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Sample records for water sediment domestic

  1. Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

    2012-08-01

    Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public. PMID:21901308

  2. Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

    2012-08-01

    Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public.

  3. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  4. Water-Using Equipment: Domestic

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

  5. Economic valuation of domestic water uses.

    PubMed

    Justes, Antón; Barberán, Ramón; Farizo, Begoña A

    2014-02-15

    There are many reasons of concern about the quality of water for domestic uses. The strategic goals of water tariffs must include savings, efficient management and equity in order to optimise availability of the best quality water. The main domestic uses of water are food preparation, personal hygiene and household cleaning; not all of them need the same quality, and for some of them there are even potential substitutes. In order to contribute to this debate, we need to know how these different uses are valued by direct users. This article focuses on eliciting values for different domestic uses, using discrete choice experiments. As far as we know, this is the first time that a differentiated valuation per use has been defined. The paper introduces three innovations in the design of the experiment. The design takes into account decisive variables in household water consumption, such as family size, together with the consumption level, and the options offered in the choice task are combinations of different prices for each of the uses. A latent class model with both common and class-specific random parameters is applied to better account for the influence of heterogeneity in the respondents' choices. The results show that the most valued use depends on the consumption level class.

  6. Quantifying Urban Water Subsidies with Hydrological Tracers of Domestic Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Sikora, M. T.; Wozniak, E.; Fisher, K. R.; Carr, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Connections between urban hydrological systems and human water infrastructure are well established. Interactions between these systems occur at a wide range of scales, from large inter-basin transfers to individual leaking pipes. However, much of the interest in these connections arises from practical considerations, for example, substantially altered in-stream flow or the presence/absence of sewage in surface water systems. Less recognized is that in smaller urban catchments, daily water flux through human water distribution systems is often much larger than low flow surface water flux from the catchment. As infrastructure ages and cross-connections grow, transfers from the substantial human fluxes to the catchment will increasingly subsidize urban water budgets. Tools for quantifying the contribution of this subsidy to urban hydrological systems can clarify both practical questions for urban managers and our understanding of flow generation in catchments. Stream water chemistry from a multi-year sampling campaign in Nine Mile Run (Pittsburgh, PA) is used to examine potential hydrological tracers of human domestic water. In particular, we examine the use of fluoride added in precise quantities as a dental health supplement as a tracer of human domestic water (e.g., drinking and waste water). While fluoride is not necessarily a conservative tracer, equilibrium reactions governing fluoride solubility generally require substantially higher cationic concentrations than those observed in surface water chemistry. Further, during periods where human subsidies dominate (e.g., water line breaks or hydrant flushes discharging to the stream) fluoride concentrations generally approach the concentration added to domestic water. We use multiple modeling approaches to demonstrate the appropriateness of fluoride as a tracer, infer contributions of human domestic water to the hydrologic budget, and explore fluoride dynamics in the Nine Mile Run basin. A fluoride tracer is

  7. Reutilization of industrial sedimentation plants as a domestic landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Viehweg, M.; Duetsch, M.; Wagner, J.; Edelmann, F.

    1995-12-31

    The methods and the investigation results for evaluation of the risk potential emanating from the mixed waste landfill Steinsee in Johanngeorgenstadt are described for the protected commodities of water, soil and air. The peculiarity of this mixed waste landfill is its layered structure (17th to 19th century near-surface mineworkings, granite weathering zone at the base of the landfill, washed-in tailings, and refuse dump). A network of measuring points has been installed in and around the landfill, and selective investigations have been made to ascertain the risk potential from the landfill. Based on the investigation results, it can be estimated that the continued use of the landfill is justifiable from the geological, hydrogeological and hydrological viewpoints, provided that permanent and continuous control is ensured by a monitoring system and that the overall situation can be improved in the short term by suitable technical measures. The waste being deposited now consists of domestic refuse, bulky refuse, sewage sludge, building rubble, excavated earth, broken up road surfacing, waste containing asbestos, industrial waste and power station ash.

  8. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.

  9. AMBIENT WATER, POREWATER, AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment assessments may be performed for a variety of purposes; these include: dredging and dredged sediment disposal, for evaluations of sediments as a capping material, to determine sediment quality, to assess biological impairment and to assess the status of environment monit...

  10. A novel approach for examining future US domestic water demand

    EPA Science Inventory

    Costs of repairing and expanding aging infrastructure and competing demands for water from other sectors such as industry and agriculture are stretching policy makers’ abilities to meet essential domestic drinking water needs for future generations. Using Bayesian statistic...

  11. Domestic livestock resources of Turkey: water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Orhan; Ertugrul, Mehmet; Wilson, Richard Trevor

    2012-04-01

    Water buffalo are an ancient component of Turkey's domestic livestock resources. Commonly referred to as the Anatolian buffalo the animal is part of the Mediterranean group which includes Syrian, Egyptian and Southeast European animals. Once quite numerous, there have been drastic reductions in their numbers since the 1970s due to intensification of dairy activities, agricultural mechanization and changing consumer preferences. The main areas of distribution are in northwest Turkey in the Marmara and Black Sea Regions. Buffalo are kept in small herds by livestock and mixed crop-livestock farmers. Milk is the main product, meat is largely a by-product of the dairy function and provision of the once-important draught power is now a minor output. Buffalo milk is used to prepare a variety of speciality products but output of both milk and meat is very low in comparison to cattle. Conditions of welfare and health status are not optimal. Internal parasites are a constraint on productivity. Some buffalo are being used for conservation grazing in the Black Sea area to maintain optimal conditions for bird life in a nature reserve. Long neglected by government there are recent activities to establish conservation herds, set up in vitro banks and undertake molecular characterization. More effort is needed by government to promote buffalo production and to engage the general public in conservation of their national heritage.

  12. Domestic livestock resources of Turkey: water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Orhan; Ertugrul, Mehmet; Wilson, Richard Trevor

    2012-04-01

    Water buffalo are an ancient component of Turkey's domestic livestock resources. Commonly referred to as the Anatolian buffalo the animal is part of the Mediterranean group which includes Syrian, Egyptian and Southeast European animals. Once quite numerous, there have been drastic reductions in their numbers since the 1970s due to intensification of dairy activities, agricultural mechanization and changing consumer preferences. The main areas of distribution are in northwest Turkey in the Marmara and Black Sea Regions. Buffalo are kept in small herds by livestock and mixed crop-livestock farmers. Milk is the main product, meat is largely a by-product of the dairy function and provision of the once-important draught power is now a minor output. Buffalo milk is used to prepare a variety of speciality products but output of both milk and meat is very low in comparison to cattle. Conditions of welfare and health status are not optimal. Internal parasites are a constraint on productivity. Some buffalo are being used for conservation grazing in the Black Sea area to maintain optimal conditions for bird life in a nature reserve. Long neglected by government there are recent activities to establish conservation herds, set up in vitro banks and undertake molecular characterization. More effort is needed by government to promote buffalo production and to engage the general public in conservation of their national heritage. PMID:21870064

  13. Classification of excessive domestic water consumption using Fuzzy Clustering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zairi Zaidi, A.; Rasmani, Khairul A.

    2016-08-01

    Demand for clean and treated water is increasing all over the world. Therefore it is crucial to conserve water for better use and to avoid unnecessary, excessive consumption or wastage of this natural resource. Classification of excessive domestic water consumption is a difficult task due to the complexity in determining the amount of water usage per activity, especially as the data is known to vary between individuals. In this study, classification of excessive domestic water consumption is carried out using a well-known Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Consumer data containing information on daily, weekly and monthly domestic water usage was employed for the purpose of classification. Using the same dataset, the result produced by the FCM clustering algorithm is compared with the result obtained from a statistical control chart. The finding of this study demonstrates the potential use of the FCM clustering algorithm for the classification of domestic consumer water consumption data.

  14. POSSIBILITY OF REDUCING DOMESTIC WATER SHORTAGE DURING DROUGHT BY POPULARIZATION OF WATER SAVING APPLIANCES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Morimasa

    I studied possibility of reducing domestic water shortage during drought by popularization of water saving appliances. Dometic water demand can be reduced by 30% by popularization of water saving appliances. If domestic water demand is reduced by 25%, domestic water don't run short in case of drought equal to drought in 1994. If water demand is reduced by 15%, shortage of domestic water is allowable. If subsidy policy is adopted to reduce water demand by 15% within 10 years, every residents must pay 200 yen every month for operating fund.

  15. Potential microbial bioinvasions via ships' ballast water, sediment, and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Drake, Lisa A; Doblin, Martina A; Dobbs, Fred C

    2007-01-01

    A prominent vector of aquatic invasive species to coastal regions is the discharge of water, sediments, and biofilm from ships' ballast-water tanks. During eight years of studying ships arriving to the lower Chesapeake Bay, we developed an understanding of the mechanisms by which invasive microorganisms might arrive to the region via ships. Within a given ship, habitats included ballast water, unpumpable water and sediment (collectively known as residuals), and biofilms formed on internal surfaces of ballast-water tanks. We sampled 69 vessels arriving from foreign and domestic ports, largely from Western Europe, the Mediterranean region, and the US East and Gulf coasts. All habitats contained bacteria and viruses. By extrapolating the measured concentration of a microbial metric to the estimated volume of ballast water, biofilm, or residual sediment and water within an average vessel, we calculated the potential total number of microorganisms contained by each habitat, thus creating a hierarchy of risk of delivery. The estimated concentration of microorganisms was greatest in ballast water>sediment and water residuals>biofilms. From these results, it is clear microorganisms may be transported within ships in a variety of ways. Using temperature tolerance as a measure of survivability and the temperature difference between ballast-water samples and the water into which the ballast water was discharged, we estimated 56% of microorganisms could survive in the lower Bay. Extrapolated delivery and survival of microorganisms to the Port of Hampton Roads in lower Chesapeake Bay shows on the order of 10(20) microorganisms (6.8 x 10(19) viruses and 3.9 x 10(18) bacteria cells) are discharged annually to the region.

  16. Socioeconomic differentials and availability of domestic water in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungumaro, Esther W.

    The past few decades has seen massive efforts to increasing provision of domestic water. However, water is still unavailable to many people most of them located in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and East Asia. Furthermore, availability of water varies greatly both spatially and temporary. While other people pay so dearly for domestic water others have an easy access to adequate clean water and sanitation. Accessibility and affordability of domestic water and sanitation is determined by a great variety of factors including socioeconomic status of households. The main objective of the paper is to inform on factors which need to be taken into account when coming up with projects to provide domestic water. It is more critical when the issue of water pricing comes into the equation. Water pricing has many facets, including equity, willingness to pay and affordability. In this premise, it is deemed important to understand the socioeconomic characteristics of the people before deciding on the amount of money they will have to pay for water consumption. It is argued that understanding people’s socioeconomic situation will greatly help to ensure that principles of sustainability and equity in water allocation and pricing are achieved. To do so, the paper utilized 2002 South Africa General Household Survey (GHS), to analyze socioeconomic variables and availability of domestic water. Analysis was mainly descriptive. However, logistic regression analysis was also utilized to determine the likelihood of living in a household that obtain water from a safe source. The study found that there is a strong relationship between availability of domestic water and socioeconomic conditions. Economic status, household size and to a lesser extent gender of head of household were found to be strong predictors of living in a household which obtained water from a safe source. The paper recommends that needs and priorities for interventions in water provision should take into account

  17. Assessment of domestic water quality: case study, Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Samira Ibrahim; Jurdi, Mey

    2007-12-01

    In urban cities, the environmental services are the responsibility of the public sector, where piped water supply is the norm for urban household. Likewise, in Beirut City (capital of Lebanon) official water authorities are the main supplier of domestic water through a network of piping system that leaks in many areas. Beirut City and its suburbs are overpopulated since it is the residence of 1/3 of the Lebanese citizens. Thus, Beirut suffers deficiency in meeting its water demand. Water rationing, as a remedial action, is firmly established since four decades by the Lebanese Water Authorities. Consumers resorted then to private wells to supplement their domestic water needs. Consequently, household water quality is influenced by external factors relating to well water characteristics and internal factors depending on the types of the pipes of the distribution network and cross connections to sewer pipes. These factors could result in chemical and microbial contamination of drinking water. The objective of this study is to investigate domestic water quality variation in Beirut City emerging form the aforementioned factors. The presented work encircles a typical case study of Beirut City (Ras Beirut). Results showed deterioration pattern in domestic water quality. The predicted metal species and scales within the water pipes of distribution network depended on water pH, hardness, sulfate, chloride, and iron. The corrosion of iron pipes mainly depended on Mg hardness.

  18. CONTAMINANTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit River has experienced over a century of heavy contaminant discharges from industry and municipalities. The sources of contaminants vary, and include non-point sources, combined sewer overflows, point sources, tributaries, sediments, and upstream inputs. ---
    Demonst...

  19. Domestic applications for aerospace waste and water management technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disanto, F.; Murray, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the aerospace developments in solid waste disposal and water purification, which are applicable to specific domestic problems are explored. Also provided is an overview of the management techniques used in defining the need, in utilizing the available tools, and in synthesizing a solution. Specifically, several water recovery processes will be compared for domestic applicability. Examples are filtration, distillation, catalytic oxidation, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis. Solid disposal methods will be discussed, including chemical treatment, drying, incineration, and wet oxidation. The latest developments in reducing household water requirements and some concepts for reusing water will be outlined.

  20. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  1. Quality of ground water from private domestic wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, Leslie A.; Hamilton, Pixie A.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights major findings from two USGS reports: DeSimone (2009) and DeSimone and others (2009). These reports can be accessed at http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa. This article is followed by a summary of treatment considerations and options for owners of private domestic wells, written by Cliff Treyens of the National Ground Water Association.

  2. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial design of a solar domestic hot water system is considered. The system performance specification and detailed design drawings are included. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  3. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  4. Prototype solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Construction of a double wall heat exchanger using soft copper tube coiled around a hot water storage tank was completed and preliminary tests were conducted. Solar transport water to tank potable water heat exchange tests were performed with a specially constructed test stand. Work was done to improve the component hardware and system design for the solar water heater. The installation of both a direct feed system and a double wall heat exchanger system provided experience and site data to enable informative decisions to be made as the solar market expands into areas where freeze protection is required.

  5. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  6. Sediment mediated species interactions in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten

    2002-10-01

    Self-structuring in marine sediment communities is achieved by the mobility of the organisms, the trophic web, and biogenic transformations of the habitat. The latter are: bioconstruction and bioturbations, sediment stabilisation and destabilisation, with facilitating and inhibiting effects. This cursory overview intends to show that in near-shore mud and sand, biogenic habitat transformations pervade all community interactions. Consequently these deserve as much attention in benthic ecosystem analyses as do trophic pathways. Abundant phototrophs and suspension feeders tend to accumulate sediment and organic matter. Underneath phototrophic mats, composite layers of anaerobic microorganisms abound. Benthic animals provide anchorage to tufts of algae, and these in turn provide shelter and food for mobile benthos. Rooted plants slow down hydrodynamics and generate complex habitats above the sediment surface but below a meshwork of roots may inhibit burrowing animals. Abundant suspension feeders stabilise sediments, and may build loose hummocks, multi-species epibenthic thickets or solid reefs, accommodating diverse epibenthic assemblages. Their raised and rough surfaces enhance turbulence. Below the sediment surface, tubes and burrows of sessile or discretely motile animals provide microoxic habitats for diverse assemblages of small organisms. At the surface, mucus of motile organisms increases sediment cohesion. Accumulated dead hardparts of the benthos support epibionts when at the surface but cause resistance to the burrowers below. Reworking and irrigation of the sediment by the infauna increases oxygenation, and particulate and solute fluxes with the overlying water. Mounds and pits generated by resident burrowers as well as by large visiting grazers and predators further diversify the benthos. All these bioengineered structures and processes generate dynamic and complex habitat-mediated interaction webs, affecting and meshed into the trophic web, which they may

  7. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  8. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  9. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters, comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  10. NORTH PORTAL - DOMESTIC COLD WATER CALCULATION - CHANGE HOUSE FACILITY #5008

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mastilovic

    2000-03-02

    The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for domestic cold water and to size the supply main piping for the Change House Facility No.5008 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (Section 4.4.1) and US Department of Energy Order 6430.1A-1540 (Section 4.4.2).

  11. Domestic water heating by solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinmuth, F.

    1980-10-01

    A solar hot water plant was equipped with extensive measuring instrumentation. The main results of tests carried out during 1 year, are: the average collector efficiency during 1 year operation is 15.9%; the total collector area of 30 sqm (23 sqm oriented to the south-west and 7 sqm to the south-east) produces 3.9 MWhr useful heat in 12 months; the climatic data of the test year (Sun radiation and outside temperatures) approximately agree with multiyear average data from the German weather bureau); and the 30 sqm collector plant only supplies 16% of the total yearly heat demand of the new dwelling of 150 sqm useful area (for space and hot water heating).

  12. Classifications of central solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. Y.; Hao, B.; Peng, C.; Wang, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there are many means by which to classify solar domestic hot water systems, which are often categorized according to their scope of supply, solar collector positions, and type of heat storage tank. However, the lack of systematic and scientific classification as well as the general disregard of the thermal performance of the auxiliary heat source is important to DHW systems. Thus, the primary focus of this paper is to determine a classification system for solar domestic hot water systems based on the positions of the solar collector and auxiliary heating device, both respectively and in combination. Field-testing data regarding many central solar DHW systems demonstrates that the position of the auxiliary heat source clearly reflects the operational energy consumption. The consumption of collective auxiliary heating hot water system is much higher than individual auxiliary heating hot water system. In addition, costs are significantly reduced by the separation of the heat storage tank and the auxiliary heating device.

  13. Use of tracers and isotopes to evaluate vulnerability of water in domestic wells to septic waste

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Fetterman, G.S.; Meyer, M.J.; Bullen, T.; Sebree, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    In Nebraska, a large number (>200) of shallow sand-point and cased wells completed in coarse alluvial sediments along rivers and lakes still are used to obtain drinking water for human consumption, even though construction of sand-point wells for consumptive uses has been banned since 1987. The quality of water from shallow domestic wells potentially vulnerable to seepage from septic systems was evaluated by analyzing for the presence of tracers and multiple isotopes. Samples were collected from 26 sand-point and perforated, cased domestic wells and were analyzed for bacteria, coliphages, nitrogen species, nitrogen and boron isotopes, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), prescription and nonprescription drugs, or organic waste water contaminants. At least 13 of the 26 domestic well samples showed some evidence of septic system effects based on the results of several tracers including DOC, coliphages, NH4+, NO3-, N2, ?? 15N[NO3-] and boron isotopes, and antibiotics and other drugs. Sand-point wells within 30 m of a septic system and <14 m deep in a shallow, thin aquifer had the most tracers detected and the highest values, indicating the greatest vulnerability to contamination from septic waste. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  14. 1. DOMESTIC WATER SUPPLY TREATMENT HOUSE, ON PENSTOCK ABOVE SAR1. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DOMESTIC WATER SUPPLY TREATMENT HOUSE, ON PENSTOCK ABOVE SAR-1. VIEW TO NORTWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Domestic Water Supply Treatment House, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Estimated Domestic, Irrigation, and Industrial Water Use in Washington, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey has published a series of Circulars and other reports on the estimated use of water in the United States at 5-year intervals. This report presents State, regional, and county estimates of the amount of water used for domestic, irrigation, and industrial purposes in the State of Washington during the year 2000. Domestic water use was estimated to be 674 million gallons per day and the per-capita rate, 114 gallons per day. Crop-irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,005 million gallons per day and the application rate, 2.2 acre-feet per acre per year, or feet per year. Golf-course irrigation water use was estimated to be 23.6 million gallons per day and the application rate, 1.4 feet per year. Industrial water use was estimated to be 681 million gallons per day. Historically, these core categories account for about 92 percent of the estimated offstream water used in Washington.

  16. Domestic water conservation practices in Tlemcen City (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habi, Mohammed; Harrouz, Omar

    2015-06-01

    During the last three decades, citizens of an Algerian city are concerned with the problem of drinking water supply. Time discontinuation service became the rule. The central idea of the analysis based on interviews is to assess the role of water in the organization of the relationship between habitat and users. The fundamental question is how users, in particular women, incorporate water in their daily lives due to rationing. Having to deal with the discontinuous and frequent weak water supply, the inhabitants of the city of Tlemcen who are connected to the water supply system, as well as those connected to the water system of all Algerian towns, have developed an internal water storage system to sort out this problem. The imposed rationing has proved to be expensive for consumers. The water shortage pushed the consumers to invest in relatively expensive storage and pumping facilities to satisfy their domestic needs. As the frequency of the water supply is on a two times per week basis, the survey reveals a discrepancy in terms of volumes consumed and stored by each household. The use of water depends on the individual storage facility and the frequency of the supply. The life of the households, particularly that of the housewives, depends on the availability of water and thus on the schedules of the Company of Production of Water "Algerian Des Eaux'' (ADE). This is particularly the case when they are supplied during the night.

  17. An experimental study on recovering heat from domestic drain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Al Shaer, Ali; Haddad, Ahmad; Khaled, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study on a system of heat recovery applied to domestic drain water pipes. The concept suggested consists of using the heat still present in the drain water as a preheating/heating source to the cold water supply of the building. To proceed, an appropriate experimental setup is developed and a coil heat exchanger is used as heat transfer device in the recovery system. Several scenarios are simulated and corresponding parameters are recorded and analyzed. It was shown that the suggested recovery concept can considerably preheat the cold water supply and then decrease the energy consumption. Particularly, up to 8.6 kW of heat were recovered when the cold water supply is initially at 3 °C.

  18. Patterns, structures and regulations of domestic water cycle systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Junying; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Dayong

    2010-05-01

    Domestic water cycle systems serving as one critical component of artificial water cycle at the catchment's scale, is so closely related to public healthy, human rights and social-economic development, and has gained the highest priority in strategic water resource and municipal infrastructure planning. In this paper, three basic patterns of domestic water cycle systems are identified and analyzed, including rural domestic water system (i.e. primary level), urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) and metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level), with different "abstract-transport-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of water consumption (such as drinking, cooking, toilet flushing, showering or cleaning). The rural domestic water system is general simple with three basic "abstract-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of basic water consumption such as drinking, cooking, washing and sanitation. The urban domestic water system has relative complex mechanisms of "abstract-supply-consume-treatment-discharge" and more micro-components of water consumption such as bath, dishwashing or car washing. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) has the most complex mechanisms by considering internal water reuse, external wastewater reclamation, and nutrient recycling processes. The detailed structures for different water cycle pattern are presented from the aspects of water quantity, wastewater quality and nutrients flow. With the speed up of urbanization and development of social-economy in China, those three basic patterns are interacting, transforming and upgrading. According to the past experiences and current situations, urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) is the dominant pattern based on indicator of system number or system scale. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) is the idealized model for the future development and management. Current domestic water system

  19. Comparative analysis of six generic solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.; Noreen, D.; Murphy, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Results were analyzed from experiments on six solar domestic hot water systems tested at National Bureau of Standards. Use of pumps, fans, controls, and solenoid valves in the pumped systems resulted in high parasitic energy consumption. Storage losses from double tank systems were greater than expected due to poor storage tank insulation. Direct systems performed better than indirect systems as expected. The thermosyphon delivered the most solar energy to the hot water load for the lowest initial cost. The air system performed poorly due to the parasitic energy consumption and poor heat transfer across the air-to-water heat exchanger. Reliable freeze protection needs to be developed for direct systems, especially thermosyphon systems, to take advantage of direct heat transfer.

  20. Sediment Budget and Sediment Fingerprinting as Management Strategies to Understand Sediment Contributions to Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Gorman-Sanisaca, L.

    2015-12-01

    A sound understanding of the sediment sources contributing to the sediment flux and the overall sediment budget of a watershed is key to total maximum daily load (TMDL) management strategies that focus on reducing sediment and sediment-related nutrient loadings to streams. This understanding can be provided by performing complementary sediment-source fingerprinting and sediment-budgeting investigations. The sediment fingerprinting approach quantifies the relative proportion of the potential sediment sources and the delivery of sediment from these sources. Sediment budget approaches provide information on the magnitude and location of the fluxes and the links between sources, sinks, and sediment output. Sediment budget approaches can include field based, photogrammetric, GIS, and modeling approaches to identify the important sources, erosion, and storage areas of sediment within a watershed. Combining sediment budget and sediment fingerprinting approaches provides resource managers with information on where to target mitigation measures that reduce erosion, and sediment delivery. Many watersheds across the U.S. have or are soon implementing TMDL allocations to reduce sediment and nutrient loadings. Streambank erosion is typically not accounted for in statistical, empirical, and process-based models, yet it is a major source of sediment in many watersheds. We present several examples of sediment budget and sediment fingerprinting studies from the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the Driftless Area, Wisconsin where information on loading of streambank sediment has been used (successfully) to shape upland and stream corridor management practices.

  1. The human right to water: the importance of domestic and productive water rights.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ralph P; Van Koppen, Barbara; Van Houweling, Emily

    2014-12-01

    The United Nations (UN) Universal Declaration of Human Rights engenders important state commitments to respect, fulfill, and protect a broad range of socio-economic rights. In 2010, a milestone was reached when the UN General Assembly recognized the human right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation. However, water plays an important role in realizing other human rights such as the right to food and livelihoods, and in realizing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. These broader water-related rights have been recognized but have not yet been operationalized. This paper unravels these broader water-related rights in a more holistic interpretation of existing international human rights law. By focusing on an emerging approach to water services provision--known as 'domestic-plus' services--the paper argues how this approach operationalizes a comprehensive range of socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas. Domestic-plus services provide water for domestic and productive uses around homesteads, which challenges the widespread practice in the public sector of planning and designing water infrastructure for a single-use. Evidence is presented to show that people in rural communities are already using their water supplies planned for domestic uses to support a wide range of productive activities. Domestic-plus services recognize and plan for these multiple-uses, while respecting the priority for clean and safe drinking water. The paper concludes that domestic-plus services operationalize the obligation to progressively fulfill a comprehensive range of indivisible socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas.

  2. Domestic water and sanitation as water security: monitoring, concepts and strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, David J.; Bartram, Jamie K.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic water and sanitation provide examples of a situation where long-term, target-driven efforts have been launched with the objective of reducing the proportion of people who are water-insecure, most recently through the millennium development goals (MDGs) framework. Impacts of these efforts have been monitored by an increasingly evidence-based system, and plans for the next period of international policy, which are likely to aim at universal coverage with basic water and sanitation, are being currently developed. As distinct from many other domains to which the concept of water security is applied, domestic or personal water security requires a perspective that incorporates the reciprocal notions of provision and risk, as the current status of domestic water and sanitation security is dominated by deficiency This paper reviews the interaction of science and technology with policies, practice and monitoring, and explores how far domestic water can helpfully fit into the proposed concept of water security, how that is best defined, and how far the human right to water affects the situation. It is considered that they fit well together in terms both of practical planning of targets and indicators and as a conceptual framework to help development. The focus needs to be broad, to extend beyond households, to emphasize maintenance as well as construction and to increase equity of access. International and subnational monitoring need to interact, and monitoring results need to be meaningful to service providers as well as users. PMID:24080628

  3. Domestic water and sanitation as water security: monitoring, concepts and strategy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, David J; Bartram, Jamie K

    2013-11-13

    Domestic water and sanitation provide examples of a situation where long-term, target-driven efforts have been launched with the objective of reducing the proportion of people who are water-insecure, most recently through the millennium development goals (MDGs) framework. Impacts of these efforts have been monitored by an increasingly evidence-based system, and plans for the next period of international policy, which are likely to aim at universal coverage with basic water and sanitation, are being currently developed. As distinct from many other domains to which the concept of water security is applied, domestic or personal water security requires a perspective that incorporates the reciprocal notions of provision and risk, as the current status of domestic water and sanitation security is dominated by deficiency This paper reviews the interaction of science and technology with policies, practice and monitoring, and explores how far domestic water can helpfully fit into the proposed concept of water security, how that is best defined, and how far the human right to water affects the situation. It is considered that they fit well together in terms both of practical planning of targets and indicators and as a conceptual framework to help development. The focus needs to be broad, to extend beyond households, to emphasize maintenance as well as construction and to increase equity of access. International and subnational monitoring need to interact, and monitoring results need to be meaningful to service providers as well as users.

  4. The lipid geochemistry of interstitial waters of recent marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Saliot, A.; Brault, M.; Boussuge, C. )

    1988-04-01

    To elucidate the nature of biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface, the authors have analyzed fatty acids, n-alkanes and sterols contained in interstitial waters collected from oxic and anoxic marine sediments in the eastern and western intertropical Atlantic Ocean and in the Arabian Sea. Lipid concentrations in interstitial waters vary widely and are generally much higher than concentrations encountered in the overlying sea water. Higher concentrations in interstitial water are observed in environments favorable for organic input and preservation of the organic matter in the water column and in the surficial sediment. The analysis of biogeochemical markers in the various media of occurrence of the organic matter such as sea water, suspended particles, settling particles and sediment is discussed in terms of differences existing between these media and bio-transformations of the organic matter at the water-sediment interface.

  5. Water and sediment quality in a tropical swamp used for agricultural and oil refining activities.

    PubMed

    Norville, Wendy; Banjoo, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    The Godineau Swamp in Trinidad receives anthropogenic input from agricultural and oil refining activities, sewage and domestic waste. This study was conducted in order to provide a comprehensive baseline dataset for the swamp, to assess water and sediment quality in the swamp, and to identify hotspots and possible sources of pollutants to the swamp. Ten sampling stations were established in the swamp during April/May and July 2002. Water quality parameters monitored included physicochemical measurements (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and salinity), total suspended solids, and nutrients (ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total phosphorus). Sediments were analyzed for hydrocarbons, heavy metals and total organic carbon. Temperatures and pH of water in the swamp were ambient; dissolved oxygen was low in many instances (<3 mg/L). In the dry season, there was saltwater intrusion along the Oropuche River up to the most easterly station. Levels of ammonia and phosphorus concentrations were suggestive of periodic inputs of agricultural and domestic wastes. Hydrocarbons concentrations in sediment were above ambient levels and suggestive of contamination from industrial activities. Sediments from the Godineau River contained elevated nutrients, hydrocarbons, metals and TOC compared with other stations. The results of this study indicate some degree of pollution of the Godineau swamp, which prompts the need for the implementation of measures beneficial for wise use of the swamp.

  6. Exploring water and food security: the water footprint of domestic food production in the Gaza Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recanati, Francesca; Castelletti, Andrea; Dotelli, Giovanni; Melià, Paco

    2016-04-01

    Water scarcity and food security are major issues in the Gaza Strip. This area is characterized by one of the highest densities in the world and it is affected by both severe scarcity of water resources and limited trading possibilities.Given this context, the enhancement of domestic food production is considered a fundamental strategy in achieving food security in the area. For this reason, rural people play a crucial role in implementing sustainable strategies for enhancing the domestic food production while preserving water resources. In order to investigate the effectiveness of existing agricultural scenarios in achieving food security in a sustainable manner, we propose a framework to assess food production systems in terms of their contribution to the nutritional and economic conditions of rural households and their impact on water resources. In particular, the latter has been carried out through the water footprint indicator proposed by the Water Footprint Network. The case study analyzed is a sample farm located in the Gaza Strip, whose food production is based on horticulture, animal husbandry and aquaculture. The study is articulated into two main parts: first, we compare alternative scenarios of vegetal and animal food production in terms of food supply, water consumption and economic income at the household scale; then, we extend the analysis to evaluate the potential contribution of domestic food production to the food security in the whole Gaza Strip, focusing on the nutritional dimension, and providing a preliminary assessment of the environmental and economic sustainability. In particular, we evaluate water appropriation for domestic food production and compare it with the availability of water resources in the region. The outcomes highlight that the domestic food production can potentially satisfy both a basic diet and economic income for rural household, but the related appropriation of freshwater results unsustainable with respect to the fresh

  7. Calibration of biological lake sediment records: Tracing diatom assemblages through the water column into the sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Dominique; Gälman, Veronika; Bigler, Christian; Renberg, Ingemar

    2013-04-01

    Paleolimnological studies rely on sediment cores taken from the deepest point of a lake. The deposited sediment and its embedded biological record are expected to be chronological and to display the lakes ecological past. Therefore many studies use micropalaeontological approaches, since, e. g., unicellular organisms like diatoms are directly dependent on habitat changes and thus mirror the prevailing weather conditions. In this study we combine a set of diatom samples from freeze cores of a varved sediment, a sediment trap and bi-weekly plankton survey data with environmental data to calibrate the biological sediment record of a lake. The annually laminated sediment of the boreal forest lake Nylandssjön in northern Sweden provides a very high temporal resolution, which allows us, even on a seasonal scale, a gapless comparison between in situ production and the sediment deposition. Analysis of the diatom assemblages through the water column into the sediment is expected to reveal quantitative and qualitative miss match in deposition, resuspension, seasonal and interannual delays caused by physical events or autochtonous interactions such as grazing in the water column. The overall comparison of the ten year plankton net record and the corresponding sediment trap samples reveals large shifts from season to season but also from year to year. The sediment trap diatom record indicates comparable abundance patterns for the main taxa (Asterionella formosa and Tabellaria flocculosa). Peaks and seasonal shifts are less pronounced in the sediment trap compared to the plankton data. An overall difficulty lies in the comparison of volumes of water and sediment, concentrations and fluxes, which needs to be solved. However, subsequent comparison with the sediment diatom assemblage is expected to lead us to understand interannual taphonomic processes affecting diatom records within ten years in the naturally formed sediment layers. More importantly we will be able to discover

  8. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  9. NORTH PORTAL - DOMESTIC COLD WATER CALCULATION - CHANGE HOUSE FACILITY #5008

    SciTech Connect

    R. Blackstone

    1996-01-25

    The purpose of this design analysis and calculation is to determine the demand for domestic cold water and to size the supply main piping for the Change House Facility No.5008 in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code (Section 4.4.1) and U.S. Department of Energy Order 6430.1A-1540 (Section 4.4.2). The method used for the calculations is based on the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC), Section 4.4.1. The first step is to determine the maximum pressure drop between the most remote cold water plumbing fixture and the main distribution supply. The developed length of pipe from the supply to the fixture is then determined from the plumbing drawings. The maximum pressure drop is then divided by the developed length which results in the friction loss per 100 feet of pipe. Equivalent fixture units are assigned from the UPC based on the actual fixture count which when totaled determines the water flow rate. The water flow rate and pressure drop are used to determine the pipe size based on a given velocity of flow.

  10. Description of 2005-10 domestic water use for selected U.S. cities and guidance for estimating domestic water use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Juracek, Kyle E.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic water-use and related socioeconomic and climatic data for 2005-10 were used in an analysis of 21 selected U.S. cities to describe recent domestic per capita water use, investigate variables that potentially affect domestic water use, and provide guidance for estimating domestic water use. Domestic water use may be affected by a combination of several factors. Domestic per capita water use for the selected cities ranged from a median annual average of 43 to 177 gallons per capita per day (gpcd). In terms of year-to-year variability in domestic per capita water use for the selected cities, the difference from the median ranged from ± 7 to ± 26 percent with an overall median variability of ± 14 percent. As a percentage of total annual water use, median annual domestic water use for the selected cities ranged from 33 to 71 percent with an overall median of 57 percent. Monthly production and water sales data were used to calculate daily per capita water use rates for the lowest 3 consecutive months (low-3) and the highest 3 consecutive months (high-3) of usage. Median low-3 domestic per capita water use for 16 selected cities ranged from 40 to 100 gpcd. Median high-3 domestic per capita water use for 16 selected cities ranged from 53 to 316 gpcd. In general, the median domestic water use as a percentage of the median total water use for 16 selected cities was similar for the low-3 and high-3 periods. Statistical analyses of combined data for the selected cities indicated that none of the socioeconomic variables, including cost of water, were potentially useful as determinants of domestic water use at the national level. However, specific socioeconomic variables may be useful for the estimation of domestic water use at the State or local level. Different socioeconomic variables may be useful in different States. Statistical analyses indicated that specific climatic variables may be useful for the estimation of domestic water use for some, but not all, of the

  11. Reliability assessment of solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. Y.; Wolosewicz, R. M.

    This paper presents reliability and mean-time-between-failure studies of six generic solar domestic hot water systems. Failure rate data for system components were obtained from product literature or from consumer product industries. Reliability block diagrams are employed for the analyses, and exponential distribution functions are assumed for individual components. Since some components do not operate continuously, a duty-cycle factor is developed and defined as the ratio of operating time to total mission time. To accommodate systems experiencing different duty cycles, an averaged duty cycle is introduced to estimate mean lives. Large variations in system reliability and mean life were found and result from wide failure-rate bands for some of the components.

  12. Reliability assessment of solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. Y.; Wolosewicz, R. M.

    Reliability and mean time between failure studies of six generic solar domestic hot water systems are presented. Failure rate data for system components were obtained from product literature or from consumer product industries. Reliability block diagrams are employed for the analyses, and exponential distribution functions are assumed for individual components. Since some components do not operate continuously, a duty-cycle factor is developed and defined as the ratio of operating time to total mission time. To accommodate systems experiencing different duty cycles, an averaged duty cycle is introduced to estimate mean lives. Large variations in system reliability and mean life were found and result from wide failure rate bands for some of the components.

  13. DEVELOPING WATER QUALITY CRITERIA FOR SUSPENDED AND BEDDED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s Framework for Developing Suspended and Bedded Sediments (SABS) Water Quality Criteria (SABS Framework) is a nationally-consistent process for developing ambient sediment quality criteria for surface waters. The SABS Framework accommodates natural variation among wa...

  14. Numerical Simulation of a Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Naso, V.

    2014-11-01

    An innovative transient numerical model is presented for the simulation of a solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system. The solar collectors have been simulated by using a zerodimensional analytical model. The temperature distributions in the heat transfer fluid and in the water inside the tank have been evaluated by one-dimensional models. The reversion elimination algorithm has been used to include the effects of natural convection among the water layers at different heights in the tank on the thermal stratification. A finite difference implicit scheme has been implemented to solve the energy conservation equation in the coil heat exchanger, and the energy conservation equation in the tank has been solved by using the finite difference Euler implicit scheme. Energy conservation equations for the solar DHW components models have been coupled by means of a home-made implicit algorithm. Results of the simulation performed using as input data the experimental values of the ambient temperature and the solar irradiance in a summer day are presented and discussed.

  15. Dispersal of fine sediment in nearshore coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Fine sediment (silt and clay) plays an important role in the physical, ecological, and environmental conditions of coastal systems, yet little is known about the dispersal and fate of fine sediment across coastal margin settings outside of river mouths. Here I provide simple physical scaling and detailed monitoring of a beach nourishment project near Imperial Beach, California, with a high portion of fines (40% silt and clay by weight). These results provide insights into the pathways and residence times of fine sediment transport across a wave-dominated coastal margin. Monitoring of the project used physical, optical, acoustic, and remote sensing techniques to track the fine portion of the nourishment sediment. The initial transport of fine sediment from the beach was influenced strongly by longshore currents of the surf zone that were established in response to the approach angles of the waves. The mean residence time of fine sediment in the surf zone—once it was suspended—was approximately 1 hour, and rapid decreases in surf zone fine sediment concentrations along the beach resulted from mixing and offshore transport in turbid rip heads. For example, during a day with oblique wave directions and surf zone longshore currents of approximately 25 cm/s, the offshore losses of fine sediment in rips resulted in a 95% reduction in alongshore surf zone fine sediment flux within 1 km of the nourishment site. However, because of the direct placement of nourishment sediment on the beach, fine suspended-sediment concentrations in the swash zone remained elevated for several days after nourishment, while fine sediment was winnowed from the beach. Once offshore of the surf zone, fine sediment settled downward in the water column and was observed to transport along and across the inner shelf. Vertically sheared currents influenced the directions and rates of fine sediment transport on the shelf. Sedimentation of fine sediment was greatest on the seafloor directly offshore

  16. Evaluation of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to reclaim domestic clothes wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation has been performed of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to determine its capability to recover water from domestic clothes wash water. A total of 32.89 kg (72.5 lb) of clothes were washed during eight wash cycles which used 1.4 lb of detergent, 145 gallons of hot water and 133.9 gallons of cold water. Water recovered at a weighted average process rate of 3.81 gallons per hour met the majority of the 23 requirements established for potable water by the U.S. Public Health Service. Average power consumed during this evaluation was approximately 71 watt-hours per gallon of water recovered. Filter replacement, which was required primarily for the control of micro-organisms in the recovered water averaged 4.86 filters per 100 gallons of wash water processed. The subsystem removed approximately 98 percent and virtually 100 percent of the phosphates and surfactants, respectively, from the wash water.

  17. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  18. Domestic water supply, competition for water resources and IWRM in Tanzania: a review and discussion paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maganga, Faustin P.; Butterworth, John A.; Moriarty, Patrick

    This paper reviews the historical development of domestic water supplies in Tanzania, the consequences of major policy shifts during the last seven decades, and some of the reasons for the failure of water supply systems. It considers the extent to which water resource issues are constraints in meeting the water supply needs of rural and urban populations, and the relevance of integrated water resources management to the WSS sector. Drawing upon case-study material from two major river basins, the Pangani and Rufiji, it reviews some of the practical steps being taken to implement IWRM principles in Tanzania.

  19. Influence of wave and current flow on sediment-carrying capacity and sediment flux at the water-sediment interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Ruijie; Yu, Yonghai; Suo, Anning

    2014-01-01

    In nearshore waters, spatial and temporal scales of waves, tidal currents, and circulation patterns vary greatly. It is, therefore, difficult to combine these factors' effects when trying to predict sediment transport processes. This paper proposes the concept of significant wave velocity, which combines the effects of waves, tides, and ocean currents using the horizontal kinetic energy superposition principle. Through a comparison of the relationship between shear stress at the water-sediment interface and sediment-carrying capacity, assuming equilibrium sediment flux, a new formula for sediment-carrying capacity, which incorporates the concept of significant wave velocities, is derived. Sediment-carrying capacity is a function of the critical velocity, which increases with water depth and decreases with increasing relative roughness of the sea bed. Finally, data from field observation stations and simulations are used to test the proposed formula. The results show that the new formula is in good agreement with both field and simulation data. This new formula for sediment-carrying capacity can be used to simulate nearshore sediment transport. PMID:25259499

  20. Domestic wash-water reclamation using an aerospace-developed water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype aerospace distillation water recovery subsystem was tested to determine its capability to recover potable water from domestic wash water. A total of 0.0994 cu m (26.25 gallons) of domestic wash water was processed over a 7-day period at an average process rate of 0.0146 cu m per day (3.85 gallons per day). The subsystem produced water that met all United States Public Health Standards for drinking water with the exception of two standards which could not be analyzed at the required sensitivity levels. Average energy consumption for this evaluation to maintain both the recovery process and microbial control in the recovered water was approximately 3366 kilowatt-hours per cubic meter (12.74 kilowatt-hours per gallon) of water recovered. This condition represents a worst case energy consumption since no attempt was made to recover heat energy in the subsystem. An ultraviolet radiation cell installed in the effluent line of the subsystem was effective in controlling coliform micro-organisms within acceptable levels for drinking water. The subsystem recovered virtually 100 percent of the available water in the waste-water process. In addition, the subsystem removed 99.6 percent and 98.3 percent of the surfactants and phosphate, respectively, from the wash water.

  1. Multi-Elements in Waters and Sediments of Shallow Lakes: Relationships with Water, Sediment, and Watershed Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Donna L.; Hanson, Mark A.; Herwig, Brian R.; Bowe, Shane E.; Otte, Marinus L.

    2015-01-01

    We measured concentrations of multiple elements, including rare earth elements, in waters and sediments of 38 shallow lakes of varying turbidity and macrophyte cover in the Prairie Parkland (PP) and Laurentian Mixed Forest (LMF) provinces of Minnesota. PP shallow lakes had higher element concentrations in waters and sediments compared to LMF sites. Redundancy analysis indicated that a combination of site- and watershed-scale features explained a large proportion of among-lake variability in element concentrations in lake water and sediments. Percent woodland cover in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and macrophyte cover collectively explained 65.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake waters. Sediment fraction smaller than 63 µm, percent woodland in watersheds, open water area, and sediment organic matter collectively explained 64.2 % of variation in element concentrations in lake sediments. In contrast to earlier work on shallow lakes, our results showed the extent to which multiple elements in shallow lake waters and sediments were influenced by a combination of variables including sediment characteristics, lake morphology, and percent land cover in watersheds. These results are informative because they help illustrate the extent of functional connectivity between shallow lakes and adjacent lands within these lake watersheds. PMID:26074657

  2. Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

    2012-07-01

    The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

  3. Measurement of Mercury Methylation in Lake Water and Sediment Samples

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Akira; Rudd, John W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Biological mercury methylation was assayed by a new radiochemical technique in the water column and sediments of a mercury-contaminated lake. In 24 weeks during 1979, there were three episodes of methylating activity in surface floc and in water, each lasting 3 to 5 weeks. Periods of methylation in the water column coincided with surface sediment methylation and appeared to be related to overall microbial activity. Mercury was actively methylated in the presence of bound sulfide. PMID:16345649

  4. Design of multifamily solar domestic hot water systems using recirculating distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wedekind, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a study designed to quantify the effect of daily domestic hot water loads and system design on the performance of solar domestic hot water systems employing a recirculating distribution system. A solar domestic hot water system judged representative of the systems funded by the HUD Solar Demonstration Program, along with a modification to this system, was modeled using the TRNSYS simulation computer program. Results of simulations over a representative climatic period show that daily domestic hot water usage significantly affects solar system performance. Notable improvement in system performance can be obtained by the use of a recirculation return to solar storage system configuration within a specific range of daily domestic hot water loads. An optimum system was developed from parametric variations of system design and modeled on an annual basis. Comparison is made to modeled system performance of the original design.

  5. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox®, a 15-min assay ofPhotobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magnalethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna in pore water was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  6. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  7. Partitioning studies of dioxin between sediment and water: The measurement of Koc for Lake Ontario sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Lodge, K.B.; Cook, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    A desorption experiment is described in which the sediment-to-water partition coefficient for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is measured for a sample from Lake Ontario. After a contact period of 4 days, the logarithm of the partition coefficient on an organic carbon basis, LogKoc, ranges from 7.25 to 7.59. Information on the partitioning behavior of dioxin between water and dissolved or suspended matter derived from the sediment is provided.

  8. Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Sub-program has set the key goal to reduce the cost of saved energy [Csav, defined as (total cost, $)/(total discounted savings, kWh_thermal)] for solar domestic water heaters (SDWH) by at least 50%. To determine if this goal is attainable and prioritize R&D for cold-climate SDWH, life-cycle analyses were done with hypothetical lower-cost components in glycol, drainback, and thermosiphon systems. Balance-of-system (BOS, everything but the collector) measures included replacing metal components with polymeric versions and system simplification. With all BOS measures in place, Csav could be reduced more than 50% with a low-cost, selectively-coated, glazed polymeric collector, and slightly less than 50% with either a conventional selective metal-glass or a non-selective glazed polymer collector. The largest percent reduction in Csav comes from replacing conventional pressurized solar storage tanks and metal heat exchangers with un-pressurized polymer tanks with immersed polymer heat exchangers, which could be developed with relatively low-risk R&D.

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC WASTEWATER CONTAMINANTS BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants have been determined in the surface waters of Europe and the United States. A preliminary report of substantially higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals in sediment suggests that bottom sediment ...

  10. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  11. Enhancing reproductive performance in domestic dairy water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Zicarelli, L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the review is to describe the factors that affect fertility in domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and the techniques that enable an improvement in reproductive performance. On Italian and Latin American farms where natural mating is practiced and bulls are always present in the herd, the inter-calving interval is approximately 400 days and the culling rate is lower than 15%. The buffalo has a tendency for seasonal reproductive activity. Reproduction is favoured when there is a decrease in day length. Ovarian activity stops if conception does not occur within 3 to 5 ovarian cycles. It is important, therefore, that appropriate management of the transition period is practiced, particularly with respect to the hygienic conditions of the uterus. In tropical countries located north of the equator, feed deficiencies and heat stress are considered the main factors that lead to poor fertility in the summer. In Pakistan, for example, the increase in body condition score during the autumn was associated with the commencement of the breeding season in buffaloes. Anoestrus is observed also in Italy, however, where the average daily temperature during the same period is 13.5 to 23.5 degrees C and feeding is constant throughout the year. The only common element between the two areas is the progressive increase in daylight hours between April and June and the day length greater than 12 hours up to September. In Italian herds that apply an out-of-season breeding strategy, an improvement in fertility (measured as the percentage of corpora lutea corresponding to subsequent pregnancy) is observed when water pools are present on the farm. This demonstrates that an improvement in environmental conditions reduces the incidence of embryonic mortality and/or abnormal cycles. To summarize, in the absence of serious nutritional problems, an improvement in environmental conditions increases fertility in buffalo.

  12. Nitrogen cycling in different types of sediments from Danish waters

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, T.H.; Henridsen, K.

    1983-05-01

    Variations in sediment N:C ratios were correlated with water depth and season. /sup 14/NH/sub 4//sup +/ was used to measure the rates of NH/sub 4//sup +/ production (d) and incorporation into bacterial cells (i) in sediments from different stations, at different seasons. The validity of the rates d and i was indicated by the predicted correlation of d:i ratios with N:C ratios of the sediment, and the predicted N:C ratio at which net NH/sub 4//sup +/; pore water NH/sub 4//sup +/, flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from sediment, and flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ into exchangeable pool. The NO/sub 3//sup -/ flux from sediment was correlated with nitrification rate and with season. Benthic infauna increased the flux of NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment by 50%. The rates of transfer of nitrogen (NO/sub 3//sup -/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, N/sub 2/) from sediment to water were 44-66% of the net rates of organic nitrogen mineralization (d-i). Flux of NO/sub 3//sup -/ + NH/sub 4//sup +/ from the sediment could supply 30-82% of the nitrogen requirement of the planktonic primary producers.

  13. Toxicity of sediments and pore water from Brunswick Estuary, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Geitner, H.

    1993-01-01

    A chlor-alkali plant in Brunswick, Georgia, USA, discharged >2 kg mercury/d into a tributary of the Turtle River-Brunswick Estuary from 1966 to 1971. Mercury concentrations in sediments collected in 1989 along the tributary near the chlor-alkali plant ranged from 1 to 27 ug/g (dry weight), with the highest concentrations found in surface (0?8 cm) sediments of subtidal zones in the vicinity of the discharge site. Toxicity screening in 1990 using Microtox? bioassays on pore water extracted on site from sediments collected at six stations distributed along the tributary indicated that pore water was highly toxic near the plant discharge. Ten-day toxicity tests on pore water from subsequent sediment samples collected near the plant discharge confirmed high toxicity to Hyalella azteca, and feeding activity was significantly reduced in whole-sediment tests. In addition to mercury in the sediments, other metals (chromium, lead, and zinc) exceeded 50 ug/g, and polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) concentrations ranged from 67 to 95 ug/g. On a molar basis, acid-volatile sulfide concentrations (20?45 umol/g) in the sediments exceeded the metal concentrations. Because acid-volatile sulfides bind with cationic metals and form metal sulfides, which are generally not bioavailable, toxicities shown by these sediments were attributed to the high concentrations of PCBs and possibly methylmercury.

  14. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index

  15. Domestic wash water reclamation for reuse as commode water supply using filtration: Reverse-osmosis separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A combined filtration-reverse-osmosis water recovery system has been evaluated to determine its capability to reclaim domestic wash water for reuse as a commode water supply. The system produced water that met all chemical and physical requirements established by the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water with the exception of carbon chloroform extractables, methylene blue active substances, and phenols. It is thought that this water is of sufficient quality to be reused as commode supply water. The feasibility of using a combined filtration and reverse-osmosis technique for reclaiming domestic wash water has been established. The use of such a technique for wash-water recovery will require a maintenance filter to remove solid materials including those less than 1 micron in size from the wash water. The reverse-osmosis module, if sufficiently protected from plugging, is an attractive low-energy technique for removing contaminants from domestic wash water.

