Science.gov

Sample records for water retention curve

  1. Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Horita, Juske; Hussey, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

  2. Water retention curves and thermal insulating properties of Thermosand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibniz, Otto; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    The heat loss and the efficiency of isolating material surrounding heat supply pipes are essential issues for the energy budget of heat supply pipe lines. Until now heat loss from the pipe is minimized by enlarging the polyurethane (PU) - insulation thickness around the pipe. As a new approach to minimize the heat loss a thermally insulating bedding material was developed and investigated. Conventional bedding sands cover all necessary soil mechanical properties, but have a high thermal conductivity from λ =1,5 to 1,7 W/(m K). A newly developed embedding material 'Thermosand' shows thermal properties from λ=0,18 W/(m K) (dry) up to 0,88 W/(m K) (wet). The raw material originates from the waste rock stockpiles of a coal mine near Fohnsdorf, Austria. With high temperatures up to nearly 1000 ° C and a special mineral mixture, a natural burned reddish material resembling clinker arises. The soilmechanical properties of Thermosand has been thoroughly investigated with laboratory testing and in situ investigations to determine compaction-, permeability- and shear-behaviour, stiffness and corresponding physical parameters. Test trenches along operational heat pipes with temperature-measurement along several cross-sections were constructed to compare conventional embedding materials with 'Thermosand'. To investigate the influence of varying moisture content on thermal conductivity a 1:1 large scale model test in the laboratory to simulate real insitu-conditions was established. Based on this model it is planned to develop numerical simulations concerning varying moisture contents and unsaturated soil mechanics with heat propagation, including the drying out of the soil during heat input. These simulations require the knowledge about the water retention properties of the material. Thus, water retention curves were measured using both steady-state tension and pressure techniques and the simplified evaporation method. The steady-state method employs a tension table (sand

  3. Closing the loop of the soil water retention curve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Alsherif, N; Wayllace, Alexandra; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The authors, to their knowledge for the first time, produced two complete principal soil water retention curves (SWRCs) under both positive and negative matric suction regimes. An innovative testing technique combining the transient water release and imbibition method (TRIM) and constant flow method (CFM) was used to identify the principal paths of SWRC in the positive pore-water pressure regime under unsaturated conditions. A negative matric suction of 9.8 kPa is needed to reach full saturation or close the loop of the SWRC for a silty soil. This work pushes the understanding of the interaction of soil and water into new territory by quantifying the boundaries of the SWRC over the entire suction domain, including both wetting and drying conditions that are relevant to field conditions such as slope wetting under heavy rainfall or rapid groundwater table rise in earthen dams or levees.

  4. Hysteresis and uncertainty in soil water-retention curve parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likos, William J.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil hydraulic parameters representing wetting and drying paths are required for predicting hydraulic and mechanical responses in a large number of applications. A comprehensive suite of laboratory experiments was conducted to measure hysteretic soil-water characteristic curves (SWCCs) representing a wide range of soil types. Results were used to quantitatively assess differences and uncertainty in three simplifications frequently adopted to estimate wetting-path SWCC parameters from more easily measured drying curves. They are the following: (1) αw=2αd, (2) nw=nd, and (3) θws=θds, where α, n, and θs are fitting parameters entering van Genuchten’s commonly adopted SWCC model, and the superscripts w and d indicate wetting and drying paths, respectively. The average ratio αw/αd for the data set was 2.24±1.25. Nominally cohesive soils had a lower αw/αd ratio (1.73±0.94) than nominally cohesionless soils (3.14±1.27). The average nw/nd ratio was 1.01±0.11 with no significant dependency on soil type, thus confirming the nw=nd simplification for a wider range of soil types than previously available. Water content at zero suction during wetting (θws) was consistently less than during drying (θds) owing to air entrapment. The θws/θds ratio averaged 0.85±0.10 and was comparable for nominally cohesive (0.87±0.11) and cohesionless (0.81±0.08) soils. Regression statistics are provided to quantitatively account for uncertainty in estimating hysteretic retention curves. Practical consequences are demonstrated for two case studies.

  5. Multiple pixel-scale soil water retention curves quantified by neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Perfect, E.; Cheng, C. L.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lee, J.; Horita, J.; Warren, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    The soil water retention function is needed for modeling multiphase flow in porous media. Traditional techniques for measuring the soil water retention function, such as the hanging water column or pressure cell methods, yield average water retention data which have to be modeled using inverse procedures to extract relevant point parameters. In this study, we have developed a technique for directly measuring multiple point (pixel-scale) water retention curves for a repacked sand material using 2-D neutron radiography. Neutron radiographic images were obtained under quasi-equilibrium conditions at nine imposed basal matric potentials during monotonic drying of Flint sand at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide (CG) 1D beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. All of the images were normalized with respect to an image of the oven dry sand column. Volumetric water contents were computed on a pixel by pixel basis using an empirical calibration equation after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. Corresponding matric potentials were calculated from the imposed basal matric potential and pixel elevations. Volumetric water content and matric potential data pairs corresponding to 120 selected pixels were used to construct 120 point water retention curves. Each curve was fitted to the Brooks and Corey equation using segmented non-linear regression in SAS. A 98.5% convergence rate was achieved resulting in 115 estimates of the four Brooks and Corey parameters. A single Brooks and Corey point water retention function was constructed for Flint sand using the median values of these parameter estimates. This curve corresponded closely with the point Brooks and Corey function inversely extracted from the average water retention data using TrueCell. Forward numerical simulations performed using HYDRUS 1-D showed that the cumulative outflows predicted using the point Brooks and Corey functions from both the direct (neutron radiography) and

  6. Laboratory and Field Investigations of Dynamic Effects in Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Yen-Huiang; Ye, Jiun-Yan

    2015-04-01

    The unsaturated soil is a multi-phase system and the embedded physical mechanisms and chemical reactions are very complicated. The characteristics of groundwater flow and mechanisms of mass transport are still ambiguous so far. In order to fully understand the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone, the soil water retention curve plays an important role in description of water flow. However, the measurements and calculations of soil water retention curve are usually obtained under the static condition or steady state (equilibrium), in which the dynamic effects (non-equilibrium) are not considered, and the obtained relationship between capillary pressure and saturation is skeptical. Therefore, the sandbox experiments and field tests will be conducted to discuss the dynamic effects in the soil water retention curve and hysteresis effect in this study. In the laboratory, the relations between capillary pressure, saturation, the rate of change of water content, and dynamic constant are evaluated through different setting of boundary conditions and different sizes of particles. In the field, the tests are conducted to describe the soil water retention curve through the rain simulator and artificial evaporation. Besides, the dynamic dewpoint potentiameter is used to analyze the hysteresis effect of soil samples, and its results are compared with the results obtained from sandbox and field experiments. Finally, through a series of experiments, the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation under the dynamic effects is established, and the associated theories and mechanisms are discussed. The works developed in this study can provide as reference tools for the hydrogeological investigation and contaminated site remediation in the future. Keywords: capillary pressure, saturation, soil water retention curve, hysteresis, sandbox experiment, field test

  7. Sample dimensions effect on prediction of soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (SHC) are key hydraulic properties for unsaturated zone hydrology and groundwater. Not only are the SWRC and SHC measurements time-consuming, their results are scale dependent. Although prediction of the SWRC and SHC from availab...

  8. The soil water retention curve: a rare beauty that's hard to observe in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Ulrich; Hannes, Matthias; Wollschläger, Ute; Wöhling, Thomas; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-04-01

    It is soil physics most used function. It is the base for all water budget modeling, and it is determined in well defined lab experiments: the soil water retention curve. Yet it is well known that there are many cases where the water retention cannot be described by a unique relationship between water content and water potential but that its trajectories often deviate in a hysteretic manner and in dynamic situations with fast infiltration fronts. Yet it is implicitly considered that the deviations are of a mere academic interest and that the simple unique retention curve can mimic the retention characteristics of soils under natural conditions. In this overview we will demonstrate from several years of monitoring of different field and lysimeter studies that the non-unique relationship between water content and water potential is the rule rather than the exception, and that the water flow regime is dominated by these 'anomalies' of the water retention characteristic. Under slowly changing water contents the dynamics can be described by hysteretic models. Of the tested hysteretic models any performed reasonably well, with the best model performance depending on the soil type and flow situation. However at fast infiltration events none of the models was able to describe the water potential signal, which was progressing much faster than the water content signal. This phenomenon has been derived from theoretical considerations for heterogeneous soils. The consequences are that water is released from the soil much faster than could be expected based on the local soil hydraulic properties. Under the impression of the presented field data it can be concluded that an elaborated determination of water retention curves at the lab scale seems to be of limited use, as the water characteristics that dominate the field scale behaviour are not captured by retention curves. A field adapted soil pysical model must cope with both hysteretic and dynamic processes, and so far the

  9. Estimating water retention curves for sandy soils at the Doñana National Park, SW Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The determination of soil water retention curves (SWRC) in the laboratory is a slow and tedious task, which is especially challenging for sandy soils due to their low water retention capacity and large water content changes for small pressure head differences. Due to spatial variability within larg...

  10. Comparison of Optimization and Two-point Methods in Estimation of Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, B.; Liaghat, A. M.; Huang, G.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) is one of the soil hydraulic properties in which its direct measurement is time consuming and expensive. Since, its measurement is unavoidable in study of environmental sciences i.e. investigation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and solute transport, in this study the attempt is to predict soil water retention curve from two measured points. By using Cresswell and Paydar (1996) method (two-point method) and an optimization method developed in this study on the basis of two points of SWRC, parameters of Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990) model (fractal dimension and air entry value) were estimated and then water content at different matric potentials were estimated and compared with their measured values (n=180). For each method, we used both 3 and 1500 kPa (case 1) and 33 and 1500 kPa (case 2) as two points of SWRC. The calculated RMSE values showed that in the Creswell and Paydar (1996) method, there exists no significant difference between case 1 and case 2. However, the calculated RMSE value in case 2 (2.35) was slightly less than case 1 (2.37). The results also showed that the developed optimization method in this study had significantly less RMSE values for cases 1 (1.63) and 2 (1.33) rather than Cresswell and Paydar (1996) method.

  11. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  12. Temperature dependence of large-scale water retention curves: Acase study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dane, J.H.

    2001-10-26

    A local-scale model for temperature-dependence of water-retention curves may be applicable to large scales. Consideration of this temperature dependence is important for modeling unsaturated flow and transport in the subsurface in numerous cases. Although significant progress has been made in understanding and modeling this temperature effect, almost all the previous studies have been limited to small scales (on the order of several centimeters). Numerical experiments were used to investigate the possibility of extending a local-scale model for the temperature-dependence of water retention curves to large scales (on the order of meters). Temperature effects on large-scale hydraulic properties are of interest in many practical applications. Numerical experiment results indicate that the local-scale model can indeed be applicable to large-scale problems for special porous media with high air entry values. A typical porous medium of this kind is the porous tuff matrix in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed geologic disposal site for national high-level nuclear wastes. Whether this finding can approximately hold for general cases needs to be investigated in future studies.

  13. Evaluating the relative air permeability of porous media from their water retention curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Tuli, A.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate modeling of water and air flow in porous media requires the definition of the relevant hydraulic properties, namely, the water retention curve (WRC) and the relative hydraulic conductivity function (RHC), as well as the definition of the relative air permeability function (RAP). Capitalizing on the approach developed previously to represent the RHC, a new model allowing the prediction of RAP based on information resulting from the WRC is proposed. The power value ηa in the model is a decreasing exponential function of the coefficient of variation, ɛ, characterizing the pore size distribution of the porous medium, and derived from its WRC. The model was calibrated using data from 22 disturbed and undisturbed soil samples and was validated using data from eight soil types ranging from quartz sand to silty clay loam. The proposed model provided accurate prediction of the soil RAP and performed in some cases (sandy loam and silty clay loam soils) better than available alternative models.

  14. Interrelations among the soil-water retention, hydraulic conductivity, and suction-stress characteristic curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The three fundamental constitutive relations that describe fluid flow, strength, and deformation behavior of variably saturated soils are the soil-water retention curve (SWRC), hydraulic conductivity function (HCF), and suction-stress characteristic curve (SSCC). Until recently, the interrelations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC have not been well established. This work sought experimental confirmation of interrelations among these three constitutive functions. Results taken from the literature for six soils and those obtained for 11 different soils were used. Using newly established analytical relations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC and these test results, the authors showed that these three constitutive relations can be defined by a common set of hydromechanical parameters. The coefficient of determination for air-entry pressures determined independently using hydraulic and mechanical methods is >0.99, >0.98 for the pore size parameter, and 0.94 for the residual degree of saturation. One practical implication is that one of any of the four experiments (axis-translation, hydraulic, shear-strength, or deformation) is sufficient to quantify all three constitutive relations.

  15. Deforestation effects on soil quality and water retention curve parameters in eastern Ardabil, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Sh.; Ahmadnejad, S.; Keivan Behjou, F.

    2016-03-01

    The land use change from natural to managed ecosystems causes serious soil degradation. The main objective of this research was to assess deforestation effects on soil physical quality attributes and soil water retention curve (SWRC) parameters in the Fandoghlou region of Ardabil province, Iran. Totally 36 surface and subsurface soil samples were taken and soil water contents measured at 13 suctions. Alfa (α) and n parameters in van Genuchten (1980) model were estimated by fitting SWRC data by using RETC software. The slope of SWRC at inflection point (SP) was calculated by Dexter (2004) equation. The results indicated that with changing land use from forest (F) to range land (R) and cultivated land (C), and also with increasing soil depth from 0-25 to 75-100 cm in each land use, organic carbon, micropores, saturated and available water contents decreased and macropores and bulk density increased significantly ( P < 0.05). The position of SWRC shape in F was higher than R and C lands at all soil depths. Changing F to R and C lands and also increasing soil depth in each land use significantly ( P < 0.05) increased α and decreased n and SP. The average values of SP were obtained 0.093, 0.051 and 0.031 for F, R and C, respectively. As a result, deforestation reduced soil physical quality by affecting SWRC parameters.

  16. Modeling the soil water retention curves of soil-gravel mixtures with regression method on the Loess Plateau of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifang; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Shao, Ming'an

    2013-01-01

    Soil water retention parameters are critical to quantify flow and solute transport in vadose zone, while the presence of rock fragments remarkably increases their variability. Therefore a novel method for determining water retention parameters of soil-gravel mixtures is required. The procedure to generate such a model is based firstly on the determination of the quantitative relationship between the content of rock fragments and the effective saturation of soil-gravel mixtures, and then on the integration of this relationship with former analytical equations of water retention curves (WRCs). In order to find such relationships, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine WRCs of soil-gravel mixtures obtained with a clay loam soil mixed with shale clasts or pebbles in three size groups with various gravel contents. Data showed that the effective saturation of the soil-gravel mixtures with the same kind of gravels within one size group had a linear relation with gravel contents, and had a power relation with the bulk density of samples at any pressure head. Revised formulas for water retention properties of the soil-gravel mixtures are proposed to establish the water retention curved surface models of the power-linear functions and power functions. The analysis of the parameters obtained by regression and validation of the empirical models showed that they were acceptable by using either the measured data of separate gravel size group or those of all the three gravel size groups having a large size range. Furthermore, the regression parameters of the curved surfaces for the soil-gravel mixtures with a large range of gravel content could be determined from the water retention data of the soil-gravel mixtures with two representative gravel contents or bulk densities. Such revised water retention models are potentially applicable in regional or large scale field investigations of significantly heterogeneous media, where various gravel sizes and different gravel

  17. Modeling the Soil Water Retention Curves of Soil-Gravel Mixtures with Regression Method on the Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huifang; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Shao, Ming'an

    2013-01-01

    Soil water retention parameters are critical to quantify flow and solute transport in vadose zone, while the presence of rock fragments remarkably increases their variability. Therefore a novel method for determining water retention parameters of soil-gravel mixtures is required. The procedure to generate such a model is based firstly on the determination of the quantitative relationship between the content of rock fragments and the effective saturation of soil-gravel mixtures, and then on the integration of this relationship with former analytical equations of water retention curves (WRCs). In order to find such relationships, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine WRCs of soil-gravel mixtures obtained with a clay loam soil mixed with shale clasts or pebbles in three size groups with various gravel contents. Data showed that the effective saturation of the soil-gravel mixtures with the same kind of gravels within one size group had a linear relation with gravel contents, and had a power relation with the bulk density of samples at any pressure head. Revised formulas for water retention properties of the soil-gravel mixtures are proposed to establish the water retention curved surface models of the power-linear functions and power functions. The analysis of the parameters obtained by regression and validation of the empirical models showed that they were acceptable by using either the measured data of separate gravel size group or those of all the three gravel size groups having a large size range. Furthermore, the regression parameters of the curved surfaces for the soil-gravel mixtures with a large range of gravel content could be determined from the water retention data of the soil-gravel mixtures with two representative gravel contents or bulk densities. Such revised water retention models are potentially applicable in regional or large scale field investigations of significantly heterogeneous media, where various gravel sizes and different gravel

  18. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  19. Strategy for applying scaling technique to water retention curves of forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Kosugi, K.; Mizuyama, T.

    2009-12-01

    Describing the infiltration of water in soils on a forested hillslope requires the information of spatial variability of water retention curve (WRC). By using a scaling technique, Hayashi et al. (2009), found that the porosity mostly characterizes the spatial variability of the WRCs on a forested hillslope. This scaling technique was based on a model, which assumes a lognormal pore size distribution and contains three parameters: the median of log-transformed pore radius, ψm, the variance of log-transformed pore radius, σ, and the effective porosity, θe. Thus, in the scaling method proposed by Hayashi et al. (2009), θe is a scaling factor, which should be determined for each individual soil, and that ψm and σ are reference parameter common for the whole data set. They examined this scaling method using θe calculated as a difference between the observed saturated water content and water content observed at ψ = -1000 cm for each sample and, ψm and σ derived from the whole data set of WRCs on the slope. Then it was showed that this scaling method could explain almost 90 % of the spatial variability in WRCs on the forested hillslope. However, this method requires the whole data set of WRCs for deriving the reference parameters (ψm and σ). For applying the scaling technique more practically, in this study, we tested a scaling method using the reference parameter derived from the WRCs at a small part of the slope. In order to examine the proposed scaling method, the WRCs for the 246 undisturbed forest soil samples, collected at 15 points distributed from downslope to upslope segments, were observed. In the proposed scaling method, we optimized the common ψm and σ to the WRCs for six soil samples, collected at one point on the middle-slope, and applied these parameters to a reference parameter for the whole data sets. The scaling method proposed by this study exhibited an increase of only 6 % in the residual sum of squares as compared with that of the method

  20. Estimating water retention curves for sandy soils at the Doñana National Park, SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prados Garcia, M. Luisa; Vanderlinden, Karl; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Giraldez Cervera, Juan Vicente; Guber, Andrey K.; Pachepsky, Yakov A.

    2010-05-01

    The determination of soil water retention curves (SWRC) in the laboratory is a slow and tedious task, which is especially challenging for sandy soils due to their low water retention capacity and large water content changes for small pressure head differences. Due to spatial variability within larger areas and difficulties to obtain minimally disturbed soil samples, especially under dry conditions, laboratory measurements of the SWRCs are only suitable for guidance, as a consequence of their low representativity and accuracy. This work was developed within the framework of a research project on the ecohydrological behaviour of the soil-plant-atmosphere system within the Doñana National Park (SW Spain). In order to characterise the hydrological behaviour of the soils, a good estimation of water retention curves and hydraulic parameters is needed. Ten locations within the study area were equipped with soil moisture sensors (ECH2O-EC20, Decagon Devices Inc.) to monitor volumetric water content at different depths throughout the vadose zone. These data allow the estimation of water fluxes and recharge of the underlying aquifer, which plays a crucial role in the wetland system of the Park, declared by UNESCO as Biosphere Reserve. In this work three methods for estimating SWRCs were developed and compared. First, sand and kaolin suction tables were used to obtain SWRCs for both minimally disturbed and disturbed samples. Second, SWRC were estimated with HYDRUS-1D using the monitored volumetric soil water content data. Finally, SWRCs were estimated using the additivity hypothesis, based on the idea that SWRCs can be approximated by summing up SWRCs corresponding to different particle-size and pore-space classes of which the soil is composed. Particle-size distributions were determined in the laboratory while water retention data for the different particle-size classes were taken from literature. The comparison of these three methods allowed us to define their strengths

  1. Estimate of the soil water retention curve from the sorptivity and β parameter calculated from an upward infiltration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, D.; Latorre, B.

    2017-01-01

    The water retention curve (θ(h)), which defines the relationship between the volumetric water content (θ) and the matric potential (h), is of paramount importance to characterize the hydraulic behaviour of soils. Because current methods to estimate θ(h) are, in general, tedious and time consuming, alternative procedures to determine θ(h) are needed. Using an upward infiltration curve, the main objective of this work is to present a method to determine the parameters of the van Genuchten (1980) water retention curve (α and n) from the sorptivity (S) and the β parameter defined in the 1D infiltration equation proposed by Haverkamp et al. (1994). The first specific objective is to present an equation, based on the Haverkamp et al. (1994) analysis, which allows describing an upward infiltration process. Secondary, assuming a known saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, calculated on a finite soil column by the Darcy's law, a numerical procedure to calculate S and β by the inverse analysis of an exfiltration curve is presented. Finally, the α and n values are numerically calculated from Ks, S and β. To accomplish the first specific objective, cumulative upward infiltration curves simulated with HYDRUS-1D for sand, loam, silt and clay soils were compared to those calculated with the proposed equation, after applying the corresponding β and S calculated from the theoretical Ks, α and n. The same curves were used to: (i) study the influence of the exfiltration time on S and β estimations, (ii) evaluate the limits of the inverse analysis, and (iii) validate the feasibility of the method to estimate α and n. Next, the θ(h) parameters estimated with the numerical method on experimental soils were compared to those obtained with pressure cells. The results showed that the upward infiltration curve could be correctly described by the modified Haverkamp et al. (1994) equation. While S was only affected by early-time exfiltration data, the β parameter had a

  2. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Moldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus; Ferré, T. P. A.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2011-06-01

    Accurate description of the soil water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics and biochemical vadose zone processes in arid environments. Soil water retention data corresponding to matric potentials of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were classified into four groups on the basis of the Dexter number (n = CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing water film thickness at a given matric potential (<-10 MPa) was evaluated. The SA estimated from the dry end of the SWRC (SA_SWRC) was in good agreement with the SA measured with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water contents. However, the TO model still overestimated water film thickness at potentials approaching ovendry condition (about -800 MPa). The semi-log linear Campbell-Shiozawa-Rossi-Nimmo (CSRN) model showed better fits for all investigated soils from -10 to -800 MPa and yielded high correlations with CL and SA. It is therefore recommended to apply the empirical CSRN model for predicting the dry part of the water retention curve (-10 to -800 MPa) from measured soil texture or surface area. Further research should aim to modify the more physically based TO model to obtain better descriptions of the SWRC in the very dry range (-300 to -800 MPa).

  3. The Effects of Salinity and Sodium Adsorption Ratio on the Water Retention and Hydraulic Conductivity Curves of Soils From The Pampa del Tamarugal, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. S.; Munoz, J.; Suarez, F. I.; Fierro, V.; Moreno, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa del Tamarugal is located in the Atacama Desert, the most arid desert of the world. It has important reserves of groundwater, which are probably fed by infiltration coming from the Andes Mountain, with groundwater levels fluctuating between 3 and 10-70 m below the land surface. In zones where shallow groundwater exists, the capillary rise allows to have a permanently moist vadose zone, which sustain native vegetation such as the Tamarugos (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) and Algarrobos (Prosopis alba Griseb.). The native vegetation relies on the soil moisture and on the evaporative fluxes, which are controlled by the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soils. The soils associated to the salt flats of the Pampa del Tamarugal are a mixture of sands and clays, which have high levels of sulfates, chloride, carbonates, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium, with high pH and electrical conductivity, and low organic matter and cationic exchange capacity. In this research, we are interested in evaluating the impact of salinity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soil, i.e., water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. Soils were collected from the Pampa del Tamarugal and brought to the laboratory for characterization. The evaporation method (HYPROP, UMS) was used to determine the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve was estimated combining the evaporation method with direct measurements using a variable head permeameter (KSAT, UMS). It was found that higher sodium concentrations increase the water retention capacity and decrease the soiĺs hydraulic conductivity. These changes occur in the moist range of the hydrodynamic characteristics. The soil's hydraulic properties have significant impact on evaporation fluxes, which is the mayor component of the water balance. Thus, it is important to quantify them and incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution effect on the hydrodynamic properties to correctly

  4. Analysis of water retention curve as a potential tool in comparing the effect of different soil management in two olive orchard in southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, G.; Gómez, J. A.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2010-05-01

    Water soil erosion is one of the major concerns in agricultural areas in Southern Spain, and the use of cover crops has been recommended as an alternative to tillage to prevent, or mitigate, soil erosion. This change of soil management implies a progressive modification of soil chemical, biological and physical properties which to date, have been documented by a limited number of studies. In this communication we describe a methodology based on the modification of the water retention curves of intact cores, present the results obtained in two olive orchards in Southern Spain, and compare them with several chemical and physical properties measured simultaneously in the orchards. The experimental areas were located in Benacazón and Pedrera, Seville province in Southern Spain, and at each location two experimental plots were established. One of the plots was under traditional tillage management and the other under cover crop soil management. The slope at the plots was 12 and 4% respectively. Soil samples were taken at both plots differentiating between the inter tree areas and the under the olive canopy areas, between two different depths: 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm. These resulted in eight different sampling areas (2x2x2). Samples were taken three year after establishing the experiments. Water retention curves of soils were obtained as the average of replications per and using the Eijkelkamp Sand and Sand/Kaolin suction tables (0-500 hPa) and a Decagon's WP4-T dewpoint potentiometer (0-300•106 hPa). The latest was used to determine the residual water content. Experimental water retention curves were to two different models: van Genuchten (1980) and Kosugi (1994). Once modeling was done, the slope value of the curves at the inflexion point, proposed by Dexter (2004a, b, c) to estimate physical quality of soils, was calculated. This study presents and discusses the advantages and problems of the different approaches for determining the water retention curves, the

  5. Permeability and Retentivity Curves In Mountain Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, S.; Ranzi, R.

    The saturated conductivity, Ks, and the retentivity curves, for mountain non-mature soils have been determined after laboratory- and field-experiments carried out over about 146 soil samples in the Toce river basin (Val d'Ossola, Northern Italian Alps). Eightythree samples only have been used to measure the retentivity curves using 15 bar and 5 bar Richard's extractors. Coherently with other researches, traditional meth- ods used to derive Ks on the basis of in situ infiltration test with a single ring infiltrom- eter provided values grater than those calculated using a variable head permeameter in laboratory. So other simplified methods have been used to estimate Ks after field analysis: the traditional method based on the Darcy's law, modified in respect of soil saturation; a method based on an application of Green and Ampt infiltration model; and a method based on the Wooding's works. All these methods, in particular the Wooding (1968) solution, gave estimates of Ks closer to the laboratory ones and to the results of a finite elements numerical solution of the Richard's equation in a 3D domain with axial simmetry. As a result an updated legend for the existing surface soil saturated conductivity map for the of the Toce basin is proposed. Inhomogeneities in the vertical permeability profiles have been identified also.

  6. High-resolution Land Cover Datasets, Composite Curve Numbers, and Storm Water Retention in the Tampa Bay, FL region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Policy makers need to understand how land cover change alters storm water regimes, yet existing methods do not fully utilize newly available datasets to quantify storm water changes at a landscape-scale. Here, we use high-resolution, remotely-sensed land cover, imperviousness, an...

  7. Fractal processes in soil water retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.W.; Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose a physical conceptual model for soil texture and pore structure that is based on the concept of fractal geometry. The motivation for a fractal model of soil texture is that some particle size distributions in granular soils have already been shown to display self-similar scaling that is typical of fractal objects. Hence it is reasonable to expect that pore size distributions may also display fractal scaling properties. The paradigm that they used for the soil pore size distribution is the Sierpinski carpet, which is a fractal that contains self similar holes (or pores) over a wide range of scales. The authors evaluate the water retention properties of regular and random Sierpinski carpets and relate these properties directly to the Brooks and Corey (or Campbell) empirical water retention model. They relate the water retention curves directly to the fractal dimension of the Sierpinski carpet and show that the fractal dimension strongly controls the water retention properties of the Sierpinski carpet soil. Higher fractal dimensions are shown to mimic clay-type soils, with very slow dewatering characteristics and relatively low fractal dimensions are shown to mimic a sandy soil with relatively rapid dewatering characteristics. Their fractal model of soil water retention removes the empirical fitting parameters from the soil water retention models and provides paramters which are intrinsic to the nature of the fractal porous structure. The relative permeability functions of Burdine and Mualem are also shown to be fractal directly from fractal water retention results.

  8. Retention Curve Measurement for Sands Using a TDR-based Long Column and Modified Tempe Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2006-12-01

    Long column and Tempe cell are typical methods for measuring the water retention curves for soils. In the conventional long column method utilizing a stack of rings, water saturation profile is determined gravimetrically. X-ray or gamma ray attenuation are non-destructive methods but require complex and expensive devices and involve the use of photon sources. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is an alternative to these radioactive methods for measuring water content profile along the column. Typical Tempe cells have a sample height of 3 to 6 cm. Suction is applied to the sample to induce drainage and monitored outflow is used to calculate the average water saturation of the sample, which potentially leads to obscuring the distinct displacement pressure value and results in a smoothed retention curve. In this study, we assumed that direct point-wise measurements provide retention curves that represent the physical behavior of the porous medium. We first determined retention curves for a number of well-sorted industrial silica sands using a long column that allows such point-wise measurements by TDR probes horizontally installed at eleven different elevations. Then, we modified a commercially available Tempe cell so that water saturation and capillary pressure head at a physical point in the cell, as well as the conventional height-averaged water saturation, can be measured simultaneously. Comparison of the conventional and point- measured retention curves that were obtained simultaneously for the identical sand samples revealed that 1) point-measured retention curves were identical to the ones measured in the long column, 2) the artifact of using height-averaged saturation values as pointed out by Dane et al. [1992] was experimentally confirmed. We further show that the displacement pressure head can possibly be underestimated especially for coarse soils when height-averaged water saturation is used. This is more significant for oil-water and DNAPL-water systems where

  9. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  10. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  11. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Soil Retention Curve in Lombardy Region Northern of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassar, Fatma; Rienzner, Michele; Chiaradia, Enrico Antonio; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Water retention characteristics are crucial input parameters in any modeling study on water flow and solute transport. These properties are difficult to measure and therefore the use of both direct and indirect methods is required in order to adequately describe them with sufficient accuracy. Several field methods, laboratory methods and theoretical models for such determinations exist, each having their own limitations and advantages (Stephens, 1994). Therefore, extensive comparisons between estimated, field and laboratory results to determine it still requires their validity for a range of different soils and specific cases. This study attempts to make a contribution specifically in this connection. The soil water retention characteristics were determined in two representative sites (PMI-1 and PMI-5) located in Landriano field, in Lombardy region, northern Italy. In the laboratory, values of both volumetric water content (θ) and soil water matric potential (h) are measured in the same sample using the tensiometric box and pressure plate apparatus. Field determination of soil water retention involved measurements of soil water content with SENTEK probes, and matric potential with tensiometers. The retention curve characteristics were also determined using some of the most commonly cited and some recently developed PTFs that use soil properties such as particle-size distribution (sand, silt, and clay content), organic matter or organic Carbon content, and dry bulk density. Field methods are considered to be more representative than laboratory and estimation methods for determining water retention characteristics (Marion et al., 1996). Therefore, field retention curves were compared against retention curves obtained from laboratory measurements and PTFs estimations. The performances of laboratory and PTFs in predicting field measured data were evaluated using root mean square error (RMSE) and bias. The comparison showed that laboratory measurements were the most

  12. Modeling structural influences on soil water retention

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A new model quantities the effect of soil structure, considered as the arrangement of particles in the soil, on soil water retention. The model partitions the pore space into texture-related and structure-related components, the textural component being what can be deduced to exist if the arrangement of the particles were random, and the structural component being the remainder. An existing model, based on particle-size distributions, represents the textural component, and a new model, based on aggregate-size distributions, represents the structural component. This new model makes use of generalized properties that vary little from one medium to another, thereby eliminating any need for empirically tilted parameters. It postulates a particular character of the structural pore space that in same ways resembles texture-related pore space, but with pore shape related to the breadth of the aggregate-size distribution. To predict a soil water retention curve, this model requires the soil's porosity and particle- and aggregate-size distributions. Tested with measurements for 17 samples from two sources, it fits the data much better than does a model based on texture alone. Goodness of fit indicated by correlation coefficients ranged from 0.908 to 0.998 for the new model, compared with a range of 0.686 in 0.955 for the texture-based model.

  13. SHEARING AND WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOR OF UNSATURATED LOAM WITH MODELING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Yukoh; Kazama, Motoki

    Unsaturated triaxial tests were carried out to study deformation behavior, effective stress path and water retention property of consolidated loam during consolidation and shearing processes. Initial matric suction was set as 0, 50, and 90 kPa, and confining pressures (net normal stresses) were set as 100 kPa. Then shearing processes were done under undrained and drained conditions. We clarified the relation between void ratio and Van Genuchten model parameter by using water retention curve. To predict the unsaturated shearing behavior, a modified Cam Clay model considering void ratio dependent Van Genuchten parameter was proposed. Those numerical test results were agreed well with laboratory tests results.

  14. Water Retention: Relieve This Premenstrual Symptom

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you continue to be troubled by monthly water retention, consult your doctor. He or she might suggest that you keep a symptom diary for a few months. This can help confirm that your symptoms are related to your menstrual cycle, rather than other causes of abdominal bloating — including ...

  15. Wildfire impacts on soil-water retention in the Colorado Front Range, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States. We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content. Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on the soil-water retention curves. Parameters for use in soil-hydraulic property models were estimated; these parameters can be used in unsaturated flow modeling for comparing burned and unburned watersheds. The primary driver for measured differences in soil-water retention in burned and unburned soils was organic matter content and not soil-particle size distribution. The tendency for unburned south-facing soils to have greater organic matter content than unburned north-facing soils in this field area may explain why unburned south-facing soils had greater soil-water retention than unburned north-facing soils. Our results suggest that high-severity wildfire can “homogenize” soil-water retention across the landscape by erasing soil-water retention differences resulting from organic matter content, which for this site may be affected by slope aspect. This homogenization could have important implications for ecohydrology and plant succession/recovery in burned areas, which could be a factor in dictating the window of vulnerability of the landscape to flash floods and erosion that are a common consequence of wildfire.

  16. Wildfire impacts on soil-water retention in the Colorado Front Range, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Brian A.

    2012-12-01

    This work examined the plot-scale differences in soil-water retention caused by wildfire in the area of the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in the Colorado Front Range, United States. We measured soil-water retention curves on intact cores and repacked samples, soil particle-size distributions, and organic matter content. Estimates were also made of plant-available water based on the soil-water retention curves. Parameters for use in soil-hydraulic property models were estimated; these parameters can be used in unsaturated flow modeling for comparing burned and unburned watersheds. The primary driver for measured differences in soil-water retention in burned and unburned soils was organic matter content and not soil-particle size distribution. The tendency for unburned south-facing soils to have greater organic matter content than unburned north-facing soils in this field area may explain why unburned south-facing soils had greater soil-water retention than unburned north-facing soils. Our results suggest that high-severity wildfire can "homogenize" soil-water retention across the landscape by erasing soil-water retention differences resulting from organic matter content, which for this site may be affected by slope aspect. This homogenization could have important implications for ecohydrology and plant succession/recovery in burned areas, which could be a factor in dictating the window of vulnerability of the landscape to flash floods and erosion that are a common consequence of wildfire.

  17. Upscaled soil-water retention using van Genuchten's function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, T.R.; Constantz, J.E.; Freyberg, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Soils are often layered at scales smaller than the block size used in numerical and conceptual models of variably saturated flow. Consequently, the small-scale variability in water content within each block must be homogenized (upscaled). Laboratory results have shown that a linear volume average (LVA) of water content at a uniform suction is a good approximation to measured water contents in heterogeneous cores. Here, we upscale water contents using van Genuchten's function for both the local and upscaled soil-water-retention characteristics. The van Genuchten (vG) function compares favorably with LVA results, laboratory experiments under hydrostatic conditions in 3-cm cores, and numerical simulations of large-scale gravity drainage. Our method yields upscaled vG parameter values by fitting the vG curve to the LVA of water contents at various suction values. In practice, it is more efficient to compute direct averages of the local vG parameter values. Nonlinear power averages quantify a feasible range of values for each upscaled vG shape parameter; upscaled values of N are consistently less than the harmonic means, reflecting broad pore-size distributions of the upscaled soils. The vG function is useful for modeling soil-water retention at large scales, and these results provide guidance for its application.

  18. INTRODUCTION OF SPRINKLER FOR CONTINUATION OF WATER RETENTIVENESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, Mokichi; Yasuda, Kohei

    This report shows the study for the development of the efficient sprinkler system which contribute to the sustainability of water-retentive pavement. Water Retentive Pavement is one of the green engineering that is hoped to mitigate heat-island phenomenon. It is necessary for water retentiveness to keep showing the best performance, because it has shortage of water retentiveness, unless it rains. Therefore, the sprinkler system which is maximized its performance of water retentiveness at any time has been developed and it has started operating in June 2010.

  19. Is the Water Heating Curve as Described?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Oliva, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    We analysed the heating curve of water which is described in textbooks. An experiment combined with some simple heat transfer calculations is discussed. The theoretical behaviour can be altered by changing the conditions under which the experiment is modelled. By identifying and controlling the different parameters involved during the heating…

  20. Soil water retention dynamics in Luvisols at contrasting slope positions in lysimeter monoliths from an eroded soil landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Marcus; Gerke, Horst H.; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Modeling water flow and solute transport in variably saturated soils requires the proper description of the soil water retention curve. The problem is that under field conditions, water retention may be hysteretic or otherwise changing in time due to changing soil properties. In arable soil landscapes, these changes may depend on the erosion history which created spatial patterns of soil properties such as texture and organic matter content and differences in crop development. The objective of this study was to analyze the dynamics in field-measured water retention data for Luvisols in 10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm soil depth (Ap, E, and Bt horizons) at two contrasting at slope positions characterized by different degrees of soil erosion under intensive agricultural cultivation. Drying and wetting water retention was obtained from tensiometer/MPS and TDR data in depths representing same soil horizons. For comparison, we used drying retention data obtained from soil cores using the evaporation method (Hyprop). Drying data were fitted to the unconstrained water retention function proposed by van Genuchten (1980) and the bimodal model of Durner (1994). For wetting data, hydraulic model parameters were determined by using the Pedroso-Williams model (2010). The water contents of wetting and drying branches were dynamically changing. These changes in water retention were different for several horizons of the more eroded Luvisol as compared to the less eroded one. Differences in water retention dynamics could be related to soil tillage and the erosion history at the different slope positions. The water differences in retention could be explained by hysteresis and temporal changes in soil water repellency. Field and lab retention data differed as reported earlier. The results suggest that estimation of soil water retention curves without resorting to time-consuming field measurements remains challenging. The results suggest that for erosion-affected arable soils of the hummocky

  1. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the effect of biochar addition on soil water retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Chang, N.; Guo, M.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar (BC) is a carbon-rich product produced by thermal degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment, whose application to sediment is said to improve water retention. However, BC produced from different feedstocks and pyrolyzed at different temperatures have distinct properties, which may alter water retention in ways difficult to predict a priori. Our goal is to develop a mechanistic understanding of BC addition on water retention by examining the impact of BC from two feedstocks, poultry litter (PL) and hardwood (HW), on the soil-water retention curves (SWRC) of a uniform sand and a sandy loam (SL). For experiments with sand, BC and sand were sieved to the same particle size (~ 0.547 mm) to minimize effects of BC addition on particle size distribution. Experiments with SL contained the same sieved BC. PL and HW bicohars were added at 2 and 7% (w/w), and water retention was measured from 0 to -4.38 × 106 cm-H2O. Both BCs increased porosities for sand and SL, up to 39 and 13% for sand and SL, respectively, with 7% HW BC addition. The primary cause for these increases was the internal porosity of BC particles. While the matric potential for air-entry was unchanged with BC addition, BC amendment increased water retention for sand and SL in the capillary region (0 to -15,000 cm-H2O) by an average of 26 and 33 % for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but only 7 and 14 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL. The most dramatic influence of BC amendment on water retention occurred in the adsorption region (< -15,000 cm-H2O), where water retention increased by a factor of 11 and 22 for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but by 140 and 190 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL, respectively. The impact of BC on water retention in these sediments is explained primarily by the additional surface area and internal porosity of PL and HW BC particles. van Genuchten (VG) models were fitted to the water retention data. For SL where the impact of BC addition on water retention was

  2. Modelling Soil Water Characteristic Curves for the Investigation of Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Matthews, Peter; Laudone, Maurizio; Van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis; Dudley, Ed; Gazze, Andrea; Quinn, Gerry; Whalley, Richard; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity presents a major challenge for the future, as it reduces both plant-available water and irrigation efficiency, and can increase flooding hazards and erosion. A collaborative research project has been set up in the UK to study hydrophobicity over a wide range of length scales. At core scale, we are investigating the wetting behaviour of water repellent soils in order to model percolation through hydrophobic pore spaces. To that end, water retention measurements were carried out on both wettable and forcibly-wetted water-repellent soils collected from three locations in England and Wales. The data were then fitted with both the commonly used Van Genuchten model and an alternative model from PoreXpert, a software program that analyses and models porous materials. The Van Genuchten model fits a curve to the data using parameters related to air entry suction, irreducible water content and pore size distribution. By contrast, PoreXpert uses a Boltzmann-annealed simplex to find a best-fit curve based on parameters directly related to the void structure of the soil: the size of the voids, the shape of the void size distribution, and how the voids are connected to each other. Both Van Genuchten and PoreXpert fit the experimental data well, but where Van Genuchten forces an S-shaped curve that can mask small variations, PoreXpert gives a closer fit of no pre-defined shape that captures subtle differences between data points. This allows us to calculate differences in the effective pore and throat size distributions, and provides a mechanistic framework from which to model additional hydrologic behaviour in water repellent soil. Simulations of capillary induced wetting based on these mechanistic postulates are then compared to wicking experiments at the core scale, which can then be upscaled and applied to other soils.

  3. Soil water retention and maximum capillary drive from saturation to oven dryness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morel-Seytoux, H. J.; Nimmo, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an alternative method to describe the water retention curve over a range of water contents from saturation to oven dryness. It makes two modifications to the standard Brooks and Corey [1964] (B-C) description, one at each end of the suction range. One expression proposed by Rossi and Nimmo [1994] is used in the high-suction range to a zero residual water content. (This Rossi-Nimmo modification to the Brooks-Corey model provides a more realistic description of the retention curve at low water contents.) Near zero suction the second modification eliminates the region where there is a change in suction with no change in water content. Tests on seven soil data sets, using three distinct analytical expressions for the high-, medium-, and low-suction ranges, show that the experimental water retention curves are well fitted by this composite procedure. The high-suction range of saturation contributes little to the maximum capillary drive, defined with a good approximation for a soil water and air system as H(cM) = {???)/(o) k(rw) dh(c), where k(rw) is relative permeability (or conductivity) to water and h(c) is capillary suction, a positive quantity in unsaturated soils. As a result, the modification suggested to describe the high-suction range does not significantly affect the equivalence between Brooks-Corey (B-C) and van Genuchten [1980] parameters presented earlier. However, the shape of the retention curve near 'natural saturation' has a significant impact on the value of the capillary drive. The estimate using the Brooks-Corey power law, extended to zero suction, will exceed that obtained with the new procedure by 25 to 30%. It is not possible to tell which procedure is appropriate. Tests on another data set, for which relative conductivity data are available, support the view of the authors that measurements of a retention curve coupled with a speculative curve of relative permeability as from a capillary model are not sufficient to accurately

  4. Determination of water retention in stratified porous materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.

    1995-01-01

    Predicted and measured water-retention values, ??(??), were compared for repacked, stratified core samples consisting of either a sand with a stone-bearing layer or a sand with a clay loam layer in various spatial orientations. Stratified core samples were packed in submersible pressure outflow cells, then water-retention measurements were performed between matric potentials, ??, of 0 to -100 kPa. Predictions of ??(??) were based on a simple volume-averaging model using estimates of the relative fraction and ??(??) values of each textural component within a stratified sample. In general, predicted ??(??) curves resembled measured curves well, except at higher saturations in a sample consisting of a clay loam layer over a sand layer. In this case, the model averaged the air-entry of both materials, while the air-entry of the sample was controlled by the clay loam in contact with the cell's air-pressure inlet. In situ, avenues for air-entry generally exist around clay layers, so that the model should adequately predict air-entry for stratified formations regardless of spatial orientation of fine versus coarse layers. Agreement between measured and predicted volumetric water contents, ??, was variable though encouraging, with mean differences between measured and predicted ?? values in the range of 10%. Differences in ?? of this magnitude are expected due to variability in pore structure between samples, and do not indicate inherent problems with the volume averaging model. This suggets that explicit modeling of stratified formations through detailed characterization of the stratigraphy has the potential of yielding accurate ??(??) values. However, hydraulic-equilibration times were distinctly different for each variation in spatial orientation of textural layering, indicating that transient behavior during drainage in stratified formations is highly sensitive to the stratigraphic sequence of textural components, as well as the volume fraction of each textural

  5. Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira . E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin; Moravan, Veronika M.Sc.; McKenzie, Michael; Agranovich, Alexander; Pickles, Tom; Wu, Jonn; Liu, Mitchell; Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S.; Morris, W. James

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of

  6. A critical evaluation of soil water retention parameterizations with respect to their behaviour near saturation and in the dry range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit; Mai, Juliane; Mielenz, Henrike

    2016-04-01

    Flow of liquid water and movement of water vapor in the unsaturated zone affect in-soil processes (e.g., root water uptake) and exchanges of water between the soil and the groundwater (e.g., aquifer recharge) and between the soil and the atmosphere (e.g., evaporation). Evapotranspiration in particular is a key factor in the way soils moderate weather and respond to climate change. Soil physicists typically model these processes at scales of individual fields and smaller. They solve Richards' equation using soil water retention curves and hydraulic conductivity curves (soil hydraulic property curves) that are typically valid for even smaller soil volumes. Over the years, many parametric expressions have been proposed as models for the soil hydraulic property curves. Before Richards' equation and the associated soil hydraulic properties can be upscaled or modified for use on scales that are more useful for climate modeling and other applications of practical relevance, the small scale soil hydraulic property curves should at least perform well on the scale for which they were originally developed. Research over the past couple of decades revealed that the fit of soil water retention curves in the dry end is often quite poor, which is particularly risky when vapor flow is a significant factor. It also emerged that the shape of the retention curve for matric potentials very close to zero can generate physically unrealistic behavior of the hydraulic conductivity near saturation when combined with a popular class of conductivity models. We critically examined most of the existing soil water retention parameterizations with respect to these two aspects, and introduced minor modifications to a few of them to improve their performance. The presentation will highlight the results of this review, and demonstrate the effect on calculated fluxes of liquid water and water vapor in soils for illustrative hypothetical scenarios.

  7. Field Soil Water Retention of the Prototype Hanford Barrier and Its Variability with Space and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-08-14

    Engineered surface barriers are used to isolate underlying contaminants from water, plants, animals, and humans. To understand the flow processes within a barrier and the barrier’s ability to store and release water, the field hydraulic properties of the barrier need to be known. In situ measurement of soil hydraulic properties and their variation over time is challenging because most measurement methods are destructive. A multiyear test of the Prototype Hanford Barrier (PHB) has yielded in situ soil water content and pressure data for a nine-year period. The upper 2 m layer of the PHB is a silt loam. Within this layer, water content and water pressure were monitored at multiple depths at 12 water balance stations using a neutron probe and heat dissipation units. Valid monitoring data from 1995 to 2003 for 4 depths at 12 monitoring stations were used to determine the field water retention of the silt loam layer. The data covered a wide range of wetness, from near saturation to the permanent wilt point, and each retention curve contained 51 to 96 data points. The data were described well with the commonly used van Genuchten water retention model. It was found that the spatial variation of the saturated and residual water content and the pore size distribution parameter were relatively small, while that of the van Genuchten alpha was relatively large. The effects of spatial variability of the retention properties appeared to be larger than the combined effects of added 15% w/w pea gravel and plant roots on the properties. Neither of the primary hydrological processes nor time had a detectible effect on the water retention of the silt loam barrier.

  8. Predicting relative permeability from water retention: A direct approach based on fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Tyner, John S.; Perfect, Edmund

    2009-04-01

    Commonly, a soil's relative permeability curve is predicted from its measured water retention curve by fitting equations that share parameters between the two curves (e.g., Brooks/Corey-Mualem and van Genuchten-Mualem). We present a new approach to predict relative permeability by direct application of measured soil water retention data without any fitting procedures. The new relative permeability model, derived from a probabilistic fractal approach, appears in series form as a function of suction and the incremental change in water content. This discrete approach describes the drained pore space and permeability at different suctions incorporating the effects of both pore size distribution and connectivity among water-filled pores. We compared the new model performance predicting relative permeability to that of the van Genuchten-Mualem (VG-M) model for 35 paired data sets from the Unsaturated Soil hydraulic Database (UNSODA) and five other previously published data sets. At the 5% level of significance, the new method predicts relative permeabilities from the UNSODA database significantly better (mean logarithmic root-mean-square error, LRMSE = 0.813) than the VG-M model (LRMSE = 1.555). Each prediction of relative permeability from the five other previously published data sets was also significantly better.

  9. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiyanto; Sakai, Masaru; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-11-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic model of Peters-Durner-Iden (PDI) as formulated for the van Genuchten (VG) retention equation. The formulation includes the following processes: capillary hysteresis accounting for air entrapment, closed scanning curves, nonhysteretic sorption of water retention onto mineral surfaces, a hysteretic function for the capillary conductivity, a nonhysteretic function for the film conductivity, and a nearly nonhysteretic function of the conductivity as a function of water content (θ) for the entire range of water contents. The proposed model only requires two additional parameters to describe hysteresis. The model was found to accurately describe observed hysteretic water retention and conductivity data for a dune sand. Using a range of published data sets, relationships could be established between the capillary water retention and film conductivity parameters. Including vapor conductivity improved conductivity descriptions in the very dry range. The resulting model allows predictions of the hydraulic conductivity from saturation until complete dryness using water retention parameters.

  10. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-03

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure.

  11. Primer on Condition Curves for Water Mains

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The development of economical tools to prioritize pipe renewal based upon structural condition and remaining asset life is essential to effectively manage water infrastructure assets for both large and small diameter pipes. One tool that may facilitate asset management...

  12. Retention of Water and Sediment by Grass Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, P. M.; Kwaad, F. J. P. M.; Klapwijk, M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper discusses aspects of grass vegetation in relation to soil erosion control. By means of a literature research, four options for using grass vegetation were recognized, each having its own requirements concerning maintenance, vegetation characteristics and field layout. The main filter mechanisms, application in the field and effects on runoff and soil loss are discussed. Field experiments on filter strips were carried out to determine whether literature data for water and sediment retention by vegetation can be applied to sloping loess soils in South Limburg (The Netherlands). The field experiments simulated a situation in which surface runoff carrying loess sediment from an upslope field enters a grass strip. The retention of water and sediment by grass strips was determined by measuring runoff discharge and the sediment concentration at the inflow and outflow points from bordered plots. Two locations with different grass age and agricultural management were studied. Results show that grass strips are effective in filtering sediment from surface runoff as long as concentrated flow is absent. Outflow sediment concentrations could be described as a function of inflow concentrations and strip width. Reductions of sediment discharge varied between 50-60, 60-90 and 90-99% for strips of 1, 4-5 and 10 m width, respectively. Old grass, extensively used as pasture, is more effective in reducing erosion than the younger grass which was often accessed by tractors for mowing. Differences in water retention between both grass locations appear to be caused mainly by differences in grass density.

