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Sample records for weakly coordinating solvents

  1. Silver(I) complexes of the weakly coordinating solvents SO(2) and CH(2)Cl(2): crystal structures, bonding, and energetics of [Ag(OSO)][Al{OC(CF(3))(3)}(4)], [Ag(OSO)(2/2)][SbF(6)], and [Ag(CH(2)Cl(2))(2)][SbF(6)].

    PubMed

    Decken, Andreas; Knapp, Carsten; Nikiforov, Grigori B; Passmore, Jack; Rautiainen, J Mikko; Wang, Xinping; Zeng, Xiaoqing

    2009-06-22

    Pushing the limits of coordination chemistry: The most weakly coordinated silver complexes of the very weakly coordinating solvents dichloromethane and liquid sulfur dioxide were prepared. Special techniques at low temperatures and the use of weakly coordinating anions allowed structural characterization of [Ag(OSO)][Al{OC(CF(3))(3)}(4)], [Ag(OSO)(2/2)][SbF(6)], and [Ag(Cl(2)CH(2))(2)][SbF(6)] (see figure). An investigation of the bonding shows that these complexes are mainly stabilized by electrostatic monopole-dipole interactions.The synthetically useful solvent-free silver(I) salt Ag[Al(pftb)(4)] (pftb=--OC(CF(3))(3)) was prepared by metathesis reaction of Li[Al(pftb)(4)] with Ag[SbF(6)] in liquid SO(2). The solvated complexes [Ag(OSO)][Al(pftb)(4)], [Ag(OSO)(2/2)][SbF(6)], and [Ag(CH(2)Cl(2))(2)][SbF(6)] were prepared and isolated by special techniques at low temperatures and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The SO(2) complexes provide the first examples of coordination of the very weak Lewis base SO(2) to silver(I). The SO(2) molecule in [Ag(OSO)][Al(pftb)(4)] is eta(1)-O coordinated to Ag(+), while the SO(2) ligands in [Ag(OSO)(2/2)][SbF(6)] bridge two Ag(+) ions in an eta(2)-O,O' (trans,trans) manner. [Ag(CH(2)Cl(2))(2)][SbF(6)] contains [Ag(CH(2)Cl(2))(2)](+) ions linked through [SbF(6)](-) ions to give a polymeric structure. The solid-state silver(I) ion affinities (SIA) of SO(2) and CH(2)Cl(2), based on bond lengths and corresponding valence units in the corresponding complexes and tensimetric titrations of Ag[Al(pftb)(4)] and Ag[SbF(6)] with SO(2) vapor, show that SO(2) is a weaker ligand to Ag(+) than the commonly used weakly coordinating solvent CH(2)Cl(2) and indicated that binding strength of SO(2) to silver(I) in the silver(I) salts increases with increasing size of the corresponding counteranion ([Al(pftb)(4)](-)>[SbF(6)](-)). The experimental findings are in good agreement with theoretical gas-phase ligand

  2. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2012-01-07

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  3. Solvent effects on 15N NMR coordination shifts.

    PubMed

    Kleinmaier, Roland; Arenz, Sven; Karim, Alavi; Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Erdélyi, Máté

    2013-01-01

    (15)N NMR chemical shift became a broadly utilized tool for characterization of complex structures and comparison of their properties. Despite the lack of systematic studies, the influence of solvent on the nitrogen coordination shift, Δ(15)N(coord), was hitherto claimed to be negligible. Herein, we report the dramatic impact of the local environment and in particular that of the interplay between solvent and substituents on Δ(15)N(coord). The comparative study of CDCl(3) and CD(3)CN solutions of silver(I)-bis(pyridine) and silver(I)-bis(pyridylethynyl)benzene complexes revealed the strong solvent dependence of their (15)N NMR chemical shift, with a solvent dependent variation of up to 40 ppm for one and the same complex. The primary influence of the effect of substituent and counter ion on the (15)N NMR chemical shifts is rationalized by corroborating Density-Functional Theory (nor discrete Fourier transform) calculations on the B3LYP/6-311 + G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Cooperative effects have to be taken into account for a comprehensive description of the coordination shift and thus the structure of silver complexes in solution. Our results demonstrate that interpretation of Δ(15)N(coord) in terms of coordination strength must always consider the solvent and counter ion. The comparable magnitude of Δ(15)N(coord) for reported transition metal complexes makes the principal findings most likely general for a broad scale of complexes of nitrogen donor ligands, which are in frequent use in modern organometallic chemistry.

  4. Reactive p-block cations stabilized by weakly coordinating anions

    PubMed Central

    Engesser, Tobias A.; Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Schleep, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry of the p-block elements is a huge playground for fundamental and applied work. With their bonding from electron deficient to hypercoordinate and formally hypervalent, the p-block elements represent an area to find terra incognita. Often, the formation of cations that contain p-block elements as central ingredient is desired, for example to make a compound more Lewis acidic for an application or simply to prove an idea. This review has collected the reactive p-block cations (rPBC) with a comprehensive focus on those that have been published since the year 2000, but including the milestones and key citations of earlier work. We include an overview on the weakly coordinating anions (WCAs) used to stabilize the rPBC and give an overview to WCA selection, ionization strategies for rPBC-formation and finally list the rPBC ordered in their respective group from 13 to 18. However, typical, often more organic ion classes that constitute for example ionic liquids (imidazolium, ammonium, etc.) were omitted, as were those that do not fulfill the – naturally subjective – “reactive”-criterion of the rPBC. As a rule, we only included rPBC with crystal structure and only rarely refer to important cations published without crystal structure. This collection is intended for those who are simply interested what has been done or what is possible, as well as those who seek advice on preparative issues, up to people having a certain application in mind, where the knowledge on the existence of a rPBC that might play a role as an intermediate or active center may be useful. PMID:26612538

  5. Weak coordination as a powerful means for developing broadly useful C-H functionalization reactions.

    PubMed

    Engle, Keary M; Mei, Tian-Sheng; Wasa, Masayuki; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2012-06-19

    the metal catalyst and position it for selective C-H cleavage. Precoordination can overcome the paraffin nature of C-H bonds by increasing the effective concentration of the substrate so that it need not be used as solvent. From a synthetic perspective, it is desirable to use a functional group that is an intrinsic part of the substrate so that extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group can be avoided. In this way, dramatic increases in molecular complexity can be accomplished in a single stroke through stereo- and site-selective introduction of a new functional group. Although reactivity is a major challenge (as with first functionalization), the philosophy in further functionalization differs; the major challenge is developing reactions that work with predictable selectivity in intricately functionalized contexts on commonly occurring structural motifs. In this Account, we focus on an emergent theme within the further functionalization literature: the use of commonly occurring functional groups to direct C-H cleavage through weak coordination. We discuss our motivation for studying Pd-catalyzed C-H functionalization assisted by weakly coordinating functional groups and chronicle our endeavors to bring reactions of this type to fruition. Through this approach, we have developed reactions with a diverse range of substrates and coupling partners, with the broad scope likely stemming from the high reactivity of the cyclopalladated intermediates, which are held together through weak interactions.

  6. COORDINATION COMPOUND-SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    A method is presented for the separation of uranium from aqueous solutions containing a uranyl salt and thorium. Thc separation is effected by adding to such solutions an organic complexing agent, and then contacting the solution with an organic solvent in which the organic complexing agent is soluble. By use of the proper complexing agent in the proper concentrations uranium will be complexed and subsequently removed in the organic solvent phase, while the thorium remains in the aqueous phase. Mentioned as suitable organic complexing agents are antipyrine, bromoantipyrine, and pyramidon.

  7. Photoinduced strong acid-weak base reactions in a polar aprotic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Min; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heesu; Gyum Kim, Taeg; Kwon, Oh-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    The excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of the strong photoacid, N-methyl-7-hydroxyquinolinium, was studied in the presence of different weak bases such as methanol, ethanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide in an aprotic solvent of acetonitrile. Here, we present chemical kinetics analysis of the ESPT mechanism to explain biphasic fluorescence decay of the parent photoacid and the sign reversal of the rise and decay of the resulting conjugate-base fluorescence. The ESPT of the free photoacid showed a molecularity of 2 with reacting alcohol molecules. In the ground state, it was found that a fraction of the photoacid formed 1 : 2 hydrogen-bonded complexes with the residual water present in the aprotic solvent or 1 : 1 complexes with the additive alcohols. In the excited state, these adducts underwent proton transfer when complexed further with diffusing alcohol molecules.

  8. Preparation of cadmium selenide colloidal quantum dots in non-coordinating solvent octadecene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazing, D. S.; Brovko, A. M.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly monodisperse cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized in non-coordinating solvent octadecene through phosphine-free method using oleic acid as surfactant. Selenium powder suspension in octadecene obtained by ultrasound processing was used as one of precursor solutions. Influence of multiple selenium precursor injections on nanocrystal growth process was investigated. Nanoparticles were characterized by means of absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies.

  9. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C-H amidation of arenes including weakly coordinating aromatic ketones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyu; Kim, Jinwoo; Chang, Sukbok

    2013-06-03

    C-H activation: The ruthenium-catalyzed direct sp(2) C-H amidation of arenes by using sulfonyl azides as the amino source is presented (see scheme). A wide range of substrates were readily amidated including arenes bearing weakly coordinating groups. Synthetic utility of the thus obtained products was demonstrated in the preparation of biologically active heterocycles.

  10. A multi-functional coordination polymer coexisting spontaneous chirality resolution and weak ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiu-Hua; Zhang, Qi; Hu, Ping

    2014-10-15

    A multifunctional homochiral coordination polymer, [Co(H{sub 2}O)(BDC)(4,4′-BPY)]∙3H{sub 2}O (1) (H{sub 2}BDC=1,2-benzenedicarboxylate and 4,4′-BPY=4,4′-bipyridine), has been successfully isolated from Co(II) ions and mixed ligands (1,2-benzenedicarboxylate and 4,4′-bipyridine). Complex 1, which exhibits spontaneous chirality resolution and weak ferromagnetism, is built by chiral helices interconnected via end-to-end 4,4′-BPY bridges into a two-dimensional (2D) layer structure. - Graphical abstract: A 2D cobalt coordination polymer compound showing spontaneous chirality resolution and weak ferromagnetism. - Highlights: • A new 2D cobalt mix-ligand coordination polymer complex has been synthesized. • The cobalt coordination polymer complex shows spontaneous chirality resolution in solid state. • The cobalt coordination polymer complex displays dominant and weak intrachain ferromagnetic interactions.

  11. Weakness

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of strength; Muscle weakness ... feel weak but have no real loss of strength. This is called subjective weakness. It may be ... flu. Or, you may have a loss of strength that can be noted on a physical exam. ...

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Weakly Coordinating Anions Based on tris-Perfluoro-tert-Butoxyborane.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Francis A; Decken, Andreas; Cameron, T Stanley; Passmore, Jack; Rautiainen, J Mikko; Whidden, Thomas K

    2017-01-17

    A convenient method for the preparation of strongly Lewis acidic tris-perfluoro-tert-butoxyborane B(OR(F))3 (1), (OR(F) = OC(CF3)3) was developed, and its X-ray structure was determined. 1 was used as a precursor, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and volume-based thermodynamics, for the synthesis of [NEt4][NCB(OR(F))3] (3) and [NMe4][FB(OR(F))3] (5) and the novel large and weakly coordinating anion salts [Li 15-Crown-5][B(OR(F))4] (2) and [NEt4][CN{B(OR(F))3}2] (4). The stability of [B(OR(F))4](-) was compared with that of some related known weakly coordinating anions by appropriate DFT calculations.

  13. Unusual Transformation from a Solvent-Stabilized 1D Coordination Polymer to a Metal-Organic Framework (MOF)-Like Cross-Linked 3D Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Beom; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kwon, O-Pil

    2015-10-26

    An unusual 1D-to-3D transformation of a coordination polymer based on organic linkers containing highly polar push-pull π-conjugated side chains is reported. The coordination polymers are synthesized from zinc nitrate and an organic linker, namely, 2,5-bis{4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]butoxy}terephthalic acid, which possesses highly polar (4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidine groups, with high dipole moments of about 7 D. The coordination polymers exhibit an unusual transformation from a soluble, solvent-stabilized 1D coordination polymer into an insoluble, metal-organic framework (MOF)-like 3D coordination polymer. The coordination polymer exhibits good film-forming ability, and the MOF-like films are insoluble in conventional organic solvents.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine dioxide photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooksby, Craig; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Reid, Philip J.

    2003-11-01

    The solvation dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in different solvents are investigated by classical molecular dynamics. Following previous work on the aqueous response to OClO photoexcitation [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 4563 (2003)], the present study considers the response of chloroform and cyclohexane; these three liquids present unique solvent environments that differ significantly in both polarity and structure. The study is designed to ascertain the origin of the solvent-invariant homogeneous linewidth associated with OClO photoexcitation and to confirm, at the molecular level, whether the relaxation dynamics are similar across dissimilar solvents due to chance or a common relaxation origin. The results obtained here are used to predict the time scale of solvent-induced optical dephasing, and excellent agreement with experiment is observed for all solvents. Analysis demonstrates that the solvation dynamics of OClO are dominated by short-ranged mechanical solute-solvent interactions regardless of the identity and electrostatic properties of the solvent. Low-frequency translational motions dominate the coupling spectrum, and virtually no contribution to energy gap relaxation is achieved through intramolecular solvent motions. The invariant homogeneous linewidth is attributed to the similarity in the primary response of all solvents to OClO photoexcitation.

  15. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalizations Directed by Distal Weakly Coordinating Functional Groups

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wan, Li; Zhang, Guofu; Leow, Dasheng; Spangler, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Ortho-C(sp2)–H olefination and acetoxylation of broadly useful synthetic building blocks phenylacetyl Weinreb amides, esters, and ketones are developed without installing an additional directing group. The interplay between the distal weak coordination and the ligand-acceleration is crucial for these reactions to proceed under mild conditions. The tolerance of longer distance between the target C–H bonds and the directing functional groups also allows for the functionalizations of more distal C–H bonds in hydrocinnamoyl ketones, Weinreb amides and biphenyl Weinreb amides. Mechanistically, the coordination of these carbonyl groups and the bisdentate amino acid ligand with Pd(II) centers provides further evidence for our early hypothesis that the carbonyl groups of the potassium carboxylate is responsible for the directed C–H activation of carboxylic acids. PMID:25768039

  16. Four unexpected lanthanide coordination polymers involving in situ reaction of solvent N, N-Dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jun-Cheng; Tong, Wen-Quan; Fu, Ai-Yun; Xie, Cheng-Gen; Chang, Wen-Gui; Wu, Ju; Xu, Guang-Nian; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Jun; Li, Yong; Yang, Peng-Qi

    2015-05-15

    Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of DMF solvent under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2{sub 1} helical chains. While the Nd(III) ions are bridged through μ{sub 2}-HIDC{sup 2−} and oxalate to form a 2D sheet along the bc plane without helical character in 4. Therefore, complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of solvent DMF to formate acid or oxalic acid under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of different 2{sub 1} helical chains in the 2D layer and 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon UV radiation. - Highlights: • Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination compounds have been synthesized through in situ reactions under solvothermal conditions. • The complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2{sub 1} helical chains in the layer. • Complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature.

  17. Importance of the C-H...N weak hydrogen bonding on the coordination structures of manganese(III) porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ikezaki, Akira; Nakamura, Mikio

    2003-04-07

    The reactions between Mn(Por)Cl and Bu(4)N(+)CN(-) have been examined in various solvents by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, where Por's are dianions of meso-tetraisopropylporphyrin (T(i)PrP), meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), meso-tetrakis(p-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)porphyrin (p-CF(3)-TPP), meso-tetramesitylporphyrin (TMP), and meso-tetrakis(2,6-dichlorophenyl)porphyrin (2,6-Cl(2)-TPP). Population ratios of the reaction products, Mn(Por)(CN) and [Mn(Por)(CN)(2)](-), have been sensitively affected by the solvents used. In the case of Mn(T(i)PrP)Cl, the following results are obtained: (i) The bis-adduct is preferentially formed in dipolar aprotic solvents such as DMSO, DMF, and acetonitrile. (ii) Both the mono- and bis-adduct are formed in the less polar solvents such as CH(2)Cl(2) and benzene though the complete conversion to the bis-adduct is achieved with much smaller amount of the ligand in benzene solution. (iii) Only the mono-adduct is formed in CHCl(3) solution even in the presence of a large excess of cyanide. (iv) Neither the mono- nor the bis-adduct is obtained in methanol solution. The results mentioned above have been explained in terms of the C-H.N and O-H.N hydrogen bonding in chloroform and methanol solutions, respectively, between the solvent molecules and cyanide ligand; hydrogen bonding weakens the coordination ability of cyanide and reduces the population of the bis-adduct. The importance of the C-H.N weak hydrogen bonding is most explicitly shown in the following fact: while the starting complex is completely converted to the bis-adduct in CH(2)Cl(2) solution, the conversion from the mono- to the bis-adduct is not observed even in the presence of 7000 equiv of Bu(4)N(+)CN(-) in CHCl(3) solution. The effective magnetic moments of the bis-adduct has been determined by the Evans method to be 3.2 micro(B) at 25 degrees C, suggesting that the complex adopts the usual (d(xy))(2)(d(xz), d(yz))(2) electron configuration despite the highly ruffled

  18. Weak coordination between leaf structure and function among closely related tomato species.

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D; Conesa, Miquel À; Roldán, Emilio J; Molins, Arántzazu; Galmés, Jeroni

    2017-03-01

    Theory predicts that natural selection should favor coordination between leaf physiology, biochemistry and anatomical structure along a functional trait spectrum from fast, resource-acquisitive syndromes to slow, resource-conservative syndromes. However, the coordination hypothesis has rarely been tested at a phylogenetic scale most relevant for understanding rapid adaptation in the recent past or for the prediction of evolutionary trajectories in response to climate change. We used a common garden to examine genetically based coordination between leaf traits across 19 wild and cultivated tomato taxa. We found weak integration between leaf structure (e.g. leaf mass per area) and physiological function (photosynthetic rate, biochemical capacity and CO2 diffusion), even though all were arrayed in the predicted direction along a 'fast-slow' spectrum. This suggests considerable scope for unique trait combinations to evolve in response to new environments or in crop breeding. In particular, we found that partially independent variation in stomatal and mesophyll conductance may allow a plant to improve water-use efficiency without necessarily sacrificing maximum photosynthetic rates. Our study does not imply that functional trait spectra, such as the leaf economics spectrum, are unimportant, but that many important axes of variation within a taxonomic group may be unique and not generalizable to other taxa.