  16. Toxicity and genotoxicity of water and sediment from streams on dotted duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    PubMed

    Factori, R; Leles, S M; Novakowski, G C; Rocha, C L S C; Thomaz, S M

    2014-11-01

    Most rivers are used as a source to supply entire cities; the quality of water is directly related to the quality of tributaries. Unfortunately men have neglected the importance of streams, which receive domestic and industrial effluents and transport nutrients and pesticides from rural areas. Given the complexity of the mixtures discharged into these water bodies, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of water and sediment of ten tributaries of Pirapó River, in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. To this end, the free-floating macrophyte Landoltia punctata (G. Meyer) Les & D.J.Crawford was used as test organism in microcosm, and the toxicity of water and sediment samples was evaluated by the relative growth rate, dry/fresh biomass ratio, and genotoxic effects (comet assay). Samples of water and sediment of each stream were arranged in microcosms with L. punctata. Seven days later, plants were collected for analysis. Nutrient levels were higher than the reference location, indicating eutrophication, but the results indicated a toxic effect for only three streams, and a genotoxic effect for all streams.

  17. Lessons learned from water/sediment-testing of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Radke, Michael; Maier, Michael P

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies revealed large differences in the transformation of pharmaceuticals in rivers with similar characteristics. The present work aimed at answering the question whether these differences are related to the transformation capacity of the specific river sediments. More generally, we also aimed at evaluating the overall diagnostic power of water/sediment tests. Incubation experiments with 9 pharmaceuticals were carried out with sediments sampled from three rivers. All compounds expect carbamazepine were removed at dissipation half-lives between 2.5 and 56 days; biotransformation was identified as the major removal process. Interestingly, sediment from river Roter Main was more efficient in removing pharmaceuticals than sediment from river Gründlach, while the opposite pattern was observed in previous field studies. Obviously, the physical boundary conditions are governing the actual elimination of pharmaceuticals and not the transformation potential of the specific sediments. In a separate experiment, an immediate onset of transformation was observed after introducing oxygen to an anoxic water/sediment system. Transformation rates in sediments sampled from several sites within one river varied up to a factor of 2.5. This considerable in-stream variability is a critical factor for environmental risk assessment where single cutoff values are being used for evaluating a compound's persistence. PMID:24602861

  18. Mid frequency shallow water fine-grained sediment attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Dosso, Stan E

    2013-07-01

    Attenuation is perhaps the most difficult sediment acoustic property to measure, but arguably one of the most important for predicting passive and active sonar performance. Measurement techniques can be separated into "direct" measurements (e.g., via sediment probes, sediment cores, and laboratory studies on "ideal" sediments) which are typically at high frequencies, O(10(4)-10(5)) Hz, and "indirect" measurements where attenuation is inferred from long-range propagation or reflection data, generally O(10(2)-10(3)) Hz. A frequency gap in measurements exists in the 600-4000 Hz band and also a general acknowledgement that much of the historical measurements on fine-grained sediments have been biased due to a non-negligible silt and sand component. A shallow water measurement technique using long range reverberation is critically explored. An approximate solution derived using energy flux theory shows that the reverberation is very sensitive to depth-integrated attenuation in a fine-grained sediment layer and separable from most other unknown geoacoustic parameters. Simulation using Bayesian methods confirms the theory. Reverberation measurements across a 10 m fine-grained sediment layer yield an attenuation of 0.009 dB/m/kHz with 95% confidence bounds of 0.006-0.013 dB/m/kHz. This is among the lowest values for sediment attenuation reported in shallow water.

  19. Microbiological evaluation of water quality from urban watersheds for domestic water supply improvement.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Murinda, Shelton E; Graves, Alexandria K

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural and urban runoffs may be major sources of pollution of water bodies and major sources of bacteria affecting the quality of drinking water. Of the different pathways by which bacterial pathogens can enter drinking water, this one has received little attention to date; that is, because soils are often considered to be near perfect filters for the transport of bacterial pathogens through the subsoil to groundwater. The goals of this study were to determine the distribution, diversity, and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from low flowing river water and sediment with inputs from different sources before water is discharged into ground water and to compare microbial contamination in water and sediment at different sampling sites. Water and sediment samples were collected from 19 locations throughout the watershed for the isolation of pathogenic E. coli. Heterotrophic plate counts and E. coli were also determined after running tertiary treated water through two tanks containing aquifer sand material. Presumptive pathogenic E. coli isolates were obtained and characterized for virulent factors and antimicrobial resistance. None of the isolates was confirmed as Shiga toxin E. coli (STEC), but as others, such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to show the diversity E. coli populations from different sources throughout the watershed. Seventy six percent of the isolates from urban sources exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. A subsequent filtration experiment after water has gone through filtration tanks containing aquifer sand material showed that there was a 1 to 2 log reduction in E. coli in aquifer sand tank. Our data showed multiple strains of E. coli without virulence attributes, but with high distribution of resistant phenotypes. Therefore, the occurrence of E. coli with multiple resistances in the environment is a matter of great concern due to possible

  20. Microbiological Evaluation of Water Quality from Urban Watersheds for Domestic Water Supply Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, A. Mark; Murinda, Shelton E.; Graves, Alexandria K.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban runoffs may be major sources of pollution of water bodies and major sources of bacteria affecting the quality of drinking water. Of the different pathways by which bacterial pathogens can enter drinking water, this one has received little attention to date; that is, because soils are often considered to be near perfect filters for the transport of bacterial pathogens through the subsoil to groundwater. The goals of this study were to determine the distribution, diversity, and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from low flowing river water and sediment with inputs from different sources before water is discharged into ground water and to compare microbial contamination in water and sediment at different sampling sites. Water and sediment samples were collected from 19 locations throughout the watershed for the isolation of pathogenic E. coli. Heterotrophic plate counts and E. coli were also determined after running tertiary treated water through two tanks containing aquifer sand material. Presumptive pathogenic E. coli isolates were obtained and characterized for virulent factors and antimicrobial resistance. None of the isolates was confirmed as Shiga toxin E. coli (STEC), but as others, such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to show the diversity E. coli populations from different sources throughout the watershed. Seventy six percent of the isolates from urban sources exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. A subsequent filtration experiment after water has gone through filtration tanks containing aquifer sand material showed that there was a 1 to 2 log reduction in E. coli in aquifer sand tank. Our data showed multiple strains of E. coli without virulence attributes, but with high distribution of resistant phenotypes. Therefore, the occurrence of E. coli with multiple resistances in the environment is a matter of great concern due to possible

  1. Effects of a nearshore wastewater discharge: Water column and sediment pore water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, P.R.; Carr, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The relationship between water column and sediment pore water toxicity was investigated near a municipal-industrial wastewater discharge in southern Texas. Toxicity associated with effluent distributions in the water column are known to vary in both time and space. Toxicity of sediment, however, is often more stable over time. Sediment can serve as a long-term integrator of toxicity in areas subject to chronic exposure of effluents. This study addressed the relationship between water column toxicity and that found in the sediments on both spatial and temporal scales. Four 2 Km transacts were established around a nearshore wastewater outfall. Eight stations along each transact were sampled for both surface waters and sediment pore water toxicity. Toxicity was determined using a modified sea urchin fertilization test. Surface waters were sampled and tested for eight consecutive months, while sediment pore waters were sampled on three occasions over the length of this study. Results have shown that toxicity in receiving waters was a good indicator to trace movements of the highly variable effluent plume. The distribution of effluent in the water column, and hence water column toxicity, was primarily driven by local wind conditions. Toxicity in sediment porewater was, much less variable and more evenly distributed over the study site. Sediment pore water toxicity was also a good predictor of the distribution of benthic infaunal invertebrates over much of the study site.

  2. Occurrence, Species, and Organ Differences in Bioaccumulation Patterns of Phthalate Esters in Municipal Domestic Water Supply Lakes in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Omiwole, Roseline A; Hassan, Titilayo; Adegbola, Rachel A; Adewuyi, Gregory O; Arukwe, Augustine

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of phthalate esters (PE) was examined in biota, ambient water, and sediments of two man-made lakes (Asejire and Eleyele) in southwestern Nigeria. Five fish species (Tilapia zillii, Hepsetus odoe, Parachanna obscura, Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, and Mormyrus rume) were analyzed for PE levels and used for calculating bioconcentration factors (BCF) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF). In addition, measured PE levels were thereafter used to calculate the phthalate pollution index (PPI) in biota and the environment. At both lakes, all sampled species had k-factor > 1, showing apparently normal growth and health condition. Higher PE levels were found in sediments compared with water at both lakes, with a pattern showing that di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was predominant PE. While there were no unique patterns of PE concentrations in both lakes, differences were observed in organ concentration patterns that were evident at both lakes. For T. zillii, the BSAF was higher for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) compared to diethyl phthalate (DEP) and lowest for DEHP. The concentration pattern demonstrated that DBP concentrated more in gills (BCF: 6.7), while DEHP concentrated more in liver (BCF: 15.2) of T. zillii at Asejire. At Eleyele, T. zillii liver and gills concentrated less DEP and DEHP. The PPI value was significantly higher in sediment with respective values of 0.27 and 0.44 at Asejire and Eleyele lakes compared with water with respective values of 0.1 and 0.18 at Asejire and Eleyele lakes. Overall, our findings suggest a broader environmental and human health implication of high PE levels in these lakes, since they provide vast water volumes that are used for municipal domestic water supply. Further, these lakes support intense artisanal fisheries, representing significant sources of aquatic food resources for neighboring communities. PMID:26090560

  3. Water and suspended sediment division at a stratified tidal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, F. A.; Vegt, M.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; Hoekstra, P.

    2013-03-01

    Tidal junctions play a crucial role in the transport of water, salt, and sediment through a delta distributary network. Water, salt and sediment are exchanged at tidal junctions, thereby influencing the transports in the connecting branches and the overall dynamics of the system. This paper presents observations of water, salt and sediment transports in three channels that connect at a stratified tidal junction. Flow variation in one channel was found to lag behind flow variation in a connected channel by more than 1 h, which is largely attributed to channel length differences from the junction to the sea. The water columns in the three channels were periodically stratified during spring tide, whereas the salinity structure represented a salt wedge during neap tide. Salinity differences between the three channels were substantial. The channels contain water bodies of different salinity and act largely independently. Flow velocities in the upper and lower layers differed substantially. Flow in the lower layer was generally in the direction of acceleration produced by the baroclinic pressure gradient. Interestingly, baroclinic pressure gradients were sometimes directed landward, indicating the presence of saltier water at the land side of the estuary. In sharp channel bends close to the junction, secondary flow was strongest at the highest axial flow velocity during spring tide. In one channel bend, these circulations steered the suspended sediment toward the inner bend, which affected the suspended sediment division.

  4. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research that is improving domestic hot water modeling capabilities to more effectively address one of the largest energy uses in residential buildings.

  5. Use of hydrocyclones for centrifugal dewatering of waste water sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lipmanovich, V.Y.

    1984-07-01

    This article investigates the effectiveness of hydrocyclones in the separation of abrasive inclusions from the sediment of primary sedimentation tanks at the Orekhovo-Zuevo aeration station. The studies were performed in a pressure hydrocyclone which was fed with wet sediment from the primary sedimentation tanks with a water content of 93.8-95.5% and an ash content of 35.1-45.1%. The flow rate characteristics and the qualitative indices of the hydrocyclone operation, depending on its geometric parameters and inlet pressure, were determined. In the process of sediment separation in the hydrocyclones, the moisture content of the drained fluid rises above and that of the slime falls below the moisture content of the wet sediment. It is established that the pattern of change in the moisture content of the separation products, the content of the dry and mineral matters, and the efficiency of separation of the dry and mineral matters with the change in the pressure at the hydrocyclone inlet and its geometric parameters in the case of activated sludge treatment is similar to the pattern of change in the corresponding indices in the cases of hydrocyclone processing of the sediment from primary sedimentation tanks.

  6. Heavy metal concentrations and toxicity in water and sediment from stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Kristin; Viklander, Maria; Scholes, Lian; Revitt, Mike

    2010-06-15

    Sedimentation is a widely used technique in structural best management practices to remove pollutants from stormwater. However, concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants. This study has concentrated on stormwater ponds and sedimentation tanks and reports on the accumulated metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and the associated toxicity to the bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The metal concentrations are compared with guidelines and the toxicity results are assessed in relation to samples for which metal concentrations either exceed or conform to these values. The water phase metal concentrations were highest in the ponds whereas the sedimentation tanks exhibited a distinct decrease towards the outlet. However, none of the water samples demonstrated toxicity even though the concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn exceeded the threshold values for the compared guidelines. The facilities with higher traffic intensities had elevated sediment concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn which increased towards the outlet for the sedimentation tanks in agreement with the highest percentage of fine particles. The sediments in both treatment facilities exhibited the expected toxic responses in line with their affinity for heavy metals but the role of organic carbon content is highlighted.

  7. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murawczyk, C.

    1973-01-01

    The work is described accomplished in compiling information needed to establish the current water supply and waste water processing requirements for dwellings, and for developing a preliminary design for a waste water to potable water management system. Data generated was used in formulation of design criteria for the preliminary design of the waste water to potable water recycling system. The system as defined was sized for a group of 500 dwelling units. Study tasks summarized include: water consumption, nature of domestic water, consumer appliances for low water consumption, water quality monitoring, baseline concept, and current and projected costs.

  8. Spectroscopic analyses of pollutants in water, sediment and fish.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh; Ibrahim, Hanan S; Ammar, Nabila S; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-11-01

    Water ways in Egypt is suffering from continual discharge without adequate treatment especially in the Delta and greater Cairo area. Accordingly water, sediments and catfishes were collected from El Mouheet El Youmna drain in Giza. Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn were determined furthermore the molecular structure of sediment and catfish were conducted with FTIR spectroscopy. Although studied metals were lower in water, higher values are recorded in sediment and catfish samples. FTIR shows possible interaction among metals and organic structures mainly proteins. The bioaccumulation of Pb and Cd proportion was significantly increased in the liver tissues of catfish. A correlation coefficient among sediment and fish liver metals accumulation exist. This infers that the waste assimilation capacity for the drain is high, a phenomena that could be ascribed to dilution, sedimentation and continual water exchange. Furthermore, the genotoxicity affect in catfish genomic corroborates the genus diagnostic markers which attributed to long pollution. This is an indication that agriculture and industrial wastes discharged into the drain has badly a significant effect on the ecological balance.

  9. Response of crayfish to hyporheic water availability and excess sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyer, Joseph J.; Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.

    2015-01-01

    Crayfish in many headwater streams regularly cope with seasonal drought. However, it is unclear how landscape changes affect the long-term persistence of crayfish populations. We designed two laboratory experiments to investigate the acute effects of common landscape stressors on crayfish: water withdrawal and sedimentation. The first experiment tested the interaction among water withdrawals (four 24-h water reductions of 0, 15, 30, or 45 cm) and two substrate treatments (pebble and cobble) on the burrowing depth of crayfish. The second experiment evaluated the effects of excess fine sediment (three treatments of 0, 45, and 90% sediment) and substrate type (cobble and pebble) on crayfish burrowing depth. Crayfish were able to burrow deeper into the simulated hyporheic zone in cobble substrate when compared to pebble. Crayfish subjected to greater water withdrawals in the pebble treatment were not able to reach the simulated hyporheic zone. Excess fine sediment reduced the depth that crayfish burrowed, regardless of substrate type. Results from this study suggest excess fine sediment may reduce crayfish persistence, particularly when seeking refuge during prolonged dry conditions.

  10. Spectroscopic analyses of pollutants in water, sediment and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-11-01

    Water ways in Egypt is suffering from continual discharge without adequate treatment especially in the Delta and greater Cairo area. Accordingly water, sediments and catfishes were collected from El Mouheet El Youmna drain in Giza. Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn were determined furthermore the molecular structure of sediment and catfish were conducted with FTIR spectroscopy. Although studied metals were lower in water, higher values are recorded in sediment and catfish samples. FTIR shows possible interaction among metals and organic structures mainly proteins. The bioaccumulation of Pb and Cd proportion was significantly increased in the liver tissues of catfish. A correlation coefficient among sediment and fish liver metals accumulation exist. This infers that the waste assimilation capacity for the drain is high, a phenomena that could be ascribed to dilution, sedimentation and continual water exchange. Furthermore, the genotoxicity affect in catfish genomic corroborates the genus diagnostic markers which attributed to long pollution. This is an indication that agriculture and industrial wastes discharged into the drain has badly a significant effect on the ecological balance.

  11. Chemistry of Stream Sediments and Surface Waters in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- This online publication portrays regional data for pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance for stream waters and a multi-element geochemical dataset for stream sediments collected in the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. A series of interpolation grid maps portray the chemistry of the stream waters and sediments in relation to bedrock geology, lithology, drainage basins, and urban areas. A series of box plots portray the statistical variation of the chemical data grouped by lithology and other features.

  12. Bacterial Mercury Methylation At The Sediment-Water Interface Of Mercury Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of bacterial mediation of mercury transformation (methylation), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) at the sediment-water interface. The greatest cause for concern re...

  13. Suspended sediment dynamics in the Kromme Rijn river: indication for intense fine sediment exchange between water column and streambed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Boomen, R.; Zweers, A. J.; Van der Perk, M.

    2012-04-01

    The limited transparency of the river water of the Kromme Rijn, a dammed distributary of the Rhine River in the Netherlands, restricts the ecological function of the stream and the achievement of the EU-Water Framework Directive targets. To increase water transparency in this river, the 'Hoogheemraadschap De Stichtse Rijnlanden' (HDSR) water authority considers to design one or more large-scale sediment traps. For an optimal design of these possible sediment traps, further knowledge about the local sediment characteristics and sedimentation and resuspension rates is a prerequisite. At the request of the HDSR water authority, we studied the fine sediment characteristics and dynamics in the Kromme Rijn river and its tributaries. Between summer 2010 and summer 2011, eleven monthly water samples were collected from six monitoring locations in the 25 km long reach of the Kromme Rijn river between the inlet from the Nederrijn river and Utrecht. Additional samples were collected from seven monitoring locations in streams and canals discharging into the Kromme Rijn river. The water samples were analysed for suspended sediment concentration and the suspended sediment was analysed for loss on ignition and particle size distribution by laser diffraction. In addition, at these monitoring locations, small sediment traps with an 8 cm circular opening were installed at 0.7 m below the water surface to measure the gross long-term sedimentation rate. These sediment traps were emptied every two months. During the monitoring period, the average sediment load in the Kromme Rijn near the inlet was 112 g/s and decreased to about 90 g/s near Utrecht. The vast majority of the sediment load (91%) in the main branch of the Kromme Rijn originates from the inlet from the Nederrijn river. The 2-16 μm and 16-63 μm particle size classes comprise about 80% of the suspended sediment. The average organic fraction of the suspended sediment was 36%. The sediment collected from the sediment traps

  14. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Schweitzer, K.A.; McKinney, R.A.; Phelps, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial waters did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  15. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; McKinney, R.A. ); Schweitzer, K.A. ); Phelps, D.K. )

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial water did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  16. Designing open water disposal for dredged muddy sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAnally, William H.; Adamec, Stephen A.

    1987-11-01

    Open water disposal of muddy sediments in the estuarine environment is practiced to minimize dredging costs and to preserve contained disposal site capacity. Open water sites are usually either dispersive or retentive. Dispersive sites are used in the expectation that disposed sediments will not remain there, but will be transported out of the site, leaving room for additional disposal. Retentive sites are designed to ensure that disposed sediments mostly remain within the site. Choice of one of these approaches depends on the site character, sediment character, and disposal quantities. Design of disposal management plans for both site types is accomplished by use of field observations, laboratory tests, and numerical modeling. Three disposal site studies illustrate the methods used. At the Alcatraz site in San Francisco Bay, a dispersive condition is maintained by use of constraints on dredged mud characteristics that were developed from laboratory tests on erosion rates and from numerical modeling of the dump process. Field experiments were designed to evaluate the management procedure. In Corpus Christi Bay a numerical model was used to determine how much disposed sediment returns to the navigation channel, and to devise a location for disposal that will minimize that return. In Puget Sound a model has been used to ensure that most of the disposed material remains in the site. New techniques, including a piped disposal through 60 m of water, were investigated.

  17. Timber Harvest Effects on Sediment and Water Yields and Analysis of Sediment Load Calculation Methods in the Interior Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elverson, C.; Karwan, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Timber harvest practices have a long-standing association with changes in water and sediment yields. We quantify the trends in water and sediment yields in the Mica Creek Experimental Watershed (MCEW) in relation to management practices with linear regression and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). From 1991 to 2013, an increase in water yield resulted from both clearcutting and thinning treatments, with monthly water yield rate increases of 13-57% and annual water yield increases up to 210 mm (40%) in the clearcut watershed. Following treatment, annual sediment yields increased in the clearcut watershed by 40-131% and the thinned watershed by 33-163%, both relative to the control watershed, with statistically-significant monthly load increases in the year immediately following treatment. Water and sediment yield changes do not follow the same post-treatment patterns. Water yields increased immediately following treatment and, over time, gradually dropped towards pre-harvest levels. Annual sediment yields increased in some years after the harvest, but in some cases the increase was years after treatment. Monthly sediment yields increased in the first year following the clearcut harvest, but elevated monthly loads following the partial cut harvest came years later. Hence, we investigate the changes in sediment yield through an examination of water yield and sediment concentration and in response to events. We test the sensitivity of our results to different methods for computing sediment yields based on total suspended solids concentration and continuous discharge measurements. Flow-weighted sediment yield averaged 24% higher than sediment yield computed from linear-interpolated total suspended solids concentration values. During typical summer and fall conditions, flow-weighting was found to overweight storm measurements and produce large sediment yield estimates. Further work is suggested to test methods of calculating monthly sediment yields with irregularly

  18. Water and bed-sediment quality in the vicinity of Berlin Lake, Ohio, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darner, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Berlin Lake, in northeast Ohio, was created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 and is used primarily for flood control for the upper reaches of the Mahoning River. The area surrounding and under the lake has been tapped for oil and natural gas production. One of the by-products of oil and gas production is concentrated salt water or brine, which might have an effect on the chemical quality of area potable-water sources. This report presents the results of a U.S. Geological Survey baseline study to collect current (2001) water and sediment-quality data and to characterize water quality in the Berlin Lake watershed. Chloride-to-bromide ratios were used to detect the presence of brine in water samples and to indicate possible adverse effects on water quality. Analyses of ground-water samples from domestic wells in the area indicate a source of chloride and bromide, but defining the source would require more data collection. Analyses of specific conductance and dissolved solids indicate that 78 percent (14 of 18) of the ground-water samples exceeded the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level for dissolved solids in public water supplies of 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L), compared to 6 percent of samples exceeding 500 mg/L in two nearby studies. Surface water was analyzed twice, once each during low-flow and surface runoff conditions. A comparison of the 2001 data to historical chloride concentrations, accounting for seasonal changes, does not indicate an increase in chloride loads for surface water in the area of Berlin Lake. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were found in bed-sediment samples collected from the mouths of major tributaries to Berlin Lake. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are produced during the incomplete combustion of organic carbon materials such as wood and fossil fuels, and they are components of petroleum products.

  19. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  20. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  1. 19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER TRIANGULATED CHANNELS AND OUT THE RAISED DUCTS TO FILTRATION PLANT. MOVEABLE BOARDS ON BOTTOM ASSIST IN REMOVING SLUDGE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. FILTER CONTROL BUILDING AT REAR. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Development of Standardized Domestic Hot Water Event Schedules for Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Burch, J.

    2008-08-01

    The Building America Research Benchmark is a standard house definition created as a point of reference for tracking progress toward multi-year energy savings targets. As part of its development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established a set of domestic hot water events to be used in conjunction with sub-hourly analysis of advanced hot water systems.

  3. Water quality effects of herded stream crossings by domestic sheep bands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On rangelands, free-ranging or loosely-herded domestic sheep tend not to linger in shrub-dominated riparian areas thus limiting their impacts on stream water quality. The water quality effects when sheep are tightly-herded during stream crossings, however, are largely unknown. In this study, downs...

  4. Improvement of sediment transport models using the shallow water framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales de Luna, Tomás; Castro Diaz, Manuel J.; Fernandez Nieto, Enrique D.; Narbona Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Sediment can be transported in several ways by the action of a river. During low transport stages, particles move by sliding and rolling over the surface of the bed. This type of transport is usually called bedload transport. With the increase of the velocity, the sediment is entrained into suspension and travels significant distances before being deposed again. One can observe a continuous exchange between sediment at the riverbed and sediment in suspension. One possible approach to model these phenomena is to use a shallow water model coupled with transport equations for sediment in suspension and a morphodynamical component for the bedload transport, which depends on an empirical flux. Nevertheless, this approach presents some drawbacks, for instance, the vertical distribution of the sediment in suspension is lost, gravitational effects for bedload transport is neglected and the models are usually too simplified for practical situations. We present here some recent advances in sediment transport modeling that aim to overcome the difficulties present in classic models. In particular, for suspended transport, a multilayer approach results as a promising tool. This allows to keep track of the vertical distribution of sediment and the computational cost is less expensive than a fully 3D approach. In what concerns bedload transport, a new general formulation will be introduced that recovers classic formulae as a particular case, but incorporates more information on the physics of the problem. This makes the model more suitable for practical applications. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and by the Spanish Government and FEDER through the research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01 and MTM2012-38383-C02-02)

  5. Sediment testing intermittent renewal system for the automated renewal of overlying water in toxicity tests with contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Phipps, G.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    A sediment testing intermittent renewal (STIR) system (stationary or portable) for invertebrate toxicity testing with contaminated sediments has been successfully developed and thoroughly tested at ERL-Duluth. Both the stationary and portable systems enable the maintenance of acceptable water quality (e.g. DO) through the capability of automatically renewing overlying water in sediment tests at rates ranging from 1 to 21 volume renewals/day. The STIR system not only significantly reduces the labor associated with renewal of overlying water but also affords a gentle exchange of water that results in virtually no sediment resuspension. Both systems can also be installed in a compact vented enclosure to permit safe testing of hazardous contaminated sediments. To date the STIR system has been used extensively for conducting 10-day bulk sediment tests with Chironomus tentans, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus.

  6. Domestic water uses: characterization of daily cycles in the north region of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina; Teixeira, Carlos A; Duarte, A A L S; Bentes, I

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing discussion among specialists about water use efficiency and the best measures to improve it. In Portugal, there have been a few attempts to expand the implementation of in situ water reuse projects. However, there is a lack of information about indoor water uses and how they are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. There are several studies that investigate per capita global water usage, but the partitioning of this volume per domestic device and daily cycles is yet unknown. Identified as one of the key questions in sustainable building design, the water end-use is of primary importance to the design of hydraulic networks in buildings. In order to overcome this lack, a quantitative characterization of daily water uses for each domestic device was performed, based on a weekly monitoring program in fifty-two different dwellings in the northern region of Portugal (Vila Real, Valpaços and Oporto). For forty of them, each water usage of different domestic devices of each dwelling was recorded. At the same time, the remaining twelve dwellings were also monitored in order to register the volume of water consumed in each utilization of each domestic device. This paper presents the results of this complete monitoring program, using collected data to establish indoor water use patterns for each domestic device, aiming to support a more realistic approach to residential water use. The daily cycles in the different cities, where the monitoring program was performed, are also presented, in order to evaluate possible influences of sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:23685370

  7. Relative role of pore water versus ingested sediment in bioavailability of organic contaminants in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, T.L.; Hansen, R.; Kure, L.K.; Forbes, V.E.; Giessing, A. |

    1998-12-01

    Experimental data for fluoranthene and feeding selectivity in combination with reaction-diffusion modeling suggest that ingestion of contaminated sediment may often be the dominant uptake pathway for deposit-feeding invertebrates in sediments. A dietary absorption efficiency of 56% and accompanying forage ratio of 2.4 were measured using natural sediment that had been dual-labeled ({sup 14}C:{sup 51}Cr) with fluoranthene and fed to the marine deposit-feeding polychaete Capitella species I. Only 3 to 4% of the total absorption could be accounted for by desorption during gut passage. These data were then used as input into a reaction-diffusion model to calculate the importance of uptake from ingested sediment relative to pore-water exposure. The calculations predict a fluoranthene dietary uptake flux that is 20 to 30 times greater than that due to pore water. Factors that act to modify or control the formation of local chemical gradients, boundary layers, or dietary absorption rates including particle selection or burrow construction will be important in determining the relative importance of potential exposure pathways. From a chemical perspective, the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption process are especially important as they will strongly influence the boundary layer immediately surrounding burrowing animals or irrigated tubes. The most important biological factors likely include irrigation behavior and burrow density and size.

  8. [Mercury in ASGM and its impact on water resources used for domestic water supply].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Arriaga, Farith A

    2014-01-01

    In regions affected by artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM), the inhalation of mercury vapor and the ingestion of fish contaminated with this metal constitute the main sources of mercury contamination that affect human health. Nevertheless, according to the World Health Organization, another source of contamination is polluted water. Although mercury in freshwater is usually found in very low concentrations because it is swiftly consumed by aquatic microorganisms, evidence shows that under specific circumstances its concentration in water can reach high levels, even surpassing the 2.0 μg/L stipulated by Colombian legislation for use as a domestic water supply. Mercury concentrations above 3.0 μg/L have been found in some Colombian municipalities, and above 8.0 μg/L in other regions around the world. Even though mercury consumption via water is a minor concern, along with other alimentary sources this low mercury concentration contributes to the total burden that affects human health. PMID:26120863

  9. An evaluation of rural communities’ water use patterns and preparedness to manage domestic water sources in Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machingambi, Memory; Manzungu, Emmanuel

    This paper makes an evaluation of rural communities’ preparedness to manage domestic water sources in Zimbabwe, as a way of assessing rural people’s willingness to contribute in cash and kind to safe and clean domestic water. A questionnaire was administered to respondents in two areas that have different rainfall regimes, as water availability was hypothesised to affect its management. This was complemented by interviews with personnel from government and semi-government institutions involved in provision of domestic water in rural areas. Information gathered included respondents’ awareness of the water resource ownership and supply structure at the community and national level, roles played by various institutions in domestic water provision, water sources ownership, number and distribution of water points, water use patterns, water based socio-economic activities and respondents’ willingness to contribute towards establishment, operation and maintenance of water points. Respondents attributed water ownership to God, the government, the community, ancestors, chiefs, ZINWA, RDCS and no one. Boreholes, shallow and deep wells, rivers, dams, canals and taps were mainly used for primary water uses like drinking, cooking, bathing, livestock watering, gardening and laundry. Brick making, gardening and irrigating plots were classified as commercial water uses because they were used to generate income. Views on water ownership affected perceptions towards establishment, maintenance and management of water points. There was a higher preference for community than individual participation except for canals and taps. The responsibility for water point establishment and repairs were regarded as the responsibility of the government, community and donors. Respondents without piped water had higher WTP amounts for the repair and desiltation of water points than those with piped water. This showed a willingness to ensure that the working order of water points was assured

  10. Sedimentation in lagoon waters (Case study on Segara Anakan Lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Lilik Kartika; Adrianto, Luky; Soewardi, Kadarwan; Atmadipoera, Agus S.; Hilmi, Endang

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the effect of sedimentation on waters area that serves as an advocate for life. It is included in the category to be wary considering these conditions will reduce the quality of life and threaten the life and survival of endemic biota. Observations rate of sedimentation since April 2014 until March 2015 performed at 6 stations that are considered to represent the condition of the lagoon. The observations for rate of sedimentation was conducted twice in a month for one year. Oceanographic parameters was taken by CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth) sensor in two seasons, at the height of the rainy season, March 2014 and August 2014. Results showed that the aquatic area more narrow characterized by changes in the outside line of the island visible on the image observation for two decades.

  11. Comparison of six generic solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Murphy, L.M.; Noreen, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of residential solar water heating is explored by analyzing six different system types. A figure of merit (that considers both performance and cost) is calculated for each system, providing information for both researchers and industry. Thermosyphon water heaters are determined to be the most cost effective option, and their wider application is recommended once a reliable draindown technique is developed.

  12. Preliminary design package for Sunspot Domestic Hot Water Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design review includes a drawing list, auto-control logic, measurement definitions, and other document pertaining to the solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control transport, auxiliary energy, and site data acquisition.

  13. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This Document is the Final Technical Report of the Solar Energy System located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. The building was air conditioned with an electric drive 300-ton chilled water central system in 1973. The building contains 126,000 square feet and the solar energy system will preheat 100 percent of domestic hot water and supply 47.5 percent of annual building heating requirements. During the building cooling seasons, the solar energy system will supply 100 percent of domestic hot water. The solar energy system consists of 4800 square feet (320 panels) Lennox/Honeywell flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 10,000 gallon steel tank storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 686.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/year (specified) building heating and domestic hot water heating. The start up date is December 4, 1979. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  14. IMPORTANCE OF INTERSTITIAL, OVERLYING WATER AND WHOLE SEDIMENT EXPOSURES TO BIOACCUMUALTION BY MARINE BIVALVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the performance of contaminated sediment studies using nonpolar pollutants, like polyclorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with marine organisms, the routes of exposure can include whole sediment, overlying waters and interstitial waters (assuming no feeding). These routes can be f...

  15. The relative merits of monitoring and domestic wells for ground water quality investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.L.; Roberts, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    The results of two studies of the effect of agricultural land use on shallow ground water quality indicate that monitoring wells may be a better choice than domestic wells for studies of pesticide occurrence or transport, or for use as early-warning indicators of potential drinking water contamination. Because domestic wells represent the used resource, and because domestic well water may be affected by historical rather than current pesticide and land- use practices, domestic wells would be the best choice for an investigation of drinking water quality. The key difference between the domestic and monitoring wells appears to be that the monitoring wells in this study were installed exclusively to sample the shallowest possible ground water. For these studies, 48 shallow domestic wells and 41 monitoring wells were located randomly within two land-use settings (row crops and orchards) in an irrigated agricultural region of eastern Washington and sampled for 145 pesticides (including nine pesticide degradates) and common water quality indicators. Constructing and sampling monitoring wells required approximately four times the resources (including manpower and materials) as locating and sampling domestic wells. Sample collection and quality assurance procedures and analytical techniques were identical except that a portable submersible pump was required for monitoring wells. In both land-use settings, no significant difference in nitrate concentration was found between well types; however, the average number of pesticides detected per well was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the monitoring wells. A greater variety of pesticides was detected in monitoring wells; many were detected only in monitoring wells. More than 60% of detections of pesticides that were found only in domestic wells were of compounds that are no longer in use. These differences in ground water quality found in this study relate to the depth of the well and are apparently related to the age of ground

  16. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  17. Evaluation of genotoxicity and toxicity of water and sediment samples from a Brazilian stream influenced by tannery industries.

    PubMed

    Júnior, Horst Mitteregger; Silva, Juliana da; Arenzon, Alexandre; Portela, Carina Saraiva; Ferreira, Isabel Cristina Fernandes de Sá; Henriques, João Antônio Pêgas

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports results of genotoxicity and toxicity studies of water and sediment samples collected from the Estância Velha stream of southern Brazil, a stream transporting both domestic sewage and effluents from regional factories working in the leather industry. Three sites were selected: in the stream headwaters (Site 1), located downstream of an urban area (Site 2), and near the basin outfall (Site 3). Results obtained with Allium cepa showed no evidence of chromosomal mutation, either in water or in sediment, during winter or summer seasons, but samples collected below Site 1 showed high toxicity. Physical and chemical analyses showed high concentrations of pollutants at these sites. Ecotoxicity tests with Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia measured toxicity in water from Sites 2 and 3 in summer 2004. A toxic effect on Hyalella azteca was only found in sediment from Site 3 during winter 2003 and summer 2004. The results suggest that the synergy among different compounds in domestic and industrial sewage discharges can make it difficult to maintain system stability. PMID:17157352

  18. Water-sediment controversy in setting environmental standards for selenium.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S J; Lemly, A D

    1999-11-01

    A substantial amount of laboratory and field research on selenium effects to biota has been accomplished since the national water quality criterion was published for selenium in 1987. Many articles have documented adverse effects on biota at concentrations below the current chronic criterion of 5 microg/L. This commentary will present information to support a national water quality criterion for selenium of 2 microg/L, based on a wide array of support from federal, state, university, and international sources. Recently, two articles have argued for a sediment-based criterion and presented a model for deriving site-specific criteria. In one example, they calculate a criterion of 31 microg/L for a stream with a low sediment selenium toxicity threshold and low site-specific sediment total organic carbon content, which is substantially higher than the national criterion of 5 microg/L. Their basic premise for proposing a sediment-based method has been critically reviewed and problems in their approach are discussed.

  19. A new conceptual framework for water and sediment connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi; Parsons, Tony; Nunes, Joao Pedro; Saco, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    For many years scientists have tried to understand, describe and quantify sediment transport on multiple scales; from the geomorphological work triggered by a single thunderstorm to the geological time scale land scape evolution, and from particles and soil aggregates up to the continental scale. In the last two decades, a new concept called connectivity (Baartman et al., 2013; Bracken et al., 2013, 2015; Parsons et al., 2015) has been used by the scientific community to describe the connection between the different scales at which the sediment redistribution research along the watershed are being studied: pedon, slope tram, slope, watersheds, and basins. This concept is seen as a means to describe and quantify the results of processes influencing the transport of sediment on all these scales. Therefore the concept of connectivity and the way scales are used in the design of a measurement and monitoring scheme are interconnected (Cerdà et al., 2012), which shows that connectivity is not only a tool for process understanding, but also a tool to measure processes on multiple scales. This research aims to describe catchment system dynamics from a connectivity point of view. This conceptual framework can be helpful to look at catchment systems and synthesize which data are necessary to take into account when measuring or modelling water and sediment transfer in catchment systems, Identifying common patterns and generalities will help discover physical reasons for differences in responses and interaction between these processes. We describe a conceptual framework which is meant to bring a better understanding of the system dynamics of a catchment in terms of water and sediment transfer by breaking apart the system dynamics in stocks (the system state at a given moment) and flows (the system fluxes). Breaking apart the internal system dynamics that determine the behaviour of the catchment system is in our opinion a way to bring a better insight into the concepts of

  20. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  1. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  2. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  3. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  4. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  5. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  6. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  7. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  8. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  9. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  11. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements... of the initial plan approval, the person owning, operating, or controlling a water, sediment,...

  12. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  13. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  15. Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Nebraska during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    No data base of actual measurements exists for self-supplied, domestic water use in Nebraska, because Nebraska laws do not require drilling permits, well registration, or reporting of volumes withdrawn from domestic wells. Self-supplied, domestic water use of 31,280 acre-ft in Nebraska during 1980 was computed from estimates of gal/day/capita use for each county. This represents an average of 95 gal/day/capita. During 1980, county use volumes ranged from 30 acre-ft in Hooker and Pawnee Counties to 1,380 acre-ft in Douglas County, and Hydrologic Unit use volumes ranged from < 5 acre-ft to 2,270 acre-ft. Natural Resources Districts ' (NRD) use volumes ranged from 360 acre-ft in Middle Niobrara NRD to 3,530 acre-feet in the Lower Elkhorn NRD for the same period. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Sporadic Legionnaires' disease: the role of domestic electric hot-water tanks.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, S F; Locas, M C; Duchesne, A; Restieri, C; Ismaïl, J; Lefebvre, B; Labbé, A C; Dion, R; Plante, M; Laverdière, M

    2012-01-01

    Sporadic community-acquired legionellosis (SCAL) can be acquired through contaminated aerosols from residential potable water. Electricity-dependent hot-water tanks are widely used in the province of Quebec (Canada) and have been shown to be frequently contaminated with Legionella spp. We prospectively investigated the homes of culture-proven SCAL patients from Quebec in order to establish the proportion of patients whose domestic potable hot-water system was contaminated with the same Legionella isolate that caused their pneumonia. Water samples were collected in each patient's home. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirty-six patients were enrolled into the study. Legionella was recovered in 12/36 (33%) homes. The residential and clinical isolates were found to be microbiologically related in 5/36 (14%) patients. Contaminated electricity-heated domestic hot-water systems contribute to the acquisition of SCAL. The proportion is similar to previous reports, but may be underestimated.

  17. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Davis, Curtiss O.

    2002-01-01

    Ocean color sensors were designed mainly for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations over the clear open oceanic areas (case 1 water) using channels between 0.4 and 0.86 micrometers. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts is equipped with narrow channels located within a wider wavelength range between 0.4 and 2.5 micrometers for a variety of remote sensing applications. The wide spectral range can provide improved capabilities for remote sensing of the more complex and turbid coastal waters (case 2 water) and for improved atmospheric corrections for Ocean scenes. In this article, we describe an empirical algorithm that uses this wide spectral range to identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. The algorithm takes advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micrometer that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  18. Investigation of the spreading and dilution of domestic waste water inputs into a tidal bay using the finite-volume model FVCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettmann, Karsten; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf; Liebezeit, Gerd; Meier, Georg

    2010-05-01

    The 'Jade Bay' is a tidal bay located in the western part of the German Wadden Sea, southern North-Sea coast. During particularly heavy rain falls, rain water mixed with domestic waste water is discharged into the bay due to the limited capacities of the waste water treatment plant of the city of Wilhelmshaven. As the discharge point is located only a few hundred meters from a public bathing beach it is important to know spreading and dilution of the waste waters by tidal and wind-driven mixing. To model the behaviour of the waste water plumes, the unstructured mesh finite-volume model FVCOM (Chen and al., 2003) is used, which allows to cover the large area of the Jade and the nearby North Sea with a relatively high resolution near the point of discharge and a coarser resolution at the outer edges of the study side. We adapted the included sediment module of FVCOM to handle the sedimentation, decay and evolution in the bottom sediments of the discharged waste water particles, especially with respect to bacteria. Furthermore, alternative discharge points located in the interior of the Jade bay were tested, which might be more suited for a faster dilution and a smaller residence time of the waste water particles in the tidal bay.

  19. Advanced biological unit processes for domestic water recycling.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, B; Laine, A L; Stephenson, T; Judd, S J

    2001-01-01

    The potential of advanced biological unit operations for the recycling of grey and black waters has been evaluated. The membrane bioreactor (MBR) demonstrated the greatest efficacy towards water recycling in terms of all the quality determinants. Both the biologically aerated filter (BAF) and the MBR were able to effectively treat the organic and physical pollutants in all the types of wastewater tested. The main difference was observed in terms of the microbiological quality, measured as total coliforms. The open bed structure of the BAF enabled passage of coliforms whereas the complete barrier of the MBR produced a non detectable level in the effluent. The MBR process complied with commonly adopted water recycling quality standards for the all determinants during the grey water trials and failed only in terms of total coliform counts once black water had been introduced into the feed. The MBR was seen as a particularly suitable advanced biological process as it was very effective at stabilising out the considerable load variations encountered during the trial.

  20. Influence of colloids on sediment-water partition coefficients of polychlorobiphenyl congeners in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Capel, P.D.; Eisenreich, S.J.

    1986-11-01

    Measurements of sediment-water partitioning of polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) congeners in Lake Superior provide some of the first field evidence demonstrating the importance of colloids to the fates of highly hydrophobic organic pollutants. Laboratory-derived correlations between sediment-water distribution coefficients and properties of both the contaminant (octanol-water partition coefficient) and the suspended solids (organic carbon content, concentration) do not accurately predict PCB speciation in Lake Superior. This failure can be explained by the presence of colloidal matter with which contaminants may associate and the very low solids concentrations in oligotrophic surface waters. A surprising consequence of such colloid associations is that the observed sediment-water distribution coefficients are independent of properties of highly hydrophobic compounds. A three-phase model including nonfilterable microparticles and macromolecular organic matter shows that colloidal-associated contaminants may be the dominant species in most surface waters. Colloidal associations are therefore likely to significantly impact the geochemistry of hydrophobic pollutants.

  1. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  2. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  3. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  4. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  5. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  6. Characterizing Water, Sediment, Nutrients, and Contaminant Fluxes in Coastal Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard N.; El-Gamal, Ayman

    2010-03-01

    Marine Constituent Dynamics in Coastal Egypt; Alexandria, Egypt, 20 November 2009; The Egyptian coastal area is a highly dynamic region in which materials (water, sediment, nutrients, and contaminants) are transported from various sources to the Mediterranean and Red seas. At a workshop in Egypt, U.S. and Egyptian scientists discussed these largely unquantified processes and how they interact to drive coastal ecology. A major goal of the workshop was to identify the most pressing research priorities for the region for both scientific and management purposes. The workshop concluded by recommending that international multidisciplinary efforts be undertaken to characterize water, nutrient, sediment, and contaminant delivery fluxes and mechanisms to coastal regions of the Nile Delta.

  7. Report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-18

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs.

  8. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    PubMed

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  9. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    PubMed

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  10. Mineralogical Evidence of Galvanic Corrosion in Domestic, Drinking Water Pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution system (DWDS) piping contains numerous examples of galvanically-coupled metals (e.g., soldered copper pipe joints, copper-lead pipes joined during partial replacements of lead service lines). The possible role of galvanic corrosion in the release of l...

  11. Domestic hot water consumption of the developed and developing communities in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    Domestic hot water consumption for five different types of dwellings in the developed and developing communities of the Johannesburg Metropolitan Area, South Africa, are determined with measurements over a period of one year (1996) in more than 770 dwellings. The hot water consumption was taken monthly with the exception of 310 dwellings where the measurements were logged, resulting in hourly hot water consumptions. The results of the two types of measurements are presented: first, hot water consumption per person per day for the different months of a year; second, hourly hot water consumption per person per day as a function of winter weekdays.

  12. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas is discussed. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  13. Assessment of physico-chemical properties and metal contents of water and sediments of Bodo Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Vincent-Akpu, Ijeoma Favour; Tyler, Andrew N.; Wilson, Clare; Mackinnon, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Some physico-chemical properties and the concentrations of the metals Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn in water and sediments were examined from September 2011 to January 2012 in Bodo Creek, where oil spills have been recurrent. Temperature, pH, total dissolved solid, conductivity, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total hardness, sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate were determined in surface water. Particle size, total organic matter (TOM), and pH were also determined in the sediments. The parameters were within permissible limits except the mean values of BOD, COD, total hardness, and sulfate that exceeded levels permissible for domestic use. The sediments consisted mainly of sand, with TOM ranging from 0.2% to 5.5%. With the exception of cadmium that was below detection limit, metal levels (mg kg−1) in the sediments were 12 (Mn), 1070 (Fe), 10 (Cu), 10 (Zn), 5.3 (Cr), 1.1 (Pb), 1.0 (Ni), and 0.5 (Co) while in water they were 24, 98, 21, 6.9, 4.0, 0.6, 0.18, and 0.16, respectively. The latter were higher than World Health Organization recommended permissible levels for both surface and drinking water. PMID:26681819

  14. A sediment resuspension and water quality model of Lake Okeechobee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, R.T.; Martin, J.; Wool, T.; Wang, P.-F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of sediment resuspension on the water quality of shallow lakes is well documented. However, a search of the literature reveals no deterministic mass-balance eutrophication models that explicitly include resuspension. We modified the Lake Okeeehobee water quality model - which uses the Water Analysis Simulation Package (WASP) to simulate algal dynamics and phosphorus, nitrogen, and oxygen cycles - to include inorganic suspended solids and algorithms that: (1) define changes in depth with changes in volume; (2) compute sediment resuspension based on bottom shear stress; (3) compute partition coefficients for ammonia and ortho-phosphorus to solids; and (4) relate light attenuation to solids concentrations. The model calibration and validation were successful with the exception of dissolved inorganic nitrogen species which did not correspond well to observed data in the validation phase. This could be attributed to an inaccurate formulation of algal nitrogen preference and/or the absence of nitrogen fixation in the model. The model correctly predicted that the lake is lightlimited from resuspended solids, and algae are primarily nitrogen limited. The model simulation suggested that biological fluxes greatly exceed external loads of dissolved nutrients; and sedimentwater interactions of organic nitrogen and phosphorus far exceed external loads. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that parameters affecting resuspension, settling, sediment nutrient and solids concentrations, mineralization, algal productivity, and algal stoichiometry are factors requiring further study to improve our understanding of the Lake Okeechobee ecosystem.

  15. Integrated water and sediment flow simulation and forecasting models for river reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Parthasarathi; Sil, Briti Sundar

    2010-05-01

    SummaryIn the present study integrated water and sediment flow simulation and forecasting models for a river reach have been developed. The new models combine Muskingum model and the sediment rating model leading to integrated water discharge-sediment concentration model ( WSCM) and water discharge-sediment discharge model ( WSDM) for a reach. The models depict coherence in water discharge and sediment load variations at a site; incorporate two hydrologic variables, water discharge and sediment load for the gauge sites and represent revised forms of the basic Muskingum model. The models can be recast into forecasting form useful for obtaining downstream water and sediment flow forecasts Δt'=2kx time unit ahead. During calibration the models can select a commensurate inflow-outflow set depending on upstream and the downstream relative sediment discharge characteristics for a reach. The models can be used for developing Muskingum model for river reaches having no water discharge records. With forecasting capabilities the present models are useful in the real time management of sediment related pollution hazards in water courses. The study indicates that a single model could be used to describe both water and sediment flow in river reaches. The proposed model formulations are demonstrated for simulating and forecasting sediment concentration, sediment discharge and water discharge in the Mississippi River Basin, USA. Model parameters are estimated using non-dominated sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II). Comparison of models performances with reported works show better performances by the present models.

  16. Factors affecting domestic water consumption in rural households upon access to improved water supply: insights from the Wei River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liangxin; Liu, Guobin; Wang, Fei; Geissen, Violette; Ritsema, Coen J

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively understanding water consumption behavior is necessary to design efficient and effective water use strategies. Despite global efforts to identify the factors that affect domestic water consumption, those related to domestic water use in rural regions have not been sufficiently studied, particularly in villages that have gained access to improved water supply. To address this gap, we investigated 247 households in eight villages in the Wei River Basin where three types of improved water supply systems are implemented. Results show that domestic water consumption in liters per capita per day was significantly correlated with water supply pattern and vegetable garden area, and significantly negatively correlated with family size and age of household head. Traditional hygiene habits, use of water appliances, and preference for vegetable gardening remain dominant behaviors in the villages with access to improved water supply. Future studies on rural domestic water consumption should pay more attention to user lifestyles (water appliance usage habits, outdoor water use) and cultural backgrounds (age, education).

