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Sample records for wavelength dispersive x-ray

  1. Decomposition of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Rémond, Guy; Myklebust, Robert; Fialin, Michel; Nockolds, Clive; Phillips, Matthew; Roques-Carmes, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Line shapes of atomic lines and soft x-ray emission bands measured with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) with the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) are reviewed. Least square fitting to pseudo-Voigt profiles of the digitally measured spectra are used to account for the presence of non-diagram features (high and low energy satellites) and instrumental induced distortions. The effect of line width and relative intensities on the quality of fits is illustrated. Spectral distortions resulting from the presence of absorption edges within the analyzed wavelength region are illustrated for the case of FeLα,β emission bands for pure Fe and iron oxides. For quantitative analysis, an analytical approach is presented where the measured soft x-ray emission bands are corrected for self absorption before extracting the intensities from the experimental data. PMID:27446750

  2. Improved detection limits in PIXE analysis employing wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavčič, M.

    2010-11-01

    A wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to measure the proton induced Lα X-ray emission spectra of Ag, Pd and Cd targets in order to lower detection limits for trace amounts of Pd and Cd in silver matrix. The measurements were performed with a Johansson-type crystal spectrometer having an energy resolution below the natural linewidths of the measured L X-ray lines. As a direct consequence of such ultrahigh experimental energy resolution, detection limits of only few tens of ppm were reached. The method presented in this work can be used in general to improve substantially PIXE detection limits compared to standard energy dispersive spectroscopy for the measurement of trace elements with atomic number in the close vicinity of the atomic number of the target matrix element.

  3. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  4. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  5. Wavelength dispersing devices for soft and ultrasoft x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tomoya; Ryon, R.W.; Shoji, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Monochromatization combining total reflection by a selected mirror and an appropriate filter offered an alternative approach in order to increase measurable intensity with reasonable spectral resolution. Recently, the use of synthetic multilayers, which are prepared by sputter/evaporation techniques, has been introduced for the detection of soft and ultrasoft x-rays. Studies on the use of these new wavelength dispersing devices have been conducted and it has been found that the reflectivity of these devices is very high compared with single crystals and soap multilayers and that their resolving power is fairly good. This report makes comparisons regarding efficiency of reflection, resolving power and x-ray analytical problems for practical applications among long spacing single crystals, soap multilayers, total reflection combined with a selected mirror and filtering and synthetic multilayers. The x-ray analytical capablities are shown based upon a standard x-ray fluorescence spectrometer equipped with a sealed-off x-ray tube and a gas flow proportional counter with thin film detector window.

  6. A controlled dispersion parallel wavelength x ray spectrometer for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, C. E.; Wight, S. A.; Romig, A. D., Jr.

    1991-04-01

    A new technique is described for the detection of x rays in electron column instruments used in microanalysis. In electron column instruments, the point source of x rays is produced by the interaction of a focused electron beam with the sample. Neither of the conventional methods, wavelength dispersive (WDS) nor energy dispersive (EDS) based spectrometry, is optimized for low Z element quantitative analysis. In WDS applications, where the analyte elements are Be through P, chemical effects complicate the x ray measurement process. Peak positions and shapes are altered, sometimes very strongly, by the electron configurations of the analyte atoms and neighboring atoms. In these cases, the ideal spectrometer would profile the peak and some small amount of continuum on either side of the peak such that an accurate peak area could be calculated. Present WDS spectrometers are serial in nature and cannot directly measure peak areas, often causing errors in the determination of light element concentrations. Bastin and co-workers have developed an elegant method to provide accurate area determinations, using the serial spectrometer, by a three point procedure. The parallel wavelength dispersive spectrometer (PWDS) proposed here is ideally suited for those applications.

  7. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging using a high-sensitivity imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Takashi; Kato, Shuichi; Doi, Makoto; Shoji, Takashi; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2013-05-01

    A new wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer equipped with a high-sensitivity imaging sensor was developed in our laboratory. In this instrument, a straight polycapillary optic was applied instead of a Soller slit as well as a 2D imaging X-ray detector instead of X-ray counters, which are used in conventional WD-XRF spectrometers. Therefore, images of elemental distribution were available after a short exposure time. Ni Kα images and Cu Kα images were clearly obtained at corresponding diffraction angles for a short exposure time of 10 s. By optimizing the spectrometer, the time required for imaging is reduced, leading to XRF image movies. It is difficult to distinguish two peaks (Ti Kα (4.508 keV) and Ba Lα (4.465 keV)) due to the poor energy resolution of EDXRS. However, Ti and Ba images could be successfully observed by the WD-XRF imaging spectrometer. The energy resolution of the developed spectrometer was 25 eV at the Ti Kα peak.

  8. Toward chromium speciation in solids using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry Cr Kβ lines.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, J; Claverie, F

    2013-04-22

    The determination of chromium speciation in solid samples is critical for environmental and industrial purposes. Several analytical methods exist to perform such a determination either directly in solid state or liquid state after an extraction step, each of them having some limitations. In this study, the use of a high-resolution wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine and quantify chromium species is investigated by looking at the differences in the Kβ transition profiles between Cr(0), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. Three different approaches were tested and compared to determine the Cr(VI) fraction of known mixtures: relative height and peak fitting using calibration mixtures, partial least square regression (PLS) of pure compounds, and principal component regression (PCR) of pure compounds. The accuracy of these methods was found to be about the same with an average relative error in the range of 15%. However, PLS and PCR can be easily implemented in an automated way contrary to peak fitting which can be sometimes perceived as analyst-dependant. Another advantage of using PLS and PCR is that information concerning the other oxidation states present in the sample can be retrieved. Finally, PLS and the peak height approach can be used up to 0.5% total chromium which make the XRF an alternative technique to X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chromium speciation in solid state. PMID:23561904

  9. Measuring surface and grain boundary segregation using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christien, F.; Le Gall, R.

    2008-07-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EPMA-WDS) is applied to the quantification of surface and grain boundary monolayer segregation. The case of sulphur segregation in nickel and nickel alloys is considered. It is evidenced that EPMA-WDS is able to detect submonolayer surface segregation. The sulphur segregation can be accurately quantified from the sulphur Kα line relative intensity (ratio of the intensity measured on the sample and the intensity measured on a standard material) using the Stratagem™ software (analytical modelling of the X-ray emission in a stratified specimen based on the PhiRoZ model). The statistical accuracy of the technique and its detection limit are estimated to be as low as a few percents of a monolayer for reasonable counting times (˜ a few minutes). The advantages and drawbacks of EPMA-WDS with respect to Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) are discussed. The main advantage of EMPA-WDS is that it is almost insensitive to surface contamination and oxidation, which makes it possible to measure surface segregation on samples that have been in contact with atmosphere. The influence of specimen tilt is also discussed. The technique is also applied to the measurement of sulphur segregation on the fracture surface of an iron-nickel alloy sample broken at high temperature. It is thus demonstrated that EPMA-WDS could be a very useful tool for failure analysis in the case of grain boundary fractures.

  10. Evaluation on the stability of Hg in ABS disk CRM during measurements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Kidokoro, Toshihiro; Hioki, Akiharu

    2012-01-01

    The stability of Hg in an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene disk certified reference material (ABS disk CRM, NMIJ CRM 8116-a) during measurements by wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) analysis was evaluated in this study. The XRF intensities of Hg (L(α)) and Pb (L(α)) as well as the XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(α))/Pb (L(α)) observed under different X-ray tube current conditions as well as their irradiation time were examined to evaluate the stability of Hg in the ABS disk CRM. The observed XRF intensities and the XRF intensity ratios for up to 32 h of measurements under 80 mA of X-ray tube current condition were constant, even though the surface of the ABS disk CRM was charred by the X-ray irradiation with high current for a long time. Moreover, the measurements on Hg and Pb in the charred disks by an energy dispersive XRF (ED-XRF) spectrometer showed constant XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(α))/Pb (L(α)). From these results, Hg in the ABS disk CRM was evaluated to be sufficiently stable for XRF analysis.

  11. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Analysis of Actinides in Dissolved Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, David

    2015-10-15

    There is an urgent need for an instrument that can quickly measure the concentration of Plutonium and other Actinides mixed with Uranium in liquids containing dissolved spent fuel rods. Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to develop an x-ray spectrometer capable of measuring U, Np and Pu in dissolved nuclear fuel rod material to less than 10 ppm levels to aid in material process control for these nuclear materials. Due to system noise produced by high radioactivity, previous x-ray spectrometers were not capable of low level measurements but the system Parallax proposed has no direct path for undesired radiation to get to the detector and the detector in the proposed device is well shielded from scatter and has very low dark current. In addition, the proposed spectrometer could measure these three elements simultaneously, also measuring background positions with an energy resolution of roughly 100 eV making it possible to see a small amount of Pu that would be hidden under the tail of the U peak in energy dispersive spectrometers. Another nearly identical spectrometer could be used to target Am and Cm if necessary. The proposed spectrometer needs only a tiny sample of roughly 1 micro-liter (1 mm3) and the measurement can be done with the liquid flowing in a radiation and chemical immune quartz capillary protected by a stainless steel rod making it possible to continuously monitor the liquid or to use a capillary manifold to measure other liquid streams. Unlike other methods such as mass spectroscopy where the sample must be taken to a remote facility and might take days for turn-around, the proposed measurement should take less than an hour. This spectrometer could enable near real-time measurement of U, Pu and Np in dilute dissolved spent nuclear fuel rod streams.

  12. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  13. Determination of fluorine concentrations using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry to analyze fluoride precipitates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kwon, E.; Kim, D.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    In recent times, fluorine has been receiving increasing attention due to the possibility for chemical (HF) leakage accidents and its high toxicity to human and environment. In this respect, a novel approach for the determination of fluorine concentrations in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry was investigated in this study. The main disadvantage of WDXRF technique for fluorine analysis is low analytical sensitivity for light elements with atomic number (Z) less than 15. To overcome this problem, we employed the precipitation reaction which fluoride is reacted with cation such as Al3+ and/or Ca2+ prior to WDXRF analysis because of their high analytical sensitivity. The cation was added in fluoride solutions to form precipitate (AlF3 and/or CaF2) and then the solution was filtered through Whatman filter. After drying at 60 °C for 5 min, the filter was coated with X-ray film and directly analyzed using WDXRF spectrometry. Consequently, we analyzed the cation on filter and subsequently fluorine concentration was calculated inversely based on chemical form of precipitate. This method can improve the analytical sensitivity of WDXRF technique for fluorine analysis and be applicable to various elements that can make precipitate.

  14. Online analysis of sulfur in diesel line by a monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Careta, Eduardo; López-Ramírez, Juan Antonio; Reynoso-Whitaker, Gilberto; Sánchez-Mondragon, Javier; Torres-Cisneros, Miguel

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes the application of a monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) technique developed in the X-ray Optical Systems laboratory Inc. The technique measures low-level sulfur (uls) in fuel. Data for ultra low sulfur in diesel were collected and analyzed using the combination of the mentioned technique and the usage of engineering tools as a fastloop array and a measurement technique. This provides a qualitative method for Diesel sulfur analysis of the Refinery Ing. Antonio M Amor (RIAMA) in Salamanca, Guanajuato. The pooled limit of quantification (PLOQ) for ultra-low-sulfur diesel was found to be less than 1.5 ppm in this study. The reproducibility of 15-ppm sulfur diesel fuel was determined to be better than 3 ppm (95 % confident level). This work shows the performance of the production of Diesel with less than 15-ppm in sulfur lines in the Hydrodesulfurizer Unit of Diesel (HDD) of the refinery. Results and conclusions discusses the better and cheaper method for the production of ultra low sulfur Diesel in the refinery.

  15. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  16. Wavelength-dispersive total-reflection X-ray fluorescence with an efficient Johansson spectrometer and an undulator X-ray source: detection of 10-16 g-level trace metals.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenji; Eba, Hiromi; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto

    2002-09-01

    The present paper reports significant enhancement of the detection power for total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The employment of an efficient wavelength-dispersive spectrometer rather than a conventional Si(Li) detector, as well as the use of a quasi-monochromatic undulator X-ray source, completely changed the quality of X-ray florescence spectra. The energy resolution is 20 times better, which effectively contributes to reducing the low-energy tail of the scattering background and to separating neighboring X-ray florescence peaks. Another advantage is its capability with respect to high-counting-rate measurements, which ensure the detection of weak signals from trace materials. The absolute and relative detection limit for nickel are 3.1 x 10(-16) g and 3.1 ppt (pg/g) for a 0.1-microL droplet of pure water, respectively, which is nearly 50 times better than the current best data achieved by conventional energy-dispersive TXRF using a Si(Li) detector system. PMID:12236366

  17. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  18. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  19. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  20. Quantification of Site-Specific Cation Exchange in Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Multi-Wavelength Anomalous X-ray Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brozek, Carl K.; Cozzolino, Anthony F.; Teat, Simon J.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Dinc,; #259; Mircea,

    2013-09-23

    We employed multiwavelength anomalous X-ray dispersion to determine the relative cation occupation at two crystallographically distinct metal sites in Fe2+-, Cu2+-, and Zn2+-exchanged versions of the microporous metal–organic framework (MOF) known as MnMnBTT (BTT = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate). By exploiting the dispersive differences between Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn, the extent and location of cation exchange were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data sets collected near the K edges of Mn2+ and of the substituting metal, and at a wavelength remote from either edge as a reference. Comparing the anomalous dispersion between these measurements indicated that the extent of Mn2+ replacement depends on the identity of the substituting metal. We contrasted two unique methods to analyze this data with a conventional approach and evaluated their limitations with emphasis on the general application of this method to other heterometallic MOFs, where site-specific metal identification is fundamental to tuning catalytic and physical properties.

  1. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400 μg) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575 μg). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water.

  2. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400 μg) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575 μg). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water. PMID:26117241

  3. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; Zhang, Jin Z; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Yano, Junko

    2015-04-14

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.

  4. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; et al

    2015-02-25

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based onmore » the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. In conclusion, the detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.« less

  5. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Yano, Junko

    2015-02-25

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. In conclusion, the detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.

  6. Application of the wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique to determine soil fluorine with consideration of iron content in the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jinsung; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Seo, Jungju

    The suitability of the wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) technique for the quantitative analysis of fluorine in soil was assessed in this study. Fluorine standards for WD-XRF calibration with soil matrices consisting of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, and CaO were prepared by varying the concentrations of CaF2 as a source of fluorine. Based on the standard calibration, the limits of detection and quantification were calculated as 812 and 2690 mg-F/kg-solid (or 1.62 and 5.39 mg-F in absolute mass term), respectively. In addition, the fluorine intensities of the standard samples with high iron content increased significantly compared to those with low iron content. Because of proximity between F-Kα and Fe-Lα line, the higher iron content preferably helped increase background fluorine intensities. As a means to compensate for the iron interference effect in fluorine analysis, the correction factor (CF) (0.0045) was derived based on the slope ratios between the measured X-ray intensity at the Bragg angle of 43.174° and iron content in the standard sample. The soil fluorine concentration determined by WD-XRF after the CF adjustment exhibited a significantly high correlation with that of the classical alkali fusion-ISE analysis. These findings clearly demonstrated that the WD-XRF technique is reliable enough to allow an easy, precise, and rapid quantitative determination of fluorine in a solid sample (such as iron-bound soil) compared to conventional methods.

  7. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better. PMID:26886588

  8. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better.

  9. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ϕ SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbLα and AsKα spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water.

  10. Rapid quantitative determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks and soils employing fused glass discs using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, A. Keshav; Khanna, Tarun C.; Mohan, K. Rama

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a calibration procedure and provides the data achieved for accuracy, precision, reproducibility and the detection limits for major (Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ti, P) and trace (Ba, Cr, Cu, Hf, La, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Ta, Th, U, Y, Zn, Zr) elements in the routine analysis of geological and environmental samples. Forty-two rock and soil reference materials were used to calibrate and evaluate the analytical method using a sequential wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Samples were prepared as fused glass discs and analysis performed with a total measuring time of thirty-one minutes. Another set of twelve independent reference materials were analyzed for the evaluation of accuracy. The detection limits and accuracy obtained for the trace elements (1-2 mg/kg) are adequate both for geochemical exploration and environmental studies. The fitness for purpose of the results was also evaluated by the quality criteria test proposed by the International Global Geochemical Mapping Program (IGCP) from which it can be deduced that the method is adequate considering geochemical mapping application and accuracy obtained is within the expected interval of certified values in most cases.

  11. Dispersion properties of x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccia, D.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S

    2006-04-20

    We study the propagation of ultrashort pulses in x-ray waveguides (WGs) by addressing the problem of the temporal dispersion. Starting from basic equations, by means of numerical calculation we demonstrate that far from the absorption edges of the WGs the cladding's material dispersion is negligible. However, close to the absorption edge significant dispersion can take place. This behavior could in principle be exploited to manipulate incoming chirped beams. Moreover, using the two coherent beams produced by the WG in the second (and higher) order of resonance suggests the use of the WC as a dispersion-free beam splitter, which can facilitate x-ray pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond temporal range without the need for external sources.

  12. Determination of rare earth elements in combustion ashes from selected Polish coal mines by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoliński, Adam; Stempin, Marek; Howaniec, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the experimental works presented in this paper was to develop a method using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF) in order to determine the content of 16 rare earth elements (REEs) and the concentration of the said elements in 169 samples of combustion ash of coals coming from ten Polish coal mines, as well as to validate the method. It was found out that there is a clear diversity in the levels and ranges of the variability of REEs occurrence in coal ashes. The average content of cerium, lanthanum, and scandium amounts to 198.8 μg • g- 1, 76.5 μg • g- 1, and 52.4 μg • g- 1 respectively, whereas for such metals as europium, holmium, lutetium, terbium, and thulium, the average content does not exceed the level of 5 μg • g- 1 (the average content for these metals amounts to 1.2 μg • g- 1, 1.4 μg • g- 1, 0.3 μg • g- 1, 1.3 μg • g- 1, and 0.6 μg • g- 1, respectively). In addition, this paper presents an analysis of data obtained by means of hierarchical clustering analysis. Simultaneous interpretation of the dendrogram of objects (coal ash samples) and the color map of the experimental data allowed a more in-depth analysis of the relationships between the clustered coal ash samples from different coal mines and the content of the rare earth elements.

  13. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.; Mishra, S. K.

    2014-03-15

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  14. Multiple-wavelength resonant fluctuation x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurta, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    A multiple-wavelength resonant fluctuation x-ray scattering approach is proposed for element-specific imaging of nanoscale objects in random ensembles with short positional and rotational relaxation times. It is shown, that by applying x-ray cross-correlation analysis in combination with iterative phase retrieval to the scattering data measured at multiple x-ray energies near an absorption edge of a substance, it is possible to image the nanoscale structure of an individual object with chemical sensitivity. The elemental distribution in distinct two-component model nanostructures was reconstructed using the simulated scattering data from two-dimensional random ensembles of particles. The approach might be especially advantageous for structural studies at x-ray free electron lasers.

  15. Determination of major elements by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in igneous rocks from the same fused sample (110 mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosova, Alena A.; Panteeva, Svetlana V.; Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2016-08-01

    The fusion technique is proposed for simultaneous determination of 35 elements from the same sample. Only 110 mg of rock sample was used to obtain fused glasses for quantitative determination of 10 major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, 16 rare earth elements and some other trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Fusion was performed with 1.1 g of lithium metaborate and LiBr solution as the releasing agent in platinum crucible in electric furnace at 1100 °C. The certified reference materials of ultramafic, mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks have been applied to obtain the calibration curves for rock-forming oxides (Na2O, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, P2O5, K2O, CaO, TiO2, MnO, Fe2O3) and some trace elements (Ba, Sr, Zr) determination by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The repeatability does not exceed the allowable standard deviation for a wide range of concentrations. In the most cases the relative standard deviation was less than 5%. Obtained glasses were utilized for the further determination of rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and some other (Ba, Sr, Zr, Rb, Cs, Y, Nb, Hf, Ta, Th and U) trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis with the same certified reference materials employed. The results could mostly be accepted as satisfactory. The proposed procedure essentially reduces the expenses in comparison with separate sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis.

  16. Analysis of medieval Serbian silver coins from XIV and XV century by means of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržetić, Ivan; Orlić, Jovana; Radić, Vesna; Radić, Milica; Ilijević, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is known as excellent nondestructive technique for analysis of artifacts, in our case, medieval numismatic coins. Collections of 30 silver coins, owned by National Museum in Belgrade, were investigated during our research. Coins from the historical period from 1389 to 1458 belong to the reign of two Serbian rulers, Stefan Lazarević and Đurđe Branković. The aim of this study was to determine elemental composition of silver coins and to characterize alloys from which the coins were minted. The dominant elements detected in all coins were Ag, Cu, Zn and Pb. In some coins Fe, Si and S were detected as well. Results from quantitative analysis shows that the content of Ag in all investigated silver coins exceed 90%, except in two coins that were assumed to be forged. The concentration of Cu ranged from 3% to 5%, and the contents of Zn and Pb varied around 1%. Characterization of coins provided us information about raw materials and employed metallurgical processes.

  17. The use of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence and discriminant analysis in the identification of the elemental composition of cumin samples and the determination of the country of origin.

    PubMed

    Hondrogiannis, E; Peterson, K; Zapf, C M; Roy, W; Blackney, B; Dailey, K

    2012-12-15

    Sixteen elements found in 33 cumin spice samples from China, India, Syria, and Turkey were analysed by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy using the commercially available Bruker - AXS S4 Explorer for the purpose of using the elements to discriminate among country of origin. Pellets were prepared of the samples and elemental concentrations calculated from calibration curves constructed using four National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards. A separate NIST tomato standard (1573a) was used as a validation check, while the WDXRF data for six of the cumin samples was further validated using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The elements measured included Ca, Mg, K, P, S, Al, Ba, Br, Cl, Fe, Na, Mn, Rb, Sr, Cu, and Zn and were detected in the range from an average mean of 4.3 mg kg(-1) for Ba up to 19223.8 mg kg(-1) for K. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine which elemental concentrations were statistically different from one another, and discriminant analysis was used to classify the cumin samples by country of origin. Using only eight elements (Ca, Mg, K, Fe, Na, Mn, Sr, and Zn) we were able to differentiate among cumin samples from four different geographic origins. Validation of the model with the validation set yielded 87.50% accuracy. Successful discrimination with just eight elements will allow for higher throughput in the screening of cumin samples using WDXRF for origin verification in less time.

  18. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  19. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald; He, Fei; Lau, Yue-Ying

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  20. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Perez Gravie, Homero

    2011-03-01

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  1. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  2. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  3. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  4. A Diffraction System with an X-ray Beam of a Band of Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Koganezawa, T.; Iwasaki, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Shoji, T.

    2004-05-12

    New diffraction system has been constructed at the Synchrotron Radiation Center at Ritsumeikan University, in which a parallel X-ray beam of a band of wavelengths is produced by reflection from a multilayer monochromator of depth-graded thicknesses. The band width is 0.013 nm and the useful wavelength range is from 0.16 nm to 0.20 nm. Diffraction patterns were taken from a single crystal of an enantiomorphous ferrocene-derivative compound employing an Imaging Plate as a detector. Bragg reflections are seen elongated with a characteristic intensity profile due to anomalous dispersion. Bijvoet pair of reflections show a clear difference in the profile on the short wavelength side of the absorption edge and distinction between the enantiomers can be made more easily than the classical method based on the comparison of integrated intensities.

  5. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  6. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F.

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  7. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using x-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    Holographic x-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent x-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the x-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered x-rays from the object and unscattered coherent x-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent x-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent x-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  8. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  9. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    calorimeter spectrometer, coupled with higher spectral resolution dispersive spectrometers to resolve line blends, has enabled many science investigations, to date mostly in our x-ray laboratory astrophysics program. These include measurements of absolute cross sections for Land K shell emission from Fe and Ni, charge exchange measurements in many astrophysically abundant elements, lifetime measurements, line ratios, and wavelength measurements. In addition, we have performed many additional measurements in nuclear physics, and in support of diagnostics for laser fusion, for example. In this presentation we will give a detailed overview of x-ray calorimeter instruments in general and in our EBIT laboratory astrophysics program in particular. We will also discuss the science yield of our measurements at EBIT over the last decade) prospects for future science enabled by the current generation of spectrometers and that will be expanded in the near future by the next generation of spectrometers starting in 2611.

  10. Synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Barnes, P.; Cockcroft, J. K.; Colston, S. L.; Häusermann, D.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Jupe, A. C.; Kunz, M.

    1998-04-01

    Energy-dispersive diffraction tomography using white-beam synchrotron X-rays with energies up to 140 keV yields images of the interior features of solid objects up to 50 mm thick. The volume sampled is determined by the geometry of the diffracting lozenge defined by the incident beam, the detector system collimation and the Bragg angle. Using conventional beam slits to form a highly collimated 50 μm × 50 μm incident beam and a 40 μm collimator aperture, we demonstrate on a PEEK phantom that a lateral resolution (transverse to the beam direction) of a few microns can be achieved. The resolution in the direction of the incident beam is necessarily poorer than this since the diffracting lozenge is elongated in this direction, with length increasing rapidly at small angles. There is no evidence of significant contamination of the diffracted intensity by the effects of multiple scattering from outside the primary lozenge.

  11. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; et al

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as wellmore » as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.« less

  12. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glockner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.

  13. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  14. Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity characterization of semiconductor heterostructures and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Mayer, T.M.; Krstelj, Z.M.

    1995-07-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity is a versatile tool for analyzing thin film structures. Layer thickness, interface roughness and composition can be determined with a single non-destructive measurement. Use of energy dispersive detection enables spectra to be acquired in less than 500 s with a rotating anode X-ray generator, making the study of kinetics possible.

  15. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x-ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x-ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a pirmary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carries each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a mutlilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x-ray sensitive photogrpahic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  16. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carriers each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a multilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  17. Development of in situ, at-wavelength metrology for soft x-ray nano-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-09-19

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the at-wavelength tests, and an original alignment method that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a FWHM focused spot size of ~;;120 nm, at 1-nm soft x-ray wavelength.

  18. TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733b AT X-RAY WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-08-10

    We present new X-ray observations obtained with Chandra ACIS-S of the HD 189733 system, consisting of a K-type star orbited by a transiting Hot Jupiter and an M-type stellar companion. We report a detection of the planetary transit in soft X-rays with a significantly deeper transit depth than observed in the optical. The X-ray data favor a transit depth of 6%-8%, versus a broadband optical transit depth of 2.41%. While we are able to exclude several possible stellar origins for this deep transit, additional observations will be necessary to fully exclude the possibility that coronal inhomogeneities influence the result. From the available data, we interpret the deep X-ray transit to be caused by a thin outer planetary atmosphere which is transparent at optical wavelengths, but dense enough to be opaque to X-rays. The X-ray radius appears to be larger than the radius observed at far-UV wavelengths, most likely due to high temperatures in the outer atmosphere at which hydrogen is mostly ionized. We furthermore detect the stellar companion HD 189733B in X-rays for the first time with an X-ray luminosity of log L{sub X} = 26.67 erg s{sup -1}. We show that the magnetic activity level of the companion is at odds with the activity level observed for the planet-hosting primary. The discrepancy may be caused by tidal interaction between the Hot Jupiter and its host star.

  19. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  20. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  1. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  2. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  3. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances

  4. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Hawreliak, James A; Ciricosta, Orlando; Collins, Gilbert W; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H; Suggit, Matthew J; Tang, Henry; Wark, Justin S

    2014-03-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  5. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  6. The coolest DA white dwarfs detected at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, K. M.; Holberg, J. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Tweedy, R. W.; Wesemael, F.

    1992-01-01

    New soft X-ray/EUV photometric observations of the DA white dwarfs KPD 0631 + 1043 = WD 0631 + 107 and PG 1113 + 413 = WD 1113 + 413 are analyzed. Previously reported soft X-ray detections of three other DAs and the failure to detect a fourth DA in deep Exosat observations are investigated. New ground-based spectra are presented for all of the objects, with IUE Ly-alpha spectra for some. These data are used to constrain the effective temperatures and surface gravities. The improved estimates of these parameters are employed to refer a photospheric He abundance for the hotter objects and to elucidate an effective observational low-temperature threshold for the detection of pure hydrogen DA white dwarfs at soft X-ray wavelengths.

  7. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  8. Rest-wavelength fiducials for the ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Graf, A T; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Leutenegger, M A; Porter, F S

    2012-10-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W(64+), which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin "the way") core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf Lβ(3) line and the Ir Lα(2) line, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir Lα(1) and Lα(2) lines and the Hf Lβ(1) and Lβ(2) lines, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±40 and ±160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W(64+) line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer.

  9. Compositional analysis of Ceramic Glaze by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedr, A.; Abdel-kareem, O.; Elnabi, S. H.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for the analysis of Egyptian Islamic glaze ceramic sample. The sample dating back to Fatimid period (969-1169AD), and collected from Al-Fustat excavation store in Cairo. The analysis of contaminated pottery sample has been performed to draw mapping for the elemental compositions by LIBS technique. LIBS measurements have been done by the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm) of Nd: YAG laser for the elemental analysis and performing the cleaning processes of the pottery sample. In addition, complementary analyses were carried out by scanning electron microscopy linked with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX) to obtain verification of chemical results. The morphological surfaces before and after cleaning has been done by Optical Microscopy (OM).

  10. Speckle-based at-wavelength metrology of X-ray mirrors with super accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    X-ray active mirrors, such as bimorph and mechanically bendable mirrors, are increasingly being used on beamlines at modern synchrotron source facilities to generate either focused or "tophat" beams. As well as optical tests in the metrology lab, it is becoming increasingly important to optimise and characterise active optics under actual beamline operating conditions. Recently developed X-ray speckle-based at-wavelength metrology technique has shown great potential. The technique has been established and further developed at the Diamond Light Source and is increasingly being used to optimise active mirrors. Details of the X-ray speckle-based at-wavelength metrology technique and an example of its applicability in characterising and optimising a micro-focusing bimorph X-ray mirror are presented. Importantly, an unprecedented angular sensitivity in the range of two nanoradians for measuring the slope error of an optical surface has been demonstrated. Such a super precision metrology technique will be beneficial to the manufacturers of polished mirrors and also in optimization of beam shaping during experiments.

  11. X-ray reflectivity measurements of surface roughness using energy dispersive detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Warwick, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new technique for measuring x-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive x-ray detection. The benefits of this method are the use of a fixed scattering angle and parallel detection of all energies simultaneously. These advantages make the technique more readily useable with laboratory x-ray sources and more compatible with growth chambers. We find excellent agreement between the calculated Fresnel reflectivity and the reflectivity obtained from a smooth Ge (001) surface. Reflectivities obtained during 500 eV Xe ion bombardment of Ge surfaces demonstrate the sensitivity of the technique to be better than 1 {angstrom}. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  13. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi, Jacob; Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-01

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today's global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males' longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  14. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Urquidi, Jacob Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-23

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today’s global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males’ longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  15. X-Ray and Multi-Wavelength Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    The launch of the Italian (with Dutch participation) satellite BeppoSAX in 1996 enabled the detection of the first X-ray GRB afterglow, which in turn led to GRB counterpart detection in multiple wavelengths. This breakthrough firmly established the cosmological nature of GRBs. However, afterglow observations of GRBs took off in large numbers after the launch of NASA's Swift satellite in 2004. Swift enabled multiple major discoveries, such as the early lightcurves of X-ray afterglows, the first detection of a short GRB afterglow and opened more questions such as where are the elusive breaks in afterglow light curves. I will describe here these results and will discuss future opportunities and improvements in the field.