  19. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Magnesium Based Coordination Networks in Different Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Debasis; Finkelstein, Jeffrey; Smirnov, A.; Forster, Paul M.; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Teat, Simon J.; Parise, John B.

    2015-10-15

    Three magnesium based metal-organic frameworks, Mg{sub 3}(3,5-PDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3} {center_dot} DMF [1], Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O) {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) [3], and Mg4(3,5-PDC)4(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} {center_dot} 2DMF {center_dot} 4.5H{sub 2}O [4], and a 2-D coordination polymer, [Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] [2] [PDC = pyridinedicarboxylate], were synthesized using a combination of DMF, methanol, ethanol, and water. Compound 1 [space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 12.3475(5) {angstrom}, b = 11.1929(5) {angstrom}, c = 28.6734(12) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.8160(10){sup o}, V = 3916.0(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}] consists of a combination of isolated and corner-sharing magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linkers to form a 3-D network with a 12.2 {angstrom} x 4.6 {angstrom} 1-D channel. The channel contains coordinated and free DMF molecules. In compound 2 [space group C2/c, a = 9.964(5) {angstrom}, b = 12.0694(6) {angstrom}, c = 7.2763(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 106.4970(6){sup o}, V = 836.70(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}], PDC connects isolated seven coordinated magnesium polyhedra into a layered structure. Compound 3 [space group P6{sub 1}22, a = 11.479(1) {angstrom}, c = 14.735(3) {angstrom}, V = 1681.7(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}] (previously reported) contains isolated magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linker with each other forming a 3D network. Compound 4 [space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 13.7442(14) {angstrom}, b = 14.2887(15) {angstrom}, c = 14.1178(14) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.912(2){sup o}, V = 2679.2(5) {angstrom}{sup 3}] also exhibits a 3D network based on isolated magnesium octahedra with square cavities containing both disordered DMF and water molecules. The structural topologies originate due to the variable coordination ability of solvent molecules with the metal center. Water molecules coordinate with the magnesium metal centers preferably over other polar solvents (DMF, methanol, ethanol) used to synthesize the coordination networks. Despite testing

  20. Solvent exfoliation of transition metal dichalcogenides: dispersibility of exfoliated nanosheets varies only weakly between compounds.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Graeme; Lotya, Mustafa; Cucinotta, Clotilde S; Sanvito, Stefano; Bergin, Shane D; Menzel, Robert; Shaffer, Milo S P; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2012-04-24

    We have studied the dispersion and exfoliation of four inorganic layered compounds, WS(2), MoS(2), MoSe(2), and MoTe(2), in a range of organic solvents. The aim was to explore the relationship between the chemical structure of the exfoliated nanosheets and their dispersibility. Sonication of the layered compounds in solvents generally gave few-layer nanosheets with lateral dimensions of a few hundred nanometers. However, the dispersed concentration varied greatly from solvent to solvent. For all four materials, the concentration peaked for solvents with surface energy close to 70 mJ/m(2), implying that all four have surface energy close to this value. Inverse gas chromatography measurements showed MoS(2) and MoSe(2) to have surface energies of ∼75 mJ/m(2), in good agreement with dispersibility measurements. However, this method suggested MoTe(2) to have a considerably larger surface energy (∼120 mJ/m(2)). While surface-energy-based solubility parameters are perhaps more intuitive for two-dimensional materials, Hansen solubility parameters are probably more useful. Our analysis shows the dispersed concentration of all four layered materials to show well-defined peaks when plotted as a function of Hansen's dispersive, polar, and H-bonding solubility parameters. This suggests that we can associate Hansen solubility parameters of δ(D) ∼ 18 MPa(1/2), δ(P) ∼ 8.5 MPa(1/2), and δ(H) ∼ 7 MPa(1/2) with all four types of layered material. Knowledge of these properties allows the estimation of the Flory-Huggins parameter, χ, for each combination of nanosheet and solvent. We found that the dispersed concentration of each material falls exponentially with χ as predicted by solution thermodynamics. This work shows that solution thermodynamics and specifically solubility parameter analysis can be used as a framework to understand the dispersion of two-dimensional materials. Finally, we note that in good solvents, such as cyclohexylpyrrolidone, the dispersions are

  1. Solvent induced synthesis, structure and properties of coordination polymers based on 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid as linker and 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Kariem, Mukaddus; Yawer, Mohd; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz

    2015-11-15

    Three new coordination polymers [Mn(hip)(phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1), [Co(hip)(phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [Cd(hip) (phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (3) (H{sub 2}hip=5-hydroxyisophthalic acid; phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal method using diethyl formamide-water (DEF-H{sub 2}O) as solvent system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all three coordination polymers 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space group P2/n. Metal ions are inter-connected by hydroxyisophthalate anions forming zig-zag 1D chain. 1D chains are further inter-connected by hydrogen bonding and π–π stacking interactions leading to 3D supramolecular architecture. Hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking provide thermal stability to polymers. Compounds 1 and 2 are paramagnetic at room temperature and variable temperature magnetic moment measurements revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions between metal ions at low temperature. Compound 3 exhibits excellent photoluminescence with large Stokes shift. - Graphical abstract: 1D helical chains of coordination polymers were synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal reaction of 5-hydroxyisopthalic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline with MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O / CoCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O / Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • Solvent induced synthesis of three coordination polymers with 1D zig-zag structure. • Crystal structures of coordination polymers are reported and discussed. • 1,10-Phenanthroline influences magnetic and luminescent properties of polymers. • Coordination polymer of Cd is luminescent exhibiting large Stokes shift.

  2. From achiral ligands to chiral coordination polymers: spontaneous resolution, weak ferromagnetism, and topological ferrimagnetism.

    PubMed

    Gao, En-Qing; Yue, Yan-Feng; Bai, Shi-Qiang; He, Zheng; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2004-02-11

    Using the achiral diazine ligands bearing two bidentate pyridylimino groups as sources of conformational chirality, five azido-bridged coordination polymers are prepared and characterized crystallographically and magnetically. The chirality of the molecular units is induced by the coordination of the diazine ligands in a twisted chiral conformation. The use of L(1) (1,4-bis(2-pyridyl)-1-amino-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene) and L(2) (1,4-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,4-diamino-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene) induces spontaneous resolution, yielding conglomerates of chiral compounds [Mn(3)(L(1))(2)(N(3))(6)](n) (1) and [Mn(2)(L(2))(2)(N(3))(3)](n)(ClO(4))(n).nH(2)O (2), respectively, where triangular (1) or double helical (2) chiral units are connected into homochiral one-dimensional (1D) chains via single end-to-end (EE) azido bridges. The chains are stacked via hydrogen bonds in a homochiral fashion to yield chiral crystals. When L(3) (2,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene) is employed, a partial spontaneous resolution occurs, where binuclear chiral units are interlinked into fish-scale-like homochiral two-dimensional (2D) layers via single EE azido bridges. The layers are stacked in a heterochiral or homochiral fashion to yield simultaneously a racemic compound, [Mn(2)(L(3))(N(3))(4)](n) (3a), and a conglomerate, [Mn(2)(L(3))(N(3))(4)](n).nMeOH (3b). On the other hand, the ligand without amino and methyl substituents (L(4), 1,4-bis(2-pyridyl)-2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene) does not induce spontaneous resolution. The resulting compound, [Mn(2)(L(4))(N(3))(4)](n) (4), consists of centrosymmetric 2D layers with alternating single diazine, single EE azido, and double end-on (EO) azido bridges, where the chirality is destroyed by the centrosymmetric double EO bridges. These compounds exhibit very different magnetic behaviors. In particular, 1 behaves as a metamagnet built of homometallic ferrimagnetic chains with a unique "fused-triangles" topology, 2 behaves as a 1D antiferromagnet with

  3. Anti-kindling Induced by Two-Stage Coordinated Reset Stimulation with Weak Onset Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal synchrony plays an important role in a number of brain diseases. To specifically counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization, Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation, a spatiotemporally patterned stimulation technique, was designed with computational means. In neuronal networks with spike timing–dependent plasticity CR stimulation causes a decrease of synaptic weights and finally anti-kindling, i.e., unlearning of abnormally strong synaptic connectivity and abnormal neuronal synchrony. Long-lasting desynchronizing aftereffects of CR stimulation have been verified in pre-clinical and clinical proof of concept studies. In general, for different neuromodulation approaches, both invasive and non-invasive, it is desirable to enable effective stimulation at reduced stimulation intensities, thereby avoiding side effects. For the first time, we here present a two-stage CR stimulation protocol, where two qualitatively different types of CR stimulation are delivered one after another, and the first stage comes at a particularly weak stimulation intensity. Numerical simulations show that a two-stage CR stimulation can induce the same degree of anti-kindling as a single-stage CR stimulation with intermediate stimulation intensity. This stimulation approach might be clinically beneficial in patients suffering from brain diseases characterized by abnormal neuronal synchrony where a first treatment stage should be performed at particularly weak stimulation intensities in order to avoid side effects. This might, e.g., be relevant in the context of acoustic CR stimulation in tinnitus patients with hyperacusis or in the case of electrical deep brain CR stimulation with sub-optimally positioned leads or side effects caused by stimulation of the target itself. We discuss how to apply our method in first in man and proof of concept studies. PMID:27242500

  4. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across 41 Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life-forms. However, recent reports suggest that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. Methods To examine this possi...

  5. Free energies for the coordination of ligands to the magnesium of chlorophyll-a in solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Rika; Reimers, Jeffrey R.

    2015-07-01

    The coordination of bases to chlorophyll magnesium modifies spectroscopic properties in solution as well as in situ in reaction centres. We evaluate the free energies of complexation of one or two pyridine, 1-propanol, diethyl ether or water solvent molecules at 298 and 150 K to rationalise observed phenomena. Various a priori dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations are performed as well as second-order Møller-Plesset calculations, focusing on the effects of dispersion modifying the intermolecular interactions, of dispersion modifying solvation energies, of entropy, and of basis-set superposition error. A process of particular interest is magnesium complexation in ether at low temperature that is often exploited to assign the Q-band visible absorption spectrum of chlorophyll. Recently, we demonstrated that trace water interferes with this process, but the nature of the resulting complex could not be uniquely determined; here, it is identified as ether.Chlorophyll-a.H2O, consistent with interpretations based on our authoritative 2013 assignment.

  6. Collective solvent coordinates for the infrared spectrum of HOD in D2O based on an ab initio electrostatic map.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; la Cour Jansen, Thomas; Zhuang, Wei; Mukamel, Shaul

    2005-01-13

    An ab initio MP2 vibrational Hamiltonian of HOD in an external electrostatic potential parametrized by the electric field and its gradient-tensor is constructed. By combining it with the fluctuating electric field induced by the D(2)O solvent obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the infrared absorption of the O-H stretch. The resulting solvent shift and infrared line shape for three force fields (TIP4P, SPC/E, and SW) are in good agreement with the experiment. A collective coordinate response for the solvent effect is constructed by identifying the main electrostatic field and gradient components contributing to the line shape. This allows a realistic stochastic Liouville equation simulation of the line shapes which is not restricted to Gaussian frequency fluctuations.

  7. Coordination conversion of cobalt(II) in binary aqueous-organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Khvostova, N.O.; Karapetyan, G.O.; Yanush, O.V.

    1985-11-01

    It has been shown that the thermochromic conversions of cobalt(II) in binary solvents are influenced by a number of factors: the nature of the solvent, the strength of the complexes of octahedral symmetry formed, the outer-sphere influence of the solvent on the complexes, the form of the anion, the solvation of the participants in the reaction, and the interaction of the components of the solvent with one another. A correlation between the strength and the spectral position of the absorption bands of the complexes of the activator has been established, and a spectroscopic criterion for selecting the solvents has been proposed. The expediency of using binary solvents to create effective thermochromic media with variable phototransmission has been substantiated.

  8. Solvent induced rapid modulation of micro/nano structures of metal carboxylates coordination polymers: mechanism and morphology dependent magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Shen, Zhu-Rui; Li, Yue; Han, Song-De; Hu, Tong-Liang; Zhang, Da-Shuai; Bu, Xian-He; Ruan, Wen-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Rational modulation of morphology is very important for functional coordination polymers (CPs) micro/nanostructures, and new strategies are still desired to achieve this challenging target. Herein, organic solvents have been established as the capping agents for rapid modulating the growth of metal-carboxylates CPs in organic solvent/water mixtures at ambient conditions. Co-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (pydc) CPs was studied here as the example. During the reaction, the organic solvents exhibited three types of modulation effect: anisotropic growth, anisotropic growth/formation of new crystalline phase and the formation of new crystalline phase solely, which was due to the variation of their binding ability with metal cations. The following study revealed that the binding ability was critically affected by their functional groups and molecular size. Moreover, their modulation effect could be finely tuned by changing volume ratios of solvent mixtures. Furthermore, they could be applied for modulating other metal-carboxylates CPs: Co-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic (BTC), Zn-pydc and Eu-pydc etc. Additionally, the as-prepared Co-pydc CPs showed a fascinating morphology-dependent antiferromagnetic behavior. PMID:25113225

  9. The facile preparation of weakly coordinating anions: structure and characterisation of silverpolyfluoroalkoxyaluminates AgAl(ORF)4, calculation of the alkoxide ion affinity.

    PubMed

    Krossing, I

    2001-01-19

    Purified LiAlH4 reacts with fluorinated alcohols HORF to give LiAl(ORF)4 (RF=-CH(CF3)2, 2a; -C(CH3)(CF3)2, 2b; -C(CF3)3, 2c) in 77 to 90% yield. The crude lithium aluminates LiAl(ORF)4 react metathetically with AgF to give the silver aluminates AgAl(ORF)4 (RF=-CH(CF3)2, 3a; -C(CH3)(CF3)2, 3b; -C(CF3)3, 3c) in almost quantitative yield. The solid-state structures of solvated 3a-c showed that the silver cation is only weakly coordinated (CN(Ag)=6-10; CN = coordination number) by the solvent and/or weak cation - anion contacts Ag-X (X=O, F, Cl, C). The strength of the Ag-X contacts of 3a-c was analysed by Brown's bond-valence method and then compared with other silver salts of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), for example [CB11H6Cl6]- and [M(OTeF5)n]- (M=B, Sb, n=4, 6). Based on this quantitative picture we showed that the Al[OC(CF3)3]4 anion is one of the most weakly coordinating anions known. Moreover, the AgAl(ORF)4 species are certainly the easiest WCAs to access preparatively (20 g in two days), additionally at low cost. The Al-O bond length of Al(ORF)4- is shortest in the sterically congested Al[OC(CF3)3]4- anion-which is stable in H2O and aqueous HNO3 (35 weight%)--and indicates a strong and highly polar Al-O bond that is resistant towards heterolytic alkoxide ion abstraction. This observation was supported by a series of HF-DFT calculations of OR-, Al(OR)3 and Al(OR)4- at the MPW1PW91 and B3LYP levels (R= CH3, CF3, C(CF3)3). The alkoxide ion affinity (AIA) is highest for R=CF3 (AlA=384 +/- 9 kJ x mol(-1)) and R= C(CF3)3 (AIA=390 +/- 3 kJ x mol(-1)), but lowest for R=CH3 (AIA=363 +/- 7 kJ X mol(-1)). The gaseous AL(ORF)4-anions are stable against the action of the strong Lewis acid ALF3(g) by 88.5 +/- 2.5 (RF=CF3) and 63 +/- 12 kJ X mol(-1) (RF=C(CF3)3), while AL(OCH3)4- decomposes with -91 +/- 2 kJ X mol(-1). Therefore the presented fluorinated aluminates AL(ORF)4- appear to be ideal candidates when large and resistant WCAs are needed, for example, in

  10. Computational, electrochemical, and spectroscopic studies of two mononuclear cobaloximes: the influence of an axial pyridine and solvent on the redox behaviour and evidence for pyridine coordination to cobalt(i) and cobalt(ii) metal centres.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark A W; Celestine, Michael J; Artis, Edward T; Joseph, Lorne S; Esquivel, Deisy L; Ledbetter, Abram J; Cropek, Donald M; Jarrett, William L; Bayse, Craig A; Brewer, Matthew I; Holder, Alvin A

    2016-06-21

    [Co(dmgBF2)2(H2O)2] (where dmgBF2 = difluoroboryldimethylglyoximato) was used to synthesize [Co(dmgBF2)2(H2O)(py)]·0.5(CH3)2CO (where py = pyridine) in acetone. The formulation of complex was confirmed by elemental analysis, high resolution MS, and various spectroscopic techniques. The complex [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)(py)] (where solv = solvent) was readily formed in situ upon the addition of pyridine to complex . A spectrophotometric titration involving complex and pyridine proved the formation of such a species, with formation constants, log K = 5.5, 5.1, 5.0, 4.4, and 3.1 in 2-butanone, dichloromethane, acetone, 1,2-difluorobenzene/acetone (4 : 1, v/v), and acetonitrile, respectively, at 20 °C. In strongly coordinating solvents, such as acetonitrile, the lower magnitude of K along with cyclic voltammetry, NMR, and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements indicated extensive dissociation of the axial pyridine. In strongly coordinating solvents, [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)(py)] can only be distinguished from [Co(dmgBF2)2(solv)2] upon addition of an excess of pyridine, however, in weakly coordinating solvents the distinctions were apparent without the need for excess pyridine. The coordination of pyridine to the cobalt(ii) centre diminished the peak current at the Epc value of the Co(I/0) redox couple, which was indicative of the relative position of the reaction equilibrium. Herein we report the first experimental and theoretical (59)Co NMR spectroscopic data for the formation of Co(i) species of reduced cobaloximes in the presence and absence of py (and its derivatives) in CD3CN. From spectroelectrochemical studies, it was found that pyridine coordination to a cobalt(i) metal centre is more favourable than coordination to a cobalt(ii) metal centre as evident by the larger formation constant, log K = 4.6 versus 3.1, respectively, in acetonitrile at 20 °C. The electrosynthesis of hydrogen by complexes and in various solvents demonstrated the dramatic effects of the axial

  11. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Sean M; Blackman, Chris J; Chang, Yvonne; Cook, Alicia M; Laws, Claire A; Westoby, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life forms. However, it has also been suggested that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. We examined coordination between hydraulic, leaf vein, and gas-exchange traits across a diverse group of 35 evergreen Australian angiosperms, spanning a large range in leaf structure and habitat. Leaf-specific conductance was calculated from petiole vessel anatomy and was also measured directly using the rehydration technique. Leaf vein density (thought to be a determinant of gas exchange rate), maximal stomatal conductance, and net CO 2 assimilation rate were also measured for most species (n = 19-35). Vein density was not correlated with leaf-specific conductance (either calculated or measured), stomatal conductance, nor maximal net CO 2 assimilation, with r (2) values ranging from 0.00 to 0.11, P values from 0.909 to 0.102, and n values from 19 to 35 in all cases. Leaf-specific conductance calculated from petiole anatomy was weakly correlated with maximal stomatal conductance (r (2) = 0.16; P = 0.022; n = 32), whereas the direct measurement of leaf-specific conductance was weakly correlated with net maximal CO 2 assimilation (r (2) = 0.21; P = 0.005; n = 35). Calculated leaf-specific conductance, xylem ultrastructure, and leaf vein density do not appear to be reliable proxy traits for assessing differences in rates of gas exchange or growth across diverse sets of evergreen angiosperms.