  17. Impact of domestic sewage on fresh water body.

    PubMed

    Shiddamallayya, N; Pratima, M

    2008-05-01

    In the present study various (physico-chemical) factors were assessed over a period of two years (from February 2002 to January 2004) to note the chemistry and quality of tank water in Bhalki town of Bidar. Physico-chemical factors like pH, dissolved oxygen, magnesium, chlorine, nitrite, sulphates and chemical oxygen demand were found with maximum concentration during summer season. Similarly, during monsoon season free carbon dioxide, alkalinity hardness, calcium, phosphate, silicon, total solids and biological oxygen demand; and in winter season organic matter were recorded. The concentrations viz., pH, hardness and nitrite were more compared to the potable water standard of WHO. The correlation matrix and dendrogram of physico-chemical factors have been computed and analysed. The positive co-relation coefficient observed between pH and magnesium, dissolved oxygen and hardness, free carbondioxide and calcium, alkalinity and nitrite, alkalinityand phosphate, alkalinity and biological oxygen demand, hardness and calcium, hardness and magnesium, magnesium and chlorine, nitrate and phosphate, nitrite and biological oxygen demand, phosphate and organic matter; and silicon and chemical oxygen demand. The dendrogram confirms chlorine, pH, hardness, silicon, total solids and sulphates are the key factors of the change in the chemistry of water body

  18. High resolution microprofiling, fractionation and speciation at sediment water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Within aquatic environments, the exchange between the sediment and the overlaying water is often driven by steep gradients of, e.g., the oxygen concentration, the redox potential or the pH value at the sediment water interface (SWI). Important transport processes at the SWI are sedimentation and resuspension of particulate matter and diffusional fluxes of dissolved substances. To gain a better understanding of the key factors and processes determining the fate of substances at the SWI, methods with a spatial high resolution are required that enable the investigation of several sediment parameters in parallel to different analytes of interest in the sediment pore water. Moreover, beside the total content, questions concerning the speciation and fractionation are of concern in studying the different (transport) processes. Due to the availability of numerous micro-sensors and -electrodes (e.g., O2, redox potential, pH value, H2S, N2O) and the development of methods for pore water sampling [1], the toolbox to study the heterogeneous and often dynamic conditions at the SWI at a sub-millimetre scale were considerably improved. Nevertheless, the methods available for pore water sampling often require the installation of the sampling devices at the sampling site and/or intensive preparation procedures that may influence the conditions at the area studied and/or the characteristics of the samples taken. By combination of a micro profiling system with a new micro filtration probe head connected to a pump and a fraction collector, a micro profiling and micro sampling system ("missy") was developed that enables for the first time a direct, automate and low invasive sampling of small volumes (<500 μL) at a spatial high resolution of a few millimetres to sub-millimetres [2]. Via the application of different sample preparation procedures followed by inductively plasma-mass spectrometry analyses, it was possible to address not only the total content of metal(loid)s, but also

  19. Microbial quality of domestic and imported brands of bottled water in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Bharath, J; Mosodeen, M; Motilal, S; Sandy, S; Sharma, S; Tessaro, T; Thomas, K; Umamaheswaran, M; Simeon, D; Adesiyun, A A

    2003-02-25

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the microbial quality of domestic and imported brands of bottled water available in Trinidad, purchased from six geographical regions in Trinidad, and representing the whole island. A sample size of 344 bottles of water was determined by using a precision rate of 2% and a Type 1 error of 5%. The membrane filter technique was used with cultures grown on m-Endo agar and m-FC agar for total coliforms and thermotolerant coliforms, respectively. Aerobic plate count (APC) was determined on nutrient agar; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on MacConkey agar, Escherichia coli was isolated on eosin methylene blue (EMB) and Salmonella spp. was assayed by using standard methods. Of the 344 water samples tested, 262 (76.2%) and 82 (23.8%) were domestic and imported brands, respectively. Eighteen (5.2%) of the 344 samples contained coliforms with a mean count of 0.88+/-6.38 coliforms per 100 ml, while 5 (1.5%) samples contained E. coli. The prevalence of total coliforms in domestic brands of bottled water was 6.9% (18 of 262) as compared with 0.0% (0 of 82) detected in imported brands. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.004). Similarly, the prevalence of aerobic bacteria in domestic brands of bottled water (33.6%) was significantly higher (p=0.001) than was found in imported brands (14.8%). Twenty-six (7.6%) of the total samples of water contained Pseudomonas species, but all were negative for thermotolerant coliforms and Salmonella spp. It was concluded that based on the recommended zero tolerance for coliforms in potable water, 5% of bottled water sold in Trinidad could be considered unfit for human consumption.

  20. Removal of sediment and bacteria from water using green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Buttice, Audrey L; Stroot, Joyce M; Lim, Daniel V; Stroot, Peter G; Alcantar, Norma A

    2010-05-01

    Although nearly all newly derived water purification methods have improved the water quality in developing countries, few have been accepted and maintained for long-term use. Field studies indicate that the most beneficial methods use indigenous resources, as they are both accessible and accepted by communities they help. In an effort to implement a material that will meet community needs, two fractions of mucilage gum were extracted from the Opuntia ficus-indica cactus and tested as flocculation agents against sediment and bacterial contamination. As diatomic ions are known to affect both mucilage and promote cell aggregation, CaCl(2) was studied in conjunction and compared with mucilage as a bacteria removal method. To evaluate performance, ion-rich waters that mimic natural water bodies were prepared. Column tests containing suspensions of the sediment kaolin exhibited particle flocculation and settling rates up to 13.2 cm/min with mucilage versus control settling rates of 0.5 cm/min. Bacillus cereus tests displayed flocculation and improved settling times with mucilage concentrations lower than 5 ppm and removal rates between 97 and 98% were observed for high bacteria concentration tests (>10(8) cells/ml). This natural material not only displays water purification abilities, but it is also affordable, renewable and readily available. PMID:20369814

  1. Analysis of a flat plate collector for hot water domestic use - a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, C.; Stanciu, D.; Gheorghian, A.; Șoriga, I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the study of a flat plate collector (FPC) used to heat water for domestic use in stationary operation. A comparison is provided between the cases of constant and time-dependent water circuit, in clear sky conditions. Numerical results emphasize the hot water temperature obtained with a given FPC area for a certain value of the mass flow rate. Imposing both the mass flow rate and hot water temperature, the minimum required area of the FPC can be determined. The computations are based on energy and mass balance equations. Steady state is obtained after three days of continuous operation.

  2. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  3. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  4. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  5. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  6. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  7. A novel tracer technique for the assessment of fine sediment dynamics in urban water management systems.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K L; Droppo, I G; He, C; Grapentine, L; Exall, K

    2011-04-01

    Urban storm water run off can reduce the quality of receiving waters due to high sediment load and associated sediment-bound contaminants. Consequently, urban water management systems, such as detention ponds, that both modify water quantity through storage and improve water quality through sediment retention are frequently-used best management practices. To manage such systems effectively and to improve their efficiency, there is a need to understand the dynamics (transport and settling) of sediment, and in particular the fine sediment fraction (<63 μm) and its associated contaminants within urban storm water management systems. This can be difficult to achieve, as modelling the transport behaviour of fine-grained and cohesive sediment is problematic and field-based measurements can be costly, time-consuming and unrepresentative. The aim of this study was to test the application of a novel cohesive sediment tracer and to determine fine sediment transport dynamics within a storm water detention pond. The cohesive sediment tracer used was a holmium labelled montmorillonite clay which flocculated and had similar size and settling velocity to the natural pond sediment it was intended to mimic. The tracer demonstrated that fine sediment was deposited across the entire pond, with the presence of reed beds and water depth being important factors for maximising sediment retention. The results of the sediment tracer experiment were in good agreement with those of a mathematical sediment transport model. Here, the deposited sediment tracer was sampled by collecting and analysing surface pond sediments for holmium. However, analysis and sampling of the three dimensional suspended tracer 'cloud' may provide more accurate information regarding internal pond sediment dynamics. PMID:21420140

  8. A novel tracer technique for the assessment of fine sediment dynamics in urban water management systems.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K L; Droppo, I G; He, C; Grapentine, L; Exall, K

    2011-04-01

    Urban storm water run off can reduce the quality of receiving waters due to high sediment load and associated sediment-bound contaminants. Consequently, urban water management systems, such as detention ponds, that both modify water quantity through storage and improve water quality through sediment retention are frequently-used best management practices. To manage such systems effectively and to improve their efficiency, there is a need to understand the dynamics (transport and settling) of sediment, and in particular the fine sediment fraction (<63 μm) and its associated contaminants within urban storm water management systems. This can be difficult to achieve, as modelling the transport behaviour of fine-grained and cohesive sediment is problematic and field-based measurements can be costly, time-consuming and unrepresentative. The aim of this study was to test the application of a novel cohesive sediment tracer and to determine fine sediment transport dynamics within a storm water detention pond. The cohesive sediment tracer used was a holmium labelled montmorillonite clay which flocculated and had similar size and settling velocity to the natural pond sediment it was intended to mimic. The tracer demonstrated that fine sediment was deposited across the entire pond, with the presence of reed beds and water depth being important factors for maximising sediment retention. The results of the sediment tracer experiment were in good agreement with those of a mathematical sediment transport model. Here, the deposited sediment tracer was sampled by collecting and analysing surface pond sediments for holmium. However, analysis and sampling of the three dimensional suspended tracer 'cloud' may provide more accurate information regarding internal pond sediment dynamics.

  9. Bacteriological quality and risk assessment of the imported and domestic bottled mineral water sold in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Zeenat, A; Hatha, A A M; Viola, L; Vipra, K

    2009-12-01

    Considering the popularity of bottled mineral water among indigenous Fijians and tourists alike, a study was carried out to determine the bacteriological quality of different bottled waters. A risk assessment was also carried out. Seventy-five samples of bottled mineral water belonging to three domestic brands and 25 samples of one imported brand were analysed for heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria and faecal coliforms. HPC counts were determined at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C using R2A medium and a membrane filtration technique was used to determine the faecal coliform (FC) load in 100 ml of water on mFC agar. Between 28 and 68% of the samples of the various domestic brands failed to meet the WHO standard of 100 colony forming units (cfu) per 100 ml at 22 degrees C and 7% of these also tested positive for faecal coliforms. All imported bottled mineral water samples were within WHO standards. A risk assessment of the HPC bacteria was carried out in terms of beta haemolytic activity and antibiotic resistance. More than 50% of the isolates showed beta haemolytic activity and were multi-drug resistant. While the overall quality of the product was generally good, there is a need to enforce stringent quality standards for the domestic bottlers to ensure the safety of consumers.

  10. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

  11. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  12. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui. PMID:27126438

  13. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui.

  14. INTERACTION OF METALS AND ORGAINIC CARBON COLLOIDS IN ANOXIC INTERSTITIAL WATERS OF MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine colloids are an important component of natural water geochemistry critical to the cycling, speciation and bioavailability of metals in marine sediments. In sediment, metals exist in three phases: particulate, colloidal and dissolved. Dissolved metal concentrations have bee...

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP OF BIOACCUMULATIVE CHEMICALS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT TO RESIDUES IN FISH: A VISUALIZATION APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A visualization approach is developed and presented for depicting and interpreting bioaccumulation relationships and data, i.e., bioaccumulation factors (BAFs), biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and chemical residues in fish, using water-sediment chemical concentration ...

  16. Assessing the fate of dredged sediments placed in open-water sites, Northern Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halka, Jeffrey; Panageotou, William; Sanford, Lawrence; Yu-Chou, Shenn

    1994-01-01

    An integrated series of field studies and experiments have been carried out on dredged sediments placed in open water sites in Northern Chesapeake Bay. The studies include: (1) examination of the potential for fluidized sediment flow, (2) quantifying the volumetric changes that the sediments undergo during dredging process and subsequent to deposition, (3) estimating parameters for cohesive sediment erosion models from field data on currents and suspended sediment concentrations, and (4) incorporating the erosion model parameters and sediment transport equation into a 3-D hydrodynamic model for the upper Chesapeake Bay to predict transport directions and setting sites of eroded sediments under a variety of seasonal weather and river flow conditions.

  17. Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

  18. Case study of the effectiveness of passive grease trap for management on domestic kitchen waste water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidzamuddin, M. Y.; Juffrizal, K.; Mustapha, F.; Zulfattah, Z. M.; Tan, C. F.; Taha, M. M.; Hidayah, I.; Hilwa, M. Z.

    2015-05-01

    Household waste, generally known as trash or garbage is mostly includes food wastes, product packaging, and other miscellaneous inorganic wastes that are coming from domestic household. Grease waste such as oil and fats can contaminate water and also clot on pipes provoking blockages. Thus, waste water from kitchen sink need a proper way of filtration. Grease trap developed in this paper is viable in trapping the grease residue. The experiments have been conducted in controlled environment and the objectives are to investigate the effectiveness of grease trap by proving the existence of retention time and the expected ratio of collected water and oil during experiment process using a prototype model.

  19. Concentrations of Elements in Sediments and Selective Fractions of Sediments, and in Natural Waters in Contact with Sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Wagner, Richard J.; Sanzolone, Richard F.; Cox, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-eight composite and replicate sediment samples from 8 Lake Roosevelt sites were collected and analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 2 non-metals, 20 metals, and 4 lanthanide and actinide elements. All elements were detected in all sediment samples except for silver (95 percent of the elements detected for 1,008 analyses), which was detected only in 4 samples. Sequential selective extraction procedures were performed on single composite samples from the eight sites. The percentage of detections for the 31 elements analyzed ranged from 76 percent for the first extraction fraction using a weak extractant to 93 percent for the four-acid dissolution of the sediments remaining after the third sequential selective extraction. Water samples in various degrees of contact with the sediment were analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 5 non-metals, 25 metals, and 16 lanthanide and actinide elements. The filtered water samples included 10 samples from the reservoir water column at 8 sites, 32 samples of porewater, 55 samples from reservoir water overlying sediments in 8 cores from the site incubated in a field laboratory, and 24 water samples that were filtered after being tumbled with sediments from 8 sites. Overall, the concentrations of only 37 percent of the 6,776 analyses of the 121 water samples were greater than the reporting limit. Selenium, bismuth, chromium, niobium, silver, and zirconium were not detected in any water samples. The percentage of concentrations for the water samples that were above the reporting limit ranged from 14 percent for the lanthanide and actinide elements to 77 percent for the alkali and alkaline earth elements. Concentrations were greater than reporting limits in only 23 percent of the analyses of reservoir water and 29 percent of the analyses of reservoir water overlying incubation cores. In contrast, 47 and 48 percent of the concentrations of porewater and water samples tumbled with sediments, respectively

  20. [Water-Sediment Partition of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Karst Underground River].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jia-cheng; Sun, Yu-chuan; Xiao, Shi-zhen

    2015-11-01

    Based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) field data of dissolved phase and sediment phase, partition coefficient K(p) in sediment-water interface from Laolongdong underground river was obtained. The concentration of PAHs in water and sediment and partition coefficient K(p) in sediment-water interface were studied. The results showed PAHs concentrations were 81.5-8 089 ng x L(-1) with a mean value (1 439 ± 2 248) ng x L(-1) in water and 58.2-1 051 ng x g(-1) with an average (367.9 ± 342.6) ng x g(-1) in sediment. The dominant PAHs were 2-3 rings PAHs in water and sediment. However, high rings PAHs obviously enriched in the sediment. Partition coefficients varied from 55.74 to 46 067 L x kg(-1) in sediment-water interface, increasing with the rise of PAH compounds. All the organic carbon partition in sediment-water interface were higher than predicate values based on typical model of equilibrium distribution indicated that PAHs were strongly adsorbed in sediment. The linear free-energy relationship coefficient between K(oc) value and octanol-water partition coefficient K(ow) was 0.75, but the slope was lower than 1, indicating that sediment in Laolongdong underground river had weakly lipophilic characteristics and adsorption ability for PAHs.

  1. Integrating the simulation of domestic water demand behaviour to an urban water model using agent based modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutiva, Ifigeneia; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The urban water system's sustainable evolution requires tools that can analyse and simulate the complete cycle including both physical and cultural environments. One of the main challenges, in this regard, is the design and development of tools that are able to simulate the society's water demand behaviour and the way policy measures affect it. The effects of these policy measures are a function of personal opinions that subsequently lead to the formation of people's attitudes. These attitudes will eventually form behaviours. This work presents the design of an ABM tool for addressing the social dimension of the urban water system. The created tool, called Urban Water Agents' Behaviour (UWAB) model, was implemented, using the NetLogo agent programming language. The main aim of the UWAB model is to capture the effects of policies and environmental pressures to water conservation behaviour of urban households. The model consists of agents representing urban households that are linked to each other creating a social network that influences the water conservation behaviour of its members. Household agents are influenced as well by policies and environmental pressures, such as drought. The UWAB model simulates behaviour resulting in the evolution of water conservation within an urban population. The final outcome of the model is the evolution of the distribution of different conservation levels (no, low, high) to the selected urban population. In addition, UWAB is implemented in combination with an existing urban water management simulation tool, the Urban Water Optioneering Tool (UWOT) in order to create a modelling platform aiming to facilitate an adaptive approach of water resources management. For the purposes of this proposed modelling platform, UWOT is used in a twofold manner: (1) to simulate domestic water demand evolution and (2) to simulate the response of the water system to the domestic water demand evolution. The main advantage of the UWAB - UWOT model

  2. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  3. EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS TO DOMESTIC WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SALT LAKE COUNTY, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Highland, Lynn M.

    1985-01-01

    A magnitude-7. 5 earthquake occurring along the central portion of the Wasatch Fault, Utah, may cause significant damage to Salt Lake County's domestic water system. This system is composed of water treatment plants, aqueducts, distribution mains, and other facilities that are vulnerable to ground shaking, liquefaction, fault movement, and slope failures. Recent investigations into surface faulting, landslide potential, and earthquake intensity provide basic data for evaluating the potential earthquake hazards to water-distribution systems in the event of a large earthquake. Water supply system components may be vulnerable to one or more earthquake-related effects, depending on site geology and topography. Case studies of water-system damage by recent large earthquakes in Utah and in other regions of the United States offer valuable insights in evaluating water system vulnerability to earthquakes.

  4. Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

  5. Partitioning behavior of per- and polyfluoroalkyl compounds between pore water and sediment in two sediment cores from Tokyo Bay, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Lutz; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Yeung, Leo W Y; Taniyasu, Sachi; Horii, Yuichi; Lam, Paul K S; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2009-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of per- and polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) between pore water and sediment in two sediment cores collected from Tokyo Bay, Japan, was investigated. In addition, the fluxes and temporal trends in one dated sediment core were studied. Short-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) (C < or = 7) were found exclusively in pore water, while long-chain PFCAs (C > or = 11) were found only in sediment The perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs), n-ethylperfluoro-1-octanesulfonamidoacetic acid (N-EtFOSAA), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) seemed to bind more strongly to sediment than PFCAs. The enrichment of PFCs on sediment increased with increasing organic matter and decreasing pH. The perfluorocarbon chain length and functional group were identified as the dominating parameters that had an influence on the partitioning behavior of the PFCs in sediment The maximum SigmaPFC contamination in sediment was observed in 2001-2002 to be a flux of 197 pg cm(-2) yr(-1). Statistically significant increased concentrations in Tokyo Bay were found for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) (1956-2008), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) (1990-2008), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) (1990-2008). Concentrations of PFOSA and N-EtFOSAA increased between 1985 and 2001, but after 2001, the concentration decreased significantly, which corresponded with the phase out of perfluorooctyl sulfonyl fluoride-based compounds by the 3M Company in 2000.

  6. Quality of Water from Domestic Wells in Principal Aquifers of the United States, 1991-2004: Overview of Major Findings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, Leslie A.; Hamilton, Pixie A.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    More than 43 million people - about 15 percent of the U.S. population - rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water (Hutson and others, 2004). The quality and safety of water from domestic wells, also known as private wells, are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act or, in most cases, by state laws. Rather, individual homeowners are responsible for maintaining their domestic well systems and for monitoring water quality. The lack of regular monitoring of domestic wells makes periodic assessments at national, regional, and local scales important sources for providing information about this key source of drinking water. This study from the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assesses water-quality conditions for about 2,100 domestic wells. The sampled wells are located in 48 states and in parts of 30 regionally extensive aquifers used for water supply in the United States. As many as 219 properties and contaminants, including pH, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), were measured. Fecal indicator bacteria and additional radionuclides were analyzed for a smaller number of wells. The large number of contaminants assessed and the broad geographic coverage of the present study provides a foundation for an improved understanding of the quality of water from the major aquifers tapped by domestic supply wells in the United States.

  7. Long Series Multi-objectives Optimal Operation of Water And Sediment Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Jin, W.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary suspended river in Inner Mongolia reaches have formed and the security of reach and ecological health of the river are threatened. Therefore, researches on water-sediment regulation by cascade reservoirs are urgent and necessary. Under this emergency background, multi-objectives water and sediment regulation are studied in this paper. Firstly, multi-objective optimal operation models of Longyangxia and Liujiaxia cascade reservoirs are established. Secondly, based on constraints handling and feasible search space techniques, the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) is greatly improved to solve the model. Thirdly, four different scenarios are set. It is demonstrated that: (1) scatter diagrams of perato front are obtained to show optimal solutions of power generation maximization, sediment maximization and the global equilibrium solutions between the two; (2) the potentiality of water-sediment regulation by Longyangxia and Liujiaxia cascade reservoirs are analyzed; (3) with the increasing water supply in future, conflict between water supply and water-sediment regulation occurred, and the sustainability of water and sediment regulation will confront with negative influences for decreasing transferable water in cascade reservoirs; (4) the transfer project has less benefit for water-sediment regulation. The research results have an important practical significance and application on water-sediment regulation by cascade reservoirs in the Upper Yellow River, to construct water and sediment control system in the whole Yellow River basin.

  8. Colonization of overlaying water by bacteria from dry river sediments.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Amalfitano, Stefano; Piccini, Claudia; Zoppini, Annamaria; Puddu, Alberto; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2008-10-01

    We studied the diversity, community composition and activity of the primary microbial colonizers of the water above freshly re-wetted sediments from a temporary river. Dried sediments, collected from Mulargia River (Sardinia, Italy), were covered with sterile freshwater in triplicate microcosms, and changes of the planktonic microbial assemblage were monitored over a 48 h period. During the first 9 h bacterial abundance was low (1.5 x 10(4) cells ml(-1)); it increased to 3.4 x 10(6) cells ml(-1) after 28 h and did not change thereafter. Approximately 20% of bacteria exhibited DNA de novo synthesis already after 9 h of incubation. Changes of the ratios of (3)H-leucine to (3)H-thymidine incorporation rates indicated a shift of growth patterns during the experiment. Extracellular enzyme activity showed a maximum at 48 h with aminopeptidase activity (430.8 +/- 22.6 nmol MCA l(-1) h(-1)) significantly higher than alkaline phosphatase (98.6 +/- 4.3 nmol MUF l(-1) h(-1)). The primary microbial colonizers of the overlaying water - as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis - were related to at least six different phylogenetic lineages of Bacilli and to Alphaproteobacteria (Brevundimonas spp. and Caulobacter spp.). Large bacterial cells affiliated to one clade of Bacillus sp. were rare in the dried sediments, but constituted the majority of the planktonic microbial assemblage and of cells with detectable DNA-synthesis until 28 h after re-wetting. Their community contribution decreased in parallel with a rise of flagellated and ciliated protists. Estimates based on cell production rates suggested that the rapidly enriched Bacillus sp. suffered disproportionally high loss rates from selective predation, thus favouring the establishment of a more heterogenic assemblage of microbes (consisting of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacteria). Our results suggest that the primary microbial colonizers of the water above dried sediments are passively released

  9. Risk factors for contamination of domestic hot water systems by Legionellae

    SciTech Connect

    Alary, M.; Joly, J.R. )

    1991-08-01

    To assess risk factors associated with the contamination of the domestic environment by legionellae, 211 houses in the Quebec City area were randomly selected and water samples were collected from the hot water tank, the shower heads, and the most frequently used faucet. After centrifugation, concentrated samples were seeded in triplicate on BCYE and GPV media. Data on the characteristics of the hot water system and plumbing in the house and on the personal habils of the occupants were collected for each house. Among these 211 houses, hot water was provided by either an oil or gas heater in 33 and by an electric heater in 178. Legionellae were isolated from none of the samples from houses with oil or gas heaters and from 39% (69 of 178) of those with electric water heaters. This association remained highly significant after control for water temperature and other variables in a stratified analysis. In the 178 houses with an electric heater, 12% of the faucets, 15% of the shower heads, and 37% of the water heaters were contaminated. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2 and 4 were the most frequently isolated strains. Logistic regression showed that factors associated with electric water heater contamination were (1) location of the house in older districts of the city (2) old age of the water heater, and (3) low water temperature. Contamination of the water heater was the only factor significantly associated with the contamination of peripheral outlets. This study shows that the presence of an electric heater is strongly associated with contamination of domestic hot water systems by Legionellae. The public health importance of this contamination is still unknown.

  10. Isolation of enteroviruses from water, suspended solids, and sediments from Galveston Bay: survival of poliovirus and rotavirus adsorbed to sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V C; Seidel, K M; Goyal, S M; Metcalf, T G; Melnick, J L

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and quantitation of enteroviruses among water, suspended solids, and compact sediments in a polluted estuary are described. Samples were collected sequentially from water, suspended solids, fluffy sediments (uppermost layer of bottom sediments), and compact sediment. A total of 103 samples were examined of which 27 (26%) were positive for virus. Polioviruses were recovered most often, followed by coxsackie B viruses and echoviruses 7 and 29. Virus was found most often attached to suspended solids: 72% of these samples were positive, whereas only 14% of water samples without solids yielded virus. Fluffy sediments yielded virus in 47% of the samples, whereas only 5% of compact bottom-sediment samples were positive. When associated with solids, poliovirus and rotavirus retained their infectious quality for 19 days. The same viruses remained infectious for only 9 days when freely suspended in seawater. Collection of suspended solids at ambient water pH appears to be very useful for the detection of virus; it has advantages over collecting and processing large volumes of water, with accompanying pH adjustment and salt addition for processing. PMID:6091548

  11. Metabolism of niclosamide in sediment and water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graebing, P.W.; Chib, J.S.; Hubert, T.D.; Gingerich, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    A series of experiments analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of [ 14C]niclosamide degradation. The aerobic aquatic metabolism of [ 14C]niclosamide was studied in nonsterile river water/sediment mixtures. Test systems, maintained under aerobic conditions, were treated with niclosamide and incubated in the dark at 25.0 ?? 1.0 ??C for 30 days. Half-lives of 4.9 and 5.4 days were calculated for the chlorosalicylic acid- and chloronitroaniline-labeled test systems, respectively. From 0 to 21 days after treatment (DAT), the only metabolism product observed in either test system was aminoniclosamide. At the final sampling interval, five peaks were resolved from the chlorosalicylic acid label, and three peaks were resolved from the chloronitroaniline label test substance. By 30 DAT, sediment-bound residues represented ???70% of the observed radioactivity. For the anaerobic aquatic metabolism of [14C]niclosamide, test systems were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 365 days. Half-lives of 0.65 day for the chlorosalicylic acid label and 2.79 days for the chloronitroaniline label were calculated. From 0 to 3 DAT, niclosamide was first transformed into aminoniclosamide. Aminoniclosamide is readily formed, as it was observed in the chlorosalicylic acid label 0 DAT sampling. Several minor metabolites were observed in the water and sediment extracts. None of these metabolites were formed to a significant amount until the parent niclosamide dissipated below the detection limit. Two of the byproducts from these metabolism studies are polar unknowns eluting at 3 and 5 min by HPLC, similar to the unknowns observed in aqueous photolysis studies.

  12. Sediment-water partitioning of inorganic mercury in estuaries.

    PubMed

    Turner, A; Millward, G E; Le Roux, S M

    2001-12-01

    The sediment-water partitioning and speciation of inorganic mercury have been studied under simulated estuarine conditions by monitoring the hydrophobicity and uptake of dissolved 203Hg(II) in samples from a variety of estuarine environments. A persistent increase in the distribution coefficientwith increasing salinity is inconsistent with inorganic speciation calculations, which predict an increase in the concentration of the soluble HgCl4(2-) complex (or reduction in sediment-water distribution coefficient) with increasing salinity. Partition data are, however, defined by an empirical equation relating to the salting out of nonelectrolytes via electrostriction and are characterized by salting constants between about 1.4 and 2.0 L mol(-1). Salting out of the neutral, covalent chloro-complex, HgCl2(0), is predicted but cannot account for the magnitude of salting out observed. Since Hg(II) strongly complexes with dissolved (and particulate) organic matter in natural environments, of more significance appears to be the salting out of Hg(II)-organic complexes. Operational measurements of the speciation of dissolved Hg(II) using Sep-Pak C18 columns indicate a reduction in the proportion of hydrophobic (C18-retained) dissolved Hg(II) complexes with increasing salinity, both in the presence and absence of suspended particles. Ratios of hydrophobic Hg(ll) before and after particle addition suggest a coupled salting out-sorption mechanism, with the precise nature of Hg(II) species salted out being determined bythe characteristics and concentrations of dissolved and sediment organic matter. PMID:11770766

  13. Microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters.

    PubMed

    Frias, J P G L; Gago, J; Otero, V; Sobral, P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics are well-documented pollutants in the marine environment that result from fragmentation of larger plastic items. Due to their long chemical chains, they can remain in the environment for long periods of time. It is estimated that the vast majority (80%) of marine litter derives from land sources and that 70% will sink and remain at the bottom of the ocean. Microplastics that result from fragmentation of larger pieces of plastic are common to be found in beaches and in the water surface. The most common microplastics are pellets, fragments and fibres. This work provides original data of the presence of microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters, reporting on microplastic concentration and polymer types. Microplastic particles were found in nearly 56% of sediment samples, accounting a total of 31 particles in 27 samples. The vast majority were microfibers (25), identified as rayon fibres, and fragments (6) identified as polypropylene, through infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR). The concentration and polymer type data is consistent with other relevant studies and reports worldwide. PMID:26748246

  14. Microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters.

    PubMed

    Frias, J P G L; Gago, J; Otero, V; Sobral, P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics are well-documented pollutants in the marine environment that result from fragmentation of larger plastic items. Due to their long chemical chains, they can remain in the environment for long periods of time. It is estimated that the vast majority (80%) of marine litter derives from land sources and that 70% will sink and remain at the bottom of the ocean. Microplastics that result from fragmentation of larger pieces of plastic are common to be found in beaches and in the water surface. The most common microplastics are pellets, fragments and fibres. This work provides original data of the presence of microplastics in coastal sediments from Southern Portuguese shelf waters, reporting on microplastic concentration and polymer types. Microplastic particles were found in nearly 56% of sediment samples, accounting a total of 31 particles in 27 samples. The vast majority were microfibers (25), identified as rayon fibres, and fragments (6) identified as polypropylene, through infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR). The concentration and polymer type data is consistent with other relevant studies and reports worldwide.

  15. Underwater MASW to evaluate stiffness of water-bottom sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.; Sonnichsen, G.V.; Hunter, J.A.; Good, R.L.; Burns, R.A.; Christian, H.

    2005-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is initially intended as a land survey method to investigate the near-surface materials for their elastic properties. The acquired data are first analyzed for dispersion characteristics and, from these the shear-wave velocity is estimated using an inversion technique. Land applications show the potential of the MASW method to map 2D bedrock surface, zones of low strength, Poisson's ratio, voids, as well as to generate shear-wave profiles for various othe geotechnical problems. An overview is given of several underwater applications of the MASW method to characterize stiffness distribution of water-bottom sediments. The first application details the survey under shallow-water (1-6 m) in the Fraser River (Canada). The second application is an innovative experimental marine seismic survey in the North Atlantic Ocean near oil fields in Grand Bank offshore Newfoundland.

  16. Radioactive dating: Studies on ground water and sediments. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning radioactive dating of ground water and sediments. Articles discuss ground water movement and recharge; and lake, marine, and glacial sediments. Citations address dating techniques using isotopes of carbon, lead, uranium, radium, and tritium. Studies on sedimentation rate, water quality, aquifer characteristics, geological survey, and glacial history are presented. (Contains a minimum of 103 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Anaerobic digestion technologies for closing the domestic water, carbon and nutrient cycles.

    PubMed

    Hammes, F; Kalogo, Y; Verstraete, W

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable wastewater treatment requires that household wastewater is collected and treated separately from industrial wastewater and rainwater run-offs. This separate treatment is, however, still inadequate, as more than 70% of the nutrients and much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and potential pathogens of a domestic sewage system are confined to the few litres of black water (faeces, urine and toilet water). Whilst grey water can easily be filter treated and re-used for secondary household purposes, black water requires more intensive treatment due to its high COD and microbial (pathogens) content. Recently developed vacuum/dry toilets produce a nutrient rich semi-solid waste stream, which, with proper treatment, offers the possibility of nutrient, carbon, water and energy recovery. This study investigates the terrestrial applicability of Life Support System (LSS) concepts as a framework for future domestic waste management. The possibilities of treating black water together with other types of human-generated solid waste (biowastes/mixed wastes) in an anaerobic reactor system at thermophilic conditions, as well as some post treatment alternatives for product recovery and re-use, are considered. Energy can partially be recovered in the form of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion. The system is investigated in the form of theoretical mass balances, together with an assessment of the current feasibility of this technology and other post-treatment alternatives.

  18. Anaerobic digestion technologies for closing the domestic water, carbon and nutrient cycles.

    PubMed

    Hammes, F; Kalogo, Y; Verstraete, W

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable wastewater treatment requires that household wastewater is collected and treated separately from industrial wastewater and rainwater run-offs. This separate treatment is, however, still inadequate, as more than 70% of the nutrients and much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and potential pathogens of a domestic sewage system are confined to the few litres of black water (faeces, urine and toilet water). Whilst grey water can easily be filter treated and re-used for secondary household purposes, black water requires more intensive treatment due to its high COD and microbial (pathogens) content. Recently developed vacuum/dry toilets produce a nutrient rich semi-solid waste stream, which, with proper treatment, offers the possibility of nutrient, carbon, water and energy recovery. This study investigates the terrestrial applicability of Life Support System (LSS) concepts as a framework for future domestic waste management. The possibilities of treating black water together with other types of human-generated solid waste (biowastes/mixed wastes) in an anaerobic reactor system at thermophilic conditions, as well as some post treatment alternatives for product recovery and re-use, are considered. Energy can partially be recovered in the form of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion. The system is investigated in the form of theoretical mass balances, together with an assessment of the current feasibility of this technology and other post-treatment alternatives. PMID:11381993

  19. Brucellosis in domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of Trinidad and Tobago with comparative epidemiology to cattle.

    PubMed

    Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Diptee, Michael D; Ramnanan, Anil; Adesiyun, Abiodun Adewale

    2011-12-01

    The water buffalo is an important domestic animal worldwide, and the local Buffalypso variety was developed in Trinidad to have improved beef qualities. Brucellosis was diagnosed in Trinidad and Tobago during 1998 in both cattle and domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) populations. Brucellosis in the latter species is caused by infection with Brucella abortus, similar to bovine brucellosis. Control of brucellosis is of paramount importance to preservation of the genetic diversity of these animals in Trinidad, and this has been complicated by differences in the epidemiology of water buffalo and bovine brucellosis. Some diagnostic tests do not have comparable accuracy between the two species, and the RB51 vaccine does not adequately protect against infection in water buffalo. The water buffalo in Trinidad may also be more resistant to infection than cattle. Development of effective vaccination protocols is key to brucellosis control in Buffalypso in Trinidad, and prohibitions on import of virulent B. abortus strains for vaccine efficacy studies has impeded progress in this area. These Trinidadian strains are of variable virulence; some might be effective for challenge in vaccine efficacy studies, while other, of lower virulence, may be vaccine candidates for use in water buffalo.

  20. Hexachlorobenzene uptake by fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Krawczyk, D.F.; Griffis, W.L.; Nebeker, A.V.; Robideaux, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

  1. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  2. Degradation, Fate and Bioavailability of Sulfamethazine in Pond Water and Sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics from animal agriculture are found in surface waters and stream sediments. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in small pond water and sediment microcosms. Sulfamethazine [14C-phenyl] was added to the water phase directly, or in a dilute swine manure solution that s...

  3. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  4. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  5. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  6. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  7. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  8. STAND, A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND WATER QUALITY. (R825758)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We introduce a new model–STAND (Sediment-Transport-Associated Nutrient Dynamics)–for simulating stream flow, sediment transport, and the interactions of sediment with other attributes of water quality. In contrast to other models, STAND employs a fully dynamic ba...

  9. LIGHT DEPENDENCE OF SEDIMENT-WATER NUTRIENT EXCHANGE IN A GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flux of dissolved nutrients between sediments and overlying water is an important component of nutrient processing in estuaries. These fluxes can be linked to sediment metabolism, which in shallow estuaries can be affected by light. Sediment cores were collected at sight stat...

  10. Laboratory experiments on dam-break flow of water-sediment mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dams induce sedimentation and store significant amounts of sediment as they age; therefore, dam failures often involve the release of sediment-laden water to the downstream floodplain. In particular, tailings dams, which are constructed to impound mining wastes, can cause devastating damage when the...

  11. Discharge, suspended sediment, bedload, and water quality in Clear Creek, western Nevada, water years 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Jena M.; Savard, Charles S.

    2015-09-30

    During this study, total annual sediment loads ranged from 355 tons per year in 2010 to 1,768 tons per year in 2011 and were significantly lower than the previous study (water years 2004–07). Bedload represented between 29 and 38 percent of total sediment load in water years 2010–12, and between 72 and 90 percent of the total sediment load in water years 2004–07, which indicates a decrease in bedload between study periods. Annual suspended-sediment loads in water years 2010–12 indicated no significant change from water years 2004–07. Mean daily discharge was significantly lower in water years 2010–12 than in waters years 2004–07 and may be the reason for the decrease in bedload that resulted in a lower total sediment load.

  12. Water and sediment quality in the Yukon River basin, Alaska, during water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains water-quality and sediment-quality data from samples collected in the Yukon River Basin from March through September during the 2004 water year (WY). Samples were collected throughout the year at five stations in the basin (three on the main stem Yukon River, one each on the Tanana and Porcupine Rivers). A broad range of physical, chemical, and biological analyses are presented.

  13. Parameterization of biogeochemical sediment-water fluxes using in situ measurements and a diagenetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, A.; Fennel, K.; Wilson, R.; Lehrter, J.; Devereux, R.

    2016-01-01

    Diagenetic processes are important drivers of water column biogeochemistry in coastal areas. For example, sediment oxygen consumption can be a significant contributor to oxygen depletion in hypoxic systems, and sediment-water nutrient fluxes support primary productivity in the overlying water column. Moreover, nonlinearities develop between bottom water conditions and sediment-water fluxes due to loss of oxygen-dependent processes in the sediment as oxygen becomes depleted in bottom waters. Yet, sediment-water fluxes of chemical species are often parameterized crudely in coupled physical-biogeochemical models, using simple linear parameterizations that are only poorly constrained by observations. Diagenetic models that represent sediment biogeochemistry are available, but rarely are coupled to water column biogeochemical models because they are computationally expensive. Here, we apply a method that efficiently parameterizes sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nitrate and ammonium by combining in situ measurements, a diagenetic model and a parameter optimization method. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to the Louisiana Shelf where high primary production, stimulated by excessive nutrient loads from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system, promotes the development of hypoxic bottom waters in summer. The parameterized sediment-water fluxes represent nonlinear feedbacks between water column and sediment processes at low bottom water oxygen concentrations, which may persist for long periods (weeks to months) in hypoxic systems such as the Louisiana Shelf. This method can be applied to other systems and is particularly relevant for shallow coastal and estuarine waters where the interaction between sediment and water column is strong and hypoxia is prone to occur due to land-based nutrient loads.

  14. Remote sensing of water clarity and suspended sediments in coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Processing of data for estimation of suspended sediment concentrations and water clarity in turbid coastal water requires three components: (1) correction of raw data to water reflectance; (2) establishment of appropriate general models relating reflectance characteristics to materials in the water; and (3) determination of the coefficients of the models appropriate for the area under study. This paper presents equations and procedures appropriate for this processing. It provides example coefficients and data for the NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer, which is the most appropriate sensor for investigating larger estuaries and turbid coastal systems until the launch of an ocean color imager (SeaWiFS) in late 1993.

  15. Redox dynamics in the Chesapeake Bay: The effect on sediment/water uranium exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, T.J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Klinkhammer, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The effect of seasonal variations in productivity and redox dynamics on the sediment/water exchange of uranium was investigated on a twelve cruise time series in the Chesapeake Bay. The deep waters of the bay undergo seasonal anoxia in response to high primary productivity and water column stratification from late spring to early fall. Dissolved oxygen was used to monitor sediment redox conditions. Dissolved [sup 238]U was measured in the water column and sediment porewaters to monitor water column/sediment exchange. Uranium incorporation in bay sediments results from two distinct processes: productivity-dependent scavenging from the water column and redox-dependent cycling of uranium between sediments and bottomwater. Uranium is removed from surface waters of the bay by scavenging with biodetritus during periods of high primary productivity. Bottomwater and sediment redox conditions determine whether this particle-bound uranium is buried or released to overlying water. Particulate uranium is released to bottomwaters and porewaters during the degradation of biodetritus and oxidation of authigenic uranium. Low oxygen in bottomwaters in the summer results in minimal exchange of uranium between the sediments and bottomwater, due to the stability of reduced U(IV). High bottomwater oxygen concentrations associated with bay turnover in the fall results in release of authigenic uranium by oxidation to the soluble (VI) form. Enrichment of uranium in fall bottomwater suggests that authigenic uranium is very labile when exposed to oxic environmental conditions. This process is enhanced by physical mixing when anoxic sediments are resuspended into the oxic bottomwaters.

  16. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  17. Ecosystem engineering at the sediment-water interface: bioturbation and consumer-substrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Nogaro, Géraldine; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; Valett, Maurice H; François-Carcaillet, Frédérique; Gaudet, Jean-Paul; Lafont, Michel; Gibert, Janine

    2009-08-01

    In soft-bottom sediments, consumers may influence ecosystem function more via engineering that alters abiotic resources than through trophic influences. Understanding the influence of bioturbation on physical, chemical, and biological processes of the water-sediment interface requires investigating top-down (consumer) and bottom-up (resource) forces. The objective of the present study was to determine how consumer bioturbation mode and sediment properties interact to dictate the hydrologic function of experimental filtration systems clogged by the deposition of fine sediments. Three fine-grained sediments characterized by different organic matter (OM) and pollutant content were used to assess the influence of resource type: sediment of urban origin highly loaded with OM and pollutants, river sediments rich in OM, and river sediments poor in OM content. The effects of consumer bioturbation (chironomid larvae vs. tubificid worms) on sediment reworking, changes in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity, and water fluxes through the water-sediment interface were measured. Invertebrate influences in reducing the clogging process depended not only on the mode of bioturbation (construction of biogenic structures, burrowing and feeding activities, etc.) but also on the interaction between the bioturbation process and the sediments of the clogging layer. We present a conceptual model that highlights the importance of sediment influences on bioturbation and argues for the integration of bottom-up influence on consumer engineering activities. PMID:19462183

  18. Quantitative bacterial examination of domestic water supplies in the Lesotho Highlands: water quality, sanitation, and village health.

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, J. D.; Nyaphisi, M.; Mandel, R.; Petersen, E.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of an examination of domestic water supplies for microbial contamination in the Lesotho Highlands, the site of a 20-year-old hydroelectric project, as part of a regional epidemiological survey of baseline health, nutritional and environmental parameters. The population's hygiene and health behaviour were also studied. A total of 72 village water sources were classified as unimproved (n = 23), semi-improved (n = 37), or improved (n = 12). Based on the estimation of total coliforms, which is a nonspecific bacterial indicator of water quality, all unimproved and semi-improved water sources would be considered as not potable. Escherichia coli, a more precise indicator of faecal pollution, was absent (P < 0.001) in most of the improved water sources. Among 588 queried households, only 38% had access to an "improved" water supply. Sanitation was a serious problem, e.g. fewer than 5% of villagers used latrines and 18% of under-5-year-olds had suffered a recent diarrhoeal illness. The study demonstrates that protection of water sources can improve the hygienic quality of rural water supplies, where disinfection is not feasible. Our findings support the WHO recommendation that E. coli should be the principal microbial indicator for portability of untreated water. Strategies for developing safe water and sanitation systems must include public health education in hygiene and water source protection, practical methods and standards for water quality monitoring, and a resource centre for project information to facilitate programme evaluation and planning. PMID:10593031

  19. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Mertes, L.A.K.; Smith, M.O.; Adams, J.B. )

    1993-03-01

    A method has been developed, based on spectral mixture analysis, to estimate the concentration of suspended sediment in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat MSS and TM images. Endmembers were derived from laboratory reflectance measurements of water-sediment mixtures with a range of sediment concentrations. Using these references spectra, the authors applied a linear mixture analysis to multispectral images after accounting for instrument and atmosphere gains and offsets. Sediment concentrations were estimated for individual pixels from the mixture analysis results based on a nonlinear calibration curve relating laboratory sediment concentrations and reflectance to endmember fractions. The uncertainty in the sediment concentrations derived from this analysis for three Amazon images is predicted to be within [plus minus] 20 mg/L, and the concentrations fall within a range of concentrations of suspended sediment that were measured at several times and places in the field over the past 15 years. The emphasis of their work is to use the patterns of sediment concentrations to compute the approximate volumes of sediment that are transferred between the main channel and floodplain of the Amazon River. However, the methodology can be applied universally if the optical properties of water and sediment at the site are known, and it is, therefore, useful for the study of suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of wetlands elsewhere.

  20. Distributions of pesticides and organic contaminants between water and suspended sediment, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and water samples were collected from San Francisco Bay in 1991 during low river discharge and after spring rains. All samples were analyzed for organophosphate, carbamate, and organochlorine pesticides; petroleum hydrocarbons; biomarkers; and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The objectives were to determine the concentrations of these contaminants in water and suspended sediment during two different hydrologic conditions and to determine partition coefficients of the contaminants between water and sediment. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, varied with location of sample collection, riverine discharge, and tidal cycle. Concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants in suspended sediments were highest during low river discharge but became diluted as agricultural soils entered the bay after spring rains. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons defined as dissolved in the water column were not detected. The concentrations sorbed on suspended sediments were variable and were dependent on sediment transport patterns in the bay. In contrast, the relatively hydrophilic organophosphate pesticides, such as chlorpyrifos and diazinon, has a more uniform concentration in suspended sediment. These pesticides were detected only after spring rains. Most of the measured diazinon, at least 98% for all samples, was in the dissolved phase. Measured partition coefficients for diazinon generally were uniform, which suggests that suspended-sediment concentrations were close to equilibrium with dissolved concentrations. The concentration of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, at any given sampling site, was driven primarily by the more abundant solution concentration. The concentrations of diazinon sorbed to suspended sediments, therefore, were independent of the patterns of sediment movement. ?? 1993 Estuarine Research Federation.

  1. The suitability of sand abstraction systems for community-managed domestic water supplies.

    PubMed

    Hussey, S W

    2000-01-01

    This paper will discuss the system of abstracting water from the underlying water-bearing sediment of surface dry river beds. The technology is well established in Zimbabwe and is a valuable method of obtaining water for human consumption as well as for both livestock and irrigation use. Within Zimbabwe the system is erroneously but commonly, referred to as "sand abstraction". Apart from traditional methods there are several systems of sand abstraction which have been developed. Each method is dependant on equipment which can be installed into river sands which retain water. Systems range from large mechanized schemes to small scale, hand-operated pump and well screen units. The author, through his work and experience in this area has come to believe that small scale units which can be operated and sustained by local communities are the best option for reliable sources of clean water. In large rivers the sediment frequently retains a perennial supply of water and during a dry-season can provide many thousands of kilolitres of water. The river sands act as a huge, slow sand-filtration system and invariably yield water which is neither contaminated by poor sanitation nor by unpalatable mineral salts. Tests undertaken on water samples drawn from river sands have indicated that contamination occurs only after abstraction from containers. Water utilised from such sources is thus particularly suitable for both primary and secondary purposes. Where such systems can be established on low river banks, not too distant from the river edge, simple sand abstraction units provide an excellent, low cost method of abstracting water. Such systems are particularly appreciated by women who prefer small, low technology installations which they can operate themselves and can maintain simply and effectively.

  2. Assessing domestic water use habits for more effective water awareness campaigns during drought periods: a case study in Alicante, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, H.; Hernández, M.; Saurí, D.

    2014-11-01

    The design of water awareness campaigns could benefit from knowledge on the specific characteristics of domestic water use and of the factors that may influence certain water consumption habits. This paper investigates water use in 450 households of 10 municipalities of drought prone Alicante (Spain) with the objective of increasing knowledge about existing domestic water behavior and therefore help to improve the design and implementation of future water awareness campaigns. The survey results indicate that users already follow many of the conservation practices mentioned in messages. Moreover, campaigns need to take into account the differences in water use and habits derived from differences in urban models (concentrated or disperse).

  3. Health implications of lipopolysaccharide endotoxins in domestic container water used by rural households in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fosso-Kankeu, E; Du Preez, H; Jagals, P

    2010-12-01

    This study assessed the occurrence of endotoxins, cyanobacteria and enterobacteria in untreated drinking water stored in domestic water containers by rural households in South Africa. Endotoxins, cyanobacteria, total coliforms and Escherichia coli were measured in the following numbers and ranges in container-water samples: 4-54 microg l(-1), 69-64,505 cells ml(-1), 9,000-280,000 CFU/100 ml and 90-1,100 CFU/100 ml, respectively, in source water and 0.23-24.7 microg l(-1), 1-501,187 cells ml(-1), 25-1,584,893 CFU/100 ml and 1-25,118 CFU/100 ml, respectively, in water from containers. The concentrations of these contaminants in water often exceeded guidelines. Container type, especially those that permit light into the vessel, played a significant role in the occurrence of these contaminants. Limited guidelines, as well as the absence of health evidence, make it uncertain whether the high levels of endotoxins in the containerised drinking water could cause a health effect in healthy persons. Most importantly, in the context of exposure to endotoxins potentially derived from high levels of cyanobacteria and enterobacteria such as coliforms in the water, a case is made for possible health effects in immune-compromised individuals exposed to water containing endotoxins and the bacteria that potentially produce it.

  4. Suspended sediment control and water quality conservation through riparian vegetation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanelli, D.; Cavazza, C.; Correggiari, S.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion and Suspended Sediment River are strongly related in the Apennines catchments which are generally characterised by a clayey lithology and impermeable soils and extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. In fact the suspended sediment yield represents one of the most reliable tools to assess real basin soil loss (Pavanelli and Pagliarani, 2002; Pavanelli and Rigotti, 2007) from the surface rain erosive features in a mountain watershed, as rills and interrills erosion, gullies, bad-lands (calanchi basins). Suspended sediment yield is known to imply several detrimental consequences: soil losses from agricultural land, worsening of the quality of the water, clogging of water supply filters and reservoir siltation. In addition, suspended sediment yield is also one of the main vector for pollutants and nutrients: various studies have already proved how nitrogen content has been constantly rising in aquifers and surface waters [Böhlke and Denver, 1995]. Finer particles and their aggregates have been proved to be the preferential vehicle for particulate nitrogen [Droppo et al., 1997; Ongley et al., 1992]. In one research [Pavanelli and al. 2006] four Apennines torrents (Gaiana, Sillaro, Savena and Lavino) with mountain basins ranging from 8.7 to 139 Km2 were monitored via automatic sampling devices, the samples of water collected were analysed to characterise suspended solids in terms of their grain size distribution and total nitrogen with respect to the source of eroded area in the catchment. Preliminary results [Pavanelli and al. 2007] seem to show the existence of a direct relationship between nitrogen concentration and finer particle concentration (<20 μm), with the maximum nitrogen loss values being related to factors like the presence of clayey formations, their position within the catchment and the availability of suspended particles. The results seem to indicate hillsides as main sources of suspended sediment to the torrents

  5. Suspended sediment control and water quality conservation through riparian vegetation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanelli, D.; Cavazza, C.; Correggiari, S.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion and Suspended Sediment River are strongly related in the Apennines catchments which are generally characterised by a clayey lithology and impermeable soils and extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. In fact the suspended sediment yield represents one of the most reliable tools to assess real basin soil loss (Pavanelli and Pagliarani, 2002; Pavanelli and Rigotti, 2007) from the surface rain erosive features in a mountain watershed, as rills and interrills erosion, gullies, bad-lands (calanchi basins). Suspended sediment yield is known to imply several detrimental consequences: soil losses from agricultural land, worsening of the quality of the water, clogging of water supply filters and reservoir siltation. In addition, suspended sediment yield is also one of the main vector for pollutants and nutrients: various studies have already proved how nitrogen content has been constantly rising in aquifers and surface waters [Böhlke and Denver, 1995]. Finer particles and their aggregates have been proved to be the preferential vehicle for particulate nitrogen [Droppo et al., 1997; Ongley et al., 1992]. In one research [Pavanelli and al. 2006] four Apennines torrents (Gaiana, Sillaro, Savena and Lavino) with mountain basins ranging from 8.7 to 139 Km2 were monitored via automatic sampling devices, the samples of water collected were analysed to characterise suspended solids in terms of their grain size distribution and total nitrogen with respect to the source of eroded area in the catchment. Preliminary results [Pavanelli and al. 2007] seem to show the existence of a direct relationship between nitrogen concentration and finer particle concentration (<20 μm), with the maximum nitrogen loss values being related to factors like the presence of clayey formations, their position within the catchment and the availability of suspended particles. The results seem to indicate hillsides as main sources of suspended sediment to the torrents

  6. Measurements of gaseous mercury exchanges at the sediment-water, water-atmosphere and sediment-atmosphere interfaces of a tidal environment (Arcachon Bay, France).