  16. X-ray photoemission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (X-ray photoemission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls and specimens aged 30 min and 3 h at room temperature in distilled water and 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). Each X-ray photoemission cycle consisted of three scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 min for usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately}1,500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {micro}m area for 500 s. The X-ray photoemission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorus. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

  17. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum.

  18. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum. PMID:7423119

  19. Phase Determination by Multiple-Wavelength X-ray Diffraction: Crystal Structure of a Basic ``Blue'' Copper Protein from Cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, J. Mitchell; Merritt, Ethan A.; Phizackerley, R. Paul; Hedman, Britt; Murata, Mitsuo; Hodgson, Keith O.; Freeman, Hans C.

    1988-08-01

    A novel x-ray diffraction technique, multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing, has been applied to the de novo determination of an unknown protein structure, that of the ``blue'' copper protein isolated from cucumber seedlings. This method makes use of crystallographic phases determined from measurements made at several wavelengths and has recently been made technically feasible through the use of intense, polychromatic synchrotron radiation together with accurate data collection from multiwire electronic area detectors. In contrast with all of the conventional methods of solving protein structures, which require either multiple isomorphous derivatives or coordinates of a similar structure for molecular replacement, this technique allows direct solution of the classical ``phase problem'' in x-ray crystallography. MAD phase assignment should be particularly useful for determining structures of small to medium-sized metalloproteins for which isomorphous derivatives are difficult or impossible to make. The structure of this particular protein provides new insights into the spectroscopic and redox properties of blue copper proteins, an important class of metalloproteins widely distributed in nature.

  20. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  1. Time-Resolved X-Ray Reflectometry in the Multiwavelength Dispersive Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Etsuo; Harada, Tetsuo; Hatano, Tadashi; Higashi, Yasuo; Yano, Yohko F.; Inada, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Shusaku; Seki, Takahiro

    2010-06-23

    A new method of measuring specular X-ray reflectivity curves with a time resolution of milliseconds to seconds is developed. A horizontally convergent X-ray beam having a one-to-one correlation between its direction and energy is realized by a curved crystal or a laterally graded multilayer on an elliptic substrate. The X-ray beam is then incident on the surface of the specimen placed at the focus in such a way that the glancing angle in the vertical direction is the same for all X-ray components, which are reflected in the vertical direction by the surface and diverge in the horizontal plane. The perpendicular momentum transfer continuously changes as a function of the horizontal ray direction since the wavelength change similarly. The normalized linear intensity distribution across the beam direction measured downstream of the specimen represents the X-ray reflectivity curve. Examples of time-resolved measurements of X-ray reflectivity curves are shown.

  2. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yuan, Sheng; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-07-09

    The comprehensive realization of the exciting advantages of new third- and forth-generation synchrotron radiation light sources requires concomitant development of reflecting and diffractive x-ray optics capable of micro- and nano-focusing, brightness preservation, and super high resolution. The fabrication, tuning, and alignment of the optics are impossible without adequate metrology instrumentation, methods, and techniques. While the accuracy of ex situ optical metrology at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has reached a state-of-the-art level, wavefront control on beamlines is often limited by environmental and systematic alignment factors, and inadequate in situ feedback. At ALS beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity. Geometric Hartmann tests, performed with a scanning illuminated sub-aperture determine the wavefront slope across the full mirror aperture. Shearing interferometry techniques use coherent illumination and provide higher sensitivity wavefront measurements. Combining these techniques with high precision optical metrology and experimental methods will enable us to provide in situ setting and alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-limited, sub 50 nm focusing at beamlines. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the x-ray beam diagnostic system, and original experimental techniques that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused spot size of 150 nm.

  3. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  4. On the calculation of the gauge volume size for energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Matthew R

    2011-11-01

    Equations for the calculation of the dimensions of a gauge volume, also known as the active volume or diffraction lozenge, in an energy-dispersive diffraction experiment where the detector is collimated by two ideal slits have been developed. Equations are given for equatorially divergent and parallel incident X-ray beams, assuming negligible axial divergence. PMID:21997921

  5. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Experimental studies of X-ray emission physics and hydrodynamics using short wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstone, P. D.; Casperson, D. E.; Cobble, J. A.; Coggeshall, S. V.; Gomez, C. C.; Hauer, A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lee, P. H. Y.; Mead, W. C.; Schappert, G. T.

    Several experimental efforts are currently under way at Low Alamos to study issues of importance for inertial confinement fusion with short wavelength lasers. These issues include the physics of X-ray conversion and the dynamics of short-wavelength laser interaction with high-Z plasmas; filamentation and self-focusing processes; and the growth of instabilities in laser-driven implosions. Most of these experiments are being pursued in collaboration with other laboratories, notably the University of Rochester and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In addition, we are undertaking basic studies of the interaction of both atomic systems and solids with ultra-intense (approximately 10 to the minus 17th W/sq cm) subpicosecond lasers at Los Alamos. These experiments explore the response of atomic systems to strong fields, multiphoton excitation, and transient phenomena in dense plasmas.

  7. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  8. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  9. Short-wavelength soft-x-ray laser pumped in double-pulse single-beam non-normal incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.; Ros, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Habib, J.; Kazamias, S.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Aurand, B.; Kuehl, T.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P.

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrated a 7.36 nm Ni-like samarium soft-x-ray laser, pumped by 36 J of a neodymium:glass chirped-pulse amplification laser. Double-pulse single-beam non-normal-incidence pumping was applied for efficient soft-x-ray laser generation. In this case, the applied technique included a single-optic focusing geometry for large beam diameters, a single-pass grating compressor, traveling-wave tuning capability, and an optimized high-energy laser double pulse. This scheme has the potential for even shorter-wavelength soft-x-ray laser pumping.

  10. Aliasing in a Hartmann wavefront sensor at x-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Bauman, Brian; Macintosh, Bruce

    2012-10-01

    The Hartmann Sensor is a simple and well-established method to interrogate wavefront quality. Recently the Hartmann sensor has been used at very short wavelengths, including the extreme UV. Here we consider the Hartmann sensor and its ability to measure the wavefront of an x-ray beam. We use both analytic methods and a wave-optics, Fresnel-diffraction simulation. The Hartmann sensor samples the wavefront, which means that it is susceptible to aliasing (the non-linear phenomenon where high-spatial frequency components are incorrectly measured as low-spatial frequency components). Our analysis shows that aliasing is more severe in the Hartmann sensor than in the corresponding (optical) Shack-Hartmann. Aliasing worsens as Hartmann hole size shrinks. The wave-optics simulations show that for reasonable optics-polishing errors and Hartmann mask design, aliasing errors can be of the same magnitude as the phase that is to be measured.

  11. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  12. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiming; d' Allivy Kelly, O; Cros, V; Bernard, R; Bortolotti, P; Anane, A; Brandl, F; Heimbach, F; Grundler, D

    2016-01-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic. PMID:27063401

  13. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiming; D'Allivy Kelly, O.; Cros, V.; Bernard, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Anane, A.; Brandl, F.; Heimbach, F.; Grundler, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic.

  14. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiming; d' Allivy Kelly, O.; Cros, V.; Bernard, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Anane, A.; Brandl, F.; Heimbach, F.; Grundler, D.

    2016-01-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic. PMID:27063401

  15. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-06-01

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8 m and capable of 105 resolving power.

  16. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  17. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  18. Airborne particles in the Miyagi Museum of Art in Sendai, Japan, studied by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Injuk, Jasna; Osán, Janos; Van Grieken, René; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2002-05-01

    The presented work provides baseline data on the existing airborne conditions in the Miyagi Museum of Art in Sendai, Japan, during the summer of 2000. The chemical composition, size and indoor and outdoor origin of the suspended particulate matter were identified using a number of advanced X-ray techniques, such as Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (EDXRF). Our results, to the best of our knowledge, represent the first detailed study of the chemical nature of the indoor particulate matter in a Japanese museum and, as such, may contribute to future improvements of the air quality inside museums and to the lasting conservation of works of art.

  19. Energy dispersive X-ray analyses of organelles of NaCI-treated maize root cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Ralf

    1984-04-01

    NaCl sensitive plants of Zea mays cv. ADOUR were grown in nutrient solutions with or without NaCl. Frozen, hydrated root-tip tissues were investigated by means of an ETEC scanning electron microscope fitted with a KEVEX energy dispersive X-ray analyser. Morphological details of the gently etched but non-coated surface of the cross fractured specimen were easy to identify and to analyse using an electron beam with a low intensity at 10 kV. X-ray data obtained from cell compartments and organelles as nuclei, nucleoli and mitochondria within individual cells establish typical X-ray spectra. Comparisons of these spectra support the hypothesis that Na + ions are predominantly localized in vacuoles and also to a lesser extent in the cytoplasm, e.g. in small vesicles, but not in other cell organelles. Furthermore the analysed cell compartments show differences in the distribution of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca effected by the addition of NaCl to the growth medium. The X-ray data are discussed in relation to the physiological meaning of a NaCl induced redistribution of elements within individual maize root cells.

  20. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid using a hard X-ray free electron laser in a dual-beam dispersive detection method.

    PubMed

    Obara, Yuki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Chiba, Yuhei; Isokawa, Yusuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Suzuki, Toshinori; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-13

    We present femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solution using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronized Ti:sapphire laser. The instrumental response time is 200 fs, and the repetition rate of measurement is 10 Hz. A cylindrical liquid beam 100 μm in diameter of aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate solution is photoexcited at 400 nm, and the transient X-ray absorption spectra are measured in the K-edge region of iron, 7.10 - 7.26 keV, using a dual X-ray beam dispersive detection method. Each of the dual beams has the pulse energy of 1.4 μJ, and pump-induced absorbance change on the order of 10(-3) is successfully detected. The photoexcited iron complex exhibits a red shifted iron K-edge with the appearance time constant of 260 fs. The X-ray absorption difference spectra, with and without the pump pulses, are independent of time delay after 1.5 ps up to 100 ps, indicating that the photoexcited species is long-lived.

  1. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  2. At-wavelength and optical metrology of bendable x-ray optics for nanofocusing at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-06-11

    We report on a new research and development program at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab directed to establish both at-wavelength and conventional optical metrology techniques suitable to characterize the surface profile of super-high-quality x-ray optics with sub-microradian precision.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet and x-ray transition wavelengths in Rb XXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indu, Khatri; Arun, Goyal; Sunny, Aggarwal; K. Singh, A.; Man, Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for transitions among the lowest 97 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p2, 3s23p3d, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s3p23d, and 3s23d2 configurations of Rb XXIV. A multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method is adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are provided for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions from the ground level to all 97 levels, although calculations are performed for a much larger number of levels. To achieve the accuracy of the data, comparisons are provided with similar data obtained from the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) and also with the available theoretical and experimental results. Our energy levels are found to be accurate to better than 1.2%. Wavelengths calculated are found to lie in EUV (extreme ultraviolet) and x-ray regions. Additionally, lifetimes for all 97 levels are obtained for the first time. The authors, Indu Khatri and Arun Goyal, were supported by the U. G. C., India for their Junior Research Fellowship and Man Mohan by the U.G.C. for Basic Science Research Fellowship.

  4. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  5. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  6. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  7. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  8. Distinction between entrance and exit wounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takakura, Ayaka; Jamal, Mostofa; Ito, Asuka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shoji; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated gunshot wounds in two autopsy cases using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Lead and copper were detected in the entrance wound of one case and lead, antimony, and copper were detected in that of the other case. In the exit wounds of both cases, lead, antimony, and copper were below detection limits. These findings indicate that the detection of metallic elements, such as lead, antimony, and copper, which are found in bullets, may be useful for differentiating entrance from exit wounds using EDX. PMID:27591531

  9. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  10. Processing and quantification of x-ray energy dispersive spectra in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1988-08-01

    Spectral processing in x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy deals with the extraction of characteristic signals from experimental data. In this text, the four basic procedures for this methodology are reviewed and their limitations outlined. Quantification, on the other hand, deals with the interpretation of the information obtained from spectral processing. Here the limitations are for the most part instrumental in nature. The prospects of higher voltage operation does not, in theory, present any new problems and may in fact prove to be more desirable assuming that electron damage effects do not preclude analysis. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Quantitative analysis of annealed scanning probe tips using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cobley, R. J.; Brown, R. A.; Barnett, C. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Penny, M. W.

    2013-01-14

    A quantitative method to measure the reduction in oxide species on the surface of electrochemically etched tungsten tips during direct current annealing is developed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Oxide species are found to decrease with annealing current, with the trend repeatable over many tips and along the length of the tip apex. A linear resistivity approximation finds significant oxide sublimation occurs at 1714 K, but surface melting and tip broadening at 2215 K. This method can be applied to calibrate any similar annealing stage, and to identify the tradeoff regime between required morphological and chemical properties.

  12. Commissioning of Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Beamline on Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A. K.; Sagdeo, Archna; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, M. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Kane, S. R.; Deb, S. K.

    2011-07-15

    An Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) beamline on bending magnet source of Indus-2 synchrotron (2.5 GeV, 300 mA) has been commissioned, for the study of single and polycrystalline samples. The beamline optics is based on vertically focusing Pt-coated pre and post mirrors and sagittal focusing Si (311) based double crystal monochromator. Experimental station consists of a six circle diffractometer equipped with scintillation detector and an image plate area detector for powder diffraction. XRD experiments have been performed to study single crystal and polycrystalline samples.

  13. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  14. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  15. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  16. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  17. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE PAGES

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  18. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE Be/X-RAY BINARY MXB 0656-072

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jingzhi; Li Hui; Liu Qingzhong; Zurita Heras, Juan Antonio; Chaty, Sylvain E-mail: hli@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: juan-antonio.zurita-heras@cea.fr

    2012-07-01

    We present and analyze the optical photometric and spectroscopic data of the Be/X-ray binary MXB 0656-072 from 2006 to 2009. A 101.2 day orbital period is found, for the first time, from the present public X-ray data (Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM). The anti-correlation between the H{alpha} emission and the UBV brightness of MXB 0656-072 during our 2007 observations indicates that a mass ejection event took place in the system. After the mass ejection, a low-density region might develop around the Oe star. With the outward motion of the circumstellar disk, the outer part of the disk interacted with the neutron star around its periastron passage and a series of X-ray outbursts were triggered between MJD 54350 and MJD 54850. The Proportional Counter Array-HEXTE spectra during the 2007-2008 X-ray outbursts could be well fitted by a cutoff power law with low-energy absorption, together with an iron line around 6.4 keV, and a broad cyclotron resonance feature around 30 keV. The same variability of the soft and hard X-ray colors in 2.3-21 keV indicated that there were no overall changes in the spectral shape during the X-ray outbursts, which might only be connected with the changes of the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star.

  19. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  20. [Application of the racial algorithm in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Yao-Yao; Ge, Liang-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-02-01

    In the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, scintillation detector such as NaI (Tl) detector usually has a low energy resolution at around 8%. The low energy resolution causes problems in spectral data analysis especially in the high background and low counts condition, it is very limited to strip the overlapped spectrum, and the more overlapping the peaks are, the more difficult to peel the peaks, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis can't be carried out because we can't recognize the peak address and peak area. Based on genetic algorithm and immune algorithm, we build a new racial algorithm which uses the Euclidean distance as the judgment of evolution, the maximum relative error as the iterative criterion to be put into overlapped spectrum analysis, then we use the Gaussian function to simulate different overlapping degrees of the spectrum, and the racial algorithm is used in overlapped peak separation and full spectrum simulation, the peak address deviation is in +/- 3 channels, the peak area deviation is no more than 5%, and it is proven that this method has a good effect in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis.

  1. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  2. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive

  3. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive

  4. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial µ-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 µm diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of µm lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  5. Effects of dispersion and absorption in resonant Bragg diffraction of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Scagnoli, V; Dobrynin, A N; Joly, Y; Collins, S P

    2014-03-26

    Resonant diffraction of x-rays by crystals with anisotropic optical properties is investigated theoretically, to assess how the intensity of a Bragg spot is influenced by effects related to dispersion (birefringence) and absorption (dichroism). Starting from an exact but opaque expression, simple analytic results are found to expose how intensity depends on dispersion and absorption in the primary and secondary beams and, also, the azimuthal angle (rotation of the crystal about the Bragg wavevector). If not the full story for a given application, our results are more than adequate to explore consequences of dispersion and absorption in the intensity of a Bragg spot. Results are evaluated for antiferromagnetic copper oxide, and low quartz. For CuO, one of our results reproduces all salient features of a previously published simulation of the azimuthal-angle dependence of a magnetic Bragg peak. It is transparent in our analytic result that dispersion and absorption effects alone cannot reproduce published experimental data. Available data for the azimuthal-angle dependence of space-group forbidden reflections (0,0, l), with l ≠ 3n, of low quartz depart from symmetry imposed by the triad axis of rotation symmetry. The observed asymmetry can be induced by dispersion and absorption even though absorption coefficients are constant, independent of the azimuthal angle, in this class of reflections.

  6. Effects of dispersion and absorption in resonant Bragg diffraction of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Scagnoli, V; Dobrynin, A N; Joly, Y; Collins, S P

    2014-03-26

    Resonant diffraction of x-rays by crystals with anisotropic optical properties is investigated theoretically, to assess how the intensity of a Bragg spot is influenced by effects related to dispersion (birefringence) and absorption (dichroism). Starting from an exact but opaque expression, simple analytic results are found to expose how intensity depends on dispersion and absorption in the primary and secondary beams and, also, the azimuthal angle (rotation of the crystal about the Bragg wavevector). If not the full story for a given application, our results are more than adequate to explore consequences of dispersion and absorption in the intensity of a Bragg spot. Results are evaluated for antiferromagnetic copper oxide, and low quartz. For CuO, one of our results reproduces all salient features of a previously published simulation of the azimuthal-angle dependence of a magnetic Bragg peak. It is transparent in our analytic result that dispersion and absorption effects alone cannot reproduce published experimental data. Available data for the azimuthal-angle dependence of space-group forbidden reflections (0,0, l), with l ≠ 3n, of low quartz depart from symmetry imposed by the triad axis of rotation symmetry. The observed asymmetry can be induced by dispersion and absorption even though absorption coefficients are constant, independent of the azimuthal angle, in this class of reflections. PMID:24599265

  7. At-wavelength metrology of hard X-ray mirror using near field speckle.

    PubMed

    Berujon, Sebastien; Wang, Hongchang; Alcock, Simon; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-03-24

    We present a method to measure the surface profile of hard X-ray reflective optics with nanometer height accuracy and sub-millimetre lateral resolution. The technique uses X-ray near-field speckle, generated by a scattering membrane translated using a piezo motor, to infer the deflection of X-rays from the surface. The method provides a nano-radian order accuracy on the mirror slopes in both the tangential and sagittal directions. As a demonstration, a pair of focusing mirrors mounted in a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) configuration were characterized and the results were in good agreement with offline metrology data. It is hoped that the new technique will provide feedback to optic manufacturers to improve mirror fabrication and be useful for the online optimization of active, nano-focusing mirrors on modern synchrotron beamlines.

  8. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  9. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  10. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gómez, D; Luna, F; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  11. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  12. Angle-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Study of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, Jared; Peiris, Suhithi

    2004-03-01

    Determining thermodynamic properties of energetic materials is important to the United States Navy for predicting the performance of new energetic formulations. This study uses angle dispersive x-ray diffraction performed at Cornell University's High Energy Synchrotron Source to obtain several isothermal equations of state of energetic materials, such as HMX and CL-20. Both non-hydrostatic and hydrostatic conditions were examined at room temperature. Pressures of up to 6GPa were achieved using diamond anvil cells. The bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative were determined by fitting the data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formalism. Experimental data will be compared to ab-initio HF calculations and MD simulations.

  13. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rénata; Peyrin, Frédéric; Vénien, Annie; Hénot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining.

  14. Studying Dark Energy, Black Holes and Cosmic Feedback at X-ray Wavelengths: NASA's Constellation-X Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most important topics in modern astrophysics are the nature of the dark energy equation of state, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in concert with galaxy bulges, and the self-regulating symmetry imposed by both stellar and AGN feedback. All of these topics are readily addressed with observations at X-ray wavelengths. For instance, theoretical models predict that the majority (98%) of the energy and metal content in starburst superwinds exists in the hot million-degree gas. The Constellation-X observatory is being developed to perform spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy so that we may directly measure the absolute element abundances and velocities of this hot gas. This talk focuses on the driving science behind this mission, which is one of two flagship missions in NASA's Beyond Einstein program. A general overview of the observatory's capabilities and basic technology will also be given.

  15. [Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for determination of shooting distance].

    PubMed

    Havel, J

    2003-10-01

    The article follows up the experiences Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons--authors: dipl. Ing. J. Havel and dipl. Ing. K. Zelenka and Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for identification of inlets (gunshot--entries) and outlets (gunshot--exits)--author: dipl. Ing. J. Havel.

  16. Extraction of accurate structure-factor amplitudes from Laue data: wavelength normalization with wiggler and undulator X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Srajer, V; Crosson, S; Schmidt, M; Key, J; Schotte, F; Anderson, S; Perman, B; Ren, Z; Teng, T Y; Bourgeois, D; Wulff, M; Moffat, K

    2000-07-01

    Wavelength normalization is an essential part of processing of Laue X-ray diffraction data and is critically important for deriving accurate structure-factor amplitudes. The results of wavelength normalization for Laue data obtained in nanosecond time-resolved experiments at the ID09 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France, are presented. Several wiggler and undulator insertion devices with complex spectra were used. The results show that even in the most challenging cases, such as wiggler/undulator tandems or single-line undulators, accurate wavelength normalization does not require unusually redundant Laue data and can be accomplished using typical Laue data sets. Single-line undulator spectra derived from Laue data compare well with the measured incident X-ray spectra. Successful wavelength normalization of the undulator data was also confirmed by the observed signal in nanosecond time-resolved experiments. Single-line undulators, which are attractive for time-resolved experiments due to their high peak intensity and low polychromatic background, are compared with wigglers, based on data obtained on the same crystal. PMID:16609201

  17. Positional characteristics of meter-decameter wavelength bursts associated with hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated and grouped type III bursts have been observed in temporal association with impulsive hard X-ray bursts in the 26-154 keV range, down to frequencies as low as 30 MHz and out to a distance of 3.1 solar radii from the disk center. The bursts occurred in regions whose electron density may have been as much as 20 times higher than that of the Newkirk-Saito model. The present observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region covering a wide range of magnetic field lines. It is noted that, of the two gradual hard X-ray bursts observed in association with type IV bursts, one was accompanied by a type II event, while the other was not, although both exhibited the same characteristics. It is suggested that the gradual burst associated with a type IV only involved electrons which are trapped in the plasmoid which produces the meter-decameter emission, while another fraction of the population is trapped in the low-lying loops which produce the hard X-ray and centimeter radiation.

  18. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  19. Metastable phase diagram of Bi probed by single-energy x-ray absorption detection and angular dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Principi, E.; Minicucci, M.; Di Cicco, A.; Trapananti, A.; De Panfilis, S.; Poloni, R.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we report the results of a detailed experimental study of samples composed of micrometric Bi droplets providing an insight into the metastable phase diagram of Bi. To this purpose we have used the single-energy x-ray absorption detection technique in combination with angular dispersive x-ray diffraction available at the BM29 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This unconventional approach has given proof of being a different and reliable tool for detecting subtle structural modifications in condensed matter. The investigation has revealed a large variety of metastable Bi polymorphs in a broad range of pressures and temperatures (25-500 deg. C, 0-6 GPa) and the occurrence of a Bi crystalline structure isomorphic to the {beta}-tin structure. We have shown that the range of undercooling of liquid Bi strongly depends upon pressure and the underlying solid stable and metastable phases. As a final result a Bi-phase diagram including metastable phases is proposed, which takes into account all structural information obtained from this experiment.

  20. Direct x-ray imaging system using an amplified metal-oxide-semiconductor imager in the 4-13-nm wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Tsuneyuki; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    1995-10-01

    We describe a direct x-ray imaging system that uses an amplified metal-oxide-semiconductor imager to detect soft x rays directly for real-time imaging. From the absolute sensitivity of this system as measured through the use of a monochromatic synchrotron radiation beam and a GaAsP Schottky-type photodiode, the minimum sensitivity at a wavelength of 13 nm was estimated to be greater than 108 photons mm-2. This is sufficient to detect soft x rays directly for real-time imaging. Onion cell observations at wavelengths of 4.3 and 4.6 nm indicate that x-ray absorption by the carbon in the cells was detected. This is a promising imaging system for the soft x-ray region in which conventional CCD's are difficult to use.

  1. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  2. APEX/J-PEX: A High-Resolution Spectrometer for EUV/X-ray Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Gursky, H.; Yentis, D. J.

    2001-09-01

    Future X-ray and EUV missions should include high-resolution spectrometers, permitting use of the full range of spectroscopic diagnostics, in particular measurement of line profiles and Doppler shifts. We present a design for such an instrument (APEX), which would fly on a Small Explorer Satellite and which employs multilayer-coated ion-etched gratings in a normal-incidence configuration. We have already flown successfully a prototype spectrometer (J-PEX) on a NASA sounding rocket. The resulting EUV spectrum of the white dwarf G191-B2B will be presented.

  3. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Haberl, F.; Delvaux, C.; Sturm, R.; Udalski, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the results of a ˜40-d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded 1036 erg s-1 we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1σ), making it the 17th known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law (Γ = 0.63) plus a high-temperature blackbody (kT ˜2 keV) component. By analysing ˜12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability while its IR flux varied in phase with the X-ray luminosity, which implies the presence of a disc-like component adding cooler light to the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  4. High-speed x-ray reflectometory in multiwavelength-dispersive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Inada, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Masaharu; Ishii, Masashi; Sakurai, Kenji; Arakawa, Etsuo

    2008-01-14

    The potential of a high speed x-ray reflectometer for time-resolved studies on the subsecond to millisecond timescales is demonstrated by recording x-ray reflection curves from a small area (1 mmx10 mm) of a 14.3 nm thick gold film on a silicon substrate with data collection times of 0.05-1 s. A horizontally convergent x-ray beam having a one-to-one correlation between ray direction and energy is produced by a curved crystal polychromator, and the beam is incident on and vertically reflected by a specimen placed at the focus. The x-ray reflectivity is measured as a function of the x-ray energy downstream of the focus using a one dimensional detector with no need for angle scan of the specimen and detector.

  5. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯ṡO hydrogen bonds.

  6. High temperature monitoring of silicon carbide ceramics by confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we presented an alternative method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics at various high temperatures in air by measuring the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratios (ICo/IRa) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of SiC ceramics with the confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. A calibration curve of the relationship between ICo/IRa and Zeff was established by using a set of 8 SiC calibration samples. The sensitivity of this approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished samples of Zeff differing from each other by only 0.01. The linear relationship between the variation of Zeff and the variations of contents of C, Si and O of SiC ceramics were found, and the corresponding calculation model of the relationship between the ΔZ and the ΔCC, ΔCSi, and ΔCO were established. The variation of contents of components of the tested SiC ceramics after oxidation at high temperature was quantitatively calculated based on the model. It was shown that the results of contents of carbon, silicon and oxygen obtained by this method were in good agreement with the results obtained by XPS, giving values of relative deviation less than 1%. It was concluded that the practicality of this proposed method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of SiC ceramics at high temperatures was acceptable.

  7. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  8. Smectic ordering in liquid-crystal aerosil dispersions. I. X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leheny, R. L.; Park, S.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Gallani, J.-L.; Garland, C. W.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2003-01-01

    Comprehensive x-ray scattering studies have characterized the smectic ordering of octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) confined in the hydrogen-bonded silica gels formed by aerosil dispersions. For all densities of aerosil and all measurement temperatures, the correlations remain short range, demonstrating that the disorder imposed by the gels destroys the nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) transition. The smectic correlation function contains two distinct contributions. The first has a form identical to that describing the critical thermal fluctuations in pure 8CB near the N-SmA transition, and this term displays a temperature dependence at high temperatures similar to that of the pure liquid crystal. The second term, which is negligible at high temperatures but dominates at low temperatures, has a shape given by the thermal term squared and describes the static fluctuations due to random fields induced by confinement in the gel. The correlation lengths appearing in the thermal and disorder terms are the same and show a strong variation with gel density at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the amplitude of the static fluctuations further suggests that nematic susceptibility becomes suppressed with increasing quenched disorder. The results overall are well described by a mapping of the liquid-crystal aerosil system onto a three-dimensional XY model in a random field with disorder strength varying linearly with the aerosil density.

  9. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Garcia, G.

    2007-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  10. High-energy x-ray anomalous dispersion correction for silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Moshe; Hart, Michael

    1988-02-01

    Energy-dependent structure factors measured by Saka and Kato [Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A 43, 252 (1987); 43, 255 (1987)] for silicon are analyzed, and values of the real part of the anomalous dispersion correction term f'(ω) extracted for 12 wavelengths in the range 0.3-0.8 Å with an estimated accuracy of a few millielectrons. This is the first experimental set of such data for wavelengths less than 0.56 Å. The agreement with previous high-accuracy data for 0.56 and 0.71 Å is very good. Comparison with nonrelativistic and relativistic theoretical calculations shows excellent agreement down to 0.4 Å with very recent relativistic calculations including multipole and retardation terms. For shorter wavelengths a small deviation between theory and experiment is observed. Possible causes for this are discussed.

  11. Wavelength dispersion of optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. A.; Chen, C.-L.

    1980-06-01

    Coefficients that characterize the contribution to the total waveguide dispersion from guide geometry and from material dispersion are introduced. These are cast in terms of the normalized parameters of normalized frequency, asymmetry measure, and effective guide index. This allows plotting of universal curves for the dispersion coefficients for step thin film and exponentially graded slab waveguides that are applicable to all such structures.

  12. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  13. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode.

  14. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser. PMID:26310765

  15. Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action at soft-x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.

    1983-01-12

    Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action in the wavelength regime 100-30A are reviewed. Schemes involving pumping of 2..-->..4 transitions in neon-like ions are singled out as particularly attractive.

  16. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, K. K.; Sanders, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  17. Observation of a Quasiperiodic Pulsation in Hard X-Ray, Radio, and Extreme-ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of a quasiperiodic pulsation (QPP) observed in the hard X-ray (HXR), radio, and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels during an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2011 September 23-24. The nonthermal HXR emission in 25-50 keV observed by RHESSI shows five distinct impulsive peaks of decaying amplitude with a period of about 3 minutes. A similar QPP was observed in the microwave emission recorded by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Polarimeter in the 2, 3.75, 9.4, and 17 GHz channels. Interestingly, the 3-minute QPP was also observed in the metric and decimetric radio frequencies (25-180, 245, 610 MHz) as repetitive type III bursts. Multiwavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly, Hinode/SOT, and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/SECCHI suggest a fan-spine topology at the eruption site, associated with the formation of a quasi-circular ribbon during the flare. A small filament was observed below the fan loops before the flare onset. The filament rose slowly and interacted with the ambient field. This behavior was followed by an untwisting motion of the filament. Two different structures of the filament showed an approximately 3-minute periodic alternate rotation in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions. The 3-minute QPP was found to highly correlate with 3-minute oscillations in a nearby sunspot. We suggest that the periodic reconnection (modulated either by a sunspot slow-mode wave or by an untwisting filament) at a magnetic null point most likely causes the repetitive particle acceleration, generating the QPP observed in HXR, microwave, and type III radio bursts.