  12. Solvent-regulated assemblies of four Zn(II) coordination polymers constructed by flexible tetracarboxylates and pyridyl ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kang; He, Xiang; Shao, Min; Li, Ming-Xing

    2016-08-01

    Four unique complexes with diverse coordination architectures were synthesized upon complexation of 5,5-(1,4-phenylenebis (methylene))bis (oxy)- diisophthalic acid (H4L) with zinc ions by using different solvent. namely, {[Zn(H2L) (bpp)]·DEF}n (1), {[Zn2(L) (bpp)2]·4H2O}n (2), {[Zn2(L) (pdp)2]·3H2O·DEF}n (3), {[Zn2(L) (pdp)2].4H2O}n (4). Complexes 1,2 and 3,4 are obtained by varying solvents to control their structures. The size of solvent molecular plays an important role to control different structure of these compounds. Compound 1 is 2D waved framework with (4, 4) grid layer as sql topology. Compound 3 displays a (4,6)-connected 2-nodal net with a fsc topology. Compounds 2 and 4 are all three-dimensional network simplified as (4,4)-connected 2-nodal net with a bbf topology. The photochemical properties of compounds 1-4 were tested in the solid state at room temperature, owing to their strong luminescent emissions, complexes 1-4 are good candidates for photoactive materials.

  13. Assembly of 4-, 6- and 8-connected Cd(II) pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers: Synthesis, solvent-dependent structural variation and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Hao; Xue, Li-Ping; Miao, Shao-Bin; Zhao, Bang-Tun

    2016-08-15

    The reaction of Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O, 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) and 1,2-bis(imidazol-1′-yl)methane (bimm) by modulating solvent systems yielded three highly connected pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers based on different dinuclear [Cd{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}] subunits bridged by carboxylate groups. Single crystal structural analyses reveal structural variation from 4-connected 2D sql layer, 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrated 3D pcu to 8-connected 3D bcu-type network in compounds 1–3. The structural dissimilarity in the structures dependent on the coordination environments of Cd(II) ions and linking modes of mixed ligand influenced by different solvent systems during the synthesis process. Moreover, thermogravimetric and photoluminescence behaviors of 1–3 were also investigated for the first time, and all the complexes emit blue luminescence in the solid state. - Graphical abstract: Key Topic. Different solvent systems modulated three Cd(II) pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers based on thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and 1,2-bis(imidazol-1′-yl)methane mixed ligands. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three solvent-dependent Cd(II) pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers have been synthesized. • Structural variation from 4-connected 2D layer, 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrated 3D net to 8-connected 3D net. • All complexes emit blue luminescence.

  14. The investigation of the solvent effect on coordination of nicotinato ligand with cobalt(II) complex containing tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, Koray; Karakaş, Duran

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion are optimized by using density functional theory (DFT) method with mix basis set. Where (ntb) represents tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine ligand and (nic) is the anion of nicotinic acids. Six different fields, vacuum, chloroform, butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents are used in these calculations. The calculated structural parameters indicate that (nic) ligand coordinates to cobalt(II) containing (ntb) ligand with one oxygen atom in butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents but coordinates with two oxygen atoms in vacuum. These results are supported with IR, UV and 1H NMR spectra. According to the calculated results, the geometry of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion is distorted octahedral in vacuum while the geometry is distorted square pyramidal in the all other solvents. Distorted octahedral [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion have not been synthesized as experimentally and it is predicted with computational chemistry methods.

  15. Insertion of functional groups into a Nd3+ metal-organic framework via single-crystal-to-single-crystal coordinating solvent exchange.

    PubMed

    Manos, Manolis J; Kyprianidou, Eleni J; Papaefstathiou, Giannis S; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2012-06-04

    Single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformations represent some of the most fascinating phenomena in chemistry. They are not only intriguing from a basic science point of view but also provide a means to modify or tune the properties of the materials via the postsynthetic introduction of suitable guest molecules or organic functional groups into their structures. Here, we describe UCY-2, a new flexible Nd(3+) metal-organic framework (MOF), which exhibits a unique capability to undergo a plethora of SCSC transformations with some of them being very uncommon. These structural alterations involve the replacement of coordinating solvent molecules of UCY-2 by terminally ligating solvents and organic ligands with multiple functional groups including -OH, -SH, -NH-, and -NH(2) or their combinations, chelating ligands, anions, and two different organic compounds. The SCSC coordinating solvent exchange is thus demonstrated as a powerful method for the functionalization of MOFs.

  16. A versatile solvent-free mechanochemical route to the synthesis of heterometallic dicyanoaurate-based coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Jobbágy, Csaba; Tunyogi, Tünde; Pálinkás, Gábor; Deák, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    The solid-state mechanochemical method was proved to be a fast, simple, and efficient route to the synthesis of heterometallic [Au(CN)(2)]-based coordination polymers. Thus, a series of mixed-metal complexes, such as KCo[Au(CN)(2)](3), KNi[Au(CN)(2)](3), Cu(H(2)O)(2)[Au(CN)(2)](2), and Zn[Au(CN)(2)](2), was obtained by grinding stoichiometric amounts of K[Au(CN)(2)] and transition metal(II) chlorides. This solid-state method rapidly yields pure dicyanoaurate-based compounds, also in cases when the aqueous solution synthesis leads to an unseparable mixture of products. In addition, in some cases, the solid state reaction was faster than the corresponding solvent-based reaction. This mechanochemical method can be applied also to main group metals to obtain various cyanoaurate-based heterometallic coordination polymers, such as Me(2)Sn[Au(CN)(2)](2) and Ph(3)Sn[Au(CN)(2)]. For the 2:1 mixture of K[Au(CN)(2)] and Me(2)SnCl(2), the dramatic enhancement of the reaction rate by the presence of a minor amount of water was noticed. In Ph(3)Sn[Au(CN)(2)], as was revealed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, each Ph(3)Sn unit is linked to two others by two Au(CN)(2) bridges via Sn-N bonds to form an infinite cyanide-bridged chain. There are no Au···Au contacts between the chains due to the sterical hindrance of the phenyl groups. A dehydrated blue Co[Au(CN)(2)](2) complex was obtained during grinding or heating of the moderate-pink Co(H(2)O)(2)[Au(CN)(2)](2) complex. This complex displays a vapochromic response when exposed to a variety of organic solvents, as well as water and ammonia vapors.

  17. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed C-H activation/alkyne annulation by weak coordination with O2 as the sole oxidant.

    PubMed

    Warratz, Svenja; Kornhaaß, Christoph; Cajaraville, Ana; Niepötter, Benedikt; Stalke, Dietmar; Ackermann, Lutz

    2015-04-27

    Aerobic oxidative CH functionalizations of weakly coordinating benzoic acids have been accomplished with versatile ruthenium(II) biscarboxylates under ambient oxygen or air. Mechanistic studies identified the key factors controlling the elementary step of the oxidation of the ruthenium(0) complex.

  18. Effect of Solvent Molecule in Pore for Flexible Porous Coordination Polymer upon Gas Adsorption and Iodine Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Arıcı, Mürsel; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Taş, Murat; Demiral, Hakan

    2015-12-07

    Four new Zn(II)-coordination polymers, namely, [Zn2(μ6-ao2btc)(μ-obix)2]n (1), [Zn2(μ4-ao2btc)(μ-obix)2]n (2), [Zn2(μ4-ao2btc)(μ-mbix)2]n (3), and {[Zn2(μ4-ao2btc)(μ-pbix)2] · 2DMF · 8H2O}n (4), where ao2btc = dioxygenated form of 3,3',5,5'-azobenzenetetracarboxylate and obix, mbix, and pbix = 1,2-, 1,3-, and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene, have been synthesized with azobenzenetetracarboxylic acid and isomeric bis(imidazole) ligands and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal analyses. X-ray results showed that 1, 2, and 4 had two-dimensional structures with 3,4L13 topology, while 3 was a three-dimensional coordination polymer with bbf topology. For 4, two types of activation strategies, solvent exchange + heating (which produced 4a) and direct heating (which produced 4b), were used to investigate the effect of a guest molecule in a flexible framework. Gas adsorption and iodine encapsulation properties of activated complexes were studied. The CO2 uptake capacities for 4a and 4b were 3.62% and 9.50%, respectively, and Langmuir surface areas calculated from CO2 isotherms were 167.4 and 350.7 m(2)/g, respectively. Moreover, 4b exhibited 19.65% and 15.27% iodine uptake in vapor phase and cyclohexane solution, respectively, which corresponded to 1.47 and 0.97 molecules of iodine/formula unit, respectively. Moreover, photoluminescence properties of the complexes were studied.

  19. Electric conductance of dispersions of metal oxides in solutions of weak acids in mixed dioxane-water solvents.

    PubMed

    Kosmulski, Marek; Mączka, Edward

    2012-08-15

    The electric conductance of solutions of sulfuric, oxalic, benzoic, and salicylic acid (up to 0.02 M) in dioxane-water mixed solvents (90% and 93% dioxane by mass) has been studied in the presence and absence of TiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) (0.5-5% by mass). TiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) enhanced the conductance of solutions of organic acids in aqueous dioxane. The conductance is interpreted in terms of adsorption of acid in molecular form, dissolution of ceramic oxides in form of anionic complexes, and leaching of acidic impurities from ceramic oxides.

  20. Part I. Student success in intensive versus traditional introductory chemistry courses. Part II. Synthesis of salts of the weakly coordinating trisphat anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Mildred V.

    Part I. Intensive courses have been shown to be associated with equal or greater student success than traditional-length courses in a wide variety of disciplines and education levels. Student records from intensive and traditional-length introductory general chemistry courses were analyzed to determine the effects, of the course format, the level of academic experience, life experience (age), GPA, academic major and gender on student success in the course. Pretest scores, GPA and ACT composite scores were used as measures of academic ability and prior knowledge; t-tests comparing the means of these variables were used to establish that the populations were comparable prior to the course. Final exam scores, total course points and pretest-posttest differences were used as measures of student success; t-tests were used to determine if differences existed between the populations. ANCOVA analyses revealed that student GPA, pretest scores and course format were the only variables tested that were significant in accounting for the variance of the academic success measures. In general, the results indicate that students achieved greater academic success in the intensive-format course, regardless of the level of academic experience, life experience, academic major or gender. Part II. Weakly coordinating anions have many important applications, one of which is to function as co-catalysts in the polymerization of olefins by zirconocene. The structure of tris(tetrachlorobenzenedialato) phosphate(V) or "trisphat" anion suggests that it might be an outstanding example of a weakly coordinating anion. Trisphat acid was synthesized and immediately used to prepare the stable tributylammonium trisphat, which was further reacted to produce trisphat salts of Group I metal cations in high yields. Results of the 35Cl NQR analysis of these trisphat salts indicate only very weak coordination between the metal cations and the chlorine atoms of the trisphat anion.

  1. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  2. Synthesis of the salts of weakly coordination stibate ions & Students' perceptions of two- and three-dimensional animations depicting an oxidation-reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Deborah Renee

    2011-12-01

    SYTHESIS OF SALTS OF WEAKLY COORDINATING STIBATE IONS. Weakly coordinating anions have many important applications including olefin polymerization co-catalysis. In an attempt to make tristibic acid, distibic acid and tetrastibic acid were made. Cesium, barium, nickel(II), and diethylammonium salts of tetrastibic acid were also synthesized. Tetrastibic acid and the ammonium salts were concluded to be stable. Elemental analyses showed that neither tristibic acid nor tristibic acid were stable under the reaction conditions employed. STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF TWO- AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL ANIMATIONS DEPICTING AN OXIDATION-REDUCATION REACTION. Electrochemistry is a difficult subject for many students to comprehend. In order to improve teaching in this area of chemistry, semi-structured clinical interviews on second-semester introductory chemistry students were conducted in which students' were asked to explain the particulate behavior of the chemicals in an oxidation-reduction reaction. The interviews included questions after students viewed the chemical demonstration and two computer animations depicting the particulate nature of the same chemical reaction. Misinterpretations of the two animations were identified and described in detail. The simpler 2-D animation was beneficial in helping students understand the oxidation-reduction reaction and write the balanced chemical equation. However, the 3-D animation did not appear to be detrimental to student understanding. Suggestions, taken from the students' comments in the interviews, for improving the animations and for teaching electrochemistry were discussed.

  3. Studying the role of protein dynamics in an SN2 enzyme reaction using free-energy surfaces and solvent coordinates.

    PubMed

    García-Meseguer, Rafael; Martí, Sergio; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2013-07-01

    Conformational changes are known to be able to drive an enzyme through its catalytic cycle, allowing, for example, substrate binding or product release. However, the influence of protein motions on the chemical step is a controversial issue. One proposal is that the simple equilibrium fluctuations incorporated into transition-state theory are insufficient to account for the catalytic effect of enzymes and that protein motions should be treated dynamically. Here, we propose the use of free-energy surfaces, obtained as a function of both a chemical coordinate and an environmental coordinate, as an efficient way to elucidate the role of protein structure and motions during the reaction. We show that the structure of the protein provides an adequate environment for the progress of the reaction, although a certain degree of flexibility is needed to attain the full catalytic effect. However, these motions do not introduce significant dynamical corrections to the rate constant and can be described as equilibrium fluctuations.

  4. Studying the role of protein dynamics in an SN2 enzyme reaction using free-energy surfaces and solvent coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Meseguer, Rafael; Martí, Sergio; Ruiz-Pernía, J. Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2013-07-01

    Conformational changes are known to be able to drive an enzyme through its catalytic cycle, allowing, for example, substrate binding or product release. However, the influence of protein motions on the chemical step is a controversial issue. One proposal is that the simple equilibrium fluctuations incorporated into transition-state theory are insufficient to account for the catalytic effect of enzymes and that protein motions should be treated dynamically. Here, we propose the use of free-energy surfaces, obtained as a function of both a chemical coordinate and an environmental coordinate, as an efficient way to elucidate the role of protein structure and motions during the reaction. We show that the structure of the protein provides an adequate environment for the progress of the reaction, although a certain degree of flexibility is needed to attain the full catalytic effect. However, these motions do not introduce significant dynamical corrections to the rate constant and can be described as equilibrium fluctuations.

  5. Ag coordination compounds of a bifunctional diaminotriazine-imidazole ligand with various anions and solvents: Synthesis, structures, photoluminescence, and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hong-Xin; Huang, Hua-Qi; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-03-01

    Six coordination compounds of Ag(I) and 2,4-diamino-6-[2-(2-methyl-1-imidazolyl)ethyl]-1,3,5-triazine (L, Ag:L = 1:2) with different anions and solvents, namely, [Ag(L)2]•(NO3)•4(H2O) (1), [Ag(L)2 ] · 1 / 2 (nds) ·(MeOH) ·(H2O) (2, H2nds = 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid), [Ag(L)2 ] · 1 / 2 (nds) ·(MeOH) · 5 / 2 (H2O) (3), [Ag(L)2 ] · 1 / 2 (nds) ·(CH3CN) (4), [Ag(L)2]•(ClO4)•(MeOH)•(H2O) (5), and [Ag(L)2]•(ClO4)•2(H2O) (6), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, PXRD and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. In these compounds, each Ag(I) ion is ligated by two imidazole nitrogens to form a Ag(L)2 unit. The anions and solvents determine hydrogen-bonding between the DAT groups links the Ag(L)2 units whether to form chains in 1 and 2 or layers in 3-6. In addition, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and luminescent properties of these compounds were also investigated.

  6. Magnetic properties of weakly exchange-coupled high spin Co(II) ions in pseudooctahedral coordination evaluated by single crystal X-band EPR spectroscopy and magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Nicolás I; Winkler, Elín; Peña, Octavio; Passeggi, Mario C G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2014-03-03

    We report single-crystal X-band EPR and magnetic measurements of the coordination polymer catena-(trans-(μ2-fumarato)tetraaquacobalt(II)), 1, and the Co(II)-doped Zn(II) analogue, 2, in different Zn:Co ratios. 1 presents two magnetically inequivalent high spin S = 3/2 Co(II) ions per unit cell, named A and B, in a distorted octahedral environment coordinated to four water oxygen atoms and trans coordinated to two carboxylic oxygen atoms from the fumarate anions, in which the Co(II) ions are linked by hydrogen bonds and fumarate molecules. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements of 1 indicate weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between the S = 3/2 spins of the Co(II) ions in the crystal lattice. Oriented single crystal EPR experiments of 1 and 2 were used to evaluate the molecular g-tensor and the different exchange coupling constants between the Co(II) ions, assuming an effective spin S′= 1/2. Unexpectedly, the eigenvectors of the molecular g-tensor were not lying along any preferential bond direction, indicating that, in high spin Co(II) ions in roughly octahedral geometry with approximately axial EPR signals, the presence of molecular pseudo axes in the metal site does not determine preferential directions for the molecular g-tensor. The EPR experiment and magnetic measurements, together with a theoretical analysis relating the coupling constants obtained from both techniques, allowed us to evaluate selectively the exchange coupling constant associated with hydrogen bonds that connect magnetically inequivalent Co(II) ions (|JAB(1/2)| = 0.055(2) cm(–1)) and the exchange coupling constant associated with a fumarate bridge connecting equivalent Co(II) ions (|JAA(1/2)| ≈ 0.25 (1) cm(–1)), in good agreement with the average J(3/2) value determined from magnetic measurements.