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Sylvain; Tessier, Emmanuel; Monperrus, Mathilde; Bridou, Romain; Clavier, Jacques; Thouzeau, Gerard; Amouroux, David

    2011-05-01

    The elemental mercury evasion from non-impacted natural areas is of significant importance in the global Hg cycle due to their large spatial coverage. Intertidal areas represent a dynamic environment promoting the transformations of Hg species and their subsequent redistribution. A major challenge remains in providing reliable data on Hg species variability and fluxes under typical transient tidal conditions found in such environment. Field experiments were thus carried out to allow the assessment and comparison of the magnitude of the gaseous Hg fluxes at the three interfaces, sediment-water, sediment-atmosphere and water-atmosphere of a mesotidal temperate lagoon (Arcachon Bay, Aquitaine, France) over three distinct seasonal conditions. The fluxes between the sediment-water and the sediment-atmosphere interfaces were directly evaluated with field flux chambers, respectively static or dynamic. Water-atmosphere fluxes were evaluated from ambient concentrations using a gas exchange model. The fluxes at the sediment-water interface ranged from -5.0 to 5.1 ng m(-2) h(-1) and appeared mainly controlled by diffusion. The occurrence of macrophytic covers (i.e.Zostera noltii sp.) enhanced the fluxes under light radiations. The first direct measurements of sediment-atmosphere fluxes are reported here. The exchanges were more intense and variable than the two other interfaces, ranging between -78 and 40 ng m(-2) h(-1) and were mostly driven by the overlying atmospheric Hg concentrations and superficial sediment temperature. The exchanges between the water column and the atmosphere, computed as a function of wind speed and gaseous mercury saturation ranged from 0.4 to 14.5 ng m(-2) h(-1). The flux intensities recorded over the intertidal sediments periodically exposed to the atmosphere were roughly 2 to 3 times higher than the fluxes of the other interfaces. The evasion of elemental mercury from emerged intertidal sediments is probably a significant pathway for Hg evasion in

  7. Water and Sediment Quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, During Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    Overview -- This report contains water-quality and sediment-quality data from samples collected in the Yukon River Basin during water year 2001 (October 2000 through September 2001). A broad range of chemical and biological analyses from three sets of samples are presented. First, samples were collected throughout the year at five stations in the basin (three on the mainstem Yukon River, one each on the Tanana and Porcupine Rivers). Second, fecal indicators were measured on samples from drinking-water supplies collected near four villages. Third, sediment cores from five lakes throughout the Yukon Basin were sampled to reconstruct historic trends in the atmospheric deposition of trace elements and hydrophobic organic compounds.

  8. Water and Sediment Quality in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, During Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    OVERVIEW: This report contains water-quality and sediment-quality data from samples collected in the Yukon River Basin from March through September during the 2005 water year (WY). Samples were collected throughout the year at five stations in the basin (three on the main stem Yukon River, one each on the Tanana and Porcupine Rivers). A broad range of physical, chemical, and biological analyses are presented. This is the final report in a series of five USGS Open-File Reports spanning five WYs, from October 2000 through September 2005. The previous four reports are listed in the references (Schuster, 2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006). Water-quality and sediment-quality data from samples collected on the Yukon River and selected major tributaries in Alaska for synoptic studies during WYs 2002-03 are published in Dornblaser and Halm (2006).

  9. Effect of water-sediment regulation of the Xiaolangdi reservoir on the concentrations, characteristics, and fluxes of suspended sediment and organic carbon in the Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Dong, Jianwei; Wang, Minghu; Xie, Hui; Xia, Na; Li, Husheng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Mou, Xinli; Wen, Jiaojiao; Bao, Yimeng

    2016-11-15

    Water-sediment regulation (WSR) of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir in the Yellow River is different from other water conservancy projects, with sediment resuspending along the river downstream of the reservoir during water regulation while some suspended sediment depositing during sediment regulation. In this study, samples were collected before, during, and after WSR to investigate the effect of WSR on the suspended sediment and organic carbon downstream of the reservoir. The suspended sediment concentration ([SPS]) increased with the river flow velocity (V) as a power function ([SPS]=1.348V(2.519)) during the three periods. The suspended sediment grain size decreased along the river during water and sediment regulations and after WSR; they were generally below 200μm with the fine particles (<50μm) of 68.0%-93.7% and positively correlated with the flow velocity. The black carbon content in suspended sediment elevated along the river during both water and sediment regulations, and it increased with 2-50μm fraction during water regulation and with <2μm fraction during sediment regulation, suggesting that black carbon mainly exists in fine particles and is influenced by both suspended sediment source and characteristics. There was no significant difference in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration during water regulation, sediment regulation, and after WSR, inferring that the effect of sediment resuspension/deposition on DOC concentration was insignificant. The contribution of DOC flux (27.3%) during WSR period to the annual flux was comparable to that (22.6%) of water, but lower than the sediment (32.5%) and particulate organic carbon (POC) (49.5%). This study suggests that WSR will exert significant influence on the concentrations, characteristics and fluxes of POC (p<0.05) and sediment (p<0.05) but have no significant influence on DOC (p>0.1) of the Yellow River. PMID:27401281

  10. Effect of water-sediment regulation of the Xiaolangdi reservoir on the concentrations, characteristics, and fluxes of suspended sediment and organic carbon in the Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Dong, Jianwei; Wang, Minghu; Xie, Hui; Xia, Na; Li, Husheng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Mou, Xinli; Wen, Jiaojiao; Bao, Yimeng

    2016-11-15

    Water-sediment regulation (WSR) of the Xiaolangdi Reservoir in the Yellow River is different from other water conservancy projects, with sediment resuspending along the river downstream of the reservoir during water regulation while some suspended sediment depositing during sediment regulation. In this study, samples were collected before, during, and after WSR to investigate the effect of WSR on the suspended sediment and organic carbon downstream of the reservoir. The suspended sediment concentration ([SPS]) increased with the river flow velocity (V) as a power function ([SPS]=1.348V(2.519)) during the three periods. The suspended sediment grain size decreased along the river during water and sediment regulations and after WSR; they were generally below 200μm with the fine particles (<50μm) of 68.0%-93.7% and positively correlated with the flow velocity. The black carbon content in suspended sediment elevated along the river during both water and sediment regulations, and it increased with 2-50μm fraction during water regulation and with <2μm fraction during sediment regulation, suggesting that black carbon mainly exists in fine particles and is influenced by both suspended sediment source and characteristics. There was no significant difference in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration during water regulation, sediment regulation, and after WSR, inferring that the effect of sediment resuspension/deposition on DOC concentration was insignificant. The contribution of DOC flux (27.3%) during WSR period to the annual flux was comparable to that (22.6%) of water, but lower than the sediment (32.5%) and particulate organic carbon (POC) (49.5%). This study suggests that WSR will exert significant influence on the concentrations, characteristics and fluxes of POC (p<0.05) and sediment (p<0.05) but have no significant influence on DOC (p>0.1) of the Yellow River.

  11. Sedimentation and water quality in the West Branch Shade River basin, Ohio, 1984 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.; Jones, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Sedimentation in, and flooding of, the West Branch Shade River and its tributaries have been major concerns of residents and State and local officials. The area was extensively surface mined for coal between the mid-1940 's and the early 1960's. Reclamation efforts immediately after mining were unsuccessful. The results have been elevated sediment loads and the subsequent loss of channel conveyance. Two sediment and stream gaging stations were established on West Branch Shade River in the area of past mining to provide data to evaluate the effectiveness of current reclamation activities on reducing sediment loads. A third station was established on the East Branch Shade River in an unmined area as a control. From October 1983 through September 1984, the annual suspended sediment yield/acre-ft of runoff was approximately two times as high for West Branch Shade River (0.51 ton/acre-ft of runoff) as for East Branch Shade River (0.28 ton/acre-ft). In addition, water quality of West Branch indicates that acidity is higher, pH is lower, and concentrations of dissolved sulfate and metals are higher than for East Branch. The concentration of coal in bed material increased in the downstream direction along West Branch Shade River. The concentration downstream in the West Branch was more than 20 times greater than in the East Branch. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Thermal Energy Storage using PCM for Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, S. A.; Sane, N. K.; Gawali, B. S.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal energy storage using phase chase materials (PCM) has received considerable attention in the past two decades for time dependent energy source such as solar energy. From several experimental and theoretical analyses that have been made to assess the performance of thermal energy storage systems, it has been demonstrated that PCM-based systems are reliable and viable options. This paper covers such information on PCMs and PCM-based systems developed for the application of solar domestic hot water system. In addition, economic analysis of thermal storage system using PCM in comparison with conventional storage system helps to validate its commercial possibility. From the economic analysis, it is found that, PCM based solar domestic hot water system (SWHS) provides 23 % more cumulative and life cycle savings than conventional SWHS and will continue to perform efficiently even after 15 years due to application of non-metallic tank. Payback period of PCM-based system is also less compared to conventional system. In conclusion, PCM based solar water heating systems can meet the requirements of Indian climatic situation in a cost effective and reliable manner.

  13. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on phosphorus lability in lake sediments amended with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    The use of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to immobilize P in sediments is a novel approach for lake restoration. However, the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments may vary with many factors, e.g., hydrogen sulfide content. Earlier works in our laboratory have demonstrated that WTRs are effective sorbents for hydrogen sulfide in water. Thus, we hypothesized that the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments would not be increased by hydrogen sulfide. The results of this work suggested that this hypothesis was tenable. Compared to the raw sediments, the amended sediments had significantly lower P desorption potential in the presence of hydrogen sulfide at different times, pH and concentrations. Moreover, the amended sediments were also better able to adsorb hydrogen sulfide. In the amended sediments, the P, which was easily desorbed due to the effect of hydrogen sulfide, was transformed into the Fe/Al bound P.

  14. Sediment-water distribution of contaminants of emerging concern in a mixed use watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the occurrence and distribution of 15 contaminants of emerging concern (CEC) in stream water and sediments in the Zumbro River watershed in Minnesota and compared these with sub-watershed land uses. Sixty pairs of sediment and water samples were collected across all seasons from...

  15. Chemical quality of surface waters and sedimentation in the Saline River basin, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Paul Robert; Jones, B.F.; Petri, Lester R.

    1964-01-01

    calcium bicarbonate type when the specific conductance is less than about 1,000 micromhos per centimeter, but it is of the sodium chloride type when the specific conductance is more than about 1,500 micromhos per centimeter. The water is off the calcium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium chloride type when the conductance is between 1,000 and 1,500 micromhos per centimeter. Most of the increase in mineralization of the water is caused by inflow of highly mineralized ground water. The ground-water inflow was estimated to be 22 percent of the total streamflow at Tescott in 1948 and 60 percent in 1952. Mineralization increases and water quality deteriorates progressively downstream along nearly the entire Saline River, especially in the part of the area directly underlain by the Dakota Sandstone between the vicinities of Fairport and Wilson: sodium and chloride are the principal constituents of water contributed by the Dakota. The total percentage of the salt in the Saline River that comes from oil-field brines is considered to be small. The water in the upper Saline River is of good quality for domestic use except that it is hard; the water in the lower Saline River is of poor quality for domestic use because most of the time it is highly mineralized, is hard, and contains high concentrations of chloride and sulfate. In the upper reaches of the river, the water is of good quality for irrigation. In the lower reaches, if the water were impounded in a reservoir, it would be of good quality for irrigation during years of high flow and of very poor quality during years of low flow. The water in the lower reaches is of poor quality for industrial use because it is highly mineralized most of the tinge. Relations of suspended-sediment discharge to water discharge were used with the long-term streamflow duration curves to compute the long-term aver age suspended-sediment discharges and concentrations at five indications. Sediment discharge is closely related to runoff. S

  16. [A laboratory and field study on the disposal of domestic waste water based on soil permeation].

    PubMed

    Yamaura, G

    1989-02-01

    The present study was conducted to get information necessary for the disposal of domestic waste water by soil permeation. The clarifying ability of soil was examined by conducting laboratory experiments using soil columns and making inquiries about practical disposal facilities based on soil permeation using trenches. In the column experiment, soil columns were prepared by packing polyvinyl chloride pipes with volcanic-ash loam, river sand, or an equivolume mixture of both, and secondary effluent of domestic waste water was poured into each soil column at a daily rate of 100 l/m2. In this experiment, loam and sand loam, both containing fine silt and clay, gave BOD removals of over 95% when the influent BOD load per 1 m3 of soil was less than 10 g/d and gave the coliform group removals of 100% when the influent coliform group load per 1 m3 soil was less than 10(9)/d. Loam and sand loam gave T-P removals of over 90%. The P adsorption capacity of soil was limited to less than 12% of the absorption coefficient of phosphoric acid. All the soils gave low T-N removals, mostly less than 50%. The trench disposal gave high removals of 90-97% for BOD, 90-97% for T-P, and 94-99% for the coliform group but low removals of 11-49% for T-N, showing a trend similar to that of the column disposal. Thus, we can roughly estimate the effectiveness of actual soil permeation disposal from the results of the column experiments. In the waste water permeation region, the extent of waste water permeation exceeded 700 cm horizontally from the trench, but the waste water load within 100 cm laterally from the trench occupied 60.3% of the total. The concentrations of T-C and T-N at almost all observation spots in the permeation region were lower than in the control region, and were not caused to accumulate in soil by waste water loading. In contrast, T-P was accumulated concentratively in the depth range from 50-100 cm right below the trench. The conditions for effective disposal of domestic

  17. U.S. Biofuel Policies and Domestic Shifts in Agricultural Land Use and Water Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, J.; Yeh, S.; Mishra, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Policies promoting domestic biofuels production could lead to significant changes in cropping patterns. Types of direct and indirect land use change include: switching among crops (displacement), expanding cropped area (extensification), and altering water/soil management practices (e.g. irrigation, tillage) (intensification). Most studies of biofuels water use impacts calculate the water intensity of biofuels in liters of irrigated/total evapotranspired water per unit energy of biofuels. But estimates based on this approach are sensitive to assumptions (e.g. co-product allocation, system boundaries), and do not convey policy-relevant information, as highlighted by the issue of land use change. We address these shortcomings by adopting a scenario-based approach that combines economic modeling with crop-water modeling of major crops and biofuel feedstocks. This allows us to holistically compare differences in water balances across policy scenarios in an integrated economic/agricultural system. We compare high spatial resolution water balance estimates under three hypothetical policy scenarios: 1) a counterfactual no-policy scenario, 2) modified Renewable Fuels Standard mandates (M-RFS2), & 3) a national Low Carbon Fuel Standard plus a modified RFS2 scenario (LCFS+RFS2). Differences between scenarios in crop water balances (i.e. transpiration, evaporation, runoff, groundwater infiltration, & irrigation) are regional and are a function of changes in land use patterns (i.e. displacement, intensification, & extensification), plus variation in crop water-use characteristics. Cropped land area increases 6.2% and 1.6% under M-RFS2 and LCFS+RFS2 scenarios, respectively, by 2030. Both policy scenarios lead to reductions in net irrigation volumes nationally compared to the no-policy scenario, though more irrigation occurs in regions of the Midwest and West. The LCFS+RFS2 reduces net irrigation water use by 3.5 times more than M-RFS2. However, both policies drive

  18. Spatial distribution characteristics of polycyclic musks as a chemical marker in river water and sediment compared with other typical pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mu, Li; Wen, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic musks (PMs), widely used in the cosmetic and perfume industries, are gaining attention as a new type of persistent organic pollutant (POP). The related contamination in developing countries, such as China, where the use of these compounds is increasing, needs to be closely monitored. This work systematically studied the distribution profile (water-suspended particulate-sediment-porewater) of PMs in Haihe River, China. The average concentrations of PMs were comparable to those of the traditional POPs. The typical PMs (galaxolide and tonalide) exhibited different environmental behaviors in various media. Water played a more significant role than suspended particulates in the transport of pollutants. Importantly, this work explored the relationships among PMs, surfactant, phosphorus, carbon, salinity, heavy metals and pesticides. Unlike previous reports focusing on the relationships among PMs, wastewater discharge and population distribution, this work innovatively studied the distribution characteristics of pollutants by principal components analysis. The results suggest that PMs can be used as a chemical marker indicating domestic contamination.

  19. Sequencing Insights into Microbial Communities in the Water and Sediments of Fenghe River, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sidan; Sun, Yujiao; Zhao, Xuan; Wang, Lei; Ding, Aizhong; Zhao, Xiaohui

    2016-07-01

    The connection between microbial community structure and spatial variation and pollution in river waters has been widely investigated. However, water and sediments together have rarely been explored. In this study, Illumina high-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze microbes in 24 water and sediment samples from natural to anthropogenic sources and from headstream to downstream areas. These data were used to assess variability in microbial community structure and diversity along in the Fenghe River, China. The relationship between bacterial diversity and environmental parameters was statistically analyzed. An average of 1682 operational taxonomic units was obtained. Microbial diversity increased from the headstream to downstream and tended to be greater in sediment compared with water. The water samples near the headstream endured relatively low Shannon and Chao1 indices. These diversity indices and the number of observed species in the water and sediment samples increase downstream. The parameters also differ in the two river tributaries. Community structures shift based on the extent of nitrogen pollution variation in the sediment and water samples. The four most dominant genera in the water community were Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Comamonadaceae, and Pseudomonas. In the sediments, the most dominant genera were Stramenopiles, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Comamonadaceae. The number of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the headstream water slightly differed from that in the sediment but varied considerably in the downstream sediments. Statistical analysis showed that community variation is correlated with changes in ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen. This study identified different microbial community structures in river water and sediments. Overall this study emphasized the need to elucidate spatial variations in bacterial diversity in water and sediments associated with physicochemical gradients and to show the effects of such

  20. Immobilization of phosphorus from water and sediment using zirconium-modified zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengjuan; Lin, Jianwei; Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Honghua

    2015-03-01

    Adding sorbents to sediments has been suggested as an effective technology for contaminated sediment remediation. In this study, a zirconium-modified zeolite (ZrMZ) was prepared, characterized, and used as a sediment amendment to control phosphorus (P) release from eutrophic lake sediments. The efficiency of ZrMZ in immobilizing P from water and sediments was investigated through a series of experiments. The phosphate adsorption capacity for ZrMZ decreased with increasing water pH. The adsorption of phosphate on ZrMZ followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption data of phosphate on ZrMZ could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 10.2 mg P/g at pH 7 and 25 °C. Sequential extraction of P from the phosphate-adsorbed ZrMZ suggested that most of P bound by ZrMZ existed as the NaOH extractable P (NaOH-P) and residual P (Res-P) and was unlikely to be released under natural pH and reducing conditions. The addition of ZrMZ into sediments reduced the inorganic P activity in the sediments by transforming bicarbonate-dithionite extractable P (BD-P) to NaOH-P and Res-P. The contents of bioavailable P such as water-soluble P (WS-P), NaHCO3 extractable P (Olsen-P), and algal available P (AAP) in sediments reduced after the sediments were mixed with ZrMZ, making P in the sediments more stable. The addition of ZrMZ into sediments significantly reduced the releasing flux of P from the sediments to the water column under different conditions. Results of this study indicate that the ZrMZ is a promising sediment amendment for controlling the internal P loading of lake sediments.

  1. [Distribution Characteristics and Pollution Status Evaluation of Sediments Nutrients in a Drinking Water Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-lin; Liu, Fei; Shi, Jian-chao

    2016-01-15

    The main purpose of this paper is to illustrate the influence of nutrients distribution in sediments on the eutrophication of drinking water reservoir. The sediments of three representative locations were field-sampled and analyzed in laboratory in March 2015. The distribution characteristics of TOC, TN and TP were measured, and the pollution status of sediments was evaluated by the comprehensive pollution index and the manual for sediment quality assessment. The content of TOC in sediments decreased with depth, and there was an increasing trend of the nitrogen content. The TP was enriched in surface sediment, implying the nutrients load in Zhoucun Reservoir was aggravating as the result of human activities. Regression analysis indicated that the content of TOC in sediments was positively correlated with contents of TN and TP in sediments. The TOC/TN values reflected that the vascular land plants, which contain cellulose, were the main source of organic matter in sediments. The comprehensive pollution index analysis result showed that the surface sediments in all three sampling sites were heavily polluted. The contents of TN and TP of surface sediments in three sampling sites were 3273-4870 mg x kg(-1) and 653-2969 mg x kg(-1), and the content of TOC was 45.65-83.00 mg x g(-1). According to the manual for sediment quality assessment, the TN, TP and TOC contents in sediments exceed the standard values for the lowest level of ecotoxicity, so there is a risk of eutrophication in Zhoucun Reservoir.

  2. [Health risk induced by estrogens during unplanned indirect potable reuse of reclaimed water from domestic wastewater].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian-Yuan; Shao, Yi-Ru; Wang, Chao; Sun, Yan; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2014-03-01

    The estrogenic endocrine disruptors in reclaimed water from domestic wastewater may induce health risks to human being, when reclaimed water is used for augmentation of drinking water unplannedly and indirectly. This study investigated changes in concentrations of estrone, estradiol, 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and octylphenol in reclaimed water during the reuse of reclaimed water for augmentation to water source such as lakes and reservoir via river. Thereafter, health risk induced by estrogens during the resue of reclaimed water was evaluated. The concentration of estrogen in secondary effluent ranged 0.1-100 ng x L(-1). The highest concentrations of bisphenol A and nonylphenol reached up to 1-10 microg x L(-1). During the indirect reuse of reclaimed water as potable water, the dilution and degradation in river and lake, and the removal by drinking water treatment process could change the concentrations of estrogen. The non-carcinogenic risks of estrone, estradiol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and octylphenol were lower than 1. When the hydraulic retention time of 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in lakes and reservoir was higher than 30 days, the non-carcinogenic risk of EE2 was lower than 1 in most cases. When the hydraulic retention time of EE2 in lakes and reservoir was less than 30 days and the percentages of reclaimed water in drinking water were higher than 50%, the non-carcinogenic risk induced by EE2 was higher than 1 in 20%-50% samples. This indicated that the risks of EE2 should be concerned.

  3. Survey of the mutagenicity of surface water, sediments, and drinking water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    PubMed

    Warren, Sarah H; Claxton, Larry D; Diliberto, Janet; Hughes, Thomas J; Swank, Adam; Kusnierz, Daniel H; Marshall, Valerie; DeMarini, David M

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) projects address the effects of environmental pollutants in a particular region on the health of the population in that region. This report is part of a RARE project that addresses this for the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN), Penobscot Island, Maine, U.S., where the Penobscot River has had fish advisories for many years due to high levels of mercury. We used the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with strains TA100, TA98, YG1041, and YG1042 with and without metabolic activation to assess the mutagenic potencies of organic extracts of the Penobscot River water and sediment, as well as drinking-water samples, all collected by the PIN Department of Natural Resources. The source water for the PIN drinking water is gravel-packed groundwater wells adjacent to the Penobscot River. Most samples of all extracts were either not mutagenic or had low to moderate mutagenic potencies. The average mutagenic potencies (revertants/L-equivalent) were 337 for the drinking-water extracts and 177 for the river-water extracts; the average mutagenic potency for the river-sediment extracts was 244 revertants(g-equivalent)(-1). This part of the RARE project showed that extracts of the Penobscot River water and sediments and Penobscot drinking water have little to no mutagenic activity that might be due to the classes of compounds that the Salmonella mutagenicity assay detects, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs (nitroarenes), and aromatic amines. This study is the first to examine the mutagenicity of environmental samples from a tribal nation in the U.S.

  4. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2011-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2008 (October 1, 2007–September 30, 2008). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2007 through September 2008. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  5. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments.Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2006 through September 2007. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  6. Nano-porous pottery using calcined waste sediment from tap water production as an additive.

    PubMed

    Sangsuk, Supin; Khunthon, Srichalai; Nilpairach, Siriphan

    2010-10-01

    A suspension of sediment from a lagoon in a tap water production plant was collected for this experiment. The suspension was spray dried and calcined at 700 °C for 1 h. After calcining, 30 wt.% of the sediment were mixed with pottery clay. Samples with and without calcined sediment were sintered at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C. The results show that calcined sediment can be used as an additive in pottery clay. The samples with calcined sediment show higher porosity, water absorption and flexural strength, especially for 900 and 1000 °C. At 900 °C, samples with calcined sediment show a porosity of 50% with an average pore size of 68 nm, water absorption of 31% and flexural strength of 12.61 MPa.

  7. Detection of Legionella spp. from Domestic Water in the Prefecture of Arta, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Dimitra; Velonakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was the isolation of Legionella spp. from domestic water supply networks in the Prefecture of Arta. A total of 100 water samples, from 25 houses, were collected. Half of the samples concerned the cold water and half the hot water supply. Purpose was to detect colonization of the water networks with Legionella spp. >500 cfu/L by using the method of filtration (ISO 11731). Out of 100 samples, 6 samples from 3 houses were positive for Legionella spp. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2–14 was isolated in 5 of 6 samples, whereas in the sixth sample Legionella anisa was identified. Only three of the samples had residual chloride over 0.2 mg/L, rate which is necessary for potable water, according to the Greek hygienic practice. Concerning the temperature of hot water, the mean temperature of the negative for Legionella samples was higher compared to the mean temperature of the positive for Legionella samples (49.9°C versus 45.5°C). It is estimated that there is risk of infection through the use of showers. The low concentration of chloride and the temperature, which was found within the limits favorable to developing Legionella spp. (20–45°C), provide fertile ground for proliferation of the bacteria. PMID:24744922

  8. The efficient role of aquatic plant (water hyacinth) in treating domestic wastewater in continuous system.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Shahabaldin; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Taib, Shazwin Mat; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Singh, Lakhweer; Kamyab, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    In this study, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) was used to treat domestic wastewater. Ten organic and inorganic parameters were monitored in three weeks for water purification. The six chemical, biological and physical parameters included Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N), Total Suspended Solids (TSS), and pH were compared with the Interim National Water Quality Standards, Malaysia River classification (INWQS) and Water Quality Index (WQI). Between 38% to 96% of reduction was observed and water quality has been improved from class III and IV to class II. Analyses for Electricity Conductivity (EC), Salinity, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and Ammonium (NH4) were also investigated. In all parameters, removal efficiency was in range of 13-17th day (optimum 14th day) which was higher than 3 weeks except DO. It reveals the optimum growth rate of water hyacinth has great effect on waste water purification efficiency in continuous system and nutrient removal was successfully achieved.

  9. The efficient role of aquatic plant (water hyacinth) in treating domestic wastewater in continuous system.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Shahabaldin; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Taib, Shazwin Mat; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Singh, Lakhweer; Kamyab, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    In this study, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) was used to treat domestic wastewater. Ten organic and inorganic parameters were monitored in three weeks for water purification. The six chemical, biological and physical parameters included Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N), Total Suspended Solids (TSS), and pH were compared with the Interim National Water Quality Standards, Malaysia River classification (INWQS) and Water Quality Index (WQI). Between 38% to 96% of reduction was observed and water quality has been improved from class III and IV to class II. Analyses for Electricity Conductivity (EC), Salinity, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and Ammonium (NH4) were also investigated. In all parameters, removal efficiency was in range of 13-17th day (optimum 14th day) which was higher than 3 weeks except DO. It reveals the optimum growth rate of water hyacinth has great effect on waste water purification efficiency in continuous system and nutrient removal was successfully achieved. PMID:26684985

  10. Field Observations of Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport, and Water and Sediment Quality in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, M. S.; Glenn, S.; Chant, R.; Rankin, K.; Korfiatis, G.; Dimou, N.; Creed, E.; Fullerton, B.; Pence, A.; Burke, P.; Haldeman, C.; Hires, R.; Hunter, E.

    2002-12-01

    The New York-New Jersey Harbor estuary system is of enormous ecological and economic importance to the region. The presence of toxic chemicals in the water and sediments results in reduced water quality, fisheries restrictions/advisories, and general adverse impacts to the estuarine ecosystem. The Port of New York and New Jersey is central to the economy of the region. However, in recent years, problems associated with the management of contaminated dredged material, including high costs and the lack of suitable disposal/use alternatives, have threatened to impact the volume of shipping in the Harbor. Sources of contaminants include atmospheric deposition, municipal and industrial wastewater treatment facilities, combined sewer and stormwater outfalls, and rainfall-induced runoff (non-point sources). In addition, Harbor sediments can act as a continuing source as they are re-suspended and moved throughout the system by both natural and man-made means. As part of the New Jersey Toxics Reduction Workplan, Stevens Institute of Technology and Rutgers University are conducting hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water and suspended sediment quality measurements in Newark Bay, the Arthur Kill and the Kill van Kull. The goals of the project include: (1) collection of high resolution (event-driven and long-term) hydrodynamic, sediment transport and water and suspended sediment quality measurements for use in the assessment of the dominant physics of the system and in the development of a combined hydrodynamic-sediment transport-water/sediment quality model for the region. (2) identification of those tributaries to NY-NJ Harbor that are significant sources of the chemicals of concern, and evaluation of the importance of non-point sources and existing contaminated bottom sediments as sources of the chemicals of concern. (3) identification of point discharges that represent significant sources of the chemicals of concern. Observations were obtained over a two-year period

  11. Multistate Evaluation of Microbial Water and Sediment Quality from Agricultural Recovery Basins.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Melissa L; Bond, Ronald F; Chase, Jennifer A; Kiger, Luana; Atwill, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural recovery basins are an important conservation practice designed to provide temporary storage of sediment and water on farms before low-volume discharge. However, food safety concerns have been raised regarding redistribution of captured sediment and water to fields used for human food production. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential microbiological risk that recovery basins may contribute to nearby produce fields and to evaluate characteristics that may influence or mitigate those risks. Water and sediment samples were collected from participating farms in three states and evaluated for bacterial indicators and pathogens over several months. Overall, 45% ( = 48) of water samples and less than 15% ( = 13) of sediment samples were positive for spp. In water samples, the occurrence of was positively associated with the use of surface water as a source of irrigation compared with groundwater as well as log-scale increases in concentration. In sediment samples, was associated with basin location (region) and basin fill levels. Sediment exposed to drying during dewatering had lower concentrations of indicator and a lower proportion of positives than submerged sediment from the same pond. Surrounding landscape characteristics, including vegetative coverage, proximity to livestock operations, and evidence of wildlife, were not correlated with pathogen occurrence in either sediment or water samples, suggesting that although habitat surrounding ponds may be an attractant to wildlife, those features may not contribute to increased pathogen occurrence in agricultural recovery basins. PMID:27065413

  12. Sediment enzyme activities and microbial community diversity in an oligotrophic drinking water reservoir, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin; Liu, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water reservoir plays a vital role in the security of urban water supply, yet little is known about microbial community diversity harbored in the sediment of this oligotrophic freshwater environmental ecosystem. In the present study, integrating community level physiological profiles (CLPPs), nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone sequence technologies, we examined the sediment urease and protease activities, bacterial community functional diversity, genetic diversity of bacterial and fungal communities in sediments from six sampling sites of Zhou cun drinking water reservoir, eastern China. The results showed that sediment urease activity was markedly distinct along the sites, ranged from 2.48 to 11.81 mg NH₃-N/(g·24 h). The highest average well color development (AWCD) was found in site C, indicating the highest metabolic activity of heterotrophic bacterial community. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed tremendous differences in the functional (metabolic) diversity patterns of the sediment bacterial communities from different sites. Meanwhile, DGGE fingerprints also indicated spatial changes of genetic diversity of sediment bacterial and fungal communities. The sequence BLAST analysis of all the sediment samples found that Comamonas sp. was the dominant bacterial species harbored in site A. Alternaria alternate, Allomyces macrogynus and Rhizophydium sp. were most commonly detected fungal species in sediments of the Zhou cun drinking water reservoir. The results from this work provide new insights about the heterogeneity of sediment microbial community metabolic activity and genetic diversity in the oligotrophic drinking water reservoir.

  13. δ18O values of Sus scrofa blood water and bone phosphate; a marked discrepancy between domestic and wild specimens.

    PubMed

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enrico

    2011-12-30

    δ¹⁸O analyses of water in the blood of domestic and wild pigs indicated that large isotopic differences exist between domestic and wild specimens of the same species (Sus scrofa) living in the same area. Similar isotopic differences are found between the δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values of bones from the two groups of animals. When δ¹⁸O values obtained from recent wild boar bones are introduced in the equation of the isotopic scale determined for domestic pigs, totally unreliable δ¹⁸O values of local meteoric water are obtained. The δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values measured in three groups of modern wild boar specimens allow the calculation of a first approximate equation which is quite different from that of domestic pigs. This isotopic scale should be accurately re-calibrated for wild animals.

  14. Virtual Water Transfers in U.S. Cities from Domestic Commodity Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahams, I. C.; Mejia, A.; Paterson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Cities have imported water into their boundaries for centuries but understanding how cities indirectly affect watersheds through the commodities which they import is fairly unknown. Thus, we present and discuss here a methodology for determining the virtual water transfers to and from U.S. cities associated with domestic commodity flows. For our methodology, we only consider agricultural and industrial commodities and, to represent the commodity flows, we use the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF) dataset from the U.S. Department of Transportation. Accordingly, we determine virtual water transfers for the 123 geographic regions in the FAF, which consists of 17 states, 73 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), and 33 remainders of states. Out of the 41 sectors that comprise the FAF data, we consider only the 29 sectors that account for the agricultural and industrial commodities. Using both water use data for macro-sectors and national water use coefficients for different industries, we determine a weighted water use coefficient for each of the 29 sectors considered. Ultimately, we use these weighted coefficients to estimate virtual water transfers and the water footprint for each city. Preliminary comparisons with other water footprint estimates indicate that our methodology yields reasonable results. In terms of the water footprint, we find that cities (i.e. MSAs) are net consumers, can consume a large proportion of their own production, and can have a large agricultural production. We also find that the per capita water footprint of industrial consumption decreases with increasing population in cities, suggesting that large cities may be more efficient.

  15. Determining the optimum solar water pumping system for domestic use, livestock water, or irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years we have field tested many different types of solar powered water pumping systems. In this paper, several steps are given to select a solar-PV water pumping system. The steps for selection of stand-alone water pumping system were: deciding whether a wind or solar water pumping sys...

  16. Sediment toxicity assessment through evaluation of the toxicity of interstitial water

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.

    1989-01-01

    The interstitial-water-toxicity approach is a multiphase procedure for assessing sediment toxicity using interstitial (i.e., pore) water. The use of pore water for sediment toxicity assessment was based on the strong correlations between contaminant concentrations in pore water and toxicity (and/or bioaccumulation) of sediment-associated contaminants by benthic macroinvertebrates. The approach combines the quantitation of pore water toxicity with toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify and quantify chemical components responsible for sediment toxicity. TIE involves recently developed procedures for the identification of toxic compounds in aqueous samples containing complex mixtures of chemicals. In the interstitial water-toxicity method, TIE procedures are implemented in three phases to characterize pore-water toxicity, identify the suspected toxicant, and confirm toxicant identification.

  17. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings.

  18. Ecological impacts of lead mining on Ozark streams: Toxicity of sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Allert, A.L.; Poulton, B.C.; Schmitt, C.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the toxicity of sediments downstream of lead-zinc mining areas in southeast Missouri, using chronic sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and pore-water toxicity tests with the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests conducted in 2002 documented reduced survival of amphipods in stream sediments collected near mining areas and reduced survival and reproduction of daphnids in most pore waters tested. Additional amphipod tests conducted in 2004 documented significant toxic effects of sediments from three streams downstream of mining areas: Strother Creek, West Fork Black River, and Bee Fork. Greatest toxicity occurred in sediments from a 6-km reach of upper Strother Creek, but significant toxic effects occurred in sediments collected at least 14 km downstream of mining in all three watersheds. Toxic effects were significantly correlated with metal concentrations (nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead) in sediments and pore waters and were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity risks based on sediment quality guidelines, although ammonia and manganese may also have contributed to toxicity at a few sites. Responses of amphipods in sediment toxicity tests were significantly correlated with characteristics of benthic invertebrate communities in study streams. These results indicate that toxicity of metals associated with sediments contributes to adverse ecological effects in streams draining the Viburnum Trend mining district.

  19. Control of water erosion and sediment in open cut coal mines in tropical areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, T.; Nugraha, C.; Matsui, K.; Shimada, H.; Ichinose, M.; Gottfried, J.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose is to reduce the environmental impacts from open cut mining in tropical areas, such as Indonesia and Vietnam. Research conducted on methods for the control of water erosion and sediment from open cut coal mines is described. Data were collected on climate and weathering in tropical areas, mechanism of water erosion and sedimentation, characteristics of rocks in coal measures under wet conditions, water management at pits and haul roads and ramps, and construction of waste dumps and water management. The results will be applied to the optimum control and management of erosion and sediments in open cut mining. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Enhancement of natural circulation type domestic solar hot water system performance by using a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, K. K.; Srinivasan, P. S. S.

    2011-08-01

    Performance improvement of existing 200 litres capacity natural convection type domestic solar hot water system is attempted. A two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a vertical axis windmill having Savonius type rotor is added to the fluid loop. The windmill driven pump circulates the water through the collector. The system with necessary instrumentation is tested over a day. Tests on Natural Circulation System (NCS) mode and Wind Assisted System (WAS) mode are carried out during January, April, July and October, 2009. Test results of a clear day are reported. Daily average efficiency of 25-28 % during NCS mode and 33-37 % during WAS mode are obtained. With higher wind velocities, higher collector flow rates and hence higher efficiencies are obtained. In general, WAS mode provides improvements in efficiency when compared to NCS mode.

  1. Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems: Cost/Benefit Analysis and Opportunities for Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Hillman, T.; Salasovich, J.

    2005-01-01

    To determine potential for reduction in the cost of saved energy (COSE) for cold-climate solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems, COSE was computed for three types of cold climate water heating systems. For each system, a series of cost-saving measures was considered: (1) balance of systems (BOS): tank, heat exchanger, and piping-valving measures; and (2) four alternative lower-cost collectors. Given all beneficial BOS measures in place, >50% reduction of COSE was achievable only with selective polymer collectors at half today's selective collector cost. In all three system types, today's metal-glass selective collector achieved the same COSE as the hypothesized non-selective polymer collector.

  2. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  3. Increased Power in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell: Facilitated Mass Transfer via a Water-Layer Anode Embedded in Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Seok; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Park, HyunJun; Kim, Jisu; Chang, In Seop

    2015-01-01

    We report a methodology for enhancing the mass transfer at the anode electrode of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs), by employing a fabric baffle to create a separate water-layer for installing the anode electrode in sediment. The maximum power in an SMFC with the anode installed in the separate water-layer (SMFC-wFB) was improved by factor of 6.6 compared to an SMFC having the anode embedded in the sediment (SMFC-woFB). The maximum current density in the SMFC-wFB was also 3.9 times higher (220.46 mA/m2) than for the SMFC-woFB. We found that the increased performance in the SMFC-wFB was due to the improved mass transfer rate of organic matter obtained by employing the water-layer during anode installation in the sediment layer. Acetate injection tests revealed that the SMFC-wFB could be applied to natural water bodies in which there is frequent organic contamination, based on the acetate flux from the cathode to the anode. PMID:26714176

  4. Increased Power in Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell: Facilitated Mass Transfer via a Water-Layer Anode Embedded in Sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Seok; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Park, HyunJun; Kim, Jisu; Chang, In Seop

    2015-01-01

    We report a methodology for enhancing the mass transfer at the anode electrode of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs), by employing a fabric baffle to create a separate water-layer for installing the anode electrode in sediment. The maximum power in an SMFC with the anode installed in the separate water-layer (SMFC-wFB) was improved by factor of 6.6 compared to an SMFC having the anode embedded in the sediment (SMFC-woFB). The maximum current density in the SMFC-wFB was also 3.9 times higher (220.46 mA/m2) than for the SMFC-woFB. We found that the increased performance in the SMFC-wFB was due to the improved mass transfer rate of organic matter obtained by employing the water-layer during anode installation in the sediment layer. Acetate injection tests revealed that the SMFC-wFB could be applied to natural water bodies in which there is frequent organic contamination, based on the acetate flux from the cathode to the anode.

  5. Ecosystem impacts of Alpine water intakes for hydropower: the challenge of sediment management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbud, Chrystelle; Lane, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Natural Alpine flow regimes are strongly modified by anthropogenic activities, notably water abstraction or impoundment for hydroelectric power production, which impacts upon both river discharge and sediment transfer systems, and in turn upon flora and fauna downstream. These kinds of impacts are well studied where rivers are regulated by dams, with sediment retained in the associated reservoirs although occasional flushing may be required (a frequency typically of many years). Such impacts may be managed by environmental flows or e-flows, whose restoration value has been shown in a number of research publications. However, there has been less attention in relation to the e-flows needed at water intakes which in Alpine environments may be associated with serious sediment-related problems. Water intakes have a very smaller sediment storage capacity than dams and thus may need to be flushed of accumulated sediment more regularly. In an Alpine setting, because rates of erosion are naturally higher, sediment is flushed in 'purges' with a frequency that may even be sub-daily at certain times of the year. Purges feed the river with solid material, but as the means of transporting it, the water, is being abstracted, sediment transport capacity is reduced. In theory, this does not eliminate sediment connectivity, but rather reduces it: the sediment is still delivered, but it can only be transported for a reduced duration; and the results may be profound hydrogeomorphic and ecosystem impacts, including downstream aggradation. In this study, we present results from a combined study of fluvial geomorphology, hydrology and ecosystem impacts of flow abstraction at water intakes. Using hydrodynamic modelling, we show that because the duration of remobilisation of purges and the peak discharge are much shorter than under natural flows, this causes the formation of a zone of sediment aggradation that moves progressively downstream as a sediment wave, leading to sedimentation

  6. Occurrence and distribution pattern of acidic pharmaceuticals in surface water, wastewater, and sediment of the Msunduzi River, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Agunbiade, Foluso O; Moodley, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The paucity of information on the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the environment in African countries led the authors to investigate 8 acidic pharmaceuticals (4 antipyretics, 3 antibiotics, and 1 lipid regulator) in wastewater, surface water, and sediments from the Msunduzi River in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The method recoveries, limits of detection (LOD), and limits of quantification were determined. The method recoveries were 58.4% to 103%, and the LODs ranged between 1.16 ng/L and 29.1 ng/L for water and between 0.58 ng/g and 14.5 ng/g for sediment. The drugs were all present in wastewater and in most of the surface water and sediment samples. Aspirin was the most abundant pharmaceutical observed, 118 ± 0.82 μg/L in wastewater influent, and the most observed antibiotic was nalidixic acid (25.2-29.9 μg/L in wastewater); bezafibrate was the least observed. The distribution pattern of the antipyretic in water indicates more impact in suburban sites. The solid-liquid partitioning of the pharmaceuticals between sediment and water, measured as the distribution coefficient (log KD ) gave an average accumulation magnitude of 10× to 32× in sediments than in water. The downstream distribution patterns for both water and sediment indicate discharge contributions from wastewater, agricultural activities, domestic waste disposal, and possible sewer system leakages. Although concentrations of the pharmaceuticals were comparable with those obtained from some other countries, the contamination of the present study site with pharmaceuticals has been over time and continues at present, making effective management and control necessary. PMID:26138880

  7. Microbial contamination of contact lens storage cases and domestic tap water of contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Üstüntürk, Miray; Zeybek, Zuhal

    2012-11-01

    Contact lenses have been widely used as an alternative to spectacles both in developed and developing countries. However, under certain circumstances, adverse responses can occur during contact lens wear and several microorganisms--including bacteria, fungi, and free living amoebae--can cause several eye infections in wearers. Extended wear of contact lenses is the major risk factor of eye infections such as microbial keratitis, besides contaminated contact lens storage case, contaminated lens care solutions, and inaccurate contact lens handling. In this study, we collected contact lens storage case and domestic tap water samples from 50 asymptomatic contact lens wearers. We determined that total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 45 (90 %), Gram negative rod bacteria were isolated in 20 (40 %), Pseudomonas spp. were isolated in 2 (4 %) and fungi were isolated in 18 (36 %) out of 50 contact lens storage cases. Free living amoebae were not detected in investigated contact lens storage cases. At the same time, out of 50, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 34 (68 %), fungi were isolated in 15 (30 %) and free living amoebae were isolated in 15 (30 %) domestic tap water samples. No Gram-negative rod bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in investigated water samples. Two contact lens case samples and two tap water samples were excluded from the analysis for Pseudomonas spp. for technical reasons. According to our findings, inadequate contact lens maintenance during lens wear may result in the contamination of contact lens storage cases. This situation can lead to severe eye infections in contact lens wearers over time.

  8. 224Ra:228Th disequilibrium in coastal sediments: Implications for solute transfer across the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Pinghe; Shi, Xiangming; Moore, Williard S.; Peng, Shiyun; Wang, Guizhi; Dai, Minhan

    2014-01-01

    We utilized 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium in the sediment to investigate processes that regulate solute transfer across the sediment-water interface. Depth profiles of dissolved and surface-bound 224Ra and 228Th in the upper 0-20 cm sediment column were measured using a delayed coincidence counter during a cruise to the Yangtze estuary from 15 to 24 August 2011. Along with 224Ra and 228Th, depth profiles of 234Th were collected to determine the bioturbation rate in the sediment. At most study sites, a significant deficit of 224Ra relative to 228Th was observed in the upper 0-10 cm. In contrast, 224Ra was in excess with respect to 228Th in the upper 0-5 cm at the river mouth, possibly due to redistribution of 224Ra from the mid-salinity region. By modeling the 224Ra depth profiles in the sediment using the general diagenetic equation, we demonstrated that in most cases molecular diffusion and bioturbation together can account for only ∼20-30% of the measured flux of 224Ra. We concluded that other mechanisms, especially irrigation, must be invoked to explain the remnant 70% of the observed deviation of 224Ra relative to 228Th. On the basis of the 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium in the sediment and a concept of increased surface area for exchange by irrigation as developed by early investigators, we proposed a new approach - the 224Ra/228Th disequilibrium approach to quantify the transfer rate of other dissolved species across the sediment-water interface. We have utilized this new approach to determine the benthic consumption rate of dissolved O2. The result reveals that benthic consumption is an important loss term of dissolved O2 in the Yangtze estuary and must be considered as one of the mechanisms that lead to hypoxia in this area.

  9. Water and sediment temperatures at mussel beds in the upper Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa J.; Sauer, Jennifer; Karns, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Native freshwater mussels are in global decline and urgently need protection and conservation. Declines in the abundance and diversity of North American mussels have been attributed to human activities that cause pollution, waterquality degradation, and habitat destruction. Recent studies suggest that effects of climate change may also endanger native mussel assemblages, as many mussel species are living close to their upper thermal tolerances. Adult and juvenile mussels spend a large fraction of their lives burrowed into sediments of rivers and lakes. Our objective was to measure surface water and sediment temperatures at known mussel beds in the Upper Mississippi (UMR) and St. Croix (SCR) rivers to estimate the potential for sediments to serve as thermal refugia. Across four mussel beds in the UMR and SCR, surface waters were generally warmer than sediments in summer, and were cooler than sediments in winter. This suggests that sediments may act as a thermal buffer for mussels in these large rivers. Although the magnitude of this effect was usually <3.0°C, sediments were up to 7.5°C cooler at one site in May, suggesting site-specific variation in the ability of sediments to act as thermal buffers. Sediment temperatures in the UMR exceeded those shown to cause mortality in laboratory studies. These data suggest that elevated water temperatures resulting from global warming, thermal discharges, water extraction, and/or droughts have the potential to adversely affect native mussel assemblages.

  10. Analysis of mitochondrial D-loop region casts new light on domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kierstein, Gerold; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo; Brenig, Bertram

    2004-02-01

    The phylogeny of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) is still a matter of discussion, especially if the two types of domestic water buffalo (swamp and river) derived from different domestication events or if they are products of human selection. To obtain more insight, we analyzed the entire mitochondrial D-loop region of 80 water buffaloes of four different breeds, i.e., 19 swamp buffaloes (Carabao) and 61 river buffaloes (Murrah, Jafarabadi, and Mediterranean), sampled in Brazil and Italy. We detected 36 mitochondrial haplotypes with 128 polymorphic sites. Pooled with published data of South-East Asian and Australian water buffaloes and based on comprehensive median-joining network and population demography analyses we show evidence that both river and swamp buffaloes decent from one domestication event, probably in the Indian subcontinent. However, the today swamp buffaloes have an unravelled mitochondrial history, which can be explained by introgression of wild water buffalo mtDNA into domestic stocks. We are also discussing indications for an independent domestication of buffaloes in China.

  11. Clear salt water above sediment-laden fresh water: Interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, B.; Konopliv, N.; Meiburg, E.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of an interface separating less dense, clear salt water above from more dense, sediment-laden fresh water below is explored via direct numerical simulations. We find that the destabilizing effects of double diffusion and particle settling amplify each other above the diffusive interface, whereas they tend to cancel each other below. For moderate settling velocities, plumes form both above and below the interface, whereas for large settling velocities plume formation below the interface is suppressed. We identify the dimensionless parameter that determines in which regime a given flow takes place, along with the critical value at which the transition between the regimes takes place.

  12. Suspended-Sediment Budget for the North Santiam River Basin, Oregon, Water Years 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bragg, Heather M.; Uhrich, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Significant Findings An analysis of sediment transport in the North Santiam River basin during water years 2005-08 indicated that: Two-thirds of sediment input to Detroit Lake originated in the upper North Santiam River subbasin. Two-thirds of the sediment transported past Geren Island originated in the Little North Santiam River subbasin. The highest annual suspended-sediment load at any of the monitoring stations was the result of a debris flow on November 6, 2006, on Mount Jefferson. About 86 percent of the total sediment input to Detroit Lake was trapped in the lake, whereas 14 percent was transported farther downstream. More than 80 percent of the sediment transport in the basin was in November, December, and January. The variance in the annual suspended-sediment loads was better explained by the magnitude of the annual peak streamflow than by the annual mean streamflow.