  13. No tillage effect on water retention characteristics of soil aggregates in rainfed semiarid conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Moure, Nuria; López, M. Victoria; Moret, David

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of changes in soil moisture retention characteristics associated to alterations in soil structure is of great interest in tillage studies. Most of these studies have evaluated soil properties in samples of total soil but not in individual aggregates. However, soil behavior at a macroscale level depends on the aggregate properties. A better knowledge of aggregate characteristics, as the water retention properties, will help to explain, for example, the response of soil to tillage, compaction and crop growth, and hence, to plan adequate soil management practices. In this study we determine the water retention curve of soil aggregates of different sizes from a soil under two tillage systems (conventional and no tillage). The study was carried out in a silty clay loam soil of semiarid Aragon (NE Spain). Two tillage systems were compared: no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage with mouldboard plough (CT). Water retention curves (WRC) were determined for soil surface aggregates (0-5 cm) of three different sizes (8-4, 4-2 and 2-1 mm in diameter) by using the TDR-pressure cell (Moret et al. 2008. Soil Till. Res, 100, 114-119). The TDR-pressure cell is a non-destructive method which permits determining WRC with the only one and same soil sample. Thus, the pressure cell was filled with aggregates up to 4 cm height, weighted and wetted to saturation from the bottom. Pressure steps were sequentially applied at -0.5, -1.5, -3, -5, -10, -33, -100, -300 kPa, and water content of each aggregate sample was measured gravimetrically and by TDR 24 h after starting each pressure head step. The volume of the sample within the cell was also determined at this moment in order to obtain the bulk density and thus calculate the volumetric water content. A good relationship was obtained between the volumetric water content calculated from the gravimetric water content and the corresponding values measured by TDR (r2=0.907; p≤0.05). Within the same tillage treatment, no

  14. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  15. Water Retention and Rheology of Ti-doped, Synthetic Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, U.; Jackson, I.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Upper mantle flow laws are currently based almost entirely on experiments with olivine from San Carlos in Arizona. Synthetically produced olivine enables the exploration of the effects of trace elements on the rheology. We have conducted a range of experiments in a gas medium apparatus with solution-gelation derived olivine that show that titanium is the most effective in binding water in the olivine structure. The FTIR signature of this structurally bound water is most similar to that of water-undersaturated natural olivine with absorption bands at 3575 and 3525 cm-1. Water added, titanium-free solgel contains little water after hotpressing and shows adsorption bands at wavenumbers near 3200 cm-1. Noble metal capsules such as Pt or AuPd, providing more oxidizing conditions, are more effective in retaining water. Experiments with NiFe-lined welded Pt capsules retain no more water than NiFe lined samples without Pt capsule. Water retention is, however, again dependent on trace element content, with Ti doped samples containing tens of ppm after hotpressing. By comparison undoped samples run under the same conditions contain little water, again with different FTIR spectra to Ti-doped samples. Our experiments suggest that Ti by itself, or with water contents at the FTIR detection limit enhances diffusion creep rates relative to undoped, dry solgel olivine. Water contents around 10 ppm in NiFe wrapped samples show an enhancement of strain rates of more than one order of magnitude. The addition of Ti, together with the presence of water, also enhances grain growth. For more coarse-grained samples in the dislocation creep regime the enhancement of the stain rate as a function of water content is approximately consistent with the flow laws of Hirth and Kohlstedt (2003).

  16. Characterizing scale- and location-dependent correlation of water retention parameters with soil physical properties using wavelet techniques.

    PubMed

    Shu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Zuoxin; Si, Bingcheng

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the correlation between soil hydraulic parameters and soil physical properties is a prerequisite for the prediction of soil hydraulic properties from soil physical properties. The objective of this study was to examine the scale- and location-dependent correlation between two water retention parameters (alpha and n) in the van Genuchten (1980) function and soil physical properties (sand content, bulk density [Bd], and organic carbon content) using wavelet techniques. Soil samples were collected from a transect from Fuxin, China. Soil water retention curves were measured, and the van Genuchten parameters were obtained through curve fitting. Wavelet coherency analysis was used to elucidate the location- and scale-dependent relationships between these parameters and soil physical properties. Results showed that the wavelet coherence between alpha and sand content was significantly different from red noise at small scales (8-20 m) and from a distance of 30 to 470 m. Their wavelet phase spectrum was predominantly out of phase, indicating negative correlation between these two variables. The strong negative correlation between alpha and Bd existed mainly at medium scales (30-80 m). However, parameter n had a strong positive correlation only with Bd at scales between 20 and 80 m. Neither of the two retention parameters had significant wavelet coherency with organic carbon content. These results suggested that location-dependent scale analyses are necessary to improve the performance for soil water retention characteristic predictions.

  17. Ringin' the water bell: dynamic modes of curved fluid sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John; Aharoni, Hillel; Fineberg, Jay; Sharon, Eran

    2015-11-01

    A water bell is formed by fluid flowing in a thin, coherent sheet in the shape of a bell. Experimentally, a water bell is created via the impact of a cylindrical jet on a flat surface. Its shape is set by the splash angle (the separation angle) of the resulting cylindrically symmetric water sheet. The separation angle is altered by adjusting the height of a lip surrounding the impact point, as in a water sprinkler. We drive the lip's height sinusoidally, altering the separation angle, and ringin' the water bell. This forcing generates disturbances on the steady-state water bell that propagate forward and backward in the fluid's reference frame at well-defined velocities, and interact, resulting in the emergence of an interference pattern unique to each steady-state geometry. We analytically model these dynamics by linearizing the amplitude of the bell's response about the underlying curved geometry. This simple model predicts the nodal structure over a wide range of steady-state water bell configurations and driving frequencies. Due to the curved water bell geometry, the nodal structure is quite complex; nevertheless, the predicted nodal structure agrees extremely well with the experimental data. When we drive the bell beyond perturbative separation angles, the nodal locations surprisingly persist, despite the strikingly altered underlying water bell shape. At extreme driving amplitudes the water sheet assumes a rich variety of tortuous, non-convex shapes; nevertheless, the fluid sheet remains intact.

  18. Storm Water Retention on Three Green Roofs with Distinct Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breach, P. A.; Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.; Powers, B. S. C.

    2014-12-01

    As urbanization continues to increase the impact of cities on their surrounding environments, the feasibility of implementing low-impact development such as green roofs is of increasing interest. Green roofs retain and attenuate storm water thereby reducing the load on urban sewer systems. In addition, green roofs can provide insulation and lower roof surface temperature leading to a decrease in building energy load. Green roof technology in North American urban environments remains underused, in part due to a lack of climate appropriate green roof design guidelines. The capacity of a green roof to moderate runoff depends on the storage capacity of the growing medium at the start of a rainfall event. Storage capacity is finite, which makes rapid drainage and evapotranspiration loss critical for maximizing storage capacity between subsequent storms. Here the retention and attenuation of storm events are quantified for experimental green roof sites located in three representative Canadian climates corresponding to; semiarid conditions in Calgary, Alberta, moderate conditions in London, Ontario, and cool and humid conditions in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The storage recovery and storm water retention at each site is modelled using a modified water balance approach. Components of the water balance including evapotranspiration are predicted using climate data collected from 2012 to 2014 at each of the experimental sites. During the measurement period there were over 300 precipitation events ranging from small, frequent events (< 2 mm) to a storm with a 250 year return period. The modeling approach adopted provides a tool for planners to assess the feasibility of implementing green roofs in their respective climates.

  19. Transport and Retention of Concentrated Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Esahani, S. G.; Steven, C. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are widely employed to promote biotic reduction of contaminants; however, emulsions can also be used to encapsulate and deliver active ingredients required for long-term subsurface treatment. Our research focuses on encapsulating alkalinity-releasing particles in oil-in-water emulsions for sustained control of subsurface pH. Typical characteristics of these emulsions include kinetically stable for >20 hr; 20% soybean oil; 1 g/mL density; 8-10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50, with emulsions developed for favorable subsurface delivery. The viscosity of the oil-in-water emulsions was found to be a function of oil content. Ultimately we aim to model both emulsion delivery and alkalinity release (from retained emulsion droplets) to provide a description of pH treatment. Emulsion transport and retention was investigated via a series of 1-d column experiments using varying particle size fractions of Ottawa sand. Emulsions were introduced for approximately two pore volumes followed by a flush of background solution (approx. ρ=1 g/mL; μ=1cP). Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibit an early fall on the backside of the breakthrough curve along with tailing. Deposition profiles are found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Particle transport models established for dilute suspensions are unable to describe the transport of the concentrated emulsions considered here. Thus, we explore the relative importance of additional processes driving concentrated droplet transport and retention. Focus is placed on evaluating the role of attachment-detachment-straining processes, as well as the influence of mixing from both viscous instabilities and variable water saturation due to deposited mass.

  20. The effect of biological activity on soil water retention and diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Burhan U.; Ferraris, Stefano; Ashton, Rhys W.; Powlson, David S.; Whalley, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Root exudates of both living and artificial origins are known to affect various rhizosphere microbial and micro-faunal activities. However, information on effects on root exudates on soil hydraulic properties responsible for water transmission and distribution in the vadose zone is inadequate, especially in dry soils. To study the effect of artificial root exudates (carbohydrate, amino acids and organic acids mixture) on soil water retention and diffusion process, a laboratory experiment was carried out using soil cores filled with air dried 2-mm sieved loamy sand soils of Cambric Arenosol subclass. Root exudates at three concentrations (1.25, 2.5 & 5.0 g C kg-1 dry soil) were added and the soil cores were saturated in distilled water for 48 hours at 20 oC together with a control. To determine whether microbes have any influence on diffusivity, two additional treatments with sterilization of microbes using mercuric chloride solution (0.10%) in root exudates (2.5 g C kg-1 dry soil) and distilled water saturated soil cores were studied. The water in the soil cores was allowed to evaporate at constant temperature (20 ± 1oC) and at a relative humidity of 0.3. The evaporation loss in terms of volumetric water content in the core was measured regularly until the water content was constant with time. Soil water diffusivity was determined numerically. To determine the water retention properties, soils were saturated and incubated for 14 days at 20 oC with the same six treatments and retention curves were generated for 8 different suctions, ranging from 0.01 bars to 15 bars. Results revealed that evaporation from soil cores, initially at a uniform moisture content of saturation, initially decreased linearly with the square root of time. The rate of decrease was gradual in the root exudate treated soils but more rapid in soils treated to stop microbial activity. Addition of root exudates considerably decreased the diffusivity compared to a control treatment. By stopping

  1. Experiment poseidon: Elemental iodine retention in water pools

    SciTech Connect

    Guentay, S.

    1990-01-01

    Although gaseous fraction of iodine is expected to be small in quantity compared with its other forms such as CsI, because of its radiological consequence, removal of elemental iodine vapor from the gas bubbles in water pools defines an important boundary condition for the severe-accident scenarios that involve water pools. The Muehleberg nuclear power plant (a boiling water reactor Mark 1 type) in Switzerland has a unique feature, namely, a second suppression pool surrounding the reactor building in addition to the regular pressure suppression pool. For those hypothetical accident scenarios that involve the second pool, scrubbing in the second suppression pool would ultimately determine the magnitude and constitution of the release. An experimental program, pool scrubbing effect on iodine decontamination (POSEIDON), was initiated at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland in 1987 to provide a data base on gaseous iodine scrubbing. Bubbles containing elemental iodine vapor and nitrogen as the carrier gas are generated using certain sized orifices immersed in a water pool. Objectives of the experimental program are defined as (a) to understand the iodine removal phenomena from bubbles and (b) to provide a data base for iodine retention under controlled boundary conditions for the development and verification of the BUSCA-PSI pool scrubbing code.

  2. Statistical evaluation and choice of soil water retention models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz, Franz; Müller, Hans-Otfried; Nollau, Volker; Schmitz, Gerd H.; El-Shehawy, Shaban A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical investigations for the evaluation of soil water retention models (SWRMs). We employed three different methods developed for model selection in the field of nonlinear regression, namely, simulation studies, analysis of nonlinearity measures, and resampling strategies such as cross validation and bootstrap methods. Using these methods together with small data sets, we evaluated the performance of three exemplarily chosen types of SWRMs with respect to their parameter properties and the reliability of model predictions. The resulting rankings of models show that the favorable models are characterized by few parameters with an almost linear estimation behavior and close to symmetric distributions. To further demonstrate the potential of the statistical methods in the field of model selection, a modification of the four-parameter van Genuchten model is proposed which shows significantly improved and robust statistical properties.

  3. Water Retention and Structure Stability in Smectitic or Kaolinitic Loam and Clay Soils Affected by Polyacrylamide Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Amirakh; Levy, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Studying the effects of polyacrylamide (PAM) on soil aggregate and structure stability is important in developing effective soil and water conservation practices and in sustaining soil and water quality. Five concentrations of an anionic PAM (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1) with a high molecular weight were tested on loam and clay soils having either a predominant smectitic or kaolinitic clay mineralogy. The effects of the PAM and of soil texture on soil water retention at near saturation and on aggregate and structure stability were investigated using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. The S-shaped water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provided: (i) the model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the water retention curve, respectively; and (ii) the soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS, where VDP is the volume of drainable pores, an indicator of the quantity of water released by a soil over the range of applied suctions (0-5 J kg-1), and MS is the modal suction representing the most frequent pore sizes (> 60 μm). In general, the treatments tested (clay mineralogy, soil type and PAM concentration) resulted in: (i) a considerable modification of the shape of the water retention curves as indicated by the changes in the α and n values; and; (ii) substantial effects on the stability indices and other model parameters. The contribution of PAM concentration to soil structure stability depended on the clay mineralogy, being more effective in the smectitic soils than in the kaolinitic ones. Although kaolinitic soils are usually more stable than smectitic soils, when the latter were treated with PAM (25-200 mg L-1) the opposite trend was observed. In the loam soils, increasing the PAM concentration notably decreased the differences between values of the stability indices of the smectitic and kaolinitic samples. The

  4. Influence of Soil Management on Water Retention from Saturation to Oven Dryness and Dominant Soil Water States in a Vertisol under Crop Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Karl; Pachepsky, Yakov; Pederera, Aura; Martinez, Gonzalo; Espejo, Antonio Jesus; Giraldez, Juan Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Unique water transfer and retention properties of Vertisols strongly affect their use in rainfed agriculture in water-limited environments. Despite the agricultural importance of the hydraulic properties of those soils, water retention data dryer than the wilting point are generally scarce, mainly as a result of practical constraints of traditional water retention measurement methods. In this work we provide a detailed description of regionalized water retention data from saturation to oven dryness, obtained from 54 minimally disturbed topsoil (0-0.05m) samples collected at a 3.5-ha experimental field in SW Spain where conventional tillage (CT) and direct drilling (DD) is compared in a wheat-sunflower-legume crop rotation on a Vertisol. Water retention was measured from saturation to oven dryness using sand and sand-kaolin boxes, a pressure plate apparatus and a dew point psychrometer, respectively. A common shape of the water retention curve (WRC) was observed in both tillage systems, with a strong discontinuity in its slope near -0.4 MPa and a decreasing spread from the wet to the dry end. A continuous function, consisting of the sum of a double exponential model (Dexter et al, 2008) and the Groenevelt and Grant (2004) model could be fitted successfully to the data. Two inflection points in the WRC were interpreted as boundaries between the structural and the textural pore spaces and between the textural and the intra-clay aggregate pore spaces. Water retention was significantly higher in DD (p<0.05) for pressure heads ranging from -0.006 to -0.32 MPa, and from -1.8 to -3.3 MPa. The magnitude of these differences ranged from 0.006 to 0.015 kg kg-1. The differential water capacity and associated equivalent pore-size distribution showed that these differences could be attributed to a combined effect of tillage and compaction, increasing and decreasing the amount of the largest pores in CT and DD, respectively, but resulting in a proportionally larger pore space

  5. Post-retention Development of Curve of Spee in Pre-adjusted Edgewise Appliance Cases, Its Correlation to Dentoskeletal Parameters: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahammed, A R Yusuf; Ganiger, Channamallappa C; Shetty, Vikranth; Sunny, Sunil; Shetty, Sadashiva; Pawar, Renuka; Suresh, K V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Curve of Spee was first described by Ferdin and Graf Von Spee in 1890. The curve of Spee is an important characteristic of the mandibular dental arch. One of the most frequently encountered problems in the treatment of orthodontic patients is an excessive overbite. Deep bite has been found to be associated with abnormal mandibular function. Temporomandibular joint disorders also have potentially detrimental effects on mandibular development. Andrews advocated leveling the curve of Spee to aflat curve, in order to facilitate construction of an optimal occlusion and that a flat plane should be given as a form of over treatment. There is no reliable information currently available from the literature about the long-term stability of the curve of Spee and the factors influencing the same. The objective of this study was to assess the post-retention development of the curve of Spee and to evaluate the dental and skeletal parameters as predictors of its post-retention stability. Materials and Methods: Pre-treatment (Tl), post-treatment (T2) and post-retention (T3) dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 24 orthodontically treated patients having a mean age of 14.5 years were evaluated. The mean period of the study group after retention was up to 2.6 years (range = 1-5 years). Pre-treatment T1, post-treatment T2, and post-retention T3 casts and radiographs were measured. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: A highly significant positive correlation was observed between the changes in the curve of Spee during treatment (T2-T1) and the net result after retention (T3-T2). This means that much of the treatment results remained stable at T3. However, slight change was noticed in curve of Spee’s depth during the time interval T3-T2. This finding was very negligible and was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The leveling of the curve of Spee during the treatment is a stable treatment objective on long term basis. There was a mild

  6. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Chen, Baohong; Xiang, Feng; Zhou, Jinxiong; Wang, Hong; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-10-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  7. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  8. Resolving structural influences on water-retention properties of alluvial deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winfield, K.A.; Nimmo, J.R.; Izbicki, J.A.; Martin, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    With the goal of improving property-transfer model (PTM) predictions of unsaturated hydraulic properties, we investigated the influence of sedimentary structure, defined as particle arrangement during deposition, on laboratory-measured water retention (water content vs. potential [??(??)]) of 10 undisturbed core samples from alluvial deposits in the western Mojave Desert, California. The samples were classified as having fluvial or debris-flow structure based on observed stratification and measured spread of particle-size distribution. The ??(??) data were fit with the Rossi-Nimmo junction model, representing water retention with three parameters: the maximum water content (??max), the ??-scaling parameter (??o), and the shape parameter (??). We examined trends between these hydraulic parameters and bulk physical properties, both textural - geometric mean, Mg, and geometric standard deviation, ??g, of particle diameter - and structural - bulk density, ??b, the fraction of unfilled pore space at natural saturation, Ae, and porosity-based randomness index, ??s, defined as the excess of total porosity over 0.3. Structural parameters ??s and Ae were greater for fluvial samples, indicating greater structural pore space and a possibly broader pore-size distribution associated with a more systematic arrangement of particles. Multiple linear regression analysis and Mallow's Cp statistic identified combinations of textural and structural parameters for the most useful predictive models: for ??max, including Ae, ??s, and ??g, and for both ??o and ??, including only textural parameters, although use of Ae can somewhat improve ??o predictions. Textural properties can explain most of the sample-to-sample variation in ??(??) independent of deposit type, but inclusion of the simple structural indicators Ae and ??s can improve PTM predictions, especially for the wettest part of the ??(??) curve. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  9. Modeling the soil water retention properties of same-textured soils with different initial void ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fang; Zhou, Wan-Huan; Yuen, Ka-Veng

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a method of predicting the soil water retention curve (SWRC) of a soil using a set of measured SWRC data from a soil with the same texture but different initial void ratio. The relationships of the volumetric water contents and the matric suctions between two samples with different initial void ratios are established. An adjustment parameter (β) is introduced to express the relationships between the matric suctions of two soil samples. The parameter β is a function of the initial void ratio, matric suction or volumetric water content. The function can take different forms, resulting in different predictive models. The optimal predictive models of β are determined for coarse-grained and fine-grained soils using the Bayesian method. The optimal models of β are validated by comparing the estimated matric suction and measured data. The comparisons show that the proposed method produces more accurate SWRCs than do other models for both coarse-grained and fine-grained soils. Furthermore, the influence of the model parameters of β on the predicted matric suction and SWRC is evaluated using Latin Hypercube sampling. An uncertainty analysis shows that the reliability of the predicted SWRC decreases with decreasing water content in fine-grained soils, and the initial void ratio has no apparent influence on the reliability of the predicted SWRCs in coarse-grained and fine-grained soils.

  10. Challenges of Watering Plants in Space: Water Retention and Distribution---What Have we Learned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinse, Robert; Jones, Scott; Or, Dani; Tuller, Markus; Topham, T. Shane; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail

    The distribution of water controls directly or indirectly the management of water, air and nutrients in coarse-textured porous plant-growth substrates. With the motivation to involve plants in future life support systems in space, the question arises whether fluid behavior in porous substrates is altered when subjected to microgravitational accelerations. Central to unraveling this question is the water retention characteristic; an often used control parameter for managing water supply to plants in space. In order to differentiate between changes in water content, water configuration, and pore-scale restrictions, we developed experiments which allowed for distinctions in retention characteristics to be made based on measurements in parabolic flight and on the ISS. These measurements highlight an important feature of capillary dominated water configuration: the non-homogeneity of water contents with no gravity gradients remaining. We found this non-homogeneity to be dependent on whether a pore was draining or imbibing prior to the induced change. This dependence results in significant water content gradients maintained at separations of only a few pore lengths. One result of this altered distribution at the root-module scale is the abridged existence and increased length of continuous gas-filled pathways for diffusive transport. These pathways represent, in part, the hypothesized limitation for the exchange of respiratory gases, and therefore record the changes in capillary dominated processes that affect the configuration and transport of fluids in porous media.

  11. Phosphorus retention mechanisms of a water treatment residual.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, J A; Barbarick, K A; Heil, D M; Chandler, J P; Redente, E F

    2003-01-01

    Water treatment residuals (WTRs) are a by-product of municipal drinking water treatment plants and can have the capacity to adsorb tremendous amounts of P. Understanding the WTR phosphorus adsorption process is important for discerning the mechanism and tenacity of P retention. We studied P adsorbing mechanism(s) of an aluminum-based [Al2(SO4)3 x 14H2O] WTR from Englewood, CO. In a laboratory study, we shook mixtures of P-loaded WTR for 1 to 211 d followed by solution pH analysis, and solution Ca, Al, and P analysis via inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. After shaking periods, we also examined the solids fraction by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EMPA-WDS). The shaking results indicated an increase in pH from 7.2 to 8.2, an increase in desorbed Ca and Al concentrations, and a decrease in desorbed P concentration. The pH and desorbed Ca concentration increases suggested that CaCO3 controlled Ca solubility. Increased desorbed Al concentration may have been due to Al(OH)4 formation. Decreased P content, in conjunction with the pH increase, was consistent with calcium phosphate formation or precipitation. The system appeared to be undersaturated with respect to dicalcium phosphate (DCP; CaHPO4) and supersaturated with respect to octacalcium phosphate [OCP; Ca4H(PO4)3 x 2.5H2O]. The Ca and Al increases, as well as OCP formation, were supported by MINTEQA2 modeling. The XRD and EMPA-WDS results for all shaking times, however, suggested surface P chemisorption as an amorphous Al-P mineral phase.

  12. Removing the impact of water abstractions on flow duration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Alessandro; Ganora, Daniele; Galeati, Giorgio; Laio, Francesco; Claps, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    on few easy-access parameters, of correction of the water abstraction impact. The model, based on an exponential form of the river Flow Duration Curve (FDC), allows completely analytical solutions. Hence the method can be applied extensively. This is particularly relevant when working on a general outlook on water resources (regional or basin scale), given the high number of water abstractions that should be considered. The correction method developed is based on only two hard data that can be easily found: i) the design maximum discharge of the water intake and ii) the days of exercise, between a year. Following the same correction hypothesis also the abstracted discharge statistics have been reconstructed analytically and combined with the statistics of the receiving reach, that can be different from the original one. This information can be useful when we are assessing water availability in a river network interconnected by derivation channels. The goodness of the correction method proposed is proven by the application to a case study in North-West Italy, along a second order tributary of the Po River. Flow values recorded at the river gauge station were affected, significantly, by the presence of a 5 MW hydropower plant. Knowing the amount of water abstracted daily by the power plant we are able to reconstruct, empirically, the natural discharge on the river and compare its main statistics with the ones computed analytically using the proposed correction model. An extremely low difference between empirical and analytical reconstructed mean discharge and L-moment of variation was founded. Also, the importance of the day of exercise information was highlighted. The correction proposed in this work is able to give a correct indication of the non-impacted natural streamflows characteristics, especially in alpine regions where water abstraction impact is a main issue.

  13. Pore-Scale Effects of Soil Structure And Microbial EPS Production On Soil Water Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orner, E.; Anderson, E.; Rubinstein, R. L.; Chau, J. F.; Shor, L. M.; Gage, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate-induced changes to the hydrological cycle will increase the frequency of extreme weather events including powerful storms and prolonged droughts. Moving forward, one of the major factors limiting primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems will be sub-optimal soil moisture. We focus here on the ability of soils to retain moisture under drying conditions. A soil's ability to retain moisture is influenced by many factors including its texture, its structure, and the activities of soil microbes. In soil microcosms, the addition of small amounts of microbially-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) can dramatically shift moisture retention curves. The objective of this research is to better understand how soil structure and EPS may act together to retain moisture in unsaturated soils. Replicate micromodels with exactly-conserved 2-D physical geometry were initially filled with aqueous suspensions of one of two types of bacteria: one mutant was ultra- muccoid and the other was non-muccoid. Replicate micromodels were held at a fixed, external, relative humidity, and the position of the air-water interface was imaged over time as water evaporates. There was no forced convection of air or water inside the micromodels: drying was achieved by water evaporation and diffusion alone. We used a fully automated, inverted microscope to image replicate drying lanes each with dimensions of 1 mm x 10 mm. A complete set of images was collected every 30 minutes for 30 hours. The results show devices loaded with the highly muccoid strain remained >40% hydrated for 13 h, while devices loaded with the non-muccoid remained >40% hydrated for only 6 h, and were completely dry by 13 h. Current work is comparing interfacial water fluxes in structured and unstructured settings, and is attempting to model the synergistic effects of soil structure and EPS content on moisture retention in real soils. This research may allow more accurate description of naturally

  14. Thermodynamic evaluation of the impact of strongly swelling polymer hydrogels with ionic silver on the water retention capacity of sandy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The impact of two types of strongly swelling polymer hydrogel (SSPH) on the water retention capacity of quartz sand in pure water and Ag+ solutions (10-100 mg/l) has been studied by using a centrifugation method in a wide range of thermodynamic water potential (Gibbs energy) from 0 to 3030 J/kg. The experimental data for the water retention curves (WRC) were estimated by the van Genuchten model. Both hydrogels – the Aquasorb preparation (Germany) with hydrophilic properties and high degree of swelling in pure water (700–1000 g H2O/g) and the new Russian amphiphilic SSPH with a peat filler (degree of swelling 500-700 g H2O/g) were very effective as water adsorbing soil conditioners in relatively small doses from 0.05 to 0.3% per mass of dry (105°C) soil substrate. The water retention capacity of sandy substrate increases under the influence of SSPH with 2-3 times up to the level of native loamy sands and loams. Adding Ag+ to the water solution results just for the highest concentration of SSPH (0.3%) and iconic silver (100 mg/l) in a significant decrease of the water retention in the soil-gel compositions.

  15. Effects of sodium polyacrylate on water retention and infiltration capacity of a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wenhua; Li, Longguo; Liu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Based on the laboratory study, the effects of sodium polyacrylate (SP) was investigated at 5 rates of 0, 0.08, 0.2, 0.5, and 1%, on water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity(Ks), infiltration characteristic and water distribution profiles of a sandy soil. The results showed that water retention and available water capacity effectively increased with increasing SP rate. The Ks and the rate of wetting front advance and infiltration under certain pond infiltration was significantly reduced by increasing SP rate, which effectively reduced water in a sandy soil leaking to a deeper layer under the plough layer. The effect of SP on water distribution was obviously to the up layer and very little to the following deeper layers. Considering both the effects on water retention and infiltration capacity, it is suggested that SP be used to the sandy soil at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.5%.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Role of Root Mucilage and Microbial Exudates on Soil Water Retention Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrenegus, T. B.; Ghezzehei, T.

    2011-12-01

    The release of organic molecules by soil microbes and plant roots to adapt their surrounding represents a substantial portion of the energy use by these organisms. The hypothesis in this study is that the long-chain molecules and hydrophilic nature of the released organic compounds deposited on soil surfaces drastically alters the dynamism of the soil water retention curves (SWRC) of the rhizosphere relative to the bulk soil through direct effect besides the well-known indirect influence of the organic matter by modifying the soil structure and providing energy for the biogeochemical processes. The experiment was set up in such away that it suppresses the indirect effect of organic matter (OM) and rather it traces only its immediate effect on SWRC. To achieve this goal inert and uniform size (0.1-0.11 mm) glassbeads were used. We assumed that wet mixing of the glass beads with OM and slow drying the mixture (40-50oC) for 1-day will lead to deposition of the OM only at the surface of the glass beads, the short time being not enough for aggregate formation. This way we can simulate the natural deposition of OM on soil surfaces. Our argument is that this deposited OM has its own distinct time-dependent SWRC which is different from that of bulk soil. Model exudates including PGA, XA, and SPA are used to mimic the behavior of plant root mucilages, bacterial and fungal exudates respectively. These model exudates at varying concentration (0, 0.008, 0.04, and 0.2 gm/l) were wet mixed with glass beads. SWRC was determined using both water-hanging column and pressure plate for both low and high suction ranges respectively. We will present the effect of exudate type and level of concentration on the dynamic behavior of SWRC of the glassbeads by determining: i) the SWRC for each treatment; ii) the rate of drying and wetting at different intervals; iii) the hysteresis of the retention curves; iv) the saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  17. Environmental Assessment: Maintenance of the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed maintenance on the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond. The EA...biological resources, water resources, air quality, safety, and hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed...traffic, noise, hazardous materials and wastes , water resources, biological resources, air quality, socioeconomics, and safety. This EA also considers

  18. Soil Water Retention as Indicator for Soil Physical Quality - Examples from Two SoilTrEC European Critical Zone Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseva, Svetla; Kercheva, Milena; Shishkov, Toma; Dimitrov, Emil; Nenov, Martin; Lair, Georg J.; Moraetis, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Soil water retention is of primary importance for majority of soil functions. The characteristics derived from Soil Water Retention Curve (SWRC) are directly related to soil structure and soil water regime and can be used as indicators for soil physical quality. The aim of this study is to present some parameters and relationships based on the SWRC data from the soil profiles characterising the European SoilTrEC Critical Zone Observatories Fuchsenbigl and Koiliaris. The studied soils are representative for highly productive soils managed as arable land in the frame of soil formation chronosequence at "Marchfeld" (Fuchsenbigl CZO), Austria and heavily impacted soils during centuries through intensive grazing and farming, under severe risk of desertification in context of climatic and lithological gradient at Koiliaris, Crete, Greece. Soil water retention at pF ≤ 2.52 was determined using the undisturbed soil cores (100 cm3 and 50 cm3) by a suction plate method. Water retention at pF = 4.2 was determined by a membrane press method and at pF ≥ 5.6 - by adsorption of water vapour at controlled relative humidity, both using ground soil samples. The soil physical quality parameter (S-parameter) was defined as the slope of the water retention curve at its inflection point (Dexter, 2006), determined with the obtained parameters of van Genuhten (1980) water retention equation. The S-parameter values were categorised to assess soil physical quality as follows: S < 0.020 very poor, 0.020 ≤ S < 0.035 poor, 0.035 ≤ S < 0.050 good, S ≥ 0.050 very good (Dexter, 2004). The results showed that most of the studied topsoil horizons have good physical quality according to both the S-parameter and the Plant-Available Water content (PAW), with the exception of the soils from croplands at CZO Fuxenbigl (F4, F5) which are with poor soil structure. The link between the S-parameter and the indicator of soil structure stability (water stable soil aggregates with size 1-3 mm) is not

  19. Preliminary permeability and water-retention data for nonwelded and bedded tuff samples, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1990-12-31

    Measurements of rock-matrix hydrologic properties at Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository, are needed to predict rates and direction of water flow in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study is to provide preliminary data on intrinsic and relative permeability and moisture retention on rock core samples and to present the methods used to collect these data. Four methods were used to measure intrinsic, or saturated permeability: Air, Klinkenberg, specific permeability to oil, and specific permeability to water. Two methods yielded data on relative permeability (gas-drive and centrifuge), and three methods (porous plate, centrifuge, and mercury intrusion porosimetry) were used to measure water-retention properties (matric potential compared to water-content curves). Standard measurements of grain density, bulk density, and porosity for the core samples were included. Results of this study showed a large range of intrinsic permeability values among rock types and high variability within rock types. The four methods yield intrinsic permeability values that are different but are highly correlated (coefficient of determination greater than 0.94). 27 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. The Status of Water in Swelling Shales: An Insight from the Water Retention Properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menaceur, Hamza; Delage, Pierre; Tang, Anh Minh; Talandier, Jean

    2016-12-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) claystone is considered in France as a possible host rock for the disposal of high-level long-lived radioactive waste at great depth. During the operational phase, the walls of the galleries and of the disposal cells will be successively subjected to desaturation induced by ventilation followed by resaturation once the galleries are closed. To better understand this phenomenon, a sound understanding of the water retention properties of the COx claystone is necessary. Following a previous study by the same group, this paper presents an investigation of microstructure changes in COx claystone under suction changes. Microstructure was investigated by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry tests on freeze-dried specimens previously submitted to various suctions. Along the drying path, the initial microstructure, characterised by a well-classified unimodal pore population around a mean diameter value of 32 nm, slightly changed with the same shape of the PSD curve and slightly moved towards smaller diameters (27-28 nm) at suctions of 150 and 331 MPa, respectively. The infra-porosity too small to be intruded by mercury (diameter smaller than 5.5 nm) reduced from 4.3 to 3.3 %. Oven drying reduced the mean diameter to 20 nm and the infra-porosity to 1 %. Wetting up to 9 MPa suction leads to saturation with no significant change in the PSD curve, whereas wetting at zero suction gave rise to the appearance of a large pore population resulting from the development of cracks with width of several micrometres, together with an enlargement of the initial pore population above the mean diameter. The concepts describing the step hydration of smectites (by the successive placement within the clay platelets along the smectite faces of 1, 2, 3 and 4 layers of water molecules with respect to the suction applied) appeared relevant to better understand the changes in microstructure of the COx claystone under suction changes. This also allowed to better define

  1. Organic carbon decomposition rates controlled by water retention time across inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Núria; Marcé, Rafael; Kothawala, Dolly N.; Tranvik, Lars. J.

    2016-07-01

    The loss of organic carbon during passage through the continuum of inland waters from soils to the sea is a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Yet, the amount of organic carbon mineralized and released to the atmosphere during its transport remains an open question, hampered by the absence of a common predictor of organic carbon decay rates. Here we analyse a compilation of existing field and laboratory measurements of organic carbon decay rates and water residence times across a wide range of aquatic ecosystems and climates. We find a negative relationship between the rate of organic carbon decay and water retention time across systems, entailing a decrease in organic carbon reactivity along the continuum of inland waters. We find that the half-life of organic carbon is short in inland waters (2.5 +/- 4.7 yr) compared to terrestrial soils and marine ecosystems, highlighting that freshwaters are hotspots of organic carbon degradation. Finally, we evaluate the response of organic carbon decay rates to projected changes in runoff. We calculate that regions projected to become drier or wetter as the global climate warms will experience changes in organic carbon decay rates of up to about 10%, which illustrates the influence of hydrological variability on the inland waters carbon cycle.

  2. [Influences of different kinds of water retentive agents on water use efficiency and root mor- phology of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-yang; Lyu, Mou-chao; Fan, Xiang-yang; Du, Zhen-jie; Hu, Chao

    2015-12-01

    The effects of 5 different kinds of water retentive agents at 2 application levels on yield, water use efficiency and root morphology of winter wheat were studied through field experiments. The results showed that there were significant differences in tiller number, flag leaf area, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) among the water retentive agent treatments of different varieties and application levels. Compared with the control, the yield increased by 1.3%-7.9%, and the WUE increased from 17.1 kg · hm⁻² · mm⁻¹ to 18.0-20.7 kg · hm⁻² · mm⁻¹ under these 5 different kinds of water retentive agent treatments. The influences of water retentive agents on average root diameter, total root length and total root surface of winter wheat all reached a significant level. The total root length increased by 3.7%-19.1% and 6.3%-27.3%, and the total root surface area increased by 6.5%-21.7% and 2.9%-18.5% in the 0-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers, respectively. The root morphology characteristics were significantly positively correlated with both yield and WUE of winter wheat. The compound water retentive agent of acrylamide/inorganic mineral had the most significant influence on the increase of WUE and the promotion of root growth of winter wheat.

  3. Effect of boundary conditions on measured water retention behavior within soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Pedroso, D.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) is a practical representation of the behavior of soil water by relating the suction (difference between the air and water pressures to the moisture content (water saturation). The SWCC is characterized by a hysteresis loop, which is thought to be unique in that any drainage-imbibition cycle lies within a main hysteresis loop limited by two different curves for drainage and imbibition. This 'uniqueness' is the main argument for considering the SWCC as a material-intrinsic feature that characterizes the pore structure and its interaction with fluids. Models have been developed with the SWCC as input data to describe the evolution of the water saturation and the suction within soils. One example of these models is the widely used Richard's equation [1]. In this work we present a series of numerical simulations to evaluate the 'unique' nature of the SWCC. The simulations involves the use of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) [2] within a regular soil, modelling the flow behavior of two immiscible fluids: wetting and non-wetting. The soil is packed within a cubic domain to resemble the experimental setups that are commonly used for measuring the SWCC[3]. The boundary conditions ensure that the non-wetting phase enters through one cubic face and the wetting phase enters trough the opposite phase, with no flow boundary conditions in the remaining 4 cubic faces. The SWCC known features are inspected including the presence of the common limit curves for different cycles involving varying limits for the suction. For this stage of simulations, the SWCC is indeed unique. Later, different boundary conditions are applied with the two fluids each injected from 3 opposing faces into the porous medium. The effect of this boundary condition change is a net flow direction, which is different from that in the previous case. A striking result is observed when both SWCC are compared and found to be noticeable different. Further analysis is

  4. The soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, M.; Vrugt, J. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Xu, C.

    2016-04-01

    The flow duration curve is a signature catchment characteristic that depicts graphically the relationship between the exceedance probability of streamflow and its magnitude. This curve is relatively easy to create and interpret, and is used widely for hydrologic analysis, water quality management, and the design of hydroelectric power plants (among others). Several mathematical expressions have been proposed to mimic the FDC. Yet, these efforts have not been particularly successful, in large part because available functions are not flexible enough to portray accurately the functional shape of the FDC for a large range of catchments and contrasting hydrologic behaviors. Here, we extend the work of Vrugt and Sadegh (2013) and introduce several commonly used models of the soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve. These soil water retention functions are relatively simple to use, contain between two to three parameters, and mimic closely the empirical FDCs of 430 catchments of the MOPEX data set. We then relate the calibrated parameter values of these models to physical and climatological characteristics of the watershed using multivariate linear regression analysis, and evaluate the regionalization potential of our proposed models against those of the literature. If quality of fit is of main importance then the 3-parameter van Genuchten model is preferred, whereas the 2-parameter lognormal, 3-parameter GEV and generalized Pareto models show greater promise for regionalization.

  5. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Patural, Laetitia; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Govin, Alexandre; Grosseau, Philippe; Ruot, Bertrand; Deves, Olivier

    2012-10-15

    We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of proton-water (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers on water retention and hydration delay of freshly-mixed white cement pastes. NMRD is useful to determine the surface diffusion coefficient of water, the specific area and the hydration kinetics of the cement-based material. In spite of modifications of the solution's viscosity, we show that the cellulosic derivatives do not modify the surface diffusion coefficient of water. Thus, the mobility of water present inside the medium is not affected by the presence of polymer. However, these admixtures modify significantly the surface fraction of mobile water molecules transiently present at solid surfaces. This quantity measured, for the first time, for all admixed cement pastes is thus relevant to explain the water retention mechanism.

  6. Retention of radium from thermal waters on sand filters and adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Elejalde, C; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Legarda, F; Romero, F; Baeza, A

    2007-06-18

    This study was focussed on laboratory experiences of retention of radium from one thermal water on sand filters and adsorbents, trying to find an easy method for the elimination in drinkable waters polluted with this natural radio-nuclide. A thermal water from Cantabria (Spain) was selected for this work. Retention experiences were made with columns of 35 mm of diameter containing 15 cm layers of washed river sand or 4 cm layers of zeolite A3, passing known volumes of thermal water at flows between 4 and 40 ml/min with control of the retained radium by determining the amount in the water after the treatment. The statistical analysis of data suggests that retention depends on the flow and the volume passed through the columns. As additional adsorbents were used kaolin and a clay rich in illite. Jar-test experiences were made agitating known weights of adsorbents with the selected thermal water, with addition of flocculants and determination of radium in filtrated water after the treatment. Data suggest that retention is related to the weight of adsorbent used, but important quantities of radium seem remain in solution for higher amounts of adsorbents, according to the statistical treatment of data. The elution of retained radium from columns or adsorbents, previously used in experiences, should be the aim of a future research.

  7. A Simple Approach for Demonstrating Soil Water Retention and Field Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A.; Heitman, J. L.; Bowman, D.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to demonstrate the soil water retention relationship and related concepts because the specialized equipment required for performing these measurements is unavailable in most classrooms. This article outlines a low-cost, easily visualized method by which these concepts can be demonstrated in most any classroom. Columns (62.5 cm…

  8. Harmonized, distributed and nation wide modelling of Nitrogen retention in Danish surface fresh waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thodsen, Hans; Larsen, Søren E.; Windolf, Jørgen; Bering Ovesen, Niels; Bøgestrand, Jens; Kronvang, Brian

    2010-05-01

    According to the EU Water Framework Directive all freshwater bodies must obtain good ecological status by 2015. In Denmark this means that all lakes with a surface area above 5 ha must be evaluated individually and mitigation measures must be enforced if the ecological status is below "good". In consequence, the nutrient pressures from point and diffuse sources must be assessed based on a quantification of the nutrient loading of each lake. In this study we focus on the loading of nitrogen. Surface water Nitrogen retention is an important parameter in loading estimations of nitrogen to lakes and marine areas. Estimations of the cost, of reducing Nitrogen loadings also largely depends on calculations of surface water retention as large percentages of the load can be removed/ retained in surface waters. Especially the presents of larger lakes on the river network can make a large difference between the loads from different catchments. A standardised calculation on annual (1990 - 2008) Nret percentages has been carried out for all Danish lakes larger than 5 hectares attached to a river network (591 lakes). The Nret calculation is based on water residence time calculations from each lake. A national 3D hydrological model, covering all major parts of the country estimated runoff for lake catchments. The diffuse nitrogen input to each lake was simulated with an empirical nitrogen load model. Where lakes are located upstream/ downstream of each other, a calculation chain involving the nitrogen retention in lakes was created. Harmonized national calculations of river nitrogen retention are carried out on the basis of river length and river width information and information on rivers in forested areas. Each river class is given a specific retention pr. unit area. The total average (1990 - 2008) Nitrogen load to Danish surface waters is modelled to 99000 t/yr. The total surface water retention is estimated to 23700 t/yr (24%). Of the surface water retention, 35% origins from

  9. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2010-09-28

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  10. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  11. Retention behavior of phenols, anilines, and alkylbenzenes in liquid chromatographic separations using subcritical water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jones, A D; Eaton, C D

    1999-09-01

    The unique characteristic of subcritical water is its widely tunable physical properties. For example, the polarity (measured by dielectric constant) of water is significantly decreased by raising water temperature. At temperatures of 200-250 °C (under moderate pressure to keep water in the liquid state), the polarity of pure water is similar to that of pure methanol or acetonitrile at ambient conditions. Therefore, pure subcritical water may be able to serve as the mobile phase for reversed-phase separations. To investigate the retention behavior in subcritical water separation, the retention factors of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene), phenol, aniline, and their derivatives have been determined using subcritical water, methanol/water, and acetonitrile/water systems. Subcritical water separations were also performed using alumina, silica-bonded C18, and poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) columns to study the influence of the stationary phase on analyte retention under subcritical water conditions.

  12. Evaluation of a computer program used to estimate water characteristic curve

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water characteristic curve, h(theta), can be used to estimate a variety of parameters in unsaturated soils. One practical application of h(theta) is its use by DRAINMOD, a drainage model that has been widely used in shallow water table regions, to determine the water table depth–drainage v...

  13. Reply to "comment on a model for soil surface evaporation based on Campbell's retention curve by Zarei et al." by M. Sadeghi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei, Ghasem; Homaee, Mehdi; Liaghat, Abdol Majid; Hoorfar, Abdol Hosain

    2015-12-01

    Sadeghi (2015) has been commented on an analytical solution we derived for evaporation from bare soils with a descending shallow groundwater table (Zarei et al., 2010). The evaporation rate in this solution was described as a function of shallow water table depth drawdown using the parameters of Campbell's soil water retention model. Sadeghi (2015) took issue with a simplifying assumption in the derivation about the pressure head distribution above the water table that allowed us to obtain the approximate solution. This response aims to demonstrate that the derivation of Zarei et al. (2010) works reasonably well in the presence of a shallow water table by providing a more detailed discussion and additional experimental evidence.

  14. Epiphyte Water Retention and Evaporation in Native and Invaded Tropical Montane Cloud Forests in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, R. G.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2006-12-01

    Epiphyte water retention was quantified at two montane cloud forest sites in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, one native and the other invaded by an alien tree species. Water storage elements measured included all epiphytic mosses, leafy liverworts, and filmy ferns. Tree surface area was estimated and a careful survey was taken to account for all epiphytes in the sample area of the forest. Samples were collected and analyzed in the lab for epiphyte water retention capacity (WRC). Based on the volume of the different kinds of epiphytes and their corresponding WRC, forest stand water retention capacity for each survey area was estimated. Evaporation from the epiphyte mass was quantified using artificial reference samples attached to trees that were weighed at intervals to determine changes in stored water on days without significant rain or fog. In addition, a soil moisture sensor was wrapped in an epiphyte sample and left in the forest for a 6-day period. Epiphyte biomass at the Native Site and Invaded Site were estimated to be 2.89 t ha-1 and 1.05 t ha-1, respectively. Average WRC at the Native Site and Invaded Site were estimated at 1.45 mm and 0.68 mm, respectively. The difference is likely due to the presence of the invasive Psidium cattleianum at the Invaded Site because its smooth stem surface is unable to support a significant epiphytic layer. The evaporation rate from the epiphyte mass near WSC for the forest stand at the Native Site was measured at 0.38 mm day-1, which represented 10.6 % of the total ET from the forest canopy at the Native Site during the period. The above research has been recently complemented by a thorough investigation of the WSC of all water storage elements (tree stems, tree leaves, shrubs, grasses, litter, fallen branches, and epiphytes) at six forested sites at different elevations within, above, and below the zone of frequent cloud-cover. The goal of this study was to create an inexpensive and efficient methodology for acquiring

  15. [Pathophysiology of portal hypertension and mechanisms of sodium and water retention in cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Garini, Giovanni; Delsante, Marco; Iannuzzella, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Portal hypertension is caused by an increased resistance to portal outflow and an increased portal blood inflow. Portal hypertension is associated with an abnormal distribution of the blood volume, which is increased in the splanchnic territory and reduced in the non-splanchnic compartments. The relative underfilling of the arterial circulation is responsible for the sodium and water retention, which is a consequence of the baroceptor-mediated activation of vasoconstrictor and antinatriuretic factors triggered to restore circulatory integrity.

  16. Heat island mitigation using water retentive pavement sprinkled with reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, H; Nasu, M; Yoshizawa, M; Miyamoto, A; Minamiyama, M

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, reclaimed wastewater has been recycled widely for non-potable urban applications and it is to be used for sprinkling roads to mitigate heat island in urban areas. To assess the heat island mitigation effects of the sprinkling reclaimed wastewater on water retentive pavement, we carried out a survey at Shiodome-District, Tokyo. The temperatures of air and roads, humidity, and WBGT (Wet-bulb globe temperature) were measured and heat flux was estimated to compare the condition of the areas with/without sprinkling. The following results were obtained. 1) Sprinkling reclaimed wastewater decreased the road surface temperature by 8 degrees during the daytime and by 3 degrees at night: temperatures equal to those on planting zones. Nevertheless sprinkling was done only in the daytime, the temperature decrease effect was not only obtained during the daytime: it continued through the night, due to the water retentive pavement. 2) Sprinkling reclaimed wastewater reduced the amount of sensible heat flux and increased that of latent heat flux. These results suggest that sprinkling reclaimed wastewater on water retentive pavement can effectively mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  17. Water retention against drying with soft-particle suspensions in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, E.; Kodger, T. E.; Faure, P.; Rodts, S.; Weitz, D. A.; Coussot, P.

    2016-09-01

    Polymers suspended in granular packings have a significant impact on water retention, which is important for soil irrigation and the curing of building materials. Whereas the drying rate remains constant during a long period for pure water due to capillary flow providing liquid water to the evaporating surface, we show that it is not the case for a suspension made of soft polymeric particles called microgels: The drying rate decreases immediately and significantly. By measuring the spatial water saturation and concentration of suspended particles with magnetic resonance imaging, we can explain these original trends and model the process. In low-viscosity fluids, the accumulation of particles at the free surface induces a recession of the air-liquid interface. A simple model, assuming particle transport and accumulation below the sample free surface, is able to reproduce our observations without any fitting parameters. The high viscosity of the microgel suspension inhibits flow towards the free surface and a drying front appears. We show that water vapor diffusion over a defined and increasing length sets the drying rate. These results and model allow for better controlling the drying and water retention in granular porous materials.

  18. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD.

  19. Hysteresis of Soil Point Water Retention Functions Determined by Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H.; Willis, K. J.; Horita, J.; Warren, J.; Cheng, C.

    2010-12-01

    Soil point water retention functions are needed for modeling flow and transport in partially-saturated porous media. Such functions are usually determined by inverse modeling of average water retention data measured experimentally on columns of finite length. However, the resulting functions are subject to the appropriateness of the chosen model, as well as the initial and boundary condition assumptions employed. Soil point water retention functions are rarely measured directly and when they are the focus is invariably on the main drying branch. Previous direct measurement methods include time domain reflectometry and gamma beam attenuation. Here we report direct measurements of the main wetting and drying branches of the point water retention function using neutron radiography. The measurements were performed on a coarse sand (Flint #13) packed into 2.6 cm diameter x 4 cm long aluminum cylinders at the NIST BT-2 (50 μm resolution) and ORNL-HFIR CG1D (70 μm resolution) imaging beamlines. The sand columns were saturated with water and then drained and rewetted under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. 2048 x 2048 pixel images of the transmitted flux of neutrons through the column were acquired at each imposed suction (~10-15 suction values per experiment). Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert’s law in conjunction with beam hardening and geometric corrections. The pixel rows were averaged and combined with information on the known distribution of suctions within the column to give 2048 point drying and wetting functions for each experiment. The point functions exhibited pronounced hysteresis and varied with column height, possibly due to differences in porosity caused by the packing procedure employed. Predicted point functions, extracted from the hanging water column volumetric data using the TrueCell inverse modeling procedure, showed very good agreement with the range of point

  20. Construction of estimated flow- and load-duration curves for Kentucky using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unthank, Michael D.; Newson, Jeremy K.; Williamson, Tanja N.; Nelson, Hugh L.

    2012-01-01

    Flow- and load-duration curves were constructed from the model outputs of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) application for streams in Kentucky. The WATER application was designed to access multiple geospatial datasets to generate more than 60 years of statistically based streamflow data for Kentucky. The WATER application enables a user to graphically select a site on a stream and generate an estimated hydrograph and flow-duration curve for the watershed upstream of that point. The flow-duration curves are constructed by calculating the exceedance probability of the modeled daily streamflows. User-defined water-quality criteria and (or) sampling results can be loaded into the WATER application to construct load-duration curves that are based on the modeled streamflow results. Estimates of flow and streamflow statistics were derived from TOPographically Based Hydrological MODEL (TOPMODEL) simulations in the WATER application. A modified TOPMODEL code, SDP-TOPMODEL (Sinkhole Drainage Process-TOPMODEL) was used to simulate daily mean discharges over the period of record for 5 karst and 5 non-karst watersheds in Kentucky in order to verify the calibrated model. A statistical evaluation of the model's verification simulations show that calibration criteria, established by previous WATER application reports, were met thus insuring the model's ability to provide acceptably accurate estimates of discharge at gaged and ungaged sites throughout Kentucky. Flow-duration curves are constructed in the WATER application by calculating the exceedence probability of the modeled daily flow values. The flow-duration intervals are expressed as a percentage, with zero corresponding to the highest stream discharge in the streamflow record. Load-duration curves are constructed by applying the loading equation (Load = Flow*Water-quality criterion) at each flow interval.

  1. Alternative measures of lipophilicity: from octanol-water partitioning to IAM retention.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2008-08-01

    This review describes lipophilicity parameters currently used in drug design and QSAR studies. After a short historical overview, the complex nature of lipophilicity as the outcome of polar/nonpolar inter- and intramolecular interactions is analysed and considered as the background for the discussion of the different lipophilicity descriptors. The first part focuses on octanol-water partitioning of neutral and ionisable compounds, evaluates the efficiency of predictions and provides a short description of the experimental methods for the determination of distribution coefficients. A next part is dedicated to reversed-phase chromatographic techniques, HPLC and TLC in lipophilicity assessment. The two methods are evaluated for their efficiency to simulate octanol-water and the progress achieved in the refinement of suitable chromatographic conditions, in particular in the field of HPLC, is outlined. Liposomes as direct models of biological membranes are examined and phospolipophilicity is compared to the traditional lipophilicity concept. Difficulties associated with liposome-water partitioning are discussed. The last part focuses on Immobilised Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatography as an alternative which combines membrane simulation with rapid measurements. IAM chromatographic retention is compared to octanol-water and liposome-water partitioning as well as to reversed-phase retention and its potential to predict biopartitioning and biological activities is discussed.