  18. Observation of a Quasiperiodic Pulsation in Hard X-Ray, Radio, and Extreme-ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of a quasiperiodic pulsation (QPP) observed in the hard X-ray (HXR), radio, and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels during an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2011 September 23–24. The nonthermal HXR emission in 25–50 keV observed by RHESSI shows five distinct impulsive peaks of decaying amplitude with a period of about 3 minutes. A similar QPP was observed in the microwave emission recorded by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Polarimeter in the 2, 3.75, 9.4, and 17 GHz channels. Interestingly, the 3-minute QPP was also observed in the metric and decimetric radio frequencies (25–180, 245, 610 MHz) as repetitive type III bursts. Multiwavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly, Hinode/SOT, and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/SECCHI suggest a fan-spine topology at the eruption site, associated with the formation of a quasi-circular ribbon during the flare. A small filament was observed below the fan loops before the flare onset. The filament rose slowly and interacted with the ambient field. This behavior was followed by an untwisting motion of the filament. Two different structures of the filament showed an approximately 3-minute periodic alternate rotation in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions. The 3-minute QPP was found to highly correlate with 3-minute oscillations in a nearby sunspot. We suggest that the periodic reconnection (modulated either by a sunspot slow-mode wave or by an untwisting filament) at a magnetic null point most likely causes the repetitive particle acceleration, generating the QPP observed in HXR, microwave, and type III radio bursts.

  19. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c− polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  20. Backscattered electron imaging and windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis: a new technique for gallstone analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, H.S.; Lillemoe, K.D.; Magnuson, T.H.; Frasca, P.; Pitt, H.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with or without conventional energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis is currently used to identify gallstone microstructure and inorganic composition. Organic calcium salts are among many biliary constituents thought to have a role in gallstone nidation and growth. However, current analytical techniques which identify these salts are destructive and compromise gallstone microstructural data. We have developed a new technique for gallstone analysis which provides simultaneous structural and compositional identification of calcium salts within gallstones. Backscattered electron imaging is used to localize calcium within cholesterol at minimum concentrations of 0.01%. Windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis produces elemental spectra of gallstone calcium salts which are qualitatively and quantitatively different. These combined techniques provide simultaneous structural and compositional information obtained from intact gallstone cross-sections and have been used to identify calcium salts in gallstones obtained at cholecystectomy from 106 patients.

  1. Application of the focusing x-ray spectrograph with crossed dispersion to investigations of X pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S.A.; Song, B.M.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.

    2004-10-01

    A new focusing spectrograph configuration with crossed dispersion (FSCD) has been developed for use in X pinch experiments. This device solves the problem in a crystal spectrograph of the overlapping of reflected radiation in many orders. The x-ray radiation from a small source is dispersed by a transmission grating before it reaches the Bragg reflector (mica crystal). A large aperture (10 mmx10 mm), 0.5 {mu}m period gold transmission grating was made on a 0.5 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate and combined with spherically bent mica crystals with radii of curvature of 100 mm or 186 mm. Results of FSCD application to plasma experiments with X pinch x-ray sources is presented.

  2. Determination of calcium and iodine in gall bladder stone using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Neslihan; Şahin, Yusuf

    2002-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques were used to analyze gall bladder stones. Enrichment of Ca and I was observed in the gall bladder stone taken from a patient. The concentration of Ca has been determined with an annular 55Fe radioactive source and the concentration of I with an annular 241Am radioactive source using the standard addition method in 2π geometry. A Si(Li)-detector was used to measure Ca and I concentrations in the gall bladder stones.

  3. At-wavelength metrology facility for soft X-ray reflection optics.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, A; Bischoff, P; Eggenstein, F; Erko, A; Gaupp, A; Künstner, S; Mast, M; Schmidt, J-S; Senf, F; Siewert, F; Zeschke, Th; Schäfers, F

    2016-05-01

    A new Optics Beamline coupled to a versatile UHV reflectometer is successfully operating at BESSY-II. It is used to carry out at-wavelength characterization and calibration of in-house produced gratings and novel nano-optical devices as well as mirrors and multilayer systems in the UV and XUV spectral region. This paper presents most recent commissioning data of the beamline and shows their correlation with initial beamline design calculations. Special attention is paid to beamline key parameters which determine the quality of the measurements such as high-order suppression and stray light behavior. The facility is open to user operation. PMID:27250385

  4. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  5. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  6. New reference and test materials for the characterization of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers at scanning electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Rackwitz, Vanessa; Krumrey, Michael; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2015-04-01

    Checking the performance of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers as well as validation of the results obtained with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) at a scanning electron microscope (SEM) involve the use of (certified) reference and dedicated test materials. This paper gives an overview on the test materials mostly employed by SEM/EDX users and accredited laboratories as well as on those recommended in international standards. The new BAM reference material EDS-CRM, which is currently in the process of certification, is specifically designed for the characterization of EDS systems at a SEM through calibration of the spectrometer efficiency in analytical laboratories in a simple manner. The certification of the spectra by means of a reference EDS is described. The focus is on the traceability of EDS efficiency which is ensured by measurements of the absolute detection efficiency of silicon drift detectors (SDD) and Si(Li) detectors at the laboratory of the PTB using the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary X-ray source standard. A new test material in development at BAM for testing the performance of an EDS in the energy range below 1 keV is also briefly presented.

  7. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  8. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  9. Low-cost virtual instrumentation system of an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Junfeng; Zeng, Libo; Liu, Ronggui; Liu, Juntang; Zhang, Zelan

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXS). It was constructed using the new architecture of a virtual instrument (VI), which is low-cost, space-saving, fast and flexible way to develop the instrument. Computer-aided teaching (CAT) was used to develop the instrument and operation rather than a traditional instrument technique. The VI was designed using the object-oriented program language C++ and compact programmable logical devices (CPLD). These include spectra collection and processing, quantitative analysis and X-ray-intensity distribution analysis. The procedure is described in detail. The VI system gives an e¡ective and user-friendly human interface for the whole analytical task. Some examples are described. PMID:18924732

  10. Microsphere-based short-wavelength recombination x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeo, E. J.; Cowley, S. C.

    1993-02-01

    We describe a scheme for obtaining very short wavelengths (λ~10 Å) in recombination lasers. The rapid cooling rates necessary to achieve population inversion during recombination are attained by adiabatic expansion of submicrometer spheres. The lasing region is made up of many such spheres. The spheres are heated impulsively by a powerful picosecond laser. First, they ionize, then as they expand, they cool and recombine. We have calculated the optimum sphere size and initial temperature for maximum gain in the n=3 to 2 transition of hydrogenlike ions of elements with atomic numbers, Z, between 10 and 30. Gain of about 250 cm-1 is calculated in aluminum at 38.8 Å. Gain rapidly decreases with Z so that gain in titanium at 13.6 Å is about 10 cm-1. We have calculated the required pump-laser intensity and found it to be attainable with current lasers. The propagation of the pump through the ``gas'' of spheres is considered and the problems arising from pump scattering by the spheres are discussed.

  11. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  12. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  13. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  14. An Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Analysis of Elemental Changes of a Persimmon Phytobezoar Dissolved in Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Higashi, Reiji; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Shin; Shiraha, Hidenori; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of phytobezoar dissolution by Coca-Cola(®), persimmon phytobezoar pieces removed from a 60-year-old Japanese woman were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The amount of calcium significantly decreased after dissolution treatment using Coca-Cola(®), suggesting a potential contribution of calcium to dissolution mechanisms. Moreover, immersion in Coca-Cola(®) for 120 hours on the exterior surface revealed that Coca-Cola(®) did not permeate persimmon phytobezoars. This is the first study to investigate the mechanisms of persimmon phytobezoar permeability and dissolution induced by Coca-Cola(®).

  15. Benzyne-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, Igor V.; Frolova, Lilia V.; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2012-01-01

    The benzyne functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using a mixture of o-trimethylsilylphenyl triflate and cesium fluoride that react with the carbon surface. The reaction requires at least 2 days of treatment before the appearance of Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectral signatures that verify modification. Raman spectra of modified graphene and graphite show a rich structure of lines corresponding to C=C-C, C-H, and low frequency modes of surface-attached benzyne rings. PMID:23505324

  16. Benzyne-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Magedov, Igor V; Frolova, Lilia V; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A; Kalugin, Nikolai G

    2013-04-01

    The benzyne functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using a mixture of o-trimethylsilylphenyl triflate and cesium fluoride that react with the carbon surface. The reaction requires at least 2 days of treatment before the appearance of Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectral signatures that verify modification. Raman spectra of modified graphene and graphite show a rich structure of lines corresponding to C=C-C, C-H, and low frequency modes of surface-attached benzyne rings.

  17. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  18. A numerical model for multiple detector energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Dycus, J H; Sang, X; LeBeau, J M

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a numerical approach to model a four quadrant energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer in the transmission electron microscope. The model includes detector geometries, specimen position and absorption, shadowing by the holder, and filtering by the Be carrier. We show that this comprehensive model accurately predicts absolute counts and intensity ratios as a function of specimen tilt and position. We directly compare the model to experimental results acquired with a FEI Super-X EDS four quadrant detector. The contribution from each detector to the sum is investigated. The program and source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/subangstrom/superAngle.

  19. A new background subtraction method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra using a cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Man; Peng, Shiqi; Zhao, Weigang; He, Jialin; Zhao, Guangcui

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to subtract the background from the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrum using a cubic spline interpolation. To accurately obtain interpolation nodes, a smooth fitting and a set of discriminant formulations were adopted. From these interpolation nodes, the background is estimated by a calculated cubic spline function. The method has been tested on spectra measured from a coin and an oil painting using a confocal MXRF setup. In addition, the method has been tested on an existing sample spectrum. The result confirms that the method can properly subtract the background.

  20. An Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Analysis of Elemental Changes of a Persimmon Phytobezoar Dissolved in Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Higashi, Reiji; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Shin; Shiraha, Hidenori; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of phytobezoar dissolution by Coca-Cola(®), persimmon phytobezoar pieces removed from a 60-year-old Japanese woman were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The amount of calcium significantly decreased after dissolution treatment using Coca-Cola(®), suggesting a potential contribution of calcium to dissolution mechanisms. Moreover, immersion in Coca-Cola(®) for 120 hours on the exterior surface revealed that Coca-Cola(®) did not permeate persimmon phytobezoars. This is the first study to investigate the mechanisms of persimmon phytobezoar permeability and dissolution induced by Coca-Cola(®). PMID:27629955

  1. Determination of metal components in marine sediments using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tung, Joanne Wai Ting

    2004-11-01

    A rapid energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometric method for the analysis of metal components of marine sediments has been presented. Calibrations were made using synthetic matrix. The agreement of the results for sediment standard reference materials with reference values is satisfactory. Major advantages of the non-destructive ED-XRF technique over conventional chemical digestion methods include the applicability to analyzing the major oxide components, as well as to trace metals, and the avoidance of hazardous chemicals. The method has been applied to the routine analysis of Hong Kong marine sediment.

  2. In situ multi-element analyses by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence on varnishes of historical violins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Varnishes of Italian violins and other historical stringed instruments have been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The instruments whose varnishes were to be analyzed were chosen from the collection kept in Musée de la Musique in Paris. Direct analyses were performed on instrument varnishes, without any sampling and non-destructively, showing inorganic elements such as lead, mercury and iron that could be related to siccatives or pigments. Analytical results and their comparison with old formulae or traditional recipes of violin varnishes, as with the few previous analytical results, will be discussed.

  3. Discrimination of land-use types in a catchment by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Melquiades, F L; Andreoni, L F S; Thomaz, E L

    2013-07-01

    Differences in composition and chemical elemental concentration are important information for soil samples classification. The objective of this study is to present a direct methodology, that is non-destructive and without complex sample preparation, in order to discriminate different land-use types and soil degradation, employing energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and multivariate analysis. Sample classification results from principal component analysis, utilizing spectral data and elemental concentration values demonstrate that the methodology is efficient to discriminate different land-use types.

  4. Multi-wavelength coverage of state transitions in the new black hole X-ray binary swift J1910.2-0546

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; King, A. L.; Gültekin, K.; Cackett, E. M.; Bailyn, C. D.; Buxton, M. M.; MacDonald, R. K. D.; Fabian, A. C.; Fox, D. B.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how black holes accrete and supply feedback to their environment is one of the outstanding challenges of modern astrophysics. Swift J1910.2-0546 is a candidate black hole low-mass X-ray binary that was discovered in 2012 when it entered an accretion outburst. To investigate the binary configuration and the accretion morphology, we monitored the evolution of the outburst for ≅3 months at X-ray, UV, optical (B, V, R, I), and near-infrared (J, H, K) wavelengths using Swift and SMARTS. The source evolved from a hard to a soft X-ray spectral state with a relatively cold accretion disk that peaked at ≅0.5 keV. A Chandra/HETG spectrum obtained during this soft state did not reveal signatures of an ionized disk wind. Both the low disk temperature and the absence of a detectable wind could indicate that the system is viewed at relatively low inclination. The multi-wavelength light curves revealed two notable features that appear to be related to X-ray state changes. First, a prominent flux decrease was observed in all wavebands ≅ 1-2 weeks before the source entered the soft state. This dip occurred in (0.6-10 keV) X-rays ≅ 6 days later than at longer wavelengths, which could possibly reflect the viscous timescale of the disk. Second, about two weeks after the source transitioned back into the hard state, the UV emission significantly increased while the X-rays steadily decayed. We discuss how these observations may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, perhaps related to the quenching/launch of a jet or the collapse/recovery of a hot flow.

  5. Kramers-Kronig analysis of soft x-ray reflectivity data of platinum thin film in 40-200 Å wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, R. K.; Sinha, Mangalika; Yadav, P.; Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H.

    2016-05-01

    Reflectivity beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron source is used to determine optical constants of a platinum thin film in the soft x-ray wavelength region of 40-200Å by applying Kramers-Kronig (KK) technique on R vs wavelength data. Upto 150Å wavelength region the results of KK analysis are found in good agreement with the Henke's optical constants and also with those obtained by the angle dependent reflectivity technique. A significant mismatch is observed above 150Å wavelength region which could be due to the presence of higher harmonics in the toroidal grating spectra of the reflectivity beamline.

  6. Mycological Applications of X-Ray Microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, M.; Ansel, M.

    1973-01-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, X-ray microanalysis applied in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy enabled us to detect the presence of calcium, potassium, sulfur, phosphorus, and magnesium; and in A. niger we detected the presence of calcium, potassium, chloride, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium, and magnesium. These various elements were identified by their K α lines. Images PMID:4584802

  7. Crystals for astronomical X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burek, A.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal spectrometric properties and the factors that affect their measurement are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on KAP are summarized and theoretical results based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction are given for the acid phthalates as well as for the commonly used planes of ADP, PET and EDDT. Anomalous dispersion is found to be important for understanding the details of crystal Bragg reflection properties at long X-ray wavelengths and some important effects are pointed out. The theory of anomalous dispersion is applied to explain the anomalous reflectivity exhibited by KAP at 23.3 A.

  8. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  9. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuder, A.; Sawan, M. Kh.; Karjou, J.; Razouk, A. K.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise ( Anisum vulgare), licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood ( Artemisia herba-alba).

  10. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  11. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y₂O₃, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  12. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    PubMed Central

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm−3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  13. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  14. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    PubMed

    Lumma; Lurio; Borthwick; Falus; Mochrie

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems. PMID:11138124

  15. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    PubMed

    Lumma; Lurio; Borthwick; Falus; Mochrie

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems.

  16. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: Static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lumma, D.; Lurio, L. B.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems.

  17. Development of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence as a mobile analysis method for hazardous metals in transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a widely applied technique for both laboratory and field-based characterization of metals in complex matrices. Here an EDXRF method is described for analysis of 13 hazardous (RCRA) metals in Portland cement, a typical matrix for transuranic (TRU) waste from US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Samples are analyzed as homogeneous powders prepared by simple drying, mixing, and milling. Analyses are performed using a commercial EDXRF spectrometer equipped with an X-ray tube, a high-resolution Si(Li) detector, and fundamental parameters software for data reduction. The spectrometer is rugged and suitable for use in either mobile or fixed-based laboratories. Standardization is accomplished using fundamental parameters techniques for several prepared standards which bracket the expected range in metal concentrations, and typical standardization uncertainties are < 10%. Detection limits range from 2--20 ppm and meet required action levels with a few exceptions including Be, Hg and V. Accuracy is evaluated from a series of unknown quality control samples and ranges from 85--102%, whereas the total method uncertainty is typically < 10%. Consequently, this simple, rapid, and inexpensive technique can provide quantitative characterization of virtually all of the RCRA metals in TRU waste cement samples.

  18. Development of W/C soft x-ray multilayer mirror by ion beam sputtering (IBS) system for below 50A wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-06-25

    A home-made Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) system has been developed in our laboratory. Using the IBS system single layer W and single layer C film has been deposited at 1000eV Ar ion energy and 10mA ion current. The W-film has been characterized by grazing Incidence X-ray reflectrometry (GIXR) technique and Atomic Force Microscope technique. The single layer C-film has been characterized by Spectroscopic Ellipsometric technique. At the same deposition condition 25-layer W/C multilayer film has been deposited which has been designed for using as mirror at 30 Degree-Sign grazing incidence angle around 50A wavelength. The multilayer sample has been characterized by measuring reflectivity of CuK{alpha} radiation and soft x-ray radiation around 50A wavelength.

  19. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  20. Gold nephropathy. Ultrastructural, fluorescent, and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.K.; Swain, R.P.; Watabe, N.; Brackett, N.C. Jr.; Pilia, P.; Hennigar, G.R.

    1981-07-01

    The nephrotic syndrome developed in a patient receiving therapy with gold for rheumatoid arthritis. The results of a histopathological examination of the renal biopsy specimen were unremarkable. Immunofluorescent studies showed deposits of immunoglobulins and C3 in a granular pattern in the glomerular basement membranes. Ultrastructurally, the discrete osmiophilic immune complexes were epimembranous. By x-ray microanalysis, gold that was complexed with sulfur was present in proximal tubular cytoplasmic vacuoles and nuclei. Gold and sulfur could not be demonstrated in glomerular epimembranous deposits. The results of these studies suggest that immune complex deposition does not involve gold and sulfur acting as haptens. Gold-salt therapy may result in damage to proximal tubules that leak renal tubular antigens, which in turn complex with autoantibody and produce an autoimmune membranous nephropathy. The evidence for this mechanism is not convincing. Although the data indicate an immune-complex cause for gold-salt nephropathy, the incident antigen (or antigens) and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  1. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  2. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  3. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  4. Hot electron and x-ray production from intense laser irradiation of wavelength-scale polystyrene spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Landry, J.; Bansal, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Karmakar, A.; Pukhov, A.; Ditmire, T.

    2007-06-15

    Hot electron and x-ray production from solid targets coated with polystyrene-spheres which are irradiated with high-contrast, 100 fs, 400 nm light pulses at intensity up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} have been studied. The peak hard x-ray signal from uncoated fused silica targets is an order of magnitude smaller than the signal from targets coated with submicron sized spheres. The temperature of the x-rays in the case of sphere-coated targets is twice as hot as that of uncoated glass. A sphere-size scan of the x-ray yield and observation of a peak in both the x-ray production and temperature at a sphere diameter of 0.26 {mu}m, indicate that these results are consistent with Mie enhancements of the laser field at the sphere surface and multipass stochastic heating of the hot electrons in the oscillating laser field. These results also match well with particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction.

  5. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  6. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  7. Final Report, DOE Award Number DE-FG02-02ER45964, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter at X-ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Y

    2007-02-28

    We report results of a collaborative study of photon and charged-particle interactions with matter between the University of Vermont and Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. A major goal was to extend the study of electromagnetic properties of selected materials to as wide a spectral range as possible. This broad approach discloses systematic trends not apparent in isolated measurements and exploits the power of dispersion analysis and sum-rule constraints. Emphasis was largely on UV and X-ray processes and capitalized on the wide range of photon energies available at NSLS. A key finding is that, under favorable circumstances, dispersion theory relates dispersive processes (e.g. refractive index, dielectric constant) to spectral moments of absorptive processes. This appears to be a new method in optics; it yields significant simplifications and provides a precise, model-independent characterization of optical materials. Problems addressed included a) x-ray magnetooptics; b) UV/soft-x-ray processes in insulators and their contribution to visible dispersion; c) demonstration of moments/dispersion analysis in glasses and applications to fiber-optic systems; d) the optical constants of silicon and their application to the stopping power of silicon for charged-particles. Results include; Resolution of a long-standing conflict over the relation between x-ray Faraday rotation and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Specifically, the Kramers-Kronig relations must be generalized to account for the breaking of time-reversal symmetry by magnetic fields. Experimental reports to the contrary were shown to be inconclusive. Reanalysis of x-ray Faraday rotation data supports the generalization; Demonstration that the optical properties of dielectrics in their region of transparency are determined by a series expansion in spectral moments of the dielectric’s infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Application of this to silicate glasses clarifies the role of glass

  8. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of moss and soil from abandoned mining of Pb-Zn ores.

    PubMed

    Koz, B

    2014-09-01

    This research investigates heavy metal pollution around one of the most important mining areas in Turkey, the Sebinkarahisar (Giresun) lead-zinc mining, by means of analyzing moss and soil samples collected in the neighborhood of the copper mining at different distances. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (Epsilon 5, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands) is utilized in the experiments. The results have indicated that the both moss and soil samples contain aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, barium, cerium, tungsten, and lead. The comparison of the heavy metal concentrations with the typical measurements in the world and with the limit values for the human health has revealed the critical heavy metal pollution levels in the region. The possible consequences of these results are briefly discussed from the point of potential hazards to ecology and human health.

  9. Analysis of aqueous and organic fission-product solutions by energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksbank, R.D.; Stewart, J.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Because of a revival of interest in reprocessing spent nuclear reactor fuel, ORNL is re-evaluating existing data on extractions. Organic degradation products and new organic extractant systems must also be investigated. Analysis of these solutions present several problems for the analytical chemist. Conventional wet chemical techniques usually require aqueous solutions. Organic solutions must be stripped or wet ashed to convert them to an aqueous system. Stripping is not always quantitative, and the high phosphorus content of organic extractants makes wet ashing difficult. Radiolysis degrades many organic solutions. In aqueous solutions, low acid concentrations cause Pu to polymerize and Zr and Mo to form colloids or precipitate; therefore, sample pretreatment becomes necessary. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a multi-element technique, unaffected by chemical states, capable of analyzing both aqueous and organic solutions. Thie technique has been applied to the determination of U, Pu, Th, Mo, Zr and Re in cold flow sheet development.

  10. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  11. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of Si sidewall surface etched by deep-reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Nishioka, Kunio; Sato, Mina

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the composition of a passivation film on a sidewall etched by deep-reactive ion etching (RIE) using SF6/O2 and C4F8 plasma, by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. It was found that the compositions of carbon and fluorine in the passivation film on the etched sidewall depend on the width and depth of the etched trench. It is important to understand both the plasma behavior and the passivation film composition to carry out fabrication by deep-RIE. We consider that these results of the EDX analysis of an etched sidewall will be useful for understanding plasma behavior in order to optimize the process conditions of deep-RIE.

  12. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the cornea. Application to paraffin sections of normal and diseased corneas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.R.; Streeten, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of chemical elements in the normal human cornea was studied by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy of routinely prepared paraffin sections. Calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur were consistently present in quantities above background and varied in concentration regionally. Analysis of fresh-frozen tissue, an approximation of the in vivo state, gave a similar elemental profile to paraffin sections, except for the loss of diffusable electrolytes in the latter. After fixation, S was the most abundant element and was highest in Descemet's membrane. Corneas with granular, lattice, macular, and Fuchs endothelial dystrophies, band keratopathy, and spheroidal degeneration were also examined. Characteristic patterns of abnormal S and Ca distribution were found in each of the dystrophies. The relative proportions of Ca, P, and S gave diagnostic profiles for distinguishing band keratopathy and spheroidal degeneration.

  13. [Line scanning analysis of white porcelain from Gong Kiln in early Tang dynasty by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xue; Mao, Zhen-wei; Feng, Min; Hu, Yao-wu; Wang, Chang-sui; Liu, Hong-miao

    2005-07-01

    Gong kiln, for its long porcelain-firing history, was one of three representative white porcelain kilns in northern China. In order to improve the quality and whiteness of white porcelain, a decorating layer or cosmetic earth was laid on the body surface in Gong kiln during early Tang dynasty, which was able to blot out rough surface and weaken the influence of fuscous body upon surface color. In this paper the main chemical composition of the white porcelain's profile was analyzed by using energy disperse X-Ray fluorescence. The result showed that different materials were used as cosmetic earth during early Tang dynasty, in accordance with the phenomenon under optical microscope. In addition, the glaze belongs to calcium glaze in which plant ash was added.

  14. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  15. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  16. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  17. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D; Li, Ju

    2015-09-23

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1 1 1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  18. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances.

  19. Determining the fraction of reddened quasars in COSMOS with multiple selection techniques from X-ray to radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, K. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Møller, P.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Zabl, J.; Maddox, N.; Krogager, J.-K.; Geier, S.; Vestergaard, M.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ledoux, C.

    2016-10-01

    The sub-population of quasars reddened by intrinsic or intervening clouds of dust are known to be underrepresented in optical quasar surveys. By defining a complete parent sample of the brightest and spatially unresolved quasars in the COSMOS field, we quantify to which extent this sub-population is fundamental to our understanding of the true population of quasars. By using the available multiwavelength data of various surveys in the COSMOS field, we built a parent sample of 33 quasars brighter than J = 20 mag, identified by reliable X-ray to radio wavelength selection techniques. Spectroscopic follow-up with the NOT/ALFOSC was carried out for four candidate quasars that had not been targeted previously to obtain a 100% redshift completeness of the sample. The population of high AV quasars (HAQs), a specific sub-population of quasars selected from optical/near-infrared photometry, some of which were shown to be missed in large optical surveys such as SDSS, is found to contribute 21%+9-5 of the parent sample. The full population of bright spatially unresolved quasars represented by our parent sample consists of 39%+9-8 reddened quasars defined by having AV > 0.1, and 21%+9-5 of the sample having E(B-V) > 0.1 assuming the extinction curve of the Small Magellanic Cloud. We show that the HAQ selection works well for selecting reddened quasars, but some are missed because their optical spectra are too blue to pass the g-r color cut in the HAQ selection. This is either due to a low degree of dust reddening or anomalous spectra. We find that the fraction of quasars with contributing light from the host galaxy, causing observed extended spatial morphology, is most dominant at z ≲ 1. At higher redshifts the population of spatially unresolved quasars selected by our parent sample is found to be representative of the full population of bright active galactic nuclei at J< 20 mag. This work quantifies the bias against reddened quasars in studies that are based solely on

  20. The Chandra Multi-Wavelength Project (ChaMP): A Serendipitous X-Ray Survey Using Chandra Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 2000 opened a new era in X-ray astronomy. Its unprecedented, < 1" spatial resolution and low background is providing views of the X-ray sky 10-100 times fainter than previously possible. We have begun to carry out a serendipitous survey of the X-ray sky using Chandra archival data to flux limits covering the range between those reached by current satellites and those of the small area Chandra deep surveys. We estimate the survey will cover about 8 sq.deg. per year to X-ray fluxes (2-10 keV) in the range 10(exp -13) - 6(exp -16) erg cm2/s and include about 3000 sources per year, roughly two thirds of which are expected to be active galactic nuclei (AGN). Optical imaging of the ChaMP fields is underway at NOAO and SAO telescopes using g',r',z' colors with which we will be able to classify the X-ray sources into object types and, in some cases, estimate their redshifts. We are also planning to obtain optical spectroscopy of a well-defined subset to allow confirmation of classification and redshift determination. All X-ray and optical results and supporting optical data will be place in the ChaMP archive within a year of the completion of our data analysis. Over the five years of Chandra operations, ChaMP will provide both a major resource for Chandra observers and a key research tool for the study of the cosmic X-ray background and the individual source populations which comprise it. ChaMP promises profoundly new science return on a number of key questions at the current frontier of many areas of astronomy including solving the spectral paradox by resolving the CXRB, locating and studying high redshift clusters and so constraining cosmological parameters, defining the true, possibly absorbed, population of quasars and studying coronal emission from late-type stars as their cores become fully convective. The current status and initial results from the ChaMP will be presented.

  1. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  2. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry fixedbeam or overscan x-ray microanalysis of particles can miss the real structure: x-ray spectrum image mapping reveals the true nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2013-05-01

    The typical strategy for analysis of a microscopic particle by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry x-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDS) is to use a fixed beam placed at the particle center or to continuously overscan to gather an "averaged" x-ray spectrum. While useful, such strategies inevitably concede any possibility of recognizing microstructure within the particle, and such fine scale structure is often critical for understanding the origins, behavior, and fate of particles. Elemental imaging by x-ray mapping has been a mainstay of SEM/EDS analytical practice for many years, but the time penalty associated with mapping with older EDS technology has discouraged its general use and reserved it more for detailed studies that justified the time investment. The emergence of the high throughput, high peak stability silicon drift detector (SDD-EDS) has enabled a more effective particle mapping strategy: "flash" x-ray spectrum image maps can now be recorded in seconds that capture the spatial distribution of major (concentration, C > 0.1 mass fraction) and minor (0.01 <= C <= 0.1) constituents. New SEM/SDD-EDS instrument configurations feature multiple SDDs that view the specimen from widely spaced azimuthal angles. Multiple, simultaneous measurements from different angles enable x-ray spectrometry and mapping that can minimize the strong geometric effects of particles. The NIST DTSA-II software engine is a powerful aid for quantitatively analyzing EDS spectra measured individually as well as for mapping information (available free for Java platforms at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  3. Investigation of a catalyst ink dispersion using both ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic TEM.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhang, HangYu; Ilavsky, Jan; Stanciu, Lia; Ho, Derek; Justice, Matthew J; Petrache, Horia I; Xie, Jian

    2010-12-21

    The dispersion of Nafion ionomer particles and Pt/C catalyst aggregates in liquid media was studied using both ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and cryogenic TEM. A systematic approach was taken to study first the dispersion of each component (i.e., ionomer particles and Pt/C aggregates), then the combination of the components, and last the catalyst ink. Multiple-level curve fitting was used to extract the particle size, size distribution, and geometry of the Pt/C aggregates and the Nafion particles in liquid media from the scattering data. The results suggest that the particle size, size distribution, and geometry are not uniform throughout the systems but rather vary significantly. It was found that the interaction of each component (i.e., the Nafion ionomer particles and the Pt/C aggregates) occurs in the dispersion. Cryogenic TEM was used to observe the size and geometry of the particles in liquid directly and to validate the scattering results. The TEM results showed excellent agreement.