  13. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  14. Sediments, porewaters and diagenesis in an urban water body, Salford, UK: impacts of remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kevin G.; Boyd, Nathan A.; Boult, Stephen

    2003-07-01

    Contaminated sediments deposited within urban water bodies commonly exert a significant negative effect on overlying water quality. However, our understanding of the processes operating within such anthropogenic sediments is currently poor. This paper describes the nature of the sediment and early diagenetic reactions in a highly polluted major urban water body (the Salford Quays of the Manchester Ship Canal) that has undergone remediation focused on the water column.The style of sedimentation within Salford Quays has been significantly changed as a result of remediation of the water column. Pre-remediation sediments are composed of a range of natural detrital grains, predominantly quartz and clay, and anthropogenic detrital material dominated by industrial furnace-derived metal-rich slag grains. Post-remediation sediments are composed of predominantly autochthonous material, including siliceous algal remains and clays. At the top of the pre-remediation sediments and immediately beneath the post-remediation sediments is a layer significantly enriched in furnace-derived slag grains, input into the basin as a result of site clearance prior to water-column remediation. These grains contain a high level of metals, resulting in a significantly enhanced metal concentration in the sediments at this depth.Porewater analysis reveals the importance of both bacterial organic matter oxidation reactions and the dissolution of industrial grains upon the mobility of nutrient and chemical species within Salford Quays. Minor release of iron and manganese at shallow depths is likely to be taking place as a result of bacterial Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. Petrographic analysis reveals that the abundant authigenic mineral within the sediment is manganese-rich vivianite, and thus Fe(II) and Mn(II) released by bacterial reactions may be being taken up through the precipitation of this mineral. Significant porewater peaks in iron, manganese and silicon deeper in the sediment column are

  15. Removal of hexavalent chromium from estuarine waters by model substrates and natural sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.M.; Schick, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    Chromate removal from waters with a range of salinities (0-32%) was studied by using both model substrates, alumina and kaolinite, and natural estuarine sediments in order to determine possible effects of sediment on dissolved chromate in estuarine systems. The dependence of chromate removal on sediment concentrations (<1 g L/sup -1/) will be ineffective in removing dissolved chromate from the water column, though the reaction will be important in deposited sediments. Chromate removal is more effective in low- than high-salinity regimes. Removal by model substrates decreases monotonically with increasing salinity but shows a peak in the 0.1-1.0% range with estuarine sediments. This latter behavior shows similarity with the salinity dependence of chromate reduction by gallic acid, suggesting reductive adsorption by the estuarine sediments. Naturally occurring levels of phosphate ansilicate show negligible effect on chromate removal.

  16. Interparticle collision of natural sediment grains in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Pitlick, J.; Bennett, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic theory and measurements of particle impacts on an inclined glass plane in water are used to investigate the mechanics of interparticle collisions in sediment-transporting flows. A collision Stokes number is proposed as a measure of the momentum of an interparticle collision versus the viscous pressure force in the interstitial gap between colliding particles. The viscous pressure force opposes motion of the particles on approach and rebound. A Stokes number of between 39 and 105 is estimated as the critical range below which particle impacts are completely viscously damped and above which impacts are partially elastic. The critical Stokes number is shown to roughly coincide with the Bagnold number transition between macroviscous and grain inertial debris flows and the transition between damped and partially elastic bed load transport saltation impacts. The nonspherical nature of natural particles significantly alters the motion of the center of mass after a partially elastic collision. The normal to the point of contact between the particles does not necessarily go through the center of mass. Thus normal rebound of the center of mass may not occur. A model of particle motion after rebound for particles of arbitrary shape, conserving both linear and angular momentum, is proposed.

  17. Shewanella fidelis sp. nov., isolated from sediments and sea water.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena P; Sawabe, Tomoo; Hayashi, Karin; Gorshkova, Nataliya M; Zhukova, Natalia V; Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Mikhailov, Valery V; Nicolau, Dan V; Christen, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Two marine bacterial strains, KMM 3582T and KMM 3589, isolated respectively from sediments of the South China Sea and sea water of the Sea of Japan, have been characterized. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence-based phylogenetic analysis placed the two strains in a separate branch of the gamma-Proteobacteria within the members of the genus Shewanella. KMM 3582T showed the highest similarity (97.1 and 97.4%, respectively) to Shewanella pealeana and Shewanella gelidimarina. The G + C contents of the DNAs of the two strains studied were 45.0 mol%. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the two strains was 82%, indicating that they represent a single genospecies. These organisms were slightly pinkish, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic (with temperature range from 4 to 30 degrees C), neutrophilic and haemolytic and were able to degrade alginate, gelatin and DNA. The novel organisms were susceptible to gentamicin, lincomycin, oleandomycin, streptomycin and polymyxin. The predominant fatty acids were characteristic for shewanellae: 13 : 0-i, 15 : 0-i, 16 : 0 and 16 : 1omega7. Eicosapentaenoic acid, 20 : 5omega3, was not detected. Phylogenetic evidence, together with phenotypic characteristics, showed that the two bacteria constitute a novel species of the genus Shewanella. The name Shewanella fidelis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain KMM 3582T (=LMG 20551T =ATCC BAA-318T).

  18. Microbiological evaluation of bottled non-carbonated ("still") water from domestic brands in Greece.

    PubMed

    Venieri, D; Vantarakis, A; Komninou, G; Papapetropoulou, M

    2006-03-01

    The microbiological quality of 1,527 samples of bottled non-carbonated ('still') mineral water, purchased from retail outlets and derived from 10 manufacturing companies in Greece, was investigated during the period 1995-2003. Applying the membrane filter technique, the aliquots of water samples (250 ml) were analyzed for the presence and enumeration of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Also, aerobic bacteria were counted as Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) ml(-1) at 22 and 37 degrees C. Positive samples for the parameters tested varied significantly among brands with an overall percentage of 13.95% bottled water samples noncompliant with the Greek water regulation. Microorganisms isolated from the samples tested were identified as species of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Pasteurella, Citrobacter, Flavobacterium, Providencia and Enterococcus. The most frequent isolated microorganism during the period of the study was P. aeruginosa. Generally, bacterial load of the samples tested ranged in low levels. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of the bottled water provided by domestic brands in the Greek market during the period 1995-2003.

  19. Microbiological evaluation of bottled non-carbonated ("still") water from domestic brands in Greece.

    PubMed

    Venieri, D; Vantarakis, A; Komninou, G; Papapetropoulou, M

    2006-03-01

    The microbiological quality of 1,527 samples of bottled non-carbonated ('still') mineral water, purchased from retail outlets and derived from 10 manufacturing companies in Greece, was investigated during the period 1995-2003. Applying the membrane filter technique, the aliquots of water samples (250 ml) were analyzed for the presence and enumeration of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Also, aerobic bacteria were counted as Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) ml(-1) at 22 and 37 degrees C. Positive samples for the parameters tested varied significantly among brands with an overall percentage of 13.95% bottled water samples noncompliant with the Greek water regulation. Microorganisms isolated from the samples tested were identified as species of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Pasteurella, Citrobacter, Flavobacterium, Providencia and Enterococcus. The most frequent isolated microorganism during the period of the study was P. aeruginosa. Generally, bacterial load of the samples tested ranged in low levels. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of the bottled water provided by domestic brands in the Greek market during the period 1995-2003. PMID:16271413

  20. Domestic rainwater harvesting to improve water supply in rural South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwenge Kahinda, Jean-marc; Taigbenu, Akpofure E.; Boroto, Jean R.

    Halving the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation, is one of the targets of the 7th Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In South Africa, with its mix of developed and developing regions, 9.7 million (20%) of the people do not have access to adequate water supply and 16 million (33%) lack proper sanitation services. Domestic Rainwater Harvesting (DRWH), which provides water directly to households enables a number of small-scale productive activities, has the potential to supply water even in rural and peri-urban areas that conventional technologies cannot supply. As part of the effort to achieve the MDGs, the South African government has committed itself to provide financial assistance to poor households for the capital cost of rainwater storage tanks and related works in the rural areas. Despite this financial assistance, the legal status of DRWH remains unclear and DRWH is in fact illegal by strict application of the water legislations. Beyond the cost of installation, maintenance and proper use of the DRWH system to ensure its sustainability, there is risk of waterborne diseases. This paper explores challenges to sustainable implementation of DRWH and proposes some interventions which the South African government could implement to overcome them.

  1. Water quality effects of herded stream crossings by domestic sheep bands.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patrick E; Moffet, Corey A; Lewis, Gregory S; Seyfried, Mark S; Hardegree, Stuart P; Pierson, Fredrick B

    2012-01-01

    Livestock impacts on total suspended solids (TSS) and pathogen (e.g., ) levels in rangeland streams are a serious concern worldwide. Herded stream crossings by domestic sheep () are periodic, necessary managerial events on high-elevation rangelands, but their impacts on stream water quality are largely unknown. We evaluated the effects of herded, one-way crossings by sheep bands (about 2000 individuals) on TSS and concentration and load responses in downstream waters. Crossing trials were conducted during the summers of 2005 and 2006 on two reaches within each of three perennial streams in the Centennial Mountains of eastern Idaho and southwestern Montana. Water samples were collected at 2-min intervals at an upstream background station and at stations 25, 100, 500, and 1500 m downstream just before and during each crossing trial. Crossings produced substantial increases in TSS and concentrations and loads downstream, but these concentration increases were localized and short lived. Maximum TSS concentration was highest 25 m downstream, declined as a function of downstream distance, and at 500 m downstream was similar to background. Post-peak TSS concentrations at all downstream stations decreased to <25 mg L within 24 to 48 min after reaching their maxima. Findings for concentration and load responses were similar to that of TSS but less clear cut. Stream-crossing sheep do affect water quality; therefore, producers and resource managers should continue to evaluate the efficacy of herdsmanship techniques for reducing water quality impact.

  2. Sudden clearing of estuarine waters upon crossing the threshold from transport to supply regulation of sediment transport as an erodible sediment pool is depleted: San Francisco Bay, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The quantity of suspended sediment in an estuary is regulated either by transport, where energy or time needed to suspend sediment is limiting, or by supply, where the quantity of erodible sediment is limiting. This paper presents a hypothesis that suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in estuaries can suddenly decrease when the threshold from transport to supply regulation is crossed as an erodible sediment pool is depleted. This study was motivated by a statistically significant 36% step decrease in SSC in San Francisco Bay from water years 1991–1998 to 1999–2007. A quantitative conceptual model of an estuary with an erodible sediment pool and transport or supply regulation of sediment transport is developed. Model results confirm that, if the regulation threshold was crossed in 1999, SSC would decrease rapidly after water year 1999 as observed. Estuaries with a similar history of a depositional sediment pulse followed by erosion may experience sudden clearing.

  3. Nitrogen dynamics in sediment during water level manipulation on the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cavanaugh, Jennifer C.; Richardson, William B.; Strauss, Eric A.; Bartsch, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) has been linked to increasing eutrophication in the Gulf of Mexico and as a result there is increased interest in managing and improving water quality in the Mississippi River system. Water level reductions, or 'drawdowns', are being used more frequently in large river impoundments to improve vegetation growth and sediment compaction. We selected two areas of the Upper Mississippi River system (Navigation Pool 8 and Swan Lake) to examine the effects of water level drawdown on N dynamics. Navigation Pool 8 experienced summer drawdowns in 2001 and 2002. Certain areas of Swan Lake have been drawn down annually since the early 1970s where as other areas have remained inundated. In the 2002 Pool 8 study we determined the effects of sediment drying and rewetting resulting from water level drawdown on (1) patterns of sediment nitrification and denitrification and (2) concentrations of sediment and surface water total N (TN), nitrate, and ammonium (NH4+). In 2001, we only examined sediment NH4+ and TN. In the Swan Lake study, we determined the long-term effects of water level drawdowns on concentrations of sediment NH4+ and TN in sediments that dried annually and those that remained inundated. Sediment NH4+ decreased significantly in the Pool 8 studies during periods of desiccation, although there were no consistent trends in nitrification and denitrification or a reduction in total sediment N. Ammonium in sediments that have dried annually in Swan Lake appeared lower but was not significantly different from sediments that remain wet. The reduction in sediment NH4+ in parts of Pool 8 was likely a result of increased plant growth and N assimilation, which is then redeposited back to the sediment surface upon plant senescence. Similarly, the Swan Lake study suggested that drawdowns do not result in long term reduction in sediment N. Water level drawdowns may actually reduce water retention time and river-floodplain connectivity, while promoting significant

  4. The chemical quality of self-supplied domestic well water in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, M.J.; Tipton, D.; Dunkle, Shapiro S.; Geiger, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Existing water quality data collected from domestic wells were summarized to develop the first national-scale retrospective of self-supplied drinking water sources. The contaminants evaluated represent a range of inorganic and organic compounds, and although the data set was not originally designed to be a statistical representation of national occurrence, it encompasses large parts of the United States including at least some wells sampled in every state and Puerto Rico. Inorganic contaminants were detected in many of the wells, and concentrations exceeded the U.S. EPA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs; federal drinking water standards used to regulate public drinking water quality) more often than organic contaminants. Of the inorganic constituents evaluated, arsenic concentrations exceeded the MCL (10 ??g/L) in ???11% of the 7580 wells evaluated, nitrate exceeded the MCL (10 mg/L) in ???8% of the 3465 wells evaluated, uranium-238 exceeded the MCL (30 ??g/L) in ???4% of the wells, and radon-222 exceeded 300 and 4000 pCi/L (potential drinking water standards currently under review by the U.S. EPA) in ???75% and 9% of the wells, respectively. The MCLs for total mercury and fluoride were each exceeded in <1% of the wells evaluated. The MCL was exceeded in <1% of all wells for all anthropogenically derived organic contaminants evaluated and was not exceeded for many contaminants. In addition, 10 contaminants evaluated do not currently have an MCL. Atrazine, however, was detected in 24% of the wells evaluated and was the most frequently detected organic contaminant of the 28 organic contaminants evaluated in this study. Simazine and metolachlor each were detected in ???9% of all wells and tied for second in frequency of detection for organic contaminants. The third and fourth most frequently detected organic contaminants were methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (6%) and chloroform (5%), respectively. Because the water quality of domestic wells is not federally regulated or

  5. Analysis of black fungal biofilms occurring at domestic water taps. II: potential routes of entry.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Guido; Hübner, Iris; Schmidt, Carsten K; de Hoog, G Sybren; Haase, Gerhard

    2013-06-01

    Formation of tenacious and massive black biofilms was occasionally observed at the water-air interphase of water taps and in associated habitats at several locations in Germany. Exophiala lecanii-corni was proven to be the dominant component of these biofilms. Water utility companies were interested to understand by which route fungi building these black biofilms enter their habitat at affected sites in domestic sanitary. A wide variety of fungi is known to be common in wet indoor environments, as well as in the drinking water resources. Two possible routes of entry are therefore considered as follows: (a) distribution by the drinking water system or (b) a retrograde route of colonisation. Previous compositional analysis revealed that the black constituents of biofilms primarily belong to the herpotrichiellaceous black yeast and relatives. Therefore, a systematic search for black fungi in the drinking water system was performed using Sabouraud's glucose agar medium with chloramphenicol and erythritol-chloramphenicol agar as isolation media. Cadophora malorum was the dominant fungus in the investigated drinking water systems, and samples taken from the house connections (n = 50; 74 %, <200 cfu/L), followed by a so far undescribed Alternaria sp. (28 %; <10 cfu/L) and E. castellanii (26 %; <10 cfu/L). Of note, C. malorum was not present in any previously analysed biofilm. Since E. lecanii-corni was not found in any water sample from the distribution system tested, but represented the most abundant species in dark biofilms previously analysed, a retrograde route of contamination in case of E. lecanii-corni can be assumed.

  6. Where There Is No Toilet: Water and Sanitation Environments of Domestic and Facility Births in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Benova, Lenka; Cumming, Oliver; Gordon, Bruce A.; Magoma, Moke; Campbell, Oona M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate water and sanitation during childbirth are likely to lead to poor maternal and newborn outcomes. This paper uses existing data sources to assess the water and sanitation (WATSAN) environment surrounding births in Tanzania in order to interrogate whether such estimates could be useful for guiding research, policy and monitoring initiatives. Methods We used the most recent Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) to characterise the delivery location of births occurring between 2005 and 2010. Births occurring in domestic environments were characterised as WATSAN-safe if the home fulfilled international definitions of improved water and improved sanitation access. We used the 2006 Service Provision Assessment survey to characterise the WATSAN environment of facilities that conduct deliveries. We combined estimates from both surveys to describe the proportion of all births occurring in WATSAN-safe environments and conducted an equity analysis based on DHS wealth quintiles and eight geographic zones. Results 42.9% (95% confidence interval: 41.6%–44.2%) of all births occurred in the woman's home. Among these, only 1.5% (95% confidence interval: 1.2%–2.0%) were estimated to have taken place in WATSAN-safe conditions. 74% of all health facilities conducted deliveries. Among these, only 44% of facilities overall and 24% of facility delivery rooms were WATSAN-safe. Combining the estimates, we showed that 30.5% of all births in Tanzania took place in a WATSAN-safe environment (range of uncertainty 25%–42%). Large wealth-based inequalities existed in the proportion of births occurring in domestic environments based on wealth quintile and geographical zone. Conclusion Existing data sources can be useful in national monitoring and prioritisation of interventions to improve poor WATSAN environments during childbirth. However, a better conceptual understanding of potentially harmful exposures and better data are needed in order to devise and apply

  7. ECO: A Generic Eutrophication Model Including Comprehensive Sediment-Water Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Johannes G. C.; van Beek, Jan K. L.

    2013-01-01

    The content and calibration of the comprehensive generic 3D eutrophication model ECO for water and sediment quality is presented. Based on a computational grid for water and sediment, ECO is used as a tool for water quality management to simulate concentrations and mass fluxes of nutrients (N, P, Si), phytoplankton species, detrital organic matter, electron acceptors and related substances. ECO combines integral simulation of water and sediment quality with sediment diagenesis and closed mass balances. Its advanced process formulations for substances in the water column and the bed sediment were developed to allow for a much more dynamic calculation of the sediment-water exchange fluxes of nutrients as resulting from steep concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface than is possible with other eutrophication models. ECO is to more accurately calculate the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients in the sediment, and to allow for more accurate prediction of phytoplankton biomass and water quality in response to mitigative measures such as nutrient load reduction. ECO was calibrated for shallow Lake Veluwe (The Netherlands). Due to restoration measures this lake underwent a transition from hypertrophic conditions to moderately eutrophic conditions, leading to the extensive colonization by submerged macrophytes. ECO reproduces observed water quality well for the transition period of ten years. The values of its process coefficients are in line with ranges derived from literature. ECO’s calculation results underline the importance of redox processes and phosphate speciation for the nutrient return fluxes. Among other things, the results suggest that authigenic formation of a stable apatite-like mineral in the sediment can contribute significantly to oligotrophication of a lake after a phosphorus load reduction. PMID:23844160

  8. ECO: a generic eutrophication model including comprehensive sediment-water interaction.

    PubMed

    Smits, Johannes G C; van Beek, Jan K L

    2013-01-01

    The content and calibration of the comprehensive generic 3D eutrophication model ECO for water and sediment quality is presented. Based on a computational grid for water and sediment, ECO is used as a tool for water quality management to simulate concentrations and mass fluxes of nutrients (N, P, Si), phytoplankton species, detrital organic matter, electron acceptors and related substances. ECO combines integral simulation of water and sediment quality with sediment diagenesis and closed mass balances. Its advanced process formulations for substances in the water column and the bed sediment were developed to allow for a much more dynamic calculation of the sediment-water exchange fluxes of nutrients as resulting from steep concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface than is possible with other eutrophication models. ECO is to more accurately calculate the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients in the sediment, and to allow for more accurate prediction of phytoplankton biomass and water quality in response to mitigative measures such as nutrient load reduction. ECO was calibrated for shallow Lake Veluwe (The Netherlands). Due to restoration measures this lake underwent a transition from hypertrophic conditions to moderately eutrophic conditions, leading to the extensive colonization by submerged macrophytes. ECO reproduces observed water quality well for the transition period of ten years. The values of its process coefficients are in line with ranges derived from literature. ECO's calculation results underline the importance of redox processes and phosphate speciation for the nutrient return fluxes. Among other things, the results suggest that authigenic formation of a stable apatite-like mineral in the sediment can contribute significantly to oligotrophication of a lake after a phosphorus load reduction.

  9. Processing of combined domestic bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flushing water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hypes, W. D.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation of processes and system configurations for reclaiming combined bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flush water was conducted. A 90-min recycle flow was effective in removing particulates and in improving other physical characteristics to the extent that the filtered water was subjectively acceptable for reuse. The addition of a charcoal filter resulted in noticeable improvements in color, turbidity, and suds elimination. Heating and chlorination of the waste waters were investigated for reducing total organism counts and eliminating coliform organisms. A temperature of 335.9 K (145 F) for 30 min and chlorine concentrations of 20 mg/l in the collection tank followed by 10 mg/l in the storage tank were determined to be adequate for this purpose. Water volume relationships and energy-use rates for the waste water reuse systems are also discussed.

  10. Analysis of assembly serial number usage in domestic light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, W.J. ); Moore, R.S. )

    1991-05-01

    Domestic light-water reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies are identified by a serial number that is placed on each assembly. These serial numbers are used as identifiers throughout the life of the fuel. The uniqueness of assembly serial numbers is important in determining their effectiveness as unambiguous identifiers. The purpose of this study is to determine what serial numbering schemes are used, the effectiveness of these schemes, and to quantify how many duplicate serial numbers occur on domestic LWR fuel assemblies. The serial numbering scheme adopted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) ensures uniqueness of assembly serial numbers. The latest numbering scheme adopted by General Electric (GE), was also found to be unique. Analysis of 70,971 fuel assembly serial numbers from permanently discharged fuel identified 11,948 serial number duplicates. Three duplicate serial numbers were found when analysis focused on duplication within the individual fuel inventory at each reactor site, but these were traced back to data entry errors and will be corrected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). There were also three instances where the serial numbers used to identify assemblies used for hot cell studies differed from the serial numbers reported to the EIA. It is recommended that fuel fabricators and utilities adhere to the ANSI serial numbering scheme to ensure serial number uniqueness. In addition, organizations collecting serial number information, should request that all known serial numbers physically attached or associated with each assembly be reported and identified by the corresponding number scheme. 10 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Phytoremediation of domestic wastewaters in free water surface constructed wetlands using Azolla pinnata.

    PubMed

    Akinbile, Christopher O; Ogunrinde, Temitope A; Che Bt Man, Hasfalina; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Two constructed wetlands, one with Azolla pinnata plant (CW1) and the other without (CW2) for treating domestic wastewaters were developed. Fifteen water parameters which include: Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Suspended Solid (TSS), Total Phosphorus (TP), Total Nitrogen (TN), Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3N), Turbidity, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), Iron (Fe), Magnesium (Mg), Manganese (Mn), and heavy metals such as Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) were analyzed using standard laboratory procedures. The experiments were conducted in two (dry and wet) seasons simultaneously. Results showed considerable reductions in all parameters and metals including Zn in CW1 compared with CW2 in the two seasons considered while Pb and Mn were not detected throughout the study. Zn concentration levels reduced significantly in both seasons just as removal efficiencies of 70.03% and 64.51% were recorded for CW1 while 35.17% and 33.45% were recorded for CW2 in both seasons. There were no significant differences in the removal efficiencies of Fe in both seasons as 99.55%, 59.09%, 88.89%, and 53.56% were recorded in CW1 and CW2 respectively. Azolla pinnata has proved effective in domestic wastewater phytoremediation studies.

  12. Variability of mercury concentrations in domestic well water, New Jersey Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, Zoltan; Barringer, Julia L.; Jacobsen, Eric; Smith, Nicholas P; Gallagher, Robert A; Sites, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of total (unfiltered) mercury (Hg) exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (2 µg/L) in the acidic water withdrawn by more than 700 domestic wells from the areally extensive unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. Background concentrations of Hg generally are <0.01 µg/L. The source of the Hg contamination has been hypothesized to arise from Hg of pesticide-application, atmospheric, and geologic origin being mobilized by some component(s) of septic-system effluent or urban leachates in unsewered residential areas. Initial results at many affected wells were not reproducible upon later resampling despite rigorous quality assurance, prompting concerns that duration of well flushing could affect the Hg concentrations. A cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection examined variability in Hg results during the flushing of domestic wells. Samples were collected at regular intervals (about 10 minutes) during flushing for eight domestic wells, until stabilization criteria was met for field-measured parameters; the Hg concentrations in the final samples ranged from about 0.0005 to 11 µg/L. Unfiltered Hg concentrations in samples collected during purging varied slightly, but particulate Hg concentration (unfiltered – filtered (0.45 micron capsule) concentration) typically was highly variable for each well, with no consistent pattern of increase or decrease in concentration. Surges of particulates probably were associated with pump cycling. Pre-pumping samples from the holding tanks generally had the lowest Hg concentrations among the samples collected at the well that day. Comparing the newly obtained results at each well to results from previous sampling indicated that Hg concentrations in water from the Hg-contaminated areas were generally greater among samples collected on different dates (long-term variations, months to years) than among samples collected on the same day (short

  13. Toxicity of phthalates to selected benthic organisms via water and sediment exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Call, D.J.; Markee, T.P.; VandeVenter, F.A.; Cox, D.A.; Geiger, D.L.; Brooke, L.T.

    1995-12-31

    A three-tiered approach was applied to evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of a series of phthalic acid esters to selected benthic invertebrates. Tier 1 consisted of 10-day exposures of the test species to the phthalates in water without sediments to determine toxicity. Tier 2 consisted of incorporating the phthalates into natural sediments and evaluating their persistence in phthalate-amended sediments under conditions simulating those of a 10-day toxicity test of contaminated sediments. Tier 3 consisted of performing 10-day exposures of test animals to phthalate-amended sediments. Phthalates were amended to sediments for Tier 3 testing based upon the results of Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests, and an estimation of partitioning between sediment and pore water based upon equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT). Sediments of varying organic carbon content were used to evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of phthalate-amended sediments. The phthalates included in this study were dimethyl, diethyl, di-n-butyl, butylbenzyl, di-n-hexyl, di-2-ethylhexyl and di-n-decyl phthalate. The sensitivities of the three test species followed the general order in water-only tests: Hyalella azteca > Chironomus tentans > Lumbriculus variegatus. The persistence of selected phthalates from Tier 2 tests, their respective toxicities from Tier 3 tests, and the utility of the EPT approach in assessing phthalate toxicity will be discussed.

  14. Toxicity tests of effluents with marsh plants in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Simon, T.L.; Brashers, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are described for toxicity testing of water and sediment with two varieties of the freshwater marsh plant Echinochloa crusgalli (Linneaus) Palisot de Beauvois (Poaceae), and complex effluents. Two tests are described: a seed germination and early seedling growth test in water, and a survival and seedling growth test in natural and synthetic sediments. Effects of effluents from a sewage treatment plant, tannery, textile mill, pulp and paper mill, coking plant and sewage treatment plant included inhibition of germination, chlorophyll synthesis and growth. The tests with rooted marsh plants were sensitive to pollutants and detected toxicity of a range of pollutants in water and sediment. Synthetic sediments similar to natural sediments allowed toxicity tests to be done under carefully controlled conditions of particle size distribution, organic content, pH, electrode potential (Eh) and cation exchange capacity (CEC).

  15. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2005-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2003 (October 1, 2002-September 30, 2003). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, one site in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2002 through September 2003. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  16. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2003-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2001 (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2000 through September 2001. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  17. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2004-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2001 through September 2002. Calibration curves and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  18. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2005 (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2004 through September 2005. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  19. Predicting pollutant concentrations in the water column during dredging operations: Implications for sediment quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Julio Cesar; Wasserman, Maria Angélica V; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens G; Almeida, Aline Mansur

    2016-07-15

    The development of new dredging techniques that can reduce, or at least predict, the environmental impacts, is in high demand by governments in developing countries. In the present work, a new methodology was developed, to evaluate the level of metals contamination (i.e. cadmium, lead and zinc) of the water column, during a dredging operation. This methodology was used to evaluate the impacts of the construction of a new maritime terminal in Sepetiba Bay, Brazil. The methodology quantifies the amount of resuspended sediments and calculates the expected contaminants concentrations in the water column. The results indicated that sediment quality criteria were not compatible with water quality criteria, because the dredging of contaminated sediments does not necessarily yield contaminated water. It is suggested that the use of sediment quality criteria for dredging operations might be abandoned, and the methodology presented in this study applied to assess dredging's environmental impacts, predicting water contamination levels.

  20. Assessing the occurrence and distribution of pyrethroids in water and suspended sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of pyrethroid insecticides in the environment was assessed by separately measuring concentrations in the dissolved and suspended sediment phases of surface water samples. Filtered water was extracted by HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges, while the sediment on the filter was sonicated and cleaned up using carbon and aluminum cartridges. Detection limits for the 13 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were 0.5 to 1 ng L-1 for water and 2 to 6 ng g for the suspended sediments. Seven pyrethroids were detected in six water samples collected from either urban or agricultural creeks, with bifenthrin detected the most frequently and at the highest concentrations. In spiked water samples and field samples, the majority of the pyrethroids were associated with the suspended sediments.

  1. A multi-level pore-water sampler for permeable sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, J.B.; Hartl, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Cable, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    The construction and operation of a multi-level piezometer (multisampler) designed to collect pore water from permeable sediments up to 230 cm below the sediment-water interface is described. Multisamplers are constructed from 1 1/2 inch schedule 80 PVC pipe. One-quarter-inch flexible PVC tubing leads from eight ports at variable depths to a 1 1/2 inch tee fitting at the top of the PVC pipe. Multisamplers are driven into the sediments using standard fence-post drivers. Water is pumped from the PVC tubing with a peristaltic pump. Field tests in Banana River Lagoon, Florida, demonstrate the utility of multisamplers. These tests include collection of multiple samples from the permeable sediments and reveal mixing between shallow pore water and overlying lagoon water.

  2. Predicting pollutant concentrations in the water column during dredging operations: Implications for sediment quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Julio Cesar; Wasserman, Maria Angélica V; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens G; Almeida, Aline Mansur

    2016-07-15

    The development of new dredging techniques that can reduce, or at least predict, the environmental impacts, is in high demand by governments in developing countries. In the present work, a new methodology was developed, to evaluate the level of metals contamination (i.e. cadmium, lead and zinc) of the water column, during a dredging operation. This methodology was used to evaluate the impacts of the construction of a new maritime terminal in Sepetiba Bay, Brazil. The methodology quantifies the amount of resuspended sediments and calculates the expected contaminants concentrations in the water column. The results indicated that sediment quality criteria were not compatible with water quality criteria, because the dredging of contaminated sediments does not necessarily yield contaminated water. It is suggested that the use of sediment quality criteria for dredging operations might be abandoned, and the methodology presented in this study applied to assess dredging's environmental impacts, predicting water contamination levels. PMID:27216043

  3. The role of domestic tap water on Acanthamoeba keratitis in non-contact lens wearers and validation of laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail Soner; Eroglu, Fadime; Erdem, Elif; Yagmur, Meltem; Tanır, Ferdi

    2015-09-01

    Acanthamoeba is increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers while contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). It is unlikely that the Acanthamoeba colonization is a feature which is effective only in patient's homes with infectious keratitis since the organism has been isolated from domestic tap water. Two hundred and thirty-one (231) corneal scrapings were taken from infectious keratitis cases, and four contact lens solutions and domestic tap waters were taken from 22 out of 44 AK-diagnosed patient's homes. Microscopic examination, culture, PCR, real-time PCR and DNA sequencing analyses were used for AK-diagnosed samples. The real-time PCR was the most sensitive (100 %) one among the methods used in diagnosis of AK. The 44 (19.0 %) out of 231 corneal scrapings, 4/4 (100 %) contact lens solution and 11/22 (50 %) of domestic tap water samples were found to be positive by real-time PCR for Acanthamoeba. A. griffini (T3), A. castellanii (T4) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes were obtained from corneal scrapings, contact lens solutions and domestic tap water samples taken from the patient's homes diagnosed with AK. The isolation of Acanthamoeba containing 6/22 (27.3 %) A. griffini (T3), 14/22 (63.6 %) A. castellanii (T4) and 2/22 (9.1 %) A. jacobsi (T15) from the domestic tap water outlets of 22 of 44 (50 %) of patient's homes revealed that is a significant source of these organisms. A. griffini (T3) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes have not been determined from AK cases in Turkey previously. Thus, we conclude that Acanthamoeba keratitis is associated with exposition of patients who has ocular trauma or ocular surface disease to domestic tap water in endemic or potentially endemic countries. PMID:26017346

  4. The role of domestic tap water on Acanthamoeba keratitis in non-contact lens wearers and validation of laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail Soner; Eroglu, Fadime; Erdem, Elif; Yagmur, Meltem; Tanır, Ferdi

    2015-09-01

    Acanthamoeba is increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers while contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). It is unlikely that the Acanthamoeba colonization is a feature which is effective only in patient's homes with infectious keratitis since the organism has been isolated from domestic tap water. Two hundred and thirty-one (231) corneal scrapings were taken from infectious keratitis cases, and four contact lens solutions and domestic tap waters were taken from 22 out of 44 AK-diagnosed patient's homes. Microscopic examination, culture, PCR, real-time PCR and DNA sequencing analyses were used for AK-diagnosed samples. The real-time PCR was the most sensitive (100 %) one among the methods used in diagnosis of AK. The 44 (19.0 %) out of 231 corneal scrapings, 4/4 (100 %) contact lens solution and 11/22 (50 %) of domestic tap water samples were found to be positive by real-time PCR for Acanthamoeba. A. griffini (T3), A. castellanii (T4) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes were obtained from corneal scrapings, contact lens solutions and domestic tap water samples taken from the patient's homes diagnosed with AK. The isolation of Acanthamoeba containing 6/22 (27.3 %) A. griffini (T3), 14/22 (63.6 %) A. castellanii (T4) and 2/22 (9.1 %) A. jacobsi (T15) from the domestic tap water outlets of 22 of 44 (50 %) of patient's homes revealed that is a significant source of these organisms. A. griffini (T3) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes have not been determined from AK cases in Turkey previously. Thus, we conclude that Acanthamoeba keratitis is associated with exposition of patients who has ocular trauma or ocular surface disease to domestic tap water in endemic or potentially endemic countries.

  5. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, Parley V.; Lasier, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  6. Ecological risk assessment of urban creek sediments contaminated by untreated domestic wastewater: potential contribution of antimicrobials and a musk fragrance.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ikumi; Kimura, Kumiko; Kameda, Yutaka; Nakada, Norihide; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that some hydrophobic pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been found to accumulate in river sediments, little is known about the contribution of these compounds to the toxicity of the whole sediment. We sampled river sediments from two urban creeks with an unsewered drainage area to investigate the toxicity for a benthic organism, Chironomus yoshimatsui. The concentrations of selected hydrophobic PPCPs, triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC) and galaxolide (HHCB) were analysed using gas chromatographic mass spectroscopy or liquid chromatographic mass spectroscopy and were found to lie within the range 50 to 200 ng g(-1). The toxicity of the three individual contaminants for the chironomid was also determined. The toxicity of TCC was found to be the strongest, with an NOEC value of 2.5 microg g(-1). Combining the toxicity and measured environmental concentration, the ecological risk was assessed and the contribution of these contaminants to the whole sediment toxicity estimated, assuming additivity. The hazard quotient of all three compounds, determined without assessment factor, ranged between 0.01 and 0.1. The combined contribution of the three compounds to total sediment toxicity was as high as 8.2%, but other unknown factors may also make an important contribution.

  7. On site experiments of the slanted soil treatment systems for domestic gray water.

    PubMed

    Itayama, Tomoaki; Kiji, Masato; Suetsugu, Aya; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Takeshi; Iwami, Norio; Mizuochi, Motoyuki; Inamori, Yuhei

    2006-01-01

    In order to make a breakthrough for the acute problem of water shortage in the world, the key words "decentralization and re-use" are very important for new sustainable sanitation systems that will be developed. Therefore, we focused on a new treatments system called "a slanted soil treatment system" which combines a biotoilet system with a domestic grey water treatment system. Because this system is a low cost and compact system, the system can be easily introduced to homes in urban areas or in the suburbs of cities in many developing countries. In this study, we performed on site experiments carried out on Shikoku Island, Japan, for several years. We obtained the following results. The slanted soil treatment system could remove organic pollutants and total nitrogen and total phosphorus in grey water effectively. Furthermore, the system performance became high in the case of the high concentration of the influent water. The nitrification reaction and denitrification reaction were speculated to exist due to aerobic zones and anaerobic zones present in the slanted soil treatment system. The slanted soil treatment system could perform for approximately 3 years with zero maintenance. The plug flow model of 1st order reaction kinetics could describe the reaction in the slanted soil treatment system. However, it is necessary to improve the system to maintain the performance in all seasons.

  8. Measurements of 222Rn activity concentration in domestic water sources in Penang, northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, B G; Jaafar, M S; Azhar, A R; Akpa, T C

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of (222)Rn activity concentration were carried out in 39 samples collected from the domestic and drinking water sources used in the island and mainland of Penang, northern peninsular, Malaysia. The measured activity concentrations ranged from 7.49 to 26.25 Bq l(-1), 0.49 to 9.72 Bq l(-1) and 0.58 to 2.54 Bq l(-1) in the raw, treated and bottled water samples collected, respectively. This indicated relatively high radon concentrations compared with that from other parts of the world, which still falls below the WHO recommended treatment level of 100 Bq l(-1). From this data, the age-dependent associated committed effective doses due to the ingestion of (222)Rn as a consequence of direct consumption of drinking water were calculated. The committed effective doses from (222)Rn resulting from 1 y's consumption of these water were estimated to range from 0.003 to 0.048, 0.001 to 0.018 and 0.002 to 0.023 mSv y(-1), for age groups 0-1, 2-16 and >16 y, respectively. PMID:21642647

  9. Measurements of 222Rn activity concentration in domestic water sources in Penang, northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, B G; Jaafar, M S; Azhar, A R; Akpa, T C

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of (222)Rn activity concentration were carried out in 39 samples collected from the domestic and drinking water sources used in the island and mainland of Penang, northern peninsular, Malaysia. The measured activity concentrations ranged from 7.49 to 26.25 Bq l(-1), 0.49 to 9.72 Bq l(-1) and 0.58 to 2.54 Bq l(-1) in the raw, treated and bottled water samples collected, respectively. This indicated relatively high radon concentrations compared with that from other parts of the world, which still falls below the WHO recommended treatment level of 100 Bq l(-1). From this data, the age-dependent associated committed effective doses due to the ingestion of (222)Rn as a consequence of direct consumption of drinking water were calculated. The committed effective doses from (222)Rn resulting from 1 y's consumption of these water were estimated to range from 0.003 to 0.048, 0.001 to 0.018 and 0.002 to 0.023 mSv y(-1), for age groups 0-1, 2-16 and >16 y, respectively.

  10. Design, Simulation, and Analysis of Domestic Solar Water Heating Systems in Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Fresart, Edouard Thomas

    Research was conducted to quantify the energy and cost savings of two different domestic solar water heating systems compared to an all-electric water heater for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona. The knowledge gained from this research will enable utilities to better align incentives and consumers to make more informed decisions prior to purchasing a solar water heater. Daily energy and temperature data were collected in a controlled, closed environment lab. Three mathematical models were designed in TRNSYS 17, a transient system simulation tool. The data from the lab were used to validate the TRNSYS models, and the TRNSYS results were used to project annual cost and energy savings for the solar water heaters. The projected energy savings for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona are 80% when using the SunEarthRTM system with an insulated and glazed flat-plate collector, and 49% when using the FAFCO RTM system with unglazed, non-insulated flat-plate collectors. Utilizing all available federal, state, and utility incentives, a consumer could expect to recoup his or her investment after the fifth year if purchasing a SunEarth RTM system, and after the eighth year if purchasing a FAFCO RTM system. Over the 20-year analysis period, a consumer could expect to save 2,519 with the SunEarthRTM system, and 971 with the FAFCORTM system.

  11. Integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water biofilms grown on domestic plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Miriam M; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2010-06-01

    Drinking water biofilms were grown on coupons of plumbing materials, including ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer (EPDM) rubber, silane cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X b), electron-ray cross-linked PE (PE-X c) and copper under constant flow-through of cold tap water. After 14 days, the biofilms were spiked with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila and Enterobacter nimipressuralis (10(6) cells/mL each). The test bacteria were environmental isolates from contamination events in drinking water systems. After static incubation for 24 h, water flow was resumed and continued for 4 weeks. Total cell count and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) of biofilms were monitored, and P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila and E. nimipressuralis were quantified, using standard culture-based methods or culture-independent fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 14 days total cell counts and HPC values were highest on EPDM followed by the plastic materials and copper. P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila became incorporated into drinking water biofilms and were capable to persist in biofilms on EPDM and PE-X materials for several weeks, while copper biofilms were colonized only by L. pneumophila in low culturable numbers. E. nimipressuralis was not detected in any of the biofilms. Application of the FISH method often yielded orders of magnitude higher levels of P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila than culture methods. These observations indicate that drinking water biofilms grown under cold water conditions on domestic plumbing materials, especially EPDM and PE-X in the present study, can be a reservoir for P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila that persist in these habitats mostly in a viable but non-culturable state. PMID:20556878

  12. IMPACT OF STORM-WATER OUTFALLS ON SEDIMENT QUALITY IN CORPUS CHRISTI BAY, TEXAS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industr...

  13. AUTOMATED LONG-TERM REMOTE MONITORING OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACIAL FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advective flux across the sediment-water interface is temporally and spatially heterogeneous in nature. For contaminated sediment sites, monitoring spatial as well as temporal variation of advective flux is of importance to proper risk management. This project was conducted to ...

  14. A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Carollo, C.

    1974-01-01

    A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils is described. Samples can be obtained within a stratigraphic interval of 2-3 cm, to a depth of 60-80 cm, and with little or no contamination of the samples by sediment or air. ?? 1974.

  15. Towards the development of a combined Norovirus and sediment transport model for coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, K.; O'Kane, J. P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sewage effluent in coastal waters used for oyster culture poses a risk to human health. The primary pathogen in outbreaks of gastroenteritis following consumption of raw oysters is the Norovirus or "winter vomiting bug". The Norovirus is a highly infectious RNA virus of the Caliciviridae taxonomic family. It has a long survival time in coastal waters (T90 = 30 days in winter). Oysters selectively concentrate Norovirus in their digestive ducts. The virus cannot be removed by conventional depuration. The primary goal of the research is to quantify the risk of Norovirus infection in coastal waters through physically-based high-resolution numerical modelling. Cork Harbour and Clew Bay in Ireland provide case studies for the research. The models simulate a number of complex physical, chemical and biological processes which influence the transport and decay of the virus as well as its bioaccumulation in oyster tissue. The current phase of the research is concerned with the adsorption of the virus to suspended sediment in the water column. Adsorbed viruses may be taken out of the water column when sedimentation occurs and, subsequently, be added to it with resuspension of the bed sediment. Preliminary simulations of the Norovirus-sediment model indicate that suspended sediment can influence the transport of the virus in coastal waters when a high sediment-water partitioning coefficient is used and the model is run under calm environmental conditions. In this instance a certain fraction of the adsorbed viruses are taken out of the water column by sedimentation and end up locked in the bed sediment. Subsequently, under storm conditions, a large number of viruses in the bed are released into the water column by erosion of the bed and a risk of contamination occurs at a time different to when the viruses were initially released into the body of water.

  16. Levels of PAHs in the waters, sediments, and shrimps of Estero de Urias, an estuary in Mexico, and their toxicological effects.

    PubMed

    Jaward, Foday M; Alegria, Henry A; Galindo Reyes, Jose G; Hoare, Armando

    2012-01-01

    PAHs were measured in water, sediment, and shrimps of Estero de Urias, an estuary in Sinaloa, Mexico, during the rainy and dry seasons, and analyzed for eleven PAHs routinely detected in samples. Phenanthrene was the most dominant congener in the water, sediment, and shrimp samples comprising about 38, 24, and 25%, respectively, of the eleven PAHs detected, followed by pyrene and naphthalene in water and sediment samples, and pyrene and fluorine in the shrimp samples. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 9 to 347 ng/L in water, 27 to 418 ng/g in sediments, and 36 to 498 ng/g in shrimps. The sources of contamination are closely related to human activities such as domestic and industrial discharge, automobile exhausts, and street runoff. High concentrations were also measured during the rainy season and during the first quarter of the year. Toxicity tests were also carried out, exposing fish embryos and juvenile shrimps to some of these PAHs. Fish embryos exposed to PAHs showed exogastrulation, while juvenile shrimps showed significantly lower growth rates than controls. DNA and protein alterations were also observed. These toxicity tests indicate that PAH concentrations measured could be dangerous to some aquatic organisms, particularly during early stages of development. PMID:22997501

  17. Solar Heating And Cooling Of Buildings (SHACOB): Requirements definition and impact analysis-2. Volume 2: Domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretcher, C. K.

    1980-11-01

    The various types of solar domestic hot water systems are discussed including their advantages and disadvantages. The problems that occur in hydronic solar heating systems are reviewed with emphasis on domestic hot water applicatons. System problems in retrofitting of residential buildings are also discussed including structural and space constraints for various components and subsystems. System design parameters include various collector sizing methods, collector orientation, storage capacity and heat loss from pipes and tanks. The installation costs are broken down by components and subsystems. The approach used for utility economic impact analysis is reviewed. The simulation is described, and the results of the economic impact analysis are given. A summary assessment is included.

  18. Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dennehy, G

    1983-04-01

    An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

  19. Remote sensing of suspended sediment water research: principles, methods, and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ping; Zhang, Jing

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the principle, data, methods and steps in suspended sediment research by using remote sensing, summed up some representative models and methods, and analyzes the deficiencies of existing methods. Combined with the recent progress of remote sensing theory and application in water suspended sediment research, we introduced in some data processing methods such as atmospheric correction method, adjacent effect correction, and some intelligence algorithms such as neural networks, genetic algorithms, support vector machines into the suspended sediment inversion research, combined with other geographic information, based on Bayesian theory, we improved the suspended sediment inversion precision, and aim to give references to the related researchers.

  20. Carbon dioxide production in surface sediments of temporarily anoxic basins (Baltic Sea) and resulting sediment-water interface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Winde, V.; Lenz, C.; Dellwig, O.; Leipe, T.; Segl, M.; Struck, U.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter is mineralized in marine sediments by microbial activity using predominantly oxygen, sulfate, and metal oxides as electron acceptors. Modern euxinic basins as found in the Baltic Sea or the Black Sea are of particular importance because they may serve as type systems for anoxia in Earth's history. We present here results from biogeochemical investigations carried out in the Baltic deeps (Gotland Basin, Landsort Deep) during the first scientific cruise of RV M.S. MERIAN in 2006, additionally during RV Prof. Penck cruises in 2006 and 2007. Short sediment cores were obtained with a multi-corer and analyzed for particulate and dissolved main, minor and trace elements, pH, DIC, methane alkalinity, besides the stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Microsensors were applied to analyze steep gradients of oxygen, sulphide and sulphate. Pore water profiles are evaluated in terms of process rates and associated element fluxes using the PROFILE software (Berg et al., 1998, L&O). Gross and net anaerobic mineralization rates were additionally obtained from core incubations with 35S. Steep gradients in DIC are associated with a strong enrichment of the light stable isotope resulting in the Gotland basin from oxidized OM. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface are compared with literature data and show for the Baltic Sea a dependence from bottom water redox conditions, and sediment compositions and formation conditions (e.g., accumulation rates). DIC in the anoxic part of the water column in the Landsort Deep and the Gotland Deep show relatively similar isotope values, close to the bottom water value, but steep gradients towards heavier values above the pelagic redoxcline. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by Leibniz IO Warnemünde, DFG (Cruise RV MSM MERIAN 01), and MPG. Thanks to B. Schneider and F. Pollehne stimulating discussions, and S. Lage and A. Schipper for technical support.

  1. Distribution of bacteria in a domestic hot water system in a Danish apartment building.

    PubMed

    Bagh, Lene Karen; Albrechtsen, Hans Jørgen; Arvin, Erik; Ovesen, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial growth in hot water systems seems to cause problems such as bad odor of the water, skin allergies and increased heat transfer resistance in heating coils. In order to establish a basis for long-term suppression of bacterial growth, we studied the distribution of bacteria in a Danish domestic hot water system. Heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) were measured in both water and biofilm samples from various sampling sites in the system. In hot water samples, where the temperature was 55-60 degrees C, the HPC were 10(3)-10(4)CFU/mL at incubation temperatures of 25 degrees C or 37 degrees C and 10(5)CFU/mL at 55 degrees C or 65 degrees C. In the cold water (10 degrees C) supplying the hot water system, the HPC at 25 degrees C or 37 degrees C was lower than in the hot water, and no bacteria were found after incubation at 55 degrees C or 65 degrees C. HPC constituted from 38% to 84% of the AODC results in hot water but only 2% in cold water, which showed a high ratio of culturable bacteria in hot water. Biofilm samples from the hot water tank and the inner surface of the pipes in the cold and hot water distribution system were collected by specially designed sampling devices, which were exposed in the system for 42 days. The quasi-steady-state number of bacteria in the biofilm, measured as the geometric mean of the HPC obtained between 21 and 42 days, was five-fold higher in the hot water pipe (13x10(5)CFU/cm(2) at 55 degrees C) than in the cold water pipe (2.8x10(5)CFU/cm(2) at 25 degrees C). There was no significant difference between the number of bacteria in the biofilm samples from the top, middle and bottom of the hot water tank, and the number of bacteria in the biofilm counted at 55 degrees C ranged from 0.6x10(4) to 1.7x10(4)CFU/cm(2). The surfaces of the sacrificial aluminum anodes and the heating coils in the hot water tank also contained high bacterial numbers. The measured number of bacteria in water and biofilm samples was related to the dimensions of

  2. Nutrient exchange and release experiment and its simulation study in lake water-sediment interface.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian-Qing; Hao, Zhen-Chun

    2006-01-01

    The sediment distributed and insolated under lake was collected for experiments. The nutrient layer distribution conditions of sampled sediment and its physical and chemical characteristics were analyzed to simulate and assess the influence degree to lake water quality. Based on the dynamic water exchanging experiments the nutrient release process in sediment and influence mechanism to substance exchanging on water-sediment interface was studied, and the correlation between the changing content of total phosphors and total nitrogen in sediment and covered water were analyzed for setting up a simulation model. At the same time the influence degree is explained in detail. The experimental results indicated that even if clean water without nutrient contents was used for water exchangement so as to decrease pollution or prevent eutrophication, however owing to the vertical nutrient distribution in lake sediment, it will lead to the increasing release amount greatly especially when the organic nutrient contained in sediment turns into inorganic status because of isolation. Besides the release process of total phosphate (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were modeled and each nutrient's exchanging equation at interface caused by covered water nutrient concentration changing was set up. According to the simulating prediction, TP and TN content of cover water will also sustain a steady higher level in a long period. The nutrient release amount of sediment is not only affected by the covered water concentration but also connects with accumulative time. The experiments provide the fundamental theoretical and practical basis for taking ecological restoration project. And research is helpful to prevent or restore lake eutrophication. PMID:17294663

  3. The mechanisms of contaminants release due to incipient motion at sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, HongWei; Cheng, PengDa; Zhong, BaoChang; Wang, DaoZeng

    2014-08-01

    Sediments in many rivers and lakes are subjected to resuspension due to a combination of hydrodynamics. However, the roles of contaminant-contained dissolved and particulate sediments during the resuspension release are rarely studied. This study focuses on the release quantity of contaminants in both water phase and solid phase. Conservative tracer (NaCl) and reactive tracer (Phosphorus) were respectively added to cohesive fine-grained sediments and non-cohesive coarse-grained sediments. A range of typical shear stress was conducted to characterize the time-depended release of contaminants in a laboratory flume. When the sediment started to move, the concentration of contaminant in the overlying water increased with the bed shear stress, but the dissolved contaminants responded faster than the particulate ones. The observed contaminant release process can be divided into three main stages: the initial two hours fast mixing: the release contribution of pore water could reach up to 75%; the middle 4-6 h adsorption: the partitioning coefficient of contaminant between water phase and solid phase decreased over the time, and the adsorption of contaminates from resuspended sediment dominated the negative release; the last equilibrium stage: the desorption and adsorption reached equilibrium, and the reactive contaminant made an impact on the water quality in the solid phase. The existing formulas to evaluate the release flux are far from practice meaning as the sediment contaminants undergo a very complex release process.