  7. Analysis of solvent nucleophile isotope effects: evidence for concerted mechanisms and nucleophilic activation by metal coordination in nonenzymatic and ribozyme-catalyzed phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Adam G; Anderson, Vernon E; Harris, Michael E

    2004-08-17

    Heavy atom isotope effects are a valuable tool for probing chemical and enzymatic reaction mechanisms; yet, they are not widely applied to examine mechanisms of nucleophilic activation. We developed approaches for analyzing solvent (18)O nucleophile isotope effects ((18)k(nuc)) that allow, for the first time, their application to hydrolysis reactions of nucleotides and nucleic acids. Here, we report (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester hydrolysis catalyzed by Mg(2+) and by the Mg(2+)-dependent RNase P ribozyme and deamination by the Zn(2+)-dependent protein enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA). Because ADA incorporates a single solvent molecule into the product inosine, this reaction can be used to monitor solvent (18)O/(16)O ratios in complex reaction mixtures. This approach, combined with new methods for analysis of isotope ratios of nucleotide phosphates by whole molecule mass spectrometry, permitted determination of (18)k(nuc) for hydrolysis of thymidine 5'-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and RNA cleavage by the RNase P ribozyme. For ADA, an inverse (18)k(nuc) of 0.986 +/- 0.001 is observed, reflecting coordination of the nucleophile by an active site Zn(2+) ion and a stepwise mechanism. In contrast, the observed (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester reactions were normal: 1.027 +/- 0.013 and 1.030 +/- 0.012 for the Mg(2+)- and ribozyme-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Such normal effects indicate that nucleophilic attack occurs in the rate-limiting step for these reactions, consistent with concerted mechanisms. However, these magnitudes are significantly less than the (18)k(nuc) observed for nucleophilic attack by hydroxide (1.068 +/- 0.007), indicating a "stiffer" bonding environment for the nucleophile in the transition state. Kinetic analysis of the Mg(2+)-catalyzed reaction indicates that a Mg(2+)-hydroxide complex is the catalytic species; thus, the lower (18)k(nuc), in large part, reflects direct metal ion coordination of the nucleophilic oxygen. A similar value for the RNase P

  8. A series of phenyl sulfonate metal coordination polymers as catalysts for one-pot Biginelli reactions under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-10-28

    Three new metal coordination polymers, namely, [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(BS)2·2H2O (1), [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(ABS)2·2H2O (2) and [Co(DPP)2(MBS)2] (3) [DPP = 1,3-di(pyridin-4-yl)propane, BS = phenyl sulfonic acid, ABS = p-aminobenzene sulfonic acid, MBS = p-methylbenzene sulfonic acid] were obtained under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1-3 were structurally characterized using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, XRD and IR spectroscopy. Both complexes 1 and 2 display a 1D tape structure. Meanwhile, complex 3 exhibits a 2D layer and further stacks via C-Hπ interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These three metal coordination polymers have been applied as catalysts for the green synthesis of a variety of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones under solvent-free conditions through the Biginelli reaction. Interestingly, the catalysis products have been obtained in high yields under eco-friendly synthesis conditions.

  9. Fine-Tuning of the Coordination Environment To Regulate the Magnetic Behavior in Solvent/Anion-Dependent Dy(III) Compounds: Synthesis, Structure, Magnetism, and Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Sheng; Qiao, Chengfang; Chen, Sanping; Yin, Bing; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Gao, Shengli

    2016-10-17

    It is crucial to understand and elucidate the self-assembly mechanism in solution systems for the construction of Dy(III)-based single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Herein, through fine-tuning of the anion and solvent, we prepared three nine-coordinate mononuclear dysprosium compounds, [Dy(2,3'-pcad)(NO3)2(CH3OH)2] (1), [Dy(2,3'-Hpcad)2(H2O)3]·3Cl·5H2O (2), and [Dy(2,3'-pcad)(NO3)(H2O)4]·NO3·H2O (3) [2,3'-Hpcad = N(3)-(2-pyridoyl)-3-pyridinecarboxamidrazone]. The reactions of formation for 1-3 are in situ thermodynamically monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry. Magnetic data analysis reveals that 2 shows SMM behavior under a zero direct-current (dc) field, whereas 1 and 3 exhibit distinct slow magnetic relaxation processes upon a 1200 Oe dc field. To deeply understand the different magnetic behaviors, the magnetic anisotropy of 1-3 has been systematically studied by ab initio calculations, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Moreover, the semiconductor behaviors of 1-3 have been investigated by experimental measurements of UV-vis spectroscopy.

  10. Polar, non-coordinating ionic liquids as solvents for the alternating copolymerization of styrene and CO catalyzed by cationic palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Klingshirn, Marc A; Broker, Grant A; Holbrey, John D; Shaughnessy, Kevin H; Rogers, Robin D

    2002-07-07

    The palladium-catalyzed copolymerization of styrene and CO in an ionic liquid solvent, 1-hexylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, gave improved yields and increased molecular weights compared to polymerizations run in methanol.

  11. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution II: Solvent Coordinate-Dependent Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    The protonation of methylamine base CH3NH2 by carbonic acid H2CO3 within a hydrogen (H)-bonded complex in aqueous solution was studied via Car-Parrinello dynamics in the preceding paper (Daschakraborty, S.; Kiefer, P. M.; Miller, Y.; Motro, Y.; Pines, D.; Pines, E.; Hynes, J. T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.5b12742). Here some important further details of the reaction path are presented, with specific emphasis on the water solvent's role. The overall reaction is barrierless and very rapid, on an ∼100 fs time scale, with the proton transfer (PT) event itself being very sudden (<10 fs). This transfer is preceded by the acid-base H-bond's compression, while the water solvent changes little until the actual PT occurrence; this results from the very strong driving force for the reaction, as indicated by the very favorable acid-protonated base ΔpKa difference. Further solvent rearrangement follows immediately the sudden PT's production of an incipient contact ion pair, stabilizing it by establishment of equilibrium solvation. The solvent water's short time scale ∼120 fs response to the incipient ion pair formation is primarily associated with librational modes and H-bond compression of water molecules around the carboxylate anion and the protonated base. This is consistent with this stabilization involving significant increase in H-bonding of hydration shell waters to the negatively charged carboxylate group oxygens' (especially the former H2CO3 donor oxygen) and the nitrogen of the positively charged protonated base's NH3(+).

  12. Alkaline earth imidazolate coordination polymers by solvent free melt synthesis as potential host lattices for rare earth photoluminescence: (x)(∞)[AE(Im)2(ImH)(2-3)], Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, x = 1-2.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Alexander; Rybak, J-Christoph; Meyer, Larissa V; Matthes, Philipp R; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Würthner, Frank; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus

    2012-04-14

    The series of alkaline earth elements magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium yields single crystalline imidazolate coordination polymers by reactions of the metals with a melt of 1H-imidazole: (1)(∞)[Mg(Im)(2)(ImH)(3)] (1), (2)(∞)[AE(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)], AE = Ca (2), Sr (3), and (1)(∞)[Ba(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)] (4). No additional solvents were used for the reactions. Co-doping experiments by addition of the rare earth elements cerium, europium and terbium were carried out. They indicate (2)(∞)[Sr(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)] as a possible host lattice for cerium(III) photoluminescence showing a blue emission and thus a novel blue emitting hybrid material phosphor 3:Ce(3+). Co-doping with europium and terbium is also possible but resulted in formation of (3)(∞)[Sr(Im)(2)]:Ln, Ln = Eu and Tb (5), with both exhibiting green emission of either Eu(2+) or Tb(3+). The other alkaline earth elements do not show acceptance of the rare earth ions investigated and a different structural chemistry. For magnesium and barium one-dimensional strand structures are observed whereas calcium and strontium give two-dimensional network structures. Combined with an increase of the ionic radii of AE(2+) the coordinative demand is also increasing from Mg(2+) to Ba(2+), reflected by four different crystal structures for the four elements Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba in 1-4. Different linkages of the imidazolate ligands result in a change from complete σ-N coordination in 1 to additional η(5)-π coordination in 4. The success of co-doping with different lanthanide ions is based on a match in the chemical behaviour and cationic radii. The use of strontium for host lattices with imidazole is a rare example in coordination chemistry of co-doping with small amounts of luminescence centers and successfully reduces the amount of high price rare earth elements in hybrid materials while maintaining the properties. All compounds are examples of pure N-coordinated coordination polymers of the alkaline earth metals and were

  13. Comparative DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of mono-, di-, and trinuclear Ni(II) complexes: the influence of ligand denticity, metal-metal distance, and coordinating solvent/anion on kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Vimal K; Singh, Ajnesh

    2014-10-06

    Six novel Ni(II) complexes, namely, [Ni2(HL(1))(OAc)2] (1), [Ni3L(1)2]·H2O·2CH3CN (2), [Ni2(L(2))(L(3))(CH3CN)] (3), [Ni2(L(2))2(H2O)2] (4), [Ni2(L(2))2(DMF)2]2·2H2O (5), and [Ni(HL(2))2]·H2O (6), were synthesized by reacting nitrophenol-based tripodal (H3L(1)) and dipodal (H2L(2)) Schiff base ligands with Ni(II) metal salts at ambient conditions. All the complexes were fully characterized with different spectroscopic techniques such as elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The solid-state structures of 2, 3, 5, and 6 were determined using single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The compounds 1, 3, 4, and 5 are dinuclear complexes where the two Ni(II) centers have octahedral geometry with bridging phenoxo groups. Compound 2 is a trinuclear complex with two different types of Ni(II) centers. In compound 3 one of the Ni(II) centers has a coordinated acetonitrile molecule, whereas in compound 4, a water molecule has occupied one coordination site of each Ni(II) center. In complex 5, the coordinated water of complex 4 was displaced by the dimethylformamide (DMF) during its crystallization. Complex 6 is mononuclear with two amine-bis(phenolate) ligands in scissorlike fashion around the Ni(II) metal center. The single crystals of 1 and 4 could not be obtained; however, from the spectroscopic data and physicochemical properties (electronic and redox properties) it was assumed that the structures of these complexes are quite similar to other analogues. DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of all characterized complexes were also investigated. The ligand denticity, coordinated anions/solvents (such as acetate, acetonitrile, water, and DMF), and cooperative action of two metal centers play a significant role in the phosphate ester bond cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitropenylphosphate by transesterification mechanism. Complex 3 exhibits highest activity among complexes 1-6 with 3.86 × 10(5) times

  14. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  15. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  16. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  17. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.

  18. Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  19. Underwater contact adhesion and microarchitecture in polyelectrolyte complexes actuated by solvent exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Lee, Dong Woog; Ahn, B. Kollbe; Seo, Sungbaek; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexation is critical to the formation and properties of many biological and polymeric materials, and is typically initiated by aqueous mixing followed by fluid-fluid phase separation, such as coacervation. Yet little to nothing is known about how coacervates evolve into intricate solid microarchitectures. Inspired by the chemical features of the cement proteins of the sandcastle worm, here we report a versatile and strong wet-contact microporous adhesive resulting from polyelectrolyte complexation triggered by solvent exchange. After premixing a catechol-functionalized weak polyanion with a polycation in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), the solution was applied underwater to various substrates whereupon electrostatic complexation, phase inversion, and rapid setting were simultaneously actuated by water-DMSO solvent exchange. Spatial and temporal coordination of complexation, inversion and setting fostered rapid (~25 s) and robust underwater contact adhesion (Wad >= 2 J m-2) of complexed catecholic polyelectrolytes to all tested surfaces including plastics, glasses, metals and biological materials.

  20. Stoddard solvent poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    These products contain Stoddard solvent: Dry cleaning fluids Paints Paint thinner Stoddard solvent ( mineral spirits ) Toners used in copy machines This list may not include all products containing Stoddard solvent.

  1. Weak Energy: Form and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Allen D.

    The equation of motion for a time-dependent weak value of a quantum mechanical observable contains a complex valued energy factor—the weak energy of evolution. This quantity is defined by the dynamics of the pre-selected and post-selected states which specify the observable's weak value. It is shown that this energy: (i) is manifested as dynamical and geometric phases that govern the evolution of the weak value during the measurement process; (ii) satisfies the Euler-Lagrange equations when expressed in terms of Pancharatnam (P) phase and Fubini-Study (FS) metric distance; (iii) provides for a PFS stationary action principle for quantum state evolution; (iv) time translates correlation amplitudes; (v) generalizes the temporal persistence of state normalization; and (vi) obeys a time-energy uncertainty relation. A similar complex valued quantity—the pointed weak energy of an evolving quantum state—is also defined and several of its properties in PFS coordinates are discussed. It is shown that the imaginary part of the pointed weak energy governs the state's survival probability and its real part is—to within a sign—the Mukunda-Simon geometric phase for arbitrary evolutions or the Aharonov-Anandan (AA) geometric phase for cyclic evolutions. Pointed weak energy gauge transformations and the PFS 1-form are defined and discussed and the relationship between the PFS 1-form and the AA connection 1-form is established. [Editors note: for a video of the talk given by Prof. Parks at the Aharonov-80 conference in 2012 at Chapman University, see http://quantum.chapman.edu/talk-25.

  2. The role of solvent and the outer coordination sphere on H2 oxidation using [Ni(PCy2NPyz2)2]2+

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Arnab; Lense, Sheri J.; Roberts, John A.; Helm, Monte L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are reversible catalysts for H2 production/oxidation, operating with fast rates and minimal overpotentials in water. Many synthetic catalyst mimics of hydrogenase operate in organic solvents. However, recent work has demonstrated the importance of water in the performance of some model complexes. In this work, the H2oxidation activity of [Ni(PCy2N(3–pyridazyl)methyl2)2]2+ (CyPyz) was compared as a function of acetonitrile, methanol, and water. The reactivity was compared under neutral and acidic conditions in all three solvents and improvement in catalytic activity, from 2 to 40 s-1, was observed with increasing hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. In addition, the overpotential for catalysis drops significantly in the presence of acid in all solvents, from as high as 600 mV to as low as 70 mV, primarily due to the shift in the equilibrium potential under these conditions. Finally, H2 production was also observed in the same solution, demonstrating bidirectional (irreversible) homogeneous H2 production/oxidation. A structurally and electronically similar complex with a benzyl instead of a pyridazyl group was not stable under these conditions, limiting the evaluation of the contributions of the outer coordination sphere. Collectively, we show that by tuning conditions we can promote fast, efficient H2 oxidation and bidirectional catalysis.

  3. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  4. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  5. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  6. Diverse stereocontrol effects induced by weakly coordinating anions. Stereospecific olefin polymerization pathways at archetypal C(s)- and C(1)-symmetric metallocenium catalysts using mono- and polynuclear halo-perfluoroarylmetalates as cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John A S; Chen, Ming-Chou; Seyam, Afif M; Li, Liting; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Stahl, Nicholas G; Marks, Tobin J

    2007-10-24

    Counteranion effects on propylene polymerization rates and stereoselectivities are compared using Cs-symmetric Me2C(Cp)(Flu)ZrMe2 (1; Cp = C5H4,eta5-cyclopentadienyl; Flu = C13H8, eta5-fluorenyl) and C1-symmetric Me2Si(OHF)(CpR*)ZrMe2 (2; OHF = C13H16, eta5-octahydrofluorenyl; CpR* = eta5-3-(-)-menthylcyclopentadienyl) precatalysts activated with the mononuclear and polynuclear perfluoroarylborate, -aluminate, and -gallate cocatalysts/activators B(C6F5)3 (3), B(o-C6F5C6F4)3 (4), Al(C6F5)3 (5), Ph3C+B(C6F5)4- (6) Ph3C+FAl(o-C6F5C6F4)3- (7), Ga(C6F5)3 (8), and recently reported mono- and polymetallic trityl perfluoroarylhalometalates Ph3C+FB(C6F5)3- (9), Ph3C+FB(o-C6F5C6F4)3- (10), (Ph3C+)xFx[Al(C6F5)3]yx- (x = 1, y = 1, 11; x = 1, y = 2, 12; x = 2, y = 3, 13), Ph3C+(C6F5)3AlFAl(o-C6F5C6F4)3- (14), Ph3C+XAl(C6F5)3- (X = Cl, 15; X = Br, 16), and Ph3C+F[Ga(C6F5)3]2- (17). Temperature, propylene concentration, and solvent polarity dependence are surveyed in polymerizations catalyzed by 1 activated with cocatalysts 3-16 and with a 1:2 ratio of Ph3CCl and 5, and with a 1:2 ratio of Ph3CBr and 5, and by 2 activated with 3, 6, 7, 12, and 14. Remarkable stereocontrol with high activities is observed for 1 + 12 and 1 + 14. Polypropylene samples produced using C1-symmetric precatalyst 2 are subjected to microstructural analyses using stochastic models describing the relative contributions of enantiofacial misinsertion and backskip processes. A powerful technique is introduced for calculating interparametric correlation matrices for these nonlinear stochastic models. The collected results significantly extend what is known about ion-pairing effects in the case of Cs-symmetric precatalyst 1 and allow these findings to be applied to the case of C1-symmetric precatalyst 2 as an agent of isospecific propylene polymerization.

  7. Insights into water coordination associated with the Cu(II)/Cu(I) electron transfer at a biomimetic Cu centre.

    PubMed

    Porras Gutiérrez, Ana Gabriela; Zeitouny, Joceline; Gomila, Antoine; Douziech, Bénédicte; Cosquer, Nathalie; Conan, Françoise; Reinaud, Olivia; Hapiot, Philippe; Le Mest, Yves; Lagrost, Corinne; Le Poul, Nicolas

    2014-05-07

    The coordination properties of the biomimetic complex [Cu(TMPA)(H2O)](CF3SO3)2 (TMPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) have been investigated by electrochemistry combined with UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopy in different non-coordinating media including imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids, for different water contents. The solid-state X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex shows that the cupric centre lies in a N4O coordination environment with a nearly perfect trigonal bipyramidal geometry (TBP), the water ligand being axially coordinated to Cu(II). In solution, the coordination geometry of the complex remains TBP in all media. Neither the triflate ion nor the anions of the ionic liquids were found to coordinate the copper centre. Cyclic voltammetry in all media shows that the decoordination of the water molecule occurs upon monoelectronic reduction of the Cu(II) complex. Back-coordination of the water ligand at the cuprous state can be detected by increasing the water content and/or decreasing the timescale of the experiment. Numerical simulations of the voltammograms allow the determination of kinetics and thermodynamics for the water association-dissociation mechanism. The resulting data suggest that (i) the binding/unbinding of water at the Cu(I) redox state is relatively slow and equilibrated in all media, and (ii) the binding of water at Cu(I) is somewhat faster in the ionic liquids than in the non-coordinating solvents, while the decoordination process is weakly sensitive to the nature of the solvents. These results suggest that ionic liquids favour water exchange without interfering with the coordination sphere of the metal centre. This makes them promising media for studying host-guest reactions with biomimetic complexes.

  8. Solvents in novolak synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobodacha, Chet J.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Durham, Dana L.; Paradis, Valerie R.

    1993-09-01

    Novolac resins may be prepared with or without a solvent present. We have found that solvent power greatly affects the properties of the finished resin and thus gives the resist chemist another variable with which to `fine-tune' resist properties. Using designed experiments, we investigated the effect of solvent power, as measured by Hansen's Solubility Parameters, of a number of solvents and solvent mixtures on the final properties of the novolac resin. We found that the relative molecular weight (RMW) and dissolution rate of a novolac resin can be varied by selection of a solvent or solvent mixture with the appropriate polarity and hydrogen- bonding characteristics. The solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics may affect the stability of the cresol/formaldehyde transition state, thus causing the observed changes in RMW and dissolution rate.

  9. Solvent Recycling for Shipyards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    alternatives to solvent cleaning. Typical equipment types that can be effectively cleaned with recycled solvents include spray guns paint hoses pumps...in place of solvent-based coatings; or equipment changes, such as the use of airless or HVLP systems to reduce paint consumption and overspray...Using mechanical cleaning methods instead of solvent cleaning Change from conventional painting to solventless processes such as thermal spray or powder

  10. NEPTUNIUM SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, L.R.; Fields, P.R.

    1959-10-01

    The separation of neptunium from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and the extraction of neptunium from the solvent solution are described. Neptunium is separated from an aqueous solution containing tetravalent or hexavalent neptunium nitrate, nitric acid, and a nitrate salting out agent, such as sodium nitrate, by contacting the solution with an organic solvent such as diethyl ether. Subsequently, the neptunium nitrate is extracted from the organic solvent extract phase with water.

  11. Barriers to Disaster Coordination: Health Sector Coordination in Banda Aceh following the South Asia Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Zoraster, Richard M

    2006-02-01

    Ecological disasters impact large populations every year, and hundreds of nongovernmental organizations, thousands of aid workers, and billions of dollars are sent in response. Yet, there have been recurring problems with coordination, leading to wasted efforts and funds. The humanitarian response to the December 2004 Earthquake and Tsunami in Asia was one of the largest ever, and coordination problems were apparent. The coordination processes and attempts at coordination are discussed in this paper. Specific barriers to cooperation are discussed, such as weak leadership, the absence of accountability, the lack of credentialing, the diverse goals of the responding agencies, and the weaknesses in the coordination process itself.

  12. Poisson Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Ying; Hu, Shi-Min

    2013-02-01

    Harmonic functions are the critical points of a Dirichlet energy functional, the linear projections of conformal maps. They play an important role in computer graphics, particularly for gradient-domain image processing and shape-preserving geometric computation. We propose Poisson coordinates, a novel transfinite interpolation scheme based on the Poisson integral formula, as a rapid way to estimate a harmonic function on a certain domain with desired boundary values. Poisson coordinates are an extension of the Mean Value coordinates (MVCs) which inherit their linear precision, smoothness, and kernel positivity. We give explicit formulas for Poisson coordinates in both continuous and 2D discrete forms. Superior to MVCs, Poisson coordinates are proved to be pseudoharmonic (i.e., they reproduce harmonic functions on n-dimensional balls). Our experimental results show that Poisson coordinates have lower Dirichlet energies than MVCs on a number of typical 2D domains (particularly convex domains). As well as presenting a formula, our approach provides useful insights for further studies on coordinates-based interpolation and fast estimation of harmonic functions.

  13. Postselected weak measurement beyond the weak value

    SciTech Connect

    Geszti, Tamas

    2010-04-15

    Closed expressions are derived for the quantum measurement statistics of pre- and postselected Gaussian particle beams. The weakness of the preselection step is shown to compete with the nonorthogonality of postselection in a transparent way. The approach is shown to be useful in analyzing postselection-based signal amplification, allowing measurements to be extended far beyond the range of validity of the well-known Aharonov-Albert-Vaidman limit. Additionally, the present treatment connects postselected weak measurement to the topic of phase-contrast microscopy.

  14. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  15. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  16. Exploring Solvent Shape and Function Using - and Isomer-Selective Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We illustrate the new types of information than can be obtained through isomer-selective ``hole-burning'' spectroscopy carried out in the vibrational manifolds of Ar-tagged cluster ions. Three examples of increasing complexity will be presented where the changes in a solute ion are correlated with different morphologies of a surrounding solvent cage. In the first, we discuss the weak coupling limit where different hydration morphologies lead to small distortions of a covalent ion. We then introduce the more interesting case of the hydrated electron, where different shapes of the water network lead to dramatic changes in the extent of delocalization in the diffuse excess electron cloud. We then turn to the most complex case involving hydration of the nitrosonium ion, where different arrangements of the same number of water molecules span the range in behavior from simple solvation to actively causing a chemical reaction. The latter results are particularly interesting as they provide a microscopic, molecular-level picture of the ``solvent coordinate'' commonly used to describe solvent mediated processes.

  17. Robust Weak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff; Aharonov, Yakir

    2006-03-01

    We introduce a new type of weak measurement which yields a quantum average of weak values that is robust, outside the range of eigenvalues, extends the valid regime for weak measurements, and for which the probability of obtaining the pre- and post-selected ensemble is not exponentially rare. This result extends the applicability of weak values, shifts the statistical interpretation previously attributed to weak values and suggests that the weak value is a property of every pre- and post-selected ensemble. We then apply this new weak measurement to Hardy's paradox. Usually the paradox is dismissed on grounds of counterfactuality, i.e., because the paradoxical effects appear only when one considers results of experiments which do not actually take place. We suggest a new set of measurements in connection with Hardy's scheme, and show that when they are actually performed, they yield strange and surprising outcomes. More generally, we claim that counterfactual paradoxes point to a deeper structure inherent to quantum mechanics characterized by weak values (Aharonov Y, Botero A, Popescu S, Reznik B, Tollaksen J, Physics Letters A, 301 (3-4): 130-138, 2002).

  18. COORDINATED AV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLEAVES, PAUL C.; AND OTHERS

    THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER IS LOCATED IN THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPPLIES ALL SCHOOLS IN THE AREA. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT ORDERS, AFTER SELECTIONS ARE MADE BY THE CLASSROOM TEACHER, ARE PROCESSED BY THE CENTER, CONFIRMED AND DELIVERED BY TRUCK THREE TIMES EACH WEEK. EACH SCHOOL HAS A BUILDING COORDINATOR WHO CHECKS THE ORDERS INTO THE…

  19. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Butler, J.P.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of neptuniunn from dissolver solutions by solvent extraction. The neptunium containing solution should be about 5N, in nitric acid.and about 0.1 M in ferrous ion. The organic extracting agent is tributyl phosphate, and the neptuniunn is recovered from the organic solvent phase by washing with water.

  20. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  1. History of Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  2. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  3. The lanthanide contraction beyond coordination chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ferru, Geoffroy; Reinhart, Benjamin; Bera, Mrinal K.; ...

    2016-04-06

    Lanthanide chemistry is dominated by the ‘lanthanide contraction’, which is conceptualized traditionally through coordination chemistry. Here we break this mold, presenting evidence that the lanthanide contraction manifests outside of the coordination sphere, influencing weak interactions between groups of molecules that drive mesoscale-assembly and emergent behavior in an amphiphile solution. Furthermore, changes in these weak interactions correlate with differences in lanthanide ion transport properties, suggesting new forces to leverage rare earth separation and refining. Our results show that the lanthanide contraction paradigm extends beyond the coordination sphere, influencing structure and properties usually associated with soft matter science.

  4. Ellipsoidal analysis of coordination polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, James; Attfield, J. Paul

    2017-02-01

    The idea of the coordination polyhedron is essential to understanding chemical structure. Simple polyhedra in crystalline compounds are often deformed due to structural complexity or electronic instabilities so distortion analysis methods are useful. Here we demonstrate that analysis of the minimum bounding ellipsoid of a coordination polyhedron provides a general method for studying distortion, yielding parameters that are sensitive to various orders in metal oxide examples. Ellipsoidal analysis leads to discovery of a general switching of polyhedral distortions at symmetry-disallowed transitions in perovskites that may evidence underlying coordination bistability, and reveals a weak off-centre `d5 effect' for Fe3+ ions that could be exploited in multiferroics. Separating electronic distortions from intrinsic deformations within the low temperature superstructure of magnetite provides new insights into the charge and trimeron orders. Ellipsoidal analysis can be useful for exploring local structure in many materials such as coordination complexes and frameworks, organometallics and organic molecules.

  5. Ellipsoidal analysis of coordination polyhedra

    PubMed Central

    Cumby, James; Attfield, J. Paul

    2017-01-01

    The idea of the coordination polyhedron is essential to understanding chemical structure. Simple polyhedra in crystalline compounds are often deformed due to structural complexity or electronic instabilities so distortion analysis methods are useful. Here we demonstrate that analysis of the minimum bounding ellipsoid of a coordination polyhedron provides a general method for studying distortion, yielding parameters that are sensitive to various orders in metal oxide examples. Ellipsoidal analysis leads to discovery of a general switching of polyhedral distortions at symmetry-disallowed transitions in perovskites that may evidence underlying coordination bistability, and reveals a weak off-centre ‘d5 effect' for Fe3+ ions that could be exploited in multiferroics. Separating electronic distortions from intrinsic deformations within the low temperature superstructure of magnetite provides new insights into the charge and trimeron orders. Ellipsoidal analysis can be useful for exploring local structure in many materials such as coordination complexes and frameworks, organometallics and organic molecules. PMID:28146146

  6. Molecular tectonics: anion control of dimensionality and connectivity in meta-pyridyl appended tetramercaptotetrathiacalix[4]arene based silver coordination networks.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikov, A; Ferlay, S; Solovieva, S E; Antipin, I S; Konovalov, A I; Kyritsakas, N; Hosseini, M W

    2014-01-07

    The combination of the same organic tecton 1, a meta-pyridyl appended tetramercaptotetrathiacalix[4]arene in 1,3-alternate conformation offering four pyridyl units and eight thioether groups, with three silver salts AgX (X = BF4(-), NO3(-) and SbF6(-)) leads, under identical conditions (concentration, temperature and solvent system), to the formation of different silver coordination networks. Both the connectivity and the dimensionality of the three silver coordination networks depend on the nature of the anion used as a counter ion. Whereas the weakly coordinating BF4(-) anion does not participate in the formation of the non-tubular 1D coordination network, the coordinating NO3(-) anion is bound to the metal cation and this leads to the formation of a tubular 1D silver coordination network. In both cases, the eight S atoms of the tecton 1 do not take part in the binding of the cation. In marked contrast, when the SbF6(-) anion is used as a counter ion, the organic tecton 1 behaves as a tetrakismonodentate through its four meta-pyridyl moieties and as a bischelating unit of the SCCS type leading thus to the formation of a porous 3D diamondoid-type network.

  7. An unusual double T5(2) water tape trapped in silver(I) coordination polymer hosts: influence of the solvent on the assembly of Ag(I)-4,4'-bipyridine chains with trans-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and their luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Xi-He; Zhao, Ya-Feng; Li, Hao-Hong; Wu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Chang-Cang

    2012-11-07

    In this paper, four silver(I) compounds, namely, {[Ag(4)(bipy)(4)(chda)]·2NO(3)·10H(2)O}(n) (1), {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·14H(2)O}(n) (2), {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·3EG·2H(2)O}(n) (3) and {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·H(2)chda}(n) (4) (where bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine, H(2)chda = trans-cyclohexane-dicarboxylate and EG = ethylene glycol), have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. In all of these compounds, the Ag(I) centers are linked by bipy ligands to form 1D Ag(I)-bipy chain structures. The chda(2-) anions of compound 1 adopt a μ(4)-coordination mode to connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains, forming a H-beam-like chain. In 2, the chda(2-) anions adopt a μ(2)-coordination mode to connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains resulting in two distinct 2D brick wall-like layers. These layers are further stacked in an ···ABAB··· fashion through interlayer π···π stacking interactions giving rise to a 3D framework consisting of quasi-rectangular channels, in which an unusual double T5(2) water tape is trapped. For 3 and 4, the chda(2-) anions show a similar μ(4)-coordination mode to that of 1 and connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains to form 2D grid layers with identical compositions and connective topologies. The experimental studies show that the final structures are greatly influenced by the molar ratio of the components and the solvents, which can be rationally interpreted by the existence of various supramolecular interactions between the host and guest molecules within these compounds through a systematic structural comparison. Additionally, the thermal stability and luminescent properties of these compounds were also studied.

  8. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Jonke, A.A.

    1957-10-01

    In improved solvent extraction process is described for the extraction of metal values from highly dilute aqueous solutions. The process comprises contacting an aqueous solution with an organic substantially water-immiscible solvent, whereby metal values are taken up by a solvent extract phase; scrubbing the solvent extract phase with an aqueous scrubbing solution; separating an aqueous solution from the scrubbed solvent extract phase; and contacting the scrubbed solvent phase with an aqueous medium whereby the extracted metal values are removed from the solvent phase and taken up by said medium to form a strip solution containing said metal values, the aqueous scrubbing solution being a mixture of strip solution and an aqueous solution which contains mineral acids anions and is free of the metal values. The process is particularly effective for purifying uranium, where one starts with impure aqueous uranyl nitrate, extracts with tributyl phosphate dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, scrubs with aqueous nitric acid and employs water to strip the uranium from the scrubbed organic phase.

  9. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  10. Neutron Polarization Analysis for Biphasic Solvent Extraction Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Motokawa, Ryuhei; Endo, Hitoshi; Nagao, Michihiro; Heller, William T.

    2016-06-16

    Here we performed neutron polarization analysis (NPA) of extracted organic phases containing complexes, comprised of Zr(NO3)4 and tri-n-butyl phosphate, which enabled decomposition of the intensity distribution of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) into the coherent and incoherent scattering components. The coherent scattering intensity, containing structural information, and the incoherent scattering compete over a wide range of magnitude of scattering vector, q, specifically when q is larger than q* ≈ 1/Rg, where Rg is the radius of gyration of scatterer. Therefore, it is important to determine the incoherent scattering intensity exactly to perform an accurate structural analysis from SANS data when Rg is small, such as the aforementioned extracted coordination species. Although NPA is the best method for evaluating the incoherent scattering component for accurately determining the coherent scattering in SANS, this method is not used frequently in SANS data analysis because it is technically challenging. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that experimental determination of the incoherent scattering using NPA is suitable for sample systems containing a small scatterer with a weak coherent scattering intensity, such as extracted complexes in biphasic solvent extraction systems.

  11. Neutron Polarization Analysis for Biphasic Solvent Extraction Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Motokawa, Ryuhei; Endo, Hitoshi; Nagao, Michihiro; ...

    2016-06-16

    Here we performed neutron polarization analysis (NPA) of extracted organic phases containing complexes, comprised of Zr(NO3)4 and tri-n-butyl phosphate, which enabled decomposition of the intensity distribution of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) into the coherent and incoherent scattering components. The coherent scattering intensity, containing structural information, and the incoherent scattering compete over a wide range of magnitude of scattering vector, q, specifically when q is larger than q* ≈ 1/Rg, where Rg is the radius of gyration of scatterer. Therefore, it is important to determine the incoherent scattering intensity exactly to perform an accurate structural analysis from SANS data when Rgmore » is small, such as the aforementioned extracted coordination species. Although NPA is the best method for evaluating the incoherent scattering component for accurately determining the coherent scattering in SANS, this method is not used frequently in SANS data analysis because it is technically challenging. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that experimental determination of the incoherent scattering using NPA is suitable for sample systems containing a small scatterer with a weak coherent scattering intensity, such as extracted complexes in biphasic solvent extraction systems.« less

  12. Modeling, Measuring, and Compensating Color Weak Vision.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-06-01

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color-normal observer, and the compensation of color images in a way that a color-weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color-normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticeable-differences between the colors which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are the isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared with the previously used methods, this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations, and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyze the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color-matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential tests.

  13. Modelling, Measuring and Compensating Color Weak Vision.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color normal observer and the compensation of color images in a way that a color weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticable-differences between color which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color-differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared to previously used methods this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyse the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential (SD) tests.

  14. Weak lensing and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Marco; Bertin, Giuseppe

    1999-02-01

    Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to reconstruct the projected mass distribution of a cluster from weak lensing provided that both the geometry of the universe and the probability distribution of galaxy redshifts are known; actually, when additional photometric data are taken to be available, the galaxy redshift distribution could be determined jointly with the cluster mass from the weak lensing analysis. In this paper we develop, in the spirit of a ``thought experiment,'' a method to constrain the geometry of the universe from weak lensing, provided that the redshifts of the source galaxies are measured. The quantitative limits and merits of the method are discussed analytically and with a set of simulations, in relation to point estimation, interval estimation, and test of hypotheses for homogeneous Friedmann-Lema\\^\\i tre models. The constraints turn out to be significant when a few thousand source galaxies are used.

  15. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  16. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  17. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  18. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  19. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  20. How Do Teachers Coordinate Their Work? A Framing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumay, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, schools have been characterized as loosely coupled systems, meaning that the teachers' work is weakly coordinated at the local level. Nonetheless, few studies have focused on the local variations of coordination modes, their sources and their nature. In this article, the process of local coordination of the teachers' work is…

  1. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  2. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  3. A continuum theory of solvation in quadrupolar solvents. I. Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Kim, Hyung J.

    2003-10-01

    A continuum theory to describe equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation in polarizable, nondipolar, quadrupolar solvents is developed. By employing the densities of the solvent quadrupole and induced dipole moments as primary field variables, a reaction field theory formulation for quadrupolar solvents is constructed with account of their electronic polarizability. Nonequilibrium solvation aspects are effected via the solvent coordinate description for the quadrupole moment density. It is found that the theory is consistent with the macroscopic Maxwell equations and satisfies the continuity of the electric potential across the cavity boundaries. Solvation stabilization arising from the solvent quadrupoles is captured via novel reaction field factors analogous to those for dipolar solvents. Comparison is made with the dielectric continuum description of the polarizable, dipolar solvents as well as with previous theories of the quadrupolar solvents. Extensions and applications of the current theoretical formulation to study free energetics and dynamics of reactive and spectroscopic processes in the quadrupolar solvents are reported in the following paper [J. Jeon and H. J. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8626 (2003)].

  4. True and masked three-coordinate T-shaped platinum(II) intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although four-coordinate square-planar geometries, with a formally 16-electron counting, are absolutely dominant in isolated Pt(II) complexes, three-coordinate, 14-electron Pt(II) complexes are believed to be key intermediates in a number of platinum-mediated organometallic transformations. Although very few authenticated three-coordinate Pt(II) complexes have been characterized, a much larger number of complexes can be described as operationally three-coordinate in a kinetic sense. In these compounds, which we have called masked T-shaped complexes, the fourth position is occupied by a very weak ligand (agostic bond, solvent molecule or counteranion), which can be easily displaced. This review summarizes the structural features of the true and masked T-shaped Pt(II) complexes reported so far and describes synthetic strategies employed for their formation. Moreover, recent experimental and theoretical reports are analyzed, which suggest the involvement of such intermediates in reaction mechanisms, particularly C–H bond-activation processes. PMID:23946831

  5. Photochromic Properties of 3-Deoxyanthocyanidin Pigments in Nontoxic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Yuki; Mihara, Mai; Kohno, Yoshiumi; Shibata, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    The photochromic properties of some naturally occurring 3-deoxyanthocyanidin pigments were investigated in various nontoxic solvents. When luteolinidin, a representative 3-deoxyanthocyanidin, was dissolved in a mixture of weakly acidic water and an organic solvent with a relative permittivity between 20 and 34, it was possible to repeatedly induce coloration via ultraviolet irradiation and decoloration under light-shielded conditions. 1,3-Butanediol and ethanol, which are approved for use in foods, cosmetics, and household goods, were found to be appropriate organic solvents for this process. In addition, we confirmed that other 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, specifically apigeninidin and tricetinidin, which are commonly found in food grains and tea leaves, also exhibit photochromic properties.

  6. Weaknesses in Underperforming Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Grift, Wim; Houtveen, Thoni

    2007-01-01

    In some Dutch elementary schools, the average performance of students over several years is significantly below the level that could be expected of them. This phenomenon is known as "underperformance." The most important identifiable weaknesses that go along with this phenomenon are that (a) learning material offered at school is…

  7. Weak Finsler structures and the Funk weak metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Athanase; Troyanov, Marc

    2009-04-01

    We discuss general notions of metrics and of Finsler structures which we call weak metrics and weak Finsler structures. Any convex domain carries a canonical weak Finsler structure, which we call its tautological weak Finsler structure. We compute distances in the tautological weak Finsler structure of a domain and we show that these are given by the so-called Funk weak metric. We conclude the paper with a discussion of geodesics, of metric balls and of convexity properties of the Funk weak metric.

  8. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  9. Composite weak bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  10. Weakly supervised glasses removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie

    2015-03-01

    Glasses removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of glasses. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove glasses more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various glasses to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.

  11. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  12. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  13. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  14. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  15. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  16. Underwater contact adhesion and microarchitecture in polyelectrolyte complexes actuated by solvent exchange

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sungbaek; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexation is critical to the formation and properties of many biological and polymeric materials, and is typically initiated by aqueous mixing1 followed by fluid–fluid phase separation, such as coacervation2–5. Yet little to nothing is known about how coacervates evolve into intricate solid microarchitectures. Inspired by the chemical features of the cement proteins of the sandcastle worm, here we report a versatile and strong wet-contact microporous adhesive resulting from polyelectrolyte complexation triggered by solvent exchange. After premixing a catechol-functionalized weak polyanion with a polycation in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), the solution was applied underwater to various substrates whereupon electrostatic complexation, phase inversion, and rapid setting were simultaneously actuated by water–DMSO solvent exchange. Spatial and temporal coordination of complexation, inversion and setting fostered rapid (~25 s) and robust underwater contact adhesion (Wad ≥ 2 J m−2) of complexed catecholic polyelectrolytes to all tested surfaces including plastics, glasses, metals and biological materials. PMID:26779881

  17. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  18. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  19. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  20. `Weak A' phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, J. P.; Gerbal, A.; Hughes-Jones, N. C.; Salmon, C.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-five weak A samples including fourteen A3, eight Ax, seven Aend, three Am and three Ae1 were studied in order to determine their A antigen site density, using an IgG anti-A labelled with 125I. The values obtained ranged between 30,000 A antigen sites for A3 individuals, and 700 sites for the Ae1 red cells. The hierarchy of values observed made it possible to establish a quantitative relationship between the red cell agglutinability of these phenotypes measured under standard conditions, and their antigen site density. PMID:4435836

  1. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  2. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  3. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  4. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  5. Simple modification of basic dyes with bulky & symmetric WCAs for improving their solubilities in organic solvents without color change

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Yun; Hwang, Tae Gyu; Woo, Sung Wun; Lee, Jae Moon; Namgoong, Jin Woong; Yuk, Sim Bum; Chung, Sei-won; Kim, Jae Pil

    2017-01-01

    A simple and easy solubility enhancement of basic dyes was performed with bulky and symmetric weakly coordinating anions (WCAs). The WCAs decreased the ionic character of the dyes by broadening the partial charge distribution and causing a screening effect on the ionic bonding. This new modification with WCAs has advantages in that it has no influence on the optical properties of the dyes. The solubilities of unmodified and modified dyes were tested in several organic solvents. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the dyes were measured. Color films were prepared with the dyes and their color loci were analyzed to evaluate the optical properties. By the modification with WCAs, commercial basic dyes showed sufficient solubilities for be applied to various applications while preserving their superior optical properties. PMID:28383019

  6. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  7. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  8. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  9. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  10. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  11. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  12. Hazardous solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-11-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is `What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?`You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product`s constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace.

  13. Weakly bound states of the He-He-Mg trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yong; Huang Deping; Gou Qingdong; Han Huili; Shi Tingyun

    2011-07-15

    We search for the existence of the weakly bound He-He-Mg molecules. The He-He-Mg molecule is treated as a three-body system. By using hyperspherical coordinates, the Schroedinger equation for the triatomic system is solved in the adiabatic approximation. We obtain that the binding of the three atoms is possible. The binding energies of such molecules are estimated.

  14. Optimized coordinates in vibrational coupled cluster calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Yagi, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-21

    The use of variationally optimized coordinates, which minimize the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) ground state energy with respect to orthogonal transformations of the coordinates, has recently been shown to improve the convergence of vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) towards the exact full VCI [K. Yagi, M. Keçeli, and S. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204118 (2012)]. The present paper proposes an incorporation of optimized coordinates into the vibrational coupled cluster (VCC), which has in the past been shown to outperform VCI in approximate calculations where similar restricted state spaces are employed in VCI and VCC. An embarrassingly parallel algorithm for variational optimization of coordinates for VSCF is implemented and the resulting coordinates and potentials are introduced into a VCC program. The performance of VCC in optimized coordinates (denoted oc-VCC) is examined through pilot applications to water, formaldehyde, and a series of water clusters (dimer, trimer, and hexamer) by comparing the calculated vibrational energy levels with those of the conventional VCC in normal coordinates and VCI in optimized coordinates. For water clusters, in particular, oc-VCC is found to gain orders of magnitude improvement in the accuracy, exemplifying that the combination of optimized coordinates localized to each monomer with the size-extensive VCC wave function provides a supreme description of systems consisting of weakly interacting sub-systems.

  15. Next Generation Solvent Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Birdwell, Joseph F.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bruffey, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Inter laboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  16. Next Generation Solvent (NGS): Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Birdwell, Jr, Joseph F.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Duncan, Nathan C.; Ensor, Dale; Hill, Talon G.; Lee, Denise L.; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Roach, Benjamin D.; Szczygiel, Patricia L.; Frederick V. Sloop, Jr.; Stoner, Erica L.; Williams, Neil J.

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Interlaboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  17. The reorganization energy of electron transfer in nonpolar solvents: Molecular level treatment of the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontyev, I. V.; Tachiya, M.

    2005-12-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer in a solute pair consisting of pyrene and dimethylaniline is investigated in a nonpolar solvent, n-hexane. The earlier elaborated approach [M. Tachiya, J. Phys Chem. 97, 5911 (1993)] is used; this method provides a physically relevant background for separating inertial and inertialess polarization responses for both nonpolarizable and polarizable molecular level simulations. The molecular-dynamics technique was implemented for obtaining the equilibrium ensemble of solvent configurations. The nonpolar solvent, n-hexane, was treated in terms of OPLS-AA parametrization. Solute Lennard-Jones parameters were taken from the same parametrization. Solute charge distributions of the initial and final states were determined using ab initio level [HF/6-31G(d,p)] quantum-chemical calculations. Configuration analysis was performed explicitly taking into account the anisotropic polarizability of n-hexane. It is shown that the Gaussian law well describes calculated distribution functions of the solvent coordinate, therefore, the rate constant of the ET reaction can be characterized by the reorganization energy. Evaluated values of the reorganization energies are in a range of 0.03-0.11 eV and significant contribution (more then 40% of magnitude) comes from anisotropic polarizability. Investigation of the reorganization energy λ dependence on the solute pair separation distance d revealed unexpected behavior. The dependence has a very sharp peak at the distance d =7Å where solvent molecules are able to penetrate into the intermediate space between the solute pair. The reason for such behavior is clarified. This new effect has a purely molecular origin and cannot be described within conventional continuum solvent models.

  18. The reorganization energy of electron transfer in nonpolar solvents: Molecular level treatment of the solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Leontyev, I.V.; Tachiya, M.

    2005-12-08

    The intermolecular electron transfer in a solute pair consisting of pyrene and dimethylaniline is investigated in a nonpolar solvent, n-hexane. The earlier elaborated approach [M. Tachiya, J. Phys Chem. 97, 5911 (1993)] is used; this method provides a physically relevant background for separating inertial and inertialess polarization responses for both nonpolarizable and polarizable molecular level simulations. The molecular-dynamics technique was implemented for obtaining the equilibrium ensemble of solvent configurations. The nonpolar solvent, n-hexane, was treated in terms of OPLS-AA parametrization. Solute Lennard-Jones parameters were taken from the same parametrization. Solute charge distributions of the initial and final states were determined using ab initio level [HF/6-31G(d,p)] quantum-chemical calculations. Configuration analysis was performed explicitly taking into account the anisotropic polarizability of n-hexane. It is shown that the Gaussian law well describes calculated distribution functions of the solvent coordinate, therefore, the rate constant of the ET reaction can be characterized by the reorganization energy. Evaluated values of the reorganization energies are in a range of 0.03-0.11 eV and significant contribution (more then 40% of magnitude) comes from anisotropic polarizability. Investigation of the reorganization energy {lambda} dependence on the solute pair separation distance d revealed unexpected behavior. The dependence has a very sharp peak at the distance d=7 A where solvent molecules are able to penetrate into the intermediate space between the solute pair. The reason for such behavior is clarified. This new effect has a purely molecular origin and cannot be described within conventional continuum solvent models.

  19. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  20. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  1. Weak neutral current chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10{sup {minus}5} kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Weak neutral current chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10-5 kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production.

  3. Nanometrization of Lanthanide-Based Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Neaime, Chrystelle; Daiguebonne, Carole; Calvez, Guillaume; Freslon, Stéphane; Bernot, Kevin; Grasset, Fabien; Cordier, Stéphane; Guillou, Olivier

    2015-11-23

    Heteronuclear lanthanide-based coordination polymers are microcrystalline powders, the luminescence properties of which can be precisely tuned by judicious choice of the rare-earth ions. In this study, we demonstrate that such materials can also be obtained as stable solutions of nanoparticles in non-toxic polyols. Bulk powders of the formula [Ln2-2x Ln'2x (bdc)3 ⋅4 H2 O]∞ (where H2 bdc denotes 1,4-benzene-dicarboxylic acid, 0≤x≤1, and Ln and Ln' denote lanthanide ions of the series La to Tm plus Y) afford nanoparticles that have been characterized by dynamic light-scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Their luminescence properties are similar to those of the bulk materials. Stabilities versus time and versus dilution with another solvent have been studied. This study has revealed that it is possible to tune the size of the nanoparticles. This process offers a reliable means of synthesizing suspensions of nanoparticles with tunable luminescence properties and tunable size distributions in a green solvent (glycerol). The process is also extendable to other coordination polymers and other solvents (ethylene glycol, for example). It constitutes a new route for the facile solubilization of lanthanide-based coordination polymers.

  4. Binary Solvent Organization at Silica/Liquid Interfaces: Preferential Ordering in Acetonitrile-Methanol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gobrogge, Eric A; Walker, Robert A

    2014-08-07

    Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy experiments examined solvent organization at the silica/binary solvent interface where the binary solvent consisted of methanol and acetonitrile in varying mole fractions. Data were compared with surface vibrational spectra acquired from silica surfaces exposed to a vapor phase saturated with the same binary solvent mixtures. Changes in vibrational band intensities suggest that methanol ideally adsorbs to the silica/vapor interface but acetonitrile accumulates in excess relative to vapor-phase composition. At the silica/liquid interface, acetonitrile's signal increases until a solution phase mole fraction of ∼0.85. At higher acetonitrile concentrations, acetonitrile's signal decreases dramatically until only a weak signature persists with the neat solvent. This behavior is ascribed to dipole-paired acetonitrile forming a bilayer with the first sublayer associating with surface silanol groups and a second sublayer consisting of weakly associating, antiparallel partners. On the basis of recent simulations, we propose that the second sublayer accumulates in excess.

  5. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  6. Coupling of protein dynamics with the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gokhan; Sauzan, Azzam; Mehtani, Disha; Sokolov, Alexei

    2003-03-01

    Glycerol and trehalose are among the many viscous solvents that are widely used for biostabilization and controlling the dynamics of proteins. It is believed that the suppression of the structural relaxations by high viscosity of solvent is responsible for improved stability in proteins. However, results of [1] and [2] demonstrate stronger suppression of biochemical activity and dynamics of proteins by liquid glycerol than by solid trehalose in a wide temperature range. The authors tried to explain the counterintuitive observations by a possible decoupling of the dynamics of the protein from trehalose. In order to test the validity of this assumption and to investigate the influence of the fast dynamics in proteins, the low frequency Raman scattering spectroscopy technique is used. Both relaxational and vibrational dynamics of glycerol, trehalose, and lysozyme in glycerol and in trehalose are studied in a wide temperature range. Dynamics of lysozyme in glycerol follows the strong temperature dependence of relaxational and vibrational dynamics of the bulk glycerol. On the other hand, the weak temperature dependence of dynamics of lysozyme in trehalose follows exactly the behavior of pure trehalose. This proves that there is a strong dynamic coupling between the protein and the solvents used. Interestingly, stronger relaxations in solid trehalose as compared to liquid glycerol are observed in the GHz region at low temperatures. This could be the reason for the enhanced protein activity observed in trehalose, compared to that in glycerol in this temperature range. Suppression of these fast relaxations should be the key for providing long-term stability to proteins. 1. Sastry, G.M. and N. Agmon, Trehalose prevents myoglobin collapse and preserves its internal mobility. BIOCHEMISTRY, 1997, 36(23): p. 7097-108. 2. Caliskan, G., et al., Influence of solvent on dynamics and stability of a protein. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, 2002, 307-310: p. 887-893.

  7. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  8. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  9. Weak Measurements of Light Chirality with a Plasmonic Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetski, Y.; Bliokh, K. Y.; Stein, B.; Genet, C.; Shitrit, N.; Kleiner, V.; Hasman, E.; Ebbesen, T. W.

    2012-07-01

    We examine, both experimentally and theoretically, an interaction of tightly focused polarized light with a slit on a metal surface supporting plasmon-polariton modes. Remarkably, this simple system can be highly sensitive to the polarization of the incident light and offers a perfect quantum weak measurement tool with a built-in postselection in the plasmon-polariton mode. We observe the plasmonic spin Hall effect in both coordinate and momentum spaces which is interpreted as weak measurements of the helicity of light with real and imaginary weak values determined by the input polarization. Our experiment combines the advantages of (i) quantum weak measurements, (ii) near-field plasmonic systems, and (iii) high-numerical aperture microscopy in employing the spin-orbit interaction of light and probing light chirality.

  10. On the coupling of solvent characteristics to the electronic structure of solute molecules.

    PubMed

    Bogatko, Stuart; Cauët, Emilie; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank

    2014-02-28

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation focusing on the solvent structure surrounding the -1, 0 and +1 charged species of F, Cl, Br and I halogen atoms and F2, Cl2, Br2 and I2 di-halogen molecules in a methanol solvent and its influence on the electronic structure of the solute molecules. Our results show a large stabilizing effect arising from the solute-solvent interactions. Well-formed first solvation shells are observed for all species, the structure of which is strongly influenced by the charge of the solute species. Detailed analysis reveals that coordination number, CN, solvent orientation, θ, and solute-solvent distance, d, are important structural characteristics which are coupled to changes in the electronic structure of the solute. We propose that the fundamental chemistry of any solute species is generally regulated by these solvent degrees of freedom.

  11. Intestinal Transport of Weak Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael J.; Shiau, Yih-Fu; Bane, Susan; Fox, Margaret

    1974-01-01

    A study has been made of the transmural fluxes of benzoic, phenylacetic, and pentanoic acids, benzylamine, hexylamine, and D-amphetamine across rat jejunum incubated in vitro. The M to S fluxes of the weak acids were greater than their corresponding S to M fluxes, and the S to M fluxes of the weak bases were larger than their M to S fluxes. These patterns of asymmetric movements were observed when the transmural electrical potential difference was clamped at 0 mV, and when the pH values of the mucosal and serosal fluids were identical. The effects of a weak acid on the fluxes of other weak electrolytes were qualitatively similar when the effector weak acid was added to the mucosal fluid, and when it was added to the serosal fluid. But the effects of a weak base on the fluxes of other weak electrolytes were dependent upon its location, and the interactions observed when the effector weak base was added to the mucosal fluid were qualitatively different than those seen when it was added to the serosal fluid. The interactions between weak electrolytes could readily be explained in terms of the function of a system of three compartments in series, in which the pH of the intermediate compartment is greater than that of the bulk phases. But these observations could not be explained in terms of an analogous system involving an intermediate compartment of low pH, or in terms of a carrier mediated system. The transport function of the three-compartment system can be described in the form of an equation, and it is found that a pH difference of less than 0.5 unit may explain our observations on weak electrolyte transport. PMID:4812635

  12. U.S. Military Operations Within the Electromagnetic Spectrum: Operational Critical Weakness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-23

    informally coordinated. Within the NTIA, the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee ( IRAC ) coordinates the federal government use. Of the 22...representatives on the IRAC , DoD occupies a mere three seats.14 The relatively weak influence of the DoD on the spectrum allocation process puts it on a

  13. Femtosecond transient dichroism/birefringence studies of solute- solvent friction and solvent dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.J.; Castner, E.W. Jr.; Konitsky, W.; Waldeck, D.H.

    1994-02-01

    Ultrafast, heterodyne, polarization spectroscopies are used to measure solute-solvent frictional coupling and characterize the neat solvent`s relaxation dynamics on femtosecond and picosecond timescales.

  14. On the stability of weakly hyperbolic invariant sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begun, N. A.; Pliss, V. A.; Sell, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    The dynamical object which we study is a compact invariant set with a suitable hyperbolic structure. Stability of weakly hyperbolic sets was studied by V. A. Pliss and G. R. Sell (see [1,2]). They assumed that the neutral, unstable and stable linear spaces of the corresponding linearized systems satisfy Lipschitz condition. They showed that if a perturbation is small, then the perturbed system has a weakly hyperbolic set KY, which is homeomorphic to the weakly hyperbolic set K of the initial system, close to K, and the dynamics on KY is close to the dynamics on K. At the same time, it is known that the Lipschitz property is too strong in the sense that the set of systems without this property is generic. Hence, there was a need to introduce new methods of studying stability of weakly hyperbolic sets without Lipschitz condition. These new methods appeared in [16-20]. They were based on the local coordinates introduced in [18] and the continuous on the whole weakly hyperbolic set coordinates introduced in [19]. In this paper we will show that even without Lipschitz condition there exists a continuous mapping h such that h (K) =KY.

  15. Developmental coordination disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... with visual or fine motor coordination (for example, writing, using scissors, tying shoelaces, or tapping one finger ... take notes may help children who have trouble writing. Children with developmental coordination disorder are more likely ...

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  17. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  18. Cognitive Personal Coordination Assistants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    of TÆMS [2, 7], DTC agent scheduling [16, 19, 12], GPGP agent coordination [2, 1, 6], and a similar approach to team coordination [17]. From the...a tactical TÆMS view, and how a Generalized Partial Global Planning ( GPGP ) coordination mechanism operates over the tactical views. Although we don’t...Norman Carver, Alan Garvey, Daniel Neiman, and Nagendra Prasad. Evolution of the GPGP Domain-Independent Coordination Framework. Computer Science

  19. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases.

    PubMed

    Klein, Natalie M; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M; Carlson, Greg N; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2013-08-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee's common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g., the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these "weak definite" interpretations arise in "incorporated" constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g., hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g., farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. Scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti-familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis.

  20. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Natalie M.; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M.; Carlson, Greg N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee’s common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g. the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these “weak definite” interpretations arise in “incorporated” constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g. hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g. farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. The imagined scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti- familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis. PMID:23685208

  1. Processing Coordination Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Paul E.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    We examined temporarily ambiguous coordination structures such as "put the butter in the bowl and the pan on the towel." Minimal Attachment predicts that the ambiguous noun phrase "the pan" will be interpreted as a noun-phrase coordination structure because it is syntactically simpler than clausal coordination. Constraint-based…

  2. Analysis Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nothnagel, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the IVS analysis coordination issues of 2012. The IVS Analysis Coordinator is responsible for generating and disseminating the official IVS products. This requires consistency of the input data by strict adherence to models and conventions. The term of the current IVS Analysis Coordinator will end on February 28, 2013.

  3. Literacy Coordinators' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    This handbook is designed to provide support for England's National Literacy Strategy's Literacy Coordinators leading and coordinating literacy across the school. The handbook is designed as a working document and will contain additional materials, LEA (local education authorities) guidance, and additional papers which Coordinators may choose to…

  4. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  5. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Switchable Polarity Solvents: Are They Green?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaumann, Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Solvents play an incredibly important role in large scale chemical reactions. Switchable polarity solvents may prove to be a class of solvent that offers energy and material efficiencies greater than existing solvents. This paper examines such solvents and their potential in a variety of chemical reactions.

  7. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  8. Weak interactions and presupernova evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M.B. State Univ. of New York . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-02-19

    The role of weak interactions, particularly electron capture and {beta}{sup {minus}} decay, in presupernova evolution is discussed. The present uncertainty in these rates is examined and the possibility of improving the situation is addressed. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  9. [Acute muscle weakness: differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Antoniuk, Sérgio A

    2013-09-06

    Acute muscle weakness, a common disorder in pediatrics, can occur from impairment of any part of the motor unit, including the upper motor neuron, lower motor neuron, peripheral nerve, neuromuscular junction or muscle. It usually manifests itself as an acute or hyperacute motor disorder of progressive or rapidly progressive course. Acute muscle weakness is a neuromuscular emergency, especially if it affects the respiratory or oropharyngeal musculature. The location of the motor weakness and associated neurological signs and symptoms usually indicate the location of the lesion. The onset, speed and clinical evolution, as well as other data from the patient's history, suggest the pathophysiological differential diagnosis. Successful treatment depends on the immediate and correct differential diagnosis. This paper presents the main differential diagnosis of main neuromuscular diseases that cause acute muscle weakness in children.

  10. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  11. Solvent extraction of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes improvement in a process for solvent refining a hydrocarbon based lubricating oil stock containing aromatics and non-aromatics components with an extraction solvent wherein the lubricating oil stock is contacted with the extraction solvent in a first extraction zone at a first extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and a solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol % forming an aromatics-rich primary extract and an aromatics-lean primary raffinate of high viscosity index of at least 85. The improvement comprises: withdrawing and cooling the primary extract to a temperature 10{degrees} F to 120{degrees} F below the extraction temperature and admixing with 0.0 vol % to 10 vol % anti-solvent thereby forming a secondary extract and a secondary raffinate, passing the secondary raffinate to a second extraction zone wherein the secondary raffinate is contacted with the extraction solvent at a second extraction temperature in the range of 100{degrees} F to 250{degrees} F and solvent to oil dosage in the range of 75 to 500 vol %, to form an aromatics-lean tertiary raffinate phase of viscosity index 65 or greater.

  12. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  13. The influence of organic sample solvents on the separation efficiency of basic compounds under strong cation exchange mode.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhen; Yu, Dongping; Liu, Yanfang; Du, Nana; Tao, Yanduo; Mei, Lijuan; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-05-04

    This study investigated the influence of organic sample solvents on separation efficiency of basic compounds under strong cation exchange (SCX) mode. The mixtures of acidic aqueous solution and organic solvent such as acetonitrile, ethanol, methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were tested as sample solvents. For later-eluting analytes, the increase of sample solvent elution strength was responsible for the decrease of separation efficiency. Thus, sample solvents with weak elution strength could provide high separation efficiencies. For earlier-eluting analytes, the retention of organic sample solvents was the main factor affecting separation efficiency. Weakly retained solvents could provide high separation efficiency. In addition, an optimized approach was proposed to reduce the effect of organic sample solvent, in which low ionic solvent was employed as initial mobile phase in the gradient. At last, the analysis of impurities in hydrophobic drug berberine was performed. The results showed that using acidic aqueous methanol as sample solvents could provide high separation efficiency and good resolution (R>1.5).

  14. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  15. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  16. SOLV-DB: Solvents Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    SOLV-DB provides a specialized mix of information on commercially available solvents. The development of the database was funded under the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) with funds from EPA and DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies in EE. The information includes: • Health and safety considerations involved in choosing and using solvents • Chemical and physical data affecting the suitability of a particular solvent for a wide range of potential applications • Regulatory responsibilities, including exposure and effluent limits, hazard classification status with respect to several key statutes, and selected reporting requirements • Environmental fate data, to indicate whether a solvent is likely to break down or persist in air or water, and what types of waste treatment techniques may apply to it • CAS numbers (from Chemical Abstracts Service) and Sax Numbers (from Sax, et.al., Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials) Supplier Information See help information at http://solvdb.ncms.org/welcome.htm (Specialized Interface)

  17. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  18. One-dimensional alignment of strong Lewis acid sites in a porous coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Takashi; Higuchi, Masakazu; Yuasa, Akihiro; Higashimura, Hideyuki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2013-11-18

    A new lanthanoid porous coordination polymer, La-BTTc (BTTc = benzene-1,3,5-tris(2-thiophene-5-carboxylate)), was synthesized and structurally characterized to have densely aligned one-dimensional open metal sites, which were found to act as strong Lewis acid sites after the removal of the coordinated solvent.

  19. New insight of coordination and extraction of uranium(VI) with N-donating ligands in room temperature ionic liquids: N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyldipicolinamide as a case study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li-Yong; Sun, Man; Mei, Lei; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Li-Rong; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-02-16

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) represent a recent new class of solvents applied in liquid/liquid extraction based nuclear fuel reprocessing, whereas the related coordination chemistry and detailed extraction processes are still not well understood and remain of deep fundamental interest. The work herein provides a new insight of coordination and extraction of uranium(VI) with N-donating ligands, e.g., N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyldipicolinamide (EtpTDPA), in commonly used RTILs. Exploration of the extraction mechanism, speciation analyses of the extracted U(VI), and crystallographic studies of the interactions of EtpTDPA with U(VI) were performed, including the first structurally characterized UO2(EtpTDPA)2(NTf2) and UO2(EtpTDPA)2(PF6)2 compounds and a first case of crystallographic differentiation between the extracted U(VI) complexes in RTILs and in molecular solvents. It was found that in RTILs two EtpTDPA molecules coordinate with one U(VI) ion through the carbonyl and pyridine nitrogen moieties, while NTf2(-) and PF6(-) act as counterions. The absence of NO3(-) in the complexes is coincident with a cation-exchange extraction. In contrast, both the extracted species and extraction mechanisms are greatly different in dichloromethane, in which UO2(2+) coordinates in a neutral complex form with one EtpTDPA molecule and two NO3(-) cations. In addition, the complex formation in RTILs is independent of the cation exchange since incorporating UO2(NO3)2, EtpTDPA, and LiNTf2 or KPF6 in a solution also produces the same complex as that in RTILs, revealing the important roles of weakly coordinating anions on the coordination chemistry between U(VI) and EtpTDPA. These findings suggest that cation-exchange extraction mode for ILs-based extraction system probably originates from the supply of weakly coordinating anions from RTILs. Thus the coordination of uranium(VI) with extractants as well as the cation-exchange extraction mode may be potentially changed by varying the

  20. Charge segregation in weakly ionized microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, John S.; Douglas, Alison M.; Stanley, Chris; Do, Changwoo; Barker, Thomas H.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate microgels synthesized from N -isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) copolymerized with a large mol% of acrylic acid, finding that when the acid groups are partially ionized at high temperatures, competition between ion-induced swelling and hydrophobic deswelling of poly(NIPAM) chains results in microphase separation. In cross-linked microgels, this manifests as a dramatic decrease in the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius to ˜0.2 , indicating that almost all the mass of the microgel is concentrated near the particle center. We also observe a concurrent decrease of the polymer network length scale via small-angle neutron scattering, confirming the presence of a dense, deswollen core surrounded by a diffuse, charged periphery. We compare these results to those obtained for a system of charged ultralow-cross-linked microgels; the form factor shows a distinct peak at high q when the temperature exceeds a threshold value. We successfully fit the form factor to theory developed to describe scattering from weakly charged gels in poor solvents, and we tie this behavior to charge segregation in the case of the cross-linked microgels.

  1. Applied biotransformations in green solvents.

    PubMed

    Hernáiz, María J; Alcántara, Andrés R; García, José I; Sinisterra, José V

    2010-08-16

    The definite interest in implementing sustainable industrial technologies has impelled the use of biocatalysts (enzymes or cells), leading to high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivities under mild conditions. As usual substrates are not soluble in water, the employ of organic solvents is mandatory. We will focus on different attempts to combine the valuable properties of green solvents with the advantages of using biocatalysts for developing cleaner synthetic processes.

  2. Water as a solvent for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    “Follow the water” is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.Life is based on non-covalent interactions. They might be either specific (enzyme-substrate interactions, selective ion transport) or nonspecific (lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions). Their strength needs to be properly tuned, and this is mediated by the solvent. If interactions are too weak, there might be undesired response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they are too strong it could impede kinetics and energetics of cellular processes. Thus, the solvent must allow for balancing these interactions, which provides strong constraints for life.Water exhibits a remarkable trait that it promotes both solvophobic and solvophilic interactions. Solvophobic (hydrophobic in the case of water) interactions are necessary for self-organization of matter. They are responsible, among others, for the formation of membranes and protein folding. The diversity of structures supported by hydrophobic interactions is the hallmark of terrestrial life responsible for its diversity, evolution and the ability to survive environmental changes. Solvophilic interactions, in turn, are needed to ensure solubility of polar species. Water offers a large temperature domain of stable liquid and the characteristic hydrophobic effects are a consequence of the temperature insensitivity of essential properties of its liquid state. Water, however, might not be the only liquid with these properties. Properties of water and other pure liquids or their mixtures that have a high dielectric constant and simultaneously support self-organization will be

  3. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooner, Karta; Parameswaran, Susha; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  4. Weak values in continuous weak measurements of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lupei; Liang, Pengfei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2015-07-01

    For continuous weak measurements of qubits, we obtain exact expressions for weak values (WVs) from the postselection restricted average of measurement outputs, by using both the quantum-trajectory equation (QTE) and the quantum Bayesian approach. The former is applicable to short-time weak measurement, while the latter can relax the measurement strength to finite. We find that even in the "very" weak limit the result can be essentially different from the one originally proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman (AAV), in the sense that our result incorporates nonperturbative correction which could be important when the AAV WV is large. Within the Bayesian framework, we obtain also elegant expressions for finite measurement strength and find that the amplifier's noise in quantum measurement has no effect on the WVs. In particular, we obtain very useful results for homodyne measurement in a circuit-QED system, which allows for measuring the real and imaginary parts of the AAV WV by simply tuning the phase of the local oscillator. This advantage can be exploited as an efficient state-tomography technique.

  5. Weak localization and weak antilocalization in doped germanium epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, P. J.; Mansell, R.; Holmes, S. N.; Myronov, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2017-02-01

    The magnetoresistance of 50 nm thick epilayers of doped germanium is measured at a range of temperatures down to 1.6 K. Both n- and p-type devices show quantum corrections to the conductivity in an applied magnetic field, with n-type devices displaying weak localization and p-type devices showing weak antilocalization. From fits to these data using the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model, the phase coherence length of each device is extracted, as well as the spin diffusion length of the p-type device. We obtain phase coherence lengths as large as 325 nm in the highly doped n-type device, presenting possible applications in quantum technologies. The decay of the phase coherence length with temperature is found to obey the same power law of lϕ ∝ Tc, where c = -0.68 ± 0.03, for each device, in spite of the clear differences in the nature of the conduction. In the p-type device, the measured spin diffusion length does not change over the range of temperatures for which weak antilocalization can be observed. The presence of a spin-orbit interaction manifested as weak antilocalization in the p-type epilayer suggests that these structures could be developed for use in spintronic devices such as the spin-FET, where significant spin lifetimes would be important for efficient device operation.

  6. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. Two of its most publicized comological connections are emphasized: big bang nucleosynthesis and dark matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of neutrine flavors, N(sub nu) is approximately 3 which in now being confirmed. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galacty and structure formation in the universe. The role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure is demonstrated.

  7. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. ):)

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  9. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  10. Porous coordination polymer with flexibility imparted by coordinatively changeable lithium ions on the pore surface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lin-Hua; Lin, Jian-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Wei-Xiong; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2010-02-01

    Solvothermal reactions of equimolar zinc acetate, lithium acetate, and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H(3)btc) in different mixed solvents yielded isostructural three-dimensional frameworks [LiZn(btc)(cG)].lG [cG and lG denote coordinated and lattice guests, respectively; cG = (nmp)(0.5)(H(2)O)(0.5), lG = (EtOH)(0.5) (1a); cG = H(2)O, lG = EtOH (1b); nmp = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone] with one-dimensional channels occupied by guest molecules and solvent-coordinated, extrusive Li(+) ions. Thermogravimetry analyses and powder X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that both 1a and 1b can lose all lattice and coordinated guests to form a desolvated phase [LiZn(btc)] (MCF-27, 1) and almost retains the original framework structure. Gas adsorption measurements on 1 confirmed its permanent porosity but suggested a structural transformation from 1a/1b to 1. It is noteworthy that only 1a can undergo a single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) transformation into 1 upon desolvation. The crystal structure of 1 revealed that the Li(+) ions were retracted into the channel walls via complementary coordination to the carboxylate oxygen atoms in the framework rather than being exposed on the pore surface. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses were also performed for N(2)- and CO(2)-loaded samples of 1, revealing that the framework remained unchanged when the gases were adsorbed. Although the gas molecules could not be modeled, the residue electrons inside the channels demonstrated that the retracted Li(+) ions still behave as the primary interacting site for CO(2) molecules. Nevertheless, solvent molecules such as H(2)O can readily compete with the framework oxygen atom to retrieve the extrusive Li(+) ions, accompanying the reverse structural transformation, i.e., from 1 to 1a/1b.