  4. Observations of 3-D transverse dispersion and dilution in natural consolidated rock by X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Maartje; Bijeljic, Branko; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Sam

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of transverse dispersion for dilution and mixing of solutes but most observations have remained limited to two-dimensional sand-box models. We present a new core-flood test to characterize solute transport in 3-D natural-rock media. A device consisting of three annular regions was used for fluid injection into a cylindrical rock core. Pure water was injected into the center and outer region and a NaI solution into the middle region. Steady state transverse dispersion of NaI was visualized with an X-ray medical CT-scanner for a range of Peclét numbers. Three methods were used to calculate Dt: (1) fitting an analytical solution, (2) analyzing the second-central moment, and (3) analyzing the dilution index and reactor ratio. Transverse dispersion decreased with distance due to flow focusing. Furthermore, Dt in the power-law regime showed sub-linear behavior. Overall, the reactor ratios were high confirming the homogeneity of Berea sandstone.

  5. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fusheng

    Four key components with regards to Monte Carlo Library Least Squares (MCLLS) have been developed by the author. These include: a comprehensive and accurate Monte Carlo simulation code - CEARXRF5 with Differential Operators (DO) and coincidence sampling, Detector Response Function (DRF), an integrated Monte Carlo - Library Least-Squares (MCLLS) Graphical User Interface (GUI) visualization System (MCLLSPro) and a new reproducible and flexible benchmark experiment setup. All these developments or upgrades enable the MCLLS approach to be a useful and powerful tool for a tremendous variety of elemental analysis applications. CEARXRF, a comprehensive and accurate Monte Carlo code for simulating the total and individual library spectral responses of all elements, has been recently upgraded to version 5 by the author. The new version has several key improvements: input file format fully compatible with MCNP5, a new efficient general geometry tracking code, versatile source definitions, various variance reduction techniques (e.g. weight window mesh and splitting, stratifying sampling, etc.), a new cross section data storage and accessing method which improves the simulation speed by a factor of four and new cross section data, upgraded differential operators (DO) calculation capability, and also an updated coincidence sampling scheme which including K-L and L-L coincidence X-Rays, while keeping all the capabilities of the previous version. The new Differential Operators method is powerful for measurement sensitivity study and system optimization. For our Monte Carlo EDXRF elemental analysis system, it becomes an important technique for quantifying the matrix effect in near real time when combined with the MCLLS approach. An integrated visualization GUI system has been developed by the author to perform elemental analysis using iterated Library Least-Squares method for various samples when an initial guess is provided. This software was built on the Borland C++ Builder

  7. Multiple dynamic regimes in colloid-polymer dispersions: New insight using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Sunita; Kishore, Suhasini; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Bhatia, Surita R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an X-ray photon correlation spectros- copy (XPCS) study of dynamic transitions in an anisotropic colloid-polymer dispersion with multiple arrested states. The results provide insight into the mechanism for formation of repulsive glasses, attractive glasses, and networked gels of col- loids with weakly adsorbing polymer chains. In the presence of adsorbing polymer chains, we observe three distinct regimes: a state with slow dynamics consisting of finite particles and clusters, for which interparticle interactions are predominantly repulsive; a second dynamic regime occurring above the satu- ration concentration of added polymer, in which small clusters of nanoparticles form via a short-range depletion attraction; and a third regime above the overlap concentration in which dynamics of clusters are independent of polymer chain length. The observed complex dynamic state diagram is primarily gov- erned by the structural reorganization of a nanoparticle cluster and polymer chains at the nanoparticle-polymer surface and in the concentrated medium, which in turn controls the dynamics of the dispersion

  8. Spatial dispersion and clustering of soil structure through lacunarity of X-ray CT images of soil macropore volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José Martínez, Fernando; Caniego, Javier; García-Gutiérrez, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity can be seen as a scale dependent measure of heterogeneity or texture ―in terms of image analysis― that was first introduced to quantify different patterns of dispersion and clustering that display geometrical objects with the same fractal dimension. Notwithstanding, lacunarity functions have been revealed as means to measure the deviation of object's geometrical structure from translational invariance beyond self-similarity and fractal geometry. In this work, we will explore how lacunarity quantifies different patterns of dispersion and clustering of different geometrical structures of soil macropore volumes imaged by X-ray computed tomography. Samples extracted from columns were collected at the experimental farm "Finca La Grajera" in La Rioja (Spain), property of La Rioja Regional Government (northern Spain). The vineyard selected was established in 1996. During the 1996 to 2004 period, the soil management was conventional tillage. Before the vineyard was established in 1996, a pasture-legume-cereal rotation was used. In 2004 an experiment was established with different types of soil cover management in between. On December 2010 columns were extracted vertically by percussion drilling between rows of the vineyard.

  9. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  10. Wavelength-tunable split-and-delay optical system for hard X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Taito; Hirano, Takashi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Inubushi, Yuichi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Tono, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-05-01

    We developed a hard X-ray split-and-delay optical (SDO) system based on Bragg diffraction in crystal optics for generating two split pulses with a variable temporal separation. To achieve both high stability and operational flexibility, the SDO system was designed to include variable-delay and fixed-delay branches. As key optical elements, we fabricated high quality thin crystals and channel-cut crystals by applying the plasma chemical vaporization machining technique. The SDO system using Si(220) crystals covered a photon energy range of 6.5-11.5keV and a delay time range from a negative value to > 45 ps over the photon energy range (up to 220 ps at 6.5 keV). A simple alignment method for realizing a spatial overlap between the split pulses was developed. The SDO system was tested at a SPring-8 beamline in combination with a focusing system. We achieved an excellent overlap with an accuracy of 30 nm for ∼ 200 nm focused beams in both the horizontal and vertical directions. This achievement is an important progress towards the realization of time-resolved studies using multiple X-ray pulses with a time range from femtosecond to subnanosecond scales at X-ray free-electron laser facilities. PMID:27137535

  11. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction potentiality in the field of cultural heritage: simultaneous structural and elemental analysis of various artefacts.

    PubMed

    Caponetti, Eugenio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Chillura Martino, Delia; Saladino, Maria Luisa

    2007-07-01

    The applicability of an Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometer to some technical questions in the field of Cultural Heritage is presented. This diffractometer, equipped with a white source, has been utilized for the structural and elemental analysis of some items having different nature. Given its design, the instrument allows to collect data from samples as big as a book or a little more. Samples, without collection of any portion and without any preliminary preparation, have been placed in the instrument and spectra have been collected in a wide energy range that contains X-ray fluorescence and diffraction features. In all cases, data acquired in air and in a non destructive way were reliable and their collection was fast. Fluorescence and X-ray diffraction information, when possible, have been compared with those obtained by XRF micro-analysis and by an Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffractometer equipped with a Cu X-ray source. By using the last two techniques, data have been collected from small areas of the samples.

  12. Femtosecond X-ray solution scattering reveals that bond formation mechanism of a gold trimer complex is independent of excitation wavelength.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jong Goo; Oang, Key Young; Kim, Tae Wu; Ki, Hosung; Jo, Junbeom; Kim, Jeongho; Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Adachi, Shin-Ichi; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2016-07-01

    The [Au(CN)2 (-)]3 trimer in water experiences a strong van der Waals interaction between the d(10) gold atoms due to large relativistic effect and can serve as an excellent model system to study the bond formation process in real time. The trimer in the ground state (S0) exists as a bent structure without the covalent bond between the gold atoms, and upon the laser excitation, one electron in the antibonding orbital goes to the bonding orbital, thereby inducing the formation of a covalent bond between gold atoms. This process has been studied by various time-resolved techniques, and most of the interpretation on the structure and dynamics converge except that the structure of the first intermediate (S1) has been debated due to different interpretations between femtosecond optical spectroscopy and femtosecond X-ray solution scattering. Recently, the excitation wavelength of 267 nm employed in our previous scattering experiment was suggested as the culprit for misinterpretation. Here, we revisited this issue by performing femtosecond X-ray solution scattering with 310 nm excitation and compared the results with our previous study employing 267 nm excitation. The data show that a linear S1 structure is formed within 500 fs regardless of excitation wavelength and the structural dynamics observed at both excitation wavelengths are identical to each other within experimental errors. PMID:27191012

  13. [Chemical composition analysis of bluish-white porcelain unearthed from Fanchang kiln, Anhui province by wave disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-zhang; Zhang, Ju-zhong; Zan, Yi

    2010-08-01

    Fanchang kiln was the earliest Chinese bluish-white porcelain kiln which first fired this special porcelain class as early as in Five Dynasties (AD 907-960). However, this important kiln declined rapidly in the middle North Song dynasty (AD 1023-1085). As to the decline reason, it is still not clearly identified till now. In order to find the truth, wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) was used to determine the elemental abundance patterns of its porcelain bodies in Five Dynasties, the early North Song dynasty and the middle North Song dynasty. The analytical results indicate that the chemical compositions of major, minor and trace elements in porcelain bodies changed greatly in the middle North Song dynasty. Combined with the results of INAA and glaze study, this change in elemental composition should be caused by the change in porcelain raw materials or body-making crafts. Meanwhile, it was just this change that led to the quality decline of raw material and rapid collapse of Fan-chang kiln in the middle North Song dynasty shortly after its establishment.

  14. Assignment of Individual Metal Redox States in a Metalloprotein By Crystallographic Refinement at Multiple X-Ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Einsle, O.; Andrade, S.L.A.; Dobbek, H.; Meyer, J.; Rees, D.C.; /Gottingen U. /Bayreuth U. /DRDC, Grenoble /Caltech

    2007-07-09

    A method is presented to derive anomalous scattering contributions for individual atoms within a protein crystal by collecting several sets of diffraction data at energies spread along an X-ray absorption edge of the element in question. The method has been applied to a [2Fe:2S] ferredoxin model system with localized charges in the reduced state of the iron-sulfur cluster. The analysis shows that upon reduction the electron resides at the iron atom closer to the protein surface. The technique should be sufficiently sensitive for more complex clusters with noninteger redox states and is generally applicable given that crystals are available.

  15. Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluoresence mapping of enamel and dental materials after chemical erosion.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sídnei; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-10-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence was employed to test the hypothesis that beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization will change the chemical properties of dental materials and enamel mineral content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 45) each received two cavity preparations (n = 90), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin; GIC: glass-ionomer cement; RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: saliva; E: erosion/Pepsi Twist®; or EM: erosion+mouthwash/Colgate Plax®). It was found that mineral loss in enamel was greater in GICE samples than in RE > RMGICE > RMGICEM > REM > GICEM. An increased percentage of Zr was found in REM indicating organic matrix degradation. Dental materials tested (R, GIC, and RMGIC) were not able to protect adjacent enamel from acid erosion by the soft drink tested. The use of mouthwash promoted protection of enamel after erosion by the soft drink. To avoid chemical dissolution by mouthwashes, protection by resin composites with surface sealants is recommended.

  16. Faults and foibles of quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a powerful and flexible elemental analysis method that can identify and quantify elements with atomic numbers > 4 (Be) present as major constituents (where the concentration C > 0.1 mass fraction, or 10 weight percent), minor (0.01<= C <= 0.1) and trace (C < 0.01, with a minimum detectable limit of ~+/- 0.0005 - 0.001 under routine measurement conditions, a level which is analyte and matrix dependent ). SEM/EDS can select specimen volumes with linear dimensions from ~ 500 nm to 5 μm depending on composition (masses ranging from ~ 10 pg to 100 pg) and can provide compositional maps that depict lateral elemental distributions. Despite the maturity of SEM/EDS, which has a history of more than 40 years, and the sophistication of modern analytical software, the method is vulnerable to serious shortcomings that can lead to incorrect elemental identifications and quantification errors that significantly exceed reasonable expectations. This paper will describe shortcomings in peak identification procedures, limitations on the accuracy of quantitative analysis due to specimen topography or failures in physical models for matrix corrections, and quantitative artifacts encountered in xray elemental mapping. Effective solutions to these problems are based on understanding the causes and then establishing appropriate measurement science protocols. NIST DTSA II and Lispix are open source analytical software available free at www.nist.gov that can aid the analyst in overcoming significant limitations to SEM/EDS.

  17. Application of X-ray microtomography for the characterisation of hollow polymer-stabilised spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    PubMed

    Gamble, John F; Terada, Masako; Holzner, Christian; Lavery, Leah; Nicholson, Sarah J; Timmins, Peter; Tobyn, Mike

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of X-ray microtomography to obtain information relating to powder characteristics such as wall thickness and solid volume fraction for hollow, polymer-stabilised spray dried dispersion (SDD) particles. SDDs of varying particle properties, with respect to shell wall thickness and degree of particle collapse, were utilised to assess the capability of the approach. The results demonstrate that the approach can provide insight into the morphological characteristics of these hollow particles, and thereby a means to understand/predict the processability and performance characteristics of the bulk material. Quantitative assessments of particle wall thickness, particle/void volume and thereby solid volume fraction were also demonstrated to be achievable. The analysis was also shown to be able to qualitatively assess the impact of the drying rate on the morphological nature of the particle surfaces, thus providing further insight into the final particle shape. The approach demonstrated a practical means to access potentially important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as particle size and bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials, and their impact on downstream processability and dosage form performance.

  18. Misfit strain of oxygen precipitates in Czochralski silicon studied with energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröschel, A.; Will, J.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.

    2014-06-01

    Annealed Czochralski Silicon wafers containing SiOx precipitates have been studied by high energy X-ray diffraction in a defocused Laue setup using a laboratory tungsten tube. The energy dispersive evaluation of the diffracted Bragg intensity of the 220 reflection within the framework of the statistical dynamical theory yields the static Debye-Waller factor E of the crystal, which gives access to the strain induced by the SiOx precipitates. The results are correlated with precipitate densities and sizes determined from transmission electron microscopy measurements of equivalent wafers. This allows for the determination of the constrained linear misfit ɛ between precipitate and crystal lattice. For samples with octahedral precipitates the values ranging from ɛ = 0.39 (+0.28/-0.12) to ɛ = 0.48 (+0.34/-0.16) indicate that self-interstitials emitted into the matrix during precipitate growth contribute to the lattice strain. In this case, the expected value calculated from literature values is ɛ = 0.26 ± 0.05. Further, the precise evaluation of Pendellösung oscillations in the diffracted Bragg intensity of as-grown wafers reveals a thermal Debye-Waller parameter for the 220 reflection B220(293 K) of 0.5582 ± 0.0039 Å2 for a structure factor based on spherically symmetric scattering contributions.

  19. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  20. A study of heavy metal pollution in Lake Victoria sediments by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Makundi, I N

    2001-01-01

    Sources of heavy metal pollution of Lake Victoria is of interest due to its economic and domestic implication in East Africa. Sediments from the shore of Lake Victoria and from some streams flowing into the lake have been analyzed for their heavy metal content using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis. The samples were collected from seventeen different locations around the Municipality of Mwanza divided into three zones according to their activities. The results show that sediments from Mwanza North, which is least in anthropogenic activities, contains Cr and Co in addition to metals of terrestrial origin (K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr), samples from Mwanza Central, which is the town center, contains high concentrations of V, Cu, Zn and Pb, and samples collected from Mwanza South, which is the industrial area, contains the highest concentrations of V, Cu, Zn, As and Pb. It is concluded that the industrial and sewage wastes discharged into the lake are the main sources of the heavy metal contamination of Lake Victoria. Further studies will be required to assess detriments of these pollutants to human and aquatic life before policy for the factories responsible is put in place. PMID:11501314

  1. Simultaneous nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticles using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Haidi D; Drinkel, Emma E; Orzechovicz, Beatriz; Leopoldino, Elder C; Souza, Franciane D; Almerindo, Gizelle I; Perdona, Cristian; Nome, Faruk

    2013-11-01

    A selective method is proposed for the determination of palladium, gold, and sulfur in catalytic systems, by direct liquid analysis using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), under an atmosphere of helium or air. This method allows a nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticulate catalysts stabilized by imidazolium propane sulfonate based zwitterionic surfactants, allowing the samples to be reused for catalytic studies. The signals from palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold samples in the presence of imidazolium propane sulfonate-based zwitterionic surfactants obtained using EDXRF before (Pd(2+), Rh(2+), Pt(2+), and Au(3+)) and after (Pd(0), Rh(0), Pt(0), and Au(0)) formation of nanoparticles are essentially identical. The results show that the EDXRF method is nondestructive and allows detection and quantification of the main components of platinum, gold, rhodium, and palladium NPs, including the surfactant concentration, with detection and quantification limits in the range of 0.4-3 mg L(-1). The matrices used in such samples present no problems, even allowing the detection and quantification of interfering elements.

  2. A chemical signal possibly related to physiology in fossil cells detected by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    2006-02-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) is a widely used tool employed to detect elemental composition and its spatial distribution in a sample without causing damage. Charcoalified cytoplasm is a new type of fossil material that came to people's attention only recently. In this paper, EDXMA is used for the first time to detect the spatial elemental distribution in charcoalified cytoplasm of two fossil plants that are more than 100 million years old. The results demonstrate certain elemental distribution patterns within charcoalified cytoplasm and the surrounding cell walls. Based on the results from cytological studies of extant material, the heterogeneous spatial elemental distribution within the charcoalified cytoplasm has the potential to be related to the maturation of cells, the presence of certain organelles, and the physiology of these organelles. This is the first chemical signal detected in cytoplasm residue that can possibly be related to plant physiology. This paves the way for further research on fossil cytoplasm, which will better our understanding on the physiology of fossil plants.

  3. Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluoresence mapping of enamel and dental materials after chemical erosion.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sídnei; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-10-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence was employed to test the hypothesis that beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization will change the chemical properties of dental materials and enamel mineral content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 45) each received two cavity preparations (n = 90), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin; GIC: glass-ionomer cement; RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: saliva; E: erosion/Pepsi Twist®; or EM: erosion+mouthwash/Colgate Plax®). It was found that mineral loss in enamel was greater in GICE samples than in RE > RMGICE > RMGICEM > REM > GICEM. An increased percentage of Zr was found in REM indicating organic matrix degradation. Dental materials tested (R, GIC, and RMGIC) were not able to protect adjacent enamel from acid erosion by the soft drink tested. The use of mouthwash promoted protection of enamel after erosion by the soft drink. To avoid chemical dissolution by mouthwashes, protection by resin composites with surface sealants is recommended. PMID:23095448

  4. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of mine waters from the Migori Gold Mining Belt in Southern Nyanza, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odumo, O B; Mustapha, A O; Patel, J P; Angeyo, H K

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of water samples from Mikei, Osiri, Masara and Macalder (Makalda) gold mines of the Migori gold mining belt of Southwestern Kenya were done to determine the level of heavy metals using the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique. The concentrations of the heavy metals were; copper (29.34 ± 5.01-14,975.59 ± 616.14 μg/L); zinc (33.69 ± 4.29-683.15 ± 32.93 μg/L); arsenic (958.16 ± 60.14-18,047.52 ± 175.00 μg/L) and lead (19.51 ± 5.5-214.53 ± 6.29 μg/L). High levels of arsenic and lead were noted. These heavy metals are not only dangerous to the lives of miners and the local inhabitants; they are also a threat to aquatic life since these waters finally find their way into Lake Victoria.

  5. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  6. The detection of food soils on stainless steel using energy dispersive X-ray and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P S; Verran, J

    2011-09-01

    Organic soiling is a major issue in the food processing industries, causing a range of biofouling and microbiological problems. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to quantify and determine the biochemical groups of food soils on stainless steel surfaces. EDX quantified organic material on surfaces where oily based residues predominated, but was limited in its usefulness since other food soils were difficult to detect. FT-IR provided spectral 'fingerprints' for each of the soils tested. Key soiling components were associated with specific peaks, viz. oils at 3025 cm(-1)-3011 cm(-1), proteins at 1698 cm(-1)-1636 cm(-1) and carbohydrates at 1658 cm(-1)-1596 cm(-1), 783 cm(-1)-742 cm(-1). High concentrations of some soils (10%) were needed for detection by both EDX and FT-IR. The two techniques may be of use for quantifying and identifying specific recalcitrant soils on surfaces to improve cleaning and hygiene regimes.

  7. Influence of poly(L-lysine) on the structure of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol/water dispersions studied by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Förster, G; Schwieger, C; Faber, F; Weber, T; Blume, A

    2007-04-01

    The interaction between the negatively charged phospholipid DPPG and positively charged poly(L: -lysine) (PLL) of different lengths was studied by X-ray scattering in the SAXS and WAXS region. As a reference pure DPPG (Na salt) was investigated over a wide temperature range (-30 to 70 degrees C). The phase behavior of DPPG in aqueous and in buffer/salt dispersions showed a metastable subgel phase at low temperatures and a recrystallization upon heating before reaching the liquid-crystalline phase. The presence of additional salt stabilizes the bilayer structure and decreases the recrystallization temperature. Large changes in the SAXS region are not connected with changes in chain packing. In DPPG/PLL samples, the PLL is inserted between adjacent headgroup layers and liberates counterions which give rise to a freezing point depression. In the complex with DPPG PLL form an alpha-helical secondary structure at pH 7 and temperatures below the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition. This prevents DPPG from recrystallization and strongly increases the stacking order. The lamellar repeat distance is decreased and fixed by the helix conformation of PLL in the gel phase. PLL with n = 14 is too short to form helices and is squeezed out reversibly from the interbilayer space upon cooling by freezing of trapped water. In dispersions with longer PLLs (n > 400) at -20 degrees C a 1D crystallization of PLL alpha-helices in the aqueous layer between the headgroups takes place. A structural model is presented for the lateral periodic complex, which is similar to the known cationic lipid/DNA complex. PMID:16909276

  8. Late Time Multi-wavelength Observations of Swift J1644+5734: A Luminous Optical/IR Bump and Quiescent X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Brown, G. C.; Metzger, B. D.; Page, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; O'Brien, P. T.; Lyman, J. D.; Wiersema, K.; Stanway, E. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Perley, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present late time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than t-70. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of LX ˜ 5 × 1042 erg s-1 and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of t-5/3, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of MBH = 3 × 106 M⊙, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint active galactic nucleus or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of MR ˜ -22 to -23. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, non-relativistic TDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape, and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous supervnovae, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.

  9. A multi-wavelength view of AB Doradus outer atmosphere . Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy at high cadence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Wolter, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the chromosphere and corona of the ultra-fast rotator AB Dor A at high temporal and spectral resolution using simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton in the X-rays, VLT/UVES in the optical, and the ATCA in the radio. Our optical spectra have a resolving power of ~50 000 with a time cadence of ~1 min. Our observations continuously cover more than one rotational period and include both quiescent periods and three flaring events of different strengths. Methods: From the X-ray observations we investigated the variations in coronal temperature, emission measure, densities, and abundance. We interpreted our data in terms of a loop model. From the optical data we characterised the flaring chromospheric material using numerous emission lines that appear in the course of the flares. A detailed analysis of the line shapes and line centres allowed us to infer physical characteristics of the flaring chromosphere and to coarsely localise the flare event on the star. Results: We specifically used the optical high-cadence spectra to demonstrate that both turbulent and Stark broadening are present during the first ten minutes of the first flare. Also, in the first few minutes of this flare, we find short-lived (one to several minutes) emission subcomponents in the Hα and Ca ii K lines, which we interpret as flare-connected shocks owing to their high intrinsic velocities. Combining the space-based data with the results of our optical spectroscopy, we derive flare-filling factors. Finally, comparing X-ray, optical broadband, and line emission, we find a correlation for two of the three flaring events, while there is no clear correlation for one event. Also, we do not find any correlation of the radio data to any other observed data. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002A and on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member

  10. Demonstration of saturated tabletop soft x-ray lasers at 5 Hz repetition rate in transitions of Ne-like ions with wavelengths near 30 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2005-10-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the laser pump energy required to operate collisional soft x-ray lasers in the gain saturated regime can be significantly reduced by directing the heating pulse into the plasma at grazing incidence for a more efficient energy deposition [1-2]. Optimization of the incidence angle led to gain-saturated operation at 5Hz repetition rate in several transitions of Ni-like ions at wavelengths ranging from 18.9nm to 13.2nm [3]. We report saturated high repetition rate laser-pumped table-top soft x-ray lasers in Ne-like ions at wavelengths near 30nm. Gain-saturated lasers operating at 5Hz repetition rate were obtained in Ne-like Ti at 32.6nm and in Ne-like V at 30.4nm heating plasmas with laser pulses of ˜1J and 8ps impinging at 20^o grazing incidence. Average powers > 1μW were measured. Strong lasing was also observed in Ne-like Cr at 28.6nm. 1. R. Keenan et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 94, 103901, (2005). 2. B. M. Luther et al, Opt. Lett., 30, 165, (2005). 3. Y. Wang et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. A, (2005).

  11. Proposal for precision wavelength measurement of the Ni-like gadolinium x-ray laser formed during the interaction of a nanostructured target with an ultrashort laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The wavelengths of the 3d 94d [J = 0]-3d 94p [J = 1] transitions of x-ray lasers in Ni-like sequence ions with nucleus charges Z  ⩽  79 are refined. The results of calculations are within the experimental error. It was found that the wavelengths of 3d3/294d3/2{} [J = 0]-3d3/29 4p 1/2 [J = 1] and 3d3/29 4d 3/2[J = 0]-3d5/29 4p 3/2[J = 1] transitions in Sm34+ and Gd36+, respectively, are in the range of 6.70-6.75 nm. Exactly for this narrow range, multilayer mirrors with high reflectance are developed. The gain of the x-ray laser with λ = 6.748 nm in Gd36+ is calculated under the assumption that plasma is formed during the interaction of a nanostructured (cluster-like) gadolinium target with high-intensity pump laser radiation. The optimum plasma density, temperature, length, and pump parameters are determined to achieve the highest Gd36+ ion fraction and emission quantum yield of ~1013 photons.

  12. Protein structure determination by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing of X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE PAGES

    Nass, Karol; Meinhart, Anton; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Foucar, Lutz; Gorel, Alexander; Aquila, Andrew; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; et al

    2016-03-09

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offers unprecedented possibilities for macromolecular structure determination of systems that are prone to radiation damage. However, phasing XFEL data de novo is complicated by the inherent inaccuracy of SFX data, and only a few successful examples, mostly based on exceedingly strong anomalous or isomorphous difference signals, have been reported. Here, it is shown that SFX data from thaumatin microcrystals can be successfully phased using only the weak anomalous scattering from the endogenous S atoms. Furthermore, a step-by-step investigation is presented of the particular problems of SAD phasing of SFX data, analysingmore » data from a derivative with a strong anomalous signal as well as the weak signal from endogenous S atoms.« less

  13. Protein structure determination by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing of X-ray free-electron laser data

    PubMed Central

    Nass, Karol; Meinhart, Anton; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Foucar, Lutz; Gorel, Alexander; Aquila, Andrew; Botha, Sabine; Doak, R. Bruce; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; Shoeman, Robert L.; Williams, Garth; Boutet, Sebastien; Schlichting, Ilme

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offers unprecedented possibilities for macromolecular structure determination of systems that are prone to radiation damage. However, phasing XFEL data de novo is complicated by the inherent inaccuracy of SFX data, and only a few successful examples, mostly based on exceedingly strong anomalous or isomorphous difference signals, have been reported. Here, it is shown that SFX data from thaumatin microcrystals can be successfully phased using only the weak anomalous scattering from the endogenous S atoms. Moreover, a step-by-step investigation is presented of the particular problems of SAD phasing of SFX data, analysing data from a derivative with a strong anomalous signal as well as the weak signal from endogenous S atoms. PMID:27158504

  14. Multiple Epoch Analysis of the Guitar Nebula and B2224+65 at Optical, X-Ray, and Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Abhimat; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Deller, A. T.; LAZIO, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Guitar Nebula is created by the interaction of the pulsar B2224+65 with the interstellar medium. We present multi-epoch observations of the nebula with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), along with preliminary astrometric observations of B2224+65 with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The Guitar Nebula was observed in H-alpha by HST with WFPC2 (1994, 2001) and ACS (2006). The tip of the nebula head has expanded along the proper motion vector of the pulsar. Meanwhile, the sides and back of the head appear to be confined, possibly due to a density gradient in the ISM. Observations with CXO ACIS reveal an X-ray jet whose tip is coincident with the location of the pulsar, but at an angle of ~118° from the proper motion vector with a length of ~2 arcmin. Using data from 2000 and 2006, we imaged the jet at 0.3--10 keV. We did not find significant differences in the jet location or morphology between the two epochs, but our results are limited by the observation signal-to-noise ratio. PSR B2224+65 is one of the targets of PSRπ, an ongoing VLBA campaign to measure pulsar proper motions and parallaxes. When completed in 2013, PSRπ will provide both a distance and transverse velocity for PSR B2224+65 with very high precision. Based on a preliminary analysis of 5 epochs already observed, we confirm that the proper motion of the nebula tip measured with HST matches the pulsar proper motion measured with the VLBA. This project was conducted at Cornell University’s Astronomy REU program, with funding provided by the NSF.

  15. Invited article: The fast readout low noise camera as a versatile x-ray detector for time resolved dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction studies of dynamic problems in materials science, chemistry, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Labiche, Jean-Claude; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark A.; Ferre, Gemma Guilera; Curfs, Caroline; Vaughan, Gavin; Homs, Alejandro; Carreiras, David Fernandez

    2007-09-15

    Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an 'area' detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needs of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors.

  16. Alternative matrix formers for nanosuspension solidification: Dissolution performance and X-ray microanalysis as an evaluation tool for powder dispersion.

    PubMed

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Froyen, Ludo; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Martens, Johan A; Augustijns, Patrick; Van Den Mooter, Guy

    2008-11-15

    Four alternative matrix formers [Avicel PH101, Fujicalin (CaHPO(4)), Aerosil 200 (SiO(2)) and Inutec SP1] were evaluated for their capability in preserving rapid dissolution after spray-drying of nanosuspensions. Model drug compounds selected were cinnarizine (CIN), itraconazole (ITR) and phenylbutazone (PHB) as they showed a decrease in dissolution rate upon spray-drying in the absence of additional matrix formers, yielding release values after 5min of dissolution (release(5min)) of 57.7+/-1.0% (CIN), 56.3+/-3.8% (ITR) and 67.4+/-1.3% (PHB). Compared to the situation without matrix former inclusion, the performance of Avicel PH101 was good for CIN (release(5min)=90.9+/-7.7%), intermediate for PHB (release(5min)=81.0+/-6.4%) and poor for ITR (release(5min)=42.1+/-4.2%). For Fujicalin, intermediate (PHB: release(5min)=87.7+/-3.0%) or poor (CIN: release(5min)=66.1+/-3.4%; ITR: release(5min)=55.9+/-5.2%) performance was seen. Results for Aerosil 200 were good for all compounds (CIN: release(5min)=91.5+/-2.5%; ITR: release(5min)=83.8+/-3.4%; PHB: release(5min)=95.5+/-2.4%), indicating that the large specific surface area was in this case translated into good matrix forming capabilities. Finally, the best results were obtained for Inutec SP1 (CIN: release(5min)=88.7+/-1.2%; ITR: release(5min)=93.4+/-2.4%; PHB: release(5min)=101.3+/-4.9%). Except for Avicel PH101, Cl-maps from X-ray microanalysis of the itraconazole powders supported the hypothesis that better dispersion of drug in the powders results in faster dissolution.