  4. Sediment desiccation as a driver of phosphate availability in the water column of Mediterranean wetlands.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Juan Diego; Guerrero, Francisco; de Vicente, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Sediment desiccation is expected to drastically affect nutrient cycling in Mediterranean wetlands as global climate change models predict that many areas will become significantly drier than they currently are. In this study, we selected two Mediterranean wetlands that clearly differ in their water chemical composition (Honda and Hituelo wetlands) in order to determine the impact of sediment desiccation on phosphate (PO₄(3-)) adsorption and desorption properties. A decrease in PO₄(3-) sorption properties was observed in transects from the littoral zone to dry land in both lakes concomitantly with a reduction in organic matter content, revealing a critical role of organic matter for sequestering P in the lake sediment. Our experiments designed to determine if drying events would lead to an enhanced P release upon re-wetting have shown that, simulating natural conditions of re-flooding (that is without adding sodium azide), PO₄(3-) concentrations were notably higher in the overlying water than those initially measured in the lake water. These results highlight the impact of drying sediment and the subsequent re-wetting on increasing P concentrations in lake water and accordingly, affecting to lake trophic state. Finally, we aimed on determining the overall effect of biotic versus abiotic activity on P release patterns observed upon re-wetting. Our results have evidenced that while in Honda, biotic processes upon re-wetting are crucial for increasing P retention in the sediment; P exchange across sediment and water upon dry sediment re-wetting is basically mediated by abiotic processes in Hituelo.

  5. Pore water profiles and early diagenesis of Mn, Cu, and Pb in sediments from large lakes

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, J.D.; Wilson, T.P.; Long, D.T.; Owen, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Mn, Cu, and Pb were measured in pore waters at a site in the Caribou sub-basin Lake Superior. The pore water profiles show evidence for the post-depositional mobility of the metals, consistent with interpretations made from sediment concentration profiles. The pore water and sediment concentration profiles of Mn appear to be diagenetically linked. Diagenetic modeling results indicate that the measured profiles are not in a steady-state relationship. The cause of the non-steady-state conditions is unclear but may be related to recent changes in sedimentation rates and in Mn/sup 2 +/ oxidation rates. Flux estimates for Cu and Pb show that these metals could be diffusing from the sediment to overlying water. The decomposition or organic matter is suggested as a source for the metals. A significant amount of Cu and Pb brought to the sediment surface during sedimentation appears to be recycled to the pore waters. This suggests that concentration profiles of these metals in the sediment may not be reliable indicators of the timing and amounts of anthropogenic metal input to Lake Superior.

  6. Partition of nonpolar organic pollutants from water to soil and sediment organic matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    The partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride and 1,2-dichlorobenzene between normal soil/sediment organic matter and water have been determined for a large set of soils, bed sediments, and suspended solids from the United States and the People's Republic of China. The Koc values for both solutes are quite invariant either for the soils or for the bed sediments; the values on bed sediments are about twice those on soils. The similarity of Koc values between normal soils and between normal bed sediments suggests that natural organic matters in soils (or sediments) of different geographic origins exhibit comparable polarities and possibly comparable compositions. The results also suggest that the process that converts eroded soils into bed sediments brings about a change in the organic matter property. The difference between soil and sediment Koc values provides a basis for identifying the source of suspended solids in river waters. The very high Koc values observed for some special soils and sediments are diagnostic of severe anthropogenic contamination.

  7. Suspended-sediment characteristics for the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, water years 2007-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant Findings An analysis of suspended-sediment transport in the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, during water years 2007–10 indicated that: Streamflow characteristics for the 4 years of study were not extremely dry or wet, and represented near-average conditions. Computed average annual suspended-sediment loads were 1,890 and 4,640 tons at the Gresham and Milwaukie stations, respectively. More than 70 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during the high-flow months of November, December, and January. Less than 10 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during April–October. About 50 percent of all suspended-sediment load is transported during the highest 1 percent of streamflows. The January 2009 streamflow peak was the third highest in the 70-year record for Johnson Creek. About 50 percent of suspended-sediment transport in water year 2009 occurred in January. The drainage area upstream of the Gresham streamflow-gaging station constitutes about 30 percent of the drainage area at the Milwaukie station, but accounted for about 40 percent of the suspended sediment and 45 percent of the streamflow at the Milwaukie station. On an annual basis, most of the higher sediment yield at the Gresham station, relative to the Milwaukie station, can be explained by the higher streamflow yield at the Gresham station rather than by higher suspended-sediment concentration.

  8. Metal leaching in drinking water domestic distribution system: an Italian case study.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate metal contamination of tap water in seven public buildings in Brescia (Italy). Two monitoring periods were performed using three different sampling methods (overnight stagnation, 30-min stagnation, and random daytime). The results show that the water parameters exceeding the international standards (Directive 98/83/EC) at the tap were lead (max = 363 μg/L), nickel (max = 184 μg/L), zinc (max = 4900 μg/L), and iron (max = 393 μg/L). Compared to the total number of tap water samples analyzed (122), the values higher than limits of Directive 98/83/EC were 17% for lead, 11% for nickel, 14% for zinc, and 7% for iron. Three buildings exceeded iron standard while five buildings exceeded the standard for nickel, lead, and zinc. Moreover, there is no evident correlation between the leaching of contaminants in the domestic distribution system and the age of the pipes while a significant influence is shown by the sampling methods.

  9. Development of a standard operating procedure for the collection of pyrethroids in water and sediment matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through a Regional Applied Research Effort grant to the United States Geological Survey, Region 9 collaborated with ORD on this project to develop a standard operating procedure for collection of water and sediment samples for pyrethroid analysis.

  10. PRECISION OF DIALYSIS (PEEPER) SAMPLING OF CADMIUM IN MARINE SEDIMENT INTERSTITIAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolating and analyzing interstitial water (IW) during sediment toxicity tests enables researchers to relate concentrations of contaminants to responses of organisms, particularly when IW is a primary route of exposure to bioavailable contaminants by benthic dwelling organisms. W...

  11. The influence of lagoon on neighboring rivers by water and sediment quality.

    PubMed

    Lai, W L; Chen, J J; Chung, C Y; Lee, C G; Liao, S W

    2010-01-01

    Canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) was applied in order to distinguish the water-quality and the sediment-quality parameters from neighboring rivers, and to recognize similarities of water and sediment properties between a lagoon and neighboring rivers. Two set of constructed discriminant functions showed a marked contribution to most of the discriminant variables. In water, the significant parameters - the total nitrogen, algae, dissolved oxygen and total phosphate - were combined as the nutrient effect factor. The recognition capacities of the two discriminant functions were 95.6 and 4.4%, respectively; the Kaoping River showed the most similarities with the water quality in Dapeng Bay; in sediment, the significant parameters porosity, Cd, Cr, Al, and Pb were combined as the heavy metal effect factor. The recognition capacities were 82.6 and 17.4%, respectively, but the sediment properties in these three rivers had no significant similarity with the Dapeng Bay. PMID:20453320

  12. METAL SPECIATION IN SOIL, SEDIMENT, AND WATER SYSTEMS VIA SYNCHROTRON RADIATION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal contaminated environmental systems (soils, sediments, and water) have challenged researchers for many years. Traditional methods of analysis have employed extraction methods to determine total metal content and define risk based on the premise that as metal concentration in...

  13. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish, water and sediment from Shing Mun River

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, V.W.; Lam-Leung, S.Y.; Chan, T.C. )

    1991-12-01

    The level and pattern of contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were investigated in tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters), sediment, and water from the Shing Mun River. The range of total PCBs was 12.9 ng/g to 181.6 ng/g wet weight in tilapia, 12.7 ng/g to 46.0 ng/g freeze-dried weight in sediment, and 3.8 ng/L to 13.6 ng/L in water. The effect of biomagnification was also observed, PCB concentrations increased from water to sediment to tilapia. PCB congeners occurred in such a way that lower chlorinated PCBs comprised a higher fraction of the total PCBs in water, sediment, and tilapia muscle, whereas higher chlorinated PCBs were more commonly found only in tilapia.

  14. Metal concentrations in water and sediments from tourist beaches of Acapulco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jonathan, M P; Roy, P D; Thangadurai, N; Srinivasalu, S; Rodríguez-Espinosa, P F; Sarkar, S K; Lakshumanan, C; Navarrete-López, M; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P

    2011-04-01

    A survey on the metal concentrations (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V, Zn) in beach water and sediments is reported from the tourist destination of Acapulco city on the Pacific coast of Mexico. The concentration of dissolved trace metals (DTMs) in beach water and acid leachable trace metals (ALTMs) in sediments indicated that they are anthropogenic in nature due to the increased tourist activities in the crowded beach locations. The statistical analysis indicates Fe and Mn play a major role as metal scavengers in both the medium (water and sediment) and the higher value of other metals is site specific in the study area, indicating that they are transported from the local area. Comparison results suggest that the beach water quality has deteriorated more than the sediments and special care needs to be taken to restore the beach quality.

  15. VISUALIZING THE RELATIONSHIP OF PBTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT TO RESIDUES IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioaccumulation of persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) in aquatic organisms results from uptake of the chemicals through several different exposure routes associated with water, sediment, and biota. This paper presents an approach for depicting and interpreting bioaccumul...

  16. Effects of sediment transport and seepage direction on hydraulic properties at the sediment-water interface of hyporheic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Pitlick, J.

    2009-01-01

    Relations between seepage flux and hydraulic properties are difficult to quantify in fluvial settings because of the difficulty in measuring these variables in situ. Tests conducted in a 1.5-m diameter by 1.5-m tall sediment-filled tank indicate that hydraulic gradient increased and hydraulic conductivity (K) decreased following the onset of downward seepage but both parameters were little changed following the onset of upward seepage. Reductions in K during downward seepage were more pronounced when surface-water current was sufficient to mobilize sediment on the bed. Averaged ratios of K determined during upward seepage to K determined during downward seepage (Kup/Kdown) through a sand-and-gravel bed increased from 1.4 to 1.7 with increasing surface-water velocity, and decreased to slightly greater than 1 when the sediment bed became fully mobile. Kup/Kdown for tests conducted with a silt veneer on the bed surface was greater than 2 for all but the fastest surface-water velocities. Substantial reductions in K also were associated with a silt floc that formed on the bed surface during and following test runs. Although the silt floc was typically less than 0.5 mm in thickness, most of the hydraulic gradient was distributed across this thin layer. K of the thin silt floc was reduced by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the underlying sediment. Directional bias in K and relation between K and surface-water velocity require the presence or absence of a layer of lower-K sediment at or near the bed surface, without which no reduction in K and corresponding increase in hydraulic gradient can occur at the bed surface. The lack of prior observation of the consistent bias in K associated with seepage direction is somewhat surprising given the numerous studies where K has been measured in fluvial settings, but may be explained by the small value of the bias relative to the typical uncertainty associated with field determinations of K. If shown to exist in field

  17. Accumulation of radium in sediments from continued disposal of produced water and hydraulic fracturing flowback water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, N. R.; Menio, E. C.; Landis, J. D.; Vengosh, A.; Lauer, N.; Harkness, J.; Kondash, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent public interest in high volume slickwater hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) has drawn increased interest in wastewater management practices by the public, researchers, industry, and regulators. The management of wastes, including both fluids and solids, poses many engineering challenges, including elevated total dissolved solids and elevated activities of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). One management option for wastewater in particular, which is used in western Pennsylvania, USA, is treatment at centralized waste treatment facilities [1]. Previous studies conducted from 2010-2012 indicated that one centralized facility, the Josephine Brine Treatment facility, removed the majority of radium from produced water and hydraulic fracturing flowback fluid (HFFF) during treatment, but low activities of radium remained in treated effluent and were discharged to surface water [2]. Despite the treatment process and radium reduction, high activities (200 times higher than upstream/background) accumulated in stream sediments at the point of effluent discharge. Here we present new results from sampling conducted at two additional centralized waste treatment facilities (Franklin Brine Treatment and Hart Brine Treatment facilities) and Josephine Brine Treatment facility conducted in June 2014. Preliminary results indicate radium is released to surface water at very low (<50 pCi/L) to non-detectable activities, however; radium continues to accumulate in sediments surrounding the area of effluent release. Combined, the data indicate that 1) radium continues to be released to surface water streams in western Pennsylvania despite oil and gas operators voluntary ban on treatment and disposal of HFFF in centralized waste treatment facilities, 2) radium accumulation in sediments occurred at multiple brine treatment facilities and is not isolated to a single accidental release of contaminants or a single facility. [1] Wilson, J. M. and J. M. VanBriesen (2012). "Oil and

  18. The effects of water flow and sedimentation on interactions between massive Porites and algal turf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowan, Jennifer C.; Tootell, Jesse S.; Carpenter, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between scleractinian corals and benthic algae can be an important process structuring reef communities, yet interaction dynamics are not fixed and may be influenced by abiotic factors such as sedimentation, a process often underlying reef degradation. However, rates of sedimentation and the effects of trapped sediments may be influenced by water flow. The first goal of this study was to quantify gradients in sedimentation and flow along fringing and back reefs of the north shore of Moorea, French Polynesia, and determine whether such gradients correlate with changes in the frequency and outcomes of massive Porites-algal turf interactions. On the back reef, the frequency of Porites-algal turf interactions and the competitive success of algal turfs increased significantly with decreasing flow. Sedimentation, however, was not a significant driver of the observed patterns. Along fringing reefs, in the absence of a flow gradient, it was the gradient in sedimentation that best explained spatial variation in Porites-algal turf interaction frequencies and the competitive success of algal turfs. The second goal was to quantify the separate and combined effects of flow and sedimentation on Porites-algal turf interactions in a laboratory setting. The combined effects of low flow and sedimentation significantly increased the area of Porites tissue damaged when in contact with algal turf, while high flow attenuated the negative effects of sedimentation. Together, these results implicate flow and sedimentation as important drivers of biological interactions between massive Porites and algal turf.

  19. Dissolved sulfide distributions in the water column and sediment pore waters of the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; VanGeen, A.; McCorkle, D.C.; Bernhard, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide concentrations in the water column and in sediment pore waters were measured by square-wave voltammetry (nanomolar detection limit) during three cruises to the Santa Barbara Basin in February 1995, November-December 1995, and April 1997. In the water column, sulfide concentrations measured outside the basin averaged 3 ?? 1 nM (n = 28) in the 0 to 600 m depth range. Inside the basin, dissolved sulfides increased to reach values of up to 15 nM at depths >400 m. A suite of box cores and multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the basin showed considerable range in surficial (400 ??M at 10 cm. Decreases in water-column nitrate below the sill depth indicate nitrate consumption (-55 to -137 ??mole m-2 h-1) similar to nearby Santa Monica Basin. Peaks in pore-water iron concentrations were generally observed between 2 and 5 cm depth with shallowest peaks at the 590 m site. These observations, including observations of the benthic microfauna, suggest that the extent to which the sulfide flux, sustained by elevated pore-water concentrations, reaches the water column may be modulated by the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in addition to iron redox and precipitation reactions.

  20. Characterization of bottom-sediment, water, and elutriate chemistry at selected stations at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    To better-understand and predict the potential effect of dredging on water quality at Reelfoot Lake, chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water. Chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water collected at five stations in the lake during November 1988. Lake water was of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of 120 milligrams per liter. Trace constituents were present in bottom sediments at concentrations representative of their average relative abundance in the earth?s crust. Elutriate waters prepared by mixing bottom sediment and lake water had suspended-solids concentrations as high as 2,000 milligrams per liter which exerted significant oxygen demand Trace constituents in the unfiltered elutriate waters were elevated with respect to lake water; elevated concentrations were attributable to the increased suspended-solids concentrations. Concentrations of total-recoverable copper, lead., and zinc in many elutriate waters exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s water-quality criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The toxicity of elutriate waters, as measured by a 48-hour bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia, was low.

  1. Water column and bed-sediment core samples collected from Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fosness, Ryan L.; Naymik, Jesse; Hopkins, Candice B.; DeWild, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Idaho Power Company, collected water-column and bed-sediment core samples from eight sites in Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, during May 5–7, 2012. Water-column and bed-sediment core samples were collected at each of the eight sites and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury. Additional bed-sediment core samples, collected from three of the eight sites, were analyzed for pesticides and other organic compounds, trace metals, and physical characteristics, such as particle size. Total mercury and methylmercury were detected in each of the water column and bed-sediment core samples. Only 17 of the 417 unique pesticide and organic compounds were detected in bed-sediment core samples. Concentrations of most organic wastewater compounds detected in bed sediment were less than the reporting level. Trace metals detected were greater than the reporting level in all the bed-sediment core samples submitted for analysis. The particle size distribution of bed-sediment core samples was predominantly clay mixed with silt.

  2. Contamination of nonylphenolic compounds in creek water, wastewater treatment plant effluents, and sediments from Lake Shihwa and vicinity, Korea: Comparison with fecal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Minkyu; Furlong, Edward T.; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yu, Jun; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2011-01-01

    Nonylphenolic compounds (NPs), coprostanol (COP), and cholestanol, major contaminants in industrial and domestic wastewaters, were analyzed in creek water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and sediment samples from artificial Lake Shihwa and its vicinity, one of the most industrialized regions in Korea. We also determined mass discharge of NPs and COP, a fecal sterol, into the lake, to understand the linkage between discharge and sediment contamination. Total NP (the sum of nonylphenol, and nonylphenol mono- and di-ethoxylates) were 0.32–875 μg L-1 in creeks, 0.61–87.0 μg L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 29.3–230 μg g-1 TOC in sediments. Concentrations of COP were 0.09–19.0 μg L-1 in creeks, 0.11–44.0 μg L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 2.51–438 μg g-1 TOC in sediments. The spatial distributions of NPs in creeks and sediments from the inshore region were different from those of COP, suggesting that Lake Shihwa contamination patterns from industrial effluents differ from those from domestic effluents. The mass discharge from the combined outfall of the WWTPs, located in the offshore region, was 2.27 kg d-1 for NPs and 1.00 kg d-1 for COP, accounting for 91% and 95% of the total discharge into Lake Shihwa, respectively. The highest concentrations of NPs and COP in sediments were found in samples at sites near the submarine outfall of the WWTPs, indicating that the submarine outfall is an important point source of wastewater pollution in Lake Shihwa.

  3. The Determination of Metals in Sediment Pore Waters and in 1N HCl-Extracted Sediments by ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, Ray H.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Schmitt, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of metals in sediment interstitial water (pore water) and those extractable from sediment with weak acids can provide important information about the bioavailability and toxicological effects of such contaminants. The highly variable nature of metal concentrations in these matrices requires instrumentation with the detection limit capability of graphite furnace atomic absorption and the wide dynamic linear range capability of ICP-OES. These criteria are satisfied with ICP-MS instrumentation. We investigated the performance of ICP-MS in the determination of certain metals from these matrices. The results for three metals were compared to those determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was concluded that ICP-MS was an excellent instrumental approach for the determination of metals in these matrices.

  4. Determination of pentachlorophenol in water and aquifer sediments by high-performance liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for the determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in water and aquifer sediments are presented. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromotography employing ion suppression and gradient elution is used. PCP can be determined directly in water at a lower limit of detection Of 0.2 micrograms per liter. For extracts of sediment, PCP can be determined to a lower limit of 1.0 micrograms per kilogram.

  5. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in Surface Waters: Interplay of Hydrodynamic Processes, Sediments, and Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the movement of pathogens in the environment is necessary to ensure the safety and protection of municipal water supply systems. Cryptosporidium parvum is a human pathogen of particular concern as it is common in surface waters of the United States, it can survive for long periods of time in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. The transport of oocysts through watersheds can be mediated by interactions with the stream channel and suspended particles in the water column. For example, the association of C. parvum oocysts with suspended particles can alter the effective physical properties of the oocysts and increase their settling velocity. The hydrodynamic coupling of the overlying water with the pore water of the sediment bed can carry oocysts from the surface water into the sediment bed. Surface-attached communities of microorganisms, called biofilms, are ubiquitous in surface water systems and can capture C. parvum oocysts. Laboratory experiments were conducted at multiple scales (flowcell, batch, and flume) to determine the association of oocysts with sediments and biofilm communities and to assess the impact of this association on C. parvum transport. The effects of flow conditions, water chemistry, sediment composition, biofilm composition, and biofilm structure on these associations were all evaluated. The experimental results demonstrate that oocyst-sediment-biofilm interactions have significant implications for the propagation of C. parvum oocysts through watersheds and should generally be considered when predicting the fate of pathogens in the environment.

  6. Reservoir sediments: a sink or source of chemicals at the surface water-groundwater interface.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Rawaa; Kazpard, Véronique; Wazne, Mahmoud; El Samrani, Antoine G; Amacha, Nabil; Saad, Zeinab; Chou, Lei

    2015-09-01

    This study delineates the physical, chemical, and biological effects resulting from anthropogenic and endogenic activities in a sensitive dammed reservoir situated in a semi-arid region. The reservoir is characterized by two major flow regimes: a wet fill hydrologic regime and a dry spill one. A seasonal sampling campaign was carried out over a period of 2 years (2011-2013) where water samples were collected across the water column and from piezometers just outside the perimeter of the reservoir. Similarly, sediments were collected from the corresponding areas beneath the water column. The water samples were analyzed for environmental isotopic ratios, elemental composition, and physical, biological and chemical parameters, whereas the sediment and algal samples were subjected to physical, mineralogical, spectroscopic, and microscopic analyses. This investigation indicated that the dam had resulted in the alteration of the biogeochemical cycle of nutrients as well as the degradation of the sediment and water quality. The hydrological and biogeochemical processes were found to induce vertical downward transport of chemicals towards the fine grained calcareous sediments during the fill mode, whereas the sediments acted as a source of a chemical flux upward through the water column and downward towards the groundwater during the spill mode. The geomorphological characteristics of the reservoir enhanced the strong hydrological connectivity between the surface water and the groundwater where the reservoir responded quickly to natural and anthropogenic changes in the upper watershed. The water and sediments in the sensitive spill mode were of poor quality and should receive more attention due to the potential hazard for the associated hydro-project and the sustainability of the agricultural soil in the long term. Thus, a safe water and sediment management plan should be implemented in order to improve the dam functionality and to safeguard the precious water resources.

  7. Radium isotopes as a tracer of sediment-water column exchange in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, W. J.; Thomas, H.; Pätsch, J.; Omar, A. M.; Schrum, C.; Daewel, U.; Brenner, H.; Baar, H. J. W.

    2014-08-01

    Sediment-water column exchange plays an important role in coastal biogeochemistry. We utilize short-lived radium isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra) to understand and quantify the dominant processes governing sediment-water column exchange throughout the North Sea. Our comprehensive survey, conducted in September 2011, represents the first of its kind conducted in the North Sea. We find that two main sources regulate surface Ra distributions: minor coastal input from rivers and shallow mudflats and North Sea sediments as the dominant source. Pore waters show 100-fold larger activities than the water column. North Sea sediment characteristics such as porosity and mean grain size, as well as turbulence at the sediment-water interface, are the dominant factors contributing to variability of Ra efflux. Ra inventory and mass balance approaches consistently yield high benthic Ra effluxes in the southern North Sea, driven by strong tidal and wind mixing, which in turn cause high sediment irrigation rates. These results exceed incubation-based Ra flux estimates and the majority of previously reported Ra flux estimates for other regions. Ra-based estimates of benthic alkalinity fluxes compare well to observed values, and the high rates of Ra efflux imply a potentially significant exchange of other products of sedimentary reactions, including carbon and nutrient species. Passive tracer simulations lend strong support to the Ra source attribution and imply seasonal variation in the surface water Ra distribution depending on stratification conditions.

  8. Compaction and movement of interstitial water in bottom sediments of the Saguenay Fjord, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, A.; Gagnon, M. J.; Côté, R.; Rami, A.

    1986-02-01

    Eight sediment cores were collected along the length of the Saguenay Fjord and Baie des Ha! Ha!, Québec, Canada. Profiles of the sediment water contents were determined for each core. Porosities were fitted to an exponential relation with core depth. The relation was modified to account for variations in granulometry and in organic carbon contents of the sediments. Porosities were observed to be more sensitive to variations in organic content than to variations in granulometry, and grain sorting appeared more important than grain size. Grain-size distribution of the sediments is in agreement with a sedimentation model where most of the suspended load enters the fjord from the Saguenay River and is deposited downstream with the surface current. The coarse particles are mainly found close to the head of the fjord, whereas the fine particles are carried farther downstream. Surface porosities were observed to be proportional to the sedimentation fluxes obtained from the literature whereas the compaction showed an inverse relationship. The fractional decreases in porosity due to compaction along the fjord indicate some horizontal flow of the interstitial water at both ends of the sampled part of the fjord. An average vertical interstitial pore water flow of 0.4 cm yr -1 with respect to the surface horizon is estimated from the data. This is small compared with the diffusion of the major constituents of sea water through the sediment.

  9. Rainfall-induced runoff from exposed streambed sediments: an important source of water pollution.

    PubMed

    Frey, S K; Gottschall, N; Wilkes, G; Grégoire, D S; Topp, E; Pintar, K D M; Sunohara, M; Marti, R; Lapen, D R

    2015-01-01

    When surface water levels decline, exposed streambed sediments can be mobilized and washed into the water course when subjected to erosive rainfall. In this study, rainfall simulations were conducted over exposed sediments along stream banks at four distinct locations in an agriculturally dominated river basin with the objective of quantifying the potential for contaminant loading from these often overlooked runoff source areas. At each location, simulations were performed at three different sites. Nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment, fecal indicator bacteria, pathogenic bacteria, and microbial source tracking (MST) markers were examined in both prerainfall sediments and rainfall-induced runoff water. Runoff generation and sediment mobilization occurred quickly (10-150 s) after rainfall initiation. Temporal trends in runoff concentrations were highly variable within and between locations. Total runoff event loads were considered large for many pollutants considered. For instance, the maximum observed total phosphorus runoff load was on the order of 1.5 kg ha. Results also demonstrate that runoff from exposed sediments can be a source of pathogenic bacteria. spp. and spp. were present in runoff from one and three locations, respectively. Ruminant MST markers were also present in runoff from two locations, one of which hosted pasturing cattle with stream access. Overall, this study demonstrated that rainfall-induced runoff from exposed streambed sediments can be an important source of surface water pollution.

  10. Sediment-water distribution of contaminants of emerging concern in a mixed use watershed.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, David J; Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth F; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the occurrence and distribution of 15 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in stream water and sediments in the Zumbro River watershed in Minnesota and compared these with sub-watershed land uses. Sixty pairs of sediment and water samples were collected across all seasons from four stream sites for over two years and analyzed for selected personal care products, pesticides, human and veterinary medications, and phytoestrogens. Spatial and temporal analyses indicate that pharmaceuticals and personal care products (urban/residential CECs) are significantly elevated in water and/or sediment at sites with greater population density (>100 people/km(2)) and percentage of developed land use (>8% of subwatershed area) than those with less population density and land area under development. Significant spatial variations of agricultural pesticides in water and sediment were detectable, even though all sites had a high percentage of agricultural land use. Seasonality in CEC concentration was observed in water but not in sediment, although sediment concentrations of three CECs did vary between years. Average measured non-equilibrium distribution coefficients exceeded equilibrium hydrophobic partitioning-based predictions for 5 of the 7 detected CECs by at least an order of magnitude. Agreement of measured and predicted distribution coefficients improved with increasing hydrophobicity and in-stream persistence. The more polar and degradable CECs showed greater variability in measured distributions across different sampling events. Our results confirm that CECs are present in urban and agricultural stream sediments, including those CECs that would typically be thought of as non-sorptive based on their log Kow values. These results and the observed patterns of sediment and water distributions augment existing information to improve prediction of CEC fate and transport, leading to more accurate assessments of exposure and risk to surface water ecosystems

  11. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study. PMID:24718610

  12. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study.

  13. Estimating Water Fluxes Across the Sediment-Water Interface in the Lower Merced River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zamora, Celia

    2008-01-01

    The lower Merced River Basin was chosen by the U.S. Geological Survey?s (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) to be included in a national study on how hydrological processes and agricultural practices interact to affect the transport and fate of agricultural chemicals. As part of this effort, surface-water?ground-water (sw?gw) interactions were studied in an instrumented 100-m reach on the lower Merced River. This study focused on estimating vertical rates of exchange across the sediment?water interface by direct measurement using seepage meters and by using temperature as a tracer coupled with numerical modeling. Temperature loggers and pressure transducers were placed in monitoring wells within the streambed and in the river to continuously monitor temperature and hydraulic head every 15 minutes from March 2004 to October 2005. One-dimensional modeling of heat and water flow was used to interpret the temperature and head observations and deduce the sw?gw fluxes using the USGS numerical model, VS2DH, which simulates variably saturated water flow and solves the energy transport equation. Results of the modeling effort indicate that the Merced River at the study reach is generally a slightly gaining stream with small head differences (cm) between the surface water and ground water, with flow reversals occurring during high streamflow events. The average vertical flux across the sediment?water interface was 0.4?2.2 cm/day, and the range of hydraulic conductivities was 1?10 m/day. Seepage meters generally failed to provide accurate data in this high-energy system because of slow seepage rates and a moving streambed resulting in scour or burial of the seepage meters. Estimates of streambed hydraulic conductivity were also made using grain-size analysis and slug tests. Estimated hydraulic conductivity for the upstream transect determined using slug tests ranged from 40 to 250 m/day, whereas the downstream transect ranged from 10 to 100 m/day. The

  14. Geochemical dynamics of the Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea): II. Composition of metalliferous sediment pore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Monnin, Christophe; Boulègue, Jacques

    2000-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep is an axial depression of the Red Sea filled with highly saline brines and covered by layered metalliferous sediment. We report new data on the vertical distribution of major salts and trace metals dissolved in the pore waters of the metalliferous sediments. We have studied the chemical composition of interstitial waters of two sediment cores of the western (core 684) and southwestern (core 683) basins. The major dissolved elements are Na and Cl. Their concentrations are close to those of the brine overlying the sediment. The pore waters are undersaturated with respect to halite at the in situ conditions (62°C, 220 bars), but are saturated at the shipboard conditions (10°C, 1 bar). The salt and water contents of the bulk sediment show that core 683 contained halite in the solid fraction. A part of it precipitated after core collection, but most of it was present in situ. Thermodynamic calculations with a water-rock interaction model based on Pitzer's ion interaction approach reveal that equilibrium between the pore waters and anhydrite is achieved in sediment layers for which observations report the presence of this mineral. We used a transport model, which shows that molecular diffusion can smooth the profile of dissolved salt and partly erase the pore water record of past variations of salinity in the lower brine. For example, we calculated that the pore water record of modern variation of brine salinity is rapidly smoothed by molecular diffusion. The dissolved transition metals show large variations with depth in the interstitial waters. The profiles of core 683 reflect the possible advection of hydrothermal fluid within the sediment of the southwestern basin. The distribution of dissolved metals in core 684 is the result of diagenetic reactions, mainly the reduction of Mn-oxide with dissolved Fe(II), the recrystallization of primary oxide minerals, and the precipitation of authigenic Mn-carbonates.

  15. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  16. Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota

    SciTech Connect

    Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

    2012-06-07

    Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960’s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms “speciation” and “fractionation” in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to

  17. Responses of wetland plants to effluents in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Nguyen, M.T.; Esry, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of two wetland vascular plants, Echinochloa crusgalli and Sesbania macrocarpa, exposed to effluents from a coke plant, a pulp mill, a wastewater treatment plant, and the herbicide, hexazinone, were measured in three types of tests: seed germination and early growth, seedling survival and growth in hydroponic culture, and seedling survival and growth in sand and synthetic sediments with clay, silt, and sand, 3, 5, 7.5, or 10% organic contents. There was no effect of effluents or herbicide on germination and survival was affected only by the herbicide. When compared to controls, growth rates were reduced significantly in all tests except for E. crusgalli exposed to effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. There, the effluent stimulated growth in sediments. Increasing concentrations of organic matter in sediments had little effect on toxicity of effluents, but did cause reduced effects of hexazinone.

  18. Assessing domestic water use habits for more effective water awareness campaigns during drought periods: a case study in Alicante, eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, H.; Hernández, M.; Saurí, D.

    2015-05-01

    The design of water awareness campaigns could benefit from knowledge of the specific characteristics of domestic water use and the factors that may influence certain water consumption habits. This paper investigates water use in 450 households in 10 municipalities of drought-prone Alicante (Spain). We aim to increase knowledge about existing domestic water behaviors and therefore help to improve the design and implementation of future water awareness campaigns and even to consolidate reductions in water use after drought periods. The survey suggests that awareness campaigns should revise their scope and their channels of diffusion on a regular basis. In a more specific way, for the Alicante case we propose policy-oriented recommendations on the scope of action for further reductions.

  19. Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, T.N.

    1996-09-01

    Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dayan, M.

    1997-12-31

    Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

  1. Chemical characterization of blue stains in domestic fixtures in contact with drinking water.

    PubMed

    Letelier, María V; Lagos, Gustavo E; Reyes, Arturo

    2008-04-01

    Bluish green staining in domestic fixtures was observed in three to 9-year-old houses in the city of Talca, located 256 km. south of Santiago, the capital of Chile. The houses contained copper pipes which were exposed to soft well water, with low pH and low buffer capacity. The aim of this paper is to establish the chemical composition of the stains and to determine the conditions by which they were formed. X-ray diffraction analysis of the stains revealed the presence of malachite, a copper compound that caused green coloring in kettles and water boilers. Dioptase, which is deep green in coloring, was identified in a bathtub tile. In one house, where blue stains were found in a toilet bowl, the presence of chrysocolla was suggested by means of X-ray fluorescence. In the field conditions studied it was concluded that the bluish green stains in bathroom home appliances were generated by the precipitation of copper compounds in places were leakages occur.

  2. Chemical characterization of blue stains in domestic fixtures in contact with drinking water.

    PubMed

    Letelier, María V; Lagos, Gustavo E; Reyes, Arturo

    2008-04-01

    Bluish green staining in domestic fixtures was observed in three to 9-year-old houses in the city of Talca, located 256 km. south of Santiago, the capital of Chile. The houses contained copper pipes which were exposed to soft well water, with low pH and low buffer capacity. The aim of this paper is to establish the chemical composition of the stains and to determine the conditions by which they were formed. X-ray diffraction analysis of the stains revealed the presence of malachite, a copper compound that caused green coloring in kettles and water boilers. Dioptase, which is deep green in coloring, was identified in a bathtub tile. In one house, where blue stains were found in a toilet bowl, the presence of chrysocolla was suggested by means of X-ray fluorescence. In the field conditions studied it was concluded that the bluish green stains in bathroom home appliances were generated by the precipitation of copper compounds in places were leakages occur. PMID:17574543

  3. Mekong schistosomiasis. III: a parasitological survey of domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) on Khong Island, Laos.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C R; Kitikoon, V; Sornmani, S; Thirachantra, S

    1975-06-01

    Of 103 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) examined on Khong Island by means of the M.I.F.C. and hatching techniques, none were passing eggs resimbling those of the Mekong schistosome. One buffalo calf was infected with Orientobilharzia harinasutai and another with Schistosoma spindale; this is the first time these parasites have been reported from Laos. Since the buffalo that were examined had constant and year-round access to a part of the Mekong River that has been shown to be a site of heavy transmission of schistosomiasis to humans and dogs, it was considered that the buffalo would have acquired the infection with the human Mekong schistosome if this were possible. In the absence of buffalo necropsies, and since no eggs of the Mekong schistosome were detected in the stools of these animals, we assumed that they had either not become infected with this parasite or, if they had, that the infections did not produce eggs in the faeces which were detectable by the methods employed. On the basis of our examinations, it would not seem that domestic water buffalo are involved as reservoirs in the epidemiology of human schistosomiasis on Khong Island.

  4. Microbial transformations of arsenic: Mobilization from glauconitic sediments to water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mumford, Adam C.; Barringer, Julia L.; Benzel, William M.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Young, L.Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey, arsenic (As) is released from glauconitic sediment to carbon- and nutrient-rich shallow groundwater. This As-rich groundwater discharges to a major area stream. We hypothesize that microbes play an active role in the mobilization of As from glauconitic subsurface sediments into groundwater in the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey. We have examined the potential impact of microbial activity on the mobilization of arsenic from subsurface sediments into the groundwater at a site on Crosswicks Creek in southern New Jersey. The As contents of sediments 33–90 cm below the streambed were found to range from 15 to 26.4 mg/kg, with siderite forming at depth. Groundwater beneath the streambed contains As at concentrations up to 89 μg/L. Microcosms developed from site sediments released 23 μg/L of As, and active microbial reduction of As(V) was observed in microcosms developed from site groundwater. DNA extracted from site sediments was amplified with primers for the 16S rRNA gene and the arsenate respiratory reductase gene, arrA, and indicated the presence of a diverse anaerobic microbial community, as well as the presence of potential arsenic-reducing bacteria. In addition, high iron (Fe) concentrations in groundwater and the presence of iron-reducing microbial genera suggests that Fe reduction in minerals may provide an additional mechanism for release of associated As, while arsenic-reducing microorganisms may serve to enhance the mobility of As in groundwater at this site.

  5. Chloride/bromide and chloride/fluoride ratios of domestic sewage effluents and associated contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A.; Pankratov, I.

    1998-09-01

    To establish geochemical tools for tracing the origin of ground water contamination, the authors examined the variations of Cl/Br and Cl/F (weight) ratios in (1) domestic waste water from the Dan Region Sewage Reclamation Project and from reservoirs in the central coast of Israel; (2) associated contaminated ground water; and (3) pristine ground water from the Mediterranean coastal aquifer of Israel. The data show that supply water, anthropogenic NaCl and fluoridation control the Cl/Br and Cl/F ratios of domestic waste water, and conventional sewage treatment does not affect the anthropogenic inorganic signals. The Cl/Br ratios of ground water contaminated with sewage effluent reflect conservative mixing proportions of sewage and regional ground water components. Sensitivity tests demonstrate that it is possible to detect and distinguish sewage contamination from marine ratios after a sewage contribution of 5 to 15% is mixed with regional ground water. Mixing with Br-enriched fresh water however, would reduce this sensitivity. Since the high Cl/Br signal of sewage effluents is distinguishable from other anthropogenic sources with low Cl/Br ratios and from natural contamination sources, Cl/Br ratios can therefore be a useful inorganic tracer for identification of the origin of contaminated ground water. The Cl/F ratios of sewage-contaminated ground water were higher than those in the original sewage effluent, which suggests retention of fluoride into the aquifer solid phase.

  6. The influence of water salinity and oxygen concentration on the water- and sediment toxicity of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vonck, A.P.M.A.; Rijkswaterstaat, M.E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments play an important role as sink where contaminants can be stored but sediments can also play an important role as a source of contaminants to the overlying water and to biota. This desorption rate of compounds from sediments to the water phase depends on several (abiotic) parameters. This study describes the effects of salinity and oxygen concentration in the overlying water on this desorption process, with special emphasis to the desorption of heavy metals. Studies showed that toxicity of cadmium is related to the overlying water salinity. An increase of LC{sub 50} for total cadmium was found with increasing water salinity in water only tests. However, when taking into account the ionactivity coefficient and speciation of cadmium, a decrease of LC50 was found in the range of 25% (8 promille) to full strength seawater (32 promille). Also sediment toxicity tests will be carried out to evaluate these differences in toxicity. Further results, as the bioaccumulation of cadmium in relation to water salinity and the effects of oxygen concentration on the desorption rate of heavy metals and also the toxicity of these metals in sediment toxicity tests will be presented.

  7. Method for the determination of organophosphate insecticides in water, sediment and biota.

    PubMed

    Tse, Hung; Comba, Michael; Alaee, Mehran

    2004-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 13 organophosphate insecticides (OPs) in water, sediment and biota at low ppb levels is described. Samples were extracted with dichloromethane or acetone/hexane and cleaned up with micro-column silica gel chromatography. Measurements were made by dual capillary column gas chromatography using both nitrogen-phosphorus (NPD) and electron capture (ECD) detection. Recoveries from fortified water samples ranged from 76% to 102% for all sample types. Practical detection limits ranged between 0.003 and 0.029 microg/l in natural water samples, 0.0004-0.005 microg/g w.w. for sediments, and 0.001-0.005 microg/g w.w for biota using the NPD and ECD method. Losses in sediments were experienced when sulphur was removed. Precision and accuracy were not affected in sediment samples where sulphur was not removed.

  8. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ruhl, Catherine A.

    2001-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 1999 (October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at one site in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 1998 through September 1999. Calibration plots and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  9. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Ganju, Neil K.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected in San Francisco Bay during water year 2000 (October 1, 1999?September 30, 2000). Optical backscatterance sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended sediment at one site in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and were analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the electrical output of the optical backscatterance sensors. This report presents the data-collection methods and summarizes the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 1999 through September 2000. Calibration plots and plots of edited data for each sensor also are presented.

  10. Survival of daphnia magna and hyalella azteca in cadmium-spiked water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Onjukka, S.T.; Cairns, M.A.; Krawczyk, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Freshwater sediments and water were spiked with cadmium (Cd) in the laboratory, and toxicity tests were conducted with the cladoceran Daphnia magna and the amphipod Hyalella azteca to determine if Cd in the sediment would cause increased toxicity. The 48-h LC50 values for Daphnia in tests without sediment were 36, 33, 24, and 40 micrograms/L total Cd. Calculated free-ion (Cd/sup 2 +/)LC50 values for the same tests were 28, 25, 18 and 31 micrograms/L. LC50 values (48-h) determined for total Cd(uncentrifuged water sample) in the sediment-containing beakers were 252, 69, and 122 micrograms/L for Daphnia. LC50 values for dissolved Cd(centrifuged 10,000 rpm) in the sediment-containing beakers were 61, 27, and 100 micrograms/L for Daphnia. Higher total Cd LC50 values indicate that Cd adsorbed to soluble organic material was not biologically available. No significant mortality of Daphnia or Hyalella occurred in the flow-through tests in which sediment contained the same levels of Cd as in the static tests. Mortality was similar in beakers with and without Cd-spiked sediment, indicating that Cd in the sediment and adsorbed to organic materials was not available to cause increased mortality.

  11. Diffusive Release of Uranium from Contaminated Sediments into Capillary Fringe Pore Water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-09-13

    We investigated the dynamics of U release between pore water fractions, during river stage changes from two contaminated capillary fringe sediments. Samples were from 7.0 m and 7.6 m below ground surface (bgs) in the Hanford 300 area. Sediments were packed into columns and saturated with Hanford groundwater for three to 84 days. After specified times, > 48 µm radius (calculated) sediment pores were drained, followed by draining pores to 15 µm radius. U release in the first two weeks was similar between sediments and pore sizes with a range of 4.4 to 5.6 µM U in the 14 day sample. The 7.0 m bgs sediment U declined in the larger pores to 0.22 µM at day 84, whereas the small pores released U to 6.7 µM at day 84. The 7.6 m bgs sediment released 1.4 µM on day 84, in the large pores, but continuously released U from the smaller pores (13.2 uM on day 84). The continuous release of U has resulted in a diffusion gradient from the smaller to larger pores. The observed differences in U pore-water concentrations between the two sediment samples were attributed to co-precipitation of U with carbonates. A mineral phase in the sediments was also identified as an U-carbonate species, similar to rutherfordine [UO2(CO3)].

  12. Arsenic redistribution between sediments and water near a highly contaminated source.

    PubMed

    Keimowitz, Alison R; Zheng, Yan; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian; Jung, Hun Bok; Stute, Martin; Simpson, H James

    2005-11-15

    Mechanisms controlling arsenic partitioning between sediment, groundwater, porewaters, and surface waters were investigated at the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site in southern New Jersey. Extensive inorganic and organic arsenic contamination at this site (historical total arsenic > 10 000 microg L(-1) or > 130 microM in groundwater) has spread downstream to the Blackwater Branch, Maurice River, and Union Lake. Stream discharge was measured in the Blackwater Branch, and water samples and sediment cores were obtained from both the stream and the lake. Porewaters and sediments were analyzed for arsenic speciation as well as total arsenic, iron, manganese, and sulfur, and they indicate that geochemical processes controlling mobility of arsenic were different in these two locations. Arsenic partitioning in the Blackwater Branch was consistent with arsenic primarily being controlled by sulfur, whereas in Union Lake, the data were consistent with arsenic being controlled largely by iron. Stream discharge and arsenic concentrations indicate that despite large-scale groundwater extraction and treatment, > 99% of arsenic transport away from the site results from continued discharge of high arsenic groundwater to the stream, rather than remobilization of arsenic in stream sediments. Changing redox conditions would be expected to change arsenic retention on sediments. In sulfur-controlled stream sediments, more oxic conditions could oxidize arsenic-bearing sulfide minerals, thereby releasing arsenic to porewaters and streamwaters; in iron-controlled lake sediments, more reducing conditions could release arsenic from sediments via reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron oxides.

  13. Using multiple combined analytical techniques to characterize water extractable organic nitrogen from Lake Erhai sediment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang; Shengrui, Wang; Haichao, Zhao; Yanping, Li; Shouliang, Huo; Weibin, Qian; Yanli, Yang; Jie, Cheng

    2016-01-15

    In this study, UV-vis absorbance, fluorescence, and FT-IR spectroscopy were combined to characterize the components and structure of the water extractable organic nitrogen (WEON) in Lake Erhai sediment. Lake Erhai sediment WEON comprised predominantly high molecular weight WEON, with the fraction with a molecular weight>1kDa accounting for 87.7% of the total. It was mainly composed of humic acid-like substances, with fewer simple aromatic proteins. Large amounts of aliphatic and amide compounds were detected by IR in the sediments. There were more polymerizable aromatic rings and carbonyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and ester compounds in the high molecular weight WEON than in the low molecular weight WEON. Additionally, fluorescence regional integration results implied that the ratio PIII+V,n/PI+II+IV,n can be indirectly taken as an indicator for WEON content in Erhai sediments. Furthermore, the composition and structural characteristics of the WEON were found to be closely related with their properties in the sediment. The large amount of aliphatic compounds in the sediment as well as the relatively high humification and aromatic degree in high molecular weight WEON, stabilizes the WEON in Lake Erhai sediment. Compared with other lake sediments of different trophic statues (such as Lake Dianchi, Lake Poyang, Lake Taihu and Lake Donghu), Erhai sediment exhibited a higher degree of humification, which benefited for reducing sediment WEON releasing risk. And it can be regarded as the reason why the nutrient content in Erhai sediment is very high, but its water quality is still good.

  14. A generic method for projecting and valuing domestic water uses, application to the Mediterranean basin at the 2050 horizon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverre, Noémie; Dumas, Patrice

    2014-05-01

    The aim is to be able to assess future domestic water demands in a region with heterogeneous levels of economic development. This work offers an original combination of a quantitative projection of demands (similar to WaterGAP methodology) and an estimation of the marginal benefit of water. This method is applicable to different levels of economic development and usable for large-scale hydroeconomic modelling. The global method consists in building demand functions taking into account the impact of both the price of water and the level of equipment, proxied by economic development, on domestic water demand. Our basis is a 3-blocks inverse demand function: the first block consists of essential water requirements for food and hygiene; the second block matches intermediate needs; and the last block corresponds to additional water consumption, such as outdoor uses, which are the least valued. The volume of the first block is fixed to match recommended basic water requirements from the literature, but we assume that the volume limits of blocks 2 and 3 depend on the level of household equipment and therefore evolve with the level of GDP per capita (structural change), with a saturation. For blocks 1 and 2 we determine the value of water from elasticity, price and quantity data from the literature, using the point-extension method. For block 3, we use a hypothetical zero-cost demand and maximal demand with actual water costs to linearly interpolate the inverse demand function. These functions are calibrated on the 24 countries part of the Mediterranean basin using data from SIMEDD, and are used for the projection and valuation of domestic water demands at the 2050 horizon. They enable to project total water demand, and also the respective shares of the different categories of demand (basic demand, intermediate demand and additional uses). These projections are performed under different combined scenarios of population, GDP and water costs.

  15. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  16. Occurrence of perfluorinated compounds in the aquatic environment as found in science park effluent, river water, rainwater, sediments, and biotissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Tsai, Yu-Ting; Yu, Tsung-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    The current article maps perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) contamination in the largest Science Park of Taiwan. The occurrence of ten target PFAAs in the effluent of an industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP), its receiving rivers, rainwater, sediment, and the muscles and livers of fish was investigated. All target PFAAs were found in effluent of IWWTP, in which perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (6,930 ng/L), perfluorohexyl sulfonate (PFHxS) (2,662 ng/L) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (3,298 ng/L) were the major constituents. Concentrations of PFBS and PFOS in the IWWTP downstream areas have exceeded safe concentration levels of avian and aquatic life, indicating a potential risk to wildlife in those areas. In sediment samples, predominant contaminants were PFOS (1.5-78 ng/g), PFOA (0.5-5.6 ng/g), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) (nd-5.4 ng/g). In biological tissue samples, concentrations as high as 28,933 ng/g of PFOS were detected in tilapia and catfish liver samples. A positive correlation for log (C sediment/C water) and log (C tissue/C water) was found. The concentration and proportion (percentage of all PFAAs) of PFOS found in biotissue samples from the Keya River (which receives industrial wastewater) were found to be much greater (200 times) than those of samples from the Keelung River (which receives mainly domestic wastewater). These findings suggest that the receiving aquatic environments and, in turn, the human food chain can be significantly influenced by industrial discharges.

  17. Occurrence of perfluorinated compounds in the aquatic environment as found in science park effluent, river water, rainwater, sediments, and biotissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Tsai, Yu-Ting; Yu, Tsung-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    The current article maps perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) contamination in the largest Science Park of Taiwan. The occurrence of ten target PFAAs in the effluent of an industrial wastewater treatment plant (IWWTP), its receiving rivers, rainwater, sediment, and the muscles and livers of fish was investigated. All target PFAAs were found in effluent of IWWTP, in which perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (6,930 ng/L), perfluorohexyl sulfonate (PFHxS) (2,662 ng/L) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) (3,298 ng/L) were the major constituents. Concentrations of PFBS and PFOS in the IWWTP downstream areas have exceeded safe concentration levels of avian and aquatic life, indicating a potential risk to wildlife in those areas. In sediment samples, predominant contaminants were PFOS (1.5-78 ng/g), PFOA (0.5-5.6 ng/g), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) (nd-5.4 ng/g). In biological tissue samples, concentrations as high as 28,933 ng/g of PFOS were detected in tilapia and catfish liver samples. A positive correlation for log (C sediment/C water) and log (C tissue/C water) was found. The concentration and proportion (percentage of all PFAAs) of PFOS found in biotissue samples from the Keya River (which receives industrial wastewater) were found to be much greater (200 times) than those of samples from the Keelung River (which receives mainly domestic wastewater). These findings suggest that the receiving aquatic environments and, in turn, the human food chain can be significantly influenced by industrial discharges. PMID:24464397

  18. Contamination of estuarine water, biota, and sediment by halogenated organic compounds: A field study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Chiou, C.T.; Brinton, T.I.; Barber, L.B.; Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in the vicinity of an industrial outfall in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, have shown that water, bottom and suspended sediment, and four different species of biota are contaminated with halogenated organic compounds (HOC) including haloarenes. A "salting-out" effect in the estuary moderately enhanced the partitioning tendency of the contaminants into biota and sediments. Contaminant concentrations in water, suspended sediments, and biota were found to be far below the values predicted on the basis of the assumption of phase equilibria with respect to concentrations in bottom sediment. Relative concentration factors of HOC between biota (catfish) and bottom sediment increased with increasing octanol/estuarine water partition coefficients (Kow*), maximizing at log Kow* of about 5, although these ratios were considerably less than equilibrium values. In contrast, contaminant concentrations in water, biota, and suspended sediments were much closer to equilibrium values. Bioconcentration factors of HOC determined on the basis of lipid content for four different biotic species correlated reasonably well with equilibrium triolein/water partition coefficients (Ktw).

  19. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  20. Modeling Hydrodynamics, Water Temperature, and Suspended Sediment in Detroit Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Bragg, Heather M.