  11. Anisotropic weak localization of light.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Riccardo; Mujumdar, Sushil; Cheung, Cecil; Yodh, A G; Wiersma, Diederik

    2004-01-23

    We have observed angular anisotropy in weak localization of light from highly scattering, orientationally ordered, nematic liquid crystals. This demonstration of angular anisotropy in a multiple-scattering interference phenomenon was facilitated by a light scattering instrument with extraordinary angular resolution. The measured anisotropies were consistent with a simple model of coherent backscattering generalized for propagation-direction dependent mean free paths.

  12. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  13. Theory of weak hypernuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dubach, J.F.; Feldman, G.B.; Holstein, B.R. |; de la Torre, L.

    1996-07-01

    The weak nomesonic decay of {Lambda}-hypernuclei is studied in the context of a one-meson-exchange model. Predictions are made for the decay rate, the {ital p}/{ital n} stimulation ratio and the asymmetry in polarized hypernuclear decay. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  14. Weak localization of seismic waves.

    PubMed

    Larose, E; Margerin, L; Van Tiggelen, B A; Campillo, M

    2004-07-23

    We report the observation of weak localization of seismic waves in a natural environment. It emerges as a doubling of the seismic energy around the source within a spot of the width of a wavelength, which is several tens of meters in our case. The characteristic time for its onset is the scattering mean-free time that quantifies the internal heterogeneity.

  15. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

  16. Weakly-bridged dimeric diorganotin(IV) compounds derived from pyruvic acid hydrazone Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, characterization and crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Min; Yin, Han-Dong; Cui, Ji-Chun

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis of four diorganotin(IV) compounds of Schiff base pyruvic acid hydrazone derivatives formulated as [R 2SnLY] 2, where L 1 is 2-SC 4H 3CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y = CH 3CH 2CH 2CH 2OH, R = n-Bu ( 1); L 2 is C 6H 5CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y = CH 3CH 2OH, R = p-F-Bz ( 2); L 3 is 2-HOC 6H 4CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y dbnd H 2O, R = p-CN -Bz ( 3); and L 4 is 4-NO 2-C 6H 4CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y dbnd CH 3CH 2OH, R = Bz ( 4). The structures of all compounds have been established by a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, 1H and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Studies reveal that four ligands present the same coordination mode with tin center, which all present tridentate ONO donor Schiff bases and coordinate to the tin center in an enolic form. In compounds 1- 4, each tin atom is seven-coordinated and exhibits a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with a planar SnO 4N unit and two apical alkyl carbon atoms, thus forming a weakly-bridged dimeric molecule. Additionally, the distance of Sn⋯O bridge in each compound is obviously affected by the choice of different alkyl groups and coordination solvent molecules, which fluctuates in the range of 2.571(5)-2.839(4) Å. Furthermore, the supramolecular structure analysis show that there are two types of supramolecular infrastructures, 1D chain or 2D network, which are formed by intermolecular O-H···N or C-H⋯X (X = O, N or F) hydrogen bonds.

  17. Coordinate Structures in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Charles F.

    1996-01-01

    Examines comparable speech and writing samples in the British and American components of the International Corpus of English (ICE) to study properties of coordinate structures in English. Findings indicate that "and" is a primary coordinator, that "but" and "or" are more peripheral, and that the concept of…

  18. The collective coordinates Jacobian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Moshe; Vinograd, Guy

    2002-05-01

    We develop an expansion for the Jacobian of the transformation from particle coordinates to collective coordinates. As a demonstration, we use the lowest order of the expansion in conjunction with a variational principle to obtain the Percus Yevick equation for a monodisperse hard sphere system and the Lebowitz equations for a polydisperse hard sphere system.

  19. Team coordination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  20. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  1. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  2. Transition Coordinators: Define Yourselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asselin, Susan B.; Todd-Allen, Mary; deFur, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Describes a technique that was used successfully to identify the changing roles and responsibilities of special educators as transition coordinators. The Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) model uses people who are currently working in the occupation to define job responsibilities. The duties of a transition coordinator are identified. (CR)

  3. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  4. Dielectric anisotropy in polar solvents under external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-08-01

    We investigate dielectric saturation and increment in polar liquids under external fields. We couple a previously introduced dipolar solvent model to a uniform electric field and derive the electrostatic kernel of interacting dipoles. This procedure allows an unambiguous definition of the liquid dielectric permittivity embodying non-linear dielectric response and correlation effects. We find that the presence of the external field results in a dielectric anisotropy characterized by a two-component dielectric permittivity tensor. The increase of the electric field amplifies the permittivity component parallel to the field direction, i.e. dielectric increment is observed along the field. However, the perpendicular component is lowered below the physiological permittivity {{\\varepsilon}w}≈ 77 , indicating dielectric saturation perpendicular to the field. By comparison with Molecular Dynamics simulations from the literature, we show that the mean-field level dielectric response theory underestimates dielectric saturation. The inclusion of dipolar correlations at the weak-coupling level intensify the mean-field level dielectric saturation and improves the agreement with simulation data at weak electric fields. The correlation-corrected theory predicts as well the presence of a metastable configuration corresponding to the antiparallel alignment of dipoles with the field. This prediction can be verified by solvent-explicit simulations where solvent molecules are expected to be trapped transiently in this metastable state.

  5. Color-weak compensation using local affine isometry based on discrimination threshold matching.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Rika; Kojima, Takanori; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2015-11-01

    We develop algorithms for color-weak compensation and color-weak simulation based on Riemannian geometry models of color spaces. The objective function introduced measures the match of color discrimination thresholds of average normal observers and a color-weak observer. The developed matching process makes use of local affine maps between color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers. The method can be used to generate displays of images that provide color-normal and color-weak observers with a similar color difference experience. It can also be used to simulate the perception of a color-weak observer for color-normal observers. We also introduce a new database of measurements of color discrimination threshold data for color-normal and color-weak observers obtained at different lightness levels in CIELUV space. The compensation methods include compensations of chromaticity using local affine maps between chromaticity planes of color-normal and color-weak observers, and one-dimensional (1D) compensation on lightness. We describe how to determine correspondences between the origins of local coordinates in color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers using a neighborhood expansion method. After matching the origins of the two coordinate systems, a local affine map is estimated by solving a nonlinear equation, or singular-value-decomposition (SVD). We apply the methods to natural images and evaluate their performance using the semantic differential (SD) method.

  6. Method of treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, W.; Mallek, H.; Plum, W.

    1981-07-07

    A method of and apparatus for treating radioactively contaminated solvent waste are claimed. The solvent waste is supplied to material such as peat, vermiculite, diaton, etc. This material effects the distribution or dispersion of the solvent and absorbs the foreign substances found in the solvent waste. Air or an inert gas flows through the material in order to pick up the solvent portions which are volatile as a consequence of their vapor pressure. The thus formed gas mixture, which includes air or inert gas and solvent portions, is purified in a known manner by thermal, electrical, or catalytic combustion of the solvent portions.

  7. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  8. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  9. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  10. Helpful hints for physical solvent absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W.

    1982-11-01

    Review of experience with natural gas treatment using physical solvents points to design and operating suggestions. Experiences with three plants using either Selexol or Sepasolv MPE solvent shows that both solvents perform well. The solvents offer economical and problem-free purification of natural gas. The Sepasolv MPE and Selexol solvents are very similar in chemical structure and physical properties. Thus, their application range is almost similar. An exchange is possible in most plants without equipment modification and/or process data.

  11. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Modeling Solvent Broadening on the Vibronic Spectra of a Series of Coumarin Dyes. From Implicit to Explicit Solvent Models.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Prampolini, Giacomo; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-12-08

    We present a protocol to estimate the solvent-induced broadening of electronic spectra based on a model that explicitly takes into account the environment embedding the solute. Starting from a classical approximation of the solvent contribution to the spectrum, the broadening arises from the spread of the excitation energies due to the fluctuation of the solvent coordinates, and it is represented as a Gaussian line shape that convolutes the vibronic spectrum of the solute. The latter is computed in harmonic approximation at room temperature with a time-dependent approach. The proposed protocol for the computation of spectral broadening exploits molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the solute-solvent system, keeping the solute degrees of freedom frozen, followed by the computation of the excitation properties with a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The factors that might influence each step of the protocol are analyzed in detail, including the selection of the empirical force field (FF) adopted in the MD simulations and the QM/MM partition of the system to compute the excitation energies. The procedure is applied to a family of coumarin dyes, and the results are compared with experiments and with the predictions of a very recent work (Cerezo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 11401-11411), where an implicit model was adopted for the solvent. The final spectra of the considered coumarins were obtained without including ad hoc phenomenological parameters and indicate that the broadenings computed with explicit and implicit models both follow the experimental trend, increasing as the polarity change from the initial to the final state increases. More in detail, the implicit model provides larger estimations of the broadening that are closer to the experimental evidence, while explicit models appear to better capture relative differences arising from different solvents or different solutes. Possible inaccuracies of the adopted

  13. Automated Solvent Seaming of Large Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Robert; Moore, James D.; Talley, Chris; Gierow, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    A solvent-based welding process enables the joining of precise, cast polyimide membranes at their edges to form larger precise membranes. The process creates a homogeneous, optical-quality seam between abutting membranes, with no overlap and with only a very localized area of figure disturbance. The seam retains 90 percent of the strength of the parent material. The process was developed for original use in the fabrication of wide-aperture membrane optics, with areal densities of less than 1 kg/m2, for lightweight telescopes, solar concentrators, antennas, and the like to be deployed in outer space. The process is just as well applicable to the fabrication of large precise polyimide membranes for flat or inflatable solar concentrators and antenna reflectors for terrestrial applications. The process is applicable to cast membranes made of CP1 (or equivalent) polyimide. The process begins with the precise fitting together and fixturing of two membrane segments. The seam is formed by applying a metered amount of a doped solution of the same polyimide along the abutting edges of the membrane segments. After the solution has been applied, the fixtured films are allowed to dry and are then cured by convective heating. The weld material is the same as the parent material, so that what is formed is a homogeneous, strong joint that is almost indistinguishable from the parent material. The success of the process is highly dependent on formulation of the seaming solution from the correct proportion of the polyimide in a suitable solvent. In addition, the formation of reliable seams depends on the deposition of a precise amount of the seaming solution along the seam line. To ensure the required precision, deposition is performed by use of an automated apparatus comprising a modified commercially available, large-format, ink-jet print head on an automated positioning table. The printing head jets the seaming solution into the seam area at a rate controlled in coordination with

  14. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output 〈o〉 of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ρ{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ρ{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling λ, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but 〈o〉 stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and λ, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification 〈o〉 cannot exceed the initial uncertainty σ{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain 〈o〉≫σ{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  15. Solvent Influences on the Molecular Aggregation of Magnesium Aryloxides

    SciTech Connect

    ZECHMANN,CECILIA A.; BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; KEMP,RICHARD A.

    2000-07-14

    Magnesium aryloxides were prepared in a variety of solvents through the reaction of dibutyl magnesium with sterically varied aryl alcohols: 2,6-dimethylphenol (H-DMP), 2,6-diisopropylphenol (H-DIP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (H-TCP). Upon using a sufficiently strong Lewis-basic solvent, the monomeric species Mg(DMP){sub 2}(py){sub 3} (1, py = pyridine), Mg(DIP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, (2a, THF = tetrahydrofuran) Mg(TCP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3} (3) were isolated. Each of these complexes possesses a five-coordinate magnesium that adopts a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In the absence of a Lewis base, the reaction with H-DIP yields a soluble trinuclear complex, [Mg(DIP){sub 2}]{sub 3} (2b). The Mg metal centers in 2b adopt a linear arrangement with a four-coordinate central metal while the outer metal centers are reduced to just three-coordinate. Solution spectroscopic methods suggest that while 2b remains intact, the monomeric species (1, 2a, and 3) are involved in equilibria, which facilitate intermolecular ligand transfer.

  16. Weak polyelectrolyte layers: tunning properties at the local level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szleifer, Igal

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the properties of grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers using a molecular theoretical approach. The theory explicitly includes the conformations of the chain molecules, the charge distribution of each conformation and the size, shape and charge of the coions and counterions. For the case of weak polyelectrolytes we also include the local acid-base equilibrium of the polymers segments, depending upon the local concentration of free protons. We have studied the structural and thermodynamic properties of model poly acrylic acid (PAA). The results of the calculations for the height of the polymer layer are in very good agreement with the experimental observations of the Genzer group. We will consider two different cases of bulk pH. One is the same value as the pKa of the acidic groups and the other is two units higher. We will show that the concentration of protons in the interior of the polymer layer can change by two orders of magnitude within a nanometer. These large ``local pH'' changes depend upon the bulk salt concentration and result in dramatic changes on the structure of the polymer brush. We will also consider the effect of solvent on the structure of the polymer layer. In particular, we concentrate our attention to the cases in which water is a poor solvent for the polymer segments when they are uncharged. The solvent effect results in an interesting competition between charging the groups to keep them in good solvent environment and uncharging driven by the local proton concentration. Finally, we will show the adsorption of charged particles on the weak polyelectrolyte layers and compare it with adsorption on strong grafted polyelectrolytes. The amount and structure of the adsorbed layers is very diffferent in the two cases. The changes in the adsorption with polymer chain length and surface coverage for both types of polymers will be discussed. Finally, a discussion of the competition between the different degrees of freedom in the system and

  17. Surfactant-Mediated Transfer of Colloidal Silica Particles from Water into an Immiscible Weakly Polar Solvent.

    PubMed

    Kasseh; Keh

    1998-12-01

    Spontaneous transfer of discrete colloidal silica particles from water into 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanone (DH) is obtained upon preliminary adsorption of dodecylbenzyldimethylammonium bromide (DBDAB) from the aqueous phase onto the solid. Partitioning of the surfactant between the silica surface and both liquid phases is evaluated through the determination of the isotherm in the aqueous phase, taking into account their mutual solubility. The organosol particles are found to be covered by a statistical monolayer of surfactant molecules presumably hydrated to the extent of 20% on a mole ratio basis. Monodispersion of this stable suspension is ascertained by dynamic light scattering. Evidence of DBDAB association in the monolayer emerges from the conductimetric behavior of the amphiphile in DH and from the reversal of the silica native charge in the organosol, as shown by electrophoretic mobility determinations. Disorganization of the water layer contacting silica upon adsorption of DBDAB is argumented to originate from the presence of sparsely distributed dodecyl chains. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  18. Tomography and weak lensing statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Munshi, Dipak; Coles, Peter; Kilbinger, Martin E-mail: peter.coles@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We provide generic predictions for the lower order cumulants of weak lensing maps, and their correlators for tomographic bins as well as in three dimensions (3D). Using small-angle approximation, we derive the corresponding one- and two-point probability distribution function for the tomographic maps from different bins and for 3D convergence maps. The modelling of weak lensing statistics is obtained by adopting a detailed prescription for the underlying density contrast that involves hierarchal ansatz and lognormal distribution. We study the dependence of our results on cosmological parameters and source distributions corresponding to the realistic surveys such as LSST and DES. We briefly outline how photometric redshift information can be incorporated in our results. We also show how topological properties of convergence maps can be quantified using our results.

  19. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  20. General curvilinear coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The basic ideas of the construction and use of numerically-generated boundary-fitted coordinate systems for the numerical solution of partial differential equations are discussed. With such coordinate systems, all computation can be done on a fixed square grid in the rectangular transformed region regardless of the shape or movement of the physical boundaries. A number of different types of configurations for the transformed region and the basic transformation relations from a cartesian system to a general curvilinear system are given. The material of this paper is applicable to all types of coordinate system generation.

  1. Uranyl ion coordination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.

    1963-01-01

    A review of the known crystal structures containing the uranyl ion shows that plane-pentagon coordination is equally as prevalent as plane-square or plane-hexagon. It is suggested that puckered-hexagon configurations of OH - or H2O about the uranyl group will tend to revert to plane-pentagon coordination. The concept of pentagonal coordination is invoked for possible explanations of the complex crystallography of the natural uranyl hydroxides and the unusual behavior of polynuclear ions in hydrolyzed uranyl solutions.

  2. A flexible polymer chain in a critical solvent: Coil or globule?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Georgi, N.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-02-01

    We study the behavior of a flexible polymer chain in the presence of a low-molecular weight solvent in the vicinity of a liquid-gas critical point within the framework of a self-consistent field theory. The total free energy of the dilute polymer solution is expressed as a function of the radius of gyration of the polymer and the average solvent number density within the gyration volume at the level of the mean-field approximation. Varying the strength of attraction between polymer and solvent we show that two qualitatively different regimes occur at the liquid-gas critical point. In case of weak polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain is in a globular state. On the contrary, in case of strong polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain attains an expanded conformation. We discuss the influence of the critical solvent density fluctuations on the polymer conformation. The reported effect could be used to excert control on the polymer conformation by changing the thermodynamic state of the solvent. It could also be helpful to estimate the solvent density within the gyration volume of the polymer for drug delivery and molecular imprinting applications.

  3. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions.

    PubMed

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-11-21

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B2) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {χαβ} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B2, and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents.

  4. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-11-01

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 ) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {χαβ} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 , and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B 2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B 2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents.

  5. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states – as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  6. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Wittrup, Inge; Burau, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs. Theory and Methods The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data. Results The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs. Discussion In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management. PMID:26528097

  7. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. -- Highlights: ► The potential for organic solvents to cause Parkinson's disease has been reviewed. ► Twins study suggests etiologic relations with chlorinated solvents and Parkinson's. ► Animal studies with TCE showed potential to cause damage to dopaminergic neurons. ► Need to determine if effects in animals are relevant to human exposure

  8. Movement and Coordination

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Fitness Nutrition Toilet Training Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Toddler > Movement and Coordination Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  9. Organic Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Luterbacher, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Transforming lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been intensely studied in recent years. A large amount of work has been dedicated to finding suitable solvent systems, which can improve the transformation of biomass into value-added chemicals. These