  2. Retention of contaminants in northern natural peatlands treating mine waste waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Katharina; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Klöve, Björn

    2014-05-01

    The mining industry in Finland is growing, leading to an increasing number of working and proposed mine sites. As a consequence, the amount of mine waste waters created is likewise increasing. This poses a great challenge for water management and purification, as these mine waste waters can lead to severe environmental and health consequences when released to receiving water bodies untreated. In the past years, the use of natural peatlands for cost-effective passive waste water treatment has been increasing. In this study, the fate of mine water contaminants in a treatment peatland receiving process waters from the Kittilä gold mine was investigated. Special attention was paid to the fate of potentially harmful substances such as arsenic, antimony or nickel. During the 4 years of operation, the peatland removed contaminants from process waters at varying efficiencies. While arsenic, antimony and nickel were retained at high efficiencies (>80% retention), other contaminants such as zinc, sulfate or iron were not retained or even leaching from the peatland. Soil samples taken in 2013 showed a linear increase of arsenic, antimony and nickel concentration in the peatland as compared to earlier sampling times, in agreement with the good retention efficiencies for those contaminants. Measured concentrations exceeded guideline values for contaminated soils, indicating that the prolonged use of treatment peatlands leads to high soil contamination and restrict further uses of the peatlands without remediation measures. Soil and pore water samples were taken along a transect with varying distance from the process water distribution ditch and analyzed for total and more easily mobile concentrations of contaminants (peat soil) as well as total and dissolved contaminants (water samples). Concentrations of contaminants such as arsenic, manganese or antimony in peat and pore water samples were highest near the distribution ditch and decreased with increasing distance from the

  3. Solute retention and the states of water in polyethylene glycol and poly(vinyl alcohol) gels.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Ryosaku; Shibukawa, Masami; Oguma, Koichi

    2004-06-18

    The states of water sorbed in a cross-linked polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel, TSKgel Ether-250, and cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gels of different pore sizes, TSKgel Toyopearl HW-40S, 50S, 55S and 75S, were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that there were three types of water in these hydrogels, non-freezing water, freezable bound water and free water. The amount of water that functions as the stationary phase in the column packed with the each gel was also estimated by a liquid chromatographic method. The estimated amount of the stationary phase water is in good agreement with the sum of the amount of non-freezing water and that of freezable bound water for HW-40S, 50S and 55S, while it agrees with the amount of only non-freezing water for HW-75S and Ether-250. This means that the stationary phase water consists of non-freezing water and freezable bound water for HW-40S, 50S and 55S, while only non-freezing water functions as the stationary phase in HW-75S and Ether-250 gels. This result can be attributed to the difference in the structure of the gels; the PVA gels containing PVA at relatively high concentrations, HW-40S, 50S and 55S, have a homogeneous gel phase, whereas HW-75S and Ether-250 have a heterogeneous gel phase consisting hydrated polymer domains and macropores with relatively hydrophobic surface. The freezable bound water in Toyopearl HW-40S, 50S and 55S can be regarded as a component of a homogeneous PVA solution phase, while that in HW-75S and Ether-250 may be water isolated in small pores of the hydrophobic domains. The results obtained by the investigation on the retention selectivity of these hydrogels in aqueous solutions supported our postulated view on the structures of the hydrogels.

  4. Organic matter controls of soil water retention in an alpine grassland and its significance for hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Yang, Jin-Ling; Li, De-Cheng; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Liu, Feng; Yang, Ren-Min; Yang, Fan

    2014-11-01

    Soil water retention influences many soil properties and soil hydrological processes. The alpine meadows and steppes of the Qilian Mountains on the northeast border of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau form the source area of the Heihe River, the second largest inland river in China. The soils of this area therefore have a large effect on water movement and storage of the entire watershed. In order to understand the controlling factors of soil water retention and how they affect regional eco-hydrological processes in an alpine grassland, thirty-five pedogenic horizons in fourteen soil profiles along two facing hillslopes in typical watersheds of this area were selected for study. Results show that the extensively-accumulated soil organic matter plays a dominant role in controlling soil water retention in this alpine environment. We distinguished two mechanisms of this control. First, at high matric potentials soil organic matter affected soil water retention mainly through altering soil structural parameters and thereby soil bulk density. Second, at low matric potentials the water adsorbing capacity of soil organic matter directly affected water retention. To investigate the hydrological functions of soils at larger scales, soil water retention was compared by three generalized pedogenic horizons. Among these soil horizons, the mattic A horizon, a diagnostic surface horizon of Chinese Soil Taxonomy defined specially for alpine meadow soils, had the greatest soil water retention over the entire range of measured matric potentials. Hillslopes with soils having these horizons are expected to have low surface runoff. This study promotes the understanding of the critical role of alpine soils, especially the vegetated surface soils in controlling the eco-hydrological processes in source regions of the Heihe River watershed.

  5. Triple Emulsion Drops with An Ultrathin Water Layer: High Encapsulation Efficiency and Enhanced Cargo Retention in Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lee, Hyomin; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Kim, June Hwan; Fan, Jing; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Zhu, Taotao; Weitz, David A

    2016-05-01

    Triple emulsion drops with an ultrathin water layer are developed to achieve high encapsulation efficiency of hydrophobic cargo in a hydrophobic polymeric shell, directly dispersed in water. Furthermore, enhanced retention of volatile hydrophobic cargo is achieved by forming a hydrogel network within this water layer that serves as a physical barrier.

  6. Chronic propranolol induces deficits in retention but not acquisition performance in the water maze in mice.

    PubMed

    Czech, D A; Nielson, K A; Laubmeier, K K

    2000-07-01

    Agents that alter adrenergic receptors, such as "beta-blockers," also alter memory storage. However, reports suggest that beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, such as propranolol, have conflicting behavioral effects with acute vs chronic dosing. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic propranolol on retention for a spatial learning task. Adult male ICR mice were given daily injections of propranolol (2, 4, 8, or 12 mg/kg ip) or 0. 9% NaCl for 15 days prior to, and during, trials in a Morris water maze. Mice received five massed acquisition (escape) trials in each of three daily sessions, followed by a single 60-s probe trial on the fourth day. The location of the submerged platform was constant for each animal over acquisition trials, but varied across animals; starting position varied across trials. A 5 (dose) x 3 (trial blocks) mixed factorial ANOVA for escape time yielded a significant trial blocks effect only (p <.001), showing performance improving over sessions. Time spent in the target quadrant on the probe trial was shorter under all doses of propranolol when compared to vehicle group (all p <.001), indicating poorer retention of prior platform location. This effect, however, was not dose-related. Swim speed was not significantly affected by propranolol. These data demonstrate that chronic dosing with propranolol can impair retention of spatial learning, which cannot be attributed to reduced arousal or motor function.

  7. Assessing the Use of Sunken Lanes for Water Retention in a Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatuška, Karel

    2012-12-01

    Newly-designed structures and landscaping elements are often used for flood protection. This article assesses the use of existing sunken lanes for retaining water in a landscape and the sedimentation of washed-off soil. The article also describes ways how to preserve or, at least minimally disrupt, existing biotopes and landscape segments. Geodetic data from one specific sunken lane in South Moravia in the Czech Republic were transferred to a digital terrain model; 9 models were subsequently generated, each with a different longitudinal sunken lane bed slope. Retention dams consisting of gabions were placed in them. The number of dams, the volume of structures made of steel gabions, and the retention area volume behind the dams were determined for each model specifically. It was determined that the number of dams, as well as their total volume, increased with the average longitudinal slope of the sunken lane bed. It was also discovered that the retention volume remained almost the same, as it only very slightly decreases with an increasing longitudinal slope.

  8. Characterizing Synergistic Water and Energy Efficiency at the Residential Scale Using a Cost Abatement Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, A. S.; Chini, C. M.; Schreiber, K. L.; Barker, Z. A.

    2015-12-01

    Energy and water are two increasingly correlated resources. Electricity generation at thermoelectric power plants requires cooling such that large water withdrawal and consumption rates are associated with electricity consumption. Drinking water and wastewater treatment require significant electricity inputs to clean, disinfect, and pump water. Due to this energy-water nexus, energy efficiency measures might be a cost-effective approach to reducing water use and water efficiency measures might support energy savings as well. This research characterizes the cost-effectiveness of different efficiency approaches in households by quantifying the direct and indirect water and energy savings that could be realized through efficiency measures, such as low-flow fixtures, energy and water efficient appliances, distributed generation, and solar water heating. Potential energy and water savings from these efficiency measures was analyzed in a product-lifetime adjusted economic model comparing efficiency measures to conventional counterparts. Results were displayed as cost abatement curves indicating the most economical measures to implement for a target reduction in water and/or energy consumption. These cost abatement curves are useful in supporting market innovation and investment in residential-scale efficiency.

  9. The infrared light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III and its relationship to the visual light curve, C2, and water production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles S.; Hanner, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The near-IR light curve of Periodic Comet Halley 1986 III is analyzed and compared with C2 production, water production, and the visual light curve. This is the most complete IR light curve compiled to date for any comet. The scattering phase function at small sun-comet-earth angles is shown to affect the slope of near-IR light curve significantly. P/Halley's dust production, as inferred from the IR light curve showed an increased production rate near perihelion which appears to be correlated with the onset of significant jet activity. The near-IR light curve, visual light curve, C2, and water production rates displayed different heliocentric variations, suggesting that one parameter cannot be accurately estimated from another. This is particularly true of the early preperihelion visual light curve. A peak of 0.3-0.5 magnitude in the visual magnitude, representing the integrated brightness of the comet's visible coma, lagged the other parameters by about a day. The near-IR color, J-H, was less red during periods of strong dust activity.

  10. Nitrate retention in riparian ground water at natural and elevated nitrate levels in north central Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Duff, John H; Jackman, Alan P; Triska, Frank J; Sheibley, Richard W; Avanzino, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between local ground water flows and NO(3)(-) transport to the channel was examined in three well transects from a natural, wooded riparian zone adjacent to the Shingobee River, MN. The hillslope ground water originated as recharge from intermittently grazed pasture up slope of the site. In the hillslope transect perpendicular to the stream, ground water NO(3)(-) concentrations decreased from approximately 3 mg N L(-1) beneath the ridge (80 m from the channel) to 0.01 to 1.0 mg N L(-1) at wells 1 to 3 m from the channel. The Cl(-) concentrations and NO(3)/Cl ratios decreased toward the channel indicating NO(3)(-) dilution and biotic retention. In the bankside well transect parallel to the stream, two distinct ground water environments were observed: an alluvial environment upstream of a relict beaver dam influenced by stream water and a hillslope environment downstream of the relict beaver dam. Nitrate was elevated to levels representative of agricultural runoff in a third well transect located approximately 5 m from the stream to assess the effectiveness of the riparian zone as a NO(3)(-) sink. Subsurface NO(3)(-) injections revealed transport of up to 15 mg N L(-1) was nearly conservative in the alluvial riparian environment. Addition of glucose stimulated dissolved oxygen uptake and promoted NO(3)(-) retention under both background and elevated NO(3)(-) levels in summer and winter. Disappearance of added NO(3)(-) was followed by transient NO(2)(-) formation and, in the presence of C(2)H(2), by N(2)O formation, demonstrating potential denitrification. Under current land use, most NO(3)(-) associated with local ground water is biotically retained or diluted before reaching the channel. However, elevating NO(3)(-) levels through agricultural cultivation would likely result in increased NO(3)(-) transport to the channel.

  11. Nitrate retention in riparian ground water at natural and elevated nitrate levels in North Central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Jackman, A.P.; Triska, F.J.; Sheibley, R.W.; Avanzino, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between local ground water flows and NO3- transport to the channel was examined in three well transects from a natural, wooded riparian zone adjacent to the Shingobee River, MN. The hillslope ground water originated as recharge from intermittently grazed pasture up slope of the site. In the hillslope transect perpendicular to the stream, ground water NO3- concentrations decreased from ???3 mg N L-1 beneath the ridge (80 m from the channel) to 0.01 to 1.0 mg N L-1 at wells 1 to 3 m from the channel. The Cl- concentrations and NO3/Cl ratios decreased toward the channel indicating NO3- dilution and biotic retention. In the bankside well transect parallel to the stream, two distinct ground water environments were observed: an alluvial environment upstream of a relict beaver dam influenced by stream water and a hillslope environment downstream of the relict beaver dam. Nitrate was elevated to levels representative of agricultural runoff in a third well transect looted ???5 m from the stream to assess the effectiveness of the riparian zone as a NO3- sink. Subsurface NO3- injections revealed transport of up to 15 mg N L-1 was nearly conservative in the alluvial riparian environment. Addition of glucose stimulated dissolved oxygen uptake and promoted NO3- retention under both background and elevated NO 3- levels in summer and winter. Disappearance of added NO3- was followed by transient NO2- formation and, in the presence of C2H2, by N2O formation, demonstrating potential denitrification. Under current land use, most NO3- associated with local ground water is biotically retained or diluted before reaching the channel. However, elevating NO 3- levels through agricultural cultivation would likely result in increased NO3- transport to the channel. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  12. Evaluating changes to reservoir rule curves using historical water-level data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mower, Ethan; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2013-01-01

    Flood control reservoirs are typically managed through rule curves (i.e. target water levels) which control the storage and release timing of flood waters. Changes to rule curves are often contemplated and requested by various user groups and management agencies with no information available about the actual flood risk of such requests. Methods of estimating flood risk in reservoirs are not easily available to those unfamiliar with hydrological models that track water movement through a river basin. We developed a quantile regression model that uses readily available daily water-level data to estimate risk of spilling. Our model provided a relatively simple process for estimating the maximum applicable water level under a specific flood risk for any day of the year. This water level represents an upper-limit umbrella under which water levels can be operated in a variety of ways. Our model allows the visualization of water-level management under a user-specified flood risk and provides a framework for incorporating the effect of a changing environment on water-level management in reservoirs, but is not designed to replace existing hydrological models. The model can improve communication and collaboration among agencies responsible for managing natural resources dependent on reservoir water levels.

  13. Effect of interaction heterogeneity on colloidal arrangements at a curved oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mina; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, Bum Jun

    2015-01-14

    We report the unique arrangement behaviour of colloidal particles at a curved oil-water interface. Particles trapped at a centrosymmetrically curved oil-water interface, formed by placing an oil lens at a neat air-water interface, organize into diverse arrangement structures due to electrostatic repulsion under the gravitational field. To reveal a possible mechanism behind the observed diversity, we investigate the interactions between pairs of particles at the curved oil-water interface. The magnitude of electrostatic repulsive interactions between pairs of particles is determined by minimizing the total potential of the particle pairs. We show that the pair interactions are quite heterogeneous, following a Gamma distribution. Using the experimentally determined pair potential and the heterogeneity in the potential as input parameters for Monte Carlo simulations, we show that such interaction heterogeneity affects the particle arrangements at the curved interface and results in an observed diversity in the particle arrangement structures. We believe that this work prompts further experimental and simulation studies to extensively understand hierarchical relations from small scale measurements (e.g., pair interactions and heterogeneity) to bulk scale properties (e.g., microstructure and interfacial rheology).

  14. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF "STAGNATION CURVES" FOR LEAD AND COPPER, AND WATER QUALITY FACTORS AFFECTING THEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Stagnation curves" are the response of metal levels, particularly lead and copper, to time under conditions of no water flow. Research on lead pipe in the early 1980's in the United States, Germany, and in the United Kingdom suggested that they were characterized by rapid incre...

  15. Formation and retention of organically bound deuterium in rice in deuterium water release experiment.

    PubMed

    Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Amano, Hikaru; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Ichimasa, Michiko; Ichimasa, Yusuke

    2002-06-01

    As a substitute of tritium, deuterated water (D2O) vapor release experiments were performed in a greenhouse to estimate the different formation and subsequent retention of organically bound deuterium in rice plants between daytime and nighttime exposure. Potted rice plants were exposed to D2O vapor in the greenhouse for 8 h, under day or night conditions. Deuterium concentrations in free water and organic matter in rice leaves and ears were investigated until harvest time. The formation of organically bound deuterium in the daytime was higher than during the nighttime by the factors of 2.4 for the ear and 2.9 for the leaf. The decrease of the organically bound deuterium concentration in the ear after the nighttime exposure was faster than that after the daytime exposure. Data analysis was carried out using a compartment model in which different generating processes of organic matter were considered. The calculated organically bound deuterium retention in rice agreed with the measured value.

  16. Fabrication of microgel-in-liposome particles with improved water retention.

    PubMed

    An, Eunjung; Jeong, Choon Bok; Cha, Chaenyung; Kim, Do Hoon; Lee, Haekwang; Kong, Hyunjoon; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Jin Woong

    2012-03-06

    Corneocytes represents the main water reservoir of stratum corneum, and that ability intimately arises from their architecture and total composition. Here we describe a novel method for fabricating a microgel-in-liposome (M-i-L) structure consisting of a sodium hyaluronate microgel and a lipid membrane envelop in order to mimic corneocyte cell structures. The essence of our approach is to use a lecithin-based microemulsion with a very low interfacial tension between the water droplet and oil continuous phase. Using this emulsion enables us to stabilize a dispersion of microgel particles without phase separation or aggregation. The addition of excess water produced single-core or multicore microgel particles enveloped in a lipid layer. To demonstrate the applicability of this unique vesicle system, we encapsulated a high concentration of natural moisturizing factor (NMF) in the microgel core and investigated how the M-i-L structure affected the water retention in comparison with other control systems. We have observed that our M-i-L particles with the NMF in the core, which mimicked the corneocyte cell structure, showed an excellent ability to retain water in the system. This experimental result inspired us to investigate how corneocyte cells, which feature a lipid-enveloped hydrogel structure, provide such long-lasting hydration to the skin.

  17. Source or Sink: Investigating the role of storm water retention ponds in the urban landscape (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, S.; Casey, R.; Ownby, D.; Snodgrass, J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of human activities on surface water, groundwater and soil is nowhere more apparent than in urban and suburban systems. Dramatic changes to watersheds in urbanizing areas have led to changes in hydrology and an associated increase in the flux of sediment and contaminants to surface and ground waters. In an effort to mediate these impacts, Best Management Practices (BMP) have been established in order to increase infiltration of runoff and trap sediment and particulates derived from impervious surfaces before they enter surface waters. Perhaps the most ubiquitous BMP are storm water retention ponds. While these structures are designed to reduce runoff and particulate loading to urban streams, their addition to the urban landscape has created a large number of new wetland habitats. In the Red Run watershed, just outside of Baltimore, Maryland, 186 discrete natural or man-made wetland areas have been identified. Of these 186 wetland areas, 165 were created to manage stormwater and most were specifically designed as stormwater management ponds (i.e., human-created basins or depressions that hold runoff for some period during the annual hydrological year). Despite their abundance in the landscape, very little is known about how these systems impact the flux of stormwater pollutants or affect the organisms using these ponds as habitat. Results from a series of related projects in the Red Run watershed are presented here in an effort to summarize the range of issues associated with stormwater management ponds. The Red Run watershed is situated inside the Urban-Rural Demarcation Line (URDL) around Baltimore City and has been identified as a smart growth corridor by Baltimore County. This region is one of two areas in Baltimore County where new development is focused. In a series of investigations of soils, surface and ground waters, and amphibian and earthworm use of 68 randomly selected stormwater retention ponds from the Red Run watershed, a range of

  18. Free water clearance curves during saline, mannitol, glucose and urea diuresis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maldonado, Manuel; Opava-Stitzer, Susan

    1978-01-01

    1. Free water clearances were measured during infusion of hypotonic saline, glucose, urea, and mannitol in Brattleboro rats. For each solute the free water clearances were plotted using either V or (CH2O + CNa) as the distal tubular delivery term. 2. In all cases the use of (CH2O + CNa) as distal delivery term yielded a steeper relationship than when V was used. There were no significant differences in the CH2O to V relationship when saline, glucose and mannitol was the solute infused. Urea, however, resulted in a curve with a slope significantly less than that for the other solutes. 3. When CH2O was plotted against (CH2O + CNa) there was still no significant difference between the slopes of the curves during saline or mannitol infusion. Use of this delivery term, however, resulted in a slope during glucose infusion which was significantly greater than that during saline or mannitol infusion. The slope for urea infusion remained lower than that for any other solute. 4. Regardless of the delivery term used, there was no significant difference in the slopes of the curves for awake Wistar and awake Brattleboro rats during mannitol infusion. This indicates that the awake rat is a suitable model for free water clearance studies. 5. The results indicate that NaCl and mannitol are both adequate for free water clearance and that (CH2O + CNa) is a better index of distal delivery than V. PMID:690907

  19. Testing the 'microbubble effect' using the Cavitron technique to measure xylem water extraction curves.

    PubMed

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Burlett, Régis; Lavigne, Bruno; Cochard, Hervé; Santiago, Louis S; Delzon, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Plant resistance to xylem cavitation is a major drought adaptation trait and is essential to characterizing vulnerability to climate change. Cavitation resistance can be determined with vulnerability curves. In the past decade, new techniques have increased the ease and speed at which vulnerability curves are produced. However, these new techniques are also subject to new artefacts, especially as related to long-vesselled species. We tested the reliability of the 'flow rotor' centrifuge technique, the so-called Cavitron, and investigated one potential mechanism behind the open vessel artefact in centrifuge-based vulnerability curves: the microbubble effect. The microbubble effect hypothesizes that microbubbles introduced to open vessels, either through sample flushing or injection of solution, travel by buoyancy or mass flow towards the axis of rotation where they artefactually nucleate cavitation. To test the microbubble effect, we constructed vulnerability curves using three different rotor sizes for five species with varying maximum vessel length, as well as water extraction curves that are constructed without injection of solution into the rotor. We found that the Cavitron technique is robust to measure resistance to cavitation in tracheid-bearing and short-vesselled species, but not for long-vesselled ones. Moreover, our results support the microbubble effect hypothesis as the major cause for the open vessel artefact in long-vesselled species.

  20. Optimising the weighting of the water retention index using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, William; Vandecasteele, Ine

    2015-04-01

    A robust composite indicator was developed to assess the capacity of the landscape to regulate and retain water passing through it at Pan-European scale. The "Water Retention Index" (WRI) takes into account the role of interception by vegetation, the water-holding capacity of the soil, and the relative capacity of the bedrock to allow percolation of water, as well as the influence of soil sealing and slope gradient. A delicate issue in composite indicators is however the relative weighting of each variable used in the indicator - strong correlations and skewness are known to cause unequal influence of the input variables, even though the weighting coefficients are equal (Paruolo et al, 2013). To understand the effects of the weightings in the WRI, penalised splines were used to calculate the first order sensitivity index of each variable used in the construction of the WRI, allowing the true influence of each input to be determined. Furthermore, the weighting coefficients were optimised using an iterative nonlinear algorithm to find the coefficients which resulted in the most equal influence of each input to the indicator. In principle, this approach can be used to improve the weighting of many different kinds of composite indicator, the results of which are often used as the basis for important policy decisions at the European level. Paruolo, Paolo, Michaela Saisana, and Andrea Saltelli. "Ratings and rankings: voodoo or science?." Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 176.3 (2013): 609-634.

  1. Prediction of the saturated hydraulic conductivity from Brooks and Corey's water retention parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasta, Paolo; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Romano, Nunzio

    2013-05-01

    Prediction of flow through variably saturated porous media requires accurate knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties, namely the water retention function (WRF) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). Unfortunately, direct measurement of the HCF is time consuming and expensive. In this study, we derive a simple closed-form equation that predicts the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks from the WRF parameters of Brooks and Corey (1964). This physically based analytical expression uses an empirical tortuosity parameter (τ) and exploits the information embedded in the measured pore-size distribution. Our proposed model is compared against the current state of the art using more than 250 soil samples from the Grenoble soil catalog (GRIZZLY) and hydraulic properties of European soils (HYPRES) databases. Results demonstrate that the proposed model provides better predictions of the saturated hydraulic conductivity values with reduced size of the 90% confidence intervals of about 3 orders of magnitude.

  2. [Volume reduction and tritium retention factor in electrolytic enrichment of water].

    PubMed

    Hirai, E; Matsuoka, N; Takashima, Y

    1990-11-01

    Volume reduction(N), tritium retention factor (R), tritium concentration factor(Z) and apparent separation factor(beta) were measured on the large and small electrolytic cell systems. The relative variation of R was smaller than that of Z. So, it is recommended to use R in calculation of tritium concentrations in water samples. Furthermore, it was empirically revealed that R can be obtained only from N if a reliable beta-value is previously known. Therefore, it is possible to obtain R without electrolysis of the tritium standard solution. Taking into account the above facts, the so-called non-spike analysis of tritium, in which electrolytic enrichment and liquid scintillation counting are combined, becomes practicable.

  3. Buried particulate organic carbon stimulates denitrification and nitrate retention in stream sediments at the groundwater-surface water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Robert S.; Scott, J. Thad; Bartsch, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The interface between ground water and surface water in streams is a hotspot for N processing. However, the role of buried organic C in N transformation at this interface is not well understood, and inferences have been based largely on descriptive studies. Our main objective was to determine how buried particulate organic C (POC) affected denitrification and NO3− retention in the sediments of an upwelling reach in a sand-plains stream in Wisconsin. We manipulated POC in mesocosms inserted in the sediments. Treatments included low and high quantities of conditioned red maple leaves (buried beneath combusted sand), ambient sediment (sand containing background levels of POC), and a control (combusted sand). We measured denitrification rates in sediments by acetylene-block assays in the laboratory and by changes in N2 concentrations in the field using membrane inlet mass spectrometry. We measured NO3−, NH4+, and dissolved organic N (DON) retention as changes in concentrations and fluxes along groundwater flow paths in the mesocosms. POC addition drove oxic ground water to severe hypoxia, led to large increases in dissolved organic C (DOC), and strongly increased denitrification rates and N (NO3− and total dissolved N) retention relative to the control. In situ denitrification accounted for 30 to 60% of NO3− retention. Our results suggest that buried POC stimulated denitrification and NO3− retention by producing DOC and by creating favorable redox conditions for denitrification.

  4. Effect of an ionic impurity on the caloric curves of water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douady, J.; Calvo, F.; Spiegelman, F.

    2009-04-01

    The equilibrium heat capacities of model pure and heterogeneous water clusters have been calculated using exchange Monte Carlo simulations. For the pure water cluster (H2O)20, microcanonical and canonical caloric curves obtained from various rigid intermolecular potentials indicate the onset of melting to lie in the range 140-180 K, in reasonable agreement with previous estimates. Clusters doped with a single hydronium or ammonium impurity show a significant shift of the melting point in the 20-molecule system, but a reduced effect when 50 molecules are reached.

  5. Impact of biocrust succession on water retention and repellency on open-cast lignite mining sites under reclamation in Lower Lusatia, NE-Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gypser, Stella; Fischer, Thomas; Lange, Philipp; Veste, Maik

    2016-04-01

    caused by bryophytes. The determination of the water retention curves showed an increase of the water holding capacity, especially in conjunction with the growth of green algae layer. The absorption capacity of soil crust biota as well as a decreased pore diameter in the green algae layers positively affected the water retention of crusted soil compared to pure substrate. The occurrence of bryophytes with later succession weakened the repellent behavior of the biocrusts, increased infiltration, and might have affected the run-off at small-scale on biocrusts. Certainly, the biological soil crusts showed water repellent properties but no distinctive hydrophobic characteristics. On both locations, similar trends of water repellency and retention related to crustal formation were observed, in spite of different relief, reclamation time and inhomogeneous distribution of crustal organisms. References Gypser, S., Veste, M., Fischer, T., Lange, P. (2016): Infiltration and water retention of biological soil crusts on reclaimed soils of former open-cast lignite mining sites in Brandenburg, north-east Germany, Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics, accepted 12. November 2015. Gypser, S., Veste, M., Fischer, T., Lange, P. (2015): Formation of soil lichen crusts at reclaimed post-mining sites, Lower Lusatia, North-east Germany. Graphis Scripta 27: 3-14.

  6. Preparation and properties of a double-coated slow-release and water-retention urea fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Liu, Mingzhu

    2006-02-22

    A double-coated, slow-release, and water-retention urea fertilizer (DSWU) was prepared by cross-linked poly(acrylic acid)-containing urea (PAAU) (the outer coating), polystyrene (PS) (the inner coating), and urea granule (the core). Elemental analysis results showed that the nitrogen content of the product was 33.6 wt %. The outer coating (PAAU) regulated the nitrogen release rate and protected the inner coating from damage. The slow-release property of the product was investigated in water and in soil. The possible mechanism of nitrogen release was proposed. The influences of PS coating percentage, temperature, water absorbency, and pH on the release of nitrogen were also investigated. It was found that PS coating percentage, temperature, and water absorbency had a significant influence on the release of nitrogen. However, the pH had no effect. The water-retention property of the product was also investigated. The results showed that the product not only had a good slow-release property but also excellent water-retention capacity, which could effectively improve the utilization of fertilizer and water resources. The results of the present work indicated that the DSWU would find good application in agriculture and horticulture, especially in drought-prone areas where the availability of water is insufficient.

  7. Preparation and properties of a double-coated slow-release NPK compound fertilizer with superabsorbent and water-retention.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Liu, Mingzhu; Rui Liang

    2008-02-01

    A double-coated slow-release NPK compound fertilizer with superabsorbent and water-retention was prepared by crosslinked poly(acrylic acid)/diatomite - containing urea (the outer coating), chitosan (the inner coating), and water-soluble granular fertilizer NPK (the core). The effects of the amount of crosslinker, initiator, degree of neutralization of acrylic acid, initial monomer and diatomite concentration on water absorbency were investigated and optimized. The water absorbency of the product was 75 times its own weight if it was allowed to swell in tap water at room temperature for 2 h. Atomic absorption spectrophotometer and element analysis results showed that the product contained 8.47% potassium (shown by K(2)O), 8.51% phosphorus (shown by P(2)O(5)), and 15.77% nitrogen. We also investigated the water-retention property of the product and the slow release behavior of N, P and K in the product. This product with excellent slow release and water-retention capacity, being nontoxic in soil and environment-friendly, could be especially useful in agricultural and horticultural applications.

  8. Biodegradability and Molecular Composition of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in Urban Stormwater Runoff and Outflow Water from a Stormwater Retention Pond.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Mary G; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-04-05

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can be a significant part of the reactive N in aquatic ecosystems and can accelerate eutrophication and harmful algal blooms. A bioassay method was coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) to determine the biodegradability and molecular composition of DON in the urban stormwater runoff and outflow water from an urban stormwater retention pond. The biodegradability of DON increased from 10% in the stormwater runoff to 40% in the pond outflow water and DON was less aromatic and had lower overall molecular weight in the pond outflow water than in the stormwater runoff. More than 1227 N-bearing organic formulas were identified with FT-ICR-MS in the stormwater runoff and pond outflow water, which were only 13% different in runoff and outflow water. These molecular formulas represented a wide range of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, amino sugars, lignins, and tannins in DON from runoff and pond outflow water. This work implies that the urban infrastructure (i.e., stormwater retention ponds) has the potential to influence biogeochemical processes in downstream water bodies because retention ponds are often a junction between the natural and the built environment.

  9. Enhancement of water retention in UV-exposed fuel-cell proton exchange membranes studied using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shaumik; Devi, Nirmala; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Rambabu, Gutru; Bhat, Santoshkumar D.; Pesala, Bala

    2016-02-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are increasingly gaining importance as a clean energy source. PEMs need to possess high proton conductivity and should be chemically and mechanically stable in the fuel cell environment. Proton conductivity of PEM in fuel cells is directly proportional to water content in the membrane. Among the various PEMs available, Nafion has high proton conductivity even with low water content compared to SPEEK (Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone)) but is also expensive. SPEEK membranes and it's composites have better mechanical properties and have comparatively higher thermal stability. Operating the fuel cell at higher temperatures and at the same time maintaining the water content of the membrane is always a great challenge. In this paper, to increase water retention capacity, Nafion, SPEEK and it's composite (SPEEK PSSA-CNT) membranes are exposed to Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation for varied times. Terahertz Spectroscopy, in both pulsed and CW mode has been used as an efficient tool to quantify the water retention of the membrane. Results using Terahertz spectroscopy show that even though the initial water absorption capacity of Nafion membranes is more, SPEEK membranes and it's composites show considerable improvement in the water retention capacity upon high intensity UV irradiation.

  10. Comparing the potentials of clay and biochar in improving water retention and mechanical resilience of sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayi, Ayodele Ebenezer; Horn, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Changing climate is threatening rainfall regularity particularly in the semi-arid and arid regions; therefore, strategies to conserve water within their coarse-grained soils and to improve water use efficiency of crops are critical. This study compared the effectiveness of biochar and two types of clay materials in augmenting water retention and improving mechanical resilience of fine sand. The amendment of fine sand with woodchip-biochar and kaolinite (non-swelling clay) and Na-bentonite (swelling clay) improved the water retention capacity and interparticle bonding of the substrate depending of the rate of amendment and water content of the substrates. Na-bentonite was more effective at increasing water retention capacity at more negative matric potentials. Biochar was more effective at saturation due to the increased porosity, while kaolinite responds similarly to biochar. It is, however, shown that most of the water retained by the Na-betonite may not be available to plants, particularly at high amendment rate. Furthermore, the clay and biochar materials improved particle bonding in the fine sand with the Na-bentonite being more effective than biochar and kaolinite (in that order) in strengthening interparticle bonds and improving the resilience of fine sand, if the rate of amendment is kept at ≤50 g kg-1.

  11. Preparation and properties of a coated slow-release and water-retention biuret phosphoramide fertilizer with superabsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuping; Yue, Guoren; Feng, Lei; Han, Yuqi; Yu, Xinghai; Zhang, Zenghu

    2011-01-12

    In this investigation, a novel water-insoluble slow-release fertilizer, biuret polyphosphoramide (BPAM), was formulated and synthesized from urea, phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)), and ferric oxide (Fe(2)O(3)). The structure of BPAM was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Subsequently, a coated slow-release BPAM fertilizer with superabsorbent was prepared by ionic cross-linked carboxymethylchitosan (the core), acrylic acid, acrylamide, and active carbon (the coating). The variable influences on the water absorbency were investigated and optimized. Component analysis results showed that the coated slow-release BPAM contained 5.66% nitrogen and 11.7% phosphorus. The property of water retention, the behavior of slow release of phosphorus, and the capacity of adsorption of cations were evaluated, and the results revealed that the product not only had good slow-release property and excellent water retention capacity but also higher adsorption capacities of cations in saline soil.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of point and parametric pedotransfer functions for estimating water retention of soils in Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touil, Sami; Degre, Aurore; Nacer Chabaca, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Improving the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs) requires studying how prediction uncertainty can be apportioned to different sources of uncertainty in inputs. In this study, the question addressed was as follows: which variable input is the main or best complementary predictor of water retention, and at which water potential? Two approaches were adopted to generate PTFs: multiple linear regressions (MLRs) for point PTFs and multiple nonlinear regressions (MNLRs) for parametric PTFs. Reliability tests showed that point PTFs provided better estimates than parametric PTFs (root mean square error, RMSE: 0.0414 and 0.0444 cm3 cm-3, and 0.0613 and 0.0605 cm3 cm-3 at -33 and -1500 kPa, respectively). The local parametric PTFs provided better estimates than Rosetta PTFs at -33 kPa. No significant difference in accuracy, however, was found between the parametric PTFs and Rosetta H2 at -1500 kPa with RMSE values of 0.0605 cm3 cm-3 and 0.0636 cm3 cm-3, respectively. The results of global sensitivity analyses (GSAs) showed that the mathematical formalism of PTFs and their input variables reacted differently in terms of point pressure and texture. The point and parametric PTFs were sensitive mainly to the sand fraction in the fine- and medium-textural classes. The use of clay percentage (C %) and bulk density (BD) as inputs in the medium-textural class improved the estimation of PTFs at -33 kPa.

  13. Effectiveness of Glycerol Ingestion for Enhanced Body Water Retention during Cold Water Immersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    carbohydrate (CHO) meal was consumed by all subjects to minimize differences in nutritional status. This was designed to ensure sufficient substrate...GLY in the ingested solution was 79 ± 8 ml. The mean nutritional values for the predive 10 meals consumed by each treatment group did not differ...body or head-out immersion. Additionally, Rochelle and Horvath (1978) found that surfers who were chronically exposed to cold water exhibited a smaller

  14. Water retention and runoff retardation in a drained wetland after heavy rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Ottfried; Fahle, Marcus; Steidl, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    high retardation effect, since in most cases the maximum ditch water level lagged several hours behind the peak in groundwater level. Besides a multitude of process-influencing factors, it was shown that in flat areas even drained wetlands can display a marked retention effect.

  15. Soil water repellency characteristic curves for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Ken; Müller, Karin; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis; Clothier, Brent; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a phenomenon that influences many soil hydrologic processes such as reduction of infiltration, increase in overland flow, and enhanced preferential flow. SWR has been observed in various soil types and textures, and the degree of SWR is greatly controlled by soil moisture content and levels of organic matter and clay. One of the key topics in SWR research is how to describe accurately the seasonal and temporal variation of SWR with the controlling factors such as soil moisture, organic matter, and clay contents for soil profiles with natural organic carbon gradients. In the present study, we summarize measured SWR data for soil profiles under different land uses and vegetation in Japan and New Zealand, and compared these with literature data. We introduce the contact angle-based evaluation of SWR and predictive models for soil water repellency characteristic curves, in which the contact angle is a function of the moisture content. We also discuss a number of novel concepts, including i) the reduction in the contact angle with soil-water contact time to describe the time dependence of SWR, ii) the relationship between the contact angles from the measured scanning curves under controlled wetting and drying cycles, and iii) the initial contact angles measured by the sessile drop method.

  16. Going beyond the unitary curve: incorporating richer cognition into agent-based water resources models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The increased availability and understanding of agent-based modeling technology and techniques provides a unique opportunity for water resources modelers, allowing them to go beyond traditional behavioral approaches from neoclassical economics, and add rich cognition to social-hydrological models. Agent-based models provide for an individual focus, and the easier and more realistic incorporation of learning, memory and other mechanisms for increased cognitive sophistication. We are in an age of global change impacting complex water resources systems, and social responses are increasingly recognized as fundamentally adaptive and emergent. In consideration of this, water resources models and modelers need to better address social dynamics in a manner beyond the capabilities of neoclassical economics theory and practice. However, going beyond the unitary curve requires unique levels of engagement with stakeholders, both to elicit the richer knowledge necessary for structuring and parameterizing agent-based models, but also to make sure such models are appropriately used. With the aim of encouraging epistemological and methodological convergence in the agent-based modeling of water resources, we have developed a water resources-specific cognitive model and an associated collaborative modeling process. Our cognitive model emphasizes efficiency in architecture and operation, and capacity to adapt to different application contexts. We describe a current application of this cognitive model and modeling process in the Arkansas Basin of Colorado. In particular, we highlight the potential benefits of, and challenges to, using more sophisticated cognitive models in agent-based water resources models.

  17. How Natural Water Retention Measures (NWRM) can help rural and urban environments improve their resilience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siauve, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    The challenges related to water resources management are exacerbated by climate change which implies additional complexity and uncertainty. The impacts of climate change have thus to be taken into account, from today on the next decades, to ensure a sustainable integrated water resources management. One of the main environmental objective of the Water Framework Directive (2000/30/CE) was to achieve and maintain a good status for all water bodies by the target date of 2015. Unfortunately, Member States didn't manage to reach this goal and in this context, the European Commission (EC), since many years, have started many initiatives and reforms to improve the global situation. In 2012 the DG Environment (DGENV) of the EC published a "Blueprint to safeguard Europe's water resources" that states the need for further implementation of water resource management measures and in particular Natural Water Retention Measures (NWRMs). NWRM are measures that aim to safeguard and enhance the water storage potential of landscape, soils and aquifers, by restoring ecosystems, natural features and characteristics of water courses, and by using natural processes. They are Nature-Based Solutions supporting adaptation and reducing vulnerability of water resources. Their interest lies with the multiple benefits they can deliver, and their capacity to contribute simultaneously to the achievement of the objectives of different European policies (WFD, FD, Biodiversity strategy …). However the knowledge on NWRM is scattered and addressed differently in the countries, whereas the NWRM potential for improving the state of the environment and resilience (drought, flood, biodiversity…) in a changing environment is high. In 2013, all EU countries started the elaboration of the second River Basin Management Plan and associated Programme of Measures. To support MS authorities and local implementers of these measures DGENV launched a 14 month project for collaboratively building knowledge and

  18. Prediction of soil water retention using soil physical data and terrain attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Nunzio; Palladino, Mario

    2002-08-01

    Characterization of soil hydraulic behavior at large scales using traditional methods is time-consuming and very costly. Efficient and cheap means of providing hydrological models with such information are procedures based on pedotransfer functions (PTFs) that estimate soil hydraulic parameters from easily measurable or already available soil physical data. Major objectives of this study are to compare the prediction performance of some published PTFs and to improve their predictive capability by accounting for certain landscape variables, such as slope, aspect, and wetness index, for example. This additional information can be easily extracted from a digital elevation model of the area under study. While topographic attributes have shown potential for mapping soil properties over a region with higher precision and simplifying estimation of some model parameters, the challenge is also to examine whether, and to what extent, ancillary data of this kind can specifically contribute to improve the predictions of soil hydraulic characteristics. Since the most recent distributed hydrological models rely even more on an accurate representation of landscape features, improving PTFs with the inclusion of topographic variables is in line with this tendency. Statistical indices of goodness-of-fit are calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. It is shown, for example, that systematic biases in water retention predictions from an original PTF can be conveniently corrected by adding some primary or compound terrain attributes. The results confirm the role of terrain variables in assessing the spatial patterns of soil hydraulic characteristics.

  19. Theoretical and experimental substantiation of a thermogravimetric method for assessing the water-retention capacity and specific surface area of disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, A. V.; Sadovnikova, N. B.; Bashina, A. S.; Kirichenko, A. V.; Vityazev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    A conceptually new instrumental method has been proposed for the determination of the sorption fragment of the soil water retention curve and the specific surface area of soils and sediments by drying samples at different temperatures, which is based on fundamental models for relative air humidity and thermodynamic water potential ( Ψ) as functions of temperature ( T). The basic equation for the calculation of water potential in the first (linear) approximation is as follows: Ψ = Q- aT, where Q is the specific heat of evaporation, and a is the physically substantiated parameter related to the initial relative air humidity in the laboratory. The setting of model parameters necessary for quantitative calculations has been performed from tabulated data for the saturated water vapor pressure as a function of temperature and results of an independent experiment with gradual air heating and synchronous automated control of air humidity and temperature with DS 1923 hydrochrons. The potentialities of the method have been demonstrated using literature data on the dehydration of soil colloids and our own results on the drying of a silty sandy soil (Arenosol) from Dubai, a light loamy soddy-podzolic soil (Albic Retisol) and a low-moor peat soil (Histosol) from Moscow oblast, and a loamy ordinary chernozem (Haplic Chernozem) from Krasnodar region.

  20. Post-main Sequence Evolution of Icy Minor Planets: Implications for Water Retention and White Dwarf Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Uri; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-12-01

    Most observations of polluted white dwarf atmospheres are consistent with accretion of water-depleted planetary material. Among tens of known cases, merely two involve accretion of objects that contain a considerable mass fraction of water. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative scarcity of these detections. Based on a new and highly detailed model, we evaluate the retention of water inside icy minor planets during the high-luminosity stellar evolution that follows the main sequence. Our model fully considers the thermal, physical, and chemical evolution of icy bodies, following their internal differentiation as well as water depletion, from the moment of their birth and through all stellar evolution phases preceding the formation of the white dwarf. We also account for different initial compositions and formation times. Our results differ from previous studies, which have either underestimated or overestimated water retention. We show that water can survive in a variety of circumstances and in great quantities, and therefore other possibilities are discussed in order to explain the infrequency of water detection. We predict that the sequence of accretion is such that water accretes earlier, and more rapidly, than the rest of the silicate disk, considerably reducing the chance of its detection in H-dominated atmospheres. In He-dominated atmospheres, the scarcity of water detections could be observationally biased. It implies that the accreted material is typically intrinsically dry, which may be the result of the inside-out depopulation sequence of minor planets.

  1. Impact of oxy-fuel combustion gases on mercury retention in activated carbons from a macroalgae waste: effect of water.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Anton, M A; Ferrera-Lorenzo, N; Fuente, E; Díaz-Somoano, M; Suarez-Ruíz, I; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Ruiz, B

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the different sorption behaviors of mercury species on activated carbons in the oxy-fuel combustion of coal and the effect of high quantities of water vapor on the retention process. The work evaluates the interactions between the mercury species and a series of activated carbons prepared from a macroalgae waste (algae meal) from the agar-agar industry in oxy-combustion atmospheres, focussing on the role that the high concentration of water in the flue gases plays in mercury retention. Two novel aspects are considered in this work (i) the impact of oxy-combustion gases on the retention of mercury by activated carbons and (ii) the performance of activated carbons prepared from biomass algae wastes for this application. The results obtained at laboratory scale indicate that the effect of the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons on mercury capture is not as important as that of reactive gases, such as the SOx and water vapor present in the flue gas. Mercury retention was found to be much lower in the oxy-combustion atmosphere than in the O2+N2 (12.6% O2) atmosphere. However, the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) to form oxidized mercury (Hg2+) amounted to 60%, resulting in an enhancement of mercury retention in the flue gas desulfurization units and a reduction in the amalgamation of Hg0 in the CO2 compression unit. This result is of considerable importance for the development of technologies based on activated carbon sorbents for mercury control in oxy-combustion processes.

  2. Impact of regression methods on improved effects of soil structure on soil water retention estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuong Minh; De Pue, Jan; Le, Khoa Van; Cornelis, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Increasing the accuracy of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), an indirect method for predicting non-readily available soil features such as soil water retention characteristics (SWRC), is of crucial importance for large scale agro-hydrological modeling. Adding significant predictors (i.e., soil structure), and implementing more flexible regression algorithms are among the main strategies of PTFs improvement. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the improved effect of categorical soil structure information on estimating soil-water content at various matric potentials, which has been reported in literature, could be enduringly captured by regression techniques other than the usually applied linear regression. Two data mining techniques, i.e., Support Vector Machines (SVM), and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), which have been recently introduced as promising tools for PTF development, were utilized to test if the incorporation of soil structure will improve PTF's accuracy under a context of rather limited training data. The results show that incorporating descriptive soil structure information, i.e., massive, structured and structureless, as grouping criterion can improve the accuracy of PTFs derived by SVM approach in the range of matric potential of -6 to -33 kPa (average RMSE decreased up to 0.005 m3 m-3 after grouping, depending on matric potentials). The improvement was primarily attributed to the outperformance of SVM-PTFs calibrated on structureless soils. No improvement was obtained with kNN technique, at least not in our study in which the data set became limited in size after grouping. Since there is an impact of regression techniques on the improved effect of incorporating qualitative soil structure information, selecting a proper technique will help to maximize the combined influence of flexible regression algorithms and soil structure information on PTF accuracy.

  3. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA's advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  4. Utilization of wheat straw for the preparation of coated controlled-release fertilizer with the function of water retention.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lihua; Liu, Mingzhu; Ni, Boli; Wang, Yanfang

    2012-07-18

    With the aim of improving fertilizer use efficiency and minimizing the negative impact on the environment, a new coated controlled-release fertilizer with the function of water retention was prepared. A novel low water solubility macromolecular fertilizer, poly(dimethylourea phosphate) (PDUP), was "designed" and formulated from N,N'-dimethylolurea (DMU) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. Simultaneously, an eco-friendly superabsorbent composite based on wheat straw (WS), acrylic acid (AA), 2-acryloylamino-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS), and N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide (NHMAAm) was synthesized and used as the coating to control the release of nutrient. The nitrogen release profile and water retention capacity of the product were also investigated. The degradation of the coating material in soil solution was studied. Meanwhile, the impact of the content of N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide on the degradation extent was examined. The experimental data showed that the product with good water retention and controlled-release capacities, being economical and eco-friendly, could be promising for applications in agriculture and horticulture.

  5. Development of a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter for the determination of the water vapor pressure curve.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, S; Georgin, E; Hermier, Y; Sparasci, F; Himbert, M

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the knowledge of the water saturation curve is required to improve the accuracy of the calibrations in humidity. In order to achieve this objective, the LNE-CETIAT and the LNE-CNAM have jointly built a facility dedicated to the measurement of the saturation vapor pressure and temperature of pure water. The principle is based on a static measurement of the pressure and the temperature of pure water in a closed, temperature-controlled thermostat, conceived like a quasi-adiabatic calorimeter. A copper cell containing pure water is placed inside a temperature-controlled copper shield, which is mounted in a vacuum-tight stainless steel vessel immersed in a thermostated bath. The temperature of the cell is measured with capsule-type standard platinum resistance thermometers, calibrated with uncertainties below the millikelvin. The vapor pressure is measured by calibrated pressure sensors connected to the cell through a pressure tube whose temperature is monitored at several points. The pressure gauges are installed in a thermostatic apparatus ensuring high stability of the pressure measurement and avoiding any condensation in the tubes. Thanks to the employment of several technical solutions, the thermal contribution to the overall uncertainty budget is reduced, and the remaining major part is mainly due to pressure measurements. This paper presents a full description of this facility and the preliminary results obtained for its characterization.

  6. How ions affect the structure of water: a combined Raman spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Namboodiri, V; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-12-27

    Raman spectroscopy in combination with multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) is used to explore the interaction between water and various kosmotropic and chaotropic anions. Raman-MCR of aqueous Na-salt (NaI, NaBr, NaNO3, Na2SO4, and Na3PO4) solutions provides solute-correlated Raman spectra (SC-spectra) of water. The SC-spectra predominantly bear the vibrational characteristics of water in the hydration shell of anions, because Na(+)-cation has negligible effect on the OH stretch band of water. The SC-spectra for the chaotropic I(-), Br(-), and NO3(-) anions and even for the kosmotropic SO4(2-) anion resemble the Raman spectrum of isotopically diluted water (H2O/D2O = 1/19; v/v) whose OH stretch band is largely comprised by the response of vibrationally decoupled OH oscillators. On the other hand, the SC-spectrum for the kosmotropic PO4(3-) anion is quite similar to the Raman spectrum of H2O (bulk). Comparison of the peak positions of SC-spectra and the Raman spectrum of isotopically diluted water suggests that the hydrogen bond strength of water in the hydration shell of SO4(2-) is comparable to that of the isotopically diluted water, but that in the hydration shell of I(-), Br(-), and NO3(-) anions is weaker than that of the latter. Analysis of integrated area of component bands of the SC-spectra reveals ∼80% reduction of the delocalization of vibrational modes (intermolecular coupling and Fermi resonance) of water in the hydration shell of I(-), Br(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) anions. In the case of trivalent PO4(3-), the vibrational delocalization is presumably reduced and the corresponding decrease in spectral response at ∼3250 cm(-1) is compensated by the increased signal of strongly hydrogen bonded (but decoupled) water species in the hydration shell. The peak area-averaged wavenumber of the SC-spectrum increases as PO4(3-) < SO4(2-) < NO3(-) < Br(-) < I(-) and indeed suggests strong hydrogen bonding of water in the hydration shell of PO4(3-) anion.

  7. Dual Impact of Tolvaptan on Intracellular and Extracellular Water in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients with Fluid Retention

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Murakami, Takuya; Igarashi, Yusuke; Okabe, Kyochika; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Saito, Takako; Sekiguchi, Chuji; Miyazawa, Yasuharu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tolvaptan, an oral selective V2-receptor antagonist, is a water diuretic that ameliorates fluid retention with a lower risk of a worsening renal function than conventional loop diuretics. Although loop diuretics predominantly decrease extracellular water (ECW) compared with intracellular water (ICW), the effect of tolvaptan on fluid distribution remains unclear. We therefore examined how tolvaptan changes ICW and ECW in accordance with the renal function. Methods Six advanced chronic kidney disease patients (stage 4 or 5) with fluid retention were enrolled in this study. Tolvaptan (7.5 mg/day) added to conventional diuretic treatment was administered to remove fluid retention. The fluid volume was measured using a bioimpedance analysis device before (day 0) and after (day 5 or 6) tolvaptan treatment. Results Body weight decreased by 2.6%±1.3% (64.4±6.5 vs. 62.8±6.3 kg, p=0.06), and urine volume increased by 54.8%±23.9% (1,215±169 vs. 1,709±137 mL/day, p=0.03) between before and after tolvaptan treatment. Tolvaptan significantly decreased ICW (6.5%±1.5%, p=0.01) and ECW (7.5%±1.4%, p=0.02), which had similar reduction rates (p=0.32). The estimated glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged during the treatment (14.6±2.8 vs. 14.9±2.7 mL/min/1.732 m, p=0.35). Conclusion Tolvaptan ameliorates body fluid retention, and induces an equivalent reduction rate of ICW and ECW without a worsening renal function. Tolvaptan is a novel water diuretic that has a different effect on fluid distribution compared with conventional loop diuretics. PMID:27725533

  8. A pulsed field gradient and NMR imaging investigations of the water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Patural, Laetitia; Porion, Patrice; Van Damme, Henri; Govin, Alexandre; Grosseau, Philippe; Ruot, Bertrand; Deves, Olivier

    2010-09-15

    The study presented in this paper is devoted to improve the knowledge on the influence of cellulose ethers (CE) on the freshly-mixed mortars water retention. Indeed, this crucial property is the most important imparted by these polysaccharides. One of the assumptions proposed to explain this phenomenon is that CE acts as diffusion barrier to the water. To test this hypothesis, the CE effect on the self-diffusion coefficient of water in solution and on the water mobility between two fresh cement pastes was studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. CE does not significantly modify the water self-diffusion coefficient in CE solution or in admixed cement pastes. Moreover the interdiffusion imaging experiments demonstrated that the water diffusion at the paste/paste interface is not affected by the presence of cellulosic admixture.

  9. Method of moving frames to solve the shallow water equations on arbitrary rotating curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, S.; Eskilsson, C.