    2007-01-01

    Detroit Lake is a large reservoir on the North Santiam River in west-central Oregon. Water temperature and suspended sediment are issues of concern in the river downstream of the reservoir. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was constructed to simulate hydrodynamics, water temperature, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment in Detroit Lake. The model was calibrated for calendar years 2002 and 2003, and for a period of storm runoff from December 1, 2005, to February 1, 2006. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorology, reservoir outflows, and tributary inflows, water temperatures, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment concentrations. Two suspended sediment size groups were modeled: one for suspended sand and silt with particle diameters larger than 2 micrometers, and another for suspended clay with particle diameters less than or equal to 2 micrometers. The model was calibrated using lake stage data, lake profile data, and data from a continuous water-quality monitor on the North Santiam River near Niagara, about 6 kilometers downstream of Detroit Dam. The calibrated model was used to estimate sediment deposition in the reservoir, examine the sources of suspended sediment exiting the reservoir, and examine the effect of the reservoir on downstream water temperatures.

  1. Septic systems as sources of organic wastewater compounds in domestic drinking water wells in a shallow sand and gravel aquifer.

    PubMed

    Schaider, Laurel A; Ackerman, Janet M; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2016-03-15

    Domestic drinking water wells serve 44 million people in the US and are common globally. They are often located in areas served by onsite wastewater treatment systems, including septic systems, which can be sources of biological and chemical pollutants to groundwater. In this study we tested 20 domestic drinking water wells in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, for 117 organic wastewater compounds (OWCs) and for inorganic markers of septic system impact. We detected 27 OWCs, including 12 pharmaceuticals, five per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), four organophosphate flame retardants, and an artificial sweetener (acesulfame). Maximum concentrations of several PFASs and pharmaceuticals were relatively high compared to public drinking water supplies in the US. The number of detected OWCs and total concentrations of pharmaceuticals and of PFASs were positively correlated with nitrate, boron, and acesulfame and negatively correlated with well depth. These wells were all located in areas served exclusively by onsite wastewater treatment systems, which are likely the main source of the OWCs in these wells, although landfill leachate may also be a source. Our results suggest that current regulations to protect domestic wells from pathogens in septic system discharges do not prevent OWCs from reaching domestic wells, and that nitrate, a commonly measured drinking water contaminant, is a useful screening tool for OWCs in domestic wells. Nitrate concentrations of 1mg/L NO3-N, which are tenfold higher than local background and tenfold lower than the US federal drinking water standard, were associated with wastewater impacts from OWCs in this study.

  2. Septic systems as sources of organic wastewater compounds in domestic drinking water wells in a shallow sand and gravel aquifer.

    PubMed

    Schaider, Laurel A; Ackerman, Janet M; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2016-03-15

    Domestic drinking water wells serve 44 million people in the US and are common globally. They are often located in areas served by onsite wastewater treatment systems, including septic systems, which can be sources of biological and chemical pollutants to groundwater. In this study we tested 20 domestic drinking water wells in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, for 117 organic wastewater compounds (OWCs) and for inorganic markers of septic system impact. We detected 27 OWCs, including 12 pharmaceuticals, five per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), four organophosphate flame retardants, and an artificial sweetener (acesulfame). Maximum concentrations of several PFASs and pharmaceuticals were relatively high compared to public drinking water supplies in the US. The number of detected OWCs and total concentrations of pharmaceuticals and of PFASs were positively correlated with nitrate, boron, and acesulfame and negatively correlated with well depth. These wells were all located in areas served exclusively by onsite wastewater treatment systems, which are likely the main source of the OWCs in these wells, although landfill leachate may also be a source. Our results suggest that current regulations to protect domestic wells from pathogens in septic system discharges do not prevent OWCs from reaching domestic wells, and that nitrate, a commonly measured drinking water contaminant, is a useful screening tool for OWCs in domestic wells. Nitrate concentrations of 1mg/L NO3-N, which are tenfold higher than local background and tenfold lower than the US federal drinking water standard, were associated with wastewater impacts from OWCs in this study. PMID:26822473

  3. Water Velocity and Bioturbation Alter Sediment Resuspension and Biogeochemistry in an Experimental Freshwater Mesocosm System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A.; Vanni, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Processes such as bioturbation and resuspension can affect organic matter decomposition by altering sediment redox conditions. Increased oxygen availability may, in turn, affect remineralization rates and larger scale processes such as benthic-pelagic coupling. However, relatively few studies have explicitly tested the simultaneous effects of bioturbation and water velocity on benthic biogeochemistry and sediment resuspension. Using a mesocosm system we conducted two experiments testing the effects of bioturbator identity on particulate and dissolved nutrient dynamics before and after a resuspension event (i.e. water velocity held constant at 0.12 m s-1 for 2 hr; Expt. 1) and rates of sediment resuspension with increasing water velocity (0.00 - 0.20 m s-1; Expt. 2). We manipulated bioturbator identity across four levels as sediments were undisturbed (control), manually punctured (2% of surface area), or disturbed by one of two fish species, either bluegill or catfish. For Expt. 1, the bioturbation treatments were applied for several days and measurements were made before and after the resuspension event. Initially, water column chlorophyll and total suspended sediment (TSS) concentrations were highest in the catfish treatments. Bioturbator identity did not affect the stoichiometry of TSS as strongly; C:N was unaffected by our treatments while N:P was lowest in the disturbed treatments. After the resuspension event, there was no difference in TSS concentrations or stoichiometric ratios across the bioturbation treatments. Dissolved nutrient flux rates were insensitive to the bioturbation treatments and were more strongly influenced by the resuspension event. For instance, sediment NO3- fluxes were negative (i.e. net flux into sediments) until after the resuspension event when they became positive. In Expt. 2, we gradually increased water velocity from 0.00 - 0.20 m s-1 and measured TSS concentrations only. TSS was initially highest in catfish treatments and lowest in

  4. Recent changes of water discharge and sediment load in the Zhujiang (Pearl River) Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, Xi Xi; Higgitt, David L.; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Han, Jingtai; Sun, Huiguo

    2008-02-01

    The paper is concerned with identifying changes in the time series of water and sediment discharge of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China. The gradual trend test (Mann-Kendall test), and abrupt change test (Pettitt test), have been employed on annual water discharge and sediment load series (from the 1950s-2004) at nine stations in the main channels and main tributaries of the Zhujiang. Both the Mann-Kendall and Pettitt tests indicate that water discharge at all stations in the Zhujiang Basin showed no significant trend or abrupt shift. Annual water discharges are mainly influenced by precipitation variability, while the construction of reservoirs/dams in the Zhujiang Basin had little influence on water discharge. Sediment load, however, showed significant decreasing trends at some stations in the main channel of the Xijiang and Dongjiang. More stations have seen significantly decreasing trends since the 1990s. The decreasing sediment load in the Zhujiang reflects the impacts of reservoir construction in the basin. In contrast, the Liujiang, the second largest tributary of the Xijiang, has experienced a significant upward shift of sediment load around 1991 likely caused by exacerbated rock desertification in the karst regions. The annual sediment load from the Zhujiang (excluding the delta region) to the estuary has declined from 80.4 × 10 6 t averaged for the period 1957-1995 to 54.0 × 10 6 t for the period 1996-2004. More specifically, the sediment load declined steadily since the early 1990s so that in 2004 it was about one-third of the mean level of pre-90s. Water discharge and sediment load of the Zhujiang would be more affected by human activities in the future with the further reservoir developments, especially the completion of the Datengxia hydroelectric project, and an intensification of the afforestation policy in the drainage basin.

  5. Microscale Modelling of Water and Gas-Water Flows in Subsea Sand Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sugita, T.; Hirabayashi, S.; Nagao, J.; Jin, Y.; Kiyono, F.

    2009-12-01

    Methane hydrate is a promising energy resource in the near future. Its production is a current hot topic and flow of methane gas with water in sediment sand layer is very important to predict the production rate. In this study, permeability of microscale sand layer was numerically simulated by a three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method. Shapes of real sands were extracted by series expansion of spherical harmonics using CT-scan images of real subsea core samples. These extracted sands were located in a cubic lattice domain by a simulated annealing method to fit to given porosities. Pressure difference was imposed at the both end faces of the domain to flow water and methane gas. By this simulation, permeability of water phase and water-gas two-phase flow were analysed and compared well with existing models. This work was financially supported by Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program planned by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). 3D image of an extracted frame-sand grain Distribution of gas and water phases in computational domain for Sw=0.80

  6. Acclimation of Hydrilla verticillata to sediment anoxia in vegetation restoration in eutrophic waters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Dai, Yanran; Rui, Shengyang; Cui, Naxin; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2015-12-01

    Sediment anoxia generally results from intense organic enrichment and is a limiting factor in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. To investigate the effect of sediment anoxia on a typical pollution-tolerant submerged macrophyte species, Hydrilla verticillata, and acclimation mechanisms in the plant, a gradient of sediment anoxia was simulated with additions of sucrose to the sediment, which can stimulate increased concentrations of total nitrogen, NH4(+) and Fe in pore water. H. verticillata growth was significantly affected by highly anoxic conditions, as indicated by reduced total biomass in the 0.5 and 1% sucrose treatments. However, slight anoxia (0.1% sucrose addition) promoted growth, and the shoot biomass was 22.64% higher than in the control. In addition to morphologic alterations, H. verticillata showed physiological acclimations to anoxia, including increased anaerobic respiration and changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in roots. The soluble protein and soluble carbohydrate contents in roots of the 1% treatment were both significantly higher compared with those in the control. The increase in alcohol dehydrogenase activity and pyruvate content in the roots suggested that H. verticillata has a well-developed capacity for anaerobic fermentation. This study suggests that highly anoxic sediments inhibit the growth of H. verticillata and the species has a degree of tolerance to anoxic conditions. Further in situ investigations should be conducted on the interactions between sediment conditions and macrophytes to comprehensively evaluate the roles of sediment in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. PMID:26423394

  7. Sequestration of priority pollutant PAHs from sediment pore water employing semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sample sediment pore water in static exposure studies under controlled laboratory conditions using (control pond and formulated) sediments fortified with 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs). The sediment fortification level of 750 ng/g was selected on the basis of what might be detected in a sediment sample from a contaminated area. The sampling interval consisted of 0, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days for each study. The analytical methodologies, as well as the extraction and sample cleanup procedures used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs at different fortification levels in SPMDs, water, and sediment were reported previously (Williamson, M.S. Thesis, University of Missouri - Columbia, USA; Williamson et al., Chemosphere (This issue - PII: S0045-6535(02)00394-6)) and used for this project. Average (mean) extraction recoveries for each PPPAH congener in each matrix are reported and discussed. No procedural blank extracts (controls) were found to contain any PPPAH residues above the method quantitation limit, therefore, no matrix interferences were detected. The focus of this publication is to demonstrate the ability to sequester environmental contaminants, specifically PPPAHs, from sediment pore water using SPMDs and two different types of fortified sediment.

  8. Presence of pyrethroid pesticides in water and sediments of Ebro River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, M. L.; Ginebreda, A.; Eljarrat, E.; Barceló, D.

    2010-11-01

    SummaryThe distribution of pyrethroid insecticides of the Ebro River Delta (NE Spain) was assessed by measuring concentrations in surface water and sediment samples. Pyrethroid extraction from water was carried out by ultrasound-assisted emulsification-extraction (UAEE), while the sediment was sonicated and cleaned up using Florisil cartridge. Method detection of limits (MLODs) for the 12 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer in negative chemical ionization (GC-NCI-MS) ranged from 0.03 to 35.8 ng L -1 for water and 2.6 to 62.4 pg g -1 for sediment. Recoveries values were in the range of 47-105% for water and 51-105% for sediments, showing satisfactory robustness of the method for analyzing pyrethroids in water and sediment samples. Cypermethrin was detected in 22 water samples collected from Ebro River Delta, while deltamethrin was present only in three water samples at concentrations ranging from 0.73 ng L -1 to 57.2 ng L -1 and 2 ng L -1 to 58.8 ng L -1 for cypermethrin and deltamethrin, respectively. These concentration levels were higher than median lethal concentration (LC50) values found for deltamethrin and lower than LC50 values found for cypermethrin when short time toxic effects are considered. In sediment samples only cypermethrin was detected at concentration levels ranged from 8.27 ng g -1 to 71.9 ng g -1. These levels were higher than its LC50 values. Environmental dynamic behaviour and fate were also evaluated for cypermethrin measuring the sediment/water partition coefficient (ranging from 5.0 to 6.3) and kinetic data (half-life ranging between 13 and 50 days). Results were in good agreement to those reported in literature

  9. A review of surface-water sediment fractions and their interactions with persistent manmade organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkowski, P.J.; Smith, J.A.; Fusillo, T.V.; Chiou, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the suspended and surficial sediment fractions and their interactions with manmade organic compounds. The objective of this review is to isolate and describe those contaminant and sediment properties that contribute to the persistence of organic compounds in surface-water systems. Most persistent, nonionic organic contaminants, such as the chlorinated insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are characterized by low water solubilities and high octanol-water partition coefficients. Consequently, sorptive interactions are the primary transformation processes that control their environmental behavior. For nonionic organic compounds, sorption is primarily attributed to the partitioning of an organic contaminant between a water phase and an organic phase. Partitioning processes play a central role in the uptake and release of contaminants by sediment organic matter and in the bioconcentration of contaminants by aquatic organisms. Chemically isolated sediment fractions show that organic matter is the primary determinant of the sorptive capacity exhibited by sediment. Humic substances, as dissolved organic matter, contribute a number of functions to the processes cycling organic contaminants. They alter the rate of transformation of contaminants, enhance apparent water solubility, and increase the carrying capacity of the water column beyond the solubility limits of the contaminant. As a component of sediment particles, humic substances, through sorptive interactions, serve as vectors for the hydrodynamic transport of organic contaminants. The capabilities of the humic substances stem in part from their polyfunctional chemical composition and also from their ability to exist in solution as dissolved species, flocculated aggregates, surface coatings, and colloidal organomineral and organometal complexes. The transport properties of manmade organic compounds have been investigated by field studies and laboratory experiments that examine the

  10. The influence of extraction procedure on ion concentrations in sediment pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment pore water has the potential to yield important information on sediment quality, but the influence of isolation procedures on the chemistry and toxicity are not completely known and consensus on methods used for the isolation from sediment has not been reached. To provide additional insight into the influence of collection procedures on pore water chemistry, anion (filtered only) and cation concentrations were measured in filtered and unfiltered pore water isolated from four sediments using three different procedures: dialysis, centrifugation and vacuum. Peepers were constructed using 24-cell culture plates and cellulose membranes, and vacuum extractors consisted of fused-glass air stones attached with airline tubing to 60cc syringes. Centrifugation was accomplished at two speeds (2,500 and 10,000 x g) for 30 min in a refrigerated centrifuge maintained at 4?C. Only minor differences in chemical characteristics and cation and anion concentrations were found among the different collecting methods with differences being sediment specific. Filtering of the pore water did not appreciably reduce major cation concentrations, but trace metals (Cu and Pb) were markedly reduced. Although the extraction methods evaluated produced pore waters of similar chemistries, the vacuum extractor provided the following advantages over the other methods: (1) ease of extraction, (2) volumes of pore water isolated, (3) minimal preparation time and (4) least time required for extraction of pore water from multiple samples at one time.

  11. Effects of sulfate-reducing bacteria on methylmercury at the sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingxia; Luo, Guangjun; He, Tianrong; Guo, Yanna; Qian, Xiaoli

    2016-08-01

    Sediment cores (containing sediment and overlying water) from Baihua Reservoir (SW China) were cultured under different redox conditions with different microbial activities, to understand the effects of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on mercury (Hg) methylation at sediment-water interfaces. Concentrations of dissolved methyl mercury (DMeHg) in the overlying water of the control cores with bioactivity maintained (BAC) and cores with only sulfate-reducing bacteria inhibited (SRBI) and bacteria fully inhibited (BACI) were measured at the anaerobic stage followed by the aerobic stage. For the BAC and SRBI cores, DMeHg concentrations in waters were much higher at the anaerobic stage than those at the aerobic stage, and they were negatively correlated to the dissolved oxygen concentrations (r=-0.5311 and r=-0.4977 for BAC and SRBI, respectively). The water DMeHg concentrations of the SRBI cores were 50% lower than those of the BAC cores, indicating that the SRB is of great importance in Hg methylation in sediment-water systems, but there should be other microbes such as iron-reducing bacteria and those containing specific gene cluster (hgcAB), besides SRB, causing Hg methylation in the sediment-water system.

  12. Effects of sulfate-reducing bacteria on methylmercury at the sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingxia; Luo, Guangjun; He, Tianrong; Guo, Yanna; Qian, Xiaoli

    2016-08-01

    Sediment cores (containing sediment and overlying water) from Baihua Reservoir (SW China) were cultured under different redox conditions with different microbial activities, to understand the effects of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on mercury (Hg) methylation at sediment-water interfaces. Concentrations of dissolved methyl mercury (DMeHg) in the overlying water of the control cores with bioactivity maintained (BAC) and cores with only sulfate-reducing bacteria inhibited (SRBI) and bacteria fully inhibited (BACI) were measured at the anaerobic stage followed by the aerobic stage. For the BAC and SRBI cores, DMeHg concentrations in waters were much higher at the anaerobic stage than those at the aerobic stage, and they were negatively correlated to the dissolved oxygen concentrations (r=-0.5311 and r=-0.4977 for BAC and SRBI, respectively). The water DMeHg concentrations of the SRBI cores were 50% lower than those of the BAC cores, indicating that the SRB is of great importance in Hg methylation in sediment-water systems, but there should be other microbes such as iron-reducing bacteria and those containing specific gene cluster (hgcAB), besides SRB, causing Hg methylation in the sediment-water system. PMID:27521953

  13. Screening of currently used pesticides in water, sediments and biota of the Guadalquivir River Basin (Spain).

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julián; Vázquez-Roig, Pablo; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-12-15

    The occurrence of 50 currently used pesticides and their transformation products in surface and waste waters, sediment and fish in the Guadalquivir River Basin was determined in 2010 and 2011. After selective sample extraction, pesticides were identified and quantified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The contamination profile in water and sediments is marked by the presence of organophosphorus and triazines. Transformation products were even at higher concentrations than parent pesticides. A wider range of pesticides was present in water than in sediments but none of them were detected in fish. The mean concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 13.0 ng/L in water and from 0.1 to 13.2 ng/g d.w. in sediment. The spatial distribution of most pesticides was consistent with the agricultural activities of the area or their urban applications. The waste water treatment plant effluents that impact the river are minor sources for few pesticides but for most of them run-off would be the most important contribution. The temporal distribution showed differences between both sampling campaigns related to the river flow. The low-flow produced a pesticide concentration effect, generating higher levels in water and accumulation in sediments. This forecasts a hazard in future scenarios if the current situation of the climate change and water scarcity evolves to more critical conditions highlighting the need of these monitoring studies. PMID:24140087

  14. Screening of currently used pesticides in water, sediments and biota of the Guadalquivir River Basin (Spain).

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julián; Vázquez-Roig, Pablo; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-12-15

    The occurrence of 50 currently used pesticides and their transformation products in surface and waste waters, sediment and fish in the Guadalquivir River Basin was determined in 2010 and 2011. After selective sample extraction, pesticides were identified and quantified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The contamination profile in water and sediments is marked by the presence of organophosphorus and triazines. Transformation products were even at higher concentrations than parent pesticides. A wider range of pesticides was present in water than in sediments but none of them were detected in fish. The mean concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 13.0 ng/L in water and from 0.1 to 13.2 ng/g d.w. in sediment. The spatial distribution of most pesticides was consistent with the agricultural activities of the area or their urban applications. The waste water treatment plant effluents that impact the river are minor sources for few pesticides but for most of them run-off would be the most important contribution. The temporal distribution showed differences between both sampling campaigns related to the river flow. The low-flow produced a pesticide concentration effect, generating higher levels in water and accumulation in sediments. This forecasts a hazard in future scenarios if the current situation of the climate change and water scarcity evolves to more critical conditions highlighting the need of these monitoring studies.

  15. Contaminants in surface water and sediments near the Tynagh silver mine site, County Galway, Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, A; Phillips, D H; Bowen, J; Sen Gupta, B

    2015-04-15

    A former silver mine in Tynagh, Co. Galway, Ireland is one of the most contaminated mine sites in Europe with maximum concentrations of Zn, As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cd far exceeding guideline values for water and sediment. The aims of this research were to 1) further assess the contamination, particularly metals, in surface water and sediment around the site, and 2) determine if the contamination has increased 10 years after the Environmental Protection Agency Ireland (EPAI) identified off-site contamination. Site pH is alkaline to neutral because CaCO3-rich sediment and rock material buffer the exposed acid generating sulphide-rich ore. When this study was compared to the previous EPAI study conducted 10 years earlier, it appeared that further weathering of exposed surface sediment had increased concentrations of As and other potentially toxic elements. Water samples from the tailings ponds and adjacent Barnacullia Stream had concentrations of Al, Cd, Mn, Zn and Pb above guideline values. Lead and Zn concentrations from the tailings pond sediment were 16 and 5 times higher, respectively, than concentrations reported 10 years earlier. Pb and Zn levels in most sediment samples exceeded the Expert Group (EGS) guidelines of 1000 and 5000 mg/kg, respectively. Arsenic concentrations were as high as 6238 mg/kg in the tailings ponds sediment, which is 62 and 862 times greater than the EGS and Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines (CSQG), respectively. Cadmium, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations in water and sediment were above guideline values downstream of the site. Additionally, Fe, Mn and organic matter (OM) were strongly correlated and correlated to Zn, Pb, As, Cd, Cu and Ni in stream sediment. Therefore, the nearby Barnacullia Stream is also a significant pathway for contaminant transport to downstream areas. Further rehabilitation of the site may decrease the contamination around the area. PMID:25634731

  16. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Geochemical controls on lead concentrations in stream water and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium distribution of lead in solution and adsorbed on cation exchange sites in sediment theoretically may be calculated from equations representing selectivities of substrate for lead over H+, Ca2+ and Na+, and the stabilities of lead solute species. Such calculations include consideration of total concentrations of major ions, cation exchange capacity (CEC) of substrate, and pH, at values expected in various natural systems. Measurements of CEC and selectivity coefficients were made for synthetic halloysite, a finely divided amorphous 1:1 clay prepared by precipitation from a mixture of solutions of aluminum and silica. Where suspended sediment having the same properties is present in concentrations of 10-1,000 mg/1 at pH 6-8, more than 90% of the lead present can be adsorbed on sediment surfaces. The cation exchange behavior of lead and other minor cationic species in natural systems could be predicted by this type of model if enough other supporting information were available. Information of the type needed describing natural stream sediments, however, is presently inadequate for accurate predictions. ?? 1976.

  18. Land application of domestic wastewater in Florida--statewide assessment of impact on ground-water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franks, Bernard J.

    1981-01-01

    In Florida domestic waste water is being applied to the land for disposal and reuse. State and Federal regulations favor land-application methods over other advanced waste water treatment practices. Despite the increasing use of this alternative technology, little is known about localized effects on groundwater quality. This report documents the extent of land-application practices in Florida and summarizes case study information on some of the more adequately monitored site throughout the State. More than 2,500 sites in Florida are permitted by the Department of Environmental Regulation for applying domestic waste water to the land. The majority (more than 1,700 sites), classified as infiltration ponds, are concentrated in central and southern Florida. More than 560 sites classified as drainfields, and more than 250 sites classified as irrigation sites, are located primarily in central Florida. An estimated 150 million gallons per day of domestic waste water, after required secondary treatment, are applied to Florida soils. Despite the large numbers of sites and the considerable volume of waste water utilized, little is known about potential impact on groundwater quality. At the few sites where observation wells have been drilled and local groundwater quality monitored, no significant deterioration of water quality has been detected. (USGS)

  19. Isolation and molecular characterization of Acanthamoeba genotypes in recreational and domestic water sources from Jamaica, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Todd, Cheridah D; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Streete, Don; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Lindo, John F

    2015-09-01

    Free living amoebae (FLA) are amphizoic protozoa that are ubiquitous in nature. Infection with FLA may result in neurological, ocular and skin infections. Exposure to Acanthamoeba occurs frequently through water contact and knowledge of the presence of the organisms in water sources is important in understanding transmission dynamics. The distribution of Acanthamoeba was studied in recreational and domestic water samples collected from across Jamaica. Morphological assessment and polymerase chain reaction revealed Acanthamoeba spp. isolates in 50.6% (42/83) and 17.3% (14/81) of recreational and domestic water, respectively. Sequencing of the DF3 region of the 18S rDNA resulted in the identification of genotypes T3, T4, T5, T10 and T11 corresponding to Acanthamoeba spp: A. griffini, A. triangularis, A. lenticulata, A. culbertsoni and A. hatchetti. Moreover, T4 was the most frequently isolated genotype in both recreational and domestic water. Thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays indicated that most isolates were potentially pathogenic. This is the first report of T3 and T10 genotypes in the Caribbean and the first report of these Acanthamoeba spp. in Jamaican waters. The study shows that there is potential risk of infection to contact wearers who practise poor lens care. Further, Acanthamoeba should be considered as a cause of neurological infections in Jamaica.

  20. Domestic cats (Felis catus) are definitive hosts for Sarcocystis sinensis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    GJERDE, Bjørn; HILALI, Mosaad

    2016-01-01

    The definitive hosts of Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes have hitherto been unknown, but the close similarity of this species to the cat-transmitted Sarcocystis bovifelis in cattle suggested they were felids. In a previous study, two domestic cats were fed macroscopic sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis contained within or dissected from the esophageal muscles of water buffaloes, while no microscopic sarcocysts of S. sinensis were noticed. Both cats started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8–10 days post infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15 dpi. Using a PCR-based molecular assay targeting the mitochondrial cox1 gene of S. fusiformis, both cats were shown to act as definitive hosts for this species. In the present study, DNA samples derived from oocysts/sporocysts in the intestinal mucosa of both cats were further examined by PCR for the presence of S. sinensis using 2 newly designed primers selectively targeting the cox1 gene of this species. All 6 DNA samples examined from each cat tested positive for S. sinensis. A 1,038-bp-long portion of cox1 was amplified and sequenced as 2 overlapping fragments from 5 of these DNA samples. The 5 sequences shared 99.3–100% identity with 7 previous cox1 sequences of S. sinensis obtained from sarcocysts in water buffaloes. Additionally, amplification of the ITS1 region with primers targeting various Sarcocystis spp., yielded amplicons of 2 different lengths, corresponding to those obtained from sarcocyst isolates of S. sinensis and S. fusiformis, respectively. This is the first study to show that cats act as definitive hosts for S. sinensis. PMID:27075117

  1. Domestic cats (Felis catus) are definitive hosts for Sarcocystis sinensis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad

    2016-08-01

    The definitive hosts of Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes have hitherto been unknown, but the close similarity of this species to the cat-transmitted Sarcocystis bovifelis in cattle suggested they were felids. In a previous study, two domestic cats were fed macroscopic sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis contained within or dissected from the esophageal muscles of water buffaloes, while no microscopic sarcocysts of S. sinensis were noticed. Both cats started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8-10 days post infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15 dpi. Using a PCR-based molecular assay targeting the mitochondrial cox1 gene of S. fusiformis, both cats were shown to act as definitive hosts for this species. In the present study, DNA samples derived from oocysts/sporocysts in the intestinal mucosa of both cats were further examined by PCR for the presence of S. sinensis using 2 newly designed primers selectively targeting the cox1 gene of this species. All 6 DNA samples examined from each cat tested positive for S. sinensis. A 1,038-bp-long portion of cox1 was amplified and sequenced as 2 overlapping fragments from 5 of these DNA samples. The 5 sequences shared 99.3-100% identity with 7 previous cox1 sequences of S. sinensis obtained from sarcocysts in water buffaloes. Additionally, amplification of the ITS1 region with primers targeting various Sarcocystis spp., yielded amplicons of 2 different lengths, corresponding to those obtained from sarcocyst isolates of S. sinensis and S. fusiformis, respectively. This is the first study to show that cats act as definitive hosts for S. sinensis.

  2. Domestic cats (Felis catus) are definitive hosts for Sarcocystis sinensis from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad

    2016-08-01

    The definitive hosts of Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes have hitherto been unknown, but the close similarity of this species to the cat-transmitted Sarcocystis bovifelis in cattle suggested they were felids. In a previous study, two domestic cats were fed macroscopic sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis contained within or dissected from the esophageal muscles of water buffaloes, while no microscopic sarcocysts of S. sinensis were noticed. Both cats started shedding small numbers of sporocysts 8-10 days post infection (dpi) and were euthanized 15 dpi. Using a PCR-based molecular assay targeting the mitochondrial cox1 gene of S. fusiformis, both cats were shown to act as definitive hosts for this species. In the present study, DNA samples derived from oocysts/sporocysts in the intestinal mucosa of both cats were further examined by PCR for the presence of S. sinensis using 2 newly designed primers selectively targeting the cox1 gene of this species. All 6 DNA samples examined from each cat tested positive for S. sinensis. A 1,038-bp-long portion of cox1 was amplified and sequenced as 2 overlapping fragments from 5 of these DNA samples. The 5 sequences shared 99.3-100% identity with 7 previous cox1 sequences of S. sinensis obtained from sarcocysts in water buffaloes. Additionally, amplification of the ITS1 region with primers targeting various Sarcocystis spp., yielded amplicons of 2 different lengths, corresponding to those obtained from sarcocyst isolates of S. sinensis and S. fusiformis, respectively. This is the first study to show that cats act as definitive hosts for S. sinensis. PMID:27075117

  3. Monitoring of Ganga water and sediments vis-à-vis tannery pollution at Kanpur (India): a case study.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, A R; Singh, R; Tandon, S N

    2001-04-01

    The leather industry, besides being a major contributor to the Indian national economy, is unfortunately also one of the major polluters. The present article discusses the influence of the wastes on the physicochemical characteristics of the Ganga water and sediments. Two sampling sites have been chosen at Kanpur, the first before and the second after the point where tanneries are located. The same physicochemical parameters which have been determined in the wastes have been monitored at these two sites for two seasons. The results reveal that most parameters increase as the river traverses between these two points. The increase in values of parameters such as BOD, COD, Cl-, and total solids could be due to the domestic wastes just as much as to the tannery wastes. Phenols and sulfides, can also come from other sources, but their probability of coming from tanneries is higher. However, chromium is one parameter which can primarily be identified to originate from the tanneries. The speciation of the sediments for chromium reveals that the leakage of chromium into the Ganga is taking place at the second site. There is almost a ten fold increase in chromium at the second site as compared to the first. At the first site the surface chromium is primarily in the residual fraction while at the second site it is in the Fe-Mn oxide fractions.

  4. Grazing Land Management Strongly Controls Water Quality, Sediment and Channel Dynamics in Tallgrass Prairie Headwater Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, B. G.; Daniels, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the prairie remnants of North America, watershed sediment regimes are heavily influenced by livestock grazing practices. Despite dramatic declines in stream water quality and ecosystem function concomitant with increasing gazing pressures, there have been no studies to quantitatively assess the relationship between various grazing treatments and sediment production in natural grassland ecosystems. In this study, we evaluate suspended sediment transport and channel morphology in the Flint Hills physiographic province using a paired whole-watershed approach, including 2 replicates of high density cattle grazing, 2 replicates of low density cattle grazing, 3 replicates of bison grazing and 3 replicates of no grazing. As expected, results demonstrate that cattle grazing operations increase e-coli, sediment concentrations and increase channel width. However, no significant differences in e-coli, suspended sediment dynamics or channel geomorphology were found between bison grazed and ungrazed watersheds.

  5. Sedimentation on the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa: cleaning efficiency from natural sediments and drill cuttings.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ann I; Purser, Autun

    2011-06-01

    Anthropogenic threats to cold-water coral reefs are trawling and hydrocarbon drilling, with both activities causing increased levels of suspended particles. The efficiency of Lophelia pertusa in rejecting local sediments and drill cuttings from the coral surface was evaluated and found not to differ between sediment types. Further results showed that the coral efficiently removed deposited material even after repeated exposures, indicating an efficient cleaning mechanism. In an experiment focusing on burial, fine-fraction drill cuttings were deposited on corals over time. Drill cutting covered coral area increased with repeated depositions, with accumulation mainly occurring on and adjacent to regions of the coral skeleton lacking tissue cover. Tissue was smothered and polyp mortality occurred where polyps became wholly covered by material. Burial of coral by drill cuttings to the current threshold level used in environmental risk assessment models by the offshore industry (6.3mm) may result in damage to L. pertusa colonies.

  6. Sedimentation on the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa: cleaning efficiency from natural sediments and drill cuttings.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ann I; Purser, Autun

    2011-06-01

    Anthropogenic threats to cold-water coral reefs are trawling and hydrocarbon drilling, with both activities causing increased levels of suspended particles. The efficiency of Lophelia pertusa in rejecting local sediments and drill cuttings from the coral surface was evaluated and found not to differ between sediment types. Further results showed that the coral efficiently removed deposited material even after repeated exposures, indicating an efficient cleaning mechanism. In an experiment focusing on burial, fine-fraction drill cuttings were deposited on corals over time. Drill cutting covered coral area increased with repeated depositions, with accumulation mainly occurring on and adjacent to regions of the coral skeleton lacking tissue cover. Tissue was smothered and polyp mortality occurred where polyps became wholly covered by material. Burial of coral by drill cuttings to the current threshold level used in environmental risk assessment models by the offshore industry (6.3mm) may result in damage to L. pertusa colonies. PMID:21529851

  7. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-04-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164 178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87-80 °C) and Site B (79 °C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (\\[pmacr]=36.1%), Aeropyrum (\\[pmacr]=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (\\[pmacr]=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (\\[pmacr]=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (\\[pmacr]=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82 °C (\\[pmacr]=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles.

  8. [Water provision for domestic ducks kept indoors--a review on the basis of the literature and our own experiences].

    PubMed

    Knierim, U; Bulheller, M A; Kuhnt, K; Briese, A; Hartung, J

    2004-03-01

    The wild ancestors of the domestic pekin and muscovy ducks are anatomically, physiologically and behaviourally well adapted to living on and at the water. The domestic ducks kept for fattening purposes still show clear preferences for open water and make use of water for foraging and feeding, drinking, for general exploration, locomotion and preening, even without prior experience. For hygienic, labour, technical and economical reasons ducks are nowadays mostly kept in closed buildings without access to open water. This significantly restricts their freedom to show their natural behaviour. An obvious consequence of this restriction is a deteriorated plumage condition, especially with regard to cleanliness. According to the Council of Europe recommendations, water shall be provided in a way that allows the ducks to cover their head with water and shake it about their body without difficulty. To date, however, there is a lack of solutions satisfying behavioural, hygienic, health, labour and economical requirements to about equally tolerable degrees. The presently available types of different water provisions are presented and discussed on the basis of existing literature as well as experiences and first results from an ongoing research project. The provision of shallow bathing water with daily water exchange promises to be a practicable solution. However, longer term research on possible negative effects of the decreased hygienic quality of the water on duck health is necessary before final conclusions can be drawn.

  9. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4-12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system.

  10. Metal ions in water and sediments of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.F.; Enciso, G.; Morales, J.W.; Sharma, V.K.; Nischt, S.L.; Domingo, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    Temperature, salinity, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the surface water of the Pom-Atasta Lagoon at 15 stations during 5 sampling events from September 1996--May 1997. Concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ag, Fe, Co, and Ba were also determined in the water and sediments at 15 stations during the study period. The values of salinity, turbidity, and TSS were related to the inputs of river water into the lagoon. Metals in the water and sediments showed no spatial variation. Seasonality in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, and Ba in the water was found and may be related to the resuspension of sediments in the lagoon. The concentrations of metals in sediments did not give significant seasonal variation. Metals in sediments were not correlated with the iron, suggesting an anthropogenic source of metals in the Pom-Atasta Lagoon. The concentrations of dissolved Pb were above the value recommended by the National Water Commission of Mexico.

  11. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4–12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system.

  12. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4–12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system. PMID:27225540

  13. Environmental Fate of Chiral Herbicide Fenoxaprop-ethyl in Water-Sediment Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xu; Yao, Guojun; Liu, Donghui; Liu, Mingke; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The environmental fate of the herbicide fenoxaprop-ethyl (FE) in water, sediment and water-sediment microcosm was studied and degradation products fenoxaprop (FA), ethyl-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoate (EHPP), 2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propanoic acid (HPPA) and 6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzoxazol-2-one (CDHB) were monitored. FE, FA, EHPP and HPPA were chiral and the environmental behavior was investigated on an enantiomeric level. In water, sediment and water-sediment microcosms, fenoxaprop-ethyl degraded very fast with half-lives less than 1 day and it was found the herbicidally inactive S-enantiomer degraded faster. Fenoxaprop was the main primary degradation product which was quickly formed and the further degradation was relatively slow with half-lives of 6.4-12.4 days, and the S-enantiomer degraded faster too. EHPP, HPPA and CDHB could be found and S-EHPP and S-HPPA were degraded preferentially. The effects of microorganism and water content were investigated and it was found that the enantioselectivity was attributed to microorganisms. In sediment, the main degradation pathway of fenoxaprop-ethyl was hydrolysis and the degradation rate of fenoxaprop-ethyl increased with water content. The degradation products and enantioselectivity should be considered for the impact of fenoxaprop-ethyl on the aquatic system. PMID:27225540

  14. Analysis of pesticides in surface water and sediment from Yolo Bypass, California, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Inputs to the Yolo Bypass are potential sources of pesticides that could impact critical life stages of native fish. To assess the direct inputs during inundation, pesticide concentrations were analyzed in water, in suspended and bed-sediment samples collected from six source watersheds to the Yolo Bypass, and from three sites within the Bypass in 2004 and 2005. Water samples were collected in February 2004 from the six input sites to the Bypass during the first flood event of the year representing pesticide inputs during high-flow events. Samples were also collected along a transect across the Bypass in early March 2004 and from three sites within the Bypass in the spring of 2004 under low-flow conditions. Low-flow data were used to understand potential pesticide contamination and its effects on native fish if water from these areas were used to flood the Bypass in dry years. To assess loads of pesticides to the Bypass associated with suspended sediments, large-volume water samples were collected during high flows in 2004 and 2005 from three sites, whereas bed sediments were collected from six sites in the fall of 2004 during the dry season. Thirteen current-use pesticides were detected in surface water samples collected during the study. The highest pesticide concentrations detected at the input sites to the Bypass corresponded to the first high-flow event of the year. The highest pesticide concentrations at the two sites sampled within the Bypass during the early spring were detected in mid-April following a major flood event as the water began to subside. The pesticides detected and their concentrations in the surface waters varied by site; however, hexazinone and simazine were detected at all sites and at some of the highest concentrations. Thirteen current-use pesticides and three organochlorine insecticides were detected in bed and suspended sediments collected in 2004 and 2005. The pesticides detected and their concentrations varied by site and sediment

  15. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Pore water and sediment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, D.E.; Berelson, W.M. ); Giordani, P.; Langone, L.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M. )

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic (Po River being the largest) has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algal growth. Cores were collected for studies of pore water and solid phase chemistry at 6 stations in this region. [sup 210]Pb was used to constrain sediment accumulation rates and a range of 0-0.5 cm/yr was determined at different stations. Excess [sup 234]Th was only found in the upper 1-2 cm, suggesting that bioturbation is largely restricted to shallow depths. Pore water profiles show evidence of irrigation, and mean diffusive fluxes for oxygen, silica phosphate and ammonia are generally 20-90% of the fluxes obtained from benthic chamber measurements. This is consistent with previous work in this area in which studies of radon fluxes indicated that irrigation plays an important role in sediment-water exchange. Pore water profiles in the northern portion of the study area (near the Po River Delta) were markedly different than profiles in the south; sediments in the north are substantially more acidic and have high concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate. From the alkalinity vs. TCO[sub 2] relationship in sediment pore waters it appears that differences in reactions involving the reduction of iron oxides and the exchange of magnesium for iron in clays are responsible for this regional difference in pore water properties. Sediments close to the Po apparently undergo more iron-magnesium exchange, while more distal sediments are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations and trends regarding the shape of the silica profiles (which show shallow maxima) will be discussed.

  16. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Transport Across The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface: Speciation In Sediment Material

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solubility and mobility of arsenic in ground water are influenced by a variety of processes in the northeastern US subjective to geogenic and anthropogenic sources. This presentation will discuss the speciation of arsenic in sediment profiles resulting from ground water disc...

  17. Suspended sediment source areas and future climate impact on soil erosion and sediment yield in a New York City water supply watershed, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, Rajith; Pradhanang, Soni M.; Schneiderman, Elliot M.; Pierson, Donald C.; Anandhi, Aavudai; Zion, Mark S.; Matonse, Adão H.; Lounsbury, David G.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2013-02-01

    High suspended sediment loads and the resulting turbidity can impact the use of surface waters for water supply and other designated uses. Changes in fluvial sediment loads influence material fluxes, aquatic geochemistry, water quality, channel morphology, and aquatic habitats. Therefore, quantifying spatial and temporal patterns in sediment loads is important both for understanding and predicting soil erosion and sediment transport processes as well as watershed-scale management of sediment and associated pollutants. A case study from the 891 km2 Cannonsville watershed, one of the major watersheds in the New York City water supply system is presented. The objective of this study was to apply Soil and Water Assessment Tool-Water Balance (SWAT-WB), a physically based semi-distributed model to identify suspended sediment generating source areas under current conditions and to simulate potential climate change impacts on soil erosion and suspended sediment yield in the study watershed for a set of future climate scenarios representative of the period 2081-2100. Future scenarios developed using nine global climate model (GCM) simulations indicate a sharp increase in the annual rates of soil erosion although a similar result in sediment yield at the watershed outlet was not evident. Future climate related changes in soil erosion and sediment yield appeared more significant in the winter due to a shift in the timing of snowmelt and also due to a decrease in the proportion of precipitation received as snow. Although an increase in future summer precipitation was predicted, soil erosion and sediment yield appeared to decrease owing to an increase in soil moisture deficit and a decrease in water yield due to increased evapotranspiration.

  18. Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Low-Cost Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Mild Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Christensen, C.; Merrigan, T.; Hewett, R.; Jorgensen, G.

    2005-01-01

    In FY99, Solar Heating and Lighting set the goal to reduce the life-cycle cost of saved-energy for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems in mild climates by 50%, primarily through use of polymer technology. Two industry teams (Davis Energy Group/SunEarth (DEG/SE) and FAFCO) have been developing un-pressurized integral-collector-storage (ICS) systems having load-side heat exchangers, and began field-testing in FY04. DEG/SE?s ICS has a rotomolded tank and thermoformed glazing. Based upon manufacturing issues, costs, and poor performance, the FAFCO team changed direction in late FY04 from an un-pressurized ICS to a direct thermosiphon design based upon use of pool collectors. Support for the teams is being provided for materials testing, modeling, and system testing. New ICS system models have been produced to model the new systems. A new ICS rating procedure for the ICS systems is undergoing testing and validation. Pipe freezing, freeze protection valves, and overheating have been tested and analyzed.

  20. Normalized rare earth elements in water, sediments, and wine: identifying sources and environmental redox conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, David Z.; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of the rare earth elements (REE) in surface waters and sediments, when normalized on an element-by-element basis to one of several rock standards and plotted versus atomic number, yield curves that reveal their partitioning between different sediment fractions and the sources of those fractions, for example, between terrestrial-derived lithogenous debris and seawater-derived biogenous detritus and hydrogenous metal oxides. The REE of ancient sediments support their partitioning into these same fractions and further contribute to the identification of the redox geochemistry of the sea water in which the sediments accumulated. The normalized curves of the REE that have been examined in several South American wine varietals can be interpreted to reflect the lithology of the bedrock on which the vines may have been grown, suggesting limited fractionation during soil development.

  1. A water and sediment budget for a Mediterranean mountainous catchment (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuset, Jordi; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.

    2016-04-01

    Sediment transport in Mediterranean mountainous catchments is highly variable influenced principally by sediment availability, which in turn is controlled by the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall, runoff and land uses. In this paper we present the water and sediment budget of the Ribera Salada, a Mediterranean forest catchment located in the Catalan Pre-Pyrenees (NE Iberian Peninsula). The river drains an area of 224 km2. The data acquisition design is composed by five nested experimental sub-catchments. Each monitoring station registers discharge and suspended sediment transport continuously. Here we present the data obtained between 2012 and 2013, two contrasted hydrological years. These data allows to analyse the contribution of each sub-catchment to the total water and suspended sediment yield of the catchment at multiple temporal scales. Annual water yield in the catchment outlet varied between 15 and 31 hm3 y-1. Maximum peak flow in the outlet of the basin was 60.9 m3 s-1; equivalent to a specific discharge of 0.28 m3 s-1 km2. Results indicate that, hydrologically, the catchment can divided in two areas with contrasted regimes. The upper part of catchment is the wettest zone, where the water yield of each sub-catchment is in directly and positive correlated to its area. In contrast, the bottom of the valley has an ephemeral hydrological regime that only supplies water during important rainfall events. Annual suspended sediment load at the catchment outlet oscillated between 615 and 3415 t y-1, with an average value of 2015 t y-1 (i.e. 9.3 t km‑2 y‑1). In contrast to the water yield, most of the suspended sediment load (i.e. 80%) is supplied from the driest part of the catchment where sediment availability is greater and there is a greater connectivity between sediment sources and the channel network. The humid part of the catchment only yielded the 20% of the sediment load, where, as in the case of the water yield, sediment yield is directly

  2. Quality of Water from Domestic Wells in Principal Aquifers of the United States, 1991-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), water samples were collected during 1991-2004 from domestic wells (private wells used for household drinking water) for analysis of drinking-water contaminants, where contaminants are considered, as defined by the Safe Drinking Water Act, to be all substances in water. Physical properties and the concentrations of major ions, trace elements, nutrients, radon, and organic compounds (pesticides and volatile organic compounds) were measured in as many as 2,167 wells; fecal indicator bacteria and radionuclides also were measured in some wells. The wells were located within major hydrogeologic settings of 30 regionally extensive aquifers used for water supply in the United States. One sample was collected from each well prior to any in-home treatment. Concentrations were compared to water-quality benchmarks for human health, either U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for public water supplies or USGS Health-Based Screening Levels (HBSLs). No individual contaminant was present in concentrations greater than available health benchmarks in more than 8 percent of the sampled wells. Collectively, however, about 23 percent of wells had at least 1 contaminant present at concentrations greater than an MCL or HBSL, based on analysis of samples from 1,389 wells in which most contaminants were measured. Radon, nitrate, several trace elements, fluoride, gross alpha- and beta-particle radioactivity, and fecal indicator bacteria were found most frequently (in one or more percent of wells) at concentrations greater than benchmarks and, thus, are of potential concern for human health. Radon concentrations were greater than the lower of two proposed MCLs (300 picocuries per liter or pCi/L) in about 65 percent of the wells and greater than the higher proposed MCL (4,000 pCi/L) in about 4 percent of wells. Nitrate, arsenic, manganese, strontium, and

  3. Enzyme activities in the water column and in shallow permeable sediments from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnosti, C.; Ziervogel, K.; Ocampo, L.; Ghobrial, S.

    2009-09-01

    The activities of extracellular enzymes that initiate the microbial remineralization of high molecular weight organic matter were investigated in the water column and sandy surface sediments at two sites in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Six fluorescently labeled polysaccharides were hydrolyzed rapidly in the water column as well as in permeable sediments. This result contrasts with previous studies carried out in environments dominated by fine-grained muds, in which the spectrum of enzymes active in the water column is quite limited compared to that of the underlying sediments. Extracts of Spirulina, Isochrysis, and Thalassiosira were also used to measure hydrolysis rates in water from one of the sites. Rates of hydrolysis of the three plankton extracts were comparable to those of the purified polysaccharides. The broad spectrum and rapid rates of hydrolysis observed in the water column at both sites in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico may be due to the permeable nature of the sediments. Fluid flux through the sediments is sufficiently high that the entire 1.5 m deep water column could filter though the sediments on timescales of a few days to two weeks. Movement of water through sediments may also transport dissolved enzymes from the sediment into the water column, enhancing the spectrum as well as the rate of water column enzymatic activities. Such interaction between the sediments and water column would permit water column microbial communities to access high molecular weight substrates that might otherwise remain unavailable as substrates.

  4. Laboratory measurements of physical, chemical, and optical characteristics of Lake Chicot sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, diffuse attenuation, beam attenuation, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of lake bottom sediment. Mixture concentrations range from 5 ppm to 700 ppm by weight of total suspended solids in filtered deionized tap water. Upwelled reflectance is a nonlinear function of remote sensing wave lengths. Near-infrared wavelengths are useful for monitoring highly turbid waters with sediment concentrations above 100 ppm. It is found that both visible and near infrared wavelengths, beam attenuation correlates well with total suspended solids ranging over two orders of magnitude.

  5. An environmental fate study of methoxychlor using water-sediment model system.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Minoru; Satsuma, Koji; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural waste water containing pesticides can reach the sea via rivers and estuaries, including brackish lakes. We studied the metabolic fate of methoxychlor [MXC; 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] in a model system consisting of sediment and associated water collected from two sampling sites: a brackish lake and a freshwater river. MXC degraded rapidly and was finally mineralized in both sediment systems. The first step of degradation was dechlorination to yield 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane [de-Cl-MXC] or CN-replacement to yield 2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile [MXC-CN], followed by O-demethylation. Although the metabolites were common to the two sediments, the dynamics of the metabolites over time were clearly distinct. In the brackish lake sediment, de-Cl-MXC accumulated transiently, whereas in the river sediment, it was rapidly converted to its demethylated metabolite. We also found that dechlorination and CN-replacement proceeded in autoclave-sterilized river sediment. In the river sediment, the abiotic reaction mediated by abundant humic acid and low oxygen level also appeared to contribute to the overall MXC metabolism.

  6. The symbiotic relationship of sediment and biofilm dynamics at the sediment water interface of oil sands industrial tailings ponds.

    PubMed

    Reid, T; VanMensel, D; Droppo, I G; Weisener, C G

    2016-09-01

    Within the oil sands industry, tailings ponds are used as a means of retaining tailings until a reclamation technology such as end pit lakes (EPLs) can be developed and optimized to remediate such tailings with a water cap (although dry-land strategies for tailing reclamation are also being developed). EPLs have proven successful for other mining ventures (e.g. metal rock mines) in eventually mitigating contaminant loads to receiving waters once biochemical remediation has taken place (although the duration for this to occur may be decades). While the biological interactions at the sediment water interface of tailings ponds or EPLs have been shown to control biogeochemical processes (i.e. chemical fluxes and redox profiles), these have often been limited to static microcosm conditions. Results from such experiments may not tell the whole story given that the sediment water interface often represents a dynamic environment where erosion and deposition may be occurring in association with microbial growth and decay. Mobilization of sediments and associated contaminants may therefore have a profound effect on remediation rates and, as such, may decrease the effectiveness of EPLs as viable reclamation strategies for mining industries. Using a novel core erosion system (U-GEMS), this paper examines how the microbial community can influence sediment water interface stability and how the biofilm community may change with tailings age and after disturbance (biofilm reestablishment). Shear strength, eroded mass measurements, density gradients, high-resolution microscopy, and microbial community analyses were made on 2 different aged tailings (fresh and ∼38 years) under biotic and abiotic conditions. The same experiments were repeated as duplicates with both sets of experiments having consolidation/biostabilization periods of 21 days. Results suggest that the stability of the tailings varies between types and conditions with the fresh biotic tailings experiencing up to 75

  7. Concentration of arsenic in water, sediments and fish species from naturally contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Juan José; Schenone, Nahuel F; Pérez Carrera, Alejo; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia

    2013-04-01

    Arsenic (As) may occur in surface freshwater ecosystems as a consequence of both natural contamination and anthropogenic activities. In this paper, As concentrations in muscle samples of 10 fish species, sediments and surface water from three naturally contaminated rivers in a central region of Argentina are reported. The study area is one of the largest regions in the world with high As concentrations in groundwater. However, information of As in freshwater ecosystems and associated biota is scarce. An extensive spatial variability of As concentrations in water and sediments of sampled ecosystems was observed. Geochemical indices indicated that sediments ranged from mostly unpolluted to strongly polluted. The concentration of As in sediments averaged 6.58 μg/g ranging from 0.23 to 59.53 μg/g. Arsenic in sediments barely followed (r = 0.361; p = 0.118) the level of contamination of water. All rivers showed high concentrations of As in surface waters, ranging from 55 to 195 μg/L. The average concentration of As in fish was 1.76 μg/g. The level of contamination with As differed significantly between species. Moreover, the level of bioaccumulation of As in fish species related to the concentration of As in water and sediments also differed between species. Whilst some fish species seemed to be able to regulate the uptake of this metalloid, the concentration of As in the large catfish Rhamdia quelen mostly followed the concentration of As in abiotic compartments. The erratic pattern of As concentrations in fish and sediments regardless of the invariable high levels in surface waters suggests the existence of complex biogeochemical processes behind the distribution patterns of As in these naturally contaminated ecosystems.