  17. Applicability of the energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis for quantification of irregular calcium deposits on fruit and leaf cuticles.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, M; Noga, G

    2008-12-01

    In our studies, we evaluated the relation between CaCl(2) concentration and the scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis parameters, net intensity, peak/background and standardized percentage of atoms and percentage of weight after application of single microdroplets on enzymatically isolated tomato fruit cuticles and apple seedling leaves. After analysis, the Ca/Cl ratio was calculated and the area ultimately covered with Ca and Cl within the droplet spread area determined. According to our findings, all evaluated parameters were influenced by both droplet volume and calcium chloride concentration, whereas Pearson's analysis revealed a strong correlation between net intensity and area ultimately covered by Ca or Cl, respectively. Simple linear regressions for net intensity, peak/background and Ca/Cl ratio showed variable determination coefficients (R(2)) ranging between 0.49 and 0.79. Multiple regression equations comprising net intensity, Ca/Cl ratio and deposit area were established to estimate the amount of calcium present on the cuticles. Equation slopes depended on droplet volumes, with determination coefficients of 0.89 and 0.81 for 0.5 and 1.0-microL droplets, respectively. The importance of the physicochemical properties of the spray solution was exploited in another study where a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic adjuvant was added to a 10 g L(-1) CaCl(2) solution, which was applied to apple seedling leaves. The addition of adjuvants increased values of net intensity and peak/background, which correlated significantly with the area covered by calcium. The importance of the methodology for studies on the interaction between leaf applied fertilizers (also extended to agrochemicals) and the characteristics of target surfaces is discussed. PMID:19094022

  18. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of soils from the moray cusco archaeological site: a study by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón Loayza, María L.; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A.; Mejía Santillán, Mirian E.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the advances in the elemental and structural characterization of the clay fraction of soils from the terraces of the Moray Archaeological site, located 38 km north of the city of Cusco, Cusco Region. One sample was collected from each of the twelve terraces of this site and its clay fraction was separated by sedimentation. Previously the pH of the raw samples was measured resulting that all of the samples were from alkaline to strongly alkaline. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used for the elemental characterization, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), using the γ 14.4 keV nuclear resonance transition in 57Fe, were used for the structural characterization of the clays and clay minerals present in each sample. The EDXRF analyses of all the samples show the presence of relatively high concentrations of sulfur in some of the samples and relatively high concentrations of calcium in all of the samples, which may be related to the high alkalinity of the samples. By XRD it is observed the presence of quartz, calcite, gypsum, cronstedtite, 2:1 phyllosilicates, and iron oxides. The mineralogical analysis of Fe by TMS shows that it is present in the form of hematite and occupying Fe2 + and Fe3 + sites in phyllosilicates, cronstedtite, and other minerals not yet identified.

  19. Quantitative determination on heavy metals in different stages of wine production by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence: Comparison on two vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Becker, Maria; von Bohlen, Alex

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the elemental content, namely heavy metals, of samples of vine-leaves, grapes must and wine. In order to assess the influence of the vineyard age on the elemental content throughout the several stages of wine production, elemental determinations of trace elements were made on products obtained from two vineyards aged 6 and 14 years from Douro region. The elemental content of vine-leaves and grapes was determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), while analysis of the must and wine was performed by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF). Almost all elements present in wine and must samples did not exceed the recommended values found in literature for wine. Bromine was present in the 6 years old wine in a concentration 1 order of magnitude greater than what is usually detected. The Cu content in vine-leaves from the older vineyard was found to be extremely high probably due to excessive use of Cu-based fungicides to control vine downy mildew. Higher Cu content was also detected in grapes although not so pronounced. Concerning the wine a slightly higher level was detected on the older vineyard, even so not exceeding the recommended value.

  20. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  1. Amalgam tattoo: report of an unusual clinical presentation and the use of energy dispersive X-ray analysis as an aid to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Greer, J.L.; Daniels, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual appearing gingival amalgam pigmentation (amalgam tattoo) that completely surrounded the maxillary right first premolar in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Because of the wide distribution and apparent clinical progression of the discoloration, an excisional biopsy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis of amalgam pigmentation was confirmed in paraffin sections by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Silver, tin, and mercury were detected in the specimen.

  2. A study on identification of the blunt lethal objects of wood, iron, brick and stone in homicide by SEM and EDAX (energy dispersive analysis x-ray).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y W; Tao, X; Li, Z Q; Chen, L; Zhou, W C

    1989-06-01

    The qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of residues on wound in homicide cases were done by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis X-ray system (EDAX) in this paper. It provides a new method of examination for identifying lethal objects in homicidal cases. Our experiment provides some advantages in these examinations, such as saving time, objective conclusion and exact results in practical cases.

  3. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 {mu}m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of {approx}50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  4. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines from laser toner and seal ink by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping could be applied to line intersection problems. The spectral data of red seal ink, laser toner and their intersections, such as peak location and peak intensity, were described. Relative peak height ratios of different chemical components in intersecting lines were used to distinguish the sequences. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping characteristics of intersecting areas were also detailed. The results show that both the laser toner and the seal ink appear on the surface of intersections, regardless of the sequence. The distribution of the two inks on the surface is influenced not only by the sequence of heterogeneous lines but also by diffusion. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray mapping are able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersections. The combination of these two techniques has provided a reliable method for sequencing intersecting lines of red seal ink and laser toner, and more importantly, this method may be a basis for sequencing superimposed lines from other writing instruments.

  5. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Pashniak, N; Strüder, L; Keckes, J; Pietsch, U

    2014-11-01

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  6. The Analysis of Particles at Low Accelerating Voltages (≤ 10 kV) With Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS).

    PubMed

    Small, J A

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of advancements in electron beam instruments and x-ray detectors which may make it possible to improve significantly the quality of results from the quantitative electron-probe analysis of individual particles. These advances include: (1) field-emission gun electron beam instruments such as scanning electron microscopes (FEG-SEMs) that have high brightness electron guns with excellent performance at low beam energies, E 0 ≤ 10 keV and (2) high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometers, like the microcalorimeter detector, that provide high-resolution (< 10 eV) parallel x-ray collection. These devices make it possible to separate low energy (< 4 keV) x-ray lines including the K lines of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen and the L and M lines for elements with atomic numbers in the range of 25 to 83. In light of these advances, this paper investigates the possibility of using accelerating voltages ≤ 10 kV, as a method to improve the accuracy of elemental analysis for micrometer-sized particles.

  7. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U.; Kirchlechner, C.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-15

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots’ energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the “3D detector method” as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  8. In-situ and operando characterization of batteries with energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, William Arthur

    Batteries play a pivotal role in the low-carbon society that is required to thwart the effects of climate change. Alternative low-carbon energy sources, such as wind and solar, are often intermittent and unreliable. Batteries are able capture their energy and deliver it later when it is needed. The implementation of battery systems in grid-level and transportation sectors is essential for efficient use of alternative energy sources. Scientists and engineers need better tools to analyze and measure the performance characteristics of batteries. One of the main hindrances in the progress of battery research is that the constituent electrode materials are inaccessible once an electrochemical cell is constructed. This leaves the researcher with a limited number of available feedback mechanisms to assess the cell's performance, e.g., current, voltage, and impedance. These data are limited in their ability to reveal the more-localized smaller-scale structural mechanisms on which the batteries' performance is so dependent. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is one of the few techniques that can internally probe a sealed battery. By analyzing the structural behavior of battery electrodes, one is able to gain insight to the physical properties on which the battery's performance is dependent. In this dissertation, EDXRD with ultrahigh energy synchrotron radiation is used to probe the electrodes of manufactured primary and secondary lithium batteries under in-situ and operando conditions. The technique is then applied to solve specific challenges facing lithium ion batteries. Diffraction spectra are collected from within a battery at 40 micrometer resolution. Peak-fitting is used to quantitatively estimate the abundance of lithiated and non-lithiated phases. Through mapping the distribution of phases within, structural changes are linked to the battery's galvanic response. A three-dimensional spatial analysis of lithium iron phosphate batteries suggests that evolution

  9. A study of X-ray emission from galactic and extragalactic sources with emphasis on soft and ultra-soft wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Lampton, M.; Cruddace, R. G.; Paresce, F.

    1974-01-01

    A Black Brant VC rocket was used to scan the Coma and Virgo clusters in order to measure structure in the X-ray sources. The rocket also made measurements of soft X-ray spectra, soft X-ray background flux during a 50 deg scan of the sky, soft X-rays from De Voucoulers 50, set limits to the energy dependence of soft X-ray background spectra, and the flux of solar 584 A radiation resonantly scattered by interstellar He flowing through the solar system.

  10. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  11. The Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer and Its Proposed Use in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Lyman, Charles E.; Williams, David B.

    1989-01-01

    The Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) equipped with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer (WDS) should have the ability to resolve peaks which normally overlap in the spectra from an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). With a WDS it should also be possible to measure lower concentrations of elements in thin foils due to the increased peak-to-background ratio compared with EDS. The WDS will measure X-ray from the light elements (4 less than Z less than 1O) more effectively. This paper addresses the possibility of interfacing a compact WDS with a focussing circle of approximately 4 cm to a modem AEM with a high-brightness (field emission) source of electrons.

  12. High repetition rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers at wavelengths down to 11.9 nm in Nickel-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Bradley M.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2005-10-01

    There is significant interest in the development of high average power table-top soft x-ray lasers (SXL) for applications. The repetition rate of gain-saturated collisional SXL operating at wavelengths of less than 30nm has been limited to one shot every several minutes by the large laser pump energy required to heat the plasma. Recent experiments have demonstrated a large pump energy reduction by directing the heating pulse into the plasma at grazing incidence [1-3]. This pumping geometry takes advantage of the refraction of the pump beam in the plasma to deposit a large fraction of its energy into the gain region. Here we report 5Hz repetition rate operation of gain-saturated table-top lasers with 1-2μW average power in transitions of Ni-like ions (Mo, Ru, Pd, Ag and Cd) at wavelengths between 18.9nm and 13.2nm, using a 1J, 8 ps heating pulse from a Ti:Sa laser. Strong amplification was also observed at 11.9 nm in Ni-like Sn. 1. R. Keenan et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 94, 103901, (2005). 2. B. M. Luther et al, Opt. Lett., 30, 165, (2005). 3. D. Alessi et al, Opt. Express, 13, 2093, (2005).

  13. RF Single Electron Transistor Readout Amplifiers for Superconducting Astronomical Detectors for X-Ray to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Delsing, Per; Frunzio, Luigi; Li, Li-Qun; Prober, Daniel; Schoelkopf, Robert; Segall, Ken; Wilson, Chris; Stahle, Carl

    2000-01-01

    We report progress on using a new type of amplifier, the Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistor (RF-SET), to develop multi-channel sensor readout systems for fast and sensitive readout of high impedance cryogenic photodetectors such as Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Single Quasiparticle Photon Counters. Although cryogenic, these detectors are desirable because of capabilities not other-wise attainable. However, high impedances and low output levels make low-noise, high-speed readouts challenging, and large format arrays would be facilitated by compact, low-power, on-chip integrated amplifiers. Well-suited for this application are RF-SETs, very high performance electrometers which use an rf readout technique to provide 100 MHz bandwidth. Small size, low power, and cryogenic operation allow direct integration with detectors, and using multiple rf carrier frequencies permits simultaneous readout of 20-50 amplifiers with a common electrical connection. We describe both the first 2-channel demonstration of this wavelength division multiplexing technique for RF-SETs, and Charge-Locked-Loop operation with 100 kHz of closed-loop bandwidth.

  14. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  15. Misidentification of Major Constituents by Automatic Qualitative Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis: A Problem that Threatens the Credibility of the Analytical Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury*, Dale E.

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium rhodium alloys, platinum chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, K[alpha] (K-L2,3) K[beta] (K-M2,3); L[alpha] (L3-M4,5) L[beta] (L2-M4) L[gamma] (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur.

  16. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the inversion degree in zinc ferrite nanocrystals dispersed on a highly porous silica aerogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Carta, D; Marras, C; Loche, D; Mountjoy, G; Ahmed, S I; Corrias, A

    2013-02-01

    The structural properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles with spinel structure dispersed in a highly porous SiO(2) aerogel matrix were compared with a bulk zinc ferrite sample. In particular, the details of the cation distribution between the octahedral (B) and tetrahedral (A) sites of the spinel structure were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The analysis of both the X-ray absorption near edge structure and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the degree of inversion of the zinc ferrite spinel structures varies with particle size. In particular, in the bulk microcrystalline sample, Zn(2+) ions are at the tetrahedral sites and trivalent Fe(3+) ions occupy octahedral sites (normal spinel). When particle size decreases, Zn(2+) ions are transferred to octahedral sites and the degree of inversion is found to increase as the nanoparticle size decreases. This is the first time that a variation of the degree of inversion with particle size is observed in ferrite nanoparticles grown within an aerogel matrix.

  17. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Bro¿żek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horváth, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  18. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the inversion degree in zinc ferrite nanocrystals dispersed on a highly porous silica aerogel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, D.; Marras, C.; Loche, D.; Mountjoy, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Corrias, A.

    2013-02-01

    The structural properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles with spinel structure dispersed in a highly porous SiO2 aerogel matrix were compared with a bulk zinc ferrite sample. In particular, the details of the cation distribution between the octahedral (B) and tetrahedral (A) sites of the spinel structure were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The analysis of both the X-ray absorption near edge structure and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the degree of inversion of the zinc ferrite spinel structures varies with particle size. In particular, in the bulk microcrystalline sample, Zn2+ ions are at the tetrahedral sites and trivalent Fe3+ ions occupy octahedral sites (normal spinel). When particle size decreases, Zn2+ ions are transferred to octahedral sites and the degree of inversion is found to increase as the nanoparticle size decreases. This is the first time that a variation of the degree of inversion with particle size is observed in ferrite nanoparticles grown within an aerogel matrix.

  19. Pre-Columbian alloys from the royal tombs of Sipán; energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis with a portable equipment.

    PubMed

    Cesareo, R; Calza, C; Dos Anjos, M; Lopes, R T; Bustamante, A; Fabian S, J; Alva, W; Chero Z, L

    2010-01-01

    On the north coast of present-day Peru flourished approximately between 50 and 700 AD, the Moche civilization. It was an advanced culture and the Moche were sophisticated metalsmiths, so that they are considered as the finest producers of jewels and artefacts of the region. The Moche metalworking ability was impressively demonstrated by the objects discovered by Walter Alva and coworkers in 1987, in the excavations of the "Tumbas Reales de Sipán". About 50 metal objects from these excavations, now at the namesake Museum, in Lambayeque, north of Peru, were analyzed with a portable equipment using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. This portable equipment is mainly composed of a small size X-ray tube and a thermoelectrically cooled X-ray detector. Standard samples of gold and silver alloys were employed for quantitative analysis. It was determined that the analyzed artefacts from the "Tumbas Reales de Sipán" are mainly composed of gold, silver and copper alloys, of gilded copper and of tumbaga, the last being a poor gold alloy enriched at the surface by depletion gilding, i.e. removing copper from the surface. PMID:19819709

  20. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  1. Effect of hydration on the structure of oriented lipid membranes investigated by in situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pisani, Michela

    2005-06-20

    In situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) was applied to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)-oriented membranes. The measurements allowed a very high density time sampling of the evolution of the structural properties of the DOTAP bilayer such as the lamellar d-spacing, the membrane thickness, and the size of the interbilayer water region. Time-resolved EDXD has been found to provide important information on the role played by free water molecules on the structure and fluidity of lipid bilayer.

  2. Effect of silica capping on the oxidation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in dispersion revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warland, A.; Antoniak, C.; Darbandi, M.; Weis, C.; Landers, J.; Keune, W.; Wende, H.

    2012-06-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been investigated as they are biocompatible and their surface can be functionalized. We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a water-in-oil microemulsion method. Bare and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of a core size of 6 nm dispersed in ethanol have been investigated by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Due to a dedicated experimental setup the particles can be measured directly in dispersion. XAS allows us to disentangle the contributions of the Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and therefore to estimate the amount of Fe3O4 in the particles. In case of the silica coated particles a high amount of magnetite was obtained. In contrast, the bare nanoparticles showed indications of a further oxidation into γ-Fe2O3 even in dispersion.

  3. Dispersion management for wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton transmission.

    PubMed

    Forysiak, W; Devaney, J F; Smith, N J; Doran, N J

    1997-05-01

    Residual frequency shifts that are due to two-soliton collisions in stepwise exponentially dispersion-tapered fiber are calculated. Two-step dispersion profiles to minimize the frequency shifts and associated timing jitter are specifically identified. These profiles will improve the performance of wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems and permit operation with longer amplifier spans over an increased bandwidth. PMID:18185603

  4. Determination of some structural and dispersion characteristics of Perftoran emulsions by the small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aul'chenko, V. M.; Vazina, A. A.; Galimov, P. V.; Korneev, V. N.; Maevskii, E. I.; Matyushin, A. M.; Tuzikov, F. V.; Tuzikova, N. A.

    2005-05-01

    By the method of small-angle X-ray scattering, it is shown that preparation Perftoran—the blood substitute with the function of carrying oxygen—contains a huge amount of spherical micellar particles in an abundance, essentially of smaller sizes, than a particle of an emulsion of perfluorochemicals. The distribution function of the form and the size of micellar particles of preparation Perftoran is determined. The assumption, that a number of clinical properties of a preparation is caused by these particles is put forward.

  5. Absolute Bragg wavelength and dispersion determination in dispersive incoherent OFDR interrogators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J.; Torregrosa, G.; Hervás, J.; Fernández-Pousa, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on an incoherent OFDR interrogator of FBG arrays based on the concept of dispersive wavelength to time delay mapping. The system is specifically designed to show stability to environmental thermal variations by the incorporation of a composite dispersive delay and weak broadband reflectors for delay and dispersion monitoring. Dispersion is imparted by the combination of a fiber coil and an athermally-packaged chirped fiber Bragg grating for dispersion compensation. Using differential measurements over a single acquisition trace, the values of Bragg wavelengths and dispersion are determined from the delays experienced by the FBGs and by additional reference wavelengths reflected in the broadband reflectors. The results show maximum deviations of 20 pm and 0.2 ps/nm with respect to OSA measurements of Bragg wavelengths and nominal dispersion values, respectively.

  6. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors, such as Si-PIN, Si-drift, Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI 2, coupled to miniaturized low-power X-ray tubes, are well suited in portable systems for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), analysis of archaeological samples. The Si-PIN detector is characterized by a thickness of about 300 μm, an area of about 2×3 mm 2, an energy resolution of about 200-250 eV at 5.9 keV and an entrance window of 25-75 μm. The Si-drift detector has approximately the same area and thickness, but an energy resolution of 155 eV at 5.9 keV. The efficiency of these detectors is around 100% from 4 to 10 keV, and then decreases versus energy, reaching ˜9% at 30 keV. Coupled to a miniaturized 10 kV, 0.1 mA, Ca-anode or to a miniaturized 30 kV, 0.1 mA, W-anode X-ray tubes, portable systems can be constructed, which are able to analyse K-lines of elements up to about silver, and L-lines of heavy elements. The Cd 1- xZn xTe detector has an area of 4 mm 2 and a thickness of 3 mm. It has an energy resolution of about 300 eV at 5.9 keV, and an efficiency of 100% over the whole range of X-rays. Finally the HgI 2 detector has an efficiency of about 100% in the whole range of X-rays, and an energy resolution of about 200 eV at 5.9 keV. Coupled to a small 50-60 kV, 1 mA, W-anode X-ray tube, portable systems can be constructed, for the analysis of practically all elements. These systems were applied to analysis in the field of archaeometry and in all applications for which portable systems are needed or at least useful (for example X-ray transmission measurements, X-ray microtomography and so on). Results of in-field use of these detectors and a comparison among these room temperature detectors in relation to concrete applications are presented. More specifically, concerning EDXRF analysis, ancient gold samples were analysed in Rome, in Mexico City and in Milan, ancient bronzes in Sassari, in Bologna, in Chieti and in Naples, and sulfur (due to pollution

  7. Elemental analysis of human amniotic fluid and placenta by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: child weight and maternal age dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Custódio, P. J.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2001-11-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate the possible influence of the mother's age in trace element concentrations in human amniotic fluid and placenta and whether these concentrations are correlated to the weight of the newborn infants. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyze 16 amniotic fluid samples, and the placenta samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The whole samples were collected during delivery from healthy mothers and healthy infants and full-term pregnancies. According to the age of the mother, three different groups were considered: 20-25, 25-30 and 30-40 years old. Only two mothers were aged more than 35 years. The weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg and three groups were also considered: 2.5-3, 3-3.5 and 3.5-4 kg. The organic matrix of the amniotic fluid samples was removed by treatment with HNO 3 followed by oxygen plasma ashing. Yttrium was used as the internal standard for TXRF analysis. Placenta samples were lyophilized and analyzed by EDXRF without any chemical treatment. Very low levels of Ni and Sr were found in the amniotic fluid samples, and were independent of the age of the mother and weight of the child. Cr, Mn, Se and Pb were at the level of the detection limit. Zn, considered one of the key elements in neonatal health, was not significantly different in the samples analyzed; however, it was weakly related to birth weigh. The concentrations obtained ranged from 0.11 to 0.92 mg/l and 30 to 65 μg/g in amniotic fluid and placenta, respectively. The only two elements which seemed to be significantly correlated with mother's age and newborn weight were Ca and Fe for both types of sample: Ca levels were increased in heavier children and older mothers; however, Fe increased with increasing maternal age, but decreased for heavier babies. The same conclusions were obtained for placenta and amniotic fluid samples. Cu is closely associated with Fe in its function in the organism

  8. Nondestructive characterization of municipal-solid-waste-contaminated surface soil by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Ghosh, Rita; Mitra, Ajoy K; Roy, Subinit; Sarkar, Manoranjan; Chowdhury, Subhajit; Bhowmik, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    The long-term environmental impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfilling is still under investigation due to the lack of detailed characterization studies. A MSW landfill site, popularly known as Dhapa, in the eastern fringe of the metropolis of Kolkata, India, is the subject of present study. A vast area of Dhapa, adjoining the current core MSW dump site and evolving from the raw MSW dumping in the past, is presently used for the cultivation of vegetables. The inorganic chemical characteristics of the MSW-contaminated Dhapa surface soil (covering a 2-km stretch of the area) along with a natural composite (geogenic) soil sample (from a small countryside farm), for comparison, were investigated using two complementary nondestructive analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for bulk analysis and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) for single-particle analysis. The bulk concentrations of K, Rb, and Zr remain almost unchanged in all the soil samples. The Dhapa soil is found to be polluted with heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, and Pb (highly elevated) and Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Sr (moderately elevated), compared to the natural countryside soil. These high bulk concentration levels of heavy metals were compared with the Ecological Soil Screening Levels for these elements (U.S. Environment Protection Agency) to assess the potential risk on the immediate biotic environment. Low-Z particle EPMA results showed that the aluminosilicate-containing particles were the most abundant, followed by SiO2, CaCO3-containing, and carbonaceous particles in the Dhapa samples, whereas in the countryside sample only aluminosilicate-containing and SiO2 particles were observed. The mineral particles encountered in the countryside sample are solely of geogenic origin, whereas those from the Dhapa samples seem to have evolved from a mixture of raw dumped MSW, urban dust, and other contributing factors such as wind

  9. Synchrotron Radiation and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Applications on Elemental Distribution in Human Hair and Bones

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.L.; Marques, A.F.; Brito, J.

    2003-01-24

    This work is an application of synchrotron microprobe X- Ray fluorescence in order to study elemental distribution along human hair samples of contemporary citizens. Furthermore, X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry is also used to analyse human bones of different historical periods: Neolithic and contemporary subjects. The elemental content in the bones allowed us to conclude about environmental contamination, dietary habits and health status influence in the corresponding citizens. All samples were collected post-mortem. Quantitative analysis was performed for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb. Mn and Fe concentration were much higher in bones from pre-historic periods. On the contrary, Pb bone concentrations of contemporary subjects are much higher than in pre-historical ones, reaching 100 {mu}g g-1, in some cases. Very low concentrations for Co, Ni, Br and Rb were found in all the analysed samples. Cu concentrations, allows to distinguish Chalcolithic bones from the Neolithic ones. The distribution of trace elements along human hair was studied for Pb and the obtained pattern was consistent with the theoretical model, based on the diffusion of this element from the root and along the hair. Therefore, the higher concentrations in hair for Pb of contemporary individuals were also observed in the bones of citizens of the same sampling sites. All samples were analysed directly without any chemical treatment.

  10. Structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface of dispersed triglyceride nanocrystals with small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiele, Martin; Schindler, Torben; Unruh, Tobias; Busch, Sebastian; Morhenn, Humphrey; Westermann, Martin; Steiniger, Frank; Radulescu, Aurel; Lindner, Peter; Schweins, Ralf; Boesecke, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Dispersions of crystalline nanoparticles with at least one sufficiently large unit cell dimension can give rise to Bragg reflections in the small-angle scattering range. If the nanocrystals possess only a small number of unit cells along these particular crystallographic directions, the corresponding Bragg reflections will be broadened. In a previous study of phospholipid stabilized dispersions of β-tripalmitin platelets [Unruh, J. Appl. Crystallogr.JACGAR0021-889810.1107/S0021889807044378 40, 1008 (2007)], the x-ray powder pattern simulation analysis (XPPSA) was developed. The XPPSA method facilitates the interpretation of the rather complicated small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) curves of such dispersions of nanocrystals. The XPPSA method yields the distribution function of the platelet thicknesses and facilitates a structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface between the nanocrystals and the dispersion medium from the shape of the broadened 001 Bragg reflection. In this contribution an improved and extended version of the XPPSA method is presented. The SAXS and small-angle neutron scattering patterns of dilute phospholipid stabilized tripalmitin dispersions can be reproduced on the basis of a consistent simulation model for the particles and their phospholipid stabilizer layer on an absolute scale. The results indicate a surprisingly flat arrangement of the phospholipid molecules in the stabilizer layer with a total thickness of only 12 Å. The stabilizer layer can be modeled by an inner shell for the fatty acid chains and an outer shell including the head groups and additional water. The experiments support a dense packing of the phospholipid molecules on the nanocrystal surfaces rather than isolated phospholipid domains.

  11. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  13. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  14. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  15. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching.

  16. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  17. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  18. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  19. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  20. Probing the Structure and Morphology of X-ray and Gamma-ray Binaries Using a Multi-Wavelength, Multi-MIssion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on High-Mass X-ray Binaries and their gamma-ray precursors, consisting of a compact object and an optical companion. Matter lost from the companion is accreted by the compact object where the gravitational potential energy is converted into X-ray radiation. The predominant high-energy emissions in gamma-ray binaries are in the MeV to TeV bandpasses. These are attributed to relativistic jets in microquasars or shocks from winds of the donor star and pulsar powered by rapid rotation of the neutron star.I use multi-wavelength observations with RXTE, MAXI, Swift, Suzaku, Fermi and ATCA to provide detailed temporal and spectral information on several X-ray binaries and one gamma-ray binary, 1FGL J1018.6-5856.My survey of the eclipsing HMXBs IGR J16393-4643, IGR J16418-4532, IGR J16479-4514, IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026 demonstrates that the physical parameters of both stellar components can be constrained. In IGR J16393-4643, spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III are found to be consistent with the eclipse duration and Roche-lobe size, but the previously proposed spectral types in IGR J16418- 4532 and IGR J16479-4514 were not. Also found to be consistent with the eclipse half-angle and Roche-lobe size were the mass donor spectral types of IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026.4U 1210-64 was postulated to be an HMXB powered by the Be mechanism. Long-term observations show distinct high and low states and a 6.7101±0.0005 day modulation. A sharp dip interpreted to be an eclipse is found in the folded light curves. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with the previously proposed spectral type B5 V, pointing to possible spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III.The gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856, discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, consists of an O6 V((f)) star and a suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. I exploit the 6.5 yr gamma-ray data to search for long-term changes in the properties of the 16.531±0.006 day orbital modulation. The best

  1. Probing the Structure and Morphology of X-ray and Gamma-ray Binaries Using a Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Mission Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry

    This thesis focuses on High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) and their gamma-ray precursors, consisting of a compact object and an optical companion. Matter lost from the companion is accreted by the compact-object where the gravitational potential energy is converted into X-ray radiation. The predominant high-energy emissions in gamma-ray binaries are in the MeV to TeV bandpasses. Often, they are attributed to relativistic jets in microquasars or shocks from winds of the donor star and pulsar powered by rapid rotation of the neutron star. I use multi-wavelength observations with RXTE, MAXI, Swift, Suzaku, Fermi and ATCA to provide detailed temporal and spectral information on several X-ray binaries and one gamma-ray binary, namely 1FGL J1018.6-5856. My survey of the eclipsing HMXBs IGR J16393-4643, IGR J16418-4532, IGR J16479-4514, IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026 demonstrates that the physical parameters of both stellar components can be constrained. In IGR J16393-4643, spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III are found to be consistent with the eclipse duration and Roche-lobe size, but the previously proposed spectral types in IGR J16418- 4532 and IGR J16479-4514 were not. Also found to be consistent with the eclipse half-angle and Roche-lobe size were the mass donor spectral types of IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026. 4U 1210-64 was postulated to be a HMXB powered by the Be mechanism. Long-term observations show distinct high and low states and a 6.7101±0.0005 day modulation. A sharp dip interpreted to be an eclipse is found in the folded light curves. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with the previously proposed spectral type B5 V, pointing to possible spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III. The gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856, discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, consists of an O6 V((f)) star and suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. I exploit the ~6.5 yr gamma-ray data to search for long-term changes in the properties of the 16.531±0.006 day orbital

  2. Broadband Wavelength Spanning Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Kashma; Shriyan, Sameet; Fontecchio, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Broadened interaction wavelength of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have extensive applications in beam steering for instrument clusters, hyperspectral imaging, wavelength filtering and construction of lightweight optics. A novel simultaneous time and spatial multiplexing formation configuration is proposed here, to increase narrow wavelength reflecting notch to broad range wavelength spanning device. HPDLC films have electro-optic controllability by applying field. No moving parts, light weight, small footprint compared to prisms and lenses, high color purity make the broadband wavelength HPDLCs desirable for the above applications. Varying the incident laser beam exposure angles using motorized rotating stage, during formation is the key step here for their formation in a single medium. The fabricated broadband wavelength sensitive HPDLCs are characterized for the uniformity of the reflected peak and electro optic response. Their output wavefront is analyzed using wavefront analysis technique.

  3. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within Δx = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  4. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  5. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ACCRETION DISK IN THE ACCRETION DISK CORONA X-RAY BINARY 4U 1822-371 AT OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Cornell, Mark E.; Hynes, Robert I.; Ashcraft, Teresa A.

    2010-01-20

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy of 4U 1822-371 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We use the new data to construct its UV/optical spectral energy distribution and its orbital light curve in the UV, V, and J bands. We derive an improved ephemeris for the optical eclipses and confirm that the orbital period is changing rapidly, indicating extremely high rates of mass flow in the system, and we show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km s{sup -1}. We show that the disk has a vertically extended, optically thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to approx0.5 of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically thick base of a disk wind, not as the optical counterpart of the ADC. Like previous models of 4U 1822-371, ours needs a tall obscuring wall near the edge of the accretion disk, but we interpret the wall as a layer of cooler material at the base of the disk wind, not as a tall, luminous disk rim.

  7. Modifications of the X-ray source and monitor at the X-ray Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbolt, W. Barlow

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the instruments aboard the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) some modifications will need to be made in the X-ray Calibration Facility at Marshall. Several of these modifications involve the X-ray source and the monitor. The source was redesigned to increase the spectral purity of the beam and decrease its polarization by minimizing the number of bremsstrahlung photons in the beam. This was accomplished by utilizing an annular electron gun which allowed the beam to take off antiparallel to the direction at which electrons are incident on the anode. Two other features of the source are the conical anode which decreases the effective spot size and a rotatable anode and filter wheel which allow the operator to change targets without breaking vacuum. The monitor is an important part of the facility because it is used to determine the X-ray flux at the target. A commercially available solid-state detector, Si(Li), should be used along with appropriate proportional counters for monitoring. This detector will be particularly useful when energy or wavelength dispersive instruments are tested because of its good resolution.

  8. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  9. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction. PMID:23298470

  10. The classification of secondary colorectal liver cancer in human biopsy samples using angular dispersive x-ray diffraction and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Farquharson, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    The motivation behind this study is to assess whether angular dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) data, processed using multivariate analysis techniques, can be used for classifying secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue and normal surrounding liver tissue in human liver biopsy samples. The ADXRD profiles from a total of 60 samples of normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases were measured using a synchrotron radiation source. The data were analysed for 56 samples using nonlinear peak-fitting software. Four peaks were fitted to all of the ADXRD profiles, and the amplitude, area, amplitude and area ratios for three of the four peaks were calculated and used for the statistical and multivariate analysis. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences between all the peak-fitting parameters and ratios between the normal and the diseased tissue groups. The technique of soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to classify normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases resulting in 67% of the normal tissue samples and 60% of the secondary colorectal liver tissue samples being classified correctly. This study has shown that the ADXRD data of normal and secondary colorectal liver cancer are statistically different and x-ray diffraction data analysed using multivariate analysis have the potential to be used as a method of tissue classification.

  11. Chain-length dependent growth dynamics of n-alkanes on silica investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity in situ and in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Frank, C.; Bommel, S.; Rukat, T.; Leitenberger, W.; Schäfer, P.; Schreiber, F.; Kowarik, S.

    2012-05-01

    We compare the growth dynamics of the three n-alkanes C36H74, C40H82, and C44H90 on SiO2 using real-time and in situ energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity. All molecules investigated align in an upright-standing orientation on the substrate and exhibit a transition from layer-by-layer growth to island growth after about 4 monolayers under the conditions employed. Simultaneous fits of the reflected intensity at five distinct points in reciprocal space show that films formed by longer n-alkanes roughen faster during growth. This behavior can be explained by a chain-length dependent height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier. Further x-ray diffraction measurements after growth indicate that films consisting of longer n-alkanes also incorporate more lying-down molecules in the top region. While the results reveal behavior typical for chain-like molecules, the findings can also be useful for the optimization of organic field effect transistors where smooth interlayers of n-alkanes without coexistence of two or more molecular orientations are required.

  12. Alterations of the intracellular water and ion concentrations in brain and liver cells during aging as revealed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of bulk specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Lustyik, G.; Nagy, I.

    1985-01-01

    Age dependence of the intracellular concentrations of monovalent ions (Na+, K+ and Cl-) was examined in 1, 11 and 25-month-old rat brain and liver cells by using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The in vivo concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions were calculated from two different measurements: The elemental concentrations were measured in freeze-dried tissue pieces, and the intracellular water content was determined by means of a recently developed X-ray microanalytic method, using frozen-hydrated and fractured bulk specimens as well as subsequent freeze-drying. All the single monovalent ion concentrations and consequently, also the total monovalent ion content showed statistically significant increases during aging in brain cortical neurons. A 3-6% loss of the intracellular water content was accompanied by a 25-45% increase of the monovalent ionic strengths by the age of 25 months. A membrane protective OH radical scavenger (centrophenoxine) reversed the dehydration in the nerve cells of old animals, resulting in a decrease of the intracellular ion concentrations. Aging has a less prominent effect on the water and ion contents of the hepatocytes. The degree of water loss of cytoplasm exceeds that of the nuclei in the liver, suggesting that dominantly the translational steps can be involved in the general age altered slowing down of the protein synthetic machinery, predicted by the membrane hypothesis of aging.

  13. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction.

  14. Non-invasive identification of chemical compounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, combined with chemometric methods of data evaluation.

    PubMed

    Henrich, A; Hoffmann, P; Ortner, H M; Greve, T; Itzel, H

    2000-01-01

    Chemicals from customers' returns have to be analyzed before they can be reused as raw materials in production. A procedure for non-invasive qualitative analysis of compounds in a closed container based on energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry is described. EDXRF was chosen as method for noninvasive analysis of chemicals through PE bottle walls without opening the bottle. This analysis aims for a quick proof of correspondence between the declaration of a reagent on the label of the bottle and its content. This analytical result cannot be achieved by a mere evaluation of characteristic element lines in EDXRF-spectra in combination with the method of matrix correction or the method of mean atomic number. These methods take into account only a small part of the total information available in an X-ray spectrum. It is shown here that valuable additional information is extractable from the spectral ranges of the Compton-scattering and Rayleigh-scattering areas by the use of methods of multivariate data analysis, especially by principle component analysis (PCA). Regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) was employed to establish a classification scheme for unknown samples.

  15. High-throughput and time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) study of the formation of CAU-1-(OH)2: microwave and conventional heating.

    PubMed

    Ahnfeldt, Tim; Moellmer, Jens; Guillerm, Vincent; Staudt, Reiner; Serre, Christian; Stock, Norbert

    2011-05-27

    Aluminium dihydroxyterephthalate [Al(8)(OH)(4)(OCH(3))(8)(BDC(OH)(2))(6)]⋅x H(2)O (denoted CAU-1-(OH)(2)) was synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, IR spectroscopy, sorption measurements, as well as thermogravimetric and elemental analysis. CAU-1-(OH)(2) is isoreticular to CAU-1 and its pores are lined with OH groups. It is stable under ambient conditions and in water, and it exhibits permanent porosity and two types of cavities with effective diameters of approximately 1 and 0.45 nm. The crystallization of CAU-1-(OH)(2) was studied by in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) experiments in the 120-145 °C temperature range. Two heating methods-conventional and microwave-were investigated. The latter leads to shorter induction periods as well as shorter reaction times. Whereas CAU-1-(OH)(2) is formed at all investigated temperatures using conventional heating, it is only observed below 130 °C using microwave heating. The calculation of the activation energy of the crystallization of CAU-1-(OH)(2) exhibits similar values for microwave and conventional synthesis.

  16. Rod Packing in Chiral Nematic Cellulose Nanocrystal Dispersions Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Laser Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christina; Agthe, Michael; Fall, Andreas B; Gordeyeva, Korneliya; Guccini, Valentina; Salajková, Michaela; Plivelic, Tomás S; Lagerwall, Jan P F; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-06-16

    The packing of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in the anisotropic chiral nematic phase has been investigated over a wide concentration range by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and laser diffraction. The average separation distance between the CNCs and the average pitch of the chiral nematic phase have been determined over the entire isotropic-anisotropic biphasic region. The average separation distances range from 51 nm, at the onset of the anisotropic phase formation, to 25 nm above 6 vol % (fully liquid crystalline phase) whereas the average pitch varies from ≈15 μm down to ≈2 μm as ϕ increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. Using the cholesteric order, we determine that the twist angle between neighboring CNCs increases from about 1° up to 4° as ϕ increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. The dependence of the twisting on the volume fraction was related to the increase in the magnitude of the repulsive interactions between the charged rods as the average separation distance decreases.

  17. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  18. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  19. X-ray fluorescence analysis major elements in silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    An automated wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer is operational for analysis of major elements in rocks and minerals. Procedures for trace-element analysis are being developed. Sample preparation methods and analytical techniques are similar to those commonly used elsewhere, but data reduction is conducted by the Fundamental Parameters program developed by Criss. Unlike empirically derived calibration curves, this data reduction method considers x-ray absorption and secondary fluorescence, which vary with differences in sample composition. X-ray intensities for each element from several standards are averaged to develop a theoretical standard for comparison with samples of unknown composition. Accurate data for samples with wide compositional ranges result from these data reduction and standardization techniques.

  20. Use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) in identification of foreign material on bullets.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, V J; Dana, S E; Taylor, W E; Ondrusek, J

    1987-01-01

    The authors report two cases in which examination of foreign material embedded in or adherent to bullets provided critical information in the reconstruction of a crime scene. Analysis of small particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) can be accomplished without destruction or injury of the particles. In one case, the detection and identification of mineral fragments embedded near the nose of a bullet provided conclusive evidence that the bullet had ricocheted from a fireplace before striking the victim. In the second case, analysis of particles from two bullets identified them as them as bone fragments, thus proving which shots fired from a police officer's gun had killed a suspected burglar. SEM-EDXA has not been widely used to identify such material on bullets, but should be considered a potentially powerful tool in forensic science. PMID:3819687

  1. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7 GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ∼8.9 GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24 GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  2. A false report of product tampering involving a rodent and soft drink can: light microscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Platek, F; Ranieri, N; Wolnik, K A

    1997-11-01

    The "Pepsi Tamperings" of 1993 resulted in a large number of cases involving foreign objects reportedly found inside canned soft drinks. Although the majority of cases involved medical syringes and metallic objects, one case involved the report of a mouse found inside a can of Caffeine-Free Diet Pepsi. Using light and polarized light microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis, trace evidence and tooth structure from the suspect mouse were matched to scratches and indentions on the suspect can. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to compare and match particles of gnawed metal from the lid of the suspect can to other particles recovered from the muzzle and stomach of the suspect mouse. The forensic analyses in this case proved the mouse could not have been canned in the soft drink product and refuted the defendant's sworn statements.

  3. Effects of Pamidronate on Dental Enamel Formation Assessed by Light Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Microhardness Testing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana P; do Espírito Santo, Renan F; Line, Sérgio R P; Pinto, Maria das G F; Santos, Pablo de M; Toralles, Maria Betania P; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory-stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical properties of mature enamel of upper incisors from adult rats that had been treated with pamidronate disodium (0.5 mg/kg/week for 56 days), using transmitted polarizing and bright-field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness testing. BFLM showed no morphological changes of the EOECM in pamidronate and control groups, but TPLM revealed a statistically significant reduction in optical retardation values of birefringence brightness of pamidronate-treated rats when compared with control animals (p0.05). The present study indicates that pamidronate can affect birefringence of the secretory-stage EOECM, which does not seem to be associated with significant changes in morphological and/or mechanical properties of mature enamel. PMID:27212049

  4. Effects of Pamidronate on Dental Enamel Formation Assessed by Light Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Microhardness Testing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana P; do Espírito Santo, Renan F; Line, Sérgio R P; Pinto, Maria das G F; Santos, Pablo de M; Toralles, Maria Betania P; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory-stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical properties of mature enamel of upper incisors from adult rats that had been treated with pamidronate disodium (0.5 mg/kg/week for 56 days), using transmitted polarizing and bright-field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness testing. BFLM showed no morphological changes of the EOECM in pamidronate and control groups, but TPLM revealed a statistically significant reduction in optical retardation values of birefringence brightness of pamidronate-treated rats when compared with control animals (p0.05). The present study indicates that pamidronate can affect birefringence of the secretory-stage EOECM, which does not seem to be associated with significant changes in morphological and/or mechanical properties of mature enamel.

  5. On the absence of a positive sound dispersion in the THz dynamics of glycerol: an inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2012-10-23

    The high frequency transport properties of glycerol are derived from inelastic x-ray scattering spectra measured at different pressures and compared with ultrasound absorption data. As a result, the presence of two distinct relaxation processes is inferred: a slow one, occurring in the GHz window and having an essentially structural character, and a fast one, related instead to microscopic degrees of freedom. While the former originates a neat increase of the apparent, i.e. frequency-dependent, sound velocity, the latter induces no visible dispersive effects on the acoustic propagation. The observed behavior is likely paradigmatic of all glass formers near or below the melting and it is here discussed and explained in some detail.

  6. Liver concentrations of copper, zinc, iron and molybdenum in sheep and goats from northern Greece, determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsakos, Panagiotis; Vougidou, Christina; Vozikis, Vasileios; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Ioannides, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc, iron and molybdenum in the liver of 76 sheep and goats from the regions of Macedonia-Thrace, northern Greece. In general, metal concentrations were in the adequate range, with one main exception of Cu-deficiency observed in all of the examined goat liver samples and Cu-toxicity found in 4 % of the sheep liver samples. One-way analysis of variance was carried out to determine significant differences among means depending on animal species, sex and age. Pearson correlation analysis was used to explore correlations between metal concentrations. The results obtained in the present study are discussed in the framework of diagnostic ranges, suggested for classifying the metal status of sheep and goats, and are compared with liver metal concentrations reported world-wide.

  7. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-01

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ˜0.9 nms-1. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  8. Liver concentrations of copper, zinc, iron and molybdenum in sheep and goats from northern Greece, determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsakos, Panagiotis; Vougidou, Christina; Vozikis, Vasileios; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Ioannides, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc, iron and molybdenum in the liver of 76 sheep and goats from the regions of Macedonia-Thrace, northern Greece. In general, metal concentrations were in the adequate range, with one main exception of Cu-deficiency observed in all of the examined goat liver samples and Cu-toxicity found in 4 % of the sheep liver samples. One-way analysis of variance was carried out to determine significant differences among means depending on animal species, sex and age. Pearson correlation analysis was used to explore correlations between metal concentrations. The results obtained in the present study are discussed in the framework of diagnostic ranges, suggested for classifying the metal status of sheep and goats, and are compared with liver metal concentrations reported world-wide. PMID:25694162

  9. Remineralization of demineralized enamel by toothpastes: a scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and three-dimensional stereo-micrographic study.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta S; Nicholson, John W; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija M

    2013-06-01

    Remineralization of hard dental tissues is thought to be a tool that could close the gap between prevention and surgical procedures in clinical dentistry. The purpose of this study was to examine the remineralizing potential of different toothpaste formulations: toothpastes containing bioactive glass, hydroxyapatite, or strontium acetate with fluoride, when applied to demineralized enamel. Results obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM/energy dispersive X-ray analyses proved that the hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass-containing toothpastes were highly efficient in promoting enamel remineralization by formation of deposits and a protective layer on the surface of the demineralized enamel, whereas the toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate and 1040 ppm fluoride as NaF had little, if any, remineralization potential. In conclusion, the treatment of demineralized teeth with toothpastes containing hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass resulted in repair of the damaged tissue. PMID:23659606

  10. Analysis of Catalonian silver coins from the Spanish War of Independence period (1808-1814) by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, A.; Queralt, I.; Alvarez-Perez, A.

    2011-02-01

    Between the years 1808 and 1814, the Spanish War of Independence took place. This period, locally known as "Guerra del Francès", generated the need for money and consequently five mints were opened around the Catalan territory. To mark the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the war, an extensive campaign of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence measurements of some of these "emergency coins" was carried out. Apart from the silver (major constituent of all the studied coins) it has been possible to recognize copper as main metal alloying element. Likewise, the presence of zinc, tin, lead, gold, platinum, antimony, nickel and iron has been also identified. The obtained results have been useful not only for the characterization of the alloys, but also to determine the differences and analogies between the emissions and for historical explanations.

  11. Determination of heavy metals in suspended waste water collected from Oued El Harrach Algiers River by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouziane, S.; Amokrane, A.; Toumert, I.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary study of the atmospheric pollution in the centre of Algiers is one of the important fields of applications in the environmental science. Nowadays, we need to evaluate the level of the contamination which has an unfavourable effect on physicochemical properties of soils and plants and namely also on human health. In the present work, water samples collected from Oued El-Harrach Algiers River, have been filtered in 0.45 μm Millipore filters to be analysed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence technique using 109Cd radioisotope source. Concentrations of the toxic elements like heavy metals are determined and compared with the published ones values by Yoshida [1] and those obtained using PIXE and NAA techniques [6].

  12. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ∼0.9 nms{sup −1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  13. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  14. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  15. Single-shot calibration of soft x-ray mirrors using a sinusoidal transmission grating.

    PubMed

    Shpilman, Z; Ehrlich, Y; Maman, S; Levy, I; Shussman, T; Oren, G; Zakosky Nueberger, I; Hurvitz, G

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of soft x-ray diagnostics is a challenge due to the lack of laboratory-size calibrated sources. An in situ calibration method for newly developed x-ray mirrors, is presented. The x-ray source is produced by laser-matter interaction, and twin transmission gratings which create two identical dispersion lines. The gratings have a sinusoidal transmission function, which produces a highly precise high-orders free spectrum. An x-ray mirror interacts with one of the dispersion lines, and the mirror efficiency curve as a function of wavelength is extracted. Mirror efficiency shows good agreement with the literature, and evidence of water layer may justify the need of in situ calibration.

  16. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  17. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  18. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  19. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  20. Direct rapid analysis of trace bioavailable soil macronutrients by chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaniu, M I; Angeyo, K H; Mwala, A K; Mangala, M J

    2012-06-01

    Precision agriculture depends on the knowledge and management of soil quality (SQ), which calls for affordable, simple and rapid but accurate analysis of bioavailable soil nutrients. Conventional SQ analysis methods are tedious and expensive. We demonstrate the utility of a new chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering (EDXRFS) spectroscopy method we have developed for direct rapid analysis of trace 'bioavailable' macronutrients (i.e. C, N, Na, Mg, P) in soils. The method exploits, in addition to X-ray fluorescence, the scatter peaks detected from soil pellets to develop a model for SQ analysis. Spectra were acquired from soil samples held in a Teflon holder analyzed using (109)Cd isotope source EDXRF spectrometer for 200 s. Chemometric techniques namely principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for pattern recognition based on fluorescence and Compton scatter peaks regions, and to develop multivariate quantitative calibration models based on Compton scatter peak respectively. SQ analyses were realized with high CMD (R(2)>0.9) and low SEP (0.01% for N and Na, 0.05% for C, 0.08% for Mg and 1.98 μg g(-1) for P). Comparison of predicted macronutrients with reference standards using a one-way ANOVA test showed no statistical difference at 95% confidence level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that an XRF method has demonstrated utility in trace analysis of macronutrients in soil or related matrices.

  1. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  2. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. III. X-RAY, RADIO, AND Halpha ACTIVITY TRENDS IN M AND L DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Basri, G.; Fleming, T. A.; Liebert, J.; Giampapa, M. S.; Gizis, J. E.; MartIn, E.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2010-01-20

    As part of our on-going investigation into the magnetic field properties of ultracool dwarfs, we present simultaneous radio, X-ray, and Halpha observations of three M9.5-L2.5 dwarfs (BRI 0021-0214, LSR 060230.4+391059, and 2MASS J052338.2-140302). We do not detect X-ray or radio emission from any of the three sources, despite previous detections of radio emission from BRI 0021 and 2M0523-14. Steady and variable Halpha emission are detected from 2M0523-14 and BRI 0021, respectively, while no Halpha emission is detected from LSR 0602+39. Overall, our survey of nine M8-L5 dwarfs doubles the number of ultracool dwarfs observed in X-rays, and triples the number of L dwarfs, providing in addition the deepest limits to date, log(L{sub X}/L{sub bol}) approx< -5. With this larger sample we find the first clear evidence for a substantial reduction in X-ray activity, by about two orders of magnitude, from mid-M to mid-L dwarfs. We find that the decline in Halpha roughly follows L{sub Ha}lpha/L{sub bol} propor to 10{sup -0.4x(SP-6)} for SP >= 6, where SP = 0 for spectral type M0. In the radio band, however, the luminosity remains relatively unchanged from M0 to L4, leading to a substantial increase in L{sub rad}/L{sub bol}. Our survey also provides the first comprehensive set of simultaneous radio/X-ray/Halpha observations of ultracool dwarfs, and reveals a clear breakdown of the radio/X-ray correlation beyond spectral type M7, evolving smoothly from L{sub n}u{sub ,rad}/L{sub X} approx 10{sup -15.5} to approx10{sup -11.5} Hz{sup -1} over the narrow spectral-type range M7-M9. This breakdown reflects the substantial reduction in X-ray activity beyond M7, but its physical origin remains unclear since, as evidenced by the uniform radio emission, there is no drop in the field dissipation and particle acceleration efficiency. Based on the results of our survey, we conclude that a further investigation of magnetic activity in ultracool dwarfs will benefit from a two-pronged approach

  3. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  4. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  5. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  6. Estimation of Crystallinity of Nifedipine-Polyvinylpyrrolidone Solid Dispersion by Usage of Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and of X-Ray Powder Diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Issei; Shimakura, Kemmaro; Kuroda, Hideki; Nakajima, Takehisa; Goto, Satoru; Makino, Kimiko

    2015-12-01

    Crystalline state of pharmaceutical materials is of great importance in preparation of pharmaceutics, because their physicochemical properties affect bioavailability, quality of products, therapeutic level and manufacturing process. In this study, we have estimated time-dependent changes of nifedipine in nifedipine-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solid dispersion by measuring terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), and compared their correlativity. Crystallinity of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersion was changed by storing the amorphous sample at 25°C-75°C and relative humidity of over 80% for 0.25-24.00 h. To compare the results of two types of measurements, we have used a general method of linear regression analysis. Crystallinities estimated using THz-TDS were plotted on the x-axis and that of XRPD were on the y-axis. From the result of the calculation, the correlativity of them was confirmed. THz-TDS has the capability of becoming the replacement of XRPD.

  7. Ca{4}YO(BO{3})3: Optical frame wavelength dependence, second harmonic generation and dispersion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segonds, P.; Boulanger, B.; Fève, J. P.; Ménaert, B.; Zaccaro, J.; Aka, G.; Pellenc, D.

    2004-11-01

    We report that the optical frame orientation is wavelength independent over the entire transmission range of the nonlinear monoclinic crystal Ca{4}YO(BO{3}){3} (YCOB). We used a new method based on internal conical refraction associated with X-rays diffraction using a single crystal cut as a sphere. Direct measurements phase matching angles of second harmonic generation (SHG) were performed in the principal planes of the spherical crystal for fundamental wavelengths up to 3.5 μm, while three absorption peaks have been measured above 2.4 μm. By fitting all data simultaneously, we found new dispersion equations of the refractive indices of YCOB which are valid in its whole transmission domain.

  8. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  9. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous and Nonosseous Materials Using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and Multivariate Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Identification of osseous materials is generally established on gross anatomical features. However, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic and may require chemical analysis. This research was designed to assess the use of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), elemental analysis, and multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis) for discrimination of osseous and nonosseous materials of similar chemical composition. Sixty samples consisting of osseous (human and nonhuman bone and dental) and non-osseous samples were assessed. After outliers were removed a high overall correct classification of 97.97% was achieved, with 99.86% correct classification for osseous materials. In addition, a blind study was conducted using 20 samples to assess the applicability for using this method to classify unknown materials. All of the blind study samples were correctly classified resulting in 100% correct classification, further demonstrating the efficiency of SEM/EDX and statistical analysis for differentiation of osseous and nonosseous materials. PMID:26234321

  10. An Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and Monte Carlo simulation study of Iron-Age Nuragic small bronzes ("Navicelle") from Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Nick; de Palmas, Anna; Bulla, Claudio; Piga, Giampaolo; Brunetti, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A spectrometric protocol combining Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry with Monte Carlo simulations of experimental spectra using the XRMC code package has been applied for the first time to characterize the elemental composition of a series of famous Iron Age small scale archaeological bronze replicas of ships (known as the "Navicelle") from the Nuragic civilization in Sardinia, Italy. The proposed protocol is a useful, nondestructive and fast analytical tool for Cultural Heritage sample. In Monte Carlo simulations, each sample was modeled as a multilayered object composed by two or three layers depending on the sample: when all present, the three layers are the original bronze substrate, the surface corrosion patina and an outermost protective layer (Paraloid) applied during past restorations. Monte Carlo simulations were able to account for the presence of the patina/corrosion layer as well as the presence of the Paraloid protective layer. It also accounted for the roughness effect commonly found at the surface of corroded metal archaeological artifacts. In this respect, the Monte Carlo simulation approach adopted here was, to the best of our knowledge, unique and enabled to determine the bronze alloy composition together with the thickness of the surface layers without the need for previously removing the surface patinas, a process potentially threatening preservation of precious archaeological/artistic artifacts for future generations.

  11. A case of hut lung: scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of a domestically acquired form of pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Gujral, Manmeet; Abraham, Jerrold L; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Iannuzzi, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    Hut lung is a pneumoconiosis caused by exposure to smoke derived from biomass fuels used for cooking in poorly ventilated huts. We report, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the dust deposited in the lungs in hut lung by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). A Bhutanese woman presented with shortness of breath and an abnormal chest radiograph. Chest CT scan showed innumerable tiny bilateral upper lobe centrilobular nodules. Transbronchial biopsy revealed mild interstitial fibrosis with heavy interstitial deposition of black dust. SEM/EDS showed that the dust was carbonaceous, with smaller yet substantial numbers of silica and silicate particles. Additional history revealed use of a wood/coal-fueled stove in a small, poorly ventilated hut for 45 years. The possibility of hut lung should be considered in women from countries where use of biomass-fueled stoves for cooking is common. Our findings support the classification of this condition as a mixed-dust pneumoconiosis.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry analysis of reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments following root canal retreatment.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncuoğlu, Elif; Keskin, Cangül; Uzun, İsmail; Bengü, Aydın S; Guler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate superficial defects and the composition of Reciproc R25 and ProTaper Retreatment file systems (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) used for retreatment. A total of 100 maxillary incisor teeth were randomly divided into the following two groups: Reciproc R25 (n = 25) and ProTaper Retreatment instrument (n = 75) groups. The nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) compositions of the files before and after use were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDX). Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the data. ProTaper Retreatment instrument group showed a significantly higher number of defects than the Reciproc group (P < 0.05). No instrument fracture was detected. The presence of debris was observed in both groups before use, although the level was significantly higher in the ProTaper Retreatment group, which consisted of metals (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between new and used instruments with regard to Ni-Ti composition (P < 0.05). EDX analysis showed that both the Reciproc and ProTaper Retreatment instruments had a Ni-Ti composition that was within the standards specified by the American Society of Testing and Materials. This study confirmed the use of both the Reciproc R25 file and ProTaper Retreatment file system for root canal filling removal in straight root canals as a safe procedure. (J Oral Sci 58, 401-406, 2016). PMID:27665980

  13. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  14. [Chemical composition analysis of early neolithic pottery unearthed from Xiaohuangshang site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Yang, Yu-Zhang; Zhang, Ju-Zhong; Cui, Wei

    2011-11-01

    The major elements in the early neolithic potteries unearthed from Xiaohuangshan site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province were determined by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The results show that the chemical compositions of the potteries from these two sites possess obvious regional features respectively. Compared with the specimen from Jiahu site, the potteries from Xiaohuangshan site have the common feature of ancient Chinese southern ceramics with high silicon and low aluminum contents. Simultaneously, the chemical composition of Xiaohuangshan pottery samples nearly unchanged from its early stage to the last stage. This phenomenon indicates that the source of the ceramic raw materials of Xiaohuangshan site was stable, and the continuous improvement of its pottery quality was mainly due to the progress in sintering techniques. However, the chemical composition of Jiahu potteries changed a lot in its three different periods. This change occurred because a large number of admixtures were added to the pottery bodies to improve their operating performances. These results also show that the improvements of pottery making techniques in different Chinese areas may have their own evolution directions respectively for the different geographical environments.

  15. In situ strain profiling of elastoplastic bending in Ti-6Al-4V alloy by synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, M.; Shukla, V.; Akdogan, E. K.; Sadangi, R.; Ignatov, A.; Balarinni, L.; Tsakalakos, T.; Jisrawi, N.; Zhong, Z.; Horvath, K.

    2009-05-01

    Elastic and plastic strain evolution under four-point bending has been studied by synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. Measured strain profiles across the specimen thickness showed an increasing linear elastic strain gradient under increasing four-point bending load up to approx2 kN. The bulk elastic modulus of Ti-6Al-4V was determined as 118 GPa. The onset of plastic deformation was found to set in at a total in-plane strain of approx0.008, both under tension and compression. Plastic deformation under bending is initiated in the vicinity of the surface and at a stress of 1100 MPa, and propagates inward, while a finite core region remains elastically deformed up to 3.67 kN loading. The onset of the plastic regime and the plastic regime itself has been verified by monitoring the line broadening of the (100) peak of alpha-Ti. The effective compression/tension stress-strain curve has been obtained from the scaling collapse of strain profile data taken at seven external load levels. A similar multiple load scaling collapse of the plastic strain variation has also been obtained. The level of precision in strain measurement reported herein was evaluated and found to be 1.5x10{sup -5} or better.

  16. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Anto Nia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2009-01-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80x60 points with steps of 20 mum were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the CaP ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  17. Energy-dispersive x-Ray Analysis of Phosphorus, Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium in Globoid Crystals in Protein Bodies from Different Regions of Cucurbita maxima Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Lott, John N. A.; Greenwood, John S.; Vollmer, Catherine M.; Buttrose, Mark S.

    1978-01-01

    The seeds of Cucurbita maxima contain protein bodies with electrondense globoid crystals. Because of their density globoid crystals are ideal material for energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis studies of elemental composition. Fixation trials were carried out to test globoid crystal extraction during glutaraldehyde fixation, water washing, and ethanol dehydration. Glutaraldehyde fixation without subsequent washing or dehydration alone produced no significant changes in elemental composition of cotyledon globoid crystals. If glutaraldehyde fixation was followed by water washes or ethanol dehydration there was some loss of the major globoid crystal elements but the relative percentages of the elements P, K, Ca, and Mg remained relatively unchanged. In this paper results of a study of the P, K, Mg, and Ca content of globoid crystals in different tissues of squash embryos are presented. The globoid crystals in the radicle were found to be the least dense in the embryo. Globoid crystals from all embryo regions contained P, K, and Mg. In the various embryo regions P and Mg maintained relatively constant proportions of the globoid crystal composition while K and Ca varied. Of particular significance is the distribution of Ca which is generally an immobile element. Calcium was found in highest amounts in the globoid crystals of the radicle and stem regions while globoid crystals in much of the cotyledon contained little, if any, Ca. The Ca storage thus seems to be spatially arranged in a manner that would aid early growth of the root-shoot axis. PMID:16660439

  18. Morphological and chemical changes in dentin after using endodontic agents: Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abraha~o.; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2012-07-01

    We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μEDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. μEDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm-1 peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.

  19. Role of trace elements (Zn, Sr, Fe) in bone development: energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of rat bone and tooth tissue.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Karina; Drzazga, Zofia; Kaszuba, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common debilitating disease around the world and it is more and more established among young people. There are well known recommendations for nutrition of newborns and children concerning adequate calcium and vitamin D intake in order to maintain proper bone density. Nevertheless, important role in structure and function of a healthy bone tissue is played by an integration between all constituents including elements other than Ca, like trace elements, which control vital processes in bone tissue. It is important from scientific point of view as well as prevention of bone diseases, to monitor the mineralization process considering changes of the concentration of minerals during first stage of bone formation. This work presents studies of trace element (zinc, strontium, and iron) concentration in bones and teeth of Wistar rats at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to examine mandibles, skulls, femurs, tibiae, and incisors. The quantitative analysis was performed using fundamental parameters method (FP). Zn and Sr concentrations were highest for the youngest individuals and decreased with age of rats, while Fe content was stable in bone matrix for most studied bones. Our results reveal the necessity of monitoring concentration of not only major, but also minor elements, because the trace elements play special role in the first period of bone development. PMID:24615876

  20. Ultrastructure and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis of cartilage after rapid freezing, low temperature freeze drying, and embedding in Spurr's resin

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, J.; Lyon, R.; Swindin, K.J.; Chesters, J.

    1985-10-01

    In order to undertake meaningful high-resolution x-ray microanalysis of tissues, methods should be used that minimize the introduction of artefacts produced by loss or translocation of ions. The most ideal method is rapid freezing but the subsequent sectioning of frozen tissues is technically difficult. An alternative method is to freeze dry the tissues at a low temperature, and then embed them in resin. This facilitates the rapid production of reproducible thin sections. With freeze-dried, embedded hypertrophic cartilage, the morphology was similar to that seen using aqueous fixatives even when no additional electron density is introduced by the use of osmium vapor. Energy-dispersive analysis of specific areas show that little or no loss or migration of ions occurs from structures such as mitochondria. Mitochondrial granules consisting of calcium and phosphorus precipitates were not observed except where the cells were damaged as a result of the freezing process. This may suggest that these granules only appear when tissue is damaged because of inadequate preservation.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry for quick detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing

    2016-03-01

    Detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria has largely been dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation, which usually takes from days to months to carry out. This clearly does not meet the requirements of analysis for time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements in a sample, including sulfur, with minimal sample treatment, this technology was applied to detect sulfur-oxidizing bacteria using their high sulfur content within the cell. This article describes the application of scanning electron microscopy imaging coupled with EDS mapping for quick detection of sulfur oxidizers in contaminated environmental water samples, with minimal sample handling. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the existence of dense granules within the bacterial cells, while EDS identified large amounts of sulfur within them. EDS mapping localized the sulfur to these granules. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the bacteria detected in our samples belonged to the genus Chromatium, which are sulfur oxidizers. Thus, EDS mapping made it possible to identify sulfur oxidizers in environmental samples based on localized sulfur within their cells, within a short time (within 24 h of sampling). This technique has wide ranging applications for detection of sulfur bacteria in environmental water samples.

  2. Quick Detection of Sulfur Bacteria in Environmental Water Sample with SEM(scanning electron microscopy) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Ding, H.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, F.; Li, X.; Gao, W.; Yin, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria play important roles in global sulfur cycle. Sulfur bacteria detection has been largely dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation which usually takes from days to months to finish. This cannot meet the requirements of some time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements including sulfur in a sample with minimal sample treatment, the technology was applied to detect sulfur bacteria through the high sulfur content in the bacteria cell. We report the application of SEM (scanning electron microscopy) imaging coupled with EDS mapping for direct and quick detection of sulfur oxidizer in contaminated environmental water samples. The presence of sulfur bacteria can be confirmed within 24 hours after sampling. Subsequent 16S RNA gene sequencing results found the bacteria detected had over 99% similarity to Chromatium Okenii, confirming the bacterium was a sulfur oxidizer. The developed technique made it possible to quickly detect sulfur oxidizer in environmental sample and could have wide applications in sulfur bacteria detection in environmental water samples.

  3. Structural analysis of polymer-protected Pd/Pt bimetallic clusters as dispersed catalysts by using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toshima, Naoki; Harada, Masafumi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Kushihashi, Kakuta; Asakura, Kiyotaka )

    1991-09-19

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was applied to the determination of the structure of colloidal dispersions of the poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected palladium/platinum bimetallic clusters, which work as the catalysts for selective partial hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene to cyclooctene. The catalytic activity was found to depend on the structure of the bimetallic clusters. The EXAFS data on the Pd/Pt (4/1) bimetallic clusters, which are the most active catalysts, indicate a Pt core structure, in which the 42 Pd atoms are on the surface of the cluster particle and 13 Pt atoms are at the center of the particle, forming a core. In contrast, the Pd/Pt (1/1) bimetallic clusters are suggested to have a modified Pt core structure, in which 28 Pt atoms connect directly with each other, being located both in the core and on the surface, and 27 Pd atoms form three islands on the surface of the cluster particle. These bimetallic clusters work as active catalysts for selective hydrogenation of olefins, selective partial hydrogenation of diene to monoene, and visible light-induced hydrogen generation from water.

  4. Exposure and analysis of microparticles embedded in silica aerogel keystones using NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Lin, Ting; Toth, Milos; Westphal, Andrew J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Silver, Eric H.

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft delivered to Earth dust particles collected from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2, with the goal of furthering the understanding of solar system formation. Stardust cometary samples were collected in a low-density, nanoporous silica aerogel making their study technically challenging. This article demonstrates the identification, exposure, and elemental composition analysis of particles analogous to those collected by NASA's Stardust mission using in-situ SEM techniques. Backscattered electron imaging is shown by experimental observation and Monte Carlo simulation to be suitable for locating particles of a range of sizes relevant to Stardust (down to submicron diameters) embedded within silica aerogel. Selective removal of the silica aerogel encapsulating an embedded particle is performed by cryogenic NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching. The porous, low-density nature of the aerogel results in an enhanced etch rate compared with solid material, making it an effective, nonmechanical method for the exposure of particles. After exposure, elemental composition of the particle was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a high spectral resolution microcalorimeter. Signals from fluorine contamination are shown to correspond to nonremoved silica aerogel and only in residual concentrations.

  5. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Soares, Luís Eduardo; Do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Antônia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abraha~O.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80×60 points with steps of 20 μm were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the Ca/P ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  6. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems. PMID:26914996

  7. Elemental relationships in rock varnish as seen with SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray) elemental line profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of rock varnish requires a thorough survey of elemental and mineralogic compositions before relating chemical variability of rock varnish to past geochemical environments. Elemental relationships in rock varnish can be examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with an elemental line profiling routine using semi-quantitative, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. Results of SEM/EDX analysis suggest: variations in cation concentrations used in varnish cation ratio dating relate more specifically to variations in detritus within the varnish than to element mobility as defined by weathering indices; Mn concentration rather than Mn:Fe ratios may be a more appropriate indicator of paleoclimatic fluctuations; and the Mn-oxide phase existing in varnish is most likely a Ba-enriched phase rather than birnessite. Element line profiling offers great potential for gaining insights into geochemical processes affecting the deposition and diagenesis of rock varnish and for testing hypotheses relating to its chemical variability. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  8. In situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction for the synthesis optimization and scale-up of the porous zirconium terephthalate UiO-66.

    PubMed

    Ragon, Florence; Horcajada, Patricia; Chevreau, Hubert; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, U-Hwang; Miller, Stuart R; Devic, Thomas; Chang, Jong-San; Serre, Christian

    2014-03-01

    The synthesis optimization and scale-up of the benchmarked microporous zirconium terephthalate UiO-66(Zr) were investigated by evaluating the impact of several parameters (zirconium precursors, acidic conditions, addition of water, and temperature) over the kinetics of crystallization by time-resolved in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. Both the addition of hydrochloric acid and water were found to speed up the reaction. The use of the less acidic ZrOCl2·8H2O as the precursor seemed to be a suitable alternative to ZrCl4·xH2O, avoiding possible reproducibility issues as a consequence of the high hygroscopic character of ZrCl4. ZrOCl2·8H2O allowed the formation of smaller good quality UiO-66(Zr) submicronic particles, paving the way for their use within the nanotechnology domain, in addition to higher reaction yields, which makes this synthesis route suitable for the preparation of UiO-66(Zr) at a larger scale. In a final step, UiO-66(Zr) was prepared using conventional reflux conditions at the 0.5 kg scale, leading to a rather high space-time yield of 490 kg m(-3) day(-1), while keeping physicochemical properties similar to those obtained from smaller scale solvothermally prepared batches.

  9. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems.

  10. Elemental concentration analysis in soil contaminated with recyclable urban garbage by tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.; Jesus, E. F. O.; Assis, J. T.; Cesareo, R.; Barroso, R. C.; Barradas, C. A. A.

    2002-11-01

    Soil and radish (Raphanus Sp) samples from areas treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage were quantitatively analyzed by using tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. Soils treated with 10, 20 and 30 t/ha of recyclable urban garbage and control soil were analyzed. The layer soils were collected at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60 cm depth. It was possible simultaneously to determine the elemental concentration of various elements: K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in recyclable urban garbage, soil treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage and radish plants cultivated in these soils. The elemental concentration of K, Ca, Ti and Fe were determined at percent level (macro-elements) and the other elements at ppm level (micro-elements). It was also possible to observe a significant increase in the contents of K, Ca, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in the soil treated in comparison with the control soil and it was also verified whether the transport of these elements to radish plants cultivated in these soils occurred.

  11. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  12. Ionic Liquids as a Reference Material Candidate for the Quick Performance Check of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometers for the Low Energy Range below 1 keV

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are proposed as simple and efficient test materials to evaluate the performance of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS) in the low energy range below 1 keV. By only one measurement, C Kα, N Kα, O Kα, and F Kα X-ray lines can be excited. Additionally, the S Kα line at 2.3 keV and, particularly, the S L series at 149 eV complete the picture with X-ray lines offered by the selected ILs. The well-known (certifiable) elemental composition of the ILs selected in the present study can be used to check the accuracy of results produced with the available EDS quantification routines in the low energy range, simultaneously, for several low atomic number elements. A comparison with other reference materials in use for testing the performance of EDS in the low energy range is included. PMID:27336962

  13. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun; Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z > 11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  14. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  15. White beam x-ray waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarre, A.; Salditt, T.; Panzner, T.; Pietsch, U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2004-07-12

    We report a white beam x-ray waveguide (WG) experiment. A resonant beam coupler x-ray waveguide (RBC) is used simultaneously as a broad bandpass (or multibandpass) monochromator and as a beam compressor. We show that, depending on the geometrical properties of the WG, the exiting beam consists of a defined number of wavelengths which can be shifted by changing the angle of incidence of the white x-ray synchrotron beam. The characteristic far-field pattern is recorded as a function of exit angle and energy. This x-ray optical setup may be used to enhance the intensity of coherent x-ray WG beams since the full energetic acceptance of the WG mode is transmitted.

  16. A Synthesis Of Cosmic X-ray And Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a synthesis model of cosmic IR and X-ray background, with the goal to derive a complete census of cosmic evolution of star formation (SF) and black-hole (BH) growth by complementing advantages of X-ray and IR surveys to each other. By assuming that individual galaxies are experiencing both SF and BH accretion, our model decomposes the total IR LF into SF and BH components while taking into account the luminosity-dependent SED and its dispersion of the SF component, and the extinction-dependent SED of the BH component. The best-fit parameters are derived by fitting to the number counts and redshift distributions at X-ray including both hard and soft bands, and mid-IR to submm bands including IRAS, Spitzer, Herschel, SCUBA, Aztec and MAMBO. Based on the fit result, our models provide a series of predictions on galaxy evolution and black-hole growth. For evolution of infrared galaxies, the model predicts that the total infrared luminosity function is best described through evolution in both luminosity and density. For evolution of AGN populations, the model predicts that the evolution of X-ray LF also shows luminosity and density dependent, that the type-1/type-2 AGN fraction is a function of both luminosity and redshift, and that the Compton-thick AGN number density evolves strongly with redshift, contributing about 20% to the total cosmic BH growth. For BH growth in IR galaxies, the model predicts that the majority of BH growth at z>1 occurs in infrared luminous galaxies and the AGN fraction as a function of IR survey is a strong function of the survey depth, ranging from >50% at bright end to below 10% at faint end. We also evaluates various AGN selection techniques at X-ray and IR wavelengths and offer predictions for future missions at X-ray and IR.

  17. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (μXRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  18. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

  19. Quantitative determinations and imaging in different structures of buried human bones from the XVIII-XIXth centuries by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence - Postmortem evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, D; Dias, A A; Carvalho, M; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P; Henriques, F R; Curate, F; Pessanha, S

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a non-commercial triaxial geometry energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) setup and a benchtop µ-XRF system were used to identify postmortem contamination in buried bones. For two of the individuals, unusually high concentrations of Cu and Pb, but also Zn (in one individual) were observed. The pigments of the burial shroud coverings have been identified as the source of contamination. Accurate and precise quantitative results were obtained by nondestructive process using fundamental parameters method taking into account the matrix absorption effects. A total of 30 bones from 13 individuals, buried between the mid-XVIIIth to early XIXth centuries, were analyzed to study the elemental composition and elemental distribution. The bones were collected from a church in Almada (Portugal), called Ermida do Espírito Santo, located near the Tagus River and at the sea neighbourhood. The triaxial geometry setup was used to quantify Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb of powder pressed bone pellets (n=9 for each bone). Cluster analysis was performed considering the elemental concentrations for the different bones. There was a clear association between some bones regarding Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb content but not a categorization between cortical and trabecular bones. The elemental distribution of Cu, Zn and Pb were assessed by the benchtop μ-analysis, the M4 Tornado, based on a polycapillary system which provides multi-elemental 2D maps. The results showed that contamination was mostly on the surface of the bone confirming that it was related to the burial shroud covering the individuals. PMID:27216663

  20. In Vitro assessment of dentin erosion after immersion in acidic beverages: surface profile analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Di Nicoló, Rebeca; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of some acidic drinks on dentin erosion, using methods of surface profile (SP) analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). One hundred standardized dentin slabs obtained from bovine incisor roots were used. Dentin slabs measuring 5x5 mm were ground flat, polished and half of each specimen surface was protected with nail polish. For 60 min, the dentin surfaces were immersed in 50 mL of 5 different drinks (Gatorade®, Del Valle Mais orange juice®, Coca-Cola®, Red Bull® and white wine), 20 blocks in each drink. The pH of each beverage was measured. After the erosive challenge, the nail polish was removed and SP was analyzed. The mineral concentration of dentin surfaces was determined by means of EDXRF. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). SP analysis showed that Red-Bull had the highest erosive potential (p<0.05). EDXRF results exhibited a decrease in phosphate in the groups immersed in Red-Bull, orange juice and white wine (p<0.05), and no significant difference in calcium content between the reference surface and eroded surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that all studied beverages promoted erosion on root dentin and Red Bull had the highest erosive potential. There was no correlation between pH of beverages and their erosive potential and only the P content changed after erosive challenge. PMID:23207852

  1. Quantitative determinations and imaging in different structures of buried human bones from the XVIII-XIXth centuries by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence - Postmortem evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, D; Dias, A A; Carvalho, M; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P; Henriques, F R; Curate, F; Pessanha, S

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a non-commercial triaxial geometry energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) setup and a benchtop µ-XRF system were used to identify postmortem contamination in buried bones. For two of the individuals, unusually high concentrations of Cu and Pb, but also Zn (in one individual) were observed. The pigments of the burial shroud coverings have been identified as the source of contamination. Accurate and precise quantitative results were obtained by nondestructive process using fundamental parameters method taking into account the matrix absorption effects. A total of 30 bones from 13 individuals, buried between the mid-XVIIIth to early XIXth centuries, were analyzed to study the elemental composition and elemental distribution. The bones were collected from a church in Almada (Portugal), called Ermida do Espírito Santo, located near the Tagus River and at the sea neighbourhood. The triaxial geometry setup was used to quantify Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb of powder pressed bone pellets (n=9 for each bone). Cluster analysis was performed considering the elemental concentrations for the different bones. There was a clear association between some bones regarding Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb content but not a categorization between cortical and trabecular bones. The elemental distribution of Cu, Zn and Pb were assessed by the benchtop μ-analysis, the M4 Tornado, based on a polycapillary system which provides multi-elemental 2D maps. The results showed that contamination was mostly on the surface of the bone confirming that it was related to the burial shroud covering the individuals.

  2. In Vitro assessment of dentin erosion after immersion in acidic beverages: surface profile analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Di Nicoló, Rebeca; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of some acidic drinks on dentin erosion, using methods of surface profile (SP) analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). One hundred standardized dentin slabs obtained from bovine incisor roots were used. Dentin slabs measuring 5x5 mm were ground flat, polished and half of each specimen surface was protected with nail polish. For 60 min, the dentin surfaces were immersed in 50 mL of 5 different drinks (Gatorade®, Del Valle Mais orange juice®, Coca-Cola®, Red Bull® and white wine), 20 blocks in each drink. The pH of each beverage was measured. After the erosive challenge, the nail polish was removed and SP was analyzed. The mineral concentration of dentin surfaces was determined by means of EDXRF. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). SP analysis showed that Red-Bull had the highest erosive potential (p<0.05). EDXRF results exhibited a decrease in phosphate in the groups immersed in Red-Bull, orange juice and white wine (p<0.05), and no significant difference in calcium content between the reference surface and eroded surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that all studied beverages promoted erosion on root dentin and Red Bull had the highest erosive potential. There was no correlation between pH of beverages and their erosive potential and only the P content changed after erosive challenge.

  3. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  4. Electron density distribution and Madelung potential in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO3)2, from two-wavelength high-resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Kuntzinger; Ghermani

    1999-06-01

    The electron density distribution in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO(3))(2), was derived from high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments. The results obtained from both Mo Kalpha- and Ag Kalpha-wavelength data sets are reported. The features of the Si-O and Al-O bonds are related to the geometrical parameters of the Si-O-Al and Si-O-Si bridges on the one hand and to the O.Li(+) interaction on the other. Kappa refinements against the two data sets yielded almost the same net charges for the Si (+1.8 e) and O (-1.0 e) atoms in spodumene. However, the Al net charge obtained from the Ag Kalpha data (+1.9 e) is larger than the net charge derived from the Mo Kalpha data (+1.5 e). This difference correlates with a more contracted Al valence shell revealed by the shorter X-ray wavelength (kappa = 1.4 for the Ag Kalpha data set). The derived net charges were used to calculate the Madelung potential at the spodumene atomic sites. The electrostatic energy for the chemical formula LiAl(SiO(3))(2) was -8.60 e(2) Å(-1) (-123.84 eV) from the net charges derived from the Ag Kalpha data and -6.97 e(2) Å(-1) (-100.37 eV) from the net charges derived from the Mo Kalpha data.

  5. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  6. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  7. Validation and comparable analysis of aluminum in the popular Chinese fried bread youtiao by wavelength dispersive XRF.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hongying; Jiang, Xiaofei; Wu, Shimin

    2016-09-15

    Aluminum (Al) is an element in alum commonly used as a raising agent for Chinese flour products, especially for a typical fried food youtiao. In the present study, the feasibility of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF) for analysis of aluminum levels in youtiao was examined. Youtiao samples spiked with known amounts of aluminum were used for calibration. Linearity, accuracy, precision, and detection and quantification limits were tested, based on three calibration curves. For further validation, test youtiao samples were analyzed by both WDXRF and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Comparison of the two methods showed that measurement performance was not significantly different. Taken together, these results indicate that WDXRF can form the basis of a rapid and simple methodology for measuring the aluminum content of youtiao, and that it is a good candidate for replacing ICP-OES for analyzing Al-containing flour products. PMID:27080872

  8. Validation and comparable analysis of aluminum in the popular Chinese fried bread youtiao by wavelength dispersive XRF.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hongying; Jiang, Xiaofei; Wu, Shimin

    2016-09-15

    Aluminum (Al) is an element in alum commonly used as a raising agent for Chinese flour products, especially for a typical fried food youtiao. In the present study, the feasibility of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF) for analysis of aluminum levels in youtiao was examined. Youtiao samples spiked with known amounts of aluminum were used for calibration. Linearity, accuracy, precision, and detection and quantification limits were tested, based on three calibration curves. For further validation, test youtiao samples were analyzed by both WDXRF and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Comparison of the two methods showed that measurement performance was not significantly different. Taken together, these results indicate that WDXRF can form the basis of a rapid and simple methodology for measuring the aluminum content of youtiao, and that it is a good candidate for replacing ICP-OES for analyzing Al-containing flour products.

  9. Mass calibration and cosmological analysis of the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample using velocity dispersion σ v and x-ray Y X measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; et al

    2015-01-30

    Here, we present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σv) and 16 X-ray YX measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σv and YX are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ v calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full SPTCL data setmore » (SZ clusters+σv+YX) to measure σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.3 = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is mν = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger Σmν further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPTCL and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the YX calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ v calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (~44% and ~23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ωm = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ8 = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find Σmν = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w to vary, we find γ = 0.73 ± 0.28 and w = –1.007 ± 0.065, demonstrating that the eΣxpansion and the growth

  10. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  11. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  12. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  13. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  14. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](λλ3726, 3728 Å) and Hδ(λ4102 Å) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ≥ LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308

  15. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Jagodzinski, P.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  16. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  17. Analysis of eight argonne premium coal samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Sellers, G.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Vivit, D.V.; Kent, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods were used in the analysis of eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce) in coal ash were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) in coal ash and trace elements (Cl and P) in whole coal were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of this study will be used in a geochemical database compiled for these materials from various analytical techniques. The experimental XRF methods and procedures used to determine these major and trace elements are described.

  18. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  19. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  20. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight ...

  1. Pelvis x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  2. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  3. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  4. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  5. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  6. Assessment of the effects of laser photobiomodulation on peri-implant bone repair through energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence: A study of dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. F.; Araújo, N. C.; Carneiro, V. S. M.; Moreno, L. M.; Guerra, L. A. P.; Santos Neto, A. P.; Gerbi, M. E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Bone neoformation is essential in the osteointegration of implants and has been correlated with the repair capacity of tissues, the blood supply and the function of the cells involved. Laser therapy accelerates the mechanical imbrication of peri-implant tissue by increasing osteoblastic activity and inducing ATP, osteopontin and the expression of sialoproteins. Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess peri-implant bone repair using the tibia of dogs that received dental implants and laser irradiation (AsGaAl 830nm - 40mW, CW, f~0.3mm) through Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). Methodology: Two groups were established: G1 (Control, n=20; two dental implants were made in the tibia of each animal; 10 animals); G2 (Experimental, n=20, two dental implants were made in the tibia each animal + Laser therapy; 10 animals). G2 was irradiated every 48 hours for two weeks, with a total of seven sessions. The first irradiation was conducted during the surgery, at which time a point in the surgical alveolus was irradiated prior to the placement of the implant and four new spatial positions were created to the North, South, East and West (NSEW) of the implant. The subsequent sessions involved irradiation at these four points and at one infra-implant point (in the direction of the implant apex). Each point received 4J/cm2 and a total dose of 20J/cm2 per session (treatment dose=140J/cm2). The specimens were removed 15 and 30 days after the operation for the EDXRF test. The Mann- Whitney statistical test was used to assess the results. Results: The increase in the calcium concentration in the periimplant region of the irradiated specimens (G2) was statistically significant (p < 0.05), when compared with the control group (G1). Conclusion: The results of the present study show that irradiation with the AsGaAl laser promoted an acceleration in bone repair in the peri-implant region.

  7. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (μm2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 μm. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains

  8. [Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic necrochemical method for determination of entry and exit of gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Havel, J

    2003-07-01

    The article is a continuation of the experiences Ing. J. Havel and Ing. K. Zelenka Energodispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons.

  9. X-ray diffraction gratings: Precise control of ultra-low blaze angle via anisotropic wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Lum, Paul; Naulleau, Patrick; Gullikson, Eric M.; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2016-07-01

    Diffraction gratings are used from micron to nanometer wavelengths as dispersing elements in optical instruments. At shorter wavelengths, crystals can be used as diffracting elements, but due to the 3D nature of the interaction with light are wavelength selective rather than wavelength dispersing. There is an urgent need to extend grating technology into the x-ray domain of wavelengths from 1 to 0.1 nm, but this requires the use of gratings that have a faceted surface in which the facet angles are very small, typically less than 1°. Small facet angles are also required in the extreme ultra-violet and soft x-ray energy ranges in free electron laser applications, in order to reduce power density below a critical damage threshold. In this work, we demonstrate a technique based on anisotropic etching of silicon designed to produce very small angle facets with a high degree of perfection.

  10. EBIS-A facility for the studies of X-ray emission from solids bombarded by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaś, D.; Jabłoński, Ł.; Jagodziński, P.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M.

    2015-07-01

    We report here on the progress in the X-ray spectroscopy program at the EBIS-A facility installed recently at the Institute of Physics of Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. In this facility the beams of low-energy highly charged ions (HCI) produced by the Dresden EBIS-A ion source, after extraction and charge-state separation in the double focusing magnet, are directed to the experimental UHV chamber equipped with a 5-axis universal sample manipulator. The X-rays emitted in interaction of the highly charged ions with solids can be measured by an energy dispersive X-ray silicon drift detector (SDD) and/or a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) mounted at the experimental chamber. The surface nanostructures formed by an impact of HCI will be studied by the grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique and using a multiprobe surface analysis system based on the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) coupled to the UHV chamber of the EBIS-A facility. In this paper a brief description of the facility, X-ray instrumentation and the surface analysis system is given and the first results are presented.

  11. MASS CALIBRATION AND COSMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SPT-SZ GALAXY CLUSTER SAMPLE USING VELOCITY DISPERSION σ {sub v} AND X-RAY Y {sub X} MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Bazin, G.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg{sup 2} of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σ {sub v}) and 16 X-ray Y {sub X} measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σ {sub v} and Y {sub X} are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ {sub v} calibration preferring ∼16% higher masses. We use the full SPT{sub CL} data set (SZ clusters+σ {sub v}+Y {sub X}) to measure σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.27){sup 0.3} = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is ∑m {sub ν} = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger ∑m {sub ν} further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPT{sub CL} and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the Y {sub X} calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ {sub v} calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (∼44% and ∼23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ω{sub m} = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ{sub 8} = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find ∑m {sub ν} = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the dark energy equation

  12. Rosat and the X-ray universe

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.K.

    1990-08-01

    A major new satellite (Rosat) promises to provide astronomers with a map of perhaps 100,000 beacons in the X-ray sky, fresh images of high-energy objects approaching the resolution of visible-light photographs, and a first-ever survey of the sky at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths. The German and British governments along with NASA are participating in this program. The grazing incidence technique previously used by Einstein and other missions is used to bring the X-rays to a focus and thus to create images. The X-ray telescope is equipped with three instruments, though only one can occupy the focus at any given time. Two are redundant detectors called position-sensitive proportional counters. The whole-sky survey will yield a complete X-ray image of the celestial sphere with 1/2-arc-minute detail of sources large and small, not just crude scans by wide-angle sensors.

  13. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  14. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  15. SASE free electron lasers as short wavelength coherent sources. From first results at 100 nm to a 1 Å X-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.

    2003-10-01

    During the last few years free electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) have been demonstrated at wavelengths of 12 μm [CITE], 830 nm [CITE], 530 nm [CITE] and 385 nm [CITE], and around 100 nm [CITE]. Recently, saturation has been observed in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region between 82 nm and 125 nm at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. The radiation pulses have been characterized with respect to pulse energy, statistical fluctuations, angular divergence and spectral distribution, both in the linear gain and in the saturation regime of the FEL [CITE]. The results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations, providing a solid basis for other projects aiming at still shorter wavelengths down to the 0.1 nm range [CITE].

  16. From zone plate to microcalorimeter . 50 years of cosmic X-ray spectroscopy at SRON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleeker, J.; Verbunt, F.

    The first method used by the SRON Laboratory for Space Research at Utrecht to spectroscopically image the Sun in X-rays employed Fresnel zone plates. Four Fresnel plates, covering four specific wavelengths, were flown on an Aerobee rocket in 1967 and gave a first useful X-ray image of the Sun in the Si-X line at 51 Å. The technique developed for the solar X-ray images enabled SRON to become the Lead Investigator for the grating spectrographs on several major X-ray satellites, i.e. on the Einstein and EXOSAT satellites, launched in November 1978 and May 1983 respectively, and on the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories both launched in 1999. Since then, a considerable effort was put into the development of cryogenically cooled, non-dispersive X-ray spectrometers as model payload elements for the XEUS, IXO and Athena mission studies. This paper briefly reviews these developments, highlights some of the resulting scientific insights and offers a few thoughts on the present outlook for a next generation X-ray observatory. The biggest challenge for the realization of such a mission is not primarily technical: global coordination and collaboration, both among scientists and the major space agencies, is a prerequisite for a successful next major leap in this discipline.

  17. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  18. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  19. Development of a soft x-ray diffractometer for a wideband multilayer grating with a novel layer structure in the 2-4 keV range

    SciTech Connect

    Imazono, Takashi; Koike, Masato; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Noboru; Koeda, Masaru; Nagano, Tetsuya; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Oue, Yuki; Yonezawa, Zeno; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Handa, Nobuo; Murano, Takanori

    2012-07-11

    We have been developing a wavelength-dispersive soft x-ray spectrograph covering an energy region of 50-4000 eV to attach to a conventional electron microscope. Observation of soft x-ray emission in the 2-4 keV range needs a multilayer coated grating. In order to evaluate the performance of the optical component in the energy region, a goniometric apparatus has been newly developed and the preliminary performance has been tested using synchrotron radiation.

  20. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  1. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  2. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  3. Normal incidence x-ray mirror for chemical microanalysis

    DOEpatents

    Carr, M.J.; Romig, A.D. Jr.

    1987-08-05

    An x-ray mirror for both electron column instruments and micro x-ray fluorescence instruments for making chemical, microanalysis comprises a non-planar mirror having, for example, a spherical reflecting surface for x-rays comprised of a predetermined number of alternating layers of high atomic number material and low atomic number material contiguously formed on a substrate and whose layers have a thickness which is a multiple of the wavelength being reflected. For electron column instruments, the wavelengths of interest lie above 1.5nm, while for x-ray fluorescence instruments, the range of interest is below 0.2nm. 4 figs.

  4. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney).

  5. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney). PMID:25618680

  6. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of biological bulk specimens: a review of the method and its application to experimental gerontology and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, I.

    1983-01-01

    Biological bulk specimens can be prepared by the freeze-fracture freeze-drying method, which is suitable for quantitative X-ray microanalysis of intracellular components. Although the spatial resolution of this analytic technique does not allow us to analyze smaller cellular compartments than the nucleus and cytoplasm it may deliver useful results for answering questions of experimental biology. Bulk specimens are also suitable for determination of intracellular water and dry mass contents under certain conditions. Applications of the bulk specimen X-ray microanalysis for experimental gerontology revealed an age dependent increase of the intracellular potassium content of the postmitotic cells, a diminution of intracellular water content during aging and delivered indirect proof for the decrease of the passive potassium permeability of the cell membrane in old hepatocytes and giant neurons. The bulk specimen method of X-ray microanalysis has been applied also in cancer research: it proved to be helpful in the determination of intracellular Na+-contents and Na+/K+ ratios in various human and experimental animal tumors as well as in other models of cell proliferation. These data gain a certain weight in light of the recent developments on the regulation of mitogenesis.

  7. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a

  8. Characterization of toners and inkjets by laser ablation spectrochemical methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejos, Tatiana; Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Almirall, José

    2014-02-01

    Detection and sourcing of counterfeit currency, examination of counterfeit security documents and determination of authenticity of medical records are examples of common forensic document investigations. In these cases, the physical and chemical composition of the ink entries can provide important information for the assessment of the authenticity of the document or for making inferences about common source. Previous results reported by our group have demonstrated that elemental analysis, using either Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) or Laser Ablation Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), provides an effective, practical and robust technique for the discrimination of document substrates and writing inks with minimal damage to the document. In this study, laser-based methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods were developed, optimized and validated for the forensic analysis of more complex inks such as toners and inkjets, to determine if their elemental composition can differentiate documents printed from different sources and to associate documents that originated from the same printing source. Comparison of the performance of each of these methods is presented, including the analytical figures of merit, discrimination capability and error rates. Different calibration strategies resulting in semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis, comparison methods (match criteria) and data analysis and interpretation tools were also developed. A total of 27 black laser toners originating from different manufacturing sources and/or batches were examined to evaluate the discrimination capability of each method. The results suggest that SEM-EDS offers relatively poor discrimination capability for this set (~ 70.7% discrimination of all the possible comparison pairs or a 29.3% type II error rate). Nonetheless, SEM-EDS can still be used as a complementary method of analysis since it has

  9. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  10. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  11. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  12. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  13. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  14. Diffractive imaging of highly focused X-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.; Peele, A. G.; Cai, Z.; Paterson, D.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-02-01

    The rapid development of new sources of coherent X-rays, such as third-generation synchrotrons, high-harmonic-generation lasers and X-ray free-electron lasers, has led to the emergence of the new field of X-ray coherent science. The extension of coherent methods to the X-ray regime makes possible methods such as coherent diffraction, X-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy, speckle interferometry and ultrafast probing at atomic resolution and femtosecond timescales. Despite rapid improvements in the resolution that conventional X-ray optics can achieve, new methods for manipulating X-rays are required to push this to the atomic scale. Here we demonstrate a coherent imaging technique that enables us to image the complex field at the focus of an X-ray zone plate without the need for conventional X-ray lenses. There are no fundamental limits on the resolution of this lensless imaging technique other than the wavelength of the X-rays themselves. The ability to characterize the beam with one measurement makes the method ideally suited to characterizing the fields generated by pulsed coherent X-ray sources.

  15. Ultraviolet Pulsations from X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    We propose to obtain high-speed photometry at ultraviolet wavelengths of all the pulsing X-ray heated stellar atmospheres of the companion stars to the neutron stars in the binaries and to create list of X-ray pulsars with optical pulsations that can be further observed for such purposes as determining the mass ratios of the binary system. Revision History: Prepared for future cycles submission-- BJW 4/24/92; Cycle 3 to cycle 2; PRISM to SINGLE-- BJW 8/27/92;

  16. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  17. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  18. X-ray focusing scheme with continuously variable lens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bernhard W; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid X-ray focusing scheme was developed for operation of the X-ray streak camera at the Advanced Photon Source: an X-ray lens focuses vertically from a long distance of 16 m and produces an extended focus that has a small footprint on an inexpensive sagittal mirror. A patented method is used to continuously adjust the focal length of the lens and compensate for chromatic dispersion in energy scans.

  19. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R. F.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories. To be launched in late 1998, AXAF will provide unprecedented capabilities for high-resolution imaging, spectrometric imaging, and high-resolution disperse spectroscopy, over the x-ray band from about 0.1 keV to 10 keV. With these capabilities, AXAF observations will address many of the outstanding questions in astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  20. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  1. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  2. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  3. Direct chlorine determination in crude oils by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: An improved method based on a proper strategy for sample homogenization and calibration with inorganic standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Adriana; Saavedra, Alvaro; Tristão, Maria Luiza B.; Nele, Márcio; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.

    2011-05-01

    Official guidelines to perform chlorine determination in crude oil are (i) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6470, which is based on the extraction of water from the oil and subsequent determination of the chloride by potentiometry, (ii) ASTM D3230, that measures the conductivity of a solution of crude oil in a mixture of organic solvents and (iii) US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 9075 that uses energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to quantify chlorine and it is applicable for the range from 200 μg g - 1 to percent levels of the analyte. The goal of this work is to propose method to quantify lower amounts of chlorine in crude oil using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using a simple calibration strategy. Sample homogenization procedure was carefully studied in order to enable accurate results. The calibration curve was made with standards prepared by diluting aqueous NaCl standard in glycerin. The method presented a linear response that covers the range from 8 to at least 100 μg g - 1 of chlorine. Chlorine in crude oil samples from Campos Basin - Brazil were quantified by the proposed method and by potentiometry after extraction of chlorine from the oil. Results achieved using both methods were statistically the same at 95% confidence level.

  4. Soft-X-Ray Prefilter for Hot, Bright Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ortendahl, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Prefilters consisting of beryllium foil supported on conductive silver mesh transmit soft x-rays but are nearly opaque to visible and infrared light. New Be/AG filters protect imaging X-ray detectors from damage by visible and longer wavelength radiation when viewing such hot, bright emitters as Sun or possibly certain industrial processes.

  5. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  6. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  7. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraenkel, Ben; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, A. Lane; Stodiek, Wolfgang; von Goeler, Schweickhard E.

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  8. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a novel immune-type receptor from Ictalurus punctatus and phasing by selenium anomalous dispersion methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrov, David A. Hernández Prada, José A.; Haire, Robert N.; Magis, Andrew T.; Bailey, Kate; Litman, Gary W.

    2007-12-01

    A highly diversified novel immune-type receptor from catfish, NITR10, was crystallized to reveal novel mechanisms of immune recognition. X-ray diffraction data from crystals of a novel immune-type receptor (NITR10 from the catfish Ictalurus punctatus) were collected to 1.65 Å resolution and reduced to the primitive hexagonal lattice. Native and selenomethionine derivatives of NITR10 crystallized under different conditions yielded P3{sub 1}21 crystals. SeMet NITR10 was phased to a correlation coefficient of 0.77 by SAD methods and experimental electron-density maps were calculated to 1.65 Å. Five NITR10 molecules are predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient.

  9. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Lepson, J.K.; Savin, D.W.; Utter, S.B.

    2000-03-02

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in it's ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, XMM, ASCA and EUVE.

  10. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-01

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 microF two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system. PMID:20113089

  11. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-15

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 {mu}F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  12. X-ray standing wave analysis of nanostructures using partially coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K. Das, Gangadhar; Bedzyk, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    The effect of longitudinal (or temporal) coherence on total reflection assisted x-ray standing wave (TR-XSW) analysis of nanoscale materials is quantitatively demonstrated by showing how the XSW fringe visibility can be strongly damped by decreasing the spectral resolution of the incident x-ray beam. The correction for nonzero wavelength dispersion (δλ ≠ 0) of the incident x-ray wave field is accounted for in the model computations of TR-XSW assisted angle dependent fluorescence yields of the nanostructure coatings on x-ray mirror surfaces. Given examples include 90 nm diameter Au nanospheres deposited on a Si(100) surface and a 3 nm thick Zn layer trapped on top a 100 nm Langmuir-Blodgett film coating on a Au mirror surface. Present method opens up important applications, such as enabling XSW studies of large dimensioned nanostructures using conventional laboratory based partially coherent x-ray sources.

  13. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  14. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  15. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  16. Study on x-ray multilayer monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changxin; Li, Mao-Lian; Miao, Tongqun; Lu, Xilin; Ma, Lie; An, Qingxiang; Liang, Guoli

    1993-01-01

    At present natural crystal TLAP used usually is replaced by artificial coated with multilayer for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectral analysis. X-ray multilayer monochromator can be used for analyzing light elements such as F, Na, Mg etc. Diffraction intensity of the multilayer component is 5 times higher than that of TLAP. This paper describes operating principle, Fabrication method and technique of the X-ray multilayer monochromator and the components are used Model 3080 E sequential X-ray fluorescence spectroscope. The multilayer diffraction components are fabricated by means of coating alternatively multilayer with high and low electron density elements on single crystal silicon substrate by vapor deposition or sputtering. Gap between multilayers is d to be equivalent to lattice constant of crystal. Sample is excited to emit fluorescence with multi-wavelength when X-ray beam illuminates surface of the sample. Fluorescence emitted passes through collimator and incidences on multilayer diffraction component to be diffracted into various wavelengths which are corresponding some angles. Contents of elements in samples can be detected according to Bragg diffraction principle. Key technologies fabricating multilayer diffraction components are how to polish super-smooth surface substrate and to control d value of thickness of multilayer. Roughness of Si(111) substrate polished by us is up to 0.1 nm RMS. Gap d 2.5 nm between multilayers. It is very difficult to realize specification as mentioned above. Thicknesses of layers are controlled by quartz piezoelectric crystal and their monitor controlling errors is about 0.34 nm RMS. Ion sputtering device is adopted to improve surface finish and construct specialty of the layers. Finally we have developed multilayer diffraction components which have been used to analyze F, Na and Mg etc. by X-ray fluorescence spectroscope.

  17. Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

    2007-05-04

    Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

  18. X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is often held that the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) arises from a region close to the central energy source. Thus X-ray observations may provide the best constraints on the central engine. In particular, the shape of the X-ray continuum gives information about the mechanism for photon generation, X-ray time variability data can constrain the size and mass of the continuum source, and X-ray occultation data give constraints on the relative sizes of the continuum source and the intervening absorbing material (often assumed to be the broad line clouds). In addition, since a fair fraction of the total energy of an AGN is emitted at X-ray wavelengths, direct measurement of the amount and spectral form of this radiation is important for modeling of the optically emitting clouds.

  19. Data collection with a tailored X-ray beam size at 2.69 Å wavelength (4.6 keV): sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23Nterm

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Michele; Groves, Matthew R.; Barford, David; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to reach wavelengths of up to 3.1 Å at the newly established EMBL P13 beamline at PETRA III, the new third-generation synchrotron at DESY in Hamburg, provides the opportunity to explore very long wavelengths to harness the sulfur anomalous signal for phase determination. Data collection at λ = 2.69 Å (4.6 keV) allowed the crystal structure determination by sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23Nterm, a subunit of the multimeric anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C). At this energy, Cdc23Nterm has an expected Bijvoet ratio 〈|F anom|〉/〈F〉 of 2.2%, with 282 residues, including six cysteines and five methionine residues, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (65.4 kDa; 12 Cys and ten Met residues). Selectively illuminating two separate portions of the same crystal with an X-ray beam of 50 µm in diameter allowed crystal twinning to be overcome. The crystals diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.2, c = 151.5 Å, and belonged to space group P43. The refined structure to 3.1 Å resolution has an R factor of 18.7% and an R free of 25.9%. This paper reports the structure solution, related methods and a discussion of the instrumentation. PMID:26960127

  20. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  1. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid

  2. X-ray microprobe using multilayer mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Thompson, A. C.; Wu, Y.; Giauque, R. D.

    1988-04-01

    Multilayer reflectors for the X-ray region have now progressed beyond the experimental stage to the point where they can be relied upon as optics for experimental systems, in synchrotron radiation research as well as in other fields. This paper reviews the design considerations for an X-ray microprobe, and summarizes experience with prototypes tested at both SSRL and NSLS. The optical systems described employ multilayer-coated spherical mirrors arranged in the Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration to demagnify the X-ray source by a factor of several hundred. By this means a spot of X-rays less than 10 μm square can be produced. The optical aberrations and other factors that limit the performance are detailed, and possible ways to improve the performance are discussed. In the prototypes the spot is directed on the specimen which is carried on a stage that can be translated horizontally and vertically. The characteristic fluorescent X-rays excited by the focused 10 keV photons are analysed by an energy-dispersive Si(Li) detector, so that by scanning the stage an elemental concentration map of the specimen is built up. In a companion paper [A.C. Thompson, J.H. Underwood, Y. Wu, R.D. Giauque, K.W. Jones and M.L. Rivers, these Proceedings, p. 318] some experimental programs are described, and estimates of the elemental sensitivity are provided.

  3. X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    An initial concept study for the X-ray Surveyor mission was carried-out by the Advanced Concept Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), with a strawman payload and related requirements that were provided by an Informal Mission Concept Team, comprised of MSFC and Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory (SAO) scientists plus a diverse cross-section of the X-ray community. The study included a detailed assessment of the requirements, a preliminary design, a mission analysis, and a preliminary cost estimate. The X-ray Surveyor strawman payload is comprised of a high-resolution mirror assembly and an instrument set, which may include an X-ray microcalorimeter, a high-definition imager, and a dispersive grating spectrometer and its readout. The mirror assembly will consist of highly nested, thin, grazing-incidence mirrors, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development—including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and new polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. This study benefits from previous studies of large missions carried out over the past two decades, such as Con-X, AXSIO and IXO, and in most areas, points to mission requirements no more stringent than those of Chandra.

  4. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  5. X-RAY GROUPS OF GALAXIES IN THE AEGIS DEEP AND WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Erfanianfar, G.; Lerchster, M.; Nandra, K.; Connelly, J. L.; Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; Laird, E.; Bielby, R.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D.; Jeltema, T.; Newman, J. A.; Coil, A. L.; Brimioulle, F.; Davis, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Willmer, C.; Gerke, B.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800 ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray-selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100% of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. These groups span the redshift range z {approx} 0.066-1.544 and virial mass range M{sub 200} {approx} 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}-1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. For the 49 extended sources that lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of the cut. A velocity-dispersion-based virial radius can cause a larger overestimation of velocity dispersion in comparison to an X-ray-based virial radius for low-mass systems. There is no significant difference between these two radial cuts for more massive systems. Independent of radial cut, an overestimation of velocity dispersion can be created in the case of the existence of significant substructure and compactness in X-ray emission, which mostly occur in low-mass systems. We also present a comparison between X-ray galaxy groups and optical galaxy groups detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method for DEEP2 data in this field.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  7. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  8. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  9. High-pressure structural transformations of PbCrO{sub 4} up to 51.2 GPa: An angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Errandonea, D.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • PbCrO{sub 4} was studied under high pressure up to 51 GPa using synchrotron powder XRD. • The occurrence of three phase transitions is reported. • The crystal structures of the high-pressure phases are assigned. • Axial and bulk compressibilities are determined. - Abstract: We report on high-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements up to 51.2 GPa in PbCrO{sub 4} at room temperature. Three high-pressure phases with structures different than the ambient-pressure monazite-type (P2{sub 1}/n) are reported. One phase transition was found at 3.8 GPa to an isomorphic structure to monazite. A second transition occurs at 11.1 GPa. After this transition, the coexistence of tetragonal (I4{sub 1}/a) and monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) structures is detected up to 21.1 GPa. Beyond this pressure and up to 51.2 GPa, only the high-pressure monoclinic phase is observed. Upon decompression all structural changes are reversible. Finally, the axial compressibilities for the different phases have been determined as well as the equations of state.

  10. Site Specific X-ray Anomalous Dispersion of the Geometrically Frustrated Kagome´ Magnet Herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2

    SciTech Connect

    A Freedman; T Han; A Prodi; P Muller; Q Huang; Y Chen; S Webb; Y Lee; T McQueen; D Nocera

    2011-12-31

    Structural characterization, exploiting X-ray scattering differences at elemental absorption edges, is developed to quantitatively determine crystallographic site-specific metal disorder. We apply this technique to the problem of Zn-Cu chemical disorder in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. This geometrically frustrated kagome antiferromagnet is one of the best candidates for a spin-liquid ground state, but chemical disorder has been suggested as a mundane explanation for its magnetic properties. Using anomalous scattering at the Zn and Cu edges, we determine that there is no Zn occupation of the intralayer Cu sites within the kagome layer; however there is Cu present on the Zn intersite, leading to a structural formula of (Zn{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 0.15})Cu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. The lack of Zn mixing onto the kagome lattice sites lends support to the idea that the electronic ground state in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} and its relatives is nontrivial.

  11. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  12. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  13. Measuring atmospheric dispersion with WLRS in multiple wavelength mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Haufe, K. H.; Dassing, Reiner

    1993-01-01

    The WLRS (Wettzell Laser Ranging System) allows the simultaneous tracking of satellites on two different wavelengths. These are the fundamental frequency of Nd:YAG at 1.064 microns and the second harmonic at 532 nm. Range measurements to the satellite LAGEOS were carried out with different experimental set-ups, after developing a detector unit based on a silicon avalanche photodiode in Geiger mode, which is sufficiently sensitive in the infrared domain. An approach towards a quantitative interpretation of the data is suggested and discussed briefly.

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  15. X-ray irradiated model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.

    2000-04-01

    We present equations and details of the computer code for precise calculation of LTE model atmospheres which are illuminated by an external radiation field. Both radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, and coherent Thomson electron scattering have been assumed. Radiation field at each frequency and depth level is computed with the method of variable Eddington factors. The code is fully suitable for the study of mutual illumination effects in close binaries. We have subsequently computed few sets of model stellar atmospheres of Teff = 1.8x 104 K, and log g = 4.0 (B3 V type star), consisting of hydrogen and helium in solar proportion, and iron of number abundance NFe / N_H = 3.7 x 10-5. We assume, that the atmosphere is illuminated by isotropic X-rays of diluted thermal spectral distribution with temperature Trad =108 K. In case of iron-rich models external X-rays cause heating of the uppermost layers up to 4 x 106 K. Such a choice of Teff and Trad differing by 4 orders of magnitude is relevant to the supposed conditions on some rings of the accretion disk in active galactic nuclei (AGN), illuminated by an X-ray source. Our code qualitatively reproduces the structure of an atmosphere and its spectrum for wavelengths ranging from infrared to X-rays. Outgoing spectra clearly exhibit all three components: spectrum of B star, external X-ray blackbody spectrum partly backscattered by the model atmosphere, and radiation from the uppermost layers, heated to very high temperatures. The latter shows He I and He II Lyman opacity jumps, and numerous b-f jumps of highly ionized iron, all of them in emission. We demonstrate that in all atmospheres of our paper the external illumination by X-rays reduces the H I Lyman jump. This is in agreement with observations of AGNs spectra.

  16. In-situ synchrotron energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction study of thin Pd foils with Pd:D and Pd:H concentrations up to 1:1

    SciTech Connect

    Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Dominguez, D. D.; Qadri, S. B.; Hubler, G. K.; Violante, V.; Hu, J. Z.; He, J. H.

    2012-10-15

    Time resolved, in-situ, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was performed in an electrolysis cell during electrochemical loading of palladium foil cathodes with hydrogen and deuterium. Concentrations of H:Pd (D:Pd) up to 1:1 in 0.1 M LiOH (LiOD) in H{sub 2}O (D{sub 2}O) electrolyte were obtained, as determined by both the Pd lattice parameter and cathode resistivity. In addition, some indications on the kinetics of loading and deloading of hydrogen from the Pd surface were obtained. The alpha-beta phase transformations were clearly delineated but no new phases at high concentration were determined.

  17. Chemical ordering of Co and Ni in a W-(AlCoNi) crystalline approximant related to Al-Co-Ni decagonal quasicrystals studied by atomic resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, Akira; Hiraga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A W-(AlCoNi) crystalline approximant, which is closely related to Al-Co-Ni decagonal quasicrystals, in an Al72.5Co20Ni7.5 alloy has been studied by atomic resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), in an instrument attached to a spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. On high-resolution EDS maps of Co and Ni elements, obtained by integrating many sets of EDS data taken from undamaged areas, chemical ordering of Co and Ni is clearly detected. In the structure of the W-(AlCoNi) phase, consisting of arrangements of transition-metal (TM) atoms located at vertices of pentagonal tilings and pentagonal arrangements of mixed sites (MSs) of TM and Al atoms, Co atoms occupy the TM atom positions with the pentagonal tiling and Ni is enriched in part of the pentagonal arrangements of MSs.

  18. The identification of the pigments used to paint statues of Feixiange Cliff in China in late 19th century by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Pu-jun; Huang, Wei; Jianhua-Wang; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Xiao-ling

    2010-11-01

    The application of micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) to the research of pigments collected from Statues of Feixiange Cliff No. 67 and No. 69 niche of Tang Dynasty in China is reported. Five kinds of pigments were found in the experimental data, including black (carbon), white (gypsum + quartz), blue (lapis lazuli) and green (Paris green + Barium sulphate). After synthesized in 1814, Paris green was reported for a large import as a light and bright green pigment to paint architectures in China from the late 19th century. The analyzed blue pigment demonstrated the similar Raman spectra to the Lâjvardina blue glazed ceramics, which indicated lapis lazuli was an artificial product. This confirmed the painting of Feixiange Cliff in the early Republic of China as the historical record, and also reveals that some pigments were imported from abroad.

  19. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Energy-Dispersive X-Ray (STEM-EDX) Spectrum Images Using Single-Atomic-Column Cross-Correlation Averaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2016-06-01

    Acquiring an atomic-resolution compositional map of crystalline specimens has become routine practice, thus opening possibilities for extracting subatomic information from such maps. A key challenge for achieving subatomic precision is the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of compositional maps. Here, we report a simple and reliable solution for achieving high-SNR energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy spectrum images for individual atomic columns. The method is based on standard cross-correlation aided by averaging of single-column EDX maps with modifications in the reference image. It produces EDX maps with minimal specimen drift, beam drift, and scan distortions. Step-by-step procedures to determine a self-consistent reference map with a discussion on the reliability, stability, and limitations of the method are presented here.

  20. Use of X-ray Fluorescence Analysis for the Determination of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a powerful tool for the analysis of solid material. That is the reason why the technique was applied for the determination of rare earth elements (REEs) since about 1970. At present, energy-dispersive XRF and wavelength-dispersive XRF are used for the analysis of pressed powder pellets or fused Li-borate beads containing REEs. The production of reliable results can only be achieved by careful optimization of the parameter, in particular the selection of spectral lines. The quantification is based on a calibration realized by using reference samples.

  1. Development of x-ray laser media. measurement of gain and development of cavity resonators for wavelengths near 130 angstroms. Volume 1. Annual scientific report, 1 Jan-31 Dec 82

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    A two part study of soft x-ray laser media is presented. Experimental observation of significant population inversion on the Balmer alpha transition in hydrogen-like flourine at 81 A in a line-focus laser plasma is reported. An analysis of the expected performance of soft x-ray multilayer reflects is presented. This volume discusses the development of an XUV (extreme ultraviolet) amplifier.

  2. Development of variable-magnification X-ray Bragg optics.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiichi; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Yumiko; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A novel X-ray Bragg optics is proposed for variable-magnification of an X-ray beam. This X-ray Bragg optics is composed of two magnifiers in a crossed arrangement, and the magnification factor, M, is controlled through the azimuth angle of each magnifier. The basic properties of the X-ray optics such as the magnification factor, image transformation matrix and intrinsic acceptance angle are described based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The feasibility of the variable-magnification X-ray Bragg optics was verified at the vertical-wiggler beamline BL-14B of the Photon Factory. For X-ray Bragg magnifiers, Si(220) crystals with an asymmetric angle of 14° were used. The magnification factor was calculated to be tunable between 0.1 and 10.0 at a wavelength of 0.112 nm. At various magnification factors (M ≥ 1.0), X-ray images of a nylon mesh were observed with an air-cooled X-ray CCD camera. Image deformation caused by the optics could be corrected by using a 2 × 2 transformation matrix and bilinear interpolation method. Not only absorption-contrast but also edge-contrast due to Fresnel diffraction was observed in the magnified images.

  3. Origin of the cosmic x-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Margon, B.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1962, it has been known that every part of the sky emits a uniform glow of x-rays. After two decades of intense study the origin of this diffuse x-ray background is still a subject of controversy. The near perfect isotropy of the x-ray background is clearly a vital clue to its origin. A second clue to the origin of the x-ray background arises from the fact that it is x-radiation tha is generated, rather than some longer wavelength radiation. Two hypotheses of the origin of this x-ray background are discussed. One hypothesis is that the x-ray background can be attributed to bremsstrahlung from a hot intergalactic medium. The second hypothesis is that the x-ray background originates from a large number of quasars. Because there is no estimate independent of the intensity of the x-ray background of how much hot intergalactic medium exists (if any), there is a real possibility that both sources contribute to the observed x-rays. (SC)

  4. A diffuse soft X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.

    1981-01-01

    A design for a diffuse X-ray spectrometer utilizing Bragg reflection is described. The geometry has a very high throughput for a given physical size and allows simultaneous observation at all wavelengths within its range. Spectral resolving power is about 35 to 50. A similar unit equipped with thallium acid pthallate crystals will cover the 11 - 24 A-range with about half this throughput and twice the resolving power.

  5. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vhiklinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the high energy universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing most, if not all, areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission now named the X-ray Surveyor. This concept study starts with a baseline payload consisting of a high resolution X-ray telescope and an instrument set which may include an X-ray calorimeter, a wide-field imager and a dispersive grating spectrometer and readout. The telescope would consist of highly nested thin shells, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development, including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and modern polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. In many areas, the mission requirements would be no more stringent than those of Chandra, and the study takes advantage of similar studies for other large area missions carried out over the past two decades. Initial assessments indicate that such an X-ray mission is scientifically compelling, technically feasible, and worthy of a high prioritization by the next American National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey for Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  6. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  7. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  8. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  10. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  11. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  12. Massively parallel X-ray holography

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John C.H; Marchesini, Stefano; Boutet, Sebastien; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Bogan, Michael J.; Bajt, Sasa; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Szöke, Abraham; Cui, Congwu; Shapiro, David A.; Howells, MAlcolm R.; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Lee, Joanna Y.; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, Marvin M.

    2008-08-01

    Advances in the development of free-electron lasers offer the realistic prospect of nanoscale imaging on the timescale of atomic motions. We identify X-ray Fourier-transform holography1,2,3 as a promising but, so far, inefficient scheme to do this. We show that a uniformly redundant array4 placed next to the sample, multiplies the efficiency of X-ray Fourier transform holography by more than three orders of magnitude, approaching that of a perfect lens, and provides holographic images with both amplitude- and phase-contrast information. The experiments reported here demonstrate this concept by imaging a nano-fabricated object at a synchrotron source, and a bacterial cell with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser, where illumination by a single 15-fs pulse was successfully used in producing the holographic image. As X-ray lasers move to shorter wavelengths we expect to obtain higher spatial resolution ultrafast movies of transient states of matter

  13. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  14. X-ray and extreme ultraviolet imaging using layered synthetic microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Barbee, T. W.; Shealy, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Up to now designers of X-ray optical instruments such as microscopes and telescopes have been compelled to use mirrors operating at small glancing angles. However, using vapor deposition techniques, it is now possible to build multilayered thin film structures in which the individual layers have thicknesses comparable with a wavelength of X-rays. These devices operate in a manner exactly analogous to multilayer dielectric coatings at visible wavelengths and can be used to increase the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet reflectivity of surfaces at large glancing angles. These X-ray mirrors have numerous potential applications in X-ray optics. Attention is given to X-ray images with a normal incidence mirror, and applications of multilayer optics. Single-mirror telescopes for solar/stellar astronomy are discussed, taking into account solar corona and transition region studies, and X-ray and extreme ultraviolet astronomy. Hybrid X-ray telescopes are also considered.

  15. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B. ); Trebes, J.E.; Balhorn, R.; Mrowka, S.; Barbee, T.W.Jr.; Brase, J.; Corzett, M.; Koch, J.A.; Lee, C.; London, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Stone, G. ); Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.T. ); Gray, J. ); Kern, D. )

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show {approximately}500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  16. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  17. X-Ray and Radio Studies of Black Hole X-Ray Transients During Outburst Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Black hole (BH) and black hole candidate (BHC) transients are X-ray binary systems that typically undergo bright outbursts that last a couple months with recurrence times of years to decades. For this ADP project, we are studying BH/BHC systems during the decaying phases of their outbursts using the Rossi X-ray Taming Explorer (RXTE), the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and multi-wavelength facilities. These systems usually undergo state transitions as they decay, and our observations are designed to catch the state transitions. The specific goals of this proposal include: 1. To determine the evolution of the characteristic frequencies present in the power spectrum (such as quasi-periodic oscillations, QPOs) during state transitions in order to place constraints on the accretion geometry; 2. To contemporaneously measure X-ray spectral and timing properties along with flux measurements in the radio band to determine the relationship between the accretion disk and radio jets; 3. To extend our studies of X-ray properties of BHCs to very low accretion rates using RXTE and Chandra. The work performed under this proposal has been highly successful, allowing the PI to lead, direct, or assist in the preparation of 7 related publications in refereed journals and 6 other conference presentations or reports. These items are listed below, and the abstracts for the refereed publications have also been included. Especially notable results include our detailed measurements of the characteristic frequencies and spectral parameters of BH/BHCs after the transition to the hard state (see All A3, and A5) and at low flux levels (see A4). Our measurements provide one of the strongest lines of evidence to date that the inner edge of the optically thick accretion disk gradually recedes from the black hole at low flux levels. In addition, we have succeeded in obtaining excellent multi-wavelength coverage of a BH system as its compact jet turned on (see Al). Our results show, somewhat

  18. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  19. Accretion and Outflows in X-ray Binaries: What's Really Going on During X-ray Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    X-ray binaries, consisting of a star and a stellar-mass black hole, are wonderful laboratories for studying accretion and outflows. They evolve on timescales quite accessible to us, unlike their supermassive cousins, and allow the possibility of gaining a deeper understanding of these two common astrophysical processes. Different wavelength regimes reveal different aspects of the systems: radio emission is largely generated by outflows and jets, X-ray emission by inner accretion flows, and optical/infrared (OIR) emission by the outer disk and companion star. The search for relationships between these different wavelengths is thus an area of active research, aiming to reveal deeper connections between accretion and outflows.Initial evidence for a strong, tight correlation between radio and X-ray emission has weakened as further observations and newly-discovered sources have been obtained. This has led to discussions of multiple tracks or clusters, or the possibility that no overall relation exists for the currently-known population of X-ray binaries. Our ability to distinguish among these options is hampered by a relative lack of observations at lower luminosities, and especially of truly X-ray quiescent (non-outbursting) systems. Although X-ray binaries spend the bulk of their existence in quiescence, few quiescent sources have been observed and multiple observations of individual sources are largely nonexistent. Here we discuss new observations of the lowest-luminosity quiescent X-ray binary, A0620-00, and the place this object occupies in investigations of the radio/X-ray plane. For the first time, we also incorporate simultaneous OIR data with the radio and X-ray data.In December 2013 we took simultaneous observations of A0620-00 in the X-ray (Chandra), the radio (EVLA), and the OIR (SMARTS 1.3m). These X-ray and radio data allowed us to investigate similarities among quiescent X-ray binaries, and changes over time for this individual object, in the radio/X-ray

  20. X rays generated in the interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Wahlin, E.K.; Fulton, R.D.; Schappert, G.T.; Jones, L.A.; Taylor, A.J.; Casperson, D.E.; Cobble, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the generation of short pulse short wavelength x-rays for pumping inner-shell x-ray lasers by photo-ionization. In contrast with previous proposals, we are looking at the use of a single line as an efficient means of pumping these lasers. As a first step we are optimizing the flashlamp x-ray conversion efficiency and characterizing the x-ray pulse length. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.