    2017-03-01

    A novel numerical scheme is proposed to solve the shallow water equations (SWEs) on arbitrary rotating curved surfaces. Based on the method of moving frames (MMF) in which the geometry is represented by orthonormal vectors, the proposed scheme not only has the fewest dimensionality both in space and time, but also does not require either of metric tensors, composite meshes, or the ambient space. The MMF-SWE formulation is numerically discretized using the discontinuous Galerkin method of arbitrary polynomial order p in space and an explicit Runge-Kutta scheme in time. The numerical model is validated against six standard tests on the sphere and the optimal order of convergence of p + 1 is numerically demonstrated. The MMF-SWE scheme is also demonstrated for its efficiency and stability on the general rotating surfaces such as ellipsoid, irregular, and non-convex surfaces.

  10. Light saturation curves show competence of the water splitting complex in inactive Photosystem II reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Nedbal, L; Gibas, C; Whitmarsh, J

    1991-12-01

    Photosystem II complexes of higher plants are structurally and functionally heterogeneous. While the only clearly defined structural difference is that Photosystem II reaction centers are served by two distinct antenna sizes, several types of functional heterogeneity have been demonstrated. Among these is the observation that in dark-adapted leaves of spinach and pea, over 30% of the Photosystem II reaction centers are unable to reduce plastoquinone to plastoquinol at physiologically meaningful rates. Several lines of evidence show that the impaired reaction centers are effectively inactive, because the rate of oxidation of the primary quinone acceptor, QA, is 1000 times slower than in normally active reaction centers. However, there are conflicting opinions and data over whether inactive Photosystem II complexes are capable of oxidizing water in the presence of certain artificial electron acceptors. In the present study we investigated whether inactive Photosystem II complexes have a functional water oxidizing system in spinach thylakoid membranes by measuring the flash yield of water oxidation products as a function of flash intensity. At low flash energies (less that 10% saturation), selected to minimize double turnovers of reaction centers, we found that in the presence of the artificial quinone acceptor, dichlorobenzoquinone (DCBQ), the yield of proton release was enhanced 20±2% over that observed in the presence of dimethylbenzoquinone (DMBQ). We argue that the extra proton release is from the normally inactive Photosystem II reaction centers that have been activated in the presence of DCBQ, demonstrating their capacity to oxidize water in repetitive flashes, as concluded by Graan and Ort (Biochim Biophys Acta (1986) 852: 320-330). The light saturation curves indicate that the effective antenna size of inactive reaction centers is 55±12% the size of active Photosystem II centers. Comparison of the light saturation dependence of steady state oxygen evolution

  11. Physicochemical properties related to long-term phosphorus retention by drinking-water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Harris, Willie G; O'Connor, George A; Obreza, Thomas A; Elliott, Herschel A

    2005-06-01

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) are nonhazardous materials that can be obtained free-of-charge from drinking-water treatment plants to reduce soluble phosphorus (P) concentrations in poorly P sorbing soils. Phosphorus sorption capacities of WTRs can vary 1-2 orders of magnitude, on the basis of short-term equilibration times (up to 7 d), but studies dealing with long-term (weeks to months) P retention by WTRs are lacking. Properties that most affect long-term P sorption capacities are pertinent to the efficacy of WTRs as amendments to stabilize P in soils. This research addressed the long-term (up to 80 d) P sorption/desorption characteristics and kinetics for seven WTRs, including the influence of specific surface area (SSA), porosity, and total C content on the overall magnitude of P sorption by seven WTRs. The data confirm a strong but variable affinity for P by WTRs. Aluminum-based WTRs tended to have higher P sorption capacity than Fe-based WTRs. Phosphorus sorption with time was biphasic in nature for most samples and best fit to a second-order rate model. The P sorption rate dependency was strongly correlated with a hysteretic P desorption, consistent with kinetic limitations on P desorption from micropores. Oxalate-extractable Al + Fe concentrations of the WTRs did not effectively explain long-term (80 d) P sorption capacities of the WTRs. Micropore (CO2-based) SSAs were greater than BET-N2 SSAs for most WTRs, except those with the lowest (<80 g kg(-1)) total C content. There was a significant negative linear correlation between the total C content and the CO2/N2 SSA ratio. The data suggest that C in WTRs increases microporosity, but reduces P sorption per unit pore volume or surface area. Hence, variability in C content confounds direct relations among SSA, porosity, and P sorption. Total C, N2-based SSA, and CO2-based SSAs explained 82% of the variability in the long-term P sorption capacities of the WTRs. Prediction of long-term P sorption

  12. Capacitive Sensors and Breakthrough Curves in Automated Irrigation for Water and Soil Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmy Hussein, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    when such sensors are used in farmers' fields. The second procedure was Breakthrough Curve (BTC) lab-method to follow the fate of chemical composition of water draining out of Ca-saturated soil columns and Exchangeable Sodium Percent, ESP, in soil materials under saturated-flow. The work was run on five packed soil-columns under hydraulic-gradient of about 6 in fine-grained soil materials (Nile clay-sediments) wetted with five NaCl aqueous solutions (10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mEq/l). The results revealed the removal of 40 to 80% of sodium from irrigation water after 6 to 8 pore volumes flowed out in about 12 hours with the highest removal from the most dilute solution. Rapid increase of ESP was observed when the inlet solution had moderate to high TDS whereas the dilute solution (10 mEq/l) has resulted in no soil chemical degradation. The results were extrapolated to field situation and showed that Nile clayey soil would never get sodic (ESP>15) when wetted with high quality water regardless the water application duration whereas only 1-4 year of irrigation with moderate to poor-quality water (as takes place under perennial irrigation) would result in ESP increase to 15 and much higher values. A secondary but important outcome of BTC experiments was that marginal sediments could be used in multi-column cells (6 to 8 columns) to improve water-quality through removal of Na+ ions from water, whereas anions could be removed by positively-charged resins and the cells could be recycled in a proposed prototype scheme.

  13. On the derivation of specific yield and soil water retention characteristics in peatlands from rainfall, microrelief and water level data - Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Bechtold, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Water level depth is one of the crucial state variables controlling the biogeochemical processes in peatlands. For flat soil surfaces, water level depth dynamics as response to boundary fluxes are primarily controlled by the water retention characteristics of the soil in and above the range of the water level fluctuations. For changing water levels, the difference of the integrals of two soil moisture profiles (∆Asoil), of a lower and a upper water level, is equal to the amount of water received or released by the soil. Dividing ∆Asoil by the water level change, results into a variable that is known as specific yield (Sy). For water level changes approaching the soil surface, changes in soil water storage are small due to the thin unsaturated zone that remains. Consequentially, Sy values approach zero with an abrupt transition to 1 in case of inundation. However, on contrary, observed water level rises due to precipitation events at various locations showed increasing Sy values for water level changes at shallow depths (Sy = precipitation/water level change; Logsdon et al., 2010). The increase of Sy values can be attributed in large parts to the influence of the microrelief on water level changes in these wet landscapes that are characterized by a mosaic of inundated and non-inundated areas. Consequentially, water level changes are dampened by partial inundation. In this situation, total Sy is composed of a spatially-integrated below ground and above ground contribution. We provide a general one-dimensional expression that correctly represents the effect of a microrelief on the total Sy. The one-dimensional expression can be applied for any soil hydraulic parameterizations and soil surface elevation frequency distributions. We demonstrate that Sy is influenced by the microrelief not only when surface storage directly contributes to Sy by (partial) inundation but also when water levels are lower than the minimum surface elevation. With the derived one

  14. Regional water-balance modelling using flow-duration curves with observational uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; Gong, L.; Beven, K. J.; Seibert, J.; Semedo, A.; Xu, C.-Y.; Halldin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Robust and reliable water-resources mapping in ungauged basins requires estimation of the uncertainties in the hydrologic model, the regionalisation method, and the observational data. In this study we investigated the use of regionalised flow-duration curves (FDCs) for constraining model predictive uncertainty, while accounting for all these uncertainty sources. A water-balance model was applied to 36 basins in Central America using regionally and globally available precipitation, climate and discharge data that were screened for inconsistencies. A rating-curve analysis for 35 Honduran discharge stations was used to estimate discharge uncertainty for the region, and the consistency of the model forcing and evaluation data was analysed using two different screening methods. FDCs with uncertainty bounds were calculated for each basin, accounting for both discharge uncertainty and, in many cases, uncertainty stemming from the use of short time series, potentially not representative for the modelling period. These uncertain FDCs were then used to regionalise a FDC for each basin, treating it as ungauged in a cross-evaluation, and this regionalised FDC was used to constrain the uncertainty in the model predictions for the basin. There was a clear relationship between the performance of the local model calibration and the degree of dataset consistency - with many basins with inconsistent data lacking behavioural simulations and the basins with the highest dataset consistency also having the highest simulation reliability. For the basins where the regionalisation of the FDCs worked best, the uncertainty bounds for the regionalised simulations were only slightly wider than those for a local model calibration. The predicted uncertainty was greater for basins where the result of the FDC-regionalisation was more uncertain, but the regionalised simulations still had a high reliability compared to the locally-calibrated simulations and often encompassed them. The regionalised

  15. Regional water balance modelling using flow-duration curves with observational uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I. K.; Gong, L.; Beven, K. J.; Seibert, J.; Semedo, A.; Xu, C.-Y.; Halldin, S.

    2014-08-01

    Robust and reliable water-resource mapping in ungauged basins requires estimation of the uncertainties in the hydrologic model, the regionalisation method, and the observational data. In this study we investigated the use of regionalised flow-duration curves (FDCs) for constraining model predictive uncertainty, while accounting for all these uncertainty sources. A water balance model was applied to 36 basins in Central America using regionally and globally available precipitation, climate and discharge data that were screened for inconsistencies. A rating-curve analysis for 35 Honduran discharge stations was used to estimate discharge uncertainty for the region, and the consistency of the model forcing and evaluation data was analysed using two different screening methods. FDCs with uncertainty bounds were calculated for each basin, accounting for both discharge uncertainty and, in many cases, uncertainty stemming from the use of short time series, potentially not representative for the modelling period. These uncertain FDCs were then used to regionalise a FDC for each basin, treating it as ungauged in a cross-evaluation, and this regionalised FDC was used to constrain the uncertainty in the model predictions for the basin. There was a clear relationship between the performance of the local model calibration and the degree of data set consistency - with many basins with inconsistent data lacking behavioural simulations (i.e. simulations within predefined limits around the observed FDC) and the basins with the highest data set consistency also having the highest simulation reliability. For the basins where the regionalisation of the FDCs worked best, the uncertainty bounds for the regionalised simulations were only slightly wider than those for a local model calibration. The predicted uncertainty was greater for basins where the result of the FDC regionalisation was more uncertain, but the regionalised simulations still had a high reliability compared to the locally

  16. Formation and Retention of Hydroxyl and Water on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Clark, R. N.; Combe, J.; Noble, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral reflectance observations by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) showed that both hydroxyl and (molecular) water (hereafter referred to collectively as H/OH) vary spatially as a function of solar illumination geometry. At low solar incidence angles, the observed strengths of the H/OH spectral features are stronger than at higher angles, suggesting that the abundance varies with the diurnal cycle. This is also demonstrated in the increasing abundances with increasing latitude, such that above ~60 degrees there is little reduction in the depth of the water-related spectral absorption bands. It was immediately recognized that the wide-spread occurrence of H/OH across the lunar surface was the result of solar wind-induced hydroxylation, a phenomenon that was predicted almost 50 years ago. The lunar soil has a finite capacity to retain implanted hydrogen, and over time, the surface reaches a steady state, or background H/OH abundance, which is manifested in spectra of the mature soil. In addition to maturity, the retention of H/OH is a function of composition and texture (i.e., crystallinity and surface/volume). There are two hypotheses for how solar wind-implanted H/OH is retained in the soil: 1) H/OH adsorbs onto active surface sites on fresh soil particles. 2) H/OH is trapped in vesicles in agglutinates and amorphous coatings on soil grains created by space weathering. Undoubtedly both of these mechanisms occur, but one process is ultimately responsible for the observed steady state mature soil abundance, and this can be studied by measuring the strength of the H/OH spectral feature from soils as a function of variable composition, texture, and maturity. Space weathering is capable of both activating and neutralizing grain surfaces. Micrometeorite and larger impacts can activate mineral surfaces through mechanical forces, such as crushing and shattering of minerals, which creates fresh surfaces with partially unsatisfied chemical bonds. The freshly fractured

  17. The effects of flow-path modification on water-quality constituent retention in an urban stormwater detention pond and wetland system, Orlando, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gain, W.S.

    1996-01-01

    Changes in constituent retention in a wet stormwater-detention pond and wetland system in Orlando, Florida, were evaluated following the 1988 installation of a flow barrier which approximately doubled the flow path and increased detention time in the pond. The pond and wetland were arranged in series so that stormwater first enters the pond and overflows into the wetland before spilling over to the regional stream system. Several principal factors that contribute to constituent retention were examined, including changes in pond-water quality between storms, stormwater quality, and pond-water flushing during storms. A simple, analytical pond-water mixing model was used as the basis for interpreting changes in retention efficiencies caused by pond modification. Retention efficiencies were calculated by a modified event-mean concentration efficiency method using a minimum variance unbiased estimator approach. The results of this study generally support the hypothesis that changes in the geometry of stormwater treatment systems can significantly affect the constituent retention efficiency of the pond and wetland system. However, the results also indicate that these changes in efficiency are caused not only by changes in residence time, but also by changes in stormwater mixing and pond water flushing during storms. Additionally, the use of average efficiencies as indications of treatment effectiveness may fail to account for biases associated with sample distribution and independent physical properties of the system, such as the range and concentrations of constituents in stormwater inflows and stormwater volume. Changes in retention efficiencies varied among chemical constituents and were significantly different in the pond and wetland. Retention efficiency was related to inflow concentration for most constituents. Increased flushing of the pond after modification caused decreases in retention efficiencies for constituents that concentrate in the pond between storms

  18. In the Way of Peacemaker Guide Curve between Water Supply and Flood Control for Short Term Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, G.; Sensoy, A.; Yavuz, O.; Sorman, A. A.; Gezgin, T.

    2012-04-01

    Effective management of a controlled reservoir system where it involves multiple and sometimes conflicting objectives is a complex problem especially in real time operations. Yuvacık Dam Reservoir, located in the Marmara region of Turkey, is built to supply annual demand of 142 hm3 water for Kocaeli city requires such a complex management strategy since it has relatively small (51 hm3) effective capacity. On the other hand, the drainage basin is fed by both rainfall and snowmelt since the elevation ranges between 80 - 1548 m. Excessive water must be stored behind the radial gates between February and May in terms of sustainability especially for summer and autumn periods. Moreover, the downstream channel physical conditions constraint the spillway releases up to 100 m3/s although the spillway is large enough to handle major floods. Thus, this situation makes short term release decisions the challenging task. Long term water supply curves, based on historical inflows and annual water demand, are in conflict with flood regulation (control) levels, based on flood attenuation and routing curves, for this reservoir. A guide curve, that is generated using both water supply and flood control of downstream channel, generally corresponds to upper elevation of conservation pool for simulation of a reservoir. However, sometimes current operation necessitates exceeding this target elevation. Since guide curves can be developed as a function of external variables, the water potential of a basin can be an indicator to explain current conditions and decide on the further strategies. Besides, releases with respect to guide curve are managed and restricted by user-defined rules. Although the managers operate the reservoir due to several variable conditions and predictions, still the simulation model using variable guide curve is an urgent need to test alternatives quickly. To that end, using HEC-ResSim, the several variable guide curves are defined to meet the requirements by

  19. Computation of type curves for flow to partially penetrating wells in water-table aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, Allen F.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of Neuman's analytical solution for flow to a well in a homogeneous, anisotropic, water-table aquifer commonly requires large amounts of computation time and can produce inaccurate results for selected combinations of parameters. Large computation times occur because the integrand of a semi-infinite integral involves the summation of an infinite series. Each term of the series requires evaluation of the roots of equations, and the series itself is sometimes slowly convergent. Inaccuracies can result from lack of computer precision or from the use of improper methods of numerical integration. In this paper it is proposed to use a method of numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution, provided by Neuman, to overcome these difficulties. The solution in Laplace space is simpler in form than the real-time solution; that is, the integrand of the semi-infinite integral does not involve an infinite series or the need to evaluate roots of equations. Because the integrand is evaluated rapidly, advanced methods of numerical integration can be used to improve accuracy with an overall reduction in computation time. The proposed method of computing type curves, for which a partially documented computer program (WTAQ1) was written, was found to reduce computation time by factors of 2 to 20 over the time needed to evaluate the closed-form, real-time solution.

  20. Influence of polymer molecular weight and concentration on coexistence curve of isobutyric acid + water.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Madhusudhana; Venkatesu, P; Bohidar, H B

    2011-10-27

    We report the influence of variation of molecular weights (MWs = 2, 4, 6, and 9 × 10(5) g mol(-1)) and concentration (C) of a long-chain polymer (polyethylene oxide, PEO) on an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) of isobutyric acid (I) + water (W) using density (ρ) measurements as a function of temperature. The ρ values in each coexisting phase of IW have been measured at three different PEO concentrations (C = 0.395, 0.796, and 1.605 mg/cm(3)) in the near critical composition of IW at temperatures below the system's upper critical point for each molecular weight (MW) of PEO. Further, to ascertain the PEO behavior in IW we have measured the polydispersity values for both coexisting liquid phases by using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The data show that the polymer was significantly affected in the critical region of IW and these various MWs and concentrations of PEO show significant modulation on the critical exponents (β), the critical temperatures (T(c)), and critical composition (ϕ(c)), which are depicting the shape of the coexistence curve. The values of β and T(c) increase with increasing PEO MW and concentrations. Besides, the ϕ(c) values slightly decrease with increasing the C values in the mixture of IW. However, the rate of decrease in ϕ(c) is insignificant. Our experimental results explicitly elucidate that most of polymer chain entangles in water rich phase, thereby the polymer monomers strongly interact with neighbor solvent particles and also intra chain interaction between polymer monomers.

  1. Water-retentive and anti-inflammatory properties of organic and inorganic substances from Korean sea mud.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmi; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Shin, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-03-01

    Sea mud has been popularly used as an effective base in cosmetic preparations although its biologically-active materials and mechanisms on skin have not yet been fully determined. We isolated humic substances as the major organic substance of the sea mud from a tidal flat in Korea, and investigated their water-retentive properties. Among the three isolated humic substances, humic acid (HA) showed the highest water retentive property (approximately 50 % mass increase from water uptake). Based on the observations that mud pack therapy has been traditionally used to soothe UV-irradiated skin, we examined the antiinflammatory property of the sea mud on UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) by measuring PGE2 levels produced by keratinocytes in the presence of either the total water or methanol extracts of the mud. The water extract showed higher inhibition of PGE2 production from HaCaT cells (30% inhibition) than the methanol extract at 200 ppm (microg/g). We further fractionated the water extract to determine the major components responsible for its anti-inflammatory effect. It was found that the minerals in the mud inhibited PGE2 production by 83 % at 200 ppm, which is comparable with the inhibitory effect of 1 microM indomethacin. No mud extract showed cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. The mineral compositions of the mineral extract were determined by ICP-MS, revealing that the sea mud consisted of more than 19 different mineral components, rich in Na+, Mg2+, and Zn2+. These results imply that the anti-inflammatory effect of the sea mud is largely due to the minerals in the mud. Our research suggests the potential use of the organic and inorganic substances from the sea mud in various skin products as safe biological substances for skin protective purposes.

  2. Graphene-based nafion nanocomposite membranes: enhanced proton transport and water retention by novel organo-functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Enotiadis, Apostolos; Angjeli, Kristina; Baldino, Noemi; Nicotera, Isabella; Gournis, Dimitrios

    2012-11-05

    Novel nanostructured organo-modified layered materials based on graphene oxide carrying various hydrophilic functional groups (-NH(2), -OH, -SO(3)H) are prepared and tested as nanofillers for the creation of innovative graphene-based Nafion nanocomposites. The hybrid membranes are characterized by a combination of analytical techniques, which show that highly homogeneous exfoliated nanocomposites are created. The pulsed field gradient NMR technique is used to measure the water self-diffusion coefficients. Remarkable behavior at temperatures up to 140 °C is observed for some composite membranes, thereby verifying the exceptional water retention property of these materials. Dynamic mechanical analysis shows that hybrid membranes are much stiffer and can withstand higher temperatures than pure Nafion.

  3. Multivariate curve resolution-assisted determination of pseudoephedrine and methamphetamine by HPLC-DAD in water samples.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Mohamedian, Hadi; Salemi, Amir; Baheri, Tahmineh

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, a simple strategy based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with a cation exchange sorbent (Finisterre SCX) followed by fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection coupled with chemometrics tools has been proposed for the determination of methamphetamine and pseudoephedrine in ground water and river water. At first, the HPLC and SPE conditions were optimized and the analytical performance of the method was determined. In the case of ground water, determination of analytes was successfully performed through univariate calibration curves. For river water sample, multivariate curve resolution and alternating least squares was implemented and the second-order advantage was achieved in samples containing uncalibrated interferences and uncorrected background signals. The calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.994).The limits of detection for pseudoephedrine and methamphetamine were 0.06 and 0.08 μg/L and the average recovery values were 104.7 and 102.3% in river water, respectively.

  4. Multiresponse multilayer vadose zone model calibration using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and field water retention data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WöHling, Thomas; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-04-01

    In the past two decades significant progress has been made toward the application of inverse modeling to estimate the water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions of the vadose zone at different spatial scales. Many of these contributions have focused on estimating only a few soil hydraulic parameters, without recourse to appropriately capturing and addressing spatial variability. The assumption of a homogeneous medium significantly simplifies the complexity of the resulting inverse problem, allowing the use of classical parameter estimation algorithms. Here we present an inverse modeling study with a high degree of vertical complexity that involves calibration of a 25 parameter Richards'-based HYDRUS-1D model using in situ measurements of volumetric water content and pressure head from multiple depths in a heterogeneous vadose zone in New Zealand. We first determine the trade-off in the fitting of both data types using the AMALGAM multiple objective evolutionary search algorithm. Then we adopt a Bayesian framework and derive posterior probability density functions of parameter and model predictive uncertainty using the recently developed differential evolution adaptive metropolis, DREAMZS adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme. We use four different formulations of the likelihood function each differing in their underlying assumption about the statistical properties of the error residual and data used for calibration. We show that AMALGAM and DREAMZS can solve for the 25 hydraulic parameters describing the water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions of the multilayer heterogeneous vadose zone. Our study clearly highlights that multiple data types are simultaneously required in the likelihood function to result in an accurate soil hydraulic characterization of the vadose zone of interest. Remaining error residuals are most likely caused by model deficiencies that are not encapsulated by the multilayer model and can not be accessed by the

  5. Predicting the soil moisture retention curve, from soil particle size distribution and bulk density data using a packing density scaling factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskini-Vishkaee, F.; Mohammadi, M. H.; Vanclooster, M.

    2014-10-01

    A substantial number of models predicting the soil moisture characteristic curve (SMC) from particle size distribution (PSD) data underestimate the dry range of the SMC especially in soils with high clay and organic matter contents. In this study, we applied a continuous form of the PSD model to predict the SMC, and subsequently we developed a physically based scaling approach to reduce the model's bias at the dry range of the SMC. The soil particle packing density was considered as a metric of soil structure and used to define a soil particle packing scaling factor. This factor was subsequently integrated in the conceptual SMC prediction model. The model was tested on 82 soils, selected from the UNSODA database. The results show that the scaling approach properly estimates the SMC for all soil samples. In comparison to the original conceptual SMC model without scaling, the scaling approach improves the model estimations on average by 30%. Improvements were particularly significant for the fine- and medium-textured soils. Since the scaling approach is parsimonious and does not rely on additional empirical parameters, we conclude that this approach may be used for estimating SMC at the larger field scale from basic soil data.

  6. Climate Change Adaptation in the Western U.S.: the Case for Dynamic Rule Curves in Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hamlet, A. F.; Burges, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change in the Western U.S. will bring systematic hydrologic changes affecting many water resources systems. Successful adaptation to these changes, which will be ongoing through the 21st century, will require the 'rebalancing' of competing system objectives such as water supply, flood control, hydropower production, and environmental services in response to hydrologic (and other) changes. Although fixed operating policies for the operation of reservoirs has been a traditional approach to water management in the 20th century, the rapid pace of projected climate shifts (~0.5 F per decade), and the prohibitive costs of recursive policy intervention to mitigate impacts, suggest that more sophisticated approaches will be needed to cope with climate change on a long term basis. The use of 'dynamic rule curves' is an approach that maintains some of the key characteristics of current water management practice (reservoir rule curves) while avoiding many of the fundamental drawbacks of traditional water resources management strategies in a non-stationary climate. In this approach, water resources systems are optimized for each operational period using ensemble streamflow and/or water demand forecasts. The ensemble of optimized reservoir storage traces are then analyzed to produce a set of unique reservoir rule curves for each operational period reflecting the current state of the system. The potential advantage of this approach is that hydrologic changes associated with climate change (such as systematically warmer temperatures) can be captured explicitly in operational hydrologic forecasts, which would in turn inform the optimized reservoir management solutions, creating water resources systems that are largely 'self tending' as the climate system evolves. Furthermore, as hydrologic forecasting systems improve (e.g. in response to improved ENSO forecasting or other scientific advances), so does the performance of reservoir operations. An example of the approach is

  7. Different retention behavior of structurally diverse basic and neutral drugs in immobilized artificial membrane and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography: comparison with octanol-water partitioning.

    PubMed

    Vrakas, Demetris; Giaginis, Costas; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2006-05-26

    The retention behavior of 43 structurally diverse neutral and basic drugs in immobilized artificial membrane chromatography was investigated and compared to the reversed-phase retention and octanol-water partitioning. IAM chromatography was performed using morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 as the aqueous component of the mobile phase. The differences in the retention factors were attributed to increased electrostatic interactions in the MOPS environment, dependent on the fraction of charged species. Electrostatic interactions were found to play a key role in the relationships with reversed-phase retention factors determined under two different mobile phase conditions as well as in the relationships with lipophilicity data. IAM retention factors correlated better with octanol-water partition coefficients log P than with log D(7.4), as a result of the contribution of electrostatic forces in IAM retention. With log D(7.4) the relationships were improved when the fraction of charged species was taken into consideration. In any case the regression coefficient of log P or log D(7.4) was considerably lower than 1 reflecting the reduced hydrophobic environment of the IAM stationary phase. The different data sets were submitted to principal component analysis for further exploration of their similarities/dissimilarities.

  8. Retention of chromium (VI) on a macroporous char following ChemChar gasification and successive leaching with water and acids.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Thomas W; Manahan, Stanley E

    2005-01-01

    A granular macroporous char, triple-reverse-burn (TRB) char, was loaded with 23.40 mg Cr/g TRB char from an aqueous solution, and the retained metal was leached by water, 0.66 M nitric acid, concentrated nitric acid, and concentrated hydrochloric acid before and after treatment by a reductive thermal gasification process (ChemChar process developed by ChemChar Research, Inc., Columbia, Missouri). The chromium leachate was analyzed by flame atomic adsorption. Reverse- and forward-mode gasifications were performed on the metal-laden char. With the exception of a 10% mass loss of carbon, the reverse mode gasification process does not change the physical characteristics of the granular char, but does increase the retention of the chromium from 16.7 to 24.2%, depending on the leachant. The forward mode gasification process produces a vitrified (or glasslike) ash residue. There was an 11.6 to 13.1% increase in the retention of the chromium by the slag and ash when compared to the nongasified chromium-loaded TRB char. Chromium (VI) was effectively removed from solution by TRB char and found to be retained to a higher degree on the char after a reductive thermal treatment.

  9. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with {{\\text{H}}2} 15O or C15O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  <8% and the calculated CBF values showed a tight correlation (r  =  0.97). The simulation showed that errors associated with the assumed parameters were  <10%, and that the optimal number of tissue curves to be used was around 500. Our results demonstrate that IDIF can be reconstructed directly from tissue curves obtained through {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies.

  10. Literature Review of the Potential Energy Savings and Retention Water from Green Roofs in Comparison with Conventional Ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselekis, Kyriakoulis

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is the comparison of green roof systems with conventional isolated and non-isolated ones in order to identify the potential energy savings of green roofs and the benefits provided in comparison with the cost of construction to the buildings. The region of interest is the Watergraafsmeer area in the city of Amsterdam. The method evaluates literature reports - mostly from 2003 to 2010 - that present the advantages of green roofs. Examples in real implementation of green roofs in USA, UK and Germany, retention of rainfall and a Life Cycle Assessment from a residential construction in Madrid will be introduced, showing the energy savings from insulation and heating/cooling that can be gained. All the reports have shown a reduction in energy costs and in runoff of water. Hence, costs and retrofitting potential completes the research. The age of buildings and the absence of insulation make green roofs an ideal alternative project for the retrofit of Watergraafsmeer.

  11. Retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in biological activated carbon filters for drinking water and the impact on ammonia reduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Yu, Shuili; Park, Heedeung; Liu, Guicai; Yuan, Qingbin

    2016-06-01

    Given the increasing discoveries related to the eco-toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) in different ecosystems and with respect to public health, it is important to understand their potential effects in drinking water treatment (DWT). The effects of TiO2 NPs on ammonia reduction, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biological activated carbon (BAC) filters for drinking water were investigated in static and dynamic states. In the static state, both the nitrification potential and AOB were significantly inhibited by 100 μg L(-1) TiO2 NPs after 12 h (p < 0.05), and the threshold decreased to 10 μg L(-1) with prolonged exposure (36 h, p < 0.05). However, AOA were not considerably affected in any of the tested conditions (p > 0.05). In the dynamic state, different amounts of TiO2 NP pulses were injected into three pilot-scale BAC filters. The decay of TiO2 NPs in the BAC filters was very slow. Both titanium quantification and scanning electron microscope analysis confirmed the retention of TiO2 NPs in the BAC filters after 134 days of operation. Furthermore, the TiO2 NP pulses considerably reduced the performance of ammonia reduction. This study identified the retention of TiO2 NPs in BAC filters and the negative effect on the ammonia reduction, suggesting a potential threat to DWT by TiO2 NPs.

  12. Potential Water Retention Capacity as a Factor in Silage Effluent Control: Experiments with High Moisture By-product Feedstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Okine Abdul; Masaaki, Hanada; Yimamu, Aibibula; Meiji, Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    The role of moisture absorptive capacity of pre-silage material and its relationship with silage effluent in high moisture by-product feedstuffs (HMBF) is assessed. The term water retention capacity which is sometimes used in explaining the rate of effluent control in ensilage may be inadequate, since it accounts exclusively for the capacity of an absorbent incorporated into a pre-silage material prior to ensiling, without consideration to how much the pre-silage material can release. A new terminology, ‘potential water retention capacity’ (PWRC), which attempts to address this shortcoming, is proposed. Data were pooled from a series of experiments conducted separately over a period of five years using laboratory silos with four categories of agro by-products (n = 27) with differing moisture contents (highest 96.9%, lowest 78.1% in fresh matter, respectively), and their silages (n = 81). These were from a vegetable source (Daikon, Raphanus sativus), a root tuber source (potato pulp), a fruit source (apple pomace) and a cereal source (brewer’s grain), respectively. The pre-silage materials were adjusted with dry in-silo absorbents consisting wheat straw, wheat or rice bran, beet pulp and bean stalks. The pooled mean for the moisture contents of all pre-silage materials was 78.3% (±10.3). Silage effluent decreased (p<0.01), with increase in PWRC of pre-silage material. The theoretical moisture content and PWRC of pre-silage material necessary to stem effluent flow completely in HMBF silage was 69.1% and 82.9 g/100 g in fresh matter, respectively. The high correlation (r = 0.76) between PWRC of ensiled material and silage effluent indicated that the latter is an important factor in silage-effluent relationship. PMID:25049587

  13. Potential Water Retention Capacity as a Factor in Silage Effluent Control: Experiments with High Moisture By-product Feedstuffs.

    PubMed

    Razak, Okine Abdul; Masaaki, Hanada; Yimamu, Aibibula; Meiji, Okamoto

    2012-04-01

    The role of moisture absorptive capacity of pre-silage material and its relationship with silage effluent in high moisture by-product feedstuffs (HMBF) is assessed. The term water retention capacity which is sometimes used in explaining the rate of effluent control in ensilage may be inadequate, since it accounts exclusively for the capacity of an absorbent incorporated into a pre-silage material prior to ensiling, without consideration to how much the pre-silage material can release. A new terminology, 'potential water retention capacity' (PWRC), which attempts to address this shortcoming, is proposed. Data were pooled from a series of experiments conducted separately over a period of five years using laboratory silos with four categories of agro by-products (n = 27) with differing moisture contents (highest 96.9%, lowest 78.1% in fresh matter, respectively), and their silages (n = 81). These were from a vegetable source (Daikon, Raphanus sativus), a root tuber source (potato pulp), a fruit source (apple pomace) and a cereal source (brewer's grain), respectively. The pre-silage materials were adjusted with dry in-silo absorbents consisting wheat straw, wheat or rice bran, beet pulp and bean stalks. The pooled mean for the moisture contents of all pre-silage materials was 78.3% (±10.3). Silage effluent decreased (p<0.01), with increase in PWRC of pre-silage material. The theoretical moisture content and PWRC of pre-silage material necessary to stem effluent flow completely in HMBF silage was 69.1% and 82.9 g/100 g in fresh matter, respectively. The high correlation (r = 0.76) between PWRC of ensiled material and silage effluent indicated that the latter is an important factor in silage-effluent relationship.

  14. Surfactant and irrigation effects on wettable soils: Runoff, erosion, and water retention responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are chemical compounds that change the contact angle of water on solid surfaces and are commonly used to increase infiltration into hydrophobic soil. Since production fields with water-repellent soil often contain areas of wettable soil, surfactants applied to such fields will likely be ...

  15. Surfactant and Irrigation Effects on Runoff, Erosion, and Water Retention of Three Wettable Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are chemical compounds that change the contact angle of water on solid surfaces and are commonly used to increase infiltration into hydrophobic soil. Since production fields with water-repellent soil often contain areas of wettable soil, surfactants applied to such fields will likely be ...

  16. Biobased polymer composites derived from corn stover and feather meals as double-coating materials for controlled-release and water-retention urea fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuechao; Tong, Zhaohui; Geng, Yuqing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2013-08-28

    In this paper, we synthesized a biobased polyurethane using liquefied corn stover, isocyanate, and diethylenetriamine. The synthesized polyurethane was used as a coating material to control nitrogen (N) release from polymer-coated urea. A novel superabsorbent composite was also formulated from chicken feather protein (CFP), acrylic acid, and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and used as an outer coating material for water retention. We studied the N release characteristics and water-retention capability of the double-layer polymer-coated urea (DPCU) applied in both water and soils. The ear yields, dry matter accumulation, total N use efficiency and N leaching from a sweet corn soil-plant system under two different irrigation regimes were also investigated. Comparison of DPCU treatments with conventional urea fertilizer revealed that DPCU treatments reduced the N release rate and improved water retention capability. Evaluation of soil and plant characteristics within the soil-plant system revealed that DPCU application effectively reduced N leaching loss, improved total N use efficiency, and increased soil water retention capability.

  17. Multilevel modeling of retention and disinfection efficacy of silver nanoparticles on ceramic water filters.

    PubMed

    Mikelonis, Anne M; Lawler, Desmond F; Passalacqua, Paola

    2016-10-01

    This research examined how variations in synthesis methods of silver nanoparticles affect both the release of silver from ceramic water filters (CWFs) and disinfection efficacy. The silver nanoparticles used were stabilized by four different molecules: citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, branched polyethylenimine, and casein. A multilevel statistical model was built to quantify if there was a significant difference in: a) extent of silver lost, b) initial amount of silver lost, c) silver lost for water of different quality, and d) total coliform removal. Experiments were performed on location at Pure Home Water, a CWF factory in Tamale, Ghana using stored rainwater and dugout water (a local surface water). The results indicated that using dugout vs. rainwater significantly affects the initial (p-value 0.0015) and sustained (p-value 0.0124) loss of silver, but that silver type does not have a significant effect. On average, dugout water removed 37.5μg/L more initial silver and had 1.1μg/L more silver in the filtrate than rainwater. Initially, filters achieved 1.9 log reduction values (LRVs) on average, but among different silver and water types this varied by as much as 2.5 LRV units. Overall, bacterial removal effectiveness was more challenging to evaluate, but some data suggest that the branched polyethylenimine silver nanoparticles provided improved initial bacterial removal over filters which were not painted with silver nanoparticles (p-value 0.038).

  18. Sulphonated imidized graphene oxide (SIGO) based polymer electrolyte membrane for improved water retention, stability and proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ravi P.; Shahi, Vinod K.

    2015-12-01

    Sulphonated imidized graphene oxide (SIGO) (graphene oxide (GO) tethered sulphonated polyimide) has been successfully synthesized by polycondensation reaction using dianhydride and sulphonated diamine. Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are prepared by using SIGO (different wt%) and sulphonated poly(imide) (SPI). Resultant SPI/SIGO composite PEMs exhibit improved stabilities (thermal, mechanical and oxidative) and good water-retention properties (high bound water content responsible for proton conduction at high temperature by internal self-humidification). Incorporation of covalent bonded SIGO into SPI matrix results hydrophobic-hydrophilic phase separation and facile architecture of proton conducting path. Well optimized sulphonated poly(imide)/sulphonated imidized graphene oxide (15 wt%) (SPI/SIGO-15) composite membrane shows 2.24 meq g-1 ion-exchange capacity (IEC); 11.38 × 10-2 S cm-1 proton conductivity; 5.12% bound water content; and 10.52 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 methanol permeability. Maximum power density for pristine SPI membrane (57.12 mW cm-2) improves to 78.53 mW cm-2 for SPI/SIGO-15 membrane, in single-cell direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) test at 70 °C using 2 M methanol fuel. Under similar experimental conditions, Nafion 117 membrane exhibits 62.40 mW cm-2 maximum power density. Reported strategy for the preparation of PEMs, offers a useful protocol for grafting of functionalized inorganic materials with in organic polymer chain by imidization.

  19. Quantifying water flow and retention in an unsaturated fracture-facial domain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.; Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologically significant flow and storage of water occur in macropores and fractures that are only partially filled. To accommodate such processes in flow models, we propose a three-domain framework. Two of the domains correspond to water flow and water storage in a fracture-facial region, in addition to the third domain of matrix water. The fracture-facial region, typically within a fraction of a millimeter of the fracture wall, includes a flowing phase whose fullness is determined by the availability and flux of preferentially flowing water, and a static storage portion whose fullness is determined by the local matric potential. The flow domain can be modeled with the source-responsive preferential flow model, and the roughness-storage domain can be modeled with capillary relations applied on the fracture-facial area. The matrix domain is treated using traditional unsaturated flow theory. We tested the model with application to the hydrology of the Chalk formation in southern England, coherently linking hydrologic information including recharge estimates, streamflow, water table fluctuation, imaging by electron microscopy, and surface roughness. The quantitative consistency of the three-domain matrix-microcavity-film model with this body of diverse data supports the hypothesized distinctions and active mechanisms of the three domains and establishes the usefulness of this framework.

  20. Mixed convection analysis in lid-driven cavity with sinusoidally curved bottom wall using CNT-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohieminul Islam; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Khan, Saadbin; Mamun, M. A. H.

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven enclosure with a curved bottom wall has been investigated using CNT (Carbon Nanotube)-water nanofluid in this paper. The curvature of the bottom wall follows the sine function. Studies have been made with different amplitudes (λ = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15) of the sine function hence wall curvature. The curved wall at the bottom is heated and the top wall is kept at a relatively low temperature. Left vertical and right vertical surface are assumed to be adiabatic. Top wall has been moving at a constant lid velocity U0 at right direction. Galerkin method of FEA (Finite Element Analysis) has been used to solve the governing equations. Different parameters like Richardson number (Ri = 0.1 ˜ 10) at a fixed Reynolds number (Re = 100), solid volume fraction of CNT particle (φ = 0 ˜ 0.09) are used to observe better heat transfer rate. Streamlines, isothermal lines and average Nusselt number plots are included to discuss the result of the investigation. A 2D plot between average Nusselt number and solid volume fraction of CNT-water nanofluid is also given to analyse heat transfer rate. It is observed that higher value of Richardson number shows better heat transfer rate. Finally, the paper concludes that better heat transfer is achieved at higher amplitude (λ = 0.15) of curved surface at higher solid volume fraction (φ = 0.09).

  1. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  2. Water retention of selected microorganisms and Martian soil simulants under close to Martian environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänchen, J.; Bauermeister, A.; Feyh, N.; de Vera, J.-P.; Rettberg, P.; Flemming, H.-C.; Szewzyk, U.

    2014-08-01

    Based on the latest knowledge about microorganisms resistant towards extreme conditions on Earth and results of new complex models on the development of the Martian atmosphere we quantitatively examined the water-bearing properties of selected extremophiles and simulated Martian regolith components and their interaction with water vapor under close to Martian environmental conditions. Three different species of microorganisms have been chosen and prepared for our study: Deinococcus geothermalis, Leptothrix sp. OT_B_406, and Xanthoria elegans. Further, two mineral mixtures representing the early and the late Martian surface as well as montmorillonite as a single component of phyllosilicatic minerals, typical for the Noachian period on Mars, were selected. The thermal mass loss of the minerals and bacteria-samples was measured by thermoanalysis. The hydration and dehydration properties were determined under close to Martian environmental conditions by sorption isotherm measurements using a McBain-Bakr quartz spring balance. It was possible to determine the total water content of the materials as well as the reversibly bound water fraction as function of the atmospheres humidity by means of these methods. Our results are important for the evaluation of future space mission outcomes including astrobiological aspects and can support the modeling of the atmosphere/surface interaction by showing the influence on the water inventory of the upper most layer of the Martian surface.

  3. Marginal cost curves for water footprint reduction in irrigated agriculture: a policy and decision making guide for efficient water use in crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalla, Abebe; Krol, Maarten; Hoekstra, Arjen

    2016-04-01

    Reducing water footprints (WF) in irrigated crop production is an essential element in water management, particularly in water-scarce areas. To achieve this, policy and decision making need to be supported with information on marginal cost curves that rank measures to reduce the WF according to their cost-effectiveness and enable the estimation of the cost associated with a certain WF reduction target, e.g. towards a certain reasonable WF benchmark. This paper aims to develop marginal cost curves (MCC) for WF reduction. The AquaCrop model is used to explore the effect of different measures on evapotranspiration and crop yield and thus WF that is used as input in the MCC. Measures relate to three dimensions of management practices: irrigation techniques (furrow, sprinkler, drip and subsurface drip); irrigation strategies (full and deficit irrigation); and mulching practices (no mulching, organic and synthetic mulching). A WF benchmark per crop is calculated as resulting from the best-available production technology. The marginal cost curve is plotted using the ratios of the marginal cost to WF reduction of the measures as ordinate, ranking with marginal costs rise with the increase of the reduction effort. For each measure, the marginal cost to reduce WF is estimated by comparing the associated WF and net present value (NPV) to the reference case (furrow irrigation, full irrigation, no mulching). The NPV for each measure is based on its capital costs, operation and maintenances costs (O&M) and revenues. A range of cases is considered, including: different crops, soil types and different environments. Key words: marginal cost curve, water footprint benchmark, soil water balance, crop growth, AquaCrop

  4. Bypassing and tightening of an underground water retention system in permeable karst: case study of the hydropower plant (HPP) Bribin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudella, Peter; Loges, Iryna; Mutschler, Thomas; Eiche, Elisabeth; Ruppert, Julia; Neumann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) joint research project in the karst area of Gunung Kidul, Province of Yogyakarta Special Region on the Java Island, Indonesia, an underground hydropower driven water extraction facility in the cave "Bribin" was developed using pump-as-turbine-driven systems for freshwater supply of the rural area. As numerous other caves in the Gunung Kidul area, Bribin is part of a ramified system of all-season water-bearing subterraneous rivers and natural caves in karstic limestone. The elliptic cross section of the cave was completely closed with a concrete barrage, thus creating a year-round underground retention volume with an operational storage level of approx. 15 m. This contribution highlights the geotechnical and geohydraulic challenges handled within the sub-project "Short-time and long-time behaviour of karst rock surrounding pressure-bearing underground water-retaining structures". One key to the feasibility of an artificial water retention scheme in a natural cave is to ensure the mechanical stability of the cave roof and sidewalls. The necessary geotechnical investigations are described. Another key to the effectiveness of such a water retention concept is the control and minimization of "lost" seepage water bypassing the barrage structure through the karst rock mass. Measures to monitor and to explain the seepage phenomena are presented as well as grouting efforts to minimize them. The limitations of improving the overall tightness will be discussed. Interpretation includes the use of analytical and numerical methods.

  5. Effect of the water content on the retention and enantioselectivity of albendazole and fenbendazole sulfoxides using amylose-based chiral stationary phases in organic-aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Materazzo, Sabrina; Carradori, Simone; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Secci, Daniela; Cirilli, Roberto

    2014-01-31

    Four commercially available immobilized amylose-derived CSPs (Chiralpak IA-3, Chiralpak ID-3, Chiralpak IE-3 and Chiralpak IF-3) were used in the HPLC analysis of the chiral sulfoxides albendazole (ABZ-SO) and fenbendazole (FBZ-SO) and their in vivo sulfide precursor (ABZ and FBZ) and sulfone metabolite (ABZ-SO2 and FBZ-SO2) under organic-aqueous mode. U-shape retention maps, established by varying the water content in the acetonitrile- and ethanol-water mobile phases, were indicative of two retention mechanisms operating on the same CSP. The dual retention behavior of polysaccharide-based CSPs was exploited to design greener enantioselective and chemoselective separations in a short time frame. The enantiomers of ABZ-SO and FBZ-SO were baseline resolved with water-rich mobile phases (with the main component usually being 50-65% water in acetonitrile) on the IF-3 CSP and ethanol-water 100:5 mixture on the IA-3 and IE-3 CSPs. A simultaneous separation of ABZ (or FBZ), enantiomers of the corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone was achieved on the IA-3 using ethanol-water 100:60 (acetonitrile-water 100:100 for FBZ) as a mobile phase.

  6. Use of a storm water retention system for conservation of regionally endangered fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Bland, James K.; Janssen, John

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining aquatic biodiversity in urban or suburban areas can be problematic because urban landscapes can be nearly devoid of aquatic habitats other than engineered basins for storm water management. These areas are usually of questionable value for fish, but we examined a case study in which five regionally imperiled fish species were reintroduced into an artificial storm water detention pond and subsequently thrived. Although not a formal experiment, postintroduction survey data suggested that three of the five species maintained high population densities for 10 years after initial stocking, and two persisted in lower numbers. Success was likely due to a combination of unique design features and prior habitat preparation that resulted in clear water conditions that supported dense vegetation. Stocked fish persisted despite occasional bouts of low dissolved oxygen and increased chloride levels resulting from road salt application within the watershed. Transplanted fish served as a source population for both research and further reintroduction experiments. We suggest that, for some fish species, habitat preservation has a middle ground between natural habitats and completely artificial environments that require constant husbandry and that storm water systems could be used to create engineered sanctuaries within the human landscape that have many potential benefits for both humans and fish.

  7. Biochar impact on improving root growth and water retention capacity in Norfolk hard setting subsoil layer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Norfolk soil series is a well-drained soil used commonly for agricultural production in the Eastern Carolinas. Certain profile features such as a hard setting subsoil layer with high bulk density, low water holding capacity and meager soil fertility characteristics makes this soil less producti...

  8. INVESTIGATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND CONDENSATE RECOVERY FOR CONDENSATE/WATER/ETHANOL MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2003-10-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period April 01, 2003 to September 30, 2003 which covers the second six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. During this reporting period, salinity scans were completed for 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mM salt concentrations at room temperature to identify optimal salinity intervals in which all three phases coexist for this system. Temperature scans are in progress at Morehouse College to identify the optimal temperature, and the temperature intervals in which all three phases coexist for this system. Coreflooding experiments are being conducted by our industrial partner in this project, Surtek, CO, to measure the effectiveness for surfactant retention and condensate recovery in flooding processes. Review of the current literature in the subject area, and modeling efforts that were established in our previous studies to predict electrical conductivities and inversion phenomena was continued from the previous reporting period. Based on the review a computer model to predict electrical conductivities of the ethylbenzene (that has the equivalent carbon number of the condensate)/water/ethanol system is being developed.

  9. Humidity interaction of lichens under astrobiological aspects: the impact of UVC exposure on their water retention properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänchen, J.; Meeßen, J.; Herzog, T. H.; Feist, M.; de la Torre, R.; Devera, J.-P. P.

    2015-07-01

    We quantitatively studied the hydration and dehydration behaviour of the three astrobiological model lichens Xanthoria elegans, Buellia frigida and Circinaria gyrosa by thermoanalysis and gravimetric isotherm measurements under close-to-Martian environmental conditions in terms of low temperature and low pressure. Additionally, the impact of UVC exposure on the isolated symbionts of B. frigida and X. elegans was studied by thermoanalysis and mass spectrometry as well as by gravimetric isotherm measurements. The thermal analysis revealed whewellite as a component of C. gyrosa which was not found in B. frigida and X. elegans. Neither the water retention nor the thermal behaviour of symbionts changed when irradiated with UVC under dry conditions. On the other hand, UVC irradiation of the wet mycobiont of B. frigida had a distinct impact on the hydration/dehydration ability which was not observed for the mycobiont of X. elegans. Possibly the melanin of B. frigida's mycobiont, that is not present in X. elegans, or a specifically damaged acetamido group of the chitin of B. frigida may be the sources of additional UVC-induced sorption sites for water associated with the UVC exposure.

  10. Evaluation of the performance of the van Genuchten equation using a large database on soil water retention of tropical soils in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottoni, M. V.; Van Genuchten, M.; Lopes Assad, M. L. R. C.; Monteiro, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The van Genuchten equation is used often to provide an empirical description of soil water retention data. The equation is commonly used for modeling hydrologic processes for environmental and agricultural applications, including irrigation. Most applications involved soils of temperate or arid climatic regions. Soil of tropical zones often have distinct textural compositions with a predominance of clay and sand, which may lead to multimodal pore size distributions that are not conducive to applications of the standard van Genuchten equation. This study aims to evaluate the performance of the van Genuchten equation using a large database on soil water retention of tropical soils in Brazil, where almost 6 million hectares are irrigated and responsible for about 70% of water consumption in Brazil. We selected 1058 undisturbed soil samples with water retention data covering a wide matric potentials. The results show that the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of the water retention estimates was larger than 4% for only 10 samples. For the remaining datasets, the RMSE distribution behaved as follows: 27 samples had an RMSE from 3 to 4%, 70 samples had an RMSE from 2 to 3%, 332 samples had an RMSE from 1 to 2%, and 619 samples had an RMSE from 0 to 1%. Because of the bimodal pore size distribution of many soils, a dual porosity retention model is probably more appropriate for samples having the higher RMSE values. Overall, the van Genuchten equation was found to be appropriate for Brazilian soil conditions. Work is underway to see if soil or landscape properties can be used to predict the presence of the bimodal pore-size distributions.

  11. The Modification of Fuel Cell-Based Breath Alcohol Sensor Materials to Improve Water Retention of Sensing Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Jesse

    are better suited for sensor applications. The commercially used porous poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) membrane was investigated and modified to improve performance of this material. As PVC does not contain any natural hydroscopic properties, the addition of various hydrophilic groups to the PVC would aid in water management. It was found that while chemical modification could improve water retention, optimization of the modifications would be required to ensure flooding was not an issue. Composites of PVC and sulfonated silica showed performance that matched that of the commercial PVC, whilst using significantly less water to achieve those results. By reducing the water required for sensing, leaching of acid, as well as flooding could be reduced. Finally, the catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer (GDL) were investigated to understand what properties of these would impart the best performance increases for the sensor. For the catalyst layer, it was found that platinum black and 20% platinum supported on carbon achieved similar results. Platinum black has excellent catalytic activity for the ethanol oxidation reaction, while the surface area of the 20% platinum supported on carbon would allow for more ethanol to react, increasing the overall sensor capability. The choice of catalyst was less of an issue than the choice of GDL. It was found that using carbon fiber paper GDLs lead to greater retention of water in the MEA compared to carbon cloth GDLs due to the lower air permeability. This came at a cost however in that with a lower air permeability, less ethanol vapour would reach the catalytic sites, reducing sensing performance. Depending on the choice of membrane, removal of the GDL could impart performance increases, but could also cause detrimental failure in the case of Nafion based systems.

  12. Critical evaluation of a simple retention time predictor based on LogKow as a complementary tool in the identification of emerging contaminants in water.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Felix

    2015-07-01

    There has been great interest in environmental analytical chemistry in developing screening methods based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) for emerging contaminants. Using HRMS, compound identification relies on the high mass resolving power and mass accuracy attainable by these analyzers. When dealing with wide-scope screening, retention time prediction can be a complementary tool for the identification of compounds, and can also reduce tedious data processing when several peaks appear in the extracted ion chromatograms. There are many in silico, Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationship methods available for the prediction of retention time for LC. However, most of these methods use commercial software to predict retention time based on various molecular descriptors. This paper explores the applicability and makes a critical discussion on a far simpler and cheaper approach to predict retention times by using LogKow. The predictor was based on a database of 595 compounds, their respective LogKow values and a chromatographic run time of 18min. Approximately 95% of the compounds were found within 4.0min of their actual retention times, and 70% within 2.0min. A predictor based purely on pesticides was also made, enabling 80% of these compounds to be found within 2.0min of their actual retention times. To demonstrate the utility of the predictors, they were successfully used as an additional tool in the identification of 30 commonly found emerging contaminants in water. Furthermore, a comparison was made by using different mass extraction windows to minimize the number of false positives obtained.