  8. A new device for collection of interstitial water from wetland sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Barnes, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    A sampler for collection of interstitial water from wetland sediments is described. It differs from other sampling devices because it does not have to be filled with solution to facilitate diffusion, it does not have to be removed from the wetland to collect samples, and it can be used to draw repeated samples over time from identical locations. The device facilitates 'in situ' measurement of a wide range of abiotic parameters such as electrical conductivity, redox potential, and pH in wetland sediments. The device has application in ecological investigations of sediment-borne wildlife diseases, studies of benthic invertebrates, measurement of nutrient exchange, and other aspects of wetland ecology.

  9. Partitioning of sediment-associated organic matter in agricultural watersheds: controlling parameters and water quality implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, S.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bachand, P. A.; Spencer, R.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hernes, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sediment-associated organic matter (OM) may constitute a significant source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in agricultural watersheds, but the partitioning of sediment-bound OM is still poorly characterized in such systems. The Willow Slough agricultural watershed in the Central Valley of California, USA, is the focus of a study of DOM dynamics in agricultural watersheds. Weekly surface water samples collected at the watershed outlet since January 2006 show that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations increase during summer irrigation up to 7 mg/L, and steadily return to winter baseline concentrations (2 mg/L). A similar trend is observed for total suspended sediment concentrations (TSS), which peak about five weeks earlier than DOC (late June) around 200 mg/L, suggesting that sediments may contribute significantly to the delivery of DOM. We investigated the potential impact of sediment-bound OM partitioning on DOM concentration and composition in agricultural surface waters and will present laboratory data related to the equilibrium abiotic release of DOM from suspended, bed, and bank sediments, collected in the Willow Slough watershed over a range of land uses and hydrologic conditions. Desorption isotherms show distinct DOC contributions between sediment types (from 2 to 15% OC desorbed), with suspended sediment from summer irrigation yielding up to 3.4 times more DOC than winter storm suspended sediment, and 4.8 times more than summer bed sediment. In addition, environmental parameters such as water temperature, conductivity, and pH were found to affect OM partitioning differently, pH displaying the most control on DOC release (up to 60% increase from pH 6.5 to pH 9.5). Finally, a detailed biogeochemical characterization of the desorbed DOM quality (including amino acids composition) will serve as a basis for comparing riverine and sediment-derived DOM. By assessing the contribution of DOM from sediments in agricultural watersheds, this research

  10. Developing Water Quality Critera for Suspended and Bedded Sediments-Illustrative Example Application.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. EPA's Framework for Developing Suspended and Bedded Sediments (SABS) Water Quality Criteria (SABS Framework) provides a consistent process, technical methods, and supporting materials to enable resource managers to develop ambient water quality criteria for one of the m...

  11. Land conversion to bioenergy production: water budget and sediment output in a semiarid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass based bioenergy production has been considered a feasible alternative of land use for the mixed-grass prairie and marginal croplands in the High Plains. However, little is known of the effect of this land use change on the water cycle and associated sediment output in this water controll...

  12. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON PHENANTHRENE SORPTION-DESORPTION ON A FRESH-WATER SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the effects of the water-miscible cosolvent methanol on the sorption-desorption of phenanthrene by the natural organic matter (NOM) of a fresh-water sediment. A biphasic pattern was observed in the relationship between the log of the carbon-normalized sorpti...

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  14. Intersex and alterations in reproductive development of a cichlid, Tilapia guineensis, from a municipal domestic water supply lake (Eleyele) in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Adeduntan, Sherifat D; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to develop and validate biomarker techniques for aquatic environmental monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in Nigeria aquatic ecosystems, using the Eleyele Lake, which is a major source of domestic water supply to Ibadan and its surrounding towns, as a model aquatic environment and Tilapia guineensis, as a model organism. A total of 55 male and 28 female fish were used for this study. No significant difference in condition factor was observed between the sexes. Evaluation of gross gonadal morphology of the sampled fish showed 33% intersex prevalence in the sampled population, of which respective 71 and 29% were males and females, with visible testis and ovary developing alongside phenotypic females and males. Plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17β-estradiol (E2) were performed, showing that male fish had significantly higher plasma LH and E2 concentrations, compared to females. Vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata proteins (Zrp) mRNA levels were significantly higher in males, compared to female fish. Contaminant analysis revealed that PCB 81, 123, 138 and 196 were the only PCB congeners detected in sediment and fish muscle (PCB153 in sediment), while dieldrin was the only organochlorine compound (OC) detected in Eleyele sediment. These responses were used in a multivariate analysis, showing that two principal components were extracted and accounted for 74% of total variation in the dataset. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that male fish variables were positively correlated with PCB congeners 18 and 123, while female fish showed positive correlations with congener 81, 138, 189, 196, indicating sex-specific pattern of association between PCBs concentrations and biomarker expression. In addition, strong positive correlation between male fish and LH, E2, FSH and Vtg was observed, while female fish positively correlated with

  15. Intersex and alterations in reproductive development of a cichlid, Tilapia guineensis, from a municipal domestic water supply lake (Eleyele) in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Adeduntan, Sherifat D; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to develop and validate biomarker techniques for aquatic environmental monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in Nigeria aquatic ecosystems, using the Eleyele Lake, which is a major source of domestic water supply to Ibadan and its surrounding towns, as a model aquatic environment and Tilapia guineensis, as a model organism. A total of 55 male and 28 female fish were used for this study. No significant difference in condition factor was observed between the sexes. Evaluation of gross gonadal morphology of the sampled fish showed 33% intersex prevalence in the sampled population, of which respective 71 and 29% were males and females, with visible testis and ovary developing alongside phenotypic females and males. Plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17β-estradiol (E2) were performed, showing that male fish had significantly higher plasma LH and E2 concentrations, compared to females. Vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata proteins (Zrp) mRNA levels were significantly higher in males, compared to female fish. Contaminant analysis revealed that PCB 81, 123, 138 and 196 were the only PCB congeners detected in sediment and fish muscle (PCB153 in sediment), while dieldrin was the only organochlorine compound (OC) detected in Eleyele sediment. These responses were used in a multivariate analysis, showing that two principal components were extracted and accounted for 74% of total variation in the dataset. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that male fish variables were positively correlated with PCB congeners 18 and 123, while female fish showed positive correlations with congener 81, 138, 189, 196, indicating sex-specific pattern of association between PCBs concentrations and biomarker expression. In addition, strong positive correlation between male fish and LH, E2, FSH and Vtg was observed, while female fish positively correlated with

  16. Water yield and sediment export in small, partially glaciated Alpine watersheds in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Natan; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-06-01

    Climate change is expected to modify the hydrological and geomorphological dynamics of mountain watersheds significantly, so impacting on downstream water yield and sediment supply. However, such watersheds are often poorly instrumented, making it difficult to link recent and rapid climate change to landscape response. Here we combine unique records of river flow and sediment export, with historical archival imagery to test the hypothesis that climate warming has substantially increased both water yield and sediment export from small Alpine watersheds (<3 km2) characterized by small (<0.5 km2 surface) glaciers. To examine ice and landform response to climate change, we apply archival digital photogrammetry to historical aerial imagery available from 1967 to present. We use the resulting data on ice loss, in combination with reliable records of stream flow from hydroelectric power intakes and climate data to approximate a water budget and to determine the evolution of different contributions to river flow. We use the stream flow records to estimate volumetric sediment transport capacity and compare this with the volumes of sand and gravel exported from the watersheds, quantified from records of intake flushing. The data show clearly that climate forcing since the early 1980s has been accompanied by a net increase in both water yield and sediment transport capacity, and we attribute these as signals of reduced snow accumulation and glacier recession. However, sediment export has not responded in the same way and we attribute this to limits on sediment delivery to streams because of poor rockwall-hillslope-channel connectivity. However, we do find that extreme climate conditions can be seen in sediment export data suggesting that these, rather than mean climate warming, may dominate watershed response.

  17. Methyl t-Butyl Ether Mineralization in Surface-Water Sediment Microcosms under Denitrifying Conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Mineralization of [U-14C] methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) to 14CO2 without accumulation of t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was observed in surface-water sediment microcosms under denitrifying conditions. Methanogenic activity and limited transformation of MTBE to TBA were observed in the absence of denitrification. Results indicate that bed sediment microorganisms can effectively degrade MTBE to nontoxic products under denitrifying conditions.

  18. Energy use and domestic hot water consumption - Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, F.S.

    1994-11-01

    New York State Energy Research & Development Authority has sponsored a project to develop comprehensive operating data on combined domestic hot water (DHW) and heating systems to be used in system design and specifications. The new, more precise DHW flow data (broken down on a per capita basis) result in a better foundation for sizing decisions. Thirty New York City multifamily buildings with combined steam heating and DHW plants were instrumented to monitor apartment, outdoor, boiler and DHW temperatures, and burner on-off times. In nine buildings, which had been upgraded, additional data collected were: stack temperature, DHW flow in 15-minute increments, oil and boiler make-up water flows, and DHW temperature before and after the mixing valve and on the return line. The data set collected for 14 months amounts to a data base of over 110 megabytes. This report presents DHW demand patterns, seasonal variations, weekday vs. weekend consumption, consumption vs. occupancy levels, coincidence of 15-, 60-, 120-, and 180- minute demand periods, and average vs. peak demand levels, as well as figures for energy to generate DHW. The format of guidelines presented in this report differs from those currently in use. The {open_quotes}Low - Medium - High{close_quotes} (LMH) users set of guidelines provide a range, rather than a specific, singular gallonage standard. By providing LMH tables and guidelines for their application the design engineer or contractor can then use these as a tool from which to select the appropriate level that matches the site being served. Values are presented for both New York sizing guidelines (developed from this study), as well as a set of {open_quote}National{close_quote} figures (derived from a compilation of studies conducted in other cities). The LMH approach and {open_quote}National{close_quote} guidelines were adopted for inclusion in the 1995 ASHRAE Handbook revision.

  19. Magnetic field-enhanced sedimentation of nanopowder magnetite in water flow.

    PubMed

    Bakhteeva, Iu; Medvedeva, I; Byzov, I; Zhakov, S; Yermakov, A; Uimin, M; Shchegoleva, N

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation dynamics of magnetite (γ-Fe3O4) nanopowder (10-20 nm) in water in a gradient magnetic field Bmax=0.3 T, (dB/dz)max=0.13 T/cm was studied for different water flow speeds and starting particle concentrations (0.1 and 1.0 g/l). The aggregates formation in water was monitored under the same conditions. In cyclical water flow, the velocity of particle sedimentation increases significantly in comparison to its rate in still water, which corresponds to the intensified aggregate formation. However, at a water flow speed more than 0.1 cm/s sedimentation velocity slows down, which might be connected to aggregate destruction in a faster water flow. Correlation between sedimentation time and the nanoparticle concentration in water does not follow the trend expected for spherical superparamagnetic particles. In our case sedimentation time is shorter for c=0.1 g/l in comparison with that for c=1 g/l. We submit that such a feature is caused by particle self-organization in water into complex structures of fractal type. This effect is unexplained in the framework of existing theoretical models of colloids systems, so far. Provisional recommendations are suggested for the design of a magnetic separator on the permanent magnets base. The main device parameters are magnetic field intensity B≥0.1 T, magnetic field gradient (dB/dz)max≈(0.1-0.2) T/cm, and water flow speed V<0.15 cm/s. For particle concentration c=1 g/l, purification of water from magnetite down to ecological and hygienic standards is reached in 80 min, for c=0.1 g/l the time is reduced down to 50 min. PMID:25650300

  20. Effect of cations on the solubilization/deposition of triclosan in sediment-water-rhamnolipid system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanbo; Hu, Yongyou; Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Wu, Wenjin

    2016-09-01

    Cations had great influence on the self-assembly of rhamnolipid, which in turn affected the fate of triclosan. The migration of triclosan from sediment to water benefited its biodegradation but it could be transformed into more toxic compounds. To regulate the fate of triclosan and reduce environmental risks extremely, the effect of four common cations in surface water (Na(+)/K(+)/Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)) on the solubilization/deposition of triclosan in sediment-water-rhamnolipid system was investigated. The interaction among cations, triclosan and rhamnolipid was explored based on self-assembly of rhamnolipid and water solubility of triclosan in rhamnolipid solutions. Results showed that cations had little influence on the fate of triclosan in the absence of rhamnolipid. Cations, especially Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), reduced the critical micelle concentration, micellar size and zeta potential of rhamnolipid solutions. The changes in self-assembly of rhamnolipid with different cations led to the difference of residual rhamnolipid concentration in water, which was nearly invariant with 0.01 M Na(+)/K(+) while decreased significantly with 0.01 M Ca(2+)/Mg(2+). Consequently, water solubility of triclosan in rhamnolipid solutions increased with the addition of Na(+)/K(+) whereas decreased with Ca(2+)/Mg(2+). In sediment-water- rhamnolipid system, triclosan was slightly solubilized from sediment to water with Na(+)/K(+) while deposited in sediment with Ca(2+)/Mg(2+). These findings provided an alternative application of rhamnolipid for the remediation of triclosan-polluted sediment. PMID:27341150

  1. A comparison of solids collected in sediment traps and automated water samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, L.A.; Rada, R.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment traps are being used in some pollution monitoring programs in the USA to sample suspended solids for contaminant analyses. This monitoring approach assumes that the characteristics of solids obtained in sediment traps are the same as those collected in whole-water sampling devices. We tested this assumption in the upper Mississippi River, based on the inorganic particle-size distribution (determined with a laser particle- analyzer) and volatile matter content of solids (a surrogate for organic matter). Cylindrical sediment traps (aspect ratio 3) were attached to a rigid mooring device and deployed in a flowing side channel in Navigation Pool 7 of the upper Mississippi River. On each side of the mooring device, a trap was situated adjacent to a port of an autosampler that collected raw water samples hourly to form 2-d composite samples. Paired samples (one trap and one raw water, composite sample) were removed from each end of the mooring device at 2-d intervals during the 30-d study period and compared. The relative particle collection efficiency of paired samplers did not vary temporally. Particle-size distributions of inorganic solids from sediment traps and water samples were not significantly different. The volatile matter content of solids was lesser in sediment traps (mean, 9.5%) than in corresponding water samples (mean, 22.7%). This bias may have been partly due to under-collection of phytoplankton (mainly cyanobacteria), which were abundant in the water column during the study. The positioning of water samplers and sediment traps in the mooring device did not influence the particle-size distribution or total solids of samples. We observed a small difference in the amount of organic matter collected by water samplers situated at opposite ends of the mooring device.

  2. The Association of Cryptosporidium parvum With Suspended Sediments: Implications for Transport in Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the transport and fate of microorganisms in surface waters is of vital concern in protecting the integrity and safety of municipal water supply systems. The human pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a particular public health interest, as it is ubiquitous in the surface waters of the United States, it can persist for long periods in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. Due to its small size (5 um), low specific gravity (1.05 g/cm3), and negative surface charge, C. parvum oocysts are generally considered to move through watersheds from their source to drinking water reservoirs with little attenuation. However, the transport of the oocysts in surface waters may be mediated by interactions with suspended sediments. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the extent of C. parvum oocyst attachment to several inorganic and organic sediments under varying water chemical conditions, and settling column experiments were performed to demonstrate how these associations influence the effective settling velocity of C. parvum oocysts. Results from these experiments showed that C. parvum oocysts do associate with inorganic and organic sediments and often settle at the rate of the suspended sediment. The size and surface charge of the host suspended sediment influenced the extent of oocyst attachment as oocysts preferentially associated with particles greater than 3 um, and fewer oocysts associated with particles having a highly negative surface charge. Background water chemical conditions including ionic strength, ion composition, and pH did not have a significant effect on oocyst attachment to suspended sediments.

  3. Spatial Variability of Metals in Surface Water and Sediment in the Langat River and Geochemical Factors That Influence Their Water-Sediment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wan Ying; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2012-01-01

    This paper determines the controlling factors that influence the metals' behavior water-sediment interaction facies and distribution of elemental content (75As, 111Cd, 59Co, 52Cr, 60Ni, and 208Pb) in water and sediment samples in order to assess the metal pollution status in the Langat River. A total of 90 water and sediment samples were collected simultaneously in triplicate at 30 sampling stations. Selected metals were analyzed using ICP-MS, and the metals' concentration varied among stations. Metal concentrations of water ranged between 0.08–24.71 μg/L for As, <0.01–0.53 μg/L for Cd, 0.06–6.22 μg/L for Co, 0.32–4.67 μg/L for Cr, 0.80–24.72 μg/L for Ni, and <0.005–6.99 μg/L for Pb. Meanwhile, for sediment, it ranged between 4.47–30.04 mg/kg for As, 0.02–0.18 mg/kg for Cd, 0.87–4.66 mg/kg for Co, 4.31–29.04 mg/kg for Cr, 2.33–8.25 mg/kg for Ni and 5.57–55.71 mg/kg for Pb. The average concentration of studied metals in the water was lower than the Malaysian National Standard for Drinking Water Quality proposed by the Ministry of Health. The average concentration for As in sediment was exceeding ISQG standards as proposed by the Canadian Sediment Quality Guidelines. Statistical analyses revealed that certain metals (As, Co, Ni, and Pb) were generally influenced by pH and conductivity. These results are important when making crucial decisions in determining potential hazardous levels of these metals toward humans. PMID:22919346

  4. Microbial Response to Experimentally Controlled Redox Transitions at the Sediment Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Frindte, Katharina; Allgaier, Martin; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Eckert, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The sediment-water interface of freshwater lakes is characterized by sharp chemical gradients, shaped by the interplay between physical, chemical and microbial processes. As dissolved oxygen is depleted in the uppermost sediment, the availability of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. nitrate and sulfate, becomes the limiting factor. We performed a time series experiment in a mesocosm to simulate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions at the sediment-water interface. Our goal was to identify changes in the microbial activity due to redox transitions induced by successive depletion of available electron acceptors. Monitoring critical hydrochemical parameters in the overlying water in conjunction with a new sampling strategy for sediment bacteria enabled us to correlate redox changes in the water to shifts in the active microbial community and the expression of functional genes representing specific redox-dependent microbial processes. Our results show that during several transitions from oxic-heterotrophic condition to sulfate-reducing condition, nitrate-availability and the on-set of sulfate reduction strongly affected the corresponding functional gene expression. There was evidence of anaerobic methane oxidation with NOx. DGGE analysis revealed redox-related changes in microbial activity and expression of functional genes involved in sulfate and nitrite reduction, whereas methanogenesis and methanotrophy showed only minor changes during redox transitions. The combination of high-frequency chemical measurements and molecular methods provide new insights into the temporal dynamics of the interplay between microbial activity and specific redox transitions at the sediment-water interface.

  5. Microbial Response to Experimentally Controlled Redox Transitions at the Sediment Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Frindte, Katharina; Allgaier, Martin; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Eckert, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The sediment-water interface of freshwater lakes is characterized by sharp chemical gradients, shaped by the interplay between physical, chemical and microbial processes. As dissolved oxygen is depleted in the uppermost sediment, the availability of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. nitrate and sulfate, becomes the limiting factor. We performed a time series experiment in a mesocosm to simulate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions at the sediment-water interface. Our goal was to identify changes in the microbial activity due to redox transitions induced by successive depletion of available electron acceptors. Monitoring critical hydrochemical parameters in the overlying water in conjunction with a new sampling strategy for sediment bacteria enabled us to correlate redox changes in the water to shifts in the active microbial community and the expression of functional genes representing specific redox-dependent microbial processes. Our results show that during several transitions from oxic-heterotrophic condition to sulfate-reducing condition, nitrate-availability and the on-set of sulfate reduction strongly affected the corresponding functional gene expression. There was evidence of anaerobic methane oxidation with NOx. DGGE analysis revealed redox-related changes in microbial activity and expression of functional genes involved in sulfate and nitrite reduction, whereas methanogenesis and methanotrophy showed only minor changes during redox transitions. The combination of high-frequency chemical measurements and molecular methods provide new insights into the temporal dynamics of the interplay between microbial activity and specific redox transitions at the sediment-water interface. PMID:26599000

  6. Enhanced phosphorus flux from overlying water to sediment in a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinzheng; Zhao, Huazhang; Zhao, Nannan; Ni, Jinren; Gu, Xuejing

    2016-09-01

    This report proposed a novel technique for the regulation of phosphorus flux based on a bioelectrochemical system. In the simulated water system, a simple in situ sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was constructed. SMFC voltage was increased with time until it was 0.23V. The redox potential of the sediment was increased from -220mV to -178mV during the process. Phosphorus concentration in the water system was decreased from 0.1mg/L to 0.01mg/L, compared with 0.09mg/L in the control. The installation of a SMFC produced an external current and internal circuit, which promoted the transfer of phosphate in overlying water to the sediment, enhanced the microbial oxidation of Fe(2+), and increased the formation of stable phosphorus in sediment. In conclusion, phosphorus flux from the overlying water to sediment was enhanced by SMFC, which has the potential to be used for eutrophication control of water bodies.

  7. Occurrence of macrophyte monocultures in drainage ditches relates to phosphorus in both sediment and water.

    PubMed

    van Zuidam, Jeroen P; Peeters, Edwin Thm

    2013-01-01

    Monocultures of functional equivalent species often negatively affect nutrient cycling and overall biodiversity of aquatic ecosystems. The importance of water and sediment nutrients for the occurrence of monocultures was analysed using field data from drainage ditches. Ranges of nutrients were identified that best explained the occurrence of monocultures of Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) St. John (Waterweed type), monocultures of duckweed (Duckweed type) and the occurrence of a diverse submerged vegetation (Mixed type). Results indicated these three vegetation types occurred at distinctive ranges of phosphorus in water and sediment. Sediment phosphorus distinguished monocultures from the Mixed type, with the two monocultures occurring at two to four times higher concentrations. The Waterweed type occurred at higher sediment phosphorus levels than the mixed type, showed a higher degree of dominance and lower number of red list species. Phosphorus concentrations in water were four to six times higher in the Duckweed type compared to the Waterweed and Mixed type. The three vegetation types had comparable total biomass which was unexpected. This comparability was likely caused by duckweed only growing at the water surface at the highest nutrient levels and the limited space in drainage ditches for increased submerged biomass development at high nutrient availability. Possible measures to limit the occurrence of monocultures, and thereby increasing the ecological quality, are discussed with focus on lowering phosphorus concentrations in both water and sediment and on removal of plant species that develop into monocultures.

  8. An Integrated Assessment of Sediment Remediation in a Midwestern U.S. Stream Using Sediment Chemistry, Water Quality, Bioassessment and Fish Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive biological, sediment and water quality study of the lower Little Scioto River near Marion, Ohio, USA was undertaken in July 2007 to evaluate the effectiveness of removal of creosote-contaminated sediment. The study area covered 7.5 river miles (RMs) of the river, ...

  9. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2010 (October 1, 2009–September 30, 2010). Turbidity sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, three sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the turbidity sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be computed. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2009 through September 2010. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  10. Summary of suspended-sediment concentration data, San Francisco Bay, California, water year 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Morgan, Tara L.

    2012-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2009 (October 1, 2008–September 30, 2009). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2008 through September 2009. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  11. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water-year 2006 (October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2005 through September 2006. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  12. Characterization of near-bed sediment transport in air and water by high-speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. S.; Hamm, N. T.; Cushman-Roisin, B.; Dade, W. B.

    2010-12-01

    Near-bed sediment transport comprises a large fraction of the total mass flux of environmental flows, yet is difficult to characterize at fine scales without disturbing the flow. Particle-tracking velocimetry by means of high-speed video has proven to be an effective technique for quantifying particle behavior under this constraint. We present here results of experiments examining: i) the vertical structure of mass and momentum and ii) initial properties of particle trajectories within a layer of sediment transport immediately above a bed of loose grains in channel flows. Observations were conducted in both air and water of test particles with the density of quartz and with median diameters that ranged from 30 µm to 600 µm. Analysis of such a wide range of sediment transport conditions by the same method permits an evaluation of the fundamental structure of the near-bed sediment transport layer, including particle concentration and particle velocity. With appropriate normalization, self-consistent structure is identified for all particles in air, medium sand in water, and fine sand and silt in water. The integral values by which the data were normalized are found to be consistent with the relevant physical properties of the sediment transporting flow. This study advances the use of high-speed videography as a method by which to investigate the detailed mechanics of particle motion in a near-bed boundary layer, which in turn, can provide boundary conditions used for modeling sediment transport in a variety of applications.

  13. Mercury and methylmercury contents in mine-waste calcine, water, and sediment collected from the Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Greaves, I.A.; Bustos, D.M.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    The Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines, produced about 2,900 t of mercury during mining of cinnabar ore from 1953 to 1976. More than 2,000,000 t of mine-waste calcines (retorted ore) were produced during mining, much of which were used to construct a jetty in nearby Honda Bay. Since 1995, high Hg contents have been found in several people living near the mine, and 21 of these people were treated for mercury poisoning. Samples of mine-waste calcine contain high total Hg concentrations ranging from 43-660 ??g/g, whereas total Hg concentrations in sediment samples collected from a mine pit lake and local stream vary from 3.7-400 ??g/g. Mine water flowing through the calcines is acidic, pH 3.1-4.3, and total Hg concentrations ranging from 18-31 ??g/l in this water significantly exceed the 1.0-??g/l drinking water standard for Hg recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Total Hg contents are generally lower in water samples collected from surrounding domestic wells, the mine pit lake, Honda Bay, and the nearby stream, varying from 0.008-1.4 ??g/l. Methylmercury concentrations in water draining mine calcines range from <0.02-1.4 ng/l, but methylmercury is highest in the pit lake water, ranging from 1.7-3.1 ng/l. Mercury methylation at the Palawan mine is similar to or higher than that found in other mercury mines worldwide. Much of the methylmercury generated in Palawan mine-waste calcines and those in Honda Bay is transferred to water, and then to marine fish and seafood. A food source pathway of Hg to humans is most likely in this coastal, high fish-consuming population.

  14. Water and sediment dynamics in a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment under cracking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoubli, Nesrine; Raclot, Damien; Moussa, Roger; Habaieb, Hamadi; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Shrink-swell soils, such as those in a Mediterranean climate regime, can cause changes in terms of hydrological and erosive responses due to the changing soil water storage conditions. Only a limited number of long-term studies have focused on the impacts on both hydrological and erosive responses and their interactions in an agricultural environment. In this context, this study aims to document the dynamics of cracks, runoff and soil erosion within a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment and to quantify the influence of crack processes on the water and sediment supplied to a reservoir located at the catchment outlet. Detailed monitoring of the presence of topsoil cracks was conducted within the Kamech catchment (ORE OMERE, Tunisia), and runoff and suspended sediment loads were continuously measured over a long period of time (2005-2012) at the outlets of a field (1.32 ha) and a catchment (263 ha). Analysis of the data showed that topsoil cracks were open approximately half of the year and that the rainfall regime and water table level conditions locally control the seasonal cracking dynamics. Topsoil cracks appeared to seriously affect the generation of runoff and sediment concentrations and, consequently, sediment yields, with similar dynamics observed at the field and catchment outlets. A similar time lag in the seasonality between water and sediment delivery was observed at these two scales: although the runoff rates were globally low during the presence of topsoil cracks, most sediment transport occurred during this period associated with very high sediment concentrations. This study underlines the importance of a good prediction of runoff during the presence of cracks for reservoir siltation considerations. In this context, the prediction of cracking effects on runoff and soil erosion is a key factor for the development of effective soil and water management strategies and downstream reservoir preservation.

  15. Analysis of Nitrogen Pollution Load by Domestic Waste Water Treatment in the Tedori River Alluvial Fan Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshisuke; Noto, Fumikazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchihara, Takeo; Tanaka, Tadashi

    An evaluation of the environment nitrogen pollution load with regard to domestic waste water treatment on the Tedori River Alluvial Fan Areas was conducted. The literature-based water quality data collected before and after the treatment and the basic outflow pollution unit was determined for the several water treatment systems. Next these data were applied for the entire alluvial fan areas resulting in an estimated total nitrogen pollution load of as 186 ton/year. 58% of the total nitrogen pollution load was estimated to be from the private residences that were not connected to the public sewage system (connecting ratio 90.5%) which thus had relation to the pollution of groundwater and water quality in the drainage canal in the region under consideration. The nitrogen pollution load was higher in the urban area more than the rural. The rural domestic waste water system accounted for about 17.9% of the total pollution load, which carried a high probability of groundwater pollution because of seepage or percolation. The pollution load from the direct flow of the public sewage treatment water to the middle stream of the Tedori River, together with the water from small companies and untreated water from local family dwellings made up about 3-10% of total pollution.

  16. The marine geochemistry of actinium-227: Evidence for its migration through sediment pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masatoshi ); Nikaido, Hirofumi )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 227}Ac with a half life of 21.8 years has a potential utility as a tracer of deep water circulation and mixing studies on time scales less than 100 years. Here the authors present the first measurement of {sup 227}Ac profile in the pore water of Northwest Pacific deep-sea sediment and in the {approximately}10,000 m long water column of Izu-Ogasawara Trench. The results clearly show that {sup 227}Ac is supplied from the sediment to the overlying water through migration in the pore water. The model calculation indicates that the molecular diffusion alone through sediment porewater can support only a half of the standing crop of excess {sup 227}Ac in the water column and the enhanced supply of {sup 227}Ac by particle mixing is necessary to account for the remainder. Thus, bioturbation in the deep sea plays an important role in controlling the flux of some short-lived radionuclides such as {sup 227}Ac and {sup 228}Ra across the sediment-water interface.

  17. Methods for determination of inorganic substances in water and fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Friedman, Linda C.

    1989-01-01

    Chapter Al of the laboratory manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to analyze samples of water, suspended sediments, and bottom material for their content of inorganic constituents. Included are methods for determining the concentration of dissolved constituents in water, the total recoverable and total of constituents in water-suspended sediment samples, and the recoverable and total concentrations of constituents in samples of bottom material. The introduction to the manual includes essential definitions and a brief discussion of the use of significant figures in calculating and reporting analytical results. Quality control in the water-analysis laboratory is discussed, including the accuracy and precision of analyses, the use of standard-reference water samples, and the operation of an effective quality-assurance program. Methods for sample preparation and pretreatment are given also. A brief discussion of the principles of the analytical techniques involved and their particular application to water and sediment analysis is presented. The analytical methods of these techniques are arranged alphabetically by constituent. For each method, the general topics covered are the application, the principle of the method, the interferences, the apparatus and reagents required, a detailed description of the analytical procedure, reporting results, units and significant figures, and analytical precision data, when available. More than 126 methods are given for the determination of 70 inorganic constituents and physical properties of water, suspended sediment, and bottom material.

  18. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility at the Hanford site (Washington State), leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a reason of continued U supply to ground water. We investigated the release of U from Hanford capillary fringe sediments to pore water. Contaminated Hanford sediments were packed into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios (1:3, 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, 25:1 mL:g). After specified times, samples were centrifuged to a gravimetric water content of 0.11 ± 0.06 g g-1. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U from the sediments into the pore water, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios (1:3 and 1:1 mL:g) showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemist workbench simulations, conducted using measured solution concentrations from experiments, indicated that calcite could precipitate in the 1:3 solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the 5:1, 10:1, and 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. Up to 22% of total U was released on day 84 for the 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio reaction. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  19. Simultaneous Investigation of Sediment Transport and Water Quality Parameters Using An In Situ Measurement Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochnow, J. V.

    Though quality of surface waters has improved remarkably over the last twenty years, the contaminant load of soft cohesive sediments remained comparatively unimproved. That is why the new European water framework directive addresses contaminant loaded sediments and postulates criteria for assessing sediment quality. Surveys into contaminated sediment behaviour have revealed adsorption/desorption characteristics of individual toxins. Biomonitoring of pollutant pressure on specific benthic organ- isms on the other hand can be useful to elucidate potential dangers to aquatic ecosys- tems. However, it is yet unknown how a given contaminant loaded sediment will re- spond to different hypercritical flow conditions in terms of release rates and partition- ing of xenobiotica. On this account a small in situ measuring device (EROSIMESS) was constructed, that features simultaneous determination of suspended sediment con- centration (optical turbidity meter), dissolved oxygen levels, pH and temperature (membrane probes) under predefined hydraulic conditions. Samples of the suspen- sion can be withdrawn for subsequent chemical analysis. Bottom shear stresses up to 5N/m2 can be generated by means of a propeller that resides in cylindrical perspex tube (erosion chamber) two centimeters above the sediment bed. Baffles on the in- ner wall of the cylinder prevent a solid body rotation of the suspension by creating additional turbulence and a second propeller straight beneath the concentration me- ter inhibits the development of a concentration gradient within the chamber. A small CCD-camera is used to control positioning of the device. It can be used in water- depths up to 5m. The control unit consists of a trigger box and an ordinary laptop computer running LabView. EROSIMESS has been successfully used in various stud- ies on contaminant release, eutrophication, and SOD (sediment oxygen demand) in rivers (Spree: Germany; Maun: UK), reservoirs (Heimbach, Haus Ley: Germany), and

  20. Water volume and sediment accumulation in Lake Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sekellick, Andrew J.; Banks, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    To assist in understanding sediment and phosphorus loadings and the management of water resources, a bathymetric survey was conducted at Lake Linganore in Frederick County, Maryland in June 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Frederick and Frederick County, Maryland. Position data and water-depth data were collected using a survey grade echo sounder and a differentially corrected global positioning system. Data were compiled and edited using geographic information system software. A three-dimensional triangulated irregular network model of the lake bottom was created to calculate the volume of stored water in the reservoir. Large-scale topographic maps of the valley prior to inundation in 1972 were provided by the City of Frederick and digitized. The two surfaces were compared and a sediment volume was calculated. Cartographic representations of both water depth and sediment accumulation were produced along with an area/capacity table. An accuracy assessment was completed on the resulting bathymetric model. Vertical accuracy at the 95-percent confidence level for the collected data, the bathymetric surface model, and the bathymetric contour map was calculated to be 0.95 feet, 1.53 feet, and 3.63 feet, respectively. The water storage volume of Lake Linganore was calculated to be 1,860 acre-feet at full pool elevation. Water volume in the reservoir has decreased by 350 acre-feet (about 16 percent) in the 37 years since the dam was constructed. The total calculated volume of sediment deposited in the lake since 1972 is 313 acre-feet. This represents an average rate of sediment accumulation of 8.5 acre-feet per year since Linganore Creek was impounded. A sectional analysis of sediment distribution indicates that the most upstream third of Lake Linganore contains the largest volume of sediment whereas the section closest to the dam contains the largest amount of water. In comparison to other Maryland Piedmont reservoirs, Lake Linganore

  1. Quality-assurance plan for the analysis of fluvial sediment by the U.S. Geological Survey Kentucky Water Science Center Sediment Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shreve, Elizabeth A.; Downs, Aimee C.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes laboratory procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey Kentucky Water Science Center Sediment Laboratory for the processing and analysis of fluvial-sediment samples for concentration of sand and finer material. The report details the processing of a sediment sample through the laboratory from receiving the sediment sample, through the analytical process, to compiling results of the requested analysis. Procedures for preserving sample integrity, calibrating and maintaining of laboratory and field instruments and equipment, analyzing samples, internal quality assurance and quality control, and validity of the sediment-analysis results also are described. The report includes a list of references cited and a glossary of sediment and quality-assurance terms.

  2. Can sediment data be used to predict alkalinity and base cation chemistry of surface waters?

    PubMed

    Begum, S; McClean, C J; Cresser, M S; Breward, N

    2010-12-15

    We hypothesise that stream sediment elemental composition can predict mean and minimum concentrations of alkalinity, Ca and Mg in the river water throughout a river network. We tested this hypothesis for the River Derwent catchment in North Yorkshire, England, by using 6 years of water chemistry data from the Environment Agency and a digital elevation model to flow path-weight British Geological Survey (BGS) sediment element concentration data. The predictive models for mean concentrations were excellent for Ca and alkalinity, but less good for Mg, and did not require land use data inputs as stream water sediment composition seems to reflect all aspects of the riparian zone soil system. Predictive model forms were linear. Attempts to predict minimum values for Ca and alkalinity also were less satisfactory. This probably is due to variations in hydrological response times to individual precipitation events across the catchment.

  3. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  4. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively.

  5. Laboratory upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Kerr reservoir sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of bottom sediments taken from two sites at Kerr Reservoir, Virginia. Mixture concentrations ranged from 5 to 1000 ppm by weight of total suspended solids (TSS) in filtered deionized tap water. The two sets of radiance and reflectance spectra obtained were similar in shape and magnitude for comparable values of TSS. Upwelled reflectance was observed to be a nonlinear function of TSS with the degree of curvature a function of wavelength. Sediment from the downstream site contained a greater amount of particulate organic carbon than from the upstream site. No strong conclusions can be made regarding the effects of this difference on the radiance and reflectance spectra. Near-infrared wavelengths appear useful for measuring highly turbid water with concentrations up to 1000 ppm or more. Chromaticity characteristics do not appear useful for monitoring sediment loads above 150 ppm.

  6. Analysis of heavy metals concentration in water and sediment in the Hara biosphere reserve, southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Mohsen; Mansouri, Borhan; Nabizadeh, Sahar; Pourkhabbaz, Alireza

    2014-02-01

    This study determined the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn) in water and sediments at nine sites in the Hara biosphere reserve of southern Iran during the summer and winter 2010. Determination of Al, Cr, Cu, and Zn in water was carried out by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (Shimadzu, AA 610s) and in sediment by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (Perkin Elmer, AA3030). Results showed that the heavy metal concentrations in the water samples decreased in the sequence of Zn > Al > Cu > Cr, while in sediment samples were Cr > Zn > Cu > Al. Data analysis indicated that with the exception of Al, there was a Pearson's correlation coefficient between pH and Cu, Zn, and Cr at α = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.001 in sediment (in winter), respectively. There were also significant differences between heavy metals of Cr, Cu, and Zn during the two seasons (p < 0.001) in the water and sediment.

  7. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80 m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats. PMID:26132902

  8. Assessment of metal toxicity in sediment pore water from Lake Macquarie, Australia.

    PubMed

    Doyle, C J; Pablo, F; Lim, R P; Hyne, R V

    2003-04-01

    Recent investigations into the level of heavy metal enrichment in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have indicated that significant contamination has occurred over the past 100 years, with elevated levels of lead, zinc, cadmium, copper, and selenium being observed in most parts of the lake. Pore water extracted from sediments showing the greatest contamination by these metals exhibited toxicity to the larval development of the sea urchin Heliocidaris tuberculata. However, an analysis of pore water metal concentrations revealed that the concentrations of these metals were too low to cause toxicity. Rather, pore water toxicity was highly correlated with manganese for the majority of sites sampled; subsequent spiking experiments confirmed manganese as a cause of toxicity. Current levels of manganese in the sediments of Lake Macquarie have arisen from natural sources and are not the result of anthropogenic activities. These results reiterate the importance of identifying the causes of toxicity in assessments of sediment contamination, particularly when testing sediment pore waters using sensitive early life stages. PMID:12712294

  9. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80 m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats.

  10. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  11. Release of elements to natural water from sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Cox, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    Reservoir sediments from Lake Roosevelt (WA, USA) that were contaminated with smelter waste discharged into the Columbia River (BC, Canada) were examined using three measures of elemental release reflecting varying degrees of physical mixing and time scales. Aqueous concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the interstitial water of reservoir sediments, in the gently stirred overlying waters of incubated sediment cores, and in supernatants of aggressively tumbled slurries of reservoir sediments generally were higher than the concentrations from a reference site. When compared to chronic water-quality criteria, all three measures of release suggest that slag-contaminated sediments near the U.S.-Canadian border are potentially toxic as a result of Cu release and Pb release in two of the three measures. All three measures of Cd release suggest potential toxicity for one site farther down the reservoir, probably contaminated as a result of transport and adsorption of Cd from smelter liquid waste. Releases of Zn and As did not appear to be potentially toxic. Carbonate geochemistry indirectly affects the potential toxicity by increasing water hardness.

  12. In situ two-dimensional high-resolution profiling of sulfide in sediment interstitial waters.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Christopher R; Wang, Feiyue

    2003-02-15

    A recently developed technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (D6T)-computer-imaging densitometry (CID) was improved to study in situ two-dimensional distributions of sulfide in sediment interstitial waters adjacent to the DGT device. The in situ profiler accumulates sulfide from the sediment interstitial water through a diffusive gel onto a AgI binding gel to form black Ag2S. The amount of sulfide bound in the binding gel is then determined from the gray scale density of the dried binding gel. New gel-making procedures were employed to produce stable, evenly dispersed AgI binding gels and to minimize the darkening of the AgI gel upon exposure to light The improved DGT-CID technique was used to profile the distribution of sulfide in sediment interstitial waters at Delta Marsh, a highly productive Prairie wetland on the south shore of Lake Manitoba, at a vertical and lateral resolution of < or = 0.4 mm. The in situ high-resolution microprofiles revealed unprecedented two-dimensional heterogeneity in sulfide concentrations in the sediment interstitial waters adjacent to the DGT device. The mosaic distribution of oxic and sulfidic microenvironments suggested not only the complexity and heterogeneity of the biogeochemistry of sulfur species and sulfide-binding metals (e.g., Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Zn) in sediments but also the capability of aquatic organisms for coping with the sulfidic environment

  13. Identification of Water-Quality Trends Using Sediment Cores from Dillon Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greve, Adrienne I.; Spahr, Norman E.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2001-01-01

    Since the construction of Dillon Reservoir, in Summit County, Colorado, in 1963, its drainage area has been the site of rapid urban development and the continued influence of historical mining. In an effort to assess changes in water quality within the drainage area, sediment cores were collected from Dillon Reservoir in 1997. The sediment cores were analyzed for pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements. Pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs were used to determine the effects of urban development, and trace elements were used to identify mining contributions. Water-quality and streambed-sediment samples, collected at the mouth of three streams that drain into Dillon Reservoir, were analyzed for trace elements. Of the 14 pesticides and 3 PCBs for which the sediment samples were analyzed, only 2 pesticides were detected. Low amounts of dichloro-diphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichloro-diphenyldichloroethane (DDD), metabolites of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), were found at core depths of 5 centimeters and below 15 centimeters in a core collected near the dam. The longest core, which was collected near the dam, spanned the entire sedimentation history of the reservoir. Concentrations of total combustion PAH and the ratio of fluoranthene to pyrene in the core sample decreased with core depth and increased over time. This relation is likely due to growth in residential and tourist populations in the region. Comparisons between core samples gathered in each arm of the reservoir showed the highest PAH concentrations were found in the Tenmile Creek arm, the only arm that has an urban area on its shores, the town of Frisco. All PAH concentrations, except the pyrene concentration in one segment in the core near the dam and acenaphthylene concentrations in the tops of three cores taken in the reservoir arms, were below Canadian interim freshwater sediment-quality guidelines. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium

  14. Sediment transport and evaluation of sediment surrogate ratings in the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, Idaho, Water Years 2011–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2015-12-14

    Acoustic surrogate ratings were developed between backscatter data collected using acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) and results of suspended-sediment samples. Ratings were successfully fit to various sediment size classes (total, fines, and sands) using ADVMs of different frequencies (1.5 and 3 megahertz). Surrogate ratings also were developed using variations of streamflow and seasonal explanatory variables. The streamflow surrogate ratings produced average annual sediment load estimates that were 8–32 percent higher, depending on site and sediment type, than estimates produced using the acoustic surrogate ratings. The streamflow surrogate ratings tended to overestimate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during periods of elevated releases from Libby Dam as well as on the falling limb of the streamflow hydrograph. Estimates from the acoustic surrogate ratings more closely matched suspended-sediment sample results than did estimates from the streamflow surrogate ratings during these periods as well as for rating validation samples collected in water year 2014. Acoustic surrogate technologies are an effective means to obtain continuous, accurate estimates of suspended-sediment concentrations and loads for general monitoring and sediment-transport modeling. In the Kootenai River, continued operation of the acoustic surrogate sites and use of the acoustic surrogate ratings to calculate continuous suspended-sediment concentrations and loads will allow for tracking changes in sediment transport over time.

  15. Influence of water and sediment supply on the long-term evolution of alluvial fans and deltas: Statistical characterization of basin-filling sedimentation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Kyle M.; Wang, Yinan

    2013-09-01

    temporal and spatial variability of sedimentation, resulting from sediment storage and release and the lateral mobility of sediment transporting flows, imparts fundamental patterns into the stratigraphic record. Recent studies show that paleoenvironmental (allogenic) signals preserved in stratigraphy may be contaminated by internally generated (autogenic) sedimentation patterns; however, it is unclear how the magnitude of autogenic dynamics is related to allogenic forcings. Utilizing statistical methods, we quantify basin-filling trends in three laboratory experiments where input water and sediment flux were varied. We use the compensation index and compensation time scale to estimate the strength of compensation, defined here as the tendency to fill topographic lows faster than would result from random deposit stacking, and to estimate the time scales over which autogenic processes operate. In the experiments, topography of channelized deltas formed by noncohesive sediment was monitored in a basin experiencing temporally and spatially uniform relative subsidence. Each experiment resulted in construction of a stratigraphic package in excess of 25 channel depths thick. We find that compensation strength in the experiments is not influenced by absolute magnitudes of water and sediment flux but does increase as a function of the ratio of water to sediment flux. A compensation time scale, defined as the maximum depth of a system's channels divided by the long-term deposition rate, accurately defines the maximum time scale at which autogenic dynamics occur in all experiments. When applied to field-scale systems, we predict that autogenic dynamics occur out to time scales between 5 and 150 kyr.

  16. Effects of light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension on the phosphorus immobilization capability of drinking water treatment residuals in lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), nonhazardous by-products generated in a drinking water treatment plant, can be reused to immobilize phosphorus (P) to control the internal P loading from lake sediments for eutrophication control. Reasonably, before practical application, it is essential to determine the P immobilization capability of WTRs in lake sediments under various conditions. In this work, laboratory scale experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension on the P immobilization capability of WTRs. The results suggested that absence of light, low microbial activity, and sediment resuspension can increase the internal P loading from lake sediments. WTRs can, however, reduce the internal P loading significantly. Further analysis demonstrated that WTRs can stabilize P, decreasing the P bioavailability in the sediments under varied conditions. WTRs also presented little undesirable effects on the dissolved oxygen levels and pH of overlying water. Therefore, light, microbial activity, and sediment resuspension have little effect on the P immobilization capability of WTRs in lake sediments.

  17. Phthalate esters in water and sediments of the Kaveri River, India: environmental levels and ecotoxicological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Krishna Kumar; Sundaramoorthy, Gomathy; Ravichandran, Praveen Kumar; Girijan, Girish Kumar; Sampath, Srimurali; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran

    2015-02-01

    Phthalate esters are well known for their environmental contamination and toxicological effects as "endocrine disruptors." In this study, environmental levels of phthalate esters and ecotoxicological risk assessments were performed in one of the major rivers in India, the Kaveri. Water and sediment samples were collected during 2010-2012 representing the major stretch of the river and extracted by solid-phase and ultrasonic methods, respectively, and analyzed for six major phthalates by using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. The analytical recovery for phthalates in water and sediment ranged from 79 to 121%. Results indicated that diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dimethyl phthalate were found in every sample, whereas butylbenzyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were detected in 92% of the water samples. Likewise, in sediment samples, DEP was found most often (94%). The total phthalates in water samples ranged from 313 to 1,640 ng/l, whereas in sediments it was 2 to 1,438 ng/g dw (dry weight) with DEHP having the highest concentration. Human health risk assessment based on drinking water consumption showed no potential risk for phthalates and also DEHP levels were safe with respect to USEPA guideline (6,000 ng/l). Further, DEHP and di-n-octyl phthalate levels in water were expected to pose little threat to sensitive organisms in the riverine ecosystem as per ECOSAR chronic values. In case of sediment, the DEHP concentration was well above the USEPA sediment guideline value. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the levels and ecotoxicological risks of phthalates in Kaveri River, India.

  18. Aquatic Sediments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Reactivity of recently deposited organic matter: Degradation of lipid compounds near the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1996-05-01

    The usefulness of biomarker compounds buried in marine sediments depends upon a quantita tive understanding of the effects of early diagenesis on their distribution. To address this, a new experimental approach was utilized to determine rates of degradation in a coastal sediment. Rates of degradation for solvent-extractable lipid components were quantified in four sediment horizons composed of newly accumulated organic matter (31-144 days since deposition). Sediment accumulation rate data derived from changes in the inventory of Be-7 ( t 1/2 = 53.3 days) were combined with concentration data for lipid biomarker compounds, enabling us to evaluate the reactivity of organic matter in the upper 8 cm of the rapidly accumulating sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, USA (CLB). Net rates of loss and rate constants were calculated for individual compounds belonging to three classes of lipids: fatty acids, sterols, and n-alkanes. Individual components showed a range in reactivity, in some cases (fatty acids), attributable to differences in their biological sources. Rates and rate constants were consistently highest in the surficial sediments (0-2.5 cm), indicating that the reactivity of a given molecule(s) decreases over time, and beginning soon after deposition. Comparison with apparent rate constants ( k') calculated over longer timescales (one and ten years) shows that steady-state diagenetic models underestimate rates of degradation at or near the sediment-water interface by an order of magnitude.

  20. Analytical assessment about the simultaneous quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles in tap water and domestic waste water.

    PubMed

    Krystek, Petra; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Kooij, Pascal J F

    2015-03-15

    For pharmaceutical applications, the use of inorganic engineered nanoparticles is of growing interest while silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are the most relevant elements. A few methods were developed recently but the validation and the application testing were quite limited. Therefore, a routinely suitable multi element method for the identification of nanoparticles of different sizes below 100 nm and elemental composition by applying asymmetric flow field flow fraction (AF4) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is developed. A complete validation model of the quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles based on Ag and Au is presented for the most relevant aqueous matrices of tap water and domestic waste water. The samples are originated from locations in the Netherlands and it is of great interest to study the unwanted presence of Ag and Au as nanoparticle residues due to possible health and environmental risks. During method development, instability effects are observed for 60 nm and 70 nm Ag ENPs with different capping agents. These effects are studied more closely in relation to matrix effects. Besides the methodological aspects, the obtained analytical results and relevant performance characteristics (e.g. measuring range, limit of detection, repeatability, reproducibility, trueness, and expanded uncertainty of measurement) are determined and discussed. For the chosen aqueous matrices, the results of the performance characteristics are significantly better for Au ENPs in comparison to Ag ENPs; e.g. repeatability and reproducibility are below 10% for all Au ENPs respectively maximal 27% repeatability for larger Ag ENPs. The method is a promising tool for the simultaneous determination of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles.