from eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Tim P.

    In March of 2000 field collection of water from the Eastern Mojave Desert resulted in the measurement of stable isotope, radiocarbon, tritium, and limited dissolved noble gases. This work was follow-on to previous studies on similar systems in southern Nevada associated with the Nevada Test Site (Davisson et al., 1999; Rose and Davisson, 2003). The data for groundwater from wells and springs was never formally published and is therefore tabulated in Table 1 in order to be recorded in public record. In addition 4 years of remote precipitation data was collected for stable isotopes and is included in Table 2.more » These studies, along with many parallel and subsequent ones using isotopes and elemental concentrations, are all related to the general research area of tracing sources and quantifying transport times of natural and man-made materials in the environment. This type of research has direct relevance in characterizing environmental contamination, understanding resource development and protection, designing early detection in WMD related terrorism, and application in forensics analysis.« less

  10. Normalized velocity profiles of field-measured turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Multiple turbidity currents were recorded in two submarine canyons with maximum speed as high as 280 cm/s. For each individual turbidity current measured at a fixed station, its depth-averaged velocity typically decreased over time while its thickness increased. Some turbidity currents gained in speed as they traveled downcanyon, suggesting a possible self-accelerating process. The measured velocity profiles, first in this high resolution, allowed normalizations with various schemes. Empirical functions, obtained from laboratory experiments whose spatial and time scales are two to three orders of magnitude smaller, were found to represent the field data fairly well. The best similarity collapse of the velocity profiles was achieved when the streamwise velocity and the elevation were normalized respectively by the depth-averaged velocity and the turbidity current thickness. This normalization scheme can be generalized to an empirical function Y = exp(–αXβ) for the jet region above the velocity maximum. Confirming theoretical arguments and laboratory results of other studies, the field turbidity currents are Froude-supercritical.

  11. Mean-flow measurements of the flow field diffusing bend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.

    1982-01-01

    Time-average measurements of the low-speed turbulent flow in a diffusing bend are presented. The experimental geometry consists of parallel top and bottom walls and curved diverging side walls. The turning of the center line of this channel is 40 deg, the area ratio is 1.5 and the ratios of height and center-line length to throat width are 1.5 and 3, respectively. The diffusing bend is preceded and followed by straight constant area sections. The inlet boundary layers on the parallel walls are artificially thickened and occupy about 30% of the channel height; those on the side walls develop naturally and are about half as thick. The free-stream speed at the inlet was approximately 30 m/sec for all the measurements. Inlet boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are presented, as are data for wall static pressures, and at six cross sections, surveys of the velocity-vector and static-pressure fields. The dominant feature of the flow field is a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices formed by the cross-stream pressure gradient in the bend on which an overall deceleration is superimposed.

  12. Direct measurements of bed stress under swash in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel C.; Griffin, John G.

    2004-03-01

    Utilizing flush mounted hot film anemometry, the bed stress under swash was measured directly in a field experiment conducted on Barret Beach, Fire Island, New York. The theory, development, and calibration of the instrument package are discussed, and results from the field experiment are presented. Examples of bed stress time series throughout a swash cycle are presented, and an ensemble averaged swash bed stress cycle is calculated. Strong asymmetry is observed between the uprush and backwash phases of the swash flow. The maximum bed shear stress exerted by the uprush is approximately double that of the backwash, while the duration of the backwash is 135% greater than that of the uprush. Friction coefficients in the swash zone are observed to be similar in magnitude to those from steady flow, with the mean observed friction coefficient equal to 0.0037. Swash friction coefficients derived from the current measurements exhibit a Reynolds number dependence similar to that observed for other flows. A systematic difference between coefficients for uprush and backwash is suggested.

  13. Antenna for Measuring Electric Fields Within the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward Charles

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses concepts for the design of an antenna to be deployed from a spacecraft for measuring the ambient electric field associated with plasma waves at a location within 3 solar radii from the solar photosphere. The antenna must be long enough to extend beyond the photoelectron and plasma sheaths of the spacecraft (expected to be of the order of meters thick) and to enable measurements at frequencies from 20 Hz to 10 MHz without contamination by spacecraft electric-field noise. The antenna must, therefore, extend beyond the thermal protection system (TPS) of the main body of the spacecraft and must withstand solar heating to a temperature as high as 2,000 C while not conducting excessive heat to the interior of the spacecraft. The TPS would be conical and its axis would be pointed toward the Sun. The antenna would include monopole halves of dipoles that would be deployed from within the shadow of the TPS. The outer potion of each monopole would be composed of a carbon-carbon (C-C) composite surface exposed to direct sunlight (hot side) and a C-C side in shadow (cold side) with yttria-stabilized zirconia spacers in-between. The hot side cannot view the spacecraft bus, while the cold side can. The booms also can be tilted to minimize heat input to spacecraft bus. This design allows one to reduce heat input to the spacecraft bus to acceptable levels.

  14. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  15. Evaluation of Occupational Cold Environments: Field Measurements and Subjective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, A. Virgílio M.; GASPAR, Adélio R.; RAIMUNDO, António M.; QUINTELA, Divo A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study. PMID:24583510

  16. Direct Measurement of Impurity Transport in a Field Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; Bolte, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Wessel, F.

    2011-10-01

    An optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the Flux Coil Generated Field Reversed Configuration (FCG-FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy. Sixteen chords view ~ 35 % of the FRC at the mid-plane. The chords are arranged in two identical fans of eight chords each. To measure transport of an impurity species, argon, an FRC is generated using either Nitrogen or Deuterium as the primary species. A puff valve is activated prior to the shot such that the argon begins to bleed in to the vacuum chamber as the FRC is formed. The gas is puffed at the optimal location for tomographic reconstruction. Each chord is collimated to illuminate a fiber optic cable which is fed to an array of photomultiplier tubes which are fitted with neutral density and band pass filters to allow the appropriate amount of light from the emitting, singly ionized, argon at 434 . 8 nm to be measured. Using a preliminary assumption that density of argon is proportional to light intensity gathered data have been used to reconstruct density profiles. These profiles often peak near the field null. The data are being analyzed to determine diffusive and convective transport coefficients.

  17. Measurement of Jupiter’s asymmetric gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Folkner, W. M.; Durante, D.; Parisi, M.; Kaspi, Y.; Galanti, E.; Guillot, T.; Hubbard, W. B.; Stevenson, D. J.; Anderson, J. D.; Buccino, D. R.; Casajus, L. Gomez; Milani, A.; Park, R.; Racioppa, P.; Serra, D.; Tortora, P.; Zannoni, M.; Cao, H.; Helled, R.; Lunine, J. I.; Miguel, Y.; Militzer, B.; Wahl, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.; Bolton, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    The gravity harmonics of a fluid, rotating planet can be decomposed into static components arising from solid-body rotation and dynamic components arising from flows. In the absence of internal dynamics, the gravity field is axially and hemispherically symmetric and is dominated by even zonal gravity harmonics J2n that are approximately proportional to qn, where q is the ratio between centrifugal acceleration and gravity at the planet’s equator. Any asymmetry in the gravity field is attributed to differential rotation and deep atmospheric flows. The odd harmonics, J3, J5, J7, J9 and higher, are a measure of the depth of the winds in the different zones of the atmosphere. Here we report measurements of Jupiter’s gravity harmonics (both even and odd) through precise Doppler tracking of the Juno spacecraft in its polar orbit around Jupiter. We find a north–south asymmetry, which is a signature of atmospheric and interior flows. Analysis of the harmonics, described in two accompanying papers, provides the vertical profile of the winds and precise constraints for the depth of Jupiter’s dynamical atmosphere.

  18. Evaluation of occupational cold environments: field measurements and subjective analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Virgílio M; Gaspar, Adélio R; Raimundo, António M; Quintela, Divo A

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study.

  19. NASA SMAPVEX 15 Field Campaign Measures Soil Moisture Over Arizona

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-09

    NASA's SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite observatory conducted a field experiment as part of its soil moisture data product validation program in southern Arizona on Aug. 2-18, 2015. The images here represent the distribution of soil moisture over the SMAPVEX15 (SMAP Validation Experiment 2015) experiment domain, as measured by the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, which was installed onboard a DC-3 aircraft operated by Airborne Imaging, Inc. Blue and green colors denote wet conditions and dry conditions are marked by red and orange. The black lines show the nominal flight path of PALS. The measurements show that on the first day, the domain surface was wet overall, but had mostly dried down by the second measurement day. On the third day, there was a mix of soil wetness. The heterogeneous soil moisture distribution over the domain is typical for the area during the North American Monsoon season and provides excellent conditions for SMAP soil moisture product validation and algorithm enhancement. The images are based on brightness temperature measured by the PALS instrument gridded on a grid with 0.6-mile (1-kilometer) pixel size. They do not yet compensate for surface characteristics, such as vegetation and topography. That work is currently in progress. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19879

  20. Remote sensing reflectance and inherent optical properties of oceanic waters derived from above-water measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhongping; Carder, Kendall L.; Steward, Robert G.; Peacock, Thomas G.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Mueller, James L.

    1997-02-01

    Remote-sensing reflectance and inherent optical properties of oceanic properties of oceanic waters are important parameters for ocean optics. Due to surface reflectance, Rrs or water-leaving radiance is difficult to measure from above the surface. It usually is derived by correcting for the reflected skylight in the measured above-water upwelling radiance using a theoretical Fresnel reflectance value. As it is difficult to determine the reflected skylight, there are errors in the Q and E derived Rrs, and the errors may get bigger for high chl_a coastal waters. For better correction of the reflected skylight,w e propose the following derivation procedure: partition the skylight into Rayleigh and aerosol contributions, remove the Rayleigh contribution using the Fresnel reflectance, and correct the aerosol contribution using an optimization algorithm. During the process, Rrs and in-water inherent optical properties are derived at the same time. For measurements of 45 sites made in the Gulf of Mexico and Arabian Sea with chl_a concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 49 mg/m3, the derived Rrs and inherent optical property values were compared with those from in-water measurements. These results indicate that for the waters studied, the proposed algorithm performs quite well in deriving Rrs and in- water inherent optical properties from above-surface measurements for clear and turbid waters.

  1. Measurements of Electric Field in a Nanosecond Pulse Discharge by 4-WAVE Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratte, Edmond; Adamovich, Igor V.; Simeni Simeni, Marien; Frederickson, Kraig

    2017-06-01

    Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and spatially resolved electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric discharge sustained in room air and in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen diffusion flame. Measurements of the electric field, and more precisely the reduced electric field (E/N) in the plasma is critical for determination rate coefficients of electron impact processes in the plasma, as well as for quantifying energy partition in the electric discharge among different molecular energy modes. The four-wave mixing measurements are performed using a collinear phase matching geometry, with nitrogen used as the probe species, at temporal resolution of about 2 ns . Absolute calibration is performed by measurement of a known electrostatic electric field. In the present experiments, the discharge is sustained between two stainless steel plate electrodes, each placed in a quartz sleeve, which greatly improves plasma uniformity. Our previous measurements of electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharge by picosecond 4-wave mixing have been done in air at room temperature, in a discharge sustained between a razor edge high-voltage electrode and a plane grounded electrode (a quartz plate or a layer of distilled water). Electric field measurements in a flame, which is a high-temperature environment, are more challenging because the four-wave mixing signal is proportional to the to square root of the difference betwen the populations of N2 ground vibrational level (v=0) and first excited vibrational level (v=1). At high temperatures, the total number density is reduced, thus reducing absolute vibrational level populations of N2. Also, the signal is reduced further due to a wider distribution of N2 molecules over multiple rotational levels at higher temperatures, while the present four-wave mixing diagnostics is using spectrally narrow output of a ps laser and a high

  2. Ambient-temperature incubation for the field detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Stauber, C; Murphy, J L; Khan, A; Mu, T; Elliott, M; Sobsey, M D

    2011-04-01

     Escherichia coli is the pre-eminent microbiological indicator used to assess safety of drinking water globally. The cost and equipment requirements for processing samples by standard methods may limit the scale of water quality testing in technologically less developed countries and other resource-limited settings, however. We evaluate here the use of ambient-temperature incubation in detection of E. coli in drinking water samples as a potential cost-saving and convenience measure with applications in regions with high (>25°C) mean ambient temperatures.   This study includes data from three separate water quality assessments: two in Cambodia and one in the Dominican Republic. Field samples of household drinking water were processed in duplicate by membrane filtration (Cambodia), Petrifilm™ (Cambodia) or Colilert® (Dominican Republic) on selective media at both standard incubation temperature (35–37°C) and ambient temperature, using up to three dilutions and three replicates at each dilution. Matched sample sets were well correlated with 80% of samples (n = 1037) within risk-based microbial count strata (E. coli CFU 100 ml−1 counts of <1, 1–10, 11–100, 101–1000, >1000), and a pooled coefficient of variation of 17% (95% CI 15–20%) for paired sample sets across all methods.   These results suggest that ambient-temperature incubation of E. coli in at least some settings may yield sufficiently robust data for water safety monitoring where laboratory or incubator access is limited.

  3. Microfabricated sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monberg, James; Henning, Albert K.

    1995-09-01

    Public awareness of the risks of exposure to electromagnetic radiation has grown over the past ten yeras. The effects of power lines on human and animal health have drawn particular attention. Some longitudinal studies of cancer rates near power lines show a significant correlation, while others show a null result. The studies have suffered from inadequate sensors for the measurement of electromagnetic radiation in vivo. In this work, we describe the design, construction, and testing of electrically passive, microfabricated single-pole antennas and coils. These sensors will be used in vivo to study the effects of electromagnetic radiation on animals. Our testing to date has been limited to in vitro studies of the magnetic field probes. Magnetic field pickup coils were fabricated with up to 100 turns, over a length of up to 1000 micrometers . Measurements were carried out with the sensors in air, and in water of various saline concentrations. Magnetic fields were applied using a Helmholtz coil. Both dc and ac fields were applied. The results indicate that small-area measurements of electromagnetic fields in vitro can be made successfully, provided adequate shielding and amplification are used.

  4. High-accuracy measurement of low-water-content in liquid using NIR spectral absorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-Jin; Wan, Xu; Jin, Hong-Zhen; Zhao, Yong; Mao, He-Fa

    2005-01-01

    Water content measurement technologies are very important for quality inspection of food, medicine products, chemical products and many other industry fields. In recent years, requests for accurate low-water-content measurement in liquid are more and more exigent, and great interests have been shown from the research and experimental work. With the development and advancement of modern production and control technologies, more accurate water content technology is needed. In this paper, a novel experimental setup based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral technology and fiber-optic sensor (OFS) is presented. It has a good measurement accuracy about -/+ 0.01%, which is better, to our knowledge, than most other methods published until now. It has a high measurement resolution of 0.001% in the measurement range from zero to 0.05% for water-in-alcohol measurement, and the water-in-oil measurement is carried out as well. In addition, the advantages of this method also include pollution-free to the measured liquid, fast measurement and so on.

  5. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements for Supersonic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) to high-speed flows has its origins in the original development of the technology by Komine et al (1991). Komine used a small shop-air driven nozzle to generate a 200 m/s flow. This flow velocity was chosen since it produced a fairly large Doppler shift in the scattered light, resulting in a significant transmission loss as the light passed through the Iodine vapor. This proof-of-concept investigation showed that the technology was capable of measuring flow velocity within a measurement plane defined by a single-frequency laser light sheet. The effort also proved that velocity measurements could be made without resolving individual seed particles as required by other techniques such as Fringe- Type Laser Velocimetry and Particle Image Velocimetry. The promise of making planar velocity measurements with the possibility of using 0.1-micron condensation particles for seeding, Dibble et al (1989), resulted in the investigation of supersonic jet flow fields, Elliott et al (1993) and Smith and Northam (1995) - Mach 2.0 and 1.9 respectively. Meyers (1993) conducted a wind tunnel investigation above an inclined flat plate at Mach 2.5 and above a delta wing at Mach 2.8 and 4.6. Although these measurements were crude from an accuracy viewpoint, they did prove that the technology could be used to study supersonic flows using condensation as the scattering medium. Since then several research groups have studied the technology and developed solutions and methodologies to overcome most of the measurement accuracy limitations:

  6. Field measurements of del13C in ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, Hella; Sabbatini, Simone; Nicolini, Giacomo; Warneke, Thorsten; Papale, Dario; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon isotope del13C-measurements are extensively used to study ecological and biogeochemical processes in ecosystems. Above terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric del13C can vary largely due to photosynthetic fractionation. Photosynthetic processes prefer the uptake of the lighter isotope 12C (in CO2), thereby enriching the atmosphere in 13C and depleting the ecosystem carbon. At night, when ecosystem respiratory fluxes are dominant, 13C-depleted CO2 is respired and thereby depletes the atmospheric del13C-content. Different ecosystems and different parts of one ecosystem (type of plant, leaves, and roots) fractionate and respire with a different del13C-ratio signature. By determining the del13C-signature of ecosystem respiration in temporal and spatial scale, an analysis can be made of the composition of respiratory sources of the ecosystem. A field study at a dry cropland after harvest (province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy) was performed in the summer of 2013. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure CO2-, CH4-, N2O-, CO- and del13C-concentrations. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurements systems: a Flux Gradient system (sampling every half hour at 1.3m and 4.2m) and 2 flux chambers (measured every hour), providing a continuous data set of the biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes and of the gas concentrations at different heights. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the Flux Gradient system at night, were determined to be between -25‰ and -20‰. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the flux chamber system, varied between -24‰ and -29‰, and showed a clear diurnal pattern, suggesting different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night.