  13. Highly efficient inactivation of bacteria found in drinking water using chitosan-bentonite composites: Modelling and breakthrough curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Motshekga, Sarah C; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2017-03-15

    Disinfection of bacterially-contaminated drinking water requires a robust and effective technique and can be achieved by using an appropriate disinfectant material. The advanced use of nanomaterials is observed as an alternative and effective way for the disinfection process and water treatment as a whole. Hence, the inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using chitosan-Bentonite (Cts-Bent) composites was studied in a fixed bed column. Cts-Bent composites were synthesized using in situ cross-linking method using Bent-supported silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles. These composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The effect of the composite bed mass, initial concentration of bacteria, and flow rate on the bacterial inactivation was investigated. The characterization results revealed that the composites were successfully prepared and confirmed the presence of both silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix. The growth curves of E. coli were expressed as breakthrough curves, based on the logistic, Gompertz, and Boltzmann models. The breakthrough time and processed volume of treated water at breakthrough were used as performance indicators, which revealed that the composites performed best at low bacterial concentration and flow rate and with substantial bed mass. The chitosan composites were found to be highly effective, which was demonstrated when no bacteria were observed in the effluent sample within the first 27 h of analysing river water. All the models were suitable for adequately describing and reproducing the experimental data with a sigmoidal pattern. Therefore, the prepared composite is showing potential to work as a disinfectant and provide an alternative solution for water disinfection; hence this study should propel further research of the same or similar materials.

  14. Role of air on local water retention behavior in the shallow heterogeneous vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Limsuwat, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2009-12-01

    In the presence of a subsurface source, air flowing through the unsaturated soil can transport toxic vapor into subsurface structures due to pressure gradients created by, e.g., a pressure drop within the building. Development of dynamic air pathways in the subsurface are largely controlled by the geological heterogeneity and the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. To better understand how these air pathways are developed, it is crucial to know how water is retained in heterogeneous medium at spatial resolutions that are finer than those adopted in typical hydrologic and soil physics applications. Although methods for soil water pressure measurement can be readily found in literature, a technique for measuring “air pressure” in wet soil is not well-established or documented. Hydrophobic porous ceramic cups have been used to measure non-wetting NAPL phase pressure in two-phase systems. However, our preliminary tests using the hydrophobic ceramic cups installed in highly wet soil showed that under conditions of fast drainage of the wetting fluid that is replaced by air, it typically took some time before the cups responded to register the air pressure. Therefore, an attempt was made to develop a more robust method where the time lag is minimized. The tested materials were; 1) ceramic porous cups, 2) sintered stainless steel cups, 3) porous glass discs, and 4) non-woven PTFE fabric. The ceramic cups, sintered stainless steel cups and sintered porous glass discs required hydrophobic treatment, whereas the non-woven PTFE fabric is hydrophobic by itself. To treat the ceramic porous cups, the method proposed by Parker and Lenhard [1988] was adopted. The sintered porous stainless steel cups and porous glass discs were treated by a commercially available water repellant compound. For those four materials, contact angle, water entry pressure, and time lag to respond to an imposed pressure were measured. The best performing material was then tested in a

  15. Membrane fouling and anti-fouling strategies using RO retentate from a municipal water recycling plant as the feed for osmotic power generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Cong; Amy, Gary L; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    RO retentate from a municipal water recycling plant is considered as a potential feed stream for osmotic power generation in this paper. The feasibility of using RO retentate from a municipal water recycling plant was examined from two aspects: (a) the membrane fouling propensity of RO retentate, and (b) the efficacy of anti-fouling strategies. The membranes used in this study were the inner selective thin film composite polyethersulfone (TFC/PES) hollow fiber membranes, which possessed a high water permeability and good mechanical strength. Scaling by phosphate salts was found to be one possible inorganic fouling on the innermost layer of the PES membrane, whereas silica fouling was observed to be the governing fouling on the outmost surface of the PES membrane. Two anti-fouling pretreatments, i.e., pH adjustment and anti-scalant pre-treatment for the feed stream, were studied and found to be straightforward and effective. Using RO retentate at pH 7.2 as the feed and 1 M NaCl as the draw solution, the average power density was 7.3 W/m(2) at 20 bar. The average power density increased to 12.6 W/m(2) by modifying RO retentate with an initial pH value of 5.5 using HCl and to 13.4 W/m(2) by adding 1.1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Moreover, the flux recovery of the fouled membranes, without the indicated pretreatments, reached 84.9% using deionized (DI) water flushing and 95.0% using air bubbling under a high crossflow velocity of 23.3 cm/s (Re = 2497) for 30 min. After pretreatment by pH adjustment, the flux recovery increased to 94.6% by DI water flushing and 100.0% by air bubbling. After pretreatment by adding 1.1 mM EDTA into RO retentate, flux was almost fully restored by physical cleaning by DI water flushing and air bubbling. These results provide insight into developing an effective pretreatment by either pH adjustment or EDTA addition before PRO and physical cleaning methods by DI water flushing and air bubbling for membrane used in

  16. On the secular retention of ground water and ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Robert E.; Harrison, Keith P.; Stillman, David E.; Kirchoff, Michelle R.

    2017-01-01

    Tropical ground ice on Mars undergoes long-term sublimation and likely exospheric escape. Without restriction of sublimation, the cryosphere would eventually breach, leading to massive loss of any underlying groundwater. We seek to understand the conditions under which the ground-ice seal, groundwater, and subsurface habitability are preserved. Using multireservoir models for the evolution of deuterium-to-hydrogen ratios, we derive a median estimate of the Hesperian-Amazonian H2O loss of 60 m (interquartile range 30-120 m) global equivalent layer (GEL), neglecting magmatic degassing. Most of the loss may have been early, with consequent low loss in the "modern" cold and dry climate. We modeled global H2O transport within Mars following an assumed abrupt transition to modern conditions at 3 Ga. Sublimation is retarded (in order of decreasing priority) by higher obliquity, smaller porosity, higher tortuosity, lower heat flow, and smaller pore radius. Higher obliquity reduces H2O loss by decreasing tropical surface temperatures and raising global atmospheric water vapor. Time-variable obliquities do not overly influence outcomes as long as the total duration <30° obliquity is <1 Gyr, with no interval longer than a few hundred million years. Decreased solar luminosity or a thicker CO2 atmosphere can also retard loss of subsurface H2O, whereas lower atmospheric water vapor accelerates sublimation. If Mars' post-Noachian crustal H2O inventory was a few hundred meters GEL or more, then the modest loss since then implies that the cryospheric seal has been maintained following top down freezing and that groundwater likely exists globally on Mars today.

  17. Retention and loss of water extractable carbon in soils: effect of clay properties.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung-Ta; Marschner, Petra

    2014-02-01

    Clay sorption is important for organic carbon (C) sequestration in soils, but little is known about the effect of different clay properties on organic C sorption and release. To investigate the effect of clay content and properties on sorption, desorption and loss of water extractable organic C (WEOC), two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, a loamy sand alone (native) or mixed with clay isolated from a surface or subsoil (78 and 96% clay) resulting in 90, 158 and 175 g clay kg(-1) soil. These soil treatments were leached with different WEOC concentrations, and then CO2 release was measured for 28 days followed by leaching with reverse osmosis water at the end of experiment. The second experiment was conducted to determine WEOC sorption and desorption of clays isolated from the loamy sand (native), surface soil and subsoil. Addition of clays isolated from surface and subsoil to sandy loam increased WEOC sorption and reduced C leaching and cumulative respiration in percentage of total organic C and WEOC added when expressed per g soil and per g clay. Compared to clays isolated from the surface and subsoil, the native clay had higher concentrations of illite and exchangeable Ca(2+), total organic C and a higher CEC but a lower extractable Fe/Al concentration. This indicates that compared to the clay isolated from the surface and the subsoil, the native clay had fewer potential WEOC binding sites because it had lower Fe/Al content thus lower number of binding sites and the existing binding sites are already occupied native organic matter. The results of this study suggest that in the soils used here, the impact of clay on WEOC sorption and loss is dependent on its indigenous organic carbon and Fe and/or Al concentrations whereas clay mineralogy, CEC, exchangeable Ca(2+) and surface area are less important.

  18. Improving Budyko curve-based estimates of long-term water partitioning using hydrologic signatures from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kuai; Shen, Chaopeng; Fisher, Joshua B.; Niu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The Budyko hypothesis provides a first-order estimate of water partitioning into runoff (Q) and evapotranspiration (E). Observations, however, often show significant departures from the Budyko curve; moreover, past improvements to Budyko curve tend to lose predictive power when migrated between regions or to small scales. Here to estimate departures from the Budyko curve, we use hydrologic signatures extracted from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomalies. The signatures include GRACE amplitude as a fraction of precipitation (A/P), interannual variability, and 1-month lag autocorrelation. We created a group of linear models embodying two alternate hypotheses that departures can be predicted by (a) Taylor series expansion based on the deviation of physical characteristics (seasonality, snow fraction, and vegetation index) from reference conditions and (b) surrogate indicators covarying with E, e.g., A/P. These models are fitted using a mesoscale USA data set (HUC4) and then evaluated using world data sets and USA basins <1 × 105 km2. The model with A/P could reduce error by 50% compared to Budyko itself. We found that seasonality and fraction of precipitation as snow account for a major portion of the predictive power of A/P, while the remainder is attributed to unexplained basin characteristics. When migrated to a global data set, type b models performed better than type a. This contrast in transferability is argued to be due to data set limitations and catchment coevolution. The GRACE-based correction performs well for USA basins >1000 km2 and, according to comparison with other global data sets, is suitable for data fusion purposes, with GRACE error as estimates of uncertainty.

  19. Evaluation of pedotransfer functions for estimating the soil water retention points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Omid; Palangi, Sahar

    2016-06-01

    Direct measurement of soil moisture has been often expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was determining the best method to estimate the soil moisture using the pedotransfer functions in the soil par2 model. Soil samples selected from the database UNSODA in three textures include sandy loam, silty loam and clay. In clay soil, the Campbell model indicated better results at field capacity (FC) and wilting point (WP) with RMSE = (0.06, 0.09) and d = (0.65, 0.55) respectively. In silty loam soil, the Epic model had accurate estimation with MBE = 0.00 at FC and Campbell model had the acceptable result of WP with RMSE = 0.03 and d = 0.77. In sandy loam, Hutson and Campbell models had a better result to estimation the FC and WP than others. Also Hutson model had an acceptable result to estimation the TAW (Total Available Water) with RMSE = (0.03, 0.04, 0.04) and MBE = (0.02, 0.01, 0.01) for clay, sandy loam and silty loam, respectively. These models demonstrate the moisture points had the internal linkage with the soil textures. Results indicated that the PTFs models simulate the agreement results with the experimental observations.

  20. Modeling water retention of sludge simulants and actual saltcake tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ferrocyanide Tanks Safety Program managed by Westinghouse hanford Company has been concerned with the potential combustion hazard of dry tank wastes containing ferrocyanide chemical in combination with nitrate salts. Pervious studies have shown that tank waste containing greater than 20 percent of weight as water could not be accidentally ignited. Moreover, a sustained combustion could not be propagated in such a wet waste even if it contained enough ferrocyanide to burn. Because moisture content is a key critical factor determining the safety of ferrocyanide-containing tank wastes, physical modeling was performed by Pacific Northwest National laboratory to evaluate the moisture-retaining behavior of typical tank wastes. The physical modeling reported here has quantified the mechanisms by which two main types of tank waste, sludge and saltcake, retain moisture in a tank profile under static conditions. Static conditions usually prevail after a tank profile has been stabilized by pumping out any excess interstitial liquid, which is not naturally retained by the waste as a result of physical forces such as capillarity.

  1. Estimating Soil Water Retention Parameters Using Remote Sensing Platforms and Data Assimilation Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, B. P.; Shin, Y.; Ines, A.

    2011-12-01

    Using air and space-borne remote sensing soil moisture data, insitu profile soil moisture at discrete depths, a physics-based soil hydrology model, and Genetic Algorithm (GA) we have developed (1) near-surface and (2) layer-specific soil-moisture assimilation schemes. This study quantifies the soil hydraulic properties of the near surface (0-5 cm) and root zone (0-200 cm) in a homogeneous/layered soil column (for individual layers) under various scenarios of vegetation type, bottom boundary conditions, and soil layering. We have conducted numerical (synthetic) studies and field experimental validation using simulation-optimization with genetic algorithm (SWAP-GA). In this study, it is demonstrated that soil texture, bottom boundary conditions, soil layers and heterogeneity of various soil types and vertical arrangements influence uncertainties for quantifying the soil hydraulic parameters in the layered soil domain. We envisage that our findings will help in the estimations of effective soil hydraulic parameters at large (remote sensing) footprints for land surface models under soil layering, vertical heterogeneity sequence, different vegetation and land covers, and ground water table depths.

  2. Applying the Delay-Curve Hough Transform To Shallow-Water Environments,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    shallow-water environments. The GAMARAY model, an eigenray -based sound propagation model, was used to produce the sound field. Even though beyond some...short ranges the direct propagation path disappears and the dominant eigenrays are due to multipath, the correlation traces still maintain the shape of

  3. The Soil-Water Characteristic Curve of Unsaturated Tropical Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F.; Setapa, A. S.; Tajudin, S. A. A.; Madun, A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Marto, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the SWCC of unsaturated tropical residual soil in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Undisturbed soil samples at five locations of high-risk slopes area were taken at a depth of 0.5 m using block sampler. In the determination of the SWCC, the pressure plate extractor with the capacity of 1500 kN/m2 has been used. The index properties of the soil such as natural moisture content, Atterberg limits, specific gravity, and soil classification are performed according to BS 1377: Part 2: 1990. The results of index properties show that the natural moisture content of the soil is between 36% to 46%, the plasticity index is between 10% - 26%, the specific gravity is between 2.51 - 2.61 and the soils is classified as silty organic clay of low plasticity. The SWCC data from the pressure plate extractor have been fitted with the Fredlund and Xing equation. The results show that the air entry value and residual matric suction for residual soils are in the range of 17 kN/m2 to 24 kN/m2 and 145 kN/m2 to 225 kN/m2 respectively. From the fitting curve, it is found that the average value of the Fredlund and Xing parameters such as a, n and m are in the range of 0.24-0.299, 1.7-4.8 and 0.142-0.440 respectively.

  4. Effects of Solution Chemistry on the Retention and Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles in Water-Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelman, A.; Wang, Y.; Pennell, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Potential health and environmental effects have been attributed to both silver nanoparticles (nAg) and the silver ion (Ag+), necessitating a thorough understanding of mechanisms governing the fate and transport of nAg in natural systems. Batch and column experiments were conducted to assess nAg transport, retention and dissolution kinetics as a function of pH, electrolyte and dissolved oxygen (DO) content. Batch experiments were performed at pH 4, 5.5 and 7, DO levels of <0.15 mg/L, 2mg/L and 8.9 mg/L, and with 10mM nitrate, acetate or borate as the background electrolyte. Batch solutions containing ca. 2 mg/L nanosilver were monitored regularly for 48 hours and analyzed for mean particle diameter, zeta potential, nanoparticle concentration and silver ion concentration. Silver nanoparticle dissolution increased with decreasing pH and with dissolved oxygen content. Increased aggregation and less negative zeta potential values (tending closer to the point of zero charge) indicate that acetate causes greater instability in nAg suspensions as compared with nitrate at the same ionic strength. Column experiments were performed in glass columns (11 cm length x 2.7 cm diameter) packed with washed 40-50 mesh Ottawa sand and saturated with a background electrolyte solution. Following a non-reactive tracer test, a three pore volume pulse of nAg suspension (ca. 3 mg/L silver) was introduced at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min (pore water velocity of ca. 7.0 m/d), followed by three pore volumes of nanoparticle-free solution. Column experiments were conducted with 10mM sodium nitrate at pH 4 and 7 and under oxygen rich (DO = 8.9 mg/L) and lean (DO < 0.15 mg/L) conditions. Hyper-exponential retention profiles were observed, with the highest attachment measured at the column inlet. Under oxygen rich conditions, approximately 85% of the input nAg was retained in sand at pH 4, compared with 25% at pH 7. Consistent with batch experimental results, dissolution of retained nanoparticles

  5. Modeling the Radial Velocity Curve of the Water Vapor Maser in VX UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, D. M.; Benson, P. J.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    1999-12-01

    VX UMa is a unique Mira-type star that demonstrates a triple-peaked spectrum of its 1.35-cm H2O maser emission. We used the high-precision curves of radial velocities of the spectral peaks, obtained by Benson & Little-Marenin from 1988 to 1992, as probes of the kinematics of the masing region. The pronounced periodicity of the radial velocity of the central component, with a period equal to the pulsational period of the optical variations, suggests the involvement of pulsations in the observed excursions of radial velocity. However, the radial velocity of the central spectral component produced by a symmetrical, pulsating spherical layer should be constantly zero. Rotation seems to be the most obvious mechanism to impart a small non-zero component to the central feature. We assume that the bulk of maser radiation originates in the equatorial "belt" around the star and approximate this region as a two-dimensional, rotating and pulsating ring. We found that any combination of rotation and pulsation produces a quadruple peaked, not a triple peaked spectrum. Therefore, some asymmetry in the disk or unequal absorption of the two central peaks by ionized gas (e.g. in the shock responsible for the maser emission) is needed. We demonstrate that one of the central peaks can then undergo periodic changes of its radial velocity with the period of pulsation, as observed. A VLBA experiment that may verify our model is under way. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-9820555.

  6. Wettability of poultry litter biochars at variable pyrolysis temperatures and their impact on soil wettability and water retention relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S. C.; Witt, B.; Guo, M.; Chiu, P.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    higher mass fractions, the impact of hydrophobic PL biochar on the sand/mixture contact angle was more dramatic: for a sand/biochar mixture with 15% PL biochar, the contact angle was 40.12°. Water drop penetration tests were also performed on these samples, and results were consistent with contact angles measured with the sessile drop method. To further explore the cause of the varying contact angle with pyrolysis temperature, the PL biochars were vigorously rinsed with deionized water or heated for 24 hours at 105°C, and the contact angle measurements repeated. Both rinsing and heating samples rendered hydrophobic PL biochar hydrophilic. Rinsate samples were analyzed for total organic carbon and with GC-MS. These data suggest that bio-oils produced during slow-pyrolysis at temperatures < 400°C condensed on biochar and caused hydrophobicity. These bio-oils could be removed through vigorous washing with deionized water or heating to 105°C. The implication of these changes in water contact angle from PL biochar addition on water retention relationships for soil and on water distribution within pores will be discussed.

  7. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Barba, M Isabel; Larrechi, M Soledad; Coronas, Alberto

    2016-05-05

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO3 < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5-48.3% for LiCl, 60.4-61.2% for LiI and 60.3-63.7% for LiNO3. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored.

  8. Water Retention Characteristics and State-Dependent Mechanical and Petro-Physical Properties of a Clay Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Katrin M.; Wymann, Linda P.; Zimmer, Sebastian; Thoeny, Reto; Amann, Florian

    2015-03-01

    A series of clay shale specimens in equilibrium with various humidity conditions were used to establish the water retention characteristics, the influence of suction on ultrasonic p-wave velocity and rock mechanical properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, onset of dilatancy, unconfined compressive strength and Brazilian tensile strength. Opalinus Clay, a clay shale considered as host rock for the disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland was utilized. The results showed that the p-wave velocity normal to bedding ( v p,n) dropped sharply upon desaturation until suction approached the air-entry value. The sharp decrease was associated with desiccation cracks solely oriented parallel to bedding. For suction in excess of the air-entry value, v p,n was constant, indicating no further desiccation damage. The suction at the shrinkage limit and at the air-entry point is similar in magnitude. The p-wave velocity parallel to bedding ( v p,p) remained constant in the entire range of suction investigated in this study. The constant v p,p with increasing suction might be associated with the disproportional decrease in the Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus and its opposing effect on p-wave velocity. An almost linear increase in unconfined compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, stress at the onset of dilatancy and Young's modulus with increasing suction was observed up to a suction of 56.6 MPa. For suction larger than 56.6 MPa, relatively constant strength and stiffness was observed. The increase is associated with the net contribution of suction to strength/stiffness, which decreases nonlinearly with decreasing volumetric water content. The rate of increase in tensile strength and unconfined compressive strength with increasing suction is different depending on the rock anisotropy. Compared to the strength values (Brazilian tensile and uniaxial compressive strength) obtained from specimens loaded parallel to bedding, the tensile strength parallel to

  9. Hot compressed water extraction curve for palm oil and beta carotene concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharizan, M. S. M.; Azian, M. N.; Yoshiyuki, Y.; Kamal, A. A. M.; Che Yunus, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Hot compressed water extraction (HCWE) is a promising green alternative for palm oil milling. The kinetic characteristic of HCWE for palm oil and it β-carotene concentration was experimentally investigated in this study at the different temperature and pressure. Semi-batch HCW extractor from 120 to 180 oC and 30 to 50 bar was used to evaluated the process for 60 mins of extraction in 10 mins interval. The results obtain using the HCWE process was compared with other extraction method. The oil extraction achieved the maximum extraction rate within 20 mins of extraction in most of the condition and starting to decrease until 60 mins of extraction time. The extraction rate for β-carotene was achieved the maximum rate in 10 mins and starting to decrease until 30 mins. None of β-carotene concentration had been extracted out from the palm oil mesocarp after 30 mins of extraction in all condition. The oil recovery of using HCWE was relatively low compare with the mechanical screw press, subcritical R134b, supercritical carbon dioxide and hexane extraction due to the oil loses in the oil-water emulsion. However, the β-carotene concentration in extracted oil using HCWE was improved compare with commercial crude palm oil (CPO) and subcritical R134a extraction.

  10. Retention of heavy metals and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons from road water in a constructed wetland and the effect of de-icing.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Karin; Lima, Ana T; Barendregt, Arjan; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2012-02-15

    A full-scale remediation facility including a detention basin and a wetland was tested for retention of heavy metals and Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water drained from a motorway in The Netherlands. The facility consisted of a detention basin, a vertical-flow reed bed and a final groundwater infiltration bed. Water samples were taken of road water, detention basin influent and wetland effluent. By using automated sampling, we were able to obtain reliable concentration averages per 4-week period during 18 months. The system retained the PAHs very well, with retention efficiencies of 90-95%. While environmental standards for these substances were surpassed in the road water, this was never the case after passage through the system. For the metals the situation was more complicated. All metals studied (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Ni) had concentrations frequently surpassing environmental standards in the road water. After passage through the system, most metal concentrations were lower than the standards, except for Cu and Zn. There was a dramatic effect of de-icing salts on the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd and Ni, in the effluent leaving the system. For Cu, the concentrations even became higher than they had ever been in the road water. It is advised to let the road water bypass the facility during de-icing periods.

  11. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 4. Mobile-phase pH measurement in methanol/water

    PubMed

    Canals; Portal; Bosch; Roses

    2000-04-15

    The different procedures used in HPLC to measure the pH of a mobile phase are evaluated in terms of the rigorous IUPAC definition of pH. The three procedures evaluated are as follows: measurement of the pH of the aqueous HPLC buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier, measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier using a pH electrode system calibrated with aqueous buffers, and measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier but calibrating the electrode system with reference buffers prepared in the same mixed solvent used as mobile phase. Following IUPAC definitions and recommendations, the three pH values can be related with the pH scales: w(w)pH, s(w)pH, and s(s)pH, respectively. The relationships between these three pH scales are also presented. The retention of several compounds with acid/base behavior in a C-18 and a polymeric column with buffered methanol/water as mobile phase is related to the mobile phase pH value measured in the three pH scales. It is demonstrated that the s(w)pH and s(s)pH scales give better relationships than the w(w)pH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier), commonly used on HPLC. The s(w)pH scale is specially recommended because of its simplicity of measurement: the pH is measured after mixing the aqueous buffer with the organic modifier, but the pH calibration is performed with the common aqueous reference buffers.

  12. Physically based estimation of soil water retention from textural data: General framework, new models, and streamlined existing models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Laguna, Luna A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous models are in widespread use for the estimation of soil water retention from more easily measured textural data. Improved models are needed for better prediction and wider applicability. We developed a basic framework from which new and existing models can be derived to facilitate improvements. Starting from the assumption that every particle has a characteristic dimension R associated uniquely with a matric pressure ?? and that the form of the ??-R relation is the defining characteristic of each model, this framework leads to particular models by specification of geometric relationships between pores and particles. Typical assumptions are that particles are spheres, pores are cylinders with volume equal to the associated particle volume times the void ratio, and that the capillary inverse proportionality between radius and matric pressure is valid. Examples include fixed-pore-shape and fixed-pore-length models. We also developed alternative versions of the model of Arya and Paris that eliminate its interval-size dependence and other problems. The alternative models are calculable by direct application of algebraic formulas rather than manipulation of data tables and intermediate results, and they easily combine with other models (e.g., incorporating structural effects) that are formulated on a continuous basis. Additionally, we developed a family of models based on the same pore geometry as the widely used unsaturated hydraulic conductivity model of Mualem. Predictions of measurements for different suitable media show that some of the models provide consistently good results and can be chosen based on ease of calculations and other factors. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of the gelatinization temperature of noodles from water sorption curves under temperature-programmed heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayako; Ogawa, Takenobu; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    A novel method in which the water sorption curve is observed under linearly temperature-raising conditions was proposed to estimate the gelatinization temperature of starch-containing foods, it was applied in an estimation of the gelatinization temperatures of dried noodles. The gelatinization temperatures of two kinds of spaghetti, dried at high and low temperature, were 52.3 and 53.1 °C, and those of udon, kishimen, juwari-soba, hachiwari-soba, so-called common soba, Malony(®), and kuzukiri were 57.0, 57.8, 61.1, 59.6, 57.4, 48.4, and 49.1 °C. The gelatinization temperatures estimated by the method were between the onset and peak temperatures obtained by differential scanning calorimetric measurement.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin methods for dispersive shallow water models in closed basins: Spurious eddies and their removal using curved boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmoeller, D. T.; Stastna, M.; Lamb, K. G.

    2016-11-01

    Discontinuous Galerkin methods offer a promising methodology for treating nearly hyperbolic systems such as dispersion-modified shallow water equations in complicated basins. Use of straight-edged triangular elements can lead to the generation of spurious eddies when wave fronts propagate around sharp, re-entrant obstacles such as headlands. While these eddies may be removed by adding strong artificial dissipation (e.g., eddy viscosity), for nearly inviscid simulations that focus on wave phenomena this approach is not reasonable. We demonstrate that the moderate order Discontinuous Galerkin methodology may be extended to curved triangular elements provided that the integral formulations are computed with high-order quadrature and cubature rules. Simulations with the new technique do not exhibit spurious eddy generation in idealized complex domains or real-world basins as exemplified by Pinehurst Lake, Alberta, Canada.

  15. Granular activated carbon adsorption of organic micro-pollutants in drinking water and treated wastewater--Aligning breakthrough curves and capacities.

    PubMed

    Zietzschmann, Frederik; Stützer, Christian; Jekel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) tests for the adsorption of organic micro-pollutants (OMP) were conducted with drinking water and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. In both waters, three influent OMP concentration levels were tested. As long as the influent OMP concentrations are below certain thresholds, the relative breakthrough behavior is not impacted in the respective water. Accordingly, the GAC capacity for OMP is directly proportional to the influent OMP concentration in the corresponding water. The differences between the OMP breakthrough curves in drinking water and WWTP effluent can be attributed to the concentrations of the low molecular weight acid and neutral (LMW) organics of the waters. Presenting the relative OMP concentrations (c/c0) over the specific throughput of the LMW organics (mg LMW organics/g GAC), the OMP breakthrough curves in drinking water and WWTP effluent superimpose each other. This superimposition can be further increased if the UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) of the LMW organics is considered. In contrast, using the specific throughput of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) did not suffice to obtain superimposed breakthrough curves. Thus, the LMW organics are the major water constituent impacting OMP adsorption onto GAC. The results demonstrate that knowing the influent OMP and LMW organics concentrations (and UV254) of different waters, the OMP breakthroughs and GAC capacities corresponding to any water can be applied to all other waters.

  16. Promoting Retention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, LaToya N.; Ficker, Lisa J.; Chadiha, Letha A.; Green, Carmen R.; Jackson, James S.; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the capability of a research volunteer registry to retain community-dwelling African American older adults, and to explore demographic and health factors associated with retention. Method: A logistic regression model was used to determine the influence of demographics, health factors, and registry logic model activities on retention in a sample of 1,730 older African American adults. Results: Almost 80% of participants active in the volunteer research registry between January 2012 and June 2015 were retained. Employment, being referred to research studies, a higher number of medical conditions, and more follow-up contacts were associated with an increased likelihood of retention. Older age, more months in the registry, and more mobility problems decreased the likelihood of retention. Discussion: These results suggest the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research logic model promotes retention through involving older African American adults in research through study referrals and intensive follow-up. The loss of participants due to age- and mobility-related issues indicate the registry may be losing its most vulnerable participants. PMID:28138501

  17. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180-914 cm-1) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention.

  18. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... indicates the bladder does not empty completely. A health care provider performs this test during an office visit. The patient often receives ... more urodynamic tests to diagnose urinary retention. The health care provider will perform these tests during an office visit. For tests that use ...

  19. Retention Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    Designed to improve student retention at Bronx Community College (BCC), this workbook is comprised of sets checklists for use by students in evaluating their progress toward a number of academic, personal, and work-related goals. The workbook is divided into five sections, each containing a set of goals and associated checklists. Part I deals with…

  20. Development of Web-based Load Duration Curve system for analysis of total maximum daily load and water quality characteristics in a waterbody.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggun; Engel, Bernard A; Park, Youn Shik; Theller, Larry; Chaubey, Indrajeet; Kong, Dong Soo; Lim, Kyoung Jae

    2012-04-30

    In many states of the US, the total maximum daily load program has been widely developed for watershed water quality restoration and management. However, the total maximum daily load is often represented as an average daily pollutant load based on average long-term flow conditions, and as such, it does not adequately describe the problems they aim to address. Without an adequate characterization of water quality problems, appropriate solutions cannot be identified and implemented. The total maximum daily load approach should consider adequate water quality characterizations based on overall flow conditions rather than on a single flow event such as average daily flow. The Load Duration Curve, which provides opportunities for enhanced pollutant source and best management practice targeting both in the total maximum daily load development and in water quality restoration efforts, has been used for the determination of appropriate total maximum daily load targets. However, at least 30 min to an hour is needed for unskilled people based on our experiences to generate the Load Duration Curve using a desktop-based spreadsheet computer program. Therefore, in this study, the Web-based Load Duration Curve system (https://engineering.purdue.edu/∼ldc/) was developed and applied to a study watershed for an analysis of the total maximum daily load and water quality characteristics in the watershed. This system provides diverse options for Flow Duration Curve and Load Duration Curve analysis of a watershed of interest in a brief time. The Web-based Load Duration Curve system is useful for characterizing the problem according to flow regimes, and for providing a visual representation that enables an easy understanding of the problem and the total maximum daily load targets. In addition, this system will be able to help researchers identify appropriate best management practices within watersheds.

  1. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of Tc=623 K, ρc=0.351 g∕cm3, and Pc=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of Tc=647.1 K, ρc=0.322 g∕cm3, and Pc=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (Tc=631 K and ρc=0.308 g∕cm3). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300–450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase

  2. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-08-01

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of Tc=623 K, ρc=0.351 g/cm3, and Pc=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of Tc=647.1 K, ρc=0.322 g/cm3, and Pc=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (Tc=631 K and ρc=0.308 g/cm3). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300-450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase-dependent polarizability with

  3. Germanium in ginseng is low and causes no sodium and water retention or renal toxicity in the diuretic-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chunjiang; Xiao, Lu; Chen, Wenlie; Chen, Songming

    2015-11-01

    Ginseng preparations contain high concentrations of germanium (Ge), which was reported to contribute to diuretic resistance or renal failure. However, Ge content in ginseng and the influence on renal functions remain unclear. Forty rats were randomly divided into control group, low, moderate, and high Ge ginseng-treated group and observed for 25 days. Daily urine, renal functions, and serum and urine electrolytics were measured. Ge retention in the organs and renal histological changes were also evaluated. Ge content ranged from 0.007 to 0.450 µg/g in various ginseng samples. Four groups showed no difference in the daily urine output, glomerular filtration rate, urinary electrolytes excretions, 24 h-urine protein, as well as plasma and urine urea nitrogen, creatinine, osmotic pressure, and pH values. Ge did not cause any renal pathological effects in this study. No Na and water retention was detected in the ginseng-treated groups. Ge retention in various organs was found highest in spleen, followed by the kidney, liver, lung, stomach, heart, and pancreas. The total Ge contents in various ginsengs were low, and ginseng treatment did not affect renal functions or cause renal histological changes.

  4. Germanium in ginseng is low and causes no sodium and water retention or renal toxicity in the diuretic-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chunjiang; Xiao, Lu; Chen, Wenlie

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng preparations contain high concentrations of germanium (Ge), which was reported to contribute to diuretic resistance or renal failure. However, Ge content in ginseng and the influence on renal functions remain unclear. Forty rats were randomly divided into control group, low, moderate, and high Ge ginseng-treated group and observed for 25 days. Daily urine, renal functions, and serum and urine electrolytics were measured. Ge retention in the organs and renal histological changes were also evaluated. Ge content ranged from 0.007 to 0.450 µg/g in various ginseng samples. Four groups showed no difference in the daily urine output, glomerular filtration rate, urinary electrolytes excretions, 24 h-urine protein, as well as plasma and urine urea nitrogen, creatinine, osmotic pressure, and pH values. Ge did not cause any renal pathological effects in this study. No Na and water retention was detected in the ginseng-treated groups. Ge retention in various organs was found highest in spleen, followed by the kidney, liver, lung, stomach, heart, and pancreas. The total Ge contents in various ginsengs were low, and ginseng treatment did not affect renal functions or cause renal histological changes. PMID:25711879

  5. Use of Fe/Al drinking water treatment residuals as amendments for enhancing the retention capacity of glyphosate in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wendling, Laura A; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2015-08-01

    Fe/Al drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), ubiquitous and non-hazardous by-products of drinking water purification, are cost-effective adsorbents for glyphosate. Given that repeated glyphosate applications could significantly decrease glyphosate retention by soils and that the adsorbed glyphosate is potentially mobile, high sorption capacity and stability of glyphosate in agricultural soils are needed to prevent pollution of water by glyphosate. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of reusing Fe/Al WTR as a soil amendment to enhance the retention capacity of glyphosate in two agricultural soils. The results of batch experiments showed that the Fe/Al WTR amendment significantly enhanced the glyphosate sorption capacity of both soils (p<0.001). Up to 30% of the previously adsorbed glyphosate desorbed from the non-amended soils, and the Fe/Al WTR amendment effectively decreased the proportion of glyphosate desorbed. Fractionation analyses further demonstrated that glyphosate adsorbed to non-amended soils was primarily retained in the readily labile fraction (NaHCO3-glyphosate). The WTR amendment significantly increased the relative proportion of the moderately labile fraction (HCl-glyphosate) and concomitantly reduced that of the NaHCO3-glyphosate, hence reducing the potential for the release of soil-adsorbed glyphosate into the aqueous phase. Furthermore, Fe/Al WTR amendment minimized the inhibitory effect of increasing solution pH on glyphosate sorption by soils and mitigated the effects of increasing solution ionic strength. The present results indicate that Fe/Al WTR is suitable for use as a soil amendment to prevent glyphosate pollution of aquatic ecosystems by enhancing the glyphosate retention capacity in soils.

  6. Colloid transport and retention in unsaturated porous media: effect of colloid input concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Morales, Verónica L; Cakmak, M Ekrem; Salvucci, Anthony E; Geohring, Larry D; Hay, Anthony G; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2010-07-01

    Colloids play an important role in facilitating transport of adsorbed contaminants in soils. Recent studies showed that under saturated conditions colloid retention was a function of its concentration. It is unknown if this is the case under unsaturated conditions. In this study, the effect of colloid concentration on colloid retention was investigated in unsaturated columns by increasing concentrations of colloid influents with varying ionic strength. Colloid retention was observed in situ by bright field microscopy and quantified by measuring colloid breakthrough curves. In our unsaturated experiments, greater input concentrations resulted in increased colloid retention at ionic strength above 0.1 mM, but not in deionized water (i.e., 0 mM ionic strength). Bright field microscope images showed that colloid retention mainly occurred at the solid-water interface and wedge-shaped air-water-solid interfaces, whereas the retention at the grain-grain contacts was minor. Some colloids at the air-water-solid interfaces were rotating and oscillating and thus trapped. Computational hydrodynamic simulation confirmed that the wedge-shaped air-water-solid interface could form a "hydrodynamic trap" by retaining colloids in its low velocity vortices. Direct visualization also revealed that colloids once retained acted as new retention sites for other suspended colloids at ionic strength greater than 0.1 mM and thereby could explain the greater retention with increased input concentrations. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) energy calculations support this concept. Finally, the results of unsaturated experiments were in agreement with limited saturated experiments under otherwise the same conditions.

  7. CHLORIDE RETENTION IN EXPERIMENTAL HYDRONEPHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Norman M.; Pulford, D. Schuyler

    1923-01-01

    1. In acute experimental hydronephrosis chloride retention occurs as well as retention of water, urea, and phenolsulfonephthalein. 2. If both water and chlorides are retained there may be no appreciable rise in the plasma chloride content. 3. When chlorides are retained, but not water, the chloride content of the plasma rises strikingly. 4. After the removal of the ureteral obstruction in acute hydronephrosis all renal functions, water, urea, and chloride excretion, may be rapidly restored in equal degree, or the chlorides may be retained temporarily while there is free excretion of water and urea. 5. In chronic hydronephrosis adequate daily excretion of urea and chlorides may be maintained by a compensatory polyuria. 6. Chloride retention or an abnormal chloride excretion may occur in certain renal lesions when there is no change in the urea, phenolsulfonephthalein, or water excretion. PMID:19868720

  8. pH-responsive controlled-release fertilizer with water retention via atom transfer radical polymerization of acrylic acid on mussel-inspired initiator.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-yuan; Jia, Xin; Zhang, Guo-xiang; Hu, Jia-mei; Zhang, Xiu-lan; Liu, Zhi-yong; Wang, He-yun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-06-12

    This work reports a polydopamine-graft-poly(acrylic acid) (Pdop-g-PAA)-coated controlled-release multi-element compound fertilizer with water-retention function by a combination of mussel-inspired chemistry and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) techniques for the first time. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometry. The results revealed that the stimuli-responsive layer formed by a Pdop inner layer and a PAA outer corona exhibit outstanding selective permeability to charged nutrients and the release rate of encapsulated elements can be tailored by the pH values. At low pH, the Pdop-g-PAA layer can reduce nutrient loss, and at high pH, the coating restrains transportation of negative nutrients but favors the release of cations. Moreover, PAA brushes provide good water-retention property. This Pdop-graft-polymer brushes coating will be effective and promising in the research and development of multi-functional controlled-release fertilizer.

  9. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  10. Determination of n-octanol/water partition coefficient for DDT-related compounds by RP-HPLC with a novel dual-point retention time correction.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-ying; Qiao, Jun-qin; Zhang, Yun-yang; Yang, Li-li; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2011-03-01

    n-Octanol/water partition coefficients (P) for DDTs and dicofol were determined by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on a C(18) column using methanol-water mixture as mobile phase. A dual-point retention time correction (DP-RTC) was proposed to rectify chromatographic retention time (t(R)) shift resulted from stationary phase aging. Based on this correction, the relationship between logP and logk(w), the logarithm of the retention factor extrapolated to pure water, was investigated for a set of 12 benzene homologues and DDT-related compounds with reliable experimental P as model compounds. A linear regression logP=(1.10±0.04) logk(w) - (0.60±0.17) was established with correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.988, cross-validated correlation coefficient R(cv)(2) of 0.983 and standard deviation (SD) of 0.156. This model was further validated using four verification compounds, naphthalene, biphenyl, 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (p,p'-DDD) and 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE) with similar structure to DDT. The RP-HPLC-determined P values showed good consistency with shake-flask (SFM) or slow-stirring (SSM) results, especially for highly hydrophobic compounds with logP in the range of 4-7. Then, the P values for five DDT-related compounds, 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (o,p'-DDT), 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (o,p'-DDD), 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethene (o,p'-DDE), and 2,2,2-trichloro-1,1-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethanol (dicofol) and its main degradation product 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone (p,p'-DBP) were evaluated by the improved RP-HPLC method for the first time. The excellent precision with SD less than 0.03 proved that the novel DP-RTC protocol can significantly increases the determination accuracy and reliability of P by RP-HPLC.

  11. On the Investigation of Coarse-Grained Models for Water: Balancing Computational Efficiency and the Retention of Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Kevin R.; McCabe, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Developing accurate models of water for use in computer simulations is important for the study of many chemical and biological systems, including lipid bilayer self-assembly. The large temporal and spatial scales needed to study such self-assembly have led to the development and application of coarse-grained models for the lipid-lipid, lipid-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. Unfortunately, popular center-of-mass-based coarse-graining techniques are limited to modeling water with one-water per bead. In this work, we have utilized the K-means algorithm to determine the optimal clustering of waters to allow the mapping of multiple waters to single coarse-grained beads. Through the study of a simple mixture between water and an amphiphilic solute (1-pentanol), we find a 4-water bead model has the optimal balance between computational efficiency and accurate solvation and structural properties when compared to water models ranging from 1 to 9 waters per bead. The 4-water model was subsequently utilized in studies of the solvation of hexadecanoic acid and the structure, as measured via radial distribution functions, for the hydrophobic tails and the bulk water phase were found to agree well with experimental data and their atomistic targets. PMID:20230012

  12. Water-balance uncertainty in Honduras: a limits-of-acceptability approach to model evaluation using a time-variant rating curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, I.; Guerrero, J.-L.; Beven, K.; Seibert, J.; Halldin, S.; Lundin, L.-C.; Xu, C.-Y.

    2009-04-01

    The climate of Central America is highly variable both spatially and temporally; extreme events like floods and droughts are recurrent phenomena posing great challenges to regional water-resources management. Scarce and low-quality hydro-meteorological data complicate hydrological modelling and few previous studies have addressed the water-balance in Honduras. In the alluvial Choluteca River, the river bed changes over time as fill and scour occur in the channel, leading to a fast-changing relation between stage and discharge and difficulties in deriving consistent rating curves. In this application of a four-parameter water-balance model, a limits-of-acceptability approach to model evaluation was used within the General Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) framework. The limits of acceptability were determined for discharge alone for each time step, and ideally a simulated result should always be contained within the limits. A moving-window weighted fuzzy regression of the ratings, based on estimated uncertainties in the rating-curve data, was used to derive the limits. This provided an objective way to determine the limits of acceptability and handle the non-stationarity of the rating curves. The model was then applied within GLUE and evaluated using the derived limits. Preliminary results show that the best simulations are within the limits 75-80% of the time, indicating that precipitation data and other uncertainties like model structure also have a significant effect on predictability.

  13. An Analytical Method for Deriving Reservoir Operation Curves to Maximize Social Benefits from Multiple Uses of Water in the Willamette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. M.; Jaeger, W. K.; Jones, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A central characteristic of large river basins in the western US is the spatial and temporal disjunction between the supply of and demand for water. Water sources are typically concentrated in forested mountain regions distant from municipal and agricultural water users, while precipitation is super-abundant in winter and deficient in summer. To cope with these disparities, systems of reservoirs have been constructed throughout the West. These reservoir systems are managed to serve two main competing purposes: to control flooding during winter and spring, and to store spring runoff and deliver it to populated, agricultural valleys during the summer. The reservoirs also provide additional benefits, including recreation, hydropower and instream flows for stream ecology. Since the storage capacity of the reservoirs cannot be used for both flood control and storage at the same time, these uses are traded-off during spring, as the most important, or dominant use of the reservoir, shifts from buffering floods to storing water for summer use. This tradeoff is expressed in the operations rule curve, which specifies the maximum level to which a reservoir can be filled throughout the year, apart from real-time flood operations. These rule curves were often established at the time a reservoir was built. However, climate change and human impacts may be altering the timing and amplitude of flood events and water scarcity is expected to intensify with anticipated changes in climate, land cover and population. These changes imply that reservoir management using current rule curves may not match future societal values for the diverse uses of water from reservoirs. Despite a broad literature on mathematical optimization for reservoir operation, these methods are not often used because they 1) simplify the hydrologic system, raising doubts about the real-world applicability of the solutions, 2) exhibit perfect foresight and assume stationarity, whereas reservoir operators face

  14. A two step method for the preparation of carbamate cross-linked cellulose films using an ionic liquid and their water retention properties.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S; Hasan, Muhammad A; Ha, Uyen

    2016-12-10

    Carbamate cross-linked cellulose films can be prepared in a two step method using cellulose dissolved in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid. The new technique involves casting the film from cellulose ionic liquid solution onto a glass surface and application of alkyl/aryl diisocyanate in dry dimethylsulfoxide solution onto the cellulose - ionic liquid coating on glass and allowing the cross-linking reaction to occur on the pre-formed cellulose coating. The carbamate cross-linked cellulose films formed were characterized by FT-IR, and TG-DTA. The water retention values of the films are shown to decrease with the increase in hydrophobicity of the alky/aryl group linker in the carbamate bridges.

  15. Suspect screening of large numbers of emerging contaminants in environmental waters using artificial neural networks for chromatographic retention time prediction and high resolution mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Hernández, Felix

    2015-12-15

    The recent development of broad-scope high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) screening methods has resulted in a much improved capability for new compound identification in environmental samples. However, positive identifications at the ng/L concentration level rely on analytical reference standards for chromatographic retention time (tR) and mass spectral comparisons. Chromatographic tR prediction can play a role in increasing confidence in suspect screening efforts for new compounds in the environment, especially when standards are not available, but reliable methods are lacking. The current work focuses on the development of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for tR prediction in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography and applied along with HRMS data to suspect screening of wastewater and environmental surface water samples. Based on a compound tR dataset of >500 compounds, an optimized 4-layer back-propagation multi-layer perceptron model enabled predictions for 85% of all compounds to within 2min of their measured tR for training (n=344) and verification (n=100) datasets. To evaluate the ANN ability for generalization to new data, the model was further tested using 100 randomly selected compounds and revealed 95% prediction accuracy within the 2-minute elution interval. Given the increasing concern on the presence of drug metabolites and other transformation products (TPs) in the aquatic environment, the model was applied along with HRMS data for preliminary identification of pharmaceutically-related compounds in real samples. Examples of compounds where reference standards were subsequently acquired and later confirmed are also presented. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time, the successful application of an accurate retention time predictor and HRMS data-mining using the largest number of compounds to preliminarily identify new or emerging contaminants in wastewater and surface waters.

  16. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, A A; Quik, J T K; Velzeboer, I

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hydraulic loadings covered the widest possible range among existing lakes. Sedimentation accounted for natural colloid as well as suspended solid settling regimes. An ENP-specific mixed sedimentation regime is proposed. This regime combines ENP sedimentation through slow settling with natural colloids from the water column, with faster settling with suspended solids from a selected part of the water column. Although sedimentation data and hydrodynamic concepts as such were not new, their first time combination or application to ENPs shows in which cases lake retention is important for these particles. In combination with ENP emission data, lake retention translates directly into potential risks of ENPs for lake benthic communities.

  17. Managing retention.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2007-01-01

    To build this process it is necessary to consult customers for preferences, build familiarity and knowledge to build a relationship and conduct business in a customized fashion. The process takes every opportunity to build customer satisfaction with each customer contact. It is an important process to have, since customers today are more demanding, sophisticated, educated and comfortable speaking to the company as an equal (Belk, 2003). Customers have more customized expectations so they want to be reached as individuals (Raymond and Tanner, 1994). Also, a disproportionate search for new business is costly. The cost to cultivate new customers is more than maintaining existing customers (Cathcart, 1990). Other reasons that customer retention is necessary is because many unhappy customers will never buy again from a company that dissatisfied them and they will communicate their displeasure to other people. These dissatisfied customers may not even convey their displeasure but without saying anything just stop doing business with that company, which may keep them unaware for some time that there is any problem (Cathcart, 1990).

  18. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  19. Chromatographic retention prediction and octanol-water partition coefficient determination of monobasic weak acidic compounds in ion-suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatography using acids as ion-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Ming, Xin; Han, Shu-ying; Qi, Zheng-chun; Sheng, Dong; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2009-08-15

    Although simple acids, replacing buffers, have been widely applied to suppress the ionization of weakly ionizable acidic analytes in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), none of the previously reported works focused on the systematic studies about the retention behavior of the acidic solutes in this ion-suppression RPLC mode. The subject of this paper was therefore to investigate the retention behavior of monobasic weak acidic compounds using acetic, perchloric and phosphoric acids as the ion-suppressors. The apparent octanol-water partition coefficient (K" ow) was proposed to calibrate the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) of these weak acidic compounds, which resulted in a better linear correlation with log k(w), the logarithm of the hypothetical retention factor corresponding to neat aqueous fraction of hydroorganic mobile phase. This log K" ow-log k w linear correlation was successfully validated by the results of monocarboxylic acids and monohydrating phenols, and moreover by the results under diverse experimental conditions for the same solutes. This straightforward relationship not only can be used to effectively predict the retention values of weak acidic solutes combined with Snyder-Soczewinski equation, but also can offer a promising medium for directly measuring K(ow) data of these compounds via Collander equation. In addition, the influence of the different ion-suppressors on the retention of weak acidic compounds was also compared in this RPLC mode.

  20. Disposable swim diaper retention of Cryptosporidium-sized particles on human subjects in a recreational water setting.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, James E; Anderson, J Brian

    2011-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is a chlorine-resistant protozoan parasite responsible for the majority of waterborne disease outbreaks in recreational water venues in the USA. Swim diapers are commonly used by diaper-aged children participating in aquatic activities. This research was intended to evaluate disposable swim diapers for retaining 5-μm diameter polystyrene microspheres, which were used as non-infectious surrogates for Cryptosporidium oocysts. A hot tub recirculating water without a filter was used for this research. The microsphere concentration in the water was monitored at regular intervals following introduction of microspheres inside of a swim diaper while a human subject undertook normal swim/play activities. Microsphere concentrations in the bulk water showed that the majority (50-97%) of Cryptosporidium-sized particles were released from the swim diaper within 1 to 5 min regardless of the swim diaper type or configuration. After only 10 min of play, 77-100% of the microspheres had been released from all swim diapers tested. This research suggests that the swim diapers commonly used by diaper-aged children in swimming pools and other aquatic activities are of limited value in retaining Cryptosporidium-sized particles. Improved swim diaper solutions are necessary to efficiently retain pathogens and effectively safeguard public health in recreational water venues.

  1. The effects of river inflow and retention time on the spatial heterogeneity of chlorophyll and water-air CO2 fluxes in a tropical hydropower reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, F. S.; Soares, M. C. S.; Assireu, A. T.; Curtarelli, M. P.; Abril, G.; Stech, J. L.; Alvalá, P. C.; Ometto, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Abundant research has been devoted to understanding the complexity of the biogeochemical and physical processes that are responsible for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs. These systems may have spatially complex and heterogeneous GHG emissions due to flooded biomass, river inflows, primary production and dam operation. In this study, we investigated the relationships between the water-air CO2 fluxes and the phytoplanktonic biomass in the Funil Reservoir, which is an old, stratified tropical reservoir that exhibits intense phytoplankton blooms and a low partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Our results indicated that the seasonal and spatial variability of chlorophyll concentrations (Chl) and pCO2 in the Funil Reservoir are related more to changes in the river inflow over the year than to environmental factors such as air temperature and solar radiation. Field data and hydro-dynamic simulations revealed that river inflow contributes to increased heterogeneity during the dry season due to variations in the reservoir retention time and river temperature. Contradictory conclusions could be drawn if only temporal data collected near the dam were considered without spatial data to represent CO2 fluxes throughout the reservoir. During periods of high retention, the average CO2 fluxes were 10.3 mmol m-2 d-1 based on temporal data near the dam versus -7.2 mmol m-2 d-1 with spatial data from along the reservoir surface. In this case, the use of solely temporal data to calculate CO2 fluxes results in the reservoir acting as a CO2 source rather than a sink. This finding suggests that the lack of spatial data in reservoir C budget calculations can affect regional and global estimates. Our results support the idea that the Funil Reservoir is a dynamic system where the hydrodynamics represented by changes in the river inflow and retention time are potentially a more important force driving both the Chl and pCO2 spatial variability than the in-system ecological

  2. Equivalent intraperitoneal doses of ibuprofen supplemented in drinking water or in diet: a behavioral and biochemical assay using antinociceptive and thromboxane inhibitory dose–response curves in mice

    PubMed Central

    El Gayar, Nesreen H.; Georgy, Sonia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ibuprofen is used chronically in different animal models of inflammation by administration in drinking water or in diet due to its short half-life. Though this practice has been used for years, ibuprofen doses were never assayed against parenteral dose–response curves. This study aims at identifying the equivalent intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses of ibuprofen, when it is administered in drinking water or in diet. Methods. Bioassays were performed using formalin test and incisional pain model for antinociceptive efficacy and serum TXB2 for eicosanoid inhibitory activity. The dose–response curve of i.p. administered ibuprofen was constructed for each test using 50, 75, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). The dose–response curves were constructed of phase 2a of the formalin test (the most sensitive phase to COX inhibitory agents), the area under the ‘change in mechanical threshold’-time curve in the incisional pain model and serum TXB2 levels. The assayed ibuprofen concentrations administered in drinking water were 0.2, 0.35, 0.6 mg/ml and those administered in diet were 82, 263, 375 mg/kg diet. Results. The 3 concentrations applied in drinking water lay between 73.6 and 85.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 58.9 and 77.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 71.8 and 125.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. The 3 concentrations administered in diet lay between 67.6 and 83.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 52.7 and 68.6 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 63.6 and 92.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. Discussion. The increment in pharmacological effects of different doses of continuously administered ibuprofen in drinking water or diet do not parallel those of i.p. administered ibuprofen. It is therefore difficult to assume the equivalent parenteral daily doses based on mathematical calculations. PMID:27547547

  3. Equivalent intraperitoneal doses of ibuprofen supplemented in drinking water or in diet: a behavioral and biochemical assay using antinociceptive and thromboxane inhibitory dose-response curves in mice.

    PubMed

    Salama, Raghda A M; El Gayar, Nesreen H; Georgy, Sonia S; Hamza, May

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ibuprofen is used chronically in different animal models of inflammation by administration in drinking water or in diet due to its short half-life. Though this practice has been used for years, ibuprofen doses were never assayed against parenteral dose-response curves. This study aims at identifying the equivalent intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses of ibuprofen, when it is administered in drinking water or in diet. Methods. Bioassays were performed using formalin test and incisional pain model for antinociceptive efficacy and serum TXB2 for eicosanoid inhibitory activity. The dose-response curve of i.p. administered ibuprofen was constructed for each test using 50, 75, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). The dose-response curves were constructed of phase 2a of the formalin test (the most sensitive phase to COX inhibitory agents), the area under the 'change in mechanical threshold'-time curve in the incisional pain model and serum TXB2 levels. The assayed ibuprofen concentrations administered in drinking water were 0.2, 0.35, 0.6 mg/ml and those administered in diet were 82, 263, 375 mg/kg diet. Results. The 3 concentrations applied in drinking water lay between 73.6 and 85.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 58.9 and 77.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 71.8 and 125.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. The 3 concentrations administered in diet lay between 67.6 and 83.8 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the formalin test; between 52.7 and 68.6 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of the incisional pain model; and between 63.6 and 92.5 mg/kg b.w., i.p., in case of serum TXB2 levels. Discussion. The increment in pharmacological effects of different doses of continuously administered ibuprofen in drinking water or diet do not parallel those of i.p. administered ibuprofen. It is therefore difficult to assume the equivalent parenteral daily doses based on mathematical calculations.

  4. Evolution of volume fractions and droplet sizes by analysis of electrical conductance curves during destabilization of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou, M; Varka, E-M; Kalogianni, E P; Karapantsios, T D

    2010-09-01

    Destabilization of hexane-in-water emulsions is studied by a continuous, non-intrusive, multi-probe, electrical conductance technique. Emulsions made of different oil fractions and surfactant (C(10)E(5)) concentrations are prepared in a stirred vessel using a Rushton turbine to break and agitate droplets. During the separation of phases, electrical signals from pairs of ring electrodes mounted at different heights onto the vessel wall, are recorded. The evolution of the local water volume fractions at the locations of the electrodes is estimated from these signals. It is found that in the absence of coalescence, the water fraction evolution curve from the bottom pair of electrodes is compatible with a bidisperse oil droplet size distribution. The sizes and volume fractions of the two droplet modes are estimated using theoretical arguments. The electrically determined droplet sizes are compared to data from microscopy image analysis. Results are discussed in detail.

  5. Strategies for Teacher Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    Strategies for teacher retention are presented, including successful approaches and elements for operating a state system for personnel recruitment and retention in special education. Such initiatives as the Utah Mentor Teacher Academy; the Texas Teacher Recruitment, Retention and Assistance Program; and the Kansas Recruitment/Retention Project…

  6. Characterization and genetic mapping of eceriferum-ym (cer-ym), a cutin deficient barley mutant with impaired leaf water retention capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Cheng; Ma, Xiaoying; Wang, Aidong; Duan, Ruijun; Nawrath, Christiane; Komatsuda, Takao; Chen, Guoxiong

    2015-09-01

    The cuticle covers the aerial parts of land plants, where it serves many important functions, including water retention. Here, a recessive cuticle mutant, eceriferum-ym (cer-ym), of Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) showed abnormally glossy spikes, sheaths, and leaves. The cer-ym mutant plant detached from its root system was hypersensitive to desiccation treatment compared with wild type plants, and detached leaves of mutant lost 41.8% of their initial weight after 1 h of dehydration under laboratory conditions, while that of the wild type plants lost only 7.1%. Stomata function was not affected by the mutation, but the mutant leaves showed increased cuticular permeability to water, suggesting a defective leaf cuticle, which was confirmed by toluidine blue staining. The mutant leaves showed a substantial reduction in the amounts of the major cutin monomers and a slight increase in the main wax component, suggesting that the enhanced cuticle permeability was a consequence of cutin deficiency. cer-ym was mapped within a 0.8 cM interval between EST marker AK370363 and AK251484, a pericentromeric region on chromosome 4H. The results indicate that the desiccation sensitivity of cer-ym is caused by a defect in leaf cutin, and that cer-ym is located in a chromosome 4H pericentromeric region.

  7. Comparison of soil water potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degre, Aurore; van der Ploeg, Martine; Caldwell, Todd; Gooren, Harm

    2015-04-01

    Temporal and spatial monitoring of soil water potential and soil water content are necessary for quantifying water flow in the domains of hydrology, soil science and crop production as knowledge of the soil water retention curve is important for solving Richards' equation. Numerous measurement techniques exist nowadays that use various physical properties of the soil-water complex to record changes in soil water content or soil water potential. Laboratory techniques are very useful to determine static properties of the soil water retention curve, and have been used to show the impacts of hysteresis. Yet, other spatiotemporal dynamics resulting from for example growing root systems, biological activity, periodic tillage and their impact on the soil structure cannot satisfactory be quantified in static setups in the laboratory. ). To be able to quantify the influence of soil heterogeneity, and spatiotemporal dynamics on the soil water retention curve, an in situ approach combining soil moisture and soil water potential measurements could provide useful data. Such an in situ approach would require sensors that can measure a representative part of the soil water retention curve. The volumetric soil water content is often measured using time domain reflectometry, and has gained widespread acceptance as a standard electronic means of volumetric water content measurement. To measure the soil water potential, water filled tensiometers are used in most studies. Unfortunately, their range remains limited due to cavitation. Recently, several new sensors for use under in situ conditions have been proposed to cover a wider range of pressure head: Polymer tensiometers, MPS (Decagon) and pF-meter (ecoTech). In this study, we present the principles behind each measurement technique. Then we present the results of a fully controlled experiment where we compared two MPS sensors, two pF-meter sensors and two POT sensors in the same repacked soil. It allows us to discuss advantages

  8. Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2004-03-31

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2003 to March 31, 2004 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number is used as the model condensate. During this reporting period, temperature scans were performed mixing equal volumes of ethylbenzene and 10mM NaCl water with various concentrations of ethanol ranging from 2 to 70 vol%. For the range of temperatures tested (2 to 70 C), results indicate that temperature is invariant and produced a single phase for ethanol concentrations greater than 60 vol%. For ethanol concentrations less than 60 vol%, only two phases were obtained with aqueous rich bottom phase more in volume than that of the ethylbenzene rich top phase. Linear coreflooding experiments were completed by our industrial partner in this project, Surtek, CO, to measure the condensate recovery in flooding processes. It was found about 30% ethylbenzene recovery was obtained by the waterflooding, however, 2wt% ethanol flooding did not produce incremental recovery of the ethylbenzene. Radial coreflooding with ethanol injection prior to water injection is in progress to assess the effectiveness of the surfactant flooding in the recovery of condensate.

  9. Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2004-09-30

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period April 01, 2004 to September 30, 2004 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number is used as the model condensate. During this reporting period, work was under way and the electrical conductivity experimental system was set up at the Atlanta University Center. Following the set-up of the emulsion measurement system, the electronic instruments and data acquisition modules involved were tested for proper operation of the system. Then, the conductivity output was normalized with that obtained for 10mM NaCl water. Radial coreflooding experiments with ethanol injection prior to and after water injection were completed to assess the effectiveness of the surfactant flooding in the recovery of condensate by our industrial partner, Surtek, CO, in this reporting period. In Run 1, 10 mM NaCl without ethanol injection recovered 31.5% of the initial ethyl benzene saturation. Injection of ethanol following 10 mM NaCl produced a tertiary ethyl benzene bank with maximum ethyl benzene cuts of 32%. In Run 2, 50 vol% of pure (100%) ethanol was injected and flowed through the Berea sandstone after Ethyl Benzene Saturation. 69% of the initial ethyl benzene was recovered. Results of the radial corefloods are very encouraging. Emulsion conductivity measurements for conjugate pair phases are in progress at Morehouse.

  10. Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2003-03-31

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2002 to April 01, 2003 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for condensate/water/ethanol system. Temperature and salinity scans are planned to identify the optimal salinity and temperature, and the temperature and salinity intervals in which all three phases coexist for this system. Test matrix to perform salinity and temperature scans has been established. Supply requests to obtain hydrocarbons, surfactant, etc., were processed and supplies obtained. Current literature in the subject area, and modeling efforts that were established in our previous studies to predict electrical conductivities and inversion phenomena were reviewed. Based on the review a computer model to predict electrical conductivities of the ethylbenzene (that has the equivalent carbon number of the condensate)/water/ethanol system is being developed. These activities resulted in one published conference abstract during this reporting period.

  11. Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2005-03-31

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2004 to March 31, 2005 which covers the fifth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number is used as the model condensate. During this reporting period, electrical conductivity measurements for bottom, and top phases, as well as bottom/top, and top/bottom conjugate pair phases of the ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system were performed for various ethanol volume percentage of the mixtures starting from 2% to 60%. Preliminary findings are that electrical conductivity of the bottom phase decreased as ethanol volume fraction of the mixture increased. Conductivity of the top phase was small and remained almost the same for variations in ethanol volume fraction of the mixture. Conductivity of the emulsion of the conjugate pair phases decreased as the fraction of volume of the top phase was increased and vice versa. Also inversion phenomena was observed. Detailed analyses are in progress including the prediction of conductivity data using the theoretical model already developed in this project.

  12. Investigation of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention and Condensate Recovery for Condensate/Water/Ethanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2005-09-30

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period April 01, 2005 to September 30, 2005 which covers the sixth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number is used as the model condensate. In the last reporting period, electrical conductivity measurements for bottom/top, and top/bottom conjugate pair phases of the ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system were performed for various ethanol volume percentage in the mixture: 2,10,20,33,43,50, and 56. During this reporting period, prediction of electrical conductivity data obtained in the past was conducted employing a theoretical model already developed in this project. Results of the comparisons for 2, and 10% ethanol volume in the mixture are presented here. A good agreement was obtained between the predicted emulsion conductivities and the measured values. To date about 99% of the proposed work has been completed. Conductivity prediction for 56% ethanol volume in the mixture is in progress. Following this prediction, a final report will be developed describing the research activities conducted through the entire project period including results and conclusions.

  13. INVESTIGATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND CONDENSATE RECOVERY FOR CONDENSATE/WATER/ETHANOL MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2005-12-01

    This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-02NT15447 during the period October 01, 2002 to September 30, 2005, which covers the total performance period of the project. During this period, work was conducted to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system. Ethylbenzene that has the equivalent carbon number was used as the model condensate. Salinity scans were performed for 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mM salt concentrations at room temperature to identify the optimal salinity and salinity intervals in which all phases coexisted. It was found that only two phases formed, and salinity has no significant effect in the volumes of the phases formed. Experiments were repeated at 30 C and observed salinity has no effect at higher temperatures as well. Following the salinity experiments, measurements were made with 10mM NaCl water for surfactant concentrations from 2 to 70 volume percent at room temperature. It was found that only two phases were formed upto 60 vol% concentration of the surfactant. Above 60 vol% surfactant, the mixture produced only a single phase. Experiments were repeated from 2 to 70 C and observed that temperature has no significant effect on the number of phases formed. At the temperatures and surfactant concentration tested, volume fraction of the aqueous bottom phase was found to be larger than that of the top phase. Electrical conductivity measurements were then conducted for bottom/top, and top/bottom conjugate pair phases of the ethylbenzene/water/ethanol system formed by mixing ethanol at various volume percentages including 2,10,33,and 56% while keeping the volumes of ethylbenzene and water the same in the mixture. Electrical conductivity of the bottom phase decreased as ethanol volume fraction in the mixture increased. Conductivity of the top phase was found small and remained almost the same for variations in ethanol volume fraction in

  14. Development and evaluation of clear-water pier and contraction scour envelope curves in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation collected clear-water pier- and contraction-scour data at 116 bridges in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Physiographic Provinces of South Carolina. Pier-scour depths collected in both provinces ranged from 0 to 8.0 feet. Contraction-scour depths collected in the Coastal Plain ranged from 0 to 3.9 feet. Using hydraulic data estimated with a one-dimensional flow model, predicted clear-water scour depths were computed with scour equations from the Federal Highway Administration Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 and compared with measured scour. This comparison indicated that predicted clear-water scour depths, in general, exceeded measured scour depths and at times were excessive. Predicted clear-water contraction scour, however, was underpredicted approximately 30 percent of the time by as much as 7.1 feet. The investigation focused on clear-water pier scour, comparing trends in the laboratory and field data. This comparison indicated that the range of dimensionless variables (relative depth, flow intensity, relative grain size) used in laboratory investigations of pier scour, were similar to the range for field data in South Carolina, further indicating that laboratory relations may have some applicability to field conditions in South Carolina. Variables determined to be important in developing pier scour in laboratory studies were investigated to understand their influence on the South Carolina field data, and many of these variables appeared to be insignificant under field conditions in South Carolina. The strongest explanatory variables were pier width and approach velocity. Envelope curves developed from the field data are useful tools for evaluating reasonable ranges of clear-water pier and contraction scour in South Carolina. A modified version of the Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 pier-scour equation also was developed as a tool for evaluating clearwater pier

  15. Stabilities of thiomolybdate complexes of iron; implications for retention of essential trace elements (Fe, Cu, Mo) in sulfidic waters.

    PubMed

    Helz, George R; Erickson, Britt E; Vorlicek, Trent P

    2014-06-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, availabilities of Fe, Mo and Cu potentially limit rates of critical biological processes, including nitrogen fixation, nitrate assimilation and N2O decomposition. During long periods in Earth's history when large parts of the ocean were sulfidic, what prevented these elements' quantitative loss from marine habitats as insoluble sulfide phases? They must have been retained by formation of soluble complexes. Identities of the key ligands are poorly known but probably include thioanions. Here, the first determinations of stability constants for Fe(2+)-[MoS4](2-) complexes in aqueous solution are reported based on measurements of pyrrhotite (hexagonal FeS) solubility under mildly alkaline conditions. Two linear complexes, [FeO(OH)MoS4](3-) and [(Fe2S2)(MoS4)2](4-), best explain the observed solubility variations. Complexes that would be consistent with cuboid cluster structures were less successful, implying that such clusters probably are minor or absent in aqueous solution under the conditions studied. The new data, together with prior data on stabilities of Cu(+)-[MoS4](2-) complexes, are used to explore computationally how competition of Fe(2+) and Cu(+) for [MoS4](2-), as well as competition of [MoS4](2-) and HS(-) for both metals would be resolved in solutions representative of sulfidic natural waters. Thiomolybdate complexes will be most important at sulfide concentrations near the [MoO4](2-)-[MoS4](2-) equivalence point. At lower sulfide concentrations, thiomolybdates are insufficiently stable to be competitive ligands in natural waters and at higher sulfide concentrations HS(-) ligands out-compete thiomolybdates.

  16. TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 channels in inflammation, energy redirection, and water retention: role in chronic inflammatory diseases with an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are accompanied by a systemic response of the body, necessary to redirect energy-rich fuels to the activated immune system and to induce volume expansion. The systemic response is switched on by two major pathways: (a) circulating cytokines enter the brain, and (b) signals via sensory nerve fibers are transmitted to the brain. Concerning item b, sensory nerve terminals are equipped with a multitude of receptors that sense temperature, inflammation, osmolality, and pain. Thus, they can be important to inform the brain about peripheral inflammation. Central to these sensory modalities are transient receptor potential channels (TRP channels) on sensory nerve endings. For example, TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can be activated by heat, inflammatory factors (e.g., protons, bradykinin, anandamide), hyperosmolality, pungent irritants, and others. TRP channels are multimodal switches that transmit peripheral signals to the brain, thereby inducing a systemic response. It is demonstrated how and why these TRP channels (TRPV1, TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8)) are important to start up a systemic response of energy expenditure, energy allocation, and water retention and how this is linked to a continuously activated immune system in chronic inflammatory diseases.

  17. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF DURATION-CURVE BASED METHODS FOR QUALIFYING VARIABILITY AND CHANGE IN WATERSHED HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decades, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other Federal program administrative and regulatory agencies spent considerable amounts of time and money to manage risks to surface waters associated with agricultural ...

  19. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    Despite best management practices, agriculture is still facing major challenges to reduce nutrients leaching to the aquatic environment. In deltas, most of total nutrient losses from artificially drained agricultural soils are discharged via drains. Controlled drainage is a promising measure to prevent drainage of valuable nutrients, improve water quality and agricultural yield and adapt to climate change (reduce peak runoff, manage water scarcity and drought). In The Netherlands, this technique has attracted much attention by water managers and farmers alike, yet field studies to determine the expected (positive) effects for Dutch conditions were scarce. Recently, a field experiment was set up on clay soils. Research questions were: how does controlled, subsurface drainage perform on clay soils? Will deeper tile drains function just as well? What are the effects on drain water quality (especially with respect to nitrogen and salt) and crop yield? An agricultural field on clay soils was used to test different tile drainage configurations. Four types of tile drainage systems were installed, all in duplicate: eight plots in total. Each plot has its own outlet to a control box, where equipment was installed to control drain discharge and to measure the flow, concentrations of macro-ions, pH, nitrogen, N-isotopes and heavy metals. In each plot, groundwater observation wells and suction cups are installed in the saturated and vadose zones, at different depths, and crop yield is determined. Four plots discharge into a hydrologic isolated ditch, enabling the determination of water- and nutrient balances. Automatic drain water samplers and innovative nitrate sensors were installed in four plots. These enable identification and unravelling so-called first flush effects (changes in concentrations after a storm event). Water-, chloride- and nitrogen balances have been set up, and the interaction between groundwater and surface water has been quantified. The hydrological

  20. Trichomes related to an unusual method of water retention and protection of the stem apex in an arid zone perennial species

    PubMed Central

    Lusa, Makeli Garibotti; Cardoso, Elaine Cristina; Machado, Silvia Rodrigues; Appezzato-da-Glória, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that trichomes protect plant organs, and several studies have investigated their role in the adaptation of plants to harsh environments. Recent studies have shown that the production of hydrophilic substances by glandular trichomes and the deposition of this secretion on young organs may facilitate water retention, thus preventing desiccation and favouring organ growth until the plant develops other protective mechanisms. Lychnophora diamantinana is a species endemic to the Brazilian ‘campos rupestres’ (rocky fields), a region characterized by intense solar radiation and water deficits. This study sought to investigate trichomes and the origin of the substances observed on the stem apices of L. diamantinana. Samples of stem apices, young and expanded leaves were studied using standard techniques, including light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Histochemical tests were used to identify the major groups of metabolites present in the trichomes and the hyaline material deposited on the apices. Non-glandular trichomes and glandular trichomes were observed. The material deposited on the stem apices was hyaline, highly hydrophilic and viscous. This hyaline material primarily consists of carbohydrates that result from the partial degradation of the cell wall of uniseriate trichomes. This degradation occurs at the same time that glandular trichomes secrete terpenoids, phenolic compounds and proteins. These results suggest that the non-glandular trichomes on the leaves of L. diamantinana help protect the young organ, particularly against desiccation, by deposition of highly hydrated substances on the apices. Furthermore, the secretion of glandular trichomes probably repels herbivore and pathogen attacks. PMID:25527474

  1. Quantifying colloid retention in partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Yuniati; Dathe, Annette; Gao, Bin; Richards, Brian K.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2006-12-01

    The transport of colloid-contaminant complexes and colloid-sized pathogens through soil to groundwater is of concern. Visualization and quantification of pore-scale colloid behavior will enable better description and simulation of retention mechanisms at individual surfaces, in contrast to breakthrough curves which only provide an integrated signal. We tested two procedures for quantifying colloid movement and retention as observed in pore-scale image sequences. After initial testing with static images, three series of images of synthetic microbead suspensions passing through unsaturated sand were examined. The region procedure (implemented in ImageJ) and the Boolean procedure (implemented in KS400) yielded nearly identical results for initial test images and for total colloid-covered areas in three image series. Because of electronic noise resulting in pixel-level brightness fluctuations the Boolean procedure tended to underestimate attached colloid counts and conversely overestimate mobile colloid counts. The region procedure had a smaller overestimation error of attached colloids. Reliable quantification of colloid retention at pore scale can be used to improve current understanding on the transport mechanisms of colloids in unsaturated porous media. For example, attachment counts at individual air/water meniscus/solid interface were well described by Langmuir isotherms.

  2. A second order kinetic approach for modeling solute retention and transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, H. M.; Amacher, M. C.

    1988-12-01

    We present a second-order kinetic approach for the description of solute retention during transport in soils. The basis for this approach is that it accounts for the sites on the soil matrix which are accessible for retention of the reactive solutes in solution. This approach was incorporated with the fully kinetic two-site model where the difference between the characteristics of the two types of sites is based on the rate of kinetic retention reactions. We also assume that the retention mechanisms are site-specific, e.g., the sorbed phase on type 1 sites may be characteristically different in their energy of reaction and/or the solute species from that on type 2 sites. The second-order two-site (SOTS) model was capable of describing the kinetic retention behavior of Cr(VI) batch data for Olivier, Windsor, and Cecil soils. Using independently measured parameters, the SOTS model was successful in predicting experimental Cr breakthrough curves (BTC's). The proposed second-order approach was also extended to the diffusion controlled mobile-immobile or two-region (SOMIM) model. The use of estimated parameters (e.g., the mobile water fraction and mass transfer coefficients) for the SOMIM model did not provide improved predictions of Cr BTC's in comparison to the SOTS model. The failure of the mobile-immobile model was attributed to the lack of nonequilibrium conditions for the two regions in these soils.

  3. Retention and mitigation of metals in sediment, soil, water, and plant of a newly constructed root-channel wetland (China) from slightly polluted source water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoling; Wang, Yu; Wang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Constructed root-channel wetland (CRCW) is a term for pre-pond/wetland/post-pond complexes, where the wetland includes plant-bed/ditch landscape and root-channel structure. Source water out of pre-ponds flows through alternate small ditches and plant beds with root-channels via a big ditch under hydraulic regulation. Then source water flows into post-ponds to finish final polishing. This article aims to explore the potential of components of a pilot CRCW in China on mitigating metals in micro-polluted source water during its initial operation stage. We investigated six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Pb) in surface sediment, plant-bed subsurface soil, water, and aquatic plants during 2012-2013. Monitoring results showed that pond/ditch sediments and plant-bed soil retained a significant amount of Cr, Ni, and Zn with 93.1%, 72.4%, and 57.5% samples showing contamination factor above limit 1 respectively. Remarkably the high values of metal enrichment factor (EF) occurred in root-channel zones. Water monitoring results indicated that Ni, Zn, and Pb were removed by 78.5% (66.7%), 57.6% (59.6%), and 26.0% (7.5%) in east (west) wetland respectively. Mass balance estimation revealed that heavy metal mass in the pond/ditch sediments accounted for 63.30% and that in plant-bed soil 36.67%, while plant uptake occupied only 0.03%. The heavy metal accretion flux in sediments was 0.41 - 211.08 μg · cm(-2) · a(-1), less than that in plant-bed soil (0.73 - 543.94 μg · cm(-2) · a(-1)). The 1.83 ha wetland has retained about 86.18 kg total heavy metals within 494 days after operation. This pilot case study proves that constructed root-channel wetland can reduce the potential ecological risk of purified raw water and provide a new and effective method for the removal of heavy metals from drinking water sources.

  4. Transport and retention of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in saturated porous media: effects of input concentration and grain size.

    PubMed

    Kasel, Daniela; Bradford, Scott A; Šimůnek, Jiří; Heggen, Marc; Vereecken, Harry; Klumpp, Erwin

    2013-02-01

    Water-saturated column experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of input concentration (C₀) and sand grain size on the transport and retention of low concentrations (1, 0.01, and 0.005 mg L⁻¹) of functionalized ¹⁴C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) under repulsive electrostatic conditions that were unfavorable for attachment. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) for MWCNT typically did not reach a plateau, but had an asymmetric shape that slowly increased during breakthrough. The retention profiles (RPs) were not exponential with distance, but rather exhibited a hyper-exponential shape with greater retention near the column inlet. The collected BTCs and RPs were simulated using a numerical model that accounted for both time- and depth-dependent blocking functions on the retention coefficient. For a given C₀, the depth-dependent retention coefficient and the maximum solid phase concentration of MWCNT were both found to increase with decreasing grain size. These trends reflect greater MWCNT retention rates and a greater number of retention locations in the finer textured sand. The fraction of the injected MWCNT mass that was recovered in the effluent increased and the RPs became less hyper-exponential in shape with higher C₀ due to enhanced blocking/filling of retention locations. This concentration dependency of MWCNT transport increased with smaller grain size because of the effect of pore structure and MWCNT shape on MWCNT retention. In particular, MWCNT have a high aspect ratio and we hypothesize that solid phase MWCNT may create a porous network with enhanced ability to retain particles in smaller grain sized sand, especially at higher C₀. Results demonstrate that model simulations of MWCNT transport and fate need to accurately account for observed behavior of both BTCs and RPs.

  5. The effect of dietary carbohydrate composition on apparent total tract digestibility, feed mean retention time, nitrogen and water balance in horses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R B; Austbø, D; Bach Knudsen, K E; Tauson, A-H

    2014-11-01

    A total of four diets with different carbohydrate composition were investigated in a 4×4 Latin square design experiment with four Norwegian Coldblooded trotter horses. The objective of the present study was to increase the fermentable fibre content and reduce the starch intake of the total ration obtained by partly substituting mature hay and barley with sugar beet pulp (SBP), a soluble fibre source. The diets investigated were hay only (HAY), hay (85% of dry matter intake (DMI)) and molassed SBP (15% of DMI) (SBP), hay (68% of DMI) and barley (32% of DMI) (BAR), and hay (68% of DMI), barley (26% of DMI) and SBP (6% of DMI) (BAR+SBP). The feeding level was 18.5, 17.3, 15.7 and 15.7 g DM/kg BW per day for the HAY, SBP, BAR and BAR+SBP diets, respectively. Each diet was fed for 18 days followed by 10 days of data collection, where apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), total mean retention time (TMRT) of ytterbium-labelled hay, water balance, digestible energy (DE) intake and nitrogen balance were measured. An enzymatic chemical dietary fibre (DF) method was used to get detailed information on the composition and ATTD of the fibre fraction. Inclusion of SBP in the diet increased the ATTD of the constituent sugars galactose and arabinose (P<0.01). Feeding the HAY and SBP diets resulted in a lower TMRT owing to a higher DF intake than the BAR and BAR+SBP diets (P<0.01). There was no difference in water intake between HAY and SBP, but faecal dry matter was lower for HAY than the other diets (P=0.017), indicating that water was more tightly bound to fibre in the HAY diet. The diets were iso-energetic and provided enough DE and protein for light to moderate exercise for a 550 kg horse. In conclusion, this study showed that the DF intake had a larger effect on TMRT than partly substituting hay or barley with SBP, and that highly fermentable pectin-rich soluble DF from SBP maintains high nutrient utilization in horses.

  6. Variation of the relaxographic "shutter-speed" for transcytolemmal water exchange affects the CR bolus-tracking curve shape.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rooney, William D; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S

    2003-12-01

    Contrast reagents (CRs) may enter the tissue interstitium for a period after a vascular bolus injection. As the amount of interstitial CR increases, the longitudinal relaxographic NMR "shutter-speed" (T(-1)) for the equilibrium transcytolemmal water exchange process increases. The quantity T(-1) is given by |r(1o)[CR(o)] + R(1o0) - R(1i)| (where r(1o) and [CR(o)] represent the interstitial (extracellular) CR relaxivity and concentration, respectively, and R(1o0) and R(1i) are the extra- and intracellular (1)H(2)O relaxation rate constants, respectively, in the absence of exchange). The increase of T(-1) with [CR(o)] causes the kinetics of the water exchange equilibrium to appear to decrease. Here, analytical theory for two-site-exchange processes is combined with that for pharmacokinetic CR delivery, extraction, and distribution in a method termed BOLus Enhanced Relaxation Overview (BOLERO(Copyright )). The shutter-speed effect alters the shape of the bolus-tracking (B-T) time-course. It is shown that this is mostly accounted for by the inclusion of only one additional parameter, which measures the mean intracellular lifetime of a water molecule. Simulated and real data demonstrate that the effect of shutter-speed variation on pharmacokinetic parameters can be very significant: neglecting this effect can lead to an underestimation of the parameter values by 50%. This phenomenon can be heterogeneous. Within a tiny gliosarcoma implanted in the rat brain, the interstitial CR in the tumor core never rises to a level sufficient to cause apparent slowing of the exchange process. However, within the few microns needed to reach the proliferating rim, this occurs to a significant degree. Thus, even relative pharmacokinetic quantities can be incorrectly represented in a parametric map that neglects this effect. The BOLERO analysis shows promise for in vivo vascular phenotyping in pathophysiology. It also includes a provision for approximating the separation of the perfusion

  7. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions.

  8. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  9. Refining the M {sub BH}-V {sub c} scaling relation with H I rotation curves of water megamaser galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ai-Lei; Greene, Jenny E.; Impellizzeri, C. M. Violette; Braatz, James A.; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Tuttle, Sarah

    2013-11-20

    Black-hole-galaxy scaling relations provide information about the coevolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. We compare the black-hole mass-circular-velocity (M {sub BH}-V {sub c}) relation with the black-hole-mass-bulge-stellar-velocity-dispersion (M {sub BH}-σ{sub *}) relation to see whether the scaling relations can passively emerge from a large number of mergers or require a physical mechanism, such as feedback from an active nucleus. We present Very Large Array H I observations of five galaxies, including three water megamaser galaxies, to measure the circular velocity. Using 22 galaxies with dynamical M {sub BH} measurements and V {sub c} measurements extending to large radius, our best-fit M {sub BH}-V {sub c} relation, log M{sub BH}=α+βlog (V{sub c}/200 km s{sup −1}), yields α=7.43{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13}, β=3.68{sub −1.20}{sup +1.23}, and an intrinsic scatter ϵ{sub int}=0.51{sub −0.09}{sup +0.11}. The intrinsic scatter may well be higher than 0.51, as we take great care to ascribe conservatively large observational errors. We find comparable scatter in the M {sub BH}-σ{sub *} relations, ϵ{sub int}=0.48{sub −0.08}{sup +0.10}, while pure merging scenarios would likely result in a tighter scaling with the dark halo (as traced by V {sub c}) properties rather than the baryonic (σ{sub *}) properties. Instead, feedback from the active nucleus may act on bulge scales to tighten the M {sub BH}-σ{sub *} relation with respect to the M {sub BH}-V {sub c} relation, as observed.

  10. Refining the M BH-V c Scaling Relation with H I Rotation Curves of Water Megamaser Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei; Greene, Jenny E.; Impellizzeri, C. M. Violette; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Braatz, James A.; Tuttle, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Black-hole-galaxy scaling relations provide information about the coevolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. We compare the black-hole mass-circular-velocity (M BH-V c) relation with the black-hole-mass-bulge-stellar-velocity-dispersion (M BH-σ*) relation to see whether the scaling relations can passively emerge from a large number of mergers or require a physical mechanism, such as feedback from an active nucleus. We present Very Large Array H I observations of five galaxies, including three water megamaser galaxies, to measure the circular velocity. Using 22 galaxies with dynamical M BH measurements and V c measurements extending to large radius, our best-fit M BH-V c relation, log M_{BH}= \\alpha + \\beta log (V_{c}/ 200 \\ km\\ s^{-1}), yields \\alpha = 7.43^{+0.13}_{-0.13}, \\beta = 3.68^{+1.23}_{-1.20}, and an intrinsic scatter \\epsilon _{int}=0.51^{+0.11}_{-0.09}. The intrinsic scatter may well be higher than 0.51, as we take great care to ascribe conservatively large observational errors. We find comparable scatter in the M BH-σ* relations, \\epsilon _{int} =0.48^{+0.10}_{-0.08}, while pure merging scenarios would likely result in a tighter scaling with the dark halo (as traced by V c) properties rather than the baryonic (σ*) properties. Instead, feedback from the active nucleus may act on bulge scales to tighten the M BH-σ* relation with respect to the M BH-V c relation, as observed.

  11. Water quality, streamflow conditions, and annual flow-duration curves for streams of the San Juan–Chama Project, southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, 1935-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falk, Sarah E.; Anderholm, Scott K.; Hafich, Katya A.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque–Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority supplements the municipal water supply for the Albuquerque metropolitan area, in central New Mexico, with water diverted from the Rio Grande. Water diverted from the Rio Grande for municipal use is derived from the San Juan–Chama Project, which delivers water from streams in the southern San Juan Mountains in the Colorado River Basin in southern Colorado to the Rio Chama watershed and the Rio Grande Basin in northern New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Albuquerque–Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, has compiled historical streamflow and water-quality data and collected new water-quality data to characterize the water quality and streamflow conditions and annual flow variability, as characterized by annual flow-duration curves, of streams of the San Juan–Chama Project. Nonparametric statistical methods were applied to calculate annual and monthly summary statistics of streamflow, trends in streamflow conditions were evaluated with the Mann–Kendall trend test, and annual variation in streamflow conditions was evaluated with annual flow-duration curves. The study area is located in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado and includes the Rio Blanco, Little Navajo River, and Navajo River, tributaries of the San Juan River in the Colorado River Basin located in the southern San Juan Mountains, and Willow Creek and Horse Lake Creek, tributaries of the Rio Chama in the Rio Grande Basin. The quality of water in the streams in the study area generally varied by watershed on the basis of the underlying geology and the volume and source of the streamflow. Water from the Rio Blanco and Little Navajo River watersheds, primarily underlain by volcanic deposits, volcaniclastic sediments and landslide deposits derived from these materials, was compositionally similar and had low specific-conductance values relative to the other streams in the study area. Water from the Navajo River

  12. Curved microchannels and bacterial streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly identified as microbial communities attached to a surface and encased in a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms have an enormous impact on health and medicine (e.g., wound healing, implant-associated infections, disease transmission). On the other hand, they constitute a major component of the stream ecosystem by increasing transport of nutrients and retention of suspended particles. In this talk, we present an experimental study of bacterial biofilm development in a microfluidic device. In particular, we show the formation of filamentous structures, or streamers, in curved channels and how these suspended biofilms are linked to the underlying hydrodynamics.

  13. Control of ice chromatographic retention mechanism by changing temperature and dopant concentration.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Yuiko; Okada, Tetsuo

    2011-12-15

    A liquid phase coexists with solid water ice in a typical binary system, such as NaCl-water, in the temperature range between the freezing point and the eutectic point (t(eu)) of the system. In ice chromatography with salt-doped ice as the stationary phase, both solid and liquid phase can contribute to solute retention in different fashions; that is, the solid ice surface acts as an adsorbent, while a solute can be partitioned into the liquid phase. Thus, both adsorption and partition mechanisms can be utilized for ice chromatographic separation. An important feature in this approach is that the liquid phase volume can be varied by changing the temperature and the concentration of a salt incorporated into the ice stationary phase. Thus, we can control the relative contribution from the partition mechanism in the entire retention because the liquid phase volume can be estimated from the freezing depression curve. Separation selectivity can thereby be modified. The applicability of this concept has been confirmed for the solutes of different adsorption and partition abilities. The predicted retention based on thermodynamics basically agrees well with the corresponding experimental retention. However, one important inconsistency has been found. The calculation predicts a step-like discontinuity of the solute retention at t(eu) because the phase diagram suggests that the liquid phase abruptly appears at t(eu) when the temperature increases. In contrast, the corresponding experimental plots are continuous over the wider range including the subeutectic temperatures. This discrepancy is explained by the existence of the liquid phase below t(eu). A difference between predicted and measured retention factors allows the estimation of the volume of the subeutectic liquid phase.

  14. Effect of solvent strength and temperature on retention for a polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica stationary phase with methanol-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kiridena, Waruna; Poole, Colin F; Koziol, Wladyslaw W

    2004-12-10

    Synergi Hydro-RP is a new type of polar-endcapped, octadecylsiloxane-bonded silica packing for reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its retention properties as a function of solvent strength and temperature are evaluated from the change in retention factors over the composition range (0-70% v/v methanol) and temperature range (25-65 degrees C) using the solvation parameter model and response surface methodologies. The main factors that affect retention are solute size and hydrogen-bond basicity, with minor contributions from solute hydrogen-bond acidity, dipole-type and electron lone pair interactions. Within the easily accessible range for both temperature and solvent strength, the ability to change selectivity is much greater for solvent strength than temperature. Also, a significant portion of the effect of increasing temperature is to reduce retention without changing selectivity. Response surfaces for the system constants are smooth and non-linear, except for cavity formation and dispersion interactions (v system constant), which is linear. Modeling of the response surfaces suggests that solvent strength and temperature are not independent factors for the b, s and e system constants and for the model intercept (c term).

  15. Semiempirical model of soil water hysteresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to represent hysteretic soil water retention curves accurately using as few measurements as possible, a new semiempirical model has been developed. It has two postulates related to physical characteristics of the medium, and two parameters, each with a definite physical interpretation, whose values are determined empirically for a given porous medium. Tests of the model show that it provides high-quality optimized fits to measured water content vs. matric pressure wetting curves for a wide variety of media. A practical use of this model is to provide a complete simulated main wetting curve for a medium where only a main drying curve and two points on the wetting curve have been measured. -from Author

  16. Enhanced retention of bacteria by TiO2 nanoparticles in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Guillermina J.; Fidalgo de Cortalezzi, María M.

    2016-08-01

    The simultaneous transport of TiO2 nanoparticles and bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa in saturated porous media was investigated. Nanoparticle and bacterium size and surface charge were measured as a function of electrolyte concentration. Sand column breakthrough curves were obtained for single and combined suspensions, at four different ionic strengths. DLVO and classical filtration theories were employed to model the interactions between particles and between particles and sand grains. Attachment of TiO2 to the sand was explained by electrostatic forces and these nanoparticles acted as bonds between the bacteria and the sand, leading to retention. Presence of TiO2 significantly increased the retention of bacteria in the sand bed, but microorganisms were released when nanomaterial influx ceased. The inclusion of nanomaterials in saturated porous media may have implications for the design and operation of sand filters in water treatment.

  17. Improvement in the water retention characteristics of sandy loam soil using a newly synthesized poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid)/AlZnFe2O4 superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite material.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Qidwai, Ansar Ahmad; Anwar, Farooq; Ullah, Inam; Rashid, Umer

    2012-08-03

    The use of some novel and efficient crop nutrient-based superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposites (SHNCs), is currently becoming increasingly important to improve the crop yield and productivity, due to their water retention properties. In the present study a poly(Acrylamide-co-acrylic acid)/AlZnFe2O4 superabsorbent hydrogel nanocomposite was synthesized and its physical properties characterized using Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), FE-SEM and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The effects of different levels of SHNC were studied to evaluate the moisture retention properties of sandy loam soil (sand 59%, silt 21%, clay 19%, pH 7.4, EC 1.92 dS/m). The soil amendment with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 w/w% of SHNC enhanced the moisture retention significantly at field capacity compared to the untreated soil. Besides, in a separate experiment, seed germination and seedling growth of wheat was found to be notably improved with the application of SHNC. A delay in wilting of seedlings by 5-8 days was observed for SHNC-amended soil, thereby improving wheat plant growth and establishment.

  18. 33 CFR 133.21 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records retention. 133.21 Section 133.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS §...

  19. 33 CFR 133.21 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Records retention. 133.21 Section 133.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS §...

  20. 33 CFR 133.21 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Records retention. 133.21 Section 133.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS §...

  1. 33 CFR 133.21 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Records retention. 133.21 Section 133.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS §...

  2. 33 CFR 133.21 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Records retention. 133.21 Section 133.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS §...

  3. Retention, retention, retention: targeting the young in CPR skills training!

    PubMed

    Roppolo, Lynn P; Pepe, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The usefulness of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in school systems has been questioned, considering that young students may not have the physical or cognitive skills required to perform complex tasks correctly. In the study conducted by Fleishhackl and coworkers, students as young as 9 years were able to successfully and effectively learn basic CPR skills, including automated external defibrillator deployment, correct recovery position, and emergency calling. As in adults, physical strength may limit the depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes given by younger individuals with low body mass index; however, skill retention is good. Training all persons across an entire community in CPR may have a logarithmic improvement in survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest because bystanders, usually family members, are more likely to know CPR and can perform it immediately, when it is physiologically most effective. Training captured audiences of trainees, such as the entire work-force of the community or the local school system, are excellent mechanisms to help achieve that goal. In addition to better retention with new half hour training kits, a multiplier effect can be achieved through school children. In addition, early training not only sets the stage for subsequent training and better retention, but it also reinforces the concept of a social obligation to help others.

  4. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  5. Assessing plant water relations based on hidden in formation in the hyper-spectral signatures: Parameterization of olive leaf P-V curve and estimation of water potential components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) is characterized by complex structures and biophysical processes acting over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Additionally, in olive grove systems, the plant adaptive strategies to respond to soil water-limited conditions make the system even more complex. One of the greatest challenges in hydrological research is to quantify changing plant water relations. A promising new technology is provided by the advent of new field spectroscopy detectors, characterized by very high resolution over the spectral range between 300 and 2500 nm, allowing the detection of narrow reflectance or absorptance peaks, to separate close lying peaks and to discover new information, hidden at lower resolutions. The general objective of the present research was to investigate a range of plant state function parameters in a non-destructive and repeatable manner and to improve methodologies aimed to parameterize hydrological models describing the entire SPAC, or each single compartment (soil or plant). We have investigated the use of hyperspectral sensing for the parameterization of the hydraulic pressure-volume curve (P-V) for olive leaf and for the indirect estimation of the two principal leaf water potential components, i.e. turgor and osmotic potentials. Experiments were carried out on an olive grove in Sicily, during the mature phase of the first vegetative flush. Leaf spectral signatures and associated P-V measurements were acquired on olive leaves collected from well-irrigated plants and from plants maintained under moderate or severe water stress. Leaf spectral reflectance was monitored with a FieldSpec 4 spectro-radiometer (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc.), in a range of wavelengths from VIS to SWIR (350-2500 nm), with sampling intervals of 1.4 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively in the regions from 350 to 1000 nm and from 1000 to 2500 nm. Measurements required the use of contact probe and leaf clip (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc

  6. Gradient retention prediction of acid-base analytes in reversed phase liquid chromatography: a simplified approach for acetonitrile-water mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2014-11-28

    In previous work, a two-parameter model to predict chromatographic retention of ionizable analytes in gradient mode was proposed. However, the procedure required some previous experimental work to get a suitable description of the pKa change with the mobile phase composition. In the present study this previous experimental work has been simplified. The analyte pKa values have been calculated through equations whose coefficients vary depending on their functional group. Forced by this new approach, other simplifications regarding the retention of the totally neutral and totally ionized species also had to be performed. After the simplifications were applied, new prediction values were obtained and compared with the previously acquired experimental data. The simplified model gave pretty good predictions while saving a significant amount of time and resources.

  7. A 2H nuclear magnetic resonance study of the state of water in neat silica and zwitterionic stationary phases and its influence on the chromatographic retention characteristics in hydrophilic interaction high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wikberg, Erika; Sparrman, Tobias; Viklund, Camilla; Jonsson, Tobias; Irgum, Knut

    2011-09-23

    2H NMR has been used as a tool for probing the state of water in hydrophilic stationary phases for liquid chromatography at temperatures between -80 and +4 °C. The fraction of water that remained unfrozen in four different neat silicas with nominal pore sizes between 60 and 300 Å, and in silicas with polymeric sulfobetaine zwitterionic functionalities prepared in different ways, could be determined by measurements of the line widths and temperature-corrected integrals of the 2H signals. The phase transitions detected during thawing made it possible to estimate the amount of non-freezable water in each phase. A distinct difference was seen between the neat and modified silicas tested. For the neat silicas, the relationship between the freezing point depression and their pore size followed the expected Gibbs-Thomson relationship. The polymeric stationary phases were found to contain considerably higher amounts of non-freezable water compared to the neat silica, which is attributed to the structural effect that the sulfobetaine polymers have on the water layer close to the stationary phase surface. The sulfobetaine stationary phases were used alongside the 100 Å silica to separate a number of polar compounds in hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) mode, and the retention characteristics could be explained in terms of the surface water structure, as well as by the porous properties of the stationary phases. This provides solid evidence supporting a partitioning mechanism, or at least of the existence of an immobilized layer of water into which partitioning could be occurring.

  8. Effect of iron salt counter ion in dose-response curves for inactivation of Fusarium solani in water through solar driven Fenton-like processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurioles-López, Verónica; Polo-López, M. Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; López-Malo, Aurelio; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    The inactivation of Fusarium solani in water was assessed by solar driven Fenton-like processes using three different iron salts: ferric acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3), ferric chloride (FeCl3) and ferrous sulfate (FeSO4). The experimental conditions tested were [Fe] ≈ 5 mg L-1, [H2O2] ≈ 10 mg L-1 and [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1 mild and high, respectively, and pH 3.0 and 5.0, under solar radiation. The highest inactivation rates were observed at high reaction conditions for the three iron salts tested at pH 5.0 with less than 3.0 kJ L-1 of accumulate energy (QUV) to achieve over 99.9% of F. solani inactivation. Fe(acac)3 was the best iron salt to accomplishing F. solani inactivation. The modified Fermi equation was used to fix the experimental inactivation, data showed it was helpful for modeling the process, adequately describing dose-response curves. Inactivation process using FeSO4 at pH 3.0 was modeled fairly with r2 = 0.98 and 0.99 (mild and high concentration, respectively). Fe(acac)3, FeCl3 and FeSO4 at high concentration (i.e. [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1) and pH 5.0 showed the highest fitting values (r2 = 0.99). Iron salt type showed a remarkable influence on the Fenton-like inactivation process.

  9. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  10. Mentorship: increasing retention probabilities.

    PubMed

    Leners, Debra Woodard; Wilson, Vicki W; Connor, Peggy; Fenton, Joanne

    2006-11-01

    Retaining nurses is a significant workforce issue. Experienced nurses in particular are getting harder to retain within hospitals and the discipline at large. One solution to boost retention is to give serious attention to professional socialization activities through contemporary nurse mentorship experiences. The authors contend that contemporary mentoring programmes, targeting developmental quality of life issues of the expert nurse, would appreciably benefit retention programmes within the hospital environment.

  11. Characterization of catechin-α-lactalbumin conjugates and the improvement in β-carotene retention in an oil-in-water nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-08-15

    The goal of this study was to prepare and characterize α-lactalbumin (ALA)-catechin conjugates as a novel emulsifier in improving the retention of β-carotene (BC) in nanoemulsions via a free radical method. Covalent modification was observed and at least one catechin molecule was binding with ALA according to ESI-MS results. Far-UV CD indicated that the secondary structure of ALA was changed after conjugation. The Z-average particle diameters of nanoemulsions stabilized with ALA and ALA-catechin conjugates were 158.8 and 162.7 nm, respectively. The increase of mean particle size and the degradation of BC at 50°C were both larger than at 25°C during 30 days storage. BC retention stabilized with ALA-catechin conjugates was appreciably greater than ALA (control), which was attributed to the increase of ALA's radicals-scavenging and free metal ion binding ability after grafting with catechin. The chemical antioxidant activities of ALA-catechin conjugates were increased with increasing concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0mg/ml. In general, labile phytochemicals, like BC, can be protected against oxidation during storage by proteins-polyphenols conjugates without any side effects.

  12. Identification of complex septic odorants in Huangpu River source water by combining the data from gas chromatography-olfactometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography using retention indices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingyuan; Yu, Jianwei; Yang, Kai; Wen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Haifeng; Yu, Zhiyong; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Min

    2016-06-15

    Identification of the trace odorants causing the septic odors in source waters with complex matrixes has long been a big challenge. The Huangpu (HP) River, an important source water for Shanghai, has long been suffering from septic and musty odors, although major odorants have not been identified. In this study, combining the data from gas chromatography-olfactometry with mass spectrometry (GC-O/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) using retention indices (RIs) was used for the identification of odorants in HP source water. Olfactometry peaks detected in water extracts by GC-O/MS were combined with the chromatography peaks detected by GC×GC-TOFMS based on the RIs determined using the retention times (RTs) of alkanes C7-C30. A total of thirteen olfactometry peaks were obtained though GC-O/MS analysis, and potential odorants corresponding to each of the olfactometry peaks were screened based on the odor characteristics and match similarity using GC×GC-TOFMS. Finally, fourteen odorants (one odorant was detected in GC×GC-TOFMS without an olfactometry peak), including three septic odorants (bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether, diethyl disulfide and dimethyl disulfide) and two musty ones (geosmin and 2-MIB), were confirmed by using authentic standards. The septic and musty odorants in six source water samples taken over a period of six months were quantified. Bis(2-chloroisopropyl) ether, with an odor activity value (OAV) of 1.84-3.2, was found to be a major septic odorant in HP source water, followed by diethyl disulfide (OAV 1.56-1.96) and dimethyl disulfide (OAV 0.37-2.42), while geosmin (OAV 4.37-11.44) was the major musty odorant, followed by 2-MIB (OAV 1.13-1.89). This is the first comprehensive study focusing on the identification of odorants in a complex source water. The integrated approach used in this study could be applied for the identification of odorants in other complex source waters

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography: An extended model for isocratic and dual gradient elution chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Feng; Graalfs, Heiner; Frech, Christian

    2016-09-16

    An extended model is developed to describe protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography based on thermodynamic principles. Special features are the incorporation of pH dependence of the ionic interaction on a mixed-mode resin and the addition of a water term into the model which enables one to describe the total number of water molecules released at the hydrophobic interfaces upon protein-ligand binding. Examples are presented on how to determine the model parameters using isocratic elution chromatography. Four mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins with different surface chemistries and ligand densities were tested using isocratic elution of two monoclonal antibodies at different pH values (7-10) and encompassed a wide range of NaCl concentrations (0-5M). U-shape mixed-mode retention curves were observed for all four resins. By taking into account of the deprotonation and protonation of the weak cationic functional groups in these mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins, conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via mixed-mode strong cationic ligands as well as conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via both mixed-mode strong cationic ligands and non-hydrophobic weak cationic ligands were identified. The changes in the retention curves with pH, salt, protein, and ligand can be described very well by the extended model using meaningful thermodynamic parameters like Gibbs energy, number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions, total number of released water molecules as well as modulator interaction constant. Furthermore, the fitted model parameters based on isocratic elution data can also be used to predict protein retention in dual salt-pH gradient elution chromatography.

  14. Optimized Delivery System Achieves Enhanced Endomyocardial Stem Cell Retention

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Atta; Latere, Jean-Pierre; Bartunek, Jozef; Homsy, Christian; Daro, Dorothee; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Steenwinckel, Valerie; Seron, Aymeric; Redfield, Margaret M.; Terzic, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Background Regenerative cell-based therapies are associated with limited myocardial retention of delivered stem cells. The objective of this study is to develop an endocardial delivery system for enhanced cell retention. Methods and Results Stem cell retention was simulated in silico using one and three-dimensional models of tissue distortion and compliance associated with delivery. Needle designs, predicted to be optimal, were accordingly engineered using nitinol – a nickel and titanium alloy displaying shape memory and super-elasticity. Biocompatibility was tested with human mesenchymal stem cells. Experimental validation was performed with species-matched cells directly delivered into Langendorff-perfused porcine hearts or administered percutaneously into the endocardium of infarcted pigs. Cell retention was quantified by flow cytometry and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodology. Models, computing optimal distribution of distortion calibrated to favor tissue compliance, predicted that a 75°-curved needle featuring small-to-large graded side holes would ensure the highest cell retention profile. In isolated hearts, the nitinol curved needle catheter (C-Cath) design ensured 3-fold superior stem cell retention compared to a standard needle. In the setting of chronic infarction, percutaneous delivery of stem cells with C-Cath yielded a 37.7±7.1% versus 10.0±2.8% retention achieved with a traditional needle, without impact on biocompatibility or safety. Conclusions Modeling guided development of a nitinol-based curved needle delivery system with incremental side holes achieved enhanced myocardial stem cell retention. PMID:24326777

  15. Prediction of the chromatographic retention of acid-base compounds in pH buffered methanol-water mobile phases in gradient mode by a simplified model.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Axel; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2015-03-13

    Retention of ionizable analytes under gradient elution depends on the pH of the mobile phase, the pKa of the analyte and their evolution along the programmed gradient. In previous work, a model depending on two fitting parameters was recommended because of its very favorable relationship between accuracy and required experimental work. It was developed using acetonitrile as the organic modifier and involves pKa modeling by means of equations that take into account the acidic functional group of the compound (carboxylic acid, protonated amine, etc.). In this work, the two-parameter predicting model is tested and validated using methanol as the organic modifier of the mobile phase and several compounds of higher pharmaceutical relevance and structural complexity as testing analytes. The results have been quite good overall, showing that the predicting model is applicable to a wide variety of acid-base compounds using mobile phases prepared with acetonitrile or methanol.

  16. Retention prediction of a set of amino acids under gradient elution conditions in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gika, Helen; Theodoridis, Georgios; Mattivi, Fulvio; Vrhovsek, Urska; Pappa-Louisi, Adriani

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of amino acids presents significant challenges to contemporary analytical separations. The present paper investigates the possibility of retention prediction in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) gradient elution based on the analytical solution of the fundamental equation of the multilinear gradient elution derived for reversed-phase systems. A simple linear dependence of the logarithm of the solute retention (ln k) upon the volume fraction of organic modifier (φ) in a binary aqueous-organic mobile is adopted. Utility of the developed methodology was tested on the separation of a mixture of 21 amino acids carried out with 14 different gradient elution programs (from simple linear to multilinear and curved shaped) using ternary eluents in which a mixture of methanol and water (1:1, v/v) was the strong eluting member and acetonitrile was the weak solvent. Starting from at least two gradient runs, the prediction of solute retention obtained under all the rest gradients was excellent, even when curved gradient profiles were used. Development of such methodologies can be of great interest for a wide range of applications.

  17. Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lynn D.; Render, Gary F.

    This study investigates whether the use of Superlearning to teach rare English words produces retention scores significantly different than Ebbinghaus's 'normal' forgetting curve. Superlearning techniques are adaptations by Ostrander and Schroeder of Lozanov's Suggestopaedic methods to tap reserve human potential. Six course sections of University…

  18. Charge retention of twisted nematic liquid-crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simulated thin-film transistor (TFT) circuit has been built to drive the twisted nematic (TN) cell for the measurements of charge retention and the transmission versus peak voltage applied to the drain electrode of the simulated TFT using the gate pulse width as a parameter. The established rule that the transmission of the TN cell depends only on the rms voltage applied to the cell has been confirmed by calculating the rms voltage of the charge retention curves in correlation with the measured transmissions. The deviation of the decaying charge retention curves from the exponential behavior has been observed and can be qualitatively explained by a combination of the dielectric and transport properties of nematic liquid-crystal medium.

  19. Financial Literacy and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruth L.

    2006-01-01

    Higher education administrators know it is more cost-effective to keep students than to recruit them. Understanding financial literacy--and how it impacts student retention and persistence on the campuses--is an important concept for administrators to comprehend. Most students are not financially literate when they enter the world of higher…

  20. Tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  1. Secondary Retention Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.; Hopkins, Patricia

    Two alternatives to retention in grade for secondary school students were evaluated in Austin (Texas). Both were designed to allow students who are potential retainees (PRs) to receive remediation in one semester. The Transitional Academic Program (TAP) allows PRs to enroll in ninth-grade courses while repeating eighth-grade courses they had…

  2. Principals Retention. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Many districts are struggling with the problem of administrator retention. Hoffman (2004) identifies some of the reasons for this: (1) Increased accountability expectations; (2) Diminished or static levels of resources to support reform efforts; (3) Greater administrator vulnerability to sanctions; (4) The complex demands of government and the…

  3. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  4. Ammonia-water mixtures at high pressures - Melting curves of ammonia dihydrate and ammonia monohydrate and a revised high-pressure phase diagram for the water-rich region. [in primordial solar system ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boone, S.; Nicol, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The phase relations of some mixtures of ammonia and water are investigated to create a phase diagram in pressure-temperature-composition space relevant to the geophysical study of bodies in the outer solar system. The mixtures of NH3(x)H2O(1-x), where x is greater than 0.30 but less than 0.51, are examined at pressures and temperatures ranging from 0-6.5 GPa and 125-400 K, respectively. The ruby luminescence technique monitors the pressure and a diamond-anvil cell compresses the samples, and the phases are identified by means of normal- and polarized-light optical microscopy. The melting curve for NH3H2O(2) is described by the equation T = 176 + 60P - 8.5P squared for the ranges of 0.06-1.4 GPa and 179-243 K. The equation for NH3H2O is T = 194 + 37P - P squared, which represents a minor correction of a previous description by Johnson et al. (1985). Observed phase transitions are consistent with the high-pressure stability limit of NH3H2O(2), and the transition boundary is found to be linear.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: chylomicron retention disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retention Disease MalaCards: chylomicron retention disease Merck Manual Consumer Version: Hypolipidemia Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Malabsorption Orphanet: Chylomicron retention disease ...

  6. Reliability of in-stream retention metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickis, Jevgenijs; Zaramella, Mattia; Marion, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The temporary solute retention within transient storage zones (TSZs) has been shown to have a large effect on the transport of solute. This retention can significantly increase the overall in-stream residence time and as consequence increase the contact time of solute with aquatic interfaces (biota, sediment) and living species. An important question that arises is whether the currently available metrics adequately represent retention mechanism. This work attempts to investigate the reliability of two existing measures, the hydrological retention factor (Rh) and the fraction of median travel time due to transient storage zone (Fmed200). For this purpose, five conservative tracer tests were conducted in four European streams with distinct morphological, sediment composition, vegetation and hydraulic characteristics. The obtained breakthrough curves (BTCs) were used to derive storage zone parameters (storage zone area, storage zone exchange coefficient and mean residence time), which then were used for comparison and in the metric expressions. The storage zone parameters were computed using a single TSZ model OTIS-P and a multiple TSZ model STIR. The STIR model was applied to BTCs as an additional tool to separate TSZs into short timescale (ST) and long timescale (LT). The study results reveal correlation between Fmed200 and LT residence time T2 values, where the streams with the lowest Fmed200 (0.01-0.96) have the smallest long timescale storage zones T2 values, ranging from 912 s to 1402 s. The findings also demonstrate an influence of discharge rate on both retention metrics. The greatest Fmed200 (6.19) and Rh (0.938) values are calculated for the streams with low discharge rates (0.08-0.10 m3s-1) and a relatively high ST storage zone residence times T1 (159 s to 351 s). Results show that the Fmed200 and Rh metrics are strongly affected by the short timescale transient storage zones, whereas the LT storage zones (hyporheic) effects are not taken into account.

  7. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  8. Mobile Learning and Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fozdar, Bharat Inder; Kumar, Lalita S.

    2007-01-01

    Student retention in open and distance learning (ODL) is comparatively poor to traditional education and, in some contexts, embarrassingly low. Literature on the subject of student retention in ODL indicates that even when interventions are designed and undertaken to improve student retention, they tend to fall short. Moreover, this area has not…

  9. Effect of aging on the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Anna-Caterina; Kaegi, Ralf; Hug, Stephan J.; Hering, Janet G.; Mangold, Stefan; Voegelin, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Iron(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in aqueous solutions affect the cycling and impact of Fe and other co-precipitated elements in environmental systems. Fresh Fe(III)-precipitates are metastable and their transformation into more stable phases during aging may result in the release of initially co-precipitated ions. Phosphate, silicate, Mg and Ca play key roles in determining the structure and composition of fresh Fe(III)-precipitates. Here we examine how these ions affect the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by oxidation of 0.5 mM dissolved Fe(II) at pH 7.0 after aging for 30 days at 40 °C. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that aged precipitates consist of the same structural units as fresh precipitates: Amorphous Fe(III)- or Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate, ferrihydrite, and poorly crystalline lepidocrocite. Mg, Ca, and dissolved phosphate stabilize (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate against transformation into ferrihydrite. Silicate further attenuates (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate transformation. The crystallinity of lepidocrocite formed in phosphate- and silicate-free solutions slightly increases during aging. The transformation of Fe(III)- and Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate into ferrihydrite and ongoing ferrihydrite crystallization during aging result in the release of co-precipitated phosphate. Dissolved Ca on the other hand limits phosphate concentrations to values consistent with solubility control by octacalciumphosphate. Owing to the combined effects of Ca and silicate, phosphate is most effectively retained by Fe(III)-precipitates formed and aged in Ca- and silicate-containing solutions. The results from this study contribute to an improved understanding of the formation and transformation of Fe(III)-precipitates and emphasize that the complexity of Fe(III)-precipitate dynamics in the presence of multiple interfering solutes must be considered when addressing their impact on major and trace elements in environmental systems.

  10. Effects of Solution Chemistry on Quantum Dot Transport and Retention in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englehart, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, H.; Colvin, V. L.; Pennell, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials with tunable surface chemistries, such as quantum dots, are becoming increasingly prevalent in commercial and medical applications. This increase in usage corresponds to an elevated risk of environmental exposures, and limited data are available on the fate and transport of quantum dots in the environment. The objective of this study was to quantify quantum dot transport and retention behavior under a variety of solution chemistries and in the presence of a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) phase. The quantum dots were prepared with a CdSe/CdZnS core/shell that was coated with an amphiphilic copolymer. The primary quantum dot coating used in this study was octylamine modified polyacrylic acid, which yields a negative surface charge (zeta potential) ranging from -30 to -40 mV in water. The mean diameter of the quantum dots in deionized water ranged from 20-30 nm based on dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. Higher salt concentrations, ranging from 3 to 1000 mM NaCl, resulted in increased diameters of the quantum dots (28 to 190 nm, respectively). Transport and retention behavior of the quantum dots was evaluated using borosilicate glass columns (2.5 cm i.d. x 10 cm length) packed with 40-50 mesh (d50 = 355 µm) Ottawa sand that had been completely saturated with water. A pulse (ca. 60mL) of quantum dot suspension was introduced to the column at a flow rate of 1mL/min (pore-water velocity of 8m/d), followed by three pore volumes of particle-free solution. To evaluate effects of the presence of a NAPL phase, a uniform distribution of residual NAPL (Soltrol 220) was established prior to the quantum dot pulse injection. Concentrations of quantum dots in the column effluent and extracted from solid samples, quantified using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES), were used to construct an effluent breakthrough curve and retention profile for each experiment. The presence of a residual NAPL phase had negligible

  11. Psychogenic urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Bird, J R

    1980-01-01

    The literature on psychogenic urinary retention is reviewed. 2 cases treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported, in which significant demand for physical punishment was revealed and seen as linked to unacceptable, unconscious sadistic and aggressive feelings. Some psychodynamic aspects of what is considered to be "a disturbance of internal body space' are discussed. Psychogenic urinary retention has received little attention in the literature. It may represent the uneasy position this disorder of bodily function occupies in clinical practice, with clear physical symptoms and associated psychological factors. The condition is more frequent in females, usually young adults. Case histories regularly record the placid, passive presentation of these patients, childhood enuresis and disturbed backgrounds. The diagnosis, "hysteric', is frequent and most psychodynamic evaluations suggest the symptom represents a displacement of unacceptable sexual wishes and impulse. 2 patients treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported who, whilst fulfilling many of the criteria already noted, additionally revealed an intense desire for physical punishment. This punitive demand had less to do with unacceptable sexual wishes, than guilt at repressed aggressive drives of considerable magnitude. The role of aggression in the genesis of psychogenic urinary retention has so far been little studied.

  12. ENHANCED RETENTION AND SENSITIVITY IN THE ANALYSIS OF CYANURIC ACID IN WATER USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON AND UV DETECTION IN HIGH PRESSURE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanuric acid (CA) has found application as a chlorine stabilizer in pool waters. The National Swimming Pool Foundation recommends CA levels between 30-50 ppm and a chlorine residual of 1.0-3.0 ppm. These chlorine levels are needed to destroy harmful pathogenic organisms. Develo...

  13. Exclusion and retention of compensatory kosmotropes by HPLC columns.

    PubMed

    Lever, M

    1998-09-16

    With water as the elution solvent, zwitterionic solutes and polyols were retained on HPLC columns, more than was water, by totally hydrophobic packing materials. Relative retentions were systematically affected by oxygen functional groups in the packing material, explicable as specific retention of water. Reproducible elution sequences of 20 solutes at a variety of hydrophobic surfaces (aromatic and both long- and short-alkyl aliphatic surfaces) showed there is a general process, consistent with interactions with hydration water at the surface having solvent properties distinct from bulk water. Early eluting solutes included glycine, sarcosine and taurine. Glycine betaine followed both these and N,N-dimethylglycine. The natural betaines propionobetaine and dimethylsulfoniopropionate also preceded glycine betaine. Dimethylsulfoxide was strongly retained, as (to a lesser extent) was proline betaine. Polyols eluted in the sequence sorbitol, trehalose, glycerol. Changes in the chemical nature of the surface or base material affected relative retentions of water and solutes. The presence of hydrogen-bonding functions increased retention of polyols, as well as water, relative to zwitterionic solutes. Specific effects retention, constraining models based on the formation of low-density water.

  14. Automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction-retention time locked-isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Devosa, Christophe; Vliegen, Maarten; Willaert, Bart; David, Frank; Moens, Luc; Sandra, Pat

    2005-06-24

    An automated method for the simultaneous determination of six important organotin compounds namely monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPhT), diphenyltin (DPhT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) in water and sediment samples is described. The method is based on derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate followed by automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction (SPME) combined with GC-MS under retention time locked (RTL) conditions. Home-synthesized deuterated organotin analogues were used as internal standards. Two high abundant fragment ions corresponding to the main tin isotopes Sn118 and Sn120 were chosen; one for quantification and one as qualifier ion. The method was validated and excellent figures of merit were obtained. Limits of quantification (LOQs) are from 1.3 to 15 ng l(-1) (ppt) for water samples and from 1.0 to 6.3 microg kg(-1) (ppb) for sediment samples. Accuracy for sediment samples was tested on spiked real-life sediment samples and on a reference PACS-2 marine harbor sediment. The developed method was used in a case-study at the harbor of Antwerp where sediment samples in different areas were taken and subsequently screened for TBT contamination. Concentrations ranged from 15 microg kg(-1) in the port of Antwerp up to 43 mg kg(-1) near a ship repair unit.

  15. Supply Curves of Conserved Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan Kevin

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

  16. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  17. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  18. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  19. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  20. CURVES: curve evolution for vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lorigo, L M; Faugeras, O D; Grimson, W E; Keriven, R; Kikinis, R; Nabavi, A; Westin, C F

    2001-09-01

    The vasculature is of utmost importance in neurosurgery. Direct visualization of images acquired with current imaging modalities, however, cannot provide a spatial representation of small vessels. These vessels, and their branches which show considerable variations, are most important in planning and performing neurosurgical procedures. In planning they provide information on where the lesion draws its blood supply and where it drains. During surgery the vessels serve as landmarks and guidelines to the lesion. The more minute the information is, the more precise the navigation and localization of computer guided procedures. Beyond neurosurgery and neurological study, vascular information is also crucial in cardiovascular surgery, diagnosis, and research. This paper addresses the problem of automatic segmentation of complicated curvilinear structures in three-dimensional imagery, with the primary application of segmenting vasculature in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The method presented is based on recent curve and surface evolution work in the computer vision community which models the object boundary as a manifold that evolves iteratively to minimize an energy criterion. This energy criterion is based both on intensity values in the image and on local smoothness properties of the object boundary, which is the vessel wall in this application. In particular, the method handles curves evolving in 3D, in contrast with previous work that has dealt with curves in 2D and surfaces in 3D. Results are presented on cerebral and aortic MRA data as well as lung computed tomography (CT) data.

  1. Transport and Retention of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots in Saturated Sand: Effects of Organic Ligands, pH and Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Snee, Preston; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The presence of nanomaterials in soil, water, and air systems following their life cycle or accidents and their effects on the environment and public health are inevitable. Ability to forecast the public health and ecological impacts of these nanomaterials encountered in the environment is limited. Therefore, it is critical to be able to predict the fate and transport on nanomaterials in the environment, in particular the subsurface, in order to conduct risk assessments. To assess the transport and retention of nanomaterials in the subsurface environment, we selected quantum dots (QDs). QDs are metal and semiconductor based nanomaterials that are essential to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Understanding the parameters that effect the transport and retention of QDs in the soil water environment is critical. Natural organic ligands are commonly found in soils and impact the soil physico-chemical processes through multifaceted reactions with metal ions present in soil solution and ligand exchange reactions on soil surfaces. Therefore, ligands may modify the surface properties of QDs and effect their stability, transport and retention in the subsurface environment. In this research, size, surface charge, and stability of CdSe/ZnS QDs in water solutions are monitored in batch experiments. The influence of organic ligands (acetate, oxalate, and citrate) on the stability of QDs at different pHs (1.5, 3.5, 5, 7 and 9) and ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 M) conditions were examined. The stability and aggregation phenomena of QDs were studied using UV-vis and DLS methods. Parameters from batch studies were selected to establish chemical conditions to be used in transport experiments to produce breakthrough curves and retention profiles in order to characterize the fate and transport of QDs in saturated sand. These transport experiments are essential to understand the mobility and retention processes in porous media where QD interactions with surfaces of heterogeneous

  2. Selenide retention by mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Finck, N; Dardenne, K; Bosbach, D; Geckeis, H

    2012-09-18

    The isotope (79)Se may be of great concern with regard to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes in deep geological repositories due to its long half-life and potential mobility in the geosphere. The Se mobility is controlled by the oxidation state: the oxidized species (Se(IV)) and (Se(VI)) are highly mobile, whereas the reduced species (Se(0) and Se(-II)) form low soluble solids. The mobility of this trace pollutant can be greatly reduced by interacting with the various barriers of the repository. Numerous studies report on the oxidized species retention by mineral phases, but only very scarce studies report on the selenide (Se(-II)) retention. In the present study, the selenide retention by coprecipitation with and by adsorption on mackinawite (FeS) was investigated. XRD and SEM analyses of the samples reveal no significant influence of Se on the mackinawite precipitate morphology and structure. Samples from coprecipitation and from adsorption are characterized at the molecular scale by a multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigation. In the coprecipitation experiment, all elements (S, Fe, and Se) are in a low ionic oxidation state and the EXAFS data strongly point to selenium located in a mackinawite-like sulfide environment. By contacting selenide ions with FeS in suspension, part of Se is located in an environment similar to that found in the coprecipitation experiment. The explanation is a dynamical dissolution-recrystallization mechanism of the highly reactive mackinawite. This is the first experimental study to report on selenide incorporation in iron monosulfide by a multi-edge XAS approach.

  3. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  4. Influence of sodium chloride and pH during acidic marination on water retention and mechanical properties of turkey breast meat.

    PubMed

    Goli, T; Ricci, J; Bohuon, P; Marchesseau, S; Collignan, A

    2014-03-01

    Turkey breast cubes underwent acidic marination in the presence of salt. The transfer of water, salt and acid was measured, and texture was assessed on the cooked meat. While significant mass gains were observed during marination, from 20 minutes of immersion onwards, only long durations produced an overall matter balance greater than that of non-marinated meat. From the first minutes of immersion, these transfers caused hardening, regardless of the presence of salt in the marinade. For longer durations, only in the absence of salt was significant tenderizing seen in comparison to the non-marinated control. This effect appears to be due on the one hand to passing the isoelectric pH of the meat during acidification, and on the other hand to setting up antagonistic mechanisms breaking down or reinforcing connective tissues by acid and salt respectively. The high degree of tenderization observed in a water-acid solution can be explained partly by dilution of the fiber load per section unit due to protein solubilization.

  5. Absorption and retention of aluminum from drinking water. 1. Effect of citric and ascorbic acids on aluminum tissue levels in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.; Jeffery, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Adult, male New Zealand rabbits (three per group) were administered drinking water containing aluminum chloride (0, 100, or 500 mg Al/liter) together with citrate (0.11 M), ascorbate (0.11 M), or no added ligand ad libitum for 12 weeks. They were fed ad libitum regular rabbit chow analyzed to contain 297 mg Al/kg. Treatment had no effect upon food and water intake or weight gain during the experimental period. No effect of aluminum was observed on tissue levels of the essential metals zinc, copper, and iron, or on hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Aluminum levels were found to increase in a dose-dependent manner in stomach and intestinal mucosa, kidney, bone, urine, and feces. There was only a slight accumulation in liver, and no accumulation in brain (cerebral cortex or hippocampus). Although plasma aluminum was directly related to aluminum intake, whole blood aluminum bore no relation to aluminum dose. Citrate had no effect on aluminum accumulation in the stomach or intestine, but significantly enhanced plasma and bone aluminum levels. Ascorbate did not enhance aluminum accumulation in any tissue studied and even prevented accumulation in bone. Both citrate and ascorbate enhanced excretion of aluminum. Ascorbate therapy may be of potential clinical use to enhance aluminum excretion.

  6. Soluble reactive phosphorus transport and retention in tropical, rainforest streams draining a volcanic and geothermally active landscape in Costa Rica.: Long-term concentration patterns, pore water environment and response to ENSO events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triska, F.J.; Pringle, C.M.; Duff, J.H.; Avanzino, R.J.; Ramirez, A.; Ardon, M.; Jackman, A.P.

    2006-01-01

    Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transport/retention was determined at four sites in three rainforest streams draining La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. La Selva is located at the base of the last remaining intact rainforest transect from 30 m above sea level to 3000 m along the entire Caribbean slope of Central America. Steam SRP levels can be naturally high there due to regional, geothermal groundwater discharged at ambient temperature. Monitoring since 1988 has revealed distinctive long-term differences in background SRP and total P (TP) for three streams in close proximity, and identified the impact of ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) events on SRP-enriched reaches. Mean interannual SRP concentrations (?? standard deviation) were 89 ?? 53??g/l in the Salto (1988-1996), 21 ?? 39??g/l in the Pantano (1988-1998), and 26 ?? 35??g/l in the Sabalo (1988-1996). After January, 1997 the separate upland-lowland contributions to discharge and SRP load were determined monthly in the Salto. SRP in Upper Salto was low (19 ?? 8??g/l, 1997-2002) until enriched at the upland-lowland transition by regional groundwater. Mean SRP concentration in Lower Salto (108 ?? 104??g/l) was typically highest February-April, the driest months, and lowest July-September, the wettest. SRP concentration was positively correlated to the inverse of discharge in Lower Salto when ENSO data were omitted (1992 and 1998-1999), but not in the Upper Salto, Pantano, or Sabalo. TP was positively correlated to the inverse of discharge in all three streams when ENSO data were omitted. High SRP springs and seeps along the Lower Salto contributed 36% of discharge but 85% of SRP export 1997-2001. Annual SRP flux from the total Salto watershed (1997-2001) averaged 2.9 kg/ha year, but only 0.6 kg/ha year from the Upper Salto. A dye tracer injection showed that pore water environments were distinctly different between Upper and Lower Salto. Upper Salto had high surface water-pore water exchange, high

  7. Nutrient retention in plant biomass and sediments from the salt marsh in Hangzhou Bay estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuexin; Wu, Ming; Gu, Binhe; Chen, Yinxu; Liang, Xinqiang

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient load into the ocean can be retained during the process of plant uptake and sedimentation in marshes along the bay zone. Seasonal variations of biomass and nutrient concentration in three dominated plant assemblages and associated sediments were monitored in this study area to determine effects of salt marsh on nutrient retention. Results showed that plant aboveground biomass displayed a unimodal curve with nutrient concentration generally decreased from spring to winter. Belowground biomass was relatively low during the rapid growth period with nutrient concentration tending to decrease and then increase during this period. Plant total nitrogen (TN) pools are higher than total phosphorus (TP) pools, and both pools showed significant seasonal variations. Water purification coefficients (WPC) of nutrients by plant assimilation were 34.4/17.3, 19.3/24.0, and 5.14/6.04 t/(m(2) year) (TN/TP) for Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpus mariqueter, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that higher annual plant biomass and nutrient assimilation contribute to greater nutrient retention capacity and accumulation in sediments, thereby enabling reduced eutrophication in transitional waters.

  8. Hyperexponential and nonmonotonic retention of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles in an Ultisol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Ge, Liqiang; He, Jianzhou; Zhang, Wei; Jaisi, Deb P; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-08-01

    The increasing application of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has heightened the concern that these ENPs would eventually be released to the environment and may enter into life cycle of living beings. In this regard, it is essential to understand how these ENPs transport and retain in natural soils because they are considered to be a major repository for ENPs. Herein, transport and retention of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) were investigated over a wide range of physicochemical factors in water-saturated columns packed with an Ultisol rich in clay-size particles. Higher mobility of PVP-AgNPs occurred at larger soil grain size, lower solution ionic strength and divalent cation concentration, higher flow rate, and greater PVP concentrations. Most breakthrough curves (BTCs) for PVP-AgNPs exhibited significant amounts of retardation in the soil due to its large surface area and quantity of retention sites. In contrast to colloid filtration theory, the shapes of retention profiles (RPs) for PVP-AgNPs were either hyperexponential or nonmonotonic (a peak in particle retention down-gradient from the column inlet). The BTCs and hyperexponential RPs were successfully described using a 1-species model that considered time- and depth-dependent retention. Conversely, a 2-species model that included reversibility of retained PVP-AgNPs had to be employed to better simulate the BTCs and nonmonotonic RPs. As the retained concentration of species 1 approached the maximum solid-phase concentration, a second mobile species (species 2, i.e., the same PVP-AgNPs that are reversibly retained) was released that could be retained at a different rate than species 1 and thus yielded the nonmonotonic RPs. Some retained PVP-AgNPs were likely to irreversibly deposit in the primary minimum associated with microscopic chemical heterogeneity (favorable sites). Transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis suggested that these

  9. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid

  10. Pesticide and trace metal occurrence and aquatic benchmark exceedances in surface waters and sediments of urban wetlands and retention ponds in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Zhang, Pei; Bui, AnhDuyen; Allinson, Mayumi; Rose, Gavin; Marshall, Stephen; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Samples of water and sediments were collected from 24 urban wetlands in Melbourne, Australia, in April 2010, and tested for more than 90 pesticides using a range of gas chromatographic (GC) and liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques, sample 'hormonal' activity using yeast-based recombinant receptor-reporter gene bioassays, and trace metals using spectroscopic techniques. At the time of sampling, there was almost no estrogenic activity in the water column. Twenty-three different pesticide residues were observed in one or more water samples from the 24 wetlands; chemicals observed at more than 40% of sites were simazine (100%), atrazine (79%), and metalaxyl and terbutryn (46%). Using the toxicity unit (TU) concept, less than 15% of the detected pesticides were considered to pose an individual, short-term risk to fish or zooplankton in the ponds and wetlands. However, one pesticide (fenvalerate) may have posed a possible short-term risk to fish (log10TUf > -3), and three pesticides (azoxystrobin, fenamiphos and fenvalerate) may have posed a risk to zooplankton (logTUzp between -2 and -3); all the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicides may have posed a risk to primary producers in the ponds and wetlands (log10TUap and/or log10TUalg > -3). The wetland sediments were contaminated with 16 different pesticides; no chemicals were observed at more than one third of sites, but based on frequency of detection and concentrations, bifenthrin (33%, maximum 59 μg/kg) is the priority insecticide of concern for the sediments studied. Five sites returned a TU greater than the possible effect threshold (i.e. log10TU > 1) as a result of bifenthrin contamination of their sediments. Most sediments did not exceed Australian sediment quality guideline levels for trace metals. However, more than half of the sites had threshold effect concentration quotients (TECQ) values >1 for Cu (58%), Pb (50%), Ni (67%) and Zn (63%), and 75% of sites had mean probable effect concentration quotients

  11. Tritium retention in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Mueller, D.; Walters, R. T.; TFTR Team; Causey, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Hirooka, J.

    1996-11-01

    The large tritium inventories projected for ITER pose an important constraint in the design of plasma facing components and the selection of first wall materials. Three years of deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR has provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium retention in a tokamak environment. More than 18 kCi of tritium has been injected into the torus via neutral beam injection and gas puffs and approximately half of this amount was retained in the vacuum vessel.(C.H. Skinner et al.), PPPL 3172 (Jan 1995). Tritium has been successfully removed by glow discharges, exposure to room air and other techniques and it is not a constraint on continued operations. A vacuum opening is scheduled for September 1996 and we plan to extract samples of tritiated carbon dust and flakes from the limiter and vacuum vessel for elemental and chemical analysis. We will present the TFTR experience in tritium recycling, retention and removal and its implications for ITER.

  12. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  13. Modeling the effects of water content on TiO2 nanoparticles transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloni, Ivan; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The transport of manufactured titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticles (NP) in porous media was investigated by metric scale column experiments under different water saturation and ionic strength (IS) conditions. The NP breakthrough curves showed that TiO2 NP retention on the interface between air and water (AWI) and the interface between the solid and the fluid (SWI) is insignificant for an IS equal to or smaller than 3 mM KCl. For larger IS, the retention is depending on the water content and the fluid velocity. The experiments, conducted with an IS of 5 mM KCl, showed a significantly higher retention of NP than that observed under saturated conditions and very similar experimental conditions. Water flow was simulated using the standard Richards equation. The hydrodynamic model parameters for unsaturated flow were estimated through independent drainage experiments. A new mathematical model was developed to describe TiO2 NP transport and retention on SWI and AWI. The model accounts for the variation of water content and water velocity as a function of depth and takes into account the presence of the AWI and its role as a NP collector. Comparisons with experimental data showed that the suggested modeled processes can be used to quantify the NPs retentions at the AWI and SWI. The suggested model can be used for both saturated and unsaturated conditions and for a rather large range of velocities.

  14. The Role of Surface Tension in Colloid Retention and Remobilization during Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    During unsaturated flow, the accumulation of colloids at fluid-fluid interfaces (AWIs) and fluid-fluid-solid contact lines (AWSs) depend on those areas and surface tension. The area and capillary forces exerting on colloids can be different by adjusting the liquid-liquid surface tension. In the present work, we adjust only surface tension to change the configuration of AWI and AWSs. Experiments were performed in a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-model. Fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene microspheres, with diameter of 300nm were used as model colloids. Water and fluorinert-FC43 were used as the two immiscible liquids. Given the fact that PDMS is a hydrophobic material, fluorinert was the wetting phase and water was the non-wetting phase in this micro-model. Surface tension was changed by adding fluorinert soluble surfactant into fluorinert-FC43. We visualized colloids interacting with the moving fluid-fluid interfaces by confocal microscopy. We also obtained colloid concentration breakthrough curves by measuring the fluorescent intensities in the outlet of the micro-model. The breakthrough curves showed that under steady-state unsaturated flow, less colloid were retained in the system under low surface tension. The visualization results showed that, under low surface tension, the fluid-fluid interfaces are almost flat, thus less area and short contact line available for colloids to attach to. During transient flow, more colloids were remobilized by the moving fluorinert-water interfaces (FWIs) and fluorinert-water-solid contact lines (FWSCs) under high surface tension. Confocal results and measured breakthrough curves confirmed that lowing surface tension decreased capillary force and liquid-liquid area, resulting less retention and remobilization of colloids.

  15. Boulder Valley Kindergarten Study: Retention Practices and Retention Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.; Smith, Mary Lee

    Having implemented a policy that allowed schools to retain children in kindergarten an extra year, the Boulder Valley Public School District in Colorado conducted a study to determine the cognitive and emotional benefits of retention in kindergarten and the characteristics that led to decisions about retention. The study involved a research review…

  16. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  17. Mixed-mode acrylamide-based continuous beds bearing tert-butyl groups for capillary electrochromatography synthesized via complexation of N-tert-butylacrylamide with a water-soluble cyclodextrin. Part I: Retention properties.

    PubMed

    Al-Massaedh, Ayat Allah; Pyell, Ute

    2016-12-16

    With the aim to improve the understanding of morphology and efficiency properties, we investigate in this series the impact of the complex formation constant of the hydrophobic monomer with respect to statistically methylated-β-cyclodextrin (Me-β-CD) on the electrochromatographic properties of highly crosslinked amphiphilic mixed-mode acrylamide-based monolithic stationary phases. Based on our previous work on amphiphilic mixed-mode monolithic stationary phases for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) using N-(1-adamantyl)acrylamide (Ad-AAm) as hydrophobic monomer that forms an extremely strong water-soluble inclusion complex with Me-β-CD, we now selected N-tert-butylacrylamide (NTBA) as hydrophobic monomer forming an inclusion complex with Me-β-CD with a much lower value of the formation constant. Mixed-mode monolithic stationary phases are synthesized by in-situ free radical copolymerization of cyclodextrin-solubilized N-tert-butylacrylamide, a water soluble crosslinker (piperazinediacrylamide), a hydrophilic neutral monomer (methacrylamide), and a negatively charged monomer (vinylsulfonic acid) in aqueous medium in bind silane pre-treated fused silica capillaries. The synthesized monolithic stationary phases have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties and can be employed in the reversed-phase mode, in the normal-phase mode, in a mixed-mode or in the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode (depending on the composition of the mobile phase and on the properties of the solute). Morphology and retention properties of this new type of stationary phase are compared to those reported in our previous series. With a homologues series of alkylphenones it is confirmed that the hydrophobicity (methylene selectivity αmeth) of the stationary phase is strongly dependent on the type of hydrophobic monomer employed. The studies reveal a significant influence of the formation constant of the involved host-guest inclusion complex on the morphology (i

  18. Stability and Retention.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Stability of tooth position in the broader sense considers all the forces that may act on the tooth. Reitan reported that significant forces remained in the periodontium after tooth movement, and he carried out research that demonstrated residual stretching of the crestal periodontal fibers more than 7 months after tooth movement. Brain demonstrated that severing the fibers reduced the relapse in tooth position in dogs. Edwards published a series of papers exploring the effects of surgical transection of the gingival fibers on tooth stability, recommending that circumferential fiberotomy be performed in order to increase posttreatment tooth stability. Other researchers have suggested ways to increase the stability of the incisors, which are typically most prone to relapse. Peck and Peck recommended that interproximal reduction be done to broaden the contact point. Boese also recommended interproximal reduction as part of a four-pronged approach to retention.

  19. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user. Based on anecdotal evidence, most people “party” during extended time away from the work environment. Therefore, the following scenarios were envisioned: (1) a person uses an illicit drug at a party on Saturday night (infrequent user); (2) a person uses a drug one time on Friday night and once again on Saturday night (infrequent user); and (3) a person uses a drug on Friday night, uses a drug twice on Saturday night, and once again on Sunday (frequent user).

  20. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  1. Toward a Record Retention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2007-01-01

    An academic library working group was charged in 2005 to create a records retention schedule and policy applicable to records containing personally identifiable information of library patrons. This group conducted a survey and extensive research, culminating in an adopted library records retention schedule and policy implemented in 2006.

  2. Alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes on clay-water interfaces: Mechanisms for the retention of uranium by altered clay surfaces on the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Legrand, Christine A.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-scale processes on the solid-water interface of clay minerals control the mobility of metals in the environment. These processes can occur in confined pore spaces of clay buffers and barriers as well as in contaminated sediments and involve a combination of alteration, adsorption and nucleation processes of multiple species and phases. This study characterizes nano-scale processes on the interface between clay minerals and uranyl-bearing solution near neutral pH. Samples of clay minerals with a contact pH of ∼6.7 are collected from a U mill and mine tailings at Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada. The tailings material contains Cu-, As-, Co-, Mo-, Ni-, Se-bearing polymetallic phases and has been deposited with a surplus of Ca(OH)2 and Na2CO3 slaked lime. Small volumes of mill-process solutions containing sulfuric acid and U are occasionally discharged onto the surface of the tailings and are neutralized after discharge by reactions with the slaked lime. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique and other analytical methods (SEM, XRD, XRF and ICP-OES) are used to characterize the chemical and mineralogical composition of phases within confined pore spaces of the clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite and in the surrounding tailings material. Alteration zones around the clay minerals are characterized by different generations of secondary silicates containing variable proportions of adsorbed uranyl- and arsenate-species and by the intergrowth of the silicates with the uranyl-minerals cuprosklodowskite, Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2](H2O)6 and metazeunerite, Cu[(UO2)(AsO4)2](H2O)8. The majority of alteration phases such as illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and vermiculite have been most likely formed in the sedimentary basin of the U-ore deposit and contain low amounts of Fe (<5 at.%). Iron-enriched Al-silicates or illite-smectites (Fe >10 at.%) formed most likely in the limed tailings at high contact pH (∼10.5) and

  3. The sales learning curve.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mark; Holloway, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    When a company launches a new product into a new market, the temptation is to immediately ramp up sales force capacity to gain customers as quickly as possible. But hiring a full sales force too early just causes the firm to burn through cash and fail to meet revenue expectations. Before it can sell an innovative product efficiently, the entire organization needs to learn how customers will acquire and use it, a process the authors call the sales learning curve. The concept of a learning curve is well understood in manufacturing. Employees transfer knowledge and experience back and forth between the production line and purchasing, manufacturing, engineering, planning, and operations. The sales learning curve unfolds similarly through the give-and-take between the company--marketing, sales, product support, and product development--and its customers. As customers adopt the product, the firm modifies both the offering and the processes associated with making and selling it. Progress along the manufacturing curve is measured by tracking cost per unit: The more a firm learns about the manufacturing process, the more efficient it becomes, and the lower the unit cost goes. Progress along the sales learning curve is measured in an analogous way: The more a company learns about the sales process, the more efficient it becomes at selling, and the higher the sales yield. As the sales yield increases, the sales learning process unfolds in three distinct phases--initiation, transition, and execution. Each phase requires a different size--and kind--of sales force and represents a different stage in a company's production, marketing, and sales strategies. Adjusting those strategies as the firm progresses along the sales learning curve allows managers to plan resource allocation more accurately, set appropriate expectations, avoid disastrous cash shortfalls, and reduce both the time and money required to turn a profit.

  4. Dynamics of curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, Carlos

    2009-08-15

    Stochastic growth phenomena on curved interfaces are studied by means of stochastic partial differential equations. These are derived as counterparts of linear planar equations on a curved geometry after a reparametrization invariance principle has been applied. We examine differences and similarities with the classical planar equations. Some characteristic features are the loss of correlation through time and a particular behavior of the average fluctuations. Dependence on the metric is also explored. The diffusive model that propagates correlations ballistically in the planar situation is particularly interesting, as this propagation becomes nonuniversal in the new regime.

  5. Rethinking Student Retention in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Linda; Ebbers, Larry

    2002-01-01

    States that student retention is significant for measuring institutional effectiveness in the prevailing environment of accountability and budgetary constraints. Presents recommendations for increasing retention, including training staff on retention issues, reviewing admission and advising strategies affecting minority populations, and piloting…

  6. Orthodontic retention: why when and how?

    PubMed

    McNally, M; Mullin, M; Dhopatkar, A; Rock, W P

    2003-10-01

    Retention is normally required after active orthodontic tooth movement to hold the teeth in their new positions. This article reviews the principles of orthodontic retention and describes common retention regimes and appliances.

  7. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  8. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  9. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  10. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  11. Retention in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Littlewood, S J

    2015-02-16

    Retention is necessary following orthodontic treatment to prevent relapse of the final occlusal outcome. Relapse can occur as a result of forces from the periodontal fibres around the teeth which tend to pull the teeth back towards their pre-treatment positions, and also from deflecting occlusal contacts if the final occlusion is less than ideal. Age changes, in the form of ongoing dentofacial growth, as well as changes in the surrounding soft tissues, can also affect the stability of the orthodontic outcome. It is therefore essential that orthodontists, patients and their general dental practitioners understand the importance of wearing retainers after orthodontic treatment. This article will update the reader on the different types of removable and fixed retainers, including their indications, duration of wear, and how they should be managed in order to minimise any unwanted effects on oral health and orthodontic outcomes. The key roles that the general dental practitioner can play in supporting their patients wearing orthodontic retainers are also emphasised.

  12. Transport and retention of colloid particles in partially saturated porous media: effect of surfactant and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Y.; Dathe, A.; Gao, B.; Cakmak, M.; Richards, B. K.; Parlange, J.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of surfactant and ionic strength concentration on colloid transport through saturated or partially saturated media has typically been studied inferentially using breakthrough curves. In this work, we made pore-scale observations in a small flow chamber to count colloids retained on the grain, air and liquid interfaces using a confocal microscope system and public domain image analysis software ImageJ. Stacks of images were analyzed for colloid retention in which the ionic strength and concentration of surfactant (nonionic Surfynol 485) were varied. The number of mobile (free in the water phase) colloids and attached colloids (retained at the surface of sand grains) for each image were quantified. We found that as ionic strength increased, the location where the colloids were retained changed from the air/water meniscus/solid (AWmS) interface to the water/solid (WS) interface. In addition, we observed that increasing the surfactant concentration reduced the retention of colloids due to decreased contact angle and surface tension.

  13. Data Retention and Anonymity Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, Stefan; Böhme, Rainer; Köpsell, Stefan

    The recently introduced legislation on data retention to aid prosecuting cyber-related crime in Europe also affects the achievable security of systems for anonymous communication on the Internet. We argue that data retention requires a review of existing security evaluations against a new class of realistic adversary models. In particular, we present theoretical results and first empirical evidence for intersection attacks by law enforcement authorities. The reference architecture for our study is the anonymity service AN.ON, from which we also collect empirical data. Our adversary model reflects an interpretation of the current implementation of the EC Directive on Data Retention in Germany.

  14. Quantitative structure-retention and retention-activity relationships of beta-blocking agents by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Detroyer, A; Vander Heyden, Y; Carda-Broch, S; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Massart, D L

    2001-04-06

    Sixteen beta-blocking agents (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, carteolol, celiprolol, esmolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, oxprenolol, pindolol, practolol, propranolol, sotalol and timolol) showing a large range of hydrophobicity (octanol-water partition coefficients, log P between -0.026 and 2.81) were subjected to micellar liquid chromatography with sodium dodecyl sulfate as micelle forming agent, and n-propanol as organic modifier. The correlation between log P and the retention factor extrapolated to a mobile phase free of micelles and organic modifier was investigated. The use of an interpolated retention factor or the retention factor for specific individual experimental mobile phases was however advantageous since the retention factors of all beta-blocking agents were measurable in the selected mobile phases. Good correlations with log P and with in vitro biological parameters (cellular permeability coefficients in Caco-2 monolayers and apparent permeability coefficients in rat intestinal segments) were found.

  15. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

  16. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  17. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  18. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  19. EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

  20. Diversity and Retention in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cinda-Sue G.; Finelli, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe three initiatives designed to increase the academic achievement and retention of historically underrepresented students (including females and underrepresented students of color) in engineering. (Contains 2 tables.)

  1. Pulmonary retention of coal dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Gibb, F.R.; Beiter, H.; Amato, F.; Yuile, C.; Kilpper, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of this study were: to determine, quantitatively, coal dust retention times in the dog lung; to test the appropriateness of a pulmonary retention model which incorporates first order rate coefficients obtained from in vitro and in vivo experiments on neutron-activated coal; to acquire a temporal description of the pulmonary disposition of the retained coal dust, and to compare the behavior of two different Pennsylvania coals in the foregoing regards. The principal findings include: retention half-times for both coals of approximately 2 years following single, hour-long exposures; a vivid association of the retained coal dust with the pulmonic lymphatics; and a general validation of the retention model.

  2. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  3. Role of active floodplains for nutrient retention in the river Rhine.

    PubMed

    Olde Venterink, H; Wiegman, F; Van der Lee, G E M; Vermaat, J E

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the importance of floodplains for nutrient retention in two distributaries of the river Rhine (Waal and IJssel) by monitoring N and P retention in a body of water during downstream transport. We hypothesized that (i) retention of P is much larger than retention of N and (ii) nutrient retention increases with an increasing amount of the discharge flowing through floodplains (QF). The second hypothesis was tested by comparing retention between the rivers Waal (low QF) and IJssel (high QF), as well as at different discharges. Total nitrogen (TN) did not decrease significantly during downstream transport in both rivers, whereas 20 to 45% of total phosphorus (TP) disappeared during transport in the river IJssel. This difference between N and P retention-supporting the first hypothesis-was probably caused by differences in sedimentation through a much lower proportion of N adsorbed to particles than of P (2-3% of N vs. 50-70% of P). Phosphorus retention was only observed in the IJssel and not in the Waal, and absolute P retention (g P s(-1) km(-1)) in the IJssel increased with increasing QF. The second hypothesis was, nevertheless, not fully supported, because the percentage P retention (% of P load) decreased (instead of increased) with increasing QF. The percentage P retention increased with decreasing river depth and flow velocity; it seemed related to the efficiency of sediment trapping.

  4. Quantization on Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frønsdal, Christian; Kontsevich, Maxim

    2007-02-01

    Deformation quantization on varieties with singularities offers perspectives that are not found on manifolds. The Harrison component of Hochschild cohomology, vanishing on smooth manifolds, reflects information about singularities. The Harrison 2-cochains are symmetric and are interpreted in terms of abelian *-products. This paper begins a study of abelian quantization on plane curves over mathbb{C}, being algebraic varieties of the form {mathbb{C}}^2/R, where R is a polynomial in two variables; that is, abelian deformations of the coordinate algebra mathbb{C}[x,y]/(R). To understand the connection between the singularities of a variety and cohomology we determine the algebraic Hochschild (co)homology and its Barr Gerstenhaber Schack decomposition. Homology is the same for all plane curves mathbb{C}[x,y]/R, but the cohomology depends on the local algebra of the singularity of R at the origin. The Appendix, by Maxim Kontsevich, explains in modern mathematical language a way to calculate Hochschild and Harrison cohomology groups for algebras of functions on singular planar curves etc. based on Koszul resolutions.

  5. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  6. Trend analyses with river sediment rating curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment rating curves, which are fitted relationships between river discharge (Q) and suspended-sediment concentration (C), are commonly used to assess patterns and trends in river water quality. In many of these studies it is assumed that rating curves have a power-law form (i.e., C = aQb, where a and b are fitted parameters). Two fundamental questions about the utility of these techniques are assessed in this paper: (i) How well to the parameters, a and b, characterize trends in the data? (ii) Are trends in rating curves diagnostic of changes to river water or sediment discharge? As noted in previous research, the offset parameter, a, is not an independent variable for most rivers, but rather strongly dependent on b and Q. Here it is shown that a is a poor metric for trends in the vertical offset of a rating curve, and a new parameter, â, as determined by the discharge-normalized power function [C = â (Q/QGM)b], where QGM is the geometric mean of the Q values sampled, provides a better characterization of trends. However, these techniques must be applied carefully, because curvature in the relationship between log(Q) and log(C), which exists for many rivers, can produce false trends in â and b. Also, it is shown that trends in â and b are not uniquely diagnostic of river water or sediment supply conditions. For example, an increase in â can be caused by an increase in sediment supply, a decrease in water supply, or a combination of these conditions. Large changes in water and sediment supplies can occur without any change in the parameters, â and b. Thus, trend analyses using sediment rating curves must include additional assessments of the time-dependent rates and trends of river water, sediment concentrations, and sediment discharge.

  7. Retention Rate by Ethnicity. Information Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Anne

    This document discusses retention rate based on ethnicity for Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) for December 2002. The study found that the 2001 Fall-Spring retention rates increased among all ethnic groups. The total college retention rate rose by 2.7 percentage points to 75.2%. Among individual groups, the highest retention rate of 76.9% was…

  8. Ice Sheet Retention Structures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Protection Manual (U.S. Army water velocities that are too high to allow an ice cover Corps of Engineers 1973). A paper by Czerniak et al. to form...phenomena. Physical hydraulic model stu- dian Journal of Civil Engineering, 4: 380. dies should precede the design and installation of most Czerniak

  9. Rotation Curves of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, Agris J.

    One can obtain a fairly good understanding of the relation between axially symmetric mass distributions and the rotation curves they produce without resorting to calculations. However it does require a break with tradition. The first step consists of replacing quantities such as surface density, volume density, and circular velocity with the mass in a ring, mass in a spherical shell, and the square of the circular velocity, or more precisely with 2 pi G r mu(r), 4 pi G r^2 rho(r), and Vc^2 (r). These three quantities all have the same dimensions, and are related to each other by scale-free linear operators. The second step consists of introducing ln(r) as the coordinate. On the log scale the scale-free operators becomes the more familiar convolution operations. Convolutions are easily handled by Fourier techniques and a surface density can be converted into a rotation curve or volume density in a small fraction of a second. A simple plot of 2 pi G r mu(r) as a function of ln(r) reveals the relative contributions of different radii to Vc^2(r). Such a plot also constitutes a sanity test for the fitting of various laws to photometric data. There are numerous examples in the literature of excellent fits to the tails that lack data or are poor fits around the maximum of 2 pi G r mu(r). I will discuss some exact relations between the above three quantities as well as some empirical observations such as the near equality of the maxima of 2 pi G r mu(r) and Vc^2 (r) curves for flat mass distributions.

  10. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  11. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  12. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  13. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  14. Complementary Curves of Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-16

    provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid...curves of descent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Naval Academy,Physics Department,Annapolis,MD,21402-1363 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  15. Curved cap corrugated sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Jackson, L. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The report describes a structure for a strong, lightweight corrugated sheet. The sheet is planar or curved and includes a plurality of corrugation segments, each segment being comprised of a generally U-shaped corrugation with a part-cylindrical crown and cap strip, and straight side walls and with secondary corrugations oriented at right angles to said side walls. The cap strip is bonded to the crown and the longitudinal edge of said cap strip extends beyond edge at the intersection between said crown and said side walls. The high strength relative to weight of the structure makes it desirable for use in aircraft or spacecraft.

  16. Transforming Curves into Curves with the Same Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Curves are considered to have the same shape when they are related by a similarity transformation of a certain kind. This paper extends earlier work on parallel curves to curves with the same shape. Some examples are given more or less explicitly. A generalization is used to show that the theory is ordinal and to show how the theory may be applied…

  17. Quantifying flow retention due to vegetation in an earthen experimental channel using the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) dilution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, Paul; Kleinhans, Maarten; Leyland, Julian; Besozzi, Louison; Duranton, Pierre; Trieu, Hai; Teske, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Understanding of flow resistance of forested floodplains is essential for floodplain flow routing and floodplain reforestation projects. Although the flow resistance of grass-lined channels is well-known, flow retention due to flow-blocking by trees is poorly understood. Flow behaviour through tree-filled channels or over forested floodplain surfaces has largely been addressed using laboratory studies of artificial surfaces and vegetation. Herein we take advantage of a broad, shallow earthen experimental outdoor channel with headwater and tailwater controls. The channel was disused and left undisturbed for more than 20 years. During this time period, small deciduous trees and a soil cover of grass, herbs and leaf-litter established naturally. We measured flow resistance and fluid retention in fifteen controlled water discharge experiments for the following conditions: (a) natural cover of herbs and trees; (b) trees only and; (c) earthen channel only. In the b-experiments the herbaceous groundcover was first removed carefully and in the c-experiments the trees were first cut flush with the earthen channel floor. Rhodamine-B dye was used to tag the flow and the resultant fluorescence of water samples were systematically assayed through time at two stations along the length of the channel. Dilution-curve data were analysed within the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) framework to yield bulk flow parameters including dispersion, fluid retention and flow resistance parameters after the procedure of Richardson & Carling (2006). The primary response of the bulk flow to vegetation removal was an increase in bulk velocity, with depth and wetted width decreasing imperceptibly at the resolution of measurement. An overall reduction in flow resistance and retention occurred as discharge increased in all experiments and flow retention. Retentiveness was more prominent during low flow and for all three experimental conditions tended to converge on a constant low value for high

  18. Soft wheat and flour products methods review: solvent retention capacity equation correction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the results of a significant change to calculations made within AACCI Approved methods 56-10 and 56-11, the Alkaline Water Retention Capacity (AWRC) test and the Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) test. The AACCI Soft Wheat and Flour Products Technical Committee reviewed propos...

  19. Motor Learning in Childhood Reveals Distinct Mechanisms for Memory Retention and Re-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musselman, Kristin E.; Roemmich, Ryan T.; Garrett, Ben; Bastian, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Adults can easily learn and access multiple versions of the same motor skill adapted for different conditions (e.g., walking in water, sand, snow). Following even a single session of adaptation, adults exhibit clear day-to-day retention and faster re-learning of the adapted pattern. Here, we studied the retention and re-learning of an adapted…

  20. Liquefaction probability curves for surficial geologic deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Liquefaction probability curves that predict the probability of surface manifestations of earthquake-induced liquefaction are developed for 14 different types of surficial geologic units. The units consist of alluvial fan, beach ridge, river delta topset and foreset beds, eolian dune, point bar, flood basin, natural river and alluvial fan levees, abandoned river channel, deep-water lake, lagoonal, sandy artificial fill, and valley train deposits. Probability is conditioned on earthquake magnitude and peak ground acceleration. Curves are developed for water table depths of 1.5 and 5.0 m. Probabilities are derived from complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) that were computed from 927 cone penetration tests. For natural deposits with a water table at 1.5 m and subjected to a M7.5 earthquake with peak ground acceleration (PGA)  =  0.25g, probabilities range from 0.5 for beach ridge, point bar, and deltaic deposits. The curves also were used to assign ranges of liquefaction probabilities to the susceptibility categories proposed previously for different geologic deposits. For the earthquake described here, probabilities for susceptibility categories have ranges of 0–0.08 for low, 0.09–0.30 for moderate, 0.31–0.62 for high, and 0.63–1.00 for very high. Retrospective predictions of liquefaction during historical earthquakes based on the curves compare favorably to observations.

  1. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance.

  2. Equilibrium retention in the nozzle of oxygen hydrogen propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.

    1987-01-01

    Arguments are presented for the retention of vibrational equilibrium of species in the nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine which are especially applicable to water and the hydroxyl radical. It is shown that the reaction OH + HH yields HOH + H maintains equilibrium as well. This is used to relate OH to H, the temperature, and the oxidizer-to-fuel ratio.

  3. 40 CFR 35.938-7 - Retention from progress payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.938-7 Retention from progress payments. (a) The grantee may retain a portion of the amount otherwise due the contractor. Except as State law otherwise provides, the amount the grantee retains...

  4. 40 CFR 35.938-7 - Retention from progress payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.938-7 Retention from progress payments. (a) The grantee may retain a portion of the amount otherwise due the contractor. Except as State law otherwise provides, the amount the grantee retains...

  5. Fuel retention studies on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast Team Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel retention has been studied on MAST using gas-balance analysis. With 8-15 min of inter-shot helium glow-discharge cleaning (4He-GDC), the wall retention fraction stays very high (>90%) during the flat-top of the plasma current, indicating this component is dominant during the discharge. Recovery of wall conditioning with 4He-GDC suggests the retention process is dominated by direct implantation of particles in shallow surface layers. The effect of 4He-GDC duration on the particle balance has also been investigated. It is shown that when there was no preceding 4He-GDC, the wall pumping capacity was reduced, causing higher plasma density and tank pressure for the next shot.

  6. Multiple CubicBezier Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Horn, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for generating smooth curves of first-order continuity. The algorithm is composed of several cubic Bezier curves joined together at the user defined control points. Introduced is a tension control parameter which can be set thus providing additional flexibility in the design of free-form curves. (KR)

  7. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  8. Quantum relative Lorenz curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscemi, Francesco; Gour, Gilad

    2017-01-01

    The theory of majorization and its variants, including thermomajorization, have been found to play a central role in the formulation of many physical resource theories, ranging from entanglement theory to quantum thermodynamics. Here we formulate the framework of quantum relative Lorenz curves, and show how it is able to unify majorization, thermomajorization, and their noncommutative analogs. In doing so, we define the family of Hilbert α divergences and show how it relates with other divergences used in quantum information theory. We then apply these tools to the problem of deciding the existence of a suitable transformation from an initial pair of quantum states to a final one, focusing in particular on applications to the resource theory of athermality, a precursor of quantum thermodynamics.

  9. Multipulse phase resetting curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Giri P.; Bazhenov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce and study systematically, in terms of phase response curves, the effect of dual-pulse excitation on the dynamics of an autonomous oscillator. Specifically, we test the deviations from linear summation of phase advances resulting from two small perturbations. We analytically derive a correction term, which generally appears for oscillators whose intrinsic dimensionality is >1. The nonlinear correction term is found to be proportional to the square of the perturbation. We demonstrate this effect in the Stuart-Landau model and in various higher dimensional neuronal models. This deviation from the superposition principle needs to be taken into account in studies of networks of pulse-coupled oscillators. Further, this deviation could be used in the verification of oscillator models via a dual-pulse excitation.

  10. Fine particle retention within stream storage areas at baseflow and in response to a storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jen; Harvey, Jud; Larsen, Laurel; González-Pinzón, Ricardo; Packman, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Fine particles (1-100 μm), including particulate organic carbon (POC) and fine sediment, influence stream ecological functioning because they have a high affinity to sorb nitrogen and phosphorus, which are limited nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. These particles immobilize within in-stream storage areas, especially hyporheic sediments and benthic biofilms. However, fine particles are also known to remobilize at all flow conditions. The combination of immobilization and remobilization events leads to downstream transport and transient retention, which fuels stream ecosystems. The main objective of this study was to quantify immobilization and remobilization rates of fine particles that influence biogeochemical cycling in sand-and-gravel bed streams. During our field injection experiment, a thunderstorm driven spate allowed us to observe fine particle dynamics during both baseflow and in response to increased flow in the fifth-order stream Difficult Run, Virginia, USA. Solute and fine particles were measured within stream surface waters and porewaters at four different in-stream locations and multiple depths. Modeling of in-stream breakthrough curves (leading edge and initial decline before the storm) with a stochastic mobile-immobile model show that fine particles were mainly transported with the solute, but with additional net deposition. Porewater samples showed that flow paths within the stream sediments are complex and heterogeneous, with varying travel times depending on the in-stream location (i.e. channel thalweg, pool or lateral cavity). Higher filtration coefficients of fine particles were observed within the channel thalweg compared to the pool, and the filtration coefficient increased with sediment depth. Furthermore, we observed the accumulation of immobilized fine particles within hyporheic sediment and benthic biofilms on cobbles during baseflow and retention was evident even after the spate. Approximately 64% of fine particles were retained during

  11. Exploring particulate retention mechanisms through visualization of E. coli transport through a single, saturated fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. G.; Dickson, S. E.; Schutten, M.

    2011-12-01

    within the epoxy fracture. Samples were drawn downstream to obtain the E. coli breakthrough curve and determine the percent retained within the fracture. This paper will present the dominant retention mechanisms of E. coli at various effective flow rates as determined from an analysis of the images showing trapped E. coli, together with the aperture field information from the direct measurement. This information will help to improve the robustness and of contaminant transport models in fractures, and will therefore improve the ability to assess the risk posed by using bedrock aquifers as drinking water sources.

  12. Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  13. Recession curve analysis for groundwater levels: case study in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailuma, A.; VÄ«tola, I.; Abramenko, K.; Lauva, D.; Vircavs, V.; Veinbergs, A.; Dimanta, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Recession curve analysis is powerful and effective analysis technique in many research areas related with hydrogeology where observations have to be made, such as water filtration and absorption of moisture, irrigation and drainage, planning of hydroelectric power production and chemical leaching (elution of chemical substances) as well as in other areas. The analysis of the surface runoff hydrograph`s recession curves, which is performed to conceive the after-effects of interaction of precipitation and surface runoff, has approved in practice. The same method for analysis of hydrograph`s recession curves can be applied for the observations of the groundwater levels. There are manually prepared hydrograph for analysis of recession curves for observation wells (MG2, BG2 and AG1) in agricultural monitoring sites in Latvia. Within this study from the available monitoring data of groundwater levels were extracted data of declining periods, splitted by month. The drop-down curves were manually (by changing the date) moved together, until to find the best match, thereby obtaining monthly drop-down curves, representing each month separately. Monthly curves were combined and manually joined, for obtaining characterizing drop-down curves of the year for each well. Within the process of decreased recession curve analysis, from the initial curve was cut out upward areas, leaving only the drops of the curve, consequently, the curve is transformed more closely to the groundwater flow, trying to take out the impact of rain or drought periods from the curve. Respectively, the drop-down curve is part of the data, collected with hydrograph, where data with the discharge dominates, without considering impact of precipitation. Using the recession curve analysis theory, ready tool "A Visual Basic Spreadsheet Macro for Recession Curve Analysis" was used for selection of data and logarithmic functions matching (K. Posavec et.al., GROUND WATER 44, no. 5: 764-767, 2006), as well as

  14. Automated reasoning about cubic curves.

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.; McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Manitoba

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the n-ary morphisms defined on projective algebraic curves satisfy some strong local-to-global equational rules of derivation not satisfied in general by universal algebras. For example, every rationally defined group law on a cubic curve must be commutative. Here we extract from the geometry of curves a first order property (gL) satisfied by all morphisms defined on these curves such that the equational consequences known for projective curves can be derived automatically from a set of six rules (stated within the first-order logic with equality). First, the rule (gL) is implemented in the theorem-proving program Otter. Then we use Otter to automatically prove some incidence theorems on projective curves without any further reference to the underlying geometry or topology of the curves.

  15. Sensitivity of the transport and retention of stabilized silver nanoparticles to physicochemical factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated sand-packed column experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of physicochemical factors on the transport and retention of surfactant stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The normalized concentration in breakthrough curves (BTCs) of AgNPs increased with a decrease in solut...

  16. Classroom Management for Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    This guidebook recommends methods for teachers to use to improve teacher-student interaction in the classroom, as a means of increasing student retention. Chapter I introduces eight major systems of classroom management which teachers may use as their values and the classroom situation dictate: "Behavior Modification,""Reality Therapy,""Discipline…

  17. Meeting Individual Needs Fosters Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artman, Johanne I.; Gore, Robert C.

    A 1991 study of non-returning students at Del Mar College (DMC), in Corpus Christi, Texas, revealed that only 37.9% of these students were actual dropouts (i.e., had failed to accomplish their educational goals, and had no plans to take up further study). Retention studies conducted in Texas between 1985 and 1989 have shown that DMC has…

  18. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-03-28

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined.

  19. Implicit Memory: Retention without Remembering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Henry L., III

    1990-01-01

    Reviews recent research on retention that is demonstrated without conscious recollection, such as the ability to tie shoelaces or drive a car. Suggests that future research in this field may have implications for such educational issues as the transfer of training and the carryover of abstract classroom learning to problems in other contexts. (EVL)

  20. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  1. A Research Study in Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knibbe, Marie Vannozzi; Dusewicz, Russell A.

    A study of the Center for Literacy's (CFL) program was conducted to provide information on retention and attrition in an urban, open-entry/open-exit, individualized, goal-based literacy program. An exploratory analysis that used student and tutor records from 1985 through 1989 provided a summary of demographics and attendance patterns. This…

  2. Three Recruitment and Retention Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronx Community Coll., NY.

    This three-part report summarizes methodology and findings of three recruitment and retention studies conducted by the Bronx Community College (BCC) during 1979-1980. Part I examines a survey of enrolled students conducted to determine student attitudes toward BCC, the services that were most in demand, the reasons for attending BCC, and student…

  3. Academic Advising for Retention Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazazes, Barbara A.

    An effective academic advising system can assist in the retention of two-year college students; however, the institution and its faculty must be committed to providing such a system. Establishing a successful advising system would require the following: (1) a clear distinction must be made between academic advising and course scheduling; (2)…

  4. Course Retention Analysis. Focus Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    A study was conducted at Mount San Antonio College (MSAC), California, to analyze patterns in credit course retention between fall 1986 and spring 1989. The study investigated the development of course prerequisites based on faculty perceptions of the skills necessary for success and minimal skill levels associated with success; student assessment…

  5. Institutionalization of a Retention Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. J.; Campbell, A.

    2006-05-01

    Bowie State University and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have, for the past 10 years, worked diligently together to enhance the science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) domain. Efforts made, because of a Model Institutions for Excellence (MIE) Award, have changed the landscape of the SMET domain by increasing the retention and graduation rates, the number of students entering graduate and professional schools, and the number of students entering SMET related careers for minorities and women. Several initiatives a Scholarship Program, PRISEM Tutoring Center, Safety-net Program, Research emphasis, Focused Mentoring, a Summer Academy for accepted incoming students, a Bridge Program for students needing assistance being admitted to the University, the RISE Program and the Bowie State Satellite Operations and Control Center (BSOCC) provide the nurturing, mentoring, and opportunities for our students. As a result of efforts made, the retention rate has increase to approximately 80%, the graduation rate has increased 40%, and 85% of the SMET students are now interested or entering graduate and professional schools. Successes that have been documented by various assessment activities have led to the institutionalization of the Retention Model of the MIE Initiative. It is anticipated that University-wide application of the retention model will prove the incentives necessary to obtain similar results as the MIE Initiative.

  6. Variation of curve number with storm depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, K.; Hejduk, L.

    2012-04-01

    The NRCS Curve Number (known also as SCS-CN) method is well known as a tool in predicting flood runoff depth from small ungauged catchment. The traditional way of determination the CNs, based on soil characteristics, land use and hydrological conditions, seemed to have tendency to overpredict the floods in some cases. Over 30 year rainfall-runoff data, collected in two small (A=23.4 & 82.4 km2), lowland, agricultural catchments in Center of Poland (Banasik & Woodward 2010), were used to determine runoff Curve Number and to check a tendency of changing. The observed CN declines with increasing storm size, which according recent views of Hawkins (1993) could be classified as a standard response of watershed. The analysis concluded, that using CN value according to the procedure described in USDA-SCS Handbook one receives representative value for estimating storm runoff from high rainfall depths in the analyzes catchments. This has been confirmed by applying "asymptotic approach" for estimating the watershed curve number from the rainfall-runoff data. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that CN, estimated from mean retention parameter S of recorded events with rainfall depth higher than initial abstraction, is also approaching the theoretical CN. The observed CN, ranging from 59.8 to 97.1 and from 52.3 to 95.5, in the smaller and the larger catchment respectively, declines with increasing storm size, which has been classified as a standard response of watershed. The investigation demonstrated also changeability of the CN during a year, with much lower values during the vegetation season. Banasik K. & D.E. Woodward (2010). "Empirical determination of curve number for a small agricultural watrshed in Poland". 2nd Joint Federal Interagency Conference, Las Vegas, NV, June 27 - July 1, 2010 (http://acwi.gov/sos/pubs/2ndJFIC/Contents/10E_Banasik_ 28_02_10. pdf). Hawkins R. H. (1993). "Asymptotic determination of curve numbers from data". Journal of Irrigation and Drainage

  7. Willing Retention of Misbelief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2003-12-01

    Students also ought to get a better picture of how useful chemistry is and what insights it can provide regarding crucial problems that face society. A student who has completed a general chemistry course ought to have some understanding of how chemists are addressing major problems involving energy resources, adequate supplies of pure food and water, degradation of the environment, poverty, disease, and terrorism. Even better, the student should be aware that these problems are intertwined and solving one of them at the expense of any or all of the others is not a true solution. Better yet, the student should realize that with appropriate education and experience, the student could contribute significantly to society’s efforts to solve these problems. Former ACS President Ronald Breslow has suggested on numerous occasions that students are more likely to be attracted to a field in which the student can participate in solving important problems, but we persist in teaching chemistry as if it is a dead science, where everything is already known. Both learning and the unknown are powerful challenges that can motivate students to put forth their best efforts. We ought to make better use of them.

  8. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  9. Impact of solids retention time on dissolved organic nitrogen and its biodegradability in treated wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and its biodegradability in treated wastewater have recently gained attention because DON potentially causes oxygen depletion and/or eutrophication in receiving waters. Laboratory scale chemostat experiments were conducted at 9 different solids retention times (SRTs)...

  10. Global phosphorus retention by river damming

    PubMed Central

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T.; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H.; Powley, Helen R.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y−1, or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions. PMID:26644553

  11. Population Ration, Intermarriage and Mother Tongue Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Eddie C. Y.

    1978-01-01

    An explanatory model of the relationship between mother tongue retention, population ratio, and intermarriage is presented. In general, data collected on mother tongue retention in Singapore, a multilingual and multiethnic society, support the proposed model. (DS)

  12. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    DOEpatents

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  13. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  14. 12 CFR 202.12 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Record retention. 202.12 Section 202.12 Banks... OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) § 202.12 Record retention. (a) Retention of prohibited information. A creditor...) Applications. For 25 months (12 months for business credit, except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of...

  15. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  16. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  17. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  18. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  19. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  20. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  1. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  2. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spittle, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Few words have dominated the vocabulary of college retention as has the word "persistence." Many institutions still struggle to engage faculty and administrators in building campuswide retention efforts, to find the organizational levers that translate the abstractions and complexities of retention theory into scalable and durable initiatives, and…

  3. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Zucker, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years of retention theory and literature have acknowledged the importance of institutional and student profiles in accounting for cross-sectional differences in retention and completion rates between types of colleges and universities. The first "P" within a 4 Ps framework of student retention--"profile"--recognizes that an institution's…

  4. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  5. Reflection of curved shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  6. Shape Preserving Interpolation by Curves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    curves Given data 1i E R2 , i = 0,..., N, we consider a curve r : [a, b] -- R2 satisfying r(ti) = Ii , i = 0,..., N, (3.1) for values a = to < tj...tN = b. For a closed curve the situation is extended periodically so that Ii +N =10, ti+N =ti, i E Z, r(t+b-a) =r(t), tc R. 3.1 Desirable properties...para- meterisation). When all vi = 0, r will reduce to the usual C2 cubic spline interpolant. As vi --+ oc, the curve is ’pulled tight’ at Ii and as

  7. Do We Have a Retention Problem ... Or Do We Have a Problem "about" Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the "problem" of student retention in higher education. But unlike most, this paper focuses not on the problem of retention "per se" but rather on how institutional leaders think about student retention, completion, and success--how the way they frame their concerns about retention can give rise to a different sort of…

  8. Phosphorus Retention by Stormwater Detention Areas: Estimation, Enhancement, and Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Shukla, S.; Hodges, A.

    2015-12-01

    Stormwater detention areas (SDAs) are considered an important best management practice (BMP) both in agricultural and urban areas. In sub-tropical Florida where sandy soils and shallow water table make the nutrient leaching losses from agricultural areas inevitable, the SDAs are relied upon as a last point of treatment. Field-measured water and phosphorus (P) fluxes from an agricultural SDA showed that contrary to generally held view, the SDA was a source of P for the first year (retention efficiency = -12%). For the next year, the SDA served as a sink (54%). The source function of the SDA was a combined effect of high rainfall, dilution of agricultural drainage with rainfall from a tropical storm, and legacy-based soil P saturation. Volume reduction was the main reason for P retention because of no remaining P sorption capacity in the soil in most of the SDA area. Although a net sink of P for Year 2, an event-wise analysis showed the SDA to be a source of P for three out of seven outflow events in Year 2 indicating P release from soil. Because surface P treatment efficiency during both years was either less than or approximately the same as surface water retention efficiency, volume reduction and not sorption or biological assimilation controlled P retention. Hydraulic (e.g. increased storage), managerial (biomass harvesting) and chemical (alum treatment) modifications were evaluated by using a stormwater treatment model and field data. The model was successfully field-verified using well accepted performance measures (e.g. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency). Maximum additional P retention was shown to be achieved by biomass harvesting (>100%) followed by chemical treatment (71%), and increased spillage level (29%). Economic feasibility of the aforementioned modifications and development of a payment for environmental services (PES) program was identified through a cost-benefit analysis for maintaining these SDAs as sink of P in the long-term.

  9. Retention in the Canadian Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-14

    the reasons that contribute to their personnel and retention problems . The research will then focus on the implemented solutions that the ADF has... one place Desire to live in own home 4 Low morale in work environment Desire to stay in one place Better career prospects in civilian life To... on my career management Low morale in my work environment and impact of job demands on family/personal life A desire for more challenging work

  10. Acute urinary retention among astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stepaniak, Philip C; Ramchandani, Suneil R; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2007-04-01

    Although acute urinary retention (AUR) is not commonly thought of as a life-threatening condition, its presentation in orbit can lead to a number of medical complications that could compromise a space mission. We report on a middle-aged astronaut who developed urinary retention during two spaceflights. On the first mission of note, the astronaut initially took standard doses of promethazine and scopolamine before launch, and developed AUR immediately after entering orbit. For the first 3 d, the astronaut underwent intermittent catheterizations with a single balloon-tipped catheter. Due to the lack of iodine solution on board and the need for the astronaut to complete certain duties without interruption, the catheter was left in place for a total of 4 d. Although the ability to void returned after day 7, a bout of AUR reemerged on day 10, 1 d before landing. On return to Earth, a cystometrogram was unremarkable. During the astronaut's next mission, AUR again recurred for the first 24 h of microgravity exposure, and the astronaut was subsequently able to void spontaneously while in space. This report details the presentation of this astronaut, the precautions that were taken for space travel subsequent to the initial episode of AUR, and the possible reasons why space travel can predispose astronauts to urinary retention while in orbit. The four major causes of AUR--obstructive, pharmacologic, psychogenic, and neurogenic-are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may have played a role in this case.

  11. Modeling fecal bacteria transport and retention in agricultural and urban soils under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Balkhair, Khaled S

    2017-03-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, that enter surface water bodies and groundwater systems through unmanaged wastewater land application, pose a great risk to human health. In this study, six soil column experiments were conducted to simulate the vulnerability of agricultural and urban field soils for fecal bacteria transport and retention under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. HYDRUS-1D kinetic attachment and kinetic attachment-detachment models were used to simulate the breakthrough curves of the experimental data by fitting model parameters. Results indicated significant differences in the retention and drainage of bacteria between saturated and unsaturated flow condition in the two studied soils. Flow under unsaturated condition retained more bacteria than the saturated flow case. The high bacteria retention in the urban soil compared to agricultural soil is ascribed not only to the dynamic attachment and sorption mechanisms but also to the greater surface area of fine particles and low flow rate. All models simulated experimental data satisfactorily under saturated flow conditions; however, under variably saturated flow, the peak concentrations were overestimated by the attachment-detachment model and underestimated by the attachment model with blocking. The good match between observed data and simulated concentrations by the attachment model which was supported by the Akaike information criterion (AIC) for model selection indicates that the first-order attachment coefficient was sufficient to represent the quantitative and temporal distribution of bacteria in the soil column. On the other hand, the total mass balance of the drained and retained bacteria in all transport experiments was in the range of values commonly found in the literature. Regardless of flow conditions and soil texture, most of the bacteria were retained in the top 12 cm of the soil column. The approaches and the models used in this study have proven to be a good tool for simulating fecal

  12. Learning curves in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Yourstone, Steven A; Smith, Howard L

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the uses of learning curve theory in medicine. Though effective application of learning curve theory in health care can result in higher quality and lower cost, it is seldom methodically applied in clinical practice. Fundamental changes are necessary in the corporate culture of medicine in order to capitalize maximally on the benefits of learning.

  13. Characterization of retention processes and their effect on the analysis of tracer tests in fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Walkup, G.W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    Retention processes such as adsorption and diffusion into an immobile region can effect tracer movement through a fractured reservoir. This study has conducted experimental work and has developed a two-dimensional model to characterize retention processes. A method to directly determine some important flow parameters, such as the fracture aperture, from the analysis of tracer tests has been developed as a result of the new two-dimensional model. The experimental work consisted of batch experiments designed to both reproduce earlier work and to determine the magnitude of the retention effects. Negligible retention was observed from which it was concluded that the batch experiments were not sensitive enough and that more sensitive flowing tests were needed. A two-dimensional model that represents a fractured medium by a mobile region, in which convention, diffusion, and adsorption are allowed, and an immobile region in which only diffusion and adsorption are allowed has been developed. It was possible to demonstrate how each of the mass-transfer processes included in the model affect tracer return curves by producing return curves for any set of the defining variables. Field data from the New Zealand was numerically fit with the model. The optimum values of the parameters determined from curve fitting provided a direct estimate of the fracture width and could be used to estimate other important flow parameters if experimentally determinable values were known. 25 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Juvenile densities relative to water regime in mainstem reservoirs of the Tennessee River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.; Lowery, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    Successful reproduction and development of strong year classes of fish in storage reservoirs are commonly associated with reproductive seasons of high water level and extensive flooding. Responses to flooding are likely to be less pronounced or altogether different in mainstem navigation reservoirs that experience limited water level fluctuation. In these reservoirs, water regime characteristics such as timing of flooding, instability of water level, and water retention could supersede the effects of water level. We examined existing data to identify aspects of the water regime that have detectable consequence on juveniles of selected taxa in a sequence of four reservoirs of the Tennessee River that exhibited relatively small annual rises. Empirical models relating density of selected age-0 centrarchids to water regime suggested that descriptors of spring and summer flow through the reservoirs, water level instability, and summer water level were better related to juvenile densities than was spring water level. Different water regimes had different effects on the study species, and presumably other species in the fish communities. Therefore, a diversity of water regimes rather than a rigid rule curve is likely most beneficial to the long-term permanence of the fish assemblages of the study reservoirs. Fixed rule curves produce drawdown zones devoid of vegetation consisting primarily of mudflats of limited ecological value to floodplain species, and maintenance of water levels within the rule curve force operational drops and rises that adversely affect littoral spawners. In developing water management plans, regulatory agencies should consider incorporating managed randomness into rule curves. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  16. Colloid transport in unsaturated porous media: the role of water content and ionic strength on particle straining.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Walker, Sharon L

    2008-02-19

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water saturation, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microspheres (1.1 microm) in porous media. Experiments were carried out under chemically unfavorable conditions for colloid attachment to both solid-water interfaces (SWI) and air-water interfaces (AWI) using negatively charged and hydrophilic colloids and modifying the solution chemistry with a bicarbonate buffer to pH 10. Interaction energy calculations and complementary batch experiments were conducted and demonstrated that partitioning of colloids to the SWI and AWI was insignificant across the range of the ionic strengths considered. The breakthrough curve and final deposition profile were measured in each experiment indicating colloid retention was highly dependent on the suspension ionic strength, water content, and sand grain size. In contrast to conventional filtration theory, most colloids were found deposited close to the column inlet, and hyper-exponential deposition profiles were observed. A mathematical model, accounting for time- and depth-dependent straining, produced a reasonably good fit for both the breakthrough curves and final deposition profiles. Experimental and modeling results suggest that straining--the retention of colloids in low velocity regions of porous media such as grain junctions--was the primary mechanism of colloid retention under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The extent of stagnant regions of flow within the pore structure is enhanced with decreasing water content, leading to a greater amount of retention. Ionic strength also contributes to straining, because the number of colloids that are held in the secondary energy minimum increases with ionic strength. These weakly associated colloids are prone to be translated to stagnation regions formed at grain-grain junctions, the solid-water-air triple point, and dead-end pores and then becoming

  17. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    FEB 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve 5a. CONTRACT...December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should acceler-ate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest...Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve Carl E. Mungan, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 100 THE PHYSICS TEACHER ◆ Vol. 44, February 2006 The shapes

  18. Curved conveyor section guide assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Truszczinski, H.

    1981-02-03

    A guide assembly for a curved conveyor section of a scraperchain conveyor guides the scraper assembly from a first straight conveyor portion round the curved conveyor section to a second straight conveyor portion. This guiding is accomplished by a pair of independently rotatable pulley wheels. A further pair of independently rotatable pulley wheels are provided to guide the drive chain of a plough round the curved conveyor section. This enables the plough to be driven to and fro along the first straight conveyor portion by a drive station attached to the second straight conveyor portion adjacent to the guide assembly.

  19. Modelling global nutrient retention by river damming: Phosphorus and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maavara, Taylor; Dürr, Hans; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The phosphorus to silicon (P:Si) nutrient ratio is a key variable affecting ecosystem health in many aquatic environments. River damming represents a major anthropogenic perturbation of natural material flows along the aquatic continuum, with the potential to profoundly modify absolute and relative nutrient availabilities in surface waters. In this study, a multi-tiered approach for estimating global nutrient retention in man-made reservoirs is presented. We illustrate its application to the global riverine flux of reactive Si, using a database of dissolved reactive Si (DSi) budgets for 24 natural lakes and 22 artificial reservoirs. The database includes information on bedrock geology, surface water pH, water residence time, reservoir age and function, climate, and trophic status. Statistical analyses (ANOVA, t-test, PCA, linear plus non-linear regressions) are used to identify the best predictors of DSi retention and delineate how reservoir properties modulate nutrient dynamics. Results indicate that (1) reservoirs retain significantly less DSi than natural lakes, and (2) the water residence time, reservoir age and function (e.g., hydroelectrical production, irrigation, flood control) are the main system variables controlling DSi retention by dams. Next, a biogeochemical Si model is used to reproduce the previously derived statistical trends for DSi retention. Calibration of the model yields a relationship that enables one to predict annual in-reservoir siliceous productivity as a function of the external reactive Si supply. The model further accounts for the transition from reservoirs where reactive Si retention is primarily due to burial of allochtonous Si to those where in-reservoir DSi uptake by diatoms dominates. Finally, the statistical and mechanistic relationships are extrapolated to estimate that 25-28 Tg SiO2 yr-1 are retained worldwide by dams, or 7% of the annual reactive Si load to watersheds. We are currently applying the same multi-tiered approach

  20. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Measurements of water potential and water content in unsaturated crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes; Gimmi, Thomas; Wydler, Hannes; LäSer, Hans-Peter; Baer, Toni

    1995-08-01

    A water desaturation zone develops around a tunnel in water-saturated rock when the evaporative water loss at the rock surface is larger than the water flow from the surrounding saturated region of restricted permeability. We describe the methods with which such water desaturation processes in rock materials can be quantified. The water retention characteristic θ (ψ) of crystalline rock samples was determined with a pressure membrane apparatus. The negative water potential, identical to the capillary pressure, ψ, below the tensiometric range (ψ < -0.1 MPa) can be measured with thermocouple psychrometers (TP), and the volumetric water contents, θ, by means of time domain reflectometry (TDR). These standard methods were adapted for measuring the water status in a macroscopically unfissured granodiorite with a total porosity of approximately 0.01. The measured water retention curve of granodiorite samples from the Grimsel test site (central Switzerland) exhibits a shape which is typical for bimodal pore size distributions. The measured bimodality is probably an artifact of a large surface ratio of solid/voids. The thermocouples were installed without a metallic screen using the cavity drilled into the granodiorite as a measuring chamber. The water potentials observed in a cylindrical granodiorite monolith ranged between -0.1 and -3.0 MPa; those near the wall in a ventilated tunnel between -0.1 and -2.2 MPa. Two types of three-rod TDR probes were used, one as a depth probe inserted into the rock, the other as a surface probe using three copper stripes attached to the surface for detecting water content changes in the rock-to-air boundary. The TDR signal was smoothed with a low-pass filter, and the signal length determined based on the first derivative of the trace. Despite the low porosity of crystalline rock these standard methods are applicable to describe the unsaturated zone in solid rock and may also be used in other consolidated materials such as concrete.

  2. Impact of various food ingredients on the retention of furan in foods.

    PubMed

    Van Lancker, Fien; Adams, An; Owczarek, Agnieszka; De Meulenaer, Bruno; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2009-12-01

    Since furan is classified as "possibly carcinogenic to humans," many studies investigated furan concentrations in foods. However, no data are available on the impact of food ingredients on the retention or release of furan from food. These data are important, since they explain the differences in furan removal during domestic food preparation. Furan retention was studied by spiking various samples with D(4)-furan and comparing D(4)-furan evaporation from these samples with comparable aqueous solutions. In addition, furan concentrations were determined. Furan retention caused by starch gels was negligible. Oils caused high furan retention: peak areas of furan in oils ranged from 22 to 25% of the corresponding aqueous solutions. In addition, in coffee, furan retention was mainly caused by the lipophilic fraction. However, since furan retention was also found in defatted coffee and coffee grounds, other coffee constituents also have the ability to retain furan. Peak areas of furan in the headspace of baby foods ranged from 71 to 97% of those in water. In addition, in this case, the highest retention was found in baby foods with added oils. Baby food containing spinach showed the highest furan concentration (172 ppb) as well as the highest furan retention.

  3. Instrument Parameters Controlling Retention Precision in Gradient Elution Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Ayse; Fan, Wenzhe; Carr, Peter W.; Schellinger, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    The precision of retention time in RPLC is important for compound identification, for setting peak integration time windows and in fundamental studies of retention. In this work, we studied the effect of temperature (T), initial (ϕ0) and final mobile phase (ϕf)composition, gradient time (tG), and flow rate (F) on the retention time precision under gradient elution conditions for various types of low MW solutes. We determined the retention factor in pure water (k′w) and the solute-dependent solvent strength (S) parameters of Snyder's linear solvent strength theory (LSST) as a function of temperature for three different groups of solutes. The effect of small changes in the chromatographic variables (T, ϕ0, ϕf, tG and F) by use of the LSST gradient retention equation were estimated. Peaks at different positions in the chromatogram have different sensitivities to changes in these instrument parameters. In general, absolute fluctuations in retention time are larger at longer gradient times. Drugs showed less sensitivity to changes in temperature compared to relatively less polar solutes, non-ionogenic solutes. Surprisingly we observed that fluctuations in temperature, mobile phase composition and flow rate had less effect on retention time under gradient conditions as compared to isocratic conditions. Overall temperature and the initial mobile phase composition are the more important variables affecting retention reproducibility in gradient elution chromatography. PMID:25459648

  4. Retention at Departments of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael; Rosa, Luis

    2013-03-01

    A thriving physics department is the end result of many actions, taken over time, that results in the development of a sense of community between the faculty and the students. As part of this sense of community, gifted students must receive special attention and innovative ideas must be incorporated to successfully accommodate the needs of these students. We have found that the best retention strategy for gifted undergraduates is the total involvement of them in undergraduate research projects and also the development of leadership in extracurricular activities within the department. A careful employment strategy is needed to secure a faculty committed to the goals of the community.

  5. Water and heat fluxes in desert soils: 2. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Milly, P. C. D.

    1994-03-01

    Transient one-dimensional fluxes of soil water (liquid and vapor) and heat in response to 1 year of atmospheric forcing were simulated numerically for a site in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas. The model was initialized and evaluated using the monitoring data presented in a companion paper (Scanlon, this issue). Soil hydraulic and thermal properties were estimated a priori from a combination of laboratory measurements, models, and other published information. In the first simulation, the main drying curves were used to describe soil water retention, and hysteresis was ignored. Remarkable consistency was found between computed and measured water potentials and temperatures. Attenuation and phase shift of the seasonal cycle of water potentials below the shallow subsurface active zone (0.0- to 0.3-m depth) were similar to those of temperatures, suggesting that water potential fluctuations were driven primarily by temperature changes. Water fluxes in the upper 0.3 m of soil were dominated by downward and upward liquid fluxes that resulted from infiltration of rain and subsequent evaporation from the surface. Upward flux was vapor dominated only in the top several millimeters of the soil during periods of evaporation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, water fluxes varied slowly and were dominated by downward thermal vapor flux that decreased with depth, causing a net accumulation of water. In a second simulation, nonhysteretic water retention was instead described by the estimated main wetting curves; the resulting differences in fluxes were attributed to lower initial water contents (given fixed initial water potential) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities that were lower than they were in the first simulation. Below a depth of 0.3 m, the thermal vapor fluxes dominated and were similar to those in the first simulation. Two other simulations were performed, differing from the first only in the prescription of different (wetter) initial water potentials. These three simulations

  6. Automated solid-phase extraction of herbicides from water for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for the pre-concentration of chloroacetanilide and triazine herbicides, and two triazine metabolites from 100-ml water samples. Breakthrough experiments for the C18 SPE cartridge show that the two triazine metabolites are not fully retained and that increasing flow-rate decreases their retention. Standard curve r2 values of 0.998-1.000 for each compound were consistently obtained and a quantitation level of 0.05 ??g/l was achieved for each compound tested. More than 10,000 surface and ground water samples have been analyzed by this method.

  7. Relationships between water infiltration and oil spill migration in sandy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Avner; Rubin, Hillel

    1987-06-01

    This article summarizes a study directed towards the prediction of oil spill migration in sandy soils. Such a prediction is needed for the design of remedial measures against soil and groundwater contamination. The geneal approach in this study is to convert available data concerning water infiltration into equivalent unknown data concerning oil spillage. This information is then fed into a numerical model by which the oil spill migration is simulated. Laboratory measurements including retention curve, hydraulic conductivity and infiltration rate, were made separately for water and kerosene in order to evaluate and confirm the suggested approach.

  8. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO2-FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10-2 M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  9. Phosphorus retention and remobilization along hydrological pathways in karst terrain.

    PubMed

    Jarvie, Helen P; Sharpley, Andrew N; Brahana, Van; Simmons, Tarra; Price, April; Neal, Colin; Lawlor, Alan J; Sleep, Darren; Thacker, Sarah; Haggard, Brian E

    2014-05-06

    Karst landscapes are often perceived as highly vulnerable to agricultural phosphorus (P) loss, via solution-enlarged conduits that bypass P retention processes. Although attenuation of P concentrations has been widely reported within karst drainage, the extent to which this results from hydrological dilution, rather than P retention, is poorly understood. This is of strategic importance for understanding the resilience of karst landscapes to P inputs, given increasing pressures for intensified agricultural production. Here hydrochemical tracers were used to account for dilution of P, and to quantify net P retention, along transport pathways between agricultural fields and emergent springs, for the karst of the Ozark Plateau, midcontinent USA. Up to ∼ 70% of the annual total P flux and ∼ 90% of the annual soluble reactive P flux was retained, with preferential retention of the most bioavailable (soluble reactive) P fractions. Our results suggest that, in some cases, karst drainage may provide a greater P sink than previously considered. However, the subsequent remobilization and release of the retained P may become a long-term source of slowly released "legacy" P to surface waters.

  10. Continuous columns for determining moisture characteristic curves of soilless substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sound water management is essential for effectively producing nursery crops. Understanding substrate water availability is a critical component to managing irrigation properly. The objective of this paper is to report a method for generating moisture characteristic curves of soilless substrate tha...

  11. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  12. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  13. The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    PS y• s’TANTIA PER SCIENTIAM NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS THE RETENTION OF FEMALE UNRESTRICTED LINE OFFICERS by Elena G...Title (Mix case letters) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This thesis analyzes the retention of female Naval officers, focusing on the

  14. Fission-product retention in HTGR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, F.J.; Kania, M.J.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed.

  15. Retention behavior of proton pump inhibitors using immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases with organic-aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Roberto; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Zanitti, Leo

    2013-08-23

    In the present study, the chromatographic behavior of two immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases (CSPs), the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3, under aqueous mobile phases conditions is presented. Four proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (omeprazole, lansoprazole, pentaprazole and rabeprazole) were selected as test compounds. The effect of the concentration of water in the mobile phase was investigated with respect to its contribution to enantioselectivity and retention. Under acetonitrile-water mobile phase conditions, retention behavior evidenced an interesting pattern. At lower water content, the retention factors decreased with increasing water and at higher water content a reversed trend was observed. These findings support the hypothesis that two retention mechanisms operated successively on the same CSP: the HILIC (with water-poor eluents) and RPLC (with water-rich eluents) modes. The retention factors were minimum in the intermediate region, corresponding to a water concentration of about 20%. Interestingly, the baseline separation of all PPIs investigated was optimized under organic-aqueous mobile phases containing a high water content (from about 50 to 65%). Thus, the dual retention behavior of the PPIs on the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3 made it possible to reach greener and harmless enantioselective conditions in a short analysis time.

  16. Enhanced retention of linuron, alachlor and metalaxyl in sandy soil columns intercalated with wood barriers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, M S; Ordax, J M; Arienzo, M; Sánchez-Martín, M J

    2011-03-01

    A study has been made of the effect a reactive barrier made of pine (softwood) or oak (hardwood) wood intercalated in a sandy soil column has on the retention of linuron, alachlor and metalaxyl (pesticides with contrasting physicochemical characteristics). The leaching of pesticides has been carried out under a saturated flow regime and breakthrough curves (BTCs) have been obtained at flow rates of 1 m Lmin(-1) (all pesticides) and 3 m Lmin(-1) (linuron). The cumulative curves in the unmodified soil indicate a leaching of pesticides >80% of the total amount of compound added. After barrier intercalation, linuron leaching decreases significantly and a modification of the leaching kinetics of alachlor and metalaxyl has been observed. The theoretical R factors increased ∼2.6-3.3, 1.2-1.6-fold, and 1.4-1.7-fold and the concentration of the maximum peak decreased ∼6-12-fold, 2-4-fold and 1.2-2-fold for linuron, alachlor and metalaxyl, respectively. When considering the three pesticides, significant correlations have been found between the theoretical retardation factor (R) and the pore volume corresponding to the maximum peaks of the BTCs (r=0.77; p<0.05) or the total volume leached (r=-0.78; p<0.05). The results reveal the efficacy of reactive wood barriers to decrease the leaching of pesticides from point sources of pollution depends on the type of wood, the hydrophobicity of the pesticide and the adopted water flow rate. Pine was more effective than oak in decreasing the leaching of hydrophobic pesticide linuron or in decreasing the maximum peak concentration of the less hydrophobic pesticides in soils. Efficacy of these wood barriers was limited for the least hydrophobic pesticide metalaxyl.

  17. NASA's Potential Contributions for Remediation of Retention Ponds Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Photocatalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Lauren W.; Ryan, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution uses NASA Earth science research on atmospheric ozone and aerosols data (1) to help improve the prediction capabilities of water runoff models that are used to estimate runoff pollution from retention ponds, and (2) to understand the pollutant removal contribution and potential of photocatalytically coated materials that could be used in these ponds. Models (the EPA's SWMM and the USGS SLAMM) exist that estimate the release of pollutants into the environment from storm-water-related retention pond runoff. UV irradiance data acquired from the satellite mission Aura and from the OMI Surface UV algorithm will be incorporated into these models to enhance their capabilities, not only by increasing the general understanding of retention pond function (both the efficacy and efficiency) but additionally by adding photocatalytic materials to these retention ponds, augmenting their performance. State and local officials who run pollution protection programs could then develop and implement photocatalytic technologies for water pollution control in retention ponds and use them in conjunction with existing runoff models. More effective decisions about water pollution protection programs could be made, the persistence and toxicity of waste generated could be minimized, and subsequently our natural water resources would be improved. This Candidate Solution is in alignment with the Water Management and Public Health National Applications.

  18. Plant species richness enhances nitrogen retention in green roof plots.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine; Schweinhart, Shelbye; Buffam, Ishi

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs have become common in many cities and are projected to continue to increase in coverage, but little is known about the ecological properties of these engineered ecosystems. In this study, we tested the biodiversity-ecosystem function hypothesis using commercially available green roof trays as replicated plots with varying levels of plant species richness (0, 1, 3, or 6 common green roof species per plot, using plants with different functional characteristics). We estimated accumulated plant biomass near the peak of the first full growing season (July 2013) and measured runoff volume after nearly every rain event from September 2012 to September 2013 (33 events) and runoff fluxes of inorganic nutrients ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate from a subset of 10 events. We found that (1) total plant biomass increased with increasing species richness, (2) green roof plots were effective at reducing storm runoff, with vegetation increasing water retention more than soil-like substrate alone, but there was no significant effect of plant species identity or richness on runoff volume, (3) green roof substrate was a significant source of phosphate, regardless of presence/absence of plants, and (4) dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = nitrate + ammonium) runoff fluxes were different among plant species and decreased significantly with increasing plant species richness. The variation in N retention was positively related to variation in plant biomass. Notably, the increased biomass and N retention with species richness in this engineered ecosystem are similar to patterns observed in published studies from grasslands and other well-studied ecosystems. We suggest that more diverse plantings on vegetated roofs may enhance the retention capacity for reactive nitrogen. This is of importance for the sustained health of vegetated roof ecosystems, which over time often experience nitrogen limitation, and is also relevant for water quality in receiving waters

  19. Dissecting the ecosystem service of large-scale pollutant retention: The role of wetlands and other landscape features.

    PubMed

    Quin, Andrew; Jaramillo, Fernando; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Various features of a landscape contribute to the regulating ecosystem service of reducing waterborne pollutant loading to downstream environments. At local scales, wetlands have been shown to be effective in retaining pollutants. Here, we investigate the landscape-scale contribution to pollutant retention provided by multiple wetlands. We develop a general analytical model which shows that the retention contribution of wetlands and other landscape features is only significant if a large fraction of the total waterborne pollutant transport passes through them. Next, by means of a statistical analysis of official data, we quantify the nutrient retention contribution of wetlands for multiple sub-catchments in two Swedish Water Management Districts. We compare this with the retention contribution of two other landscape features: the waterborne transport distance and major lakes. The landscape-scale retention contribution of wetlands is undetectable; rather, the other two landscape features account for much of the total nutrient retention.

  20. Assessment of nutrient retention by Natete wetland Kampala, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanyiginya, V.; Kansiime, F.; Kimwaga, R.; Mashauri, D. A.

    Natete wetland which is located in a suburb of Kampala city in Uganda is dominated by C yperus papyrus and covers an area of approximately 1 km 2. The wetland receives wastewater and runoff from Natete town which do not have a wastewater treatment facility. The main objective of this study was to assess nutrient retention of Natete wetland and specifically to: determine the wastewater flow patterns in the wetland; estimate the nutrient loads into and out of the wetland; determine the nutrient retention by soil, plants and water column in the wetland; and assess the above and belowground biomass density of the dominant vegetation. Soil, water and plant samples were taken at 50 m intervals along two transects cut through the wetland; soil and water samples were taken at 10 cm just below the surface. Physico-chemical parameters namely pH, electrical conductivity and temperature were measured in situ. Water samples were analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Electrical conductivity ranged between 113 μS/cm and 530 μS/cm and the wastewater flow was concentrated on the eastern side of the wetland. pH varied between 6 and 7, temperature ranged from 19 °C to 24 °C. NH 4-N, NO 3-N, and TN concentrations were retained by 21%, 98%, and 35% respectively. Phosphorus concentration was higher at the outlet of the wetland possibly due to release from sediments and leaching. Nutrient loads were higher at the inlet (12,614 ± 394 kgN/day and 778 ± 159 kgP/day) than the outlet (2368 ± 425 kgN/day and 216 ± 56 kgP/day) indicating retention by the wetland. Plants stored most nutrients compared to soil and water. The belowground biomass of papyrus vegetation in the wetland was higher (1288.4 ± 8.3 gDW/m 2) than the aboveground biomass (1019.7 ± 13.8 gDW/m 2). Plant uptake is one of the important routes of nutrient retention in Natete wetland. It is recommended that harvesting papyrus can be an

  1. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  2. Quantification of colloid retention and release by straining and energy minima in variably saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wenjing; Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Stoof, Cathelijne R; Gao, Bin; Schatz, Anna Lottie; Zhang, Yalei; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2013-08-06

    The prediction of colloid transport in unsaturated porous media in the presence of large energy barrier is hampered by scant information of the proportional retention by straining and attractive interactions at surface energy minima. This study aims to fill this gap by performing saturated and unsaturated column experiments in which colloid pulses were added at various ionic strengths (ISs) from 0.1 to 50 mM. Subsequent flushing with deionized water released colloids held at the secondary minimum. Next, destruction of the column freed colloids held by straining. Colloids not recovered at the end of the experiment were quantified as retained at the primary minimum. Results showed that net colloid retention increased with IS and was independent of saturation degree under identical IS and Darcian velocity. Attachment rates were greater in unsaturated columns, despite an over 3-fold increase in pore water velocity relative to saturated columns, because additional retention at the readily available air-associated interfaces (e.g., the air-water-solid [AWS] interfaces) is highly efficient. Complementary visual data showed heavy retention at the AWS interfaces. Retention by secondary minima ranged between 8% and 46% as IS increased, and was greater for saturated conditions. Straining accounted for an average of 57% of the retained colloids with insignificant differences among the treatments. Finally, retention by primary minima ranged between 14% and 35% with increasing IS, and was greater for unsaturated conditions due to capillary pinning.

  3. Influence of hydrologic loading rate on phosphorus retention and ecosystem productivity in created wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsch, W.J.; Cronk, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Four 2- to 3-ha constructed freshwater riparian wetlands in Lake County, Illinois, were subjected to two hydrologic regimes of pumped river water to simulate nonpoint source pollution. The experimental wetlands at the Des Plaines River Wetland Demonstration Project were designed to develop and test wetland design principles, construction methods, and management programs needed to create and maintain wetlands for the purposes of water quality management, flood control, and fish and wildlife habitat. High-flow wetlands (HFW) with short retention times received 34 to 38 cm of river water per week, and low-flow wetlands (LFW) with high retention times received 10 to 15 cm per week. This report summarizes research results for phosphorus dynamics and retention, macrophyte development, periphyton productivity, and overall water column metabolism through 1992. All of these functions were hypothesized to be related to hydrologic conditions.

  4. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  5. Fractionation of process water in thermomechanical pulp mills.

    PubMed

    Persson, T; Krawczyk, H; Nordin, A-K; Jönsson, A-S

    2010-06-01

    In this work process water from a thermomechanical pulp mill was divided into five fractions by filtration and membrane filtration. Suspended matter was mainly isolated in the retentate from the drum filter, extractives in the microfiltration retentate, hemicelluloses in the ultrafiltration retentate and lignin in the nanofiltration retentate. The final water fraction was of fresh water quality. For each tonne of pulp produced, about 10kg of suspended matter, more than 0.3kg of extractives, 11kg of hemicelluloses and 8kg of aromatic compounds (lignin) could be recovered from the drum filtration retentate, the microfiltration retentate, the ultrafiltration retentate and the nanofiltration retentate, respectively. About 40% of the treated process water could be recovered as fresh water.

  6. Mechanisms affecting the transport and retention of bacteria, bacteriophage and microspheres in laboratory-scale saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggewiss, G.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is becoming an increasingly important water source due to the ever-increasing demands from agricultural, residential and industrial consumers. In search of more secure sources, wells are routinely finished over large vertical depths in bedrock aquifers, creating new hydraulic pathways and thus increasing the risk of cross contamination. Moreover, hydraulic pathways are also being altered and created by increasing water withdrawal rates from these wells. Currently, it is not well understood how biological contaminants are transported through, and retained in, fractured media thereby making risk assessment and land use decisions difficult. Colloid transport within fractured rock is a complex process with several mechanisms affecting transport and retention, including: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, diffusion, size exclusion, adsorption, and decay. Several researchers have investigated the transport of bacteria, bacteriophage, and microspheres (both carboxylated and plain) to evaluate the effects of surface properties and size on transport and retention. These studies have suggested that transport is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the particle, the fracture, and the carrying fluid. However, these studies contain little detail regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for transport beyond speculating about their existence. Further, little work has been done to compare the transport of these particulate materials through the same fracture, allowing for direct observations based on particulate size and surface properties. This research examines the similarities and differences in transport and retention between four different particles through two different laboratory-scale, saturated fractures. This work is designed to explore the effects of particle size, surface properties, ionic strength of the carrying solution, and aperture field characteristics on transport and retention in single, saturated fractures. The particulates

  7. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  8. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  9. Supply curves of conserved energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, A. K.

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes.

  10. Retention and transport of nutrients in a mature agricultural impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. M.; Julian, J. P.; Doyle, M. W.; Stanley, E. H.

    2013-03-01

    Small impoundments intended for irrigation, livestock watering, and hydropower are numerous in agricultural regions of the world. Many of these artificial water bodies are well positioned to intercept fertilizer runoff and pollutants but could be vulnerable to long-term sedimentation, management intervention, or failure. We examined solute retention in a mature, sediment-filled, run-of-river impoundment created by a small, >100 year old dam in agricultural Wisconsin, United States. To do so, we measured instantaneous net fluxes of inorganic and organic solutes through the system, which contained wetlands. The impoundment was a persistent net sink for sulfate and, during the warm season only, a net sink for nitrate, ammonium, and soluble reactive phosphorus. There was also a negative relationship between nitrate and sulfate retention, suggestive of nitrate-stimulated sulfate production. Impoundment hydraulics were then altered by a management manipulation (dam removal) that caused mean water travel time to decrease by approximately 40%. Following manipulation, autoregressive modeling of solute time series indicated a decrease in mean net retention of nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, and soluble reactive phosphorus. There was also a decrease in the variability (coefficient of variation) of instantaneous net exports of dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus. These biogeochemical changes were consistent with predictions based on hydraulics (reduced water travel time), with the exception of ammonium release immediately following reservoir dewatering. Our results emphasize the biogeochemical importance of reservoir-wetland ecosystems, which are expanding with impoundment sedimentation but are threatened by infrastructure aging. We suggest that reservoir wetlands be considered in the management of dams and surface water pollution.

  11. Curve Fit Technique for a Smooth Curve Using Gaussian Sections.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    curve-fitting. Furthermore, the algorithm that does the fitting is simple enough to be used on a programmable calculator . 8 -I.F , A X i 4. Y-14 .4. - -* F.J OR;r IF 17 r*~~ , ac ~J ’a vt. . S ~ :.. *~All, a-4k .16’.- a1 1, t

  12. 12 CFR 226.25 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Record retention. 226.25 Section 226.25 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.25 Record retention. (a) General rule. A creditor...

  13. 10 CFR 37.103 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Record retention. 37.103 Section 37.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Records § 37.103 Record retention. Licensees shall maintain the records that are required by...

  14. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  15. Measuring Up: Benchmarking Graduate Retention. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyers, C.; Perryman, S.; Barber, L.

    Retention of college graduates by employers across the United Kingdom was examined. Data were collected through a survey of 362 organizations and interviews with 36 employers and their graduate employees. Most employers were unworried by their levels of graduate retention; two-thirds expected to keep new recruits for the foreseeable future. Rates…

  16. Novel Word Retention in Sequential Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Pui Fong

    2014-01-01

    Children's ability to learn and retain new words is fundamental to their vocabulary development. This study examined word retention in children learning a home language (L1) from birth and a second language (L2) in preschool settings. Participants were presented with sixteen novel words in L1 and in L2 and were tested for retention after…

  17. 76 FR 34010 - Credit Risk Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ...-AA43 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 267 RIN 2501-AD53 Credit Risk Retention... a joint notice of proposed rulemaking for public comment to implement the credit risk retention... Reform and Consumer Protection Act (``Credit Risk NPR'' or ``proposed rule''). Due to the complexity...

  18. The Grade Retention/Social Promotion Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    1985-01-01

    This publication focuses on the retention/promotion debate regarding failing and low-achieving students. An introductory essay describes the inherent limitation in the research done on this issue--the impossibility of obtaining an appropriate control group--and suggests that the retention/promotion quandary can best be resolved by accommodating…

  19. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  20. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  1. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...