  7. Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vang, Óluva K; Corfitzen, Charlotte B; Smith, Christian; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface water. To investigate the ability of the ATP assay in detecting different contamination types, the contaminant was diluted with non-chlorinated drinking water. Wastewater, diluted at 10(4) in drinking water, was detected with the ATP assay, as well as 10(2) to 10(3) times diluted surface water. To improve the performance of the ATP assay in detecting microbial ingress in drinking water, different approaches were investigated, i.e. quantifying microbial ATP or applying reagents of different sensitivities to reduce measurement variations; however, none of these approaches contributed significantly in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more sensitive than the ATP measurements, though with much longer response times. Continuous sampling combined with ATP measurements displays definite monitoring potential for microbial drinking water quality, since microbial ingress in drinking water can be detected in real-time with ATP measurements. The ability of the ATP assay to detect microbial ingress is influenced by both the ATP load from the contaminant itself and the ATP concentration in the specific drinking water. Consequently, a low ATP concentration of the specific drinking water facilitates a better detection of a potential contamination of the water supply with the ATP assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanics of water pore formation in lipid membrane under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Bing; Li, Dechang; Diao, Jiajie; Ji, Baohua

    2017-04-01

    Transmembrane water pores are crucial for substance transport through cell membranes via membrane fusion, such as in neural communication. However, the molecular mechanism of water pore formation is not clear. In this study, we apply all-atom molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics simulations to study the process of water pore formation under an electric field. We show that water molecules can enter a membrane under an electric field and form a water pore of a few nanometers in diameter. These water molecules disturb the interactions between lipid head groups and the ordered arrangement of lipids. Following the movement of water molecules, the lipid head groups are rotated and driven into the hydrophobic region of the membrane. The reorientated lipid head groups inside the membrane form a hydrophilic surface of the water pore. This study reveals the atomic details of how an electric field influences the movement of water molecules and lipid head groups, resulting in water pore formation.

  9. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K.; Demoz, B.; DiGirolamo, P.; Mielke, B.; Stein, B.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.; Turner, D.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent technology upgrades to the NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar have permitted significant improvements in the daytime and nighttime measurement of water vapor using Raman lidar. Numerical simulation has been used to study the temperature sensitivity of the narrow spectral band measurements presented here.

  10. Spatially telescoping measurements for improved characterization of groundwater-surface water interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kikuchi, Colin; Ferre, Ty P.A.; Welker, Jeffery M.

    2012-01-01

    The suite of measurement methods available to characterize fluxes between groundwater and surface water is rapidly growing. However, there are few studies that examine approaches to design of field investigations that include multiple methods. We propose that performing field measurements in a spatially telescoping sequence improves measurement flexibility and accounts for nested heterogeneities while still allowing for parsimonious experimental design. We applied this spatially telescoping approach in a study of ground water-surface water (GW-SW) interaction during baseflow conditions along Lucile Creek, located near Wasilla, Alaska. Catchment-scale data, including channel geomorphic indices and hydrogeologic transects, were used to screen areas of potentially significant GW-SW exchange. Specifically, these data indicated increasing groundwater contribution from a deeper regional aquifer along the middle to lower reaches of the stream. This initial assessment was tested using reach-scale estimates of groundwater contribution during baseflow conditions, including differential discharge measurements and the use of chemical tracers analyzed in a three-component mixing model. The reach-scale measurements indicated a large increase in discharge along the middle reaches of the stream accompanied by a shift in chemical composition towards a regional groundwater end member. Finally, point measurements of vertical water fluxes -- obtained using seepage meters as well as temperature-based methods -- were used to evaluate spatial and temporal variability of GW-SW exchange within representative reaches. The spatial variability of upward fluxes, estimated using streambed temperature mapping at the sub-reach scale, was observed to vary in relation to both streambed composition and the magnitude of groundwater contribution from differential discharge measurements. The spatially telescoping approach improved the efficiency of this field investigation. Beginning our assessment

  11. Electro-suppression of water nano-droplets' solidification in no man's land: Electromagnetic fields' entropic trapping of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Prithwish K.; Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding water solidification, especially in "No Man's Land" (NML) (150 K < T < 235 K) is crucially important (e.g., upper-troposphere cloud processes) and challenging. A rather neglected aspect of tropospheric ice-crystallite formation is inevitably present electromagnetic fields' role. Here, we employ non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of aggressively quenched supercooled water nano-droplets in the gas phase under NML conditions, in externally applied electromagnetic (e/m) fields, elucidating significant differences between effects of static and oscillating fields: although static fields induce "electro-freezing," e/m fields exhibit the contrary - solidification inhibition. This anti-freeze action extends not only to crystal-ice formation but also restricts amorphisation, i.e., suppression of low-density amorphous ice which forms otherwise in zero-field NML environments. E/m-field applications maintain water in the deeply supercooled state in an "entropic trap," which is ripe for industrial impacts in cryo-freezing, etc.

  12. Emergency field water supply system using natural filtration elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikneswaran, M.; Yahya, Muhamad Azani; Yusof, Mohammed Alias; Ismail, Siti Nor Kamariah

    2018-02-01

    Water is the most important resource in times of emergency and during military missions. In addition, if there is a war in a country, sources of clean water are essential for life. But, the safety and cleanliness of the river water for the campers and hikers still uncertain. Usually, polluted and contaminated river water is not safe to be directly consumed by human. However, this problem can be partly resolved by using water filter where the river water can be consumed directly after the filtration process. In respect of that, this study was conducted to design the filter media for personal water purification system. Hence, the objective of this work also is to develop a personal, portable dual purpose handy water filter to provide an easier way to get safe, clean and healthy drinking water for human wherever they go. The water quality of samples collected before and after filtration were analyzed. Water samples were taken from a waterfall near Lestari Block and Lake beside Marine Centre UPNM Campus. The experimental results were analyzed based on the assessment of water quality parameters. Overall, the analysis of the results showed that the water filter was designed with basic mix tabs aqua filter water purification tablets is showing a better result where it achieve the class I of water quality index (WQI). In details, the water sample taken from waterfall near Lestari Block shown the WQI around 93 which is higher than WQI of water sample from Lake near Marine Centre UPNM which is 86, class II A which can be used for external purpose only.

  13. Continuous measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallman, Magdalena; Lammirato, Carlo; Rütting, Tobias; Delin, Sofia; Weslien, Per; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture represents 59 % of the anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, according to the IPCC (Ciais et al. 2013). N2O emissions are typically irregular and vary widely in time and space, which makes it difficult to get a good representation of the emissions (Henault et al. 2012), particularly if measurements have low frequency and/or cover only a short time period. Manual measurements are, for practical reasons, often short-term and low-frequent, or restricted to periods where emissions are expected to be high, e.g. after fertilizing. However, the nature of N2O emissions, being largely unpredictable, calls for continuous or near-continuous measurements over long time periods. So far, rather few long-term, high resolution measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields are reported; among them are Flessa et al. (2002) and Senapati et al. (2016). In this study, we have a two-year data set (2015-2017) with hourly measurements from ten automatic chambers, covering unfertilized controls as well as different nitrogen fertilizer treatments. Grain was produced on the field, and effects of tillage, harvest and other cropping measures were covered. What we can see from the experiment is that (a) the unfertilized control plots seem to follow the same emission pattern as the fertilized plots, at a level similar to the standard mineral fertilized plots (120 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and (b) freeze/thaw emissions are comparable in size to emissions after fertilizing. These two findings imply that the importance of fertilizing to the overall N2O emissions from arable soils may be smaller than previously expected. References: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell et al. 2013: Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung et

  14. Technical Note: Out‐of‐field dose measurement at near surface with plastic scintillator detector

    PubMed Central

    Bourgouin, Alexandra; Varfalvy, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Out‐of‐field dose depends on multiple factors, making peripheral dosimetry complex. Only a few dosimeters have the required features for measuring peripheral dose. Plastic scintillator dosimeters (PSDs) offer numerous dosimetric advantages as required for out‐of‐field dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to determine the potential of using PSD as a surface peripheral dosimeter. Measurements were performed with a parallel‐plate ion chamber, a small volume ion chamber, and with a PSD. Lateral‐dose measurements (LDM) at 0.5 cm depth and depth‐dose curve (PDD) were made and compared to the dose calculation provided by a treatment planning system (TPS). This study shows that a PSD can measure a dose as low as 0.51±0.17cGy for photon beam and 0.58±0.20cGy for electron beam with a difference of 0.2 and 0.1 cGy compared to a parallel‐plate ion chamber. This study demonstrates the potential of using PSD as an out‐of‐field dosimeter since measurements with PSD avoid averaging over a too‐large depth, at 1 mm diameter, and can make precise measurement at very low dose. Also, electronic equilibrium is easier to reach with PSD due to its small sensitive volume and its water equivalence. PACS number(s): 87.55.N, 87.55.km PMID:27685131

  15. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  16. First electric field measurements from the plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Eriksson, Anders; Odelstad, Elias; André, Mats; Dickeli, Guillaume; Kullen, Anita; Lindqvist, Per-Arne

    2017-04-01

    We present the first electric field measurements from the plasma environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, performed by the Rosetta dual Langmuir probe instrument LAP. For two time intervals, measurements of the electric field from cometocentric distances of 149 and 348 km are presented together with estimates of the spacecraft potential, which can be used as an indicator of plasma density changes. Persistent wave activity around the local water ion lower hybrid frequency (determined from the magnetic field measurements from the fluxgate magnetometer MAG) is observed. The largest amplitudes are observed at sharp plasma gradients. We discuss the probability that these waves are excited by the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI), and conclude that the necessary requirements for the LHDI to be operating are fulfilled. We also present first statistical results of the electric field measurements, showing that the wave activity is concentrated to certain regions of the comet, and varies with heliocentric distance. We also discuss the possible effects the waves have on the ambient plasma, and suggest that they may explain hot plasma populations.

  17. Measuring Subsurface Water Fluxes Using a Heat Pulse Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T. E.; Wang, Q.; Horton, R.

    2001-12-01

    Subsurface water flux is an important parameter in studies of runoff, infiltration, groundwater recharge, and subsurface chemical transport. Heat pulse sensors have been proposed as promising tools for measuring subsurface water fluxes. Our heat pulse probe consists of three 4-cm stainless-steel needles embedded in a waterproof epoxy body. The needles contain resistance heaters and thermocouples. The probes are connected to an external datalogger and power supply and then installed in soil. To measure the water flux, a 15-s heat pulse is generated at the middle needle using the power supply and the resistance heater, and the temperature increases at the needles 6-mm upstream and downstream from the heater are recorded using the thermocouples and datalogger. To date, heat pulse methods have required cumbersome mathematical analysis to calculate soil water flux from this measured data. We present a new mathematical analysis showing that a simple relationship exists between water flux and the ratio of the temperature increase downstream from the line heat source to the temperature increase upstream from the line heat source. The simplicity of this relationship makes heat pulse sensors a more attractive option for measuring subsurface water fluxes.

  18. Composite measures of watershed health from a water quality perspective.

    PubMed

    Mallya, Ganeshchandra; Hantush, Mohamed; Govindaraju, Rao S

    2018-05-15

    Water quality data at gaging stations are typically compared with established federal, state, or local water quality standards to determine if violations (concentrations of specific constituents falling outside acceptable limits) have occurred. Based on the frequency and severity of water quality violations, risk metrics such as reliability, resilience, and vulnerability (R-R-V) are computed for assessing water quality-based watershed health. In this study, a modified methodology for computing R-R-V measures is presented, and a new composite watershed health index is proposed. Risk-based assessments for different water quality parameters are carried out using identified national sampling stations within the Upper Mississippi River Basin, the Maumee River Basin, and the Ohio River Basin. The distributional properties of risk measures with respect to water quality parameters are reported. Scaling behaviors of risk measures using stream order, specifically for the watershed health (WH) index, suggest that WH values increased with stream order for suspended sediment concentration, nitrogen, and orthophosphate in the Upper Mississippi River Basin. Spatial distribution of risk measures enable identification of locations exhibiting poor watershed health with respect to the chosen numerical standard, and the role of land use characteristics within the watershed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monte Carlo and experimental determination of correction factors for gamma knife perfexion small field dosimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoros, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pappas, E. P.; Georgiou, E.; Kollias, G.; Karaiskos, P.; Pantelis, E.

    2017-09-01

    Detector-, field size- and machine-specific correction factors are required for precise dosimetry measurements in small and non-standard photon fields. In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques were used to calculate the k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} and k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors for a series of ionization chambers, a synthetic microDiamond and diode dosimeters, used for reference and/or output factor (OF) measurements in the Gamma Knife Perfexion photon fields. Calculations were performed for the solid water (SW) and ABS plastic phantoms, as well as for a water phantom of the same geometry. MC calculations for the k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors in SW were compared against corresponding experimental results for a subset of ionization chambers and diode detectors. Reference experimental OF data were obtained through the weighted average of corresponding measurements using TLDs, EBT-2 films and alanine pellets. k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} values close to unity (within 1%) were calculated for most of ionization chambers in water. Greater corrections of up to 6.0% were observed for chambers with relatively large air-cavity dimensions and steel central electrode. A phantom correction of 1.006 and 1.024 (breaking down to 1.014 from the ABS sphere and 1.010 from the accompanying ABS phantom adapter) were calculated for the SW and ABS phantoms, respectively, adding up to k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} corrections in water. Both measurements and MC calculations for the diode and microDiamond detectors resulted in lower than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors, due to their denser sensitive volume and encapsulation materials. In comparison, higher than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} results for the ionization chambers suggested field size depended dose underestimations (being significant for the 4 mm field), with magnitude depending on the combination of

  20. Measurements of Gas and Particle Phase Emissions From Munitions Detonation in a Field Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, E. C.; Knighton, W. B.; Timko, M.; Wood, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Beardsley, H. M.

    2007-12-01

    During the Point of Fire (POF) field campaign conducted at Fort Sill Oklahoma U.S.A. in March 2007 a suite of real- time trace gas and fine (submicron) particulate matter (PM) instrumentation characterized the point of fire emission plumes from large, medium and small caliber weapons systems. Muzzle emission plumes were measured and where appropriate, breach plumes and gun crew breathing zone measurements were also conducted. Aerosol measurements were conducted with an aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne CTOF-AMS) for particle composition, condensation particle counter (CPC) for particle number density and DUSTRAK aerosol monitor for particle mass. Gas phase measurements included CO, CO2, NOx and a variety of trace gas species measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) including hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetonitrile, acrylonitrile, benzene, toluene, benzonitrile and styrene. In the majority of the plume measurements, HCN was the most prominent compound measured by PTR-MS. Quantification of HCN by PTR-MS is difficult due to its proton affinity being close enough to that of water to allow a significant backward reaction of protonated HCN with water, reducing the detection sensitivity and making the response dependent on humidity. We have developed a quantification procedure for HCN based on laboratory measurements of a calibration gas standard of HCN, which allows the humidity dependence to be extracted directly from the proton hydrate ion intensities. The correction factors for HCN are quite significant varying between 10 and 30 depending on sample humidity.

  1. Estimates of Leaf Relative Water Content from Optical Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2017-12-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plant canopies remains a long term goal of remote sensing research. Existing approaches to remotely sensing canopy water status, such as the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT), have limitations. The CWSI, based upon remotely sensing canopy radiant temperature in the thermal infrared spectral region, does not work well in humid regions, requires estimates of the vapor pressure deficit near the canopy during the remote sensing over-flight and, once stomata close, provides little information regarding the canopy water status. The EWT is based upon the physics of water-light interaction in the 900-2000nm spectral region, not plant physiology. Our goal, development of a remote sensing technique for estimating plant water status based upon measurements in the VIS/NIR spectral region, would potentially provide remote sensing access to plant dehydration physiology - to the cellular photochemistry and structural changes associated with water deficits in leaves. In this research, we used optical, crossed polarization filters to measure the VIS/NIR light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, for 78 corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) leaves having relative water contents (RWC) between 0.60 and 0.98. Our results show that as RWC decreases R increases while T decreases. Our results tie R and T changes in the VIS/NIR to leaf physiological changes - linking the light scattered out of the drying leaf interior to its relative water content and to changes in leaf cellular structure and pigments. Our results suggest remotely sensing the physiological water status of a single leaf - and perhaps of a plant canopy - might be possible in the future.

  2. Field Evaluation of Polymer Capacitive Humidity Sensors for Bowen Ratio Energy Balance Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  3. Use of solar energy for mobile field domitory space and hot water heating

    SciTech Connect

    Turulov, V.A.; Kaem, Yu.Z.

    1978-01-01

    The solar space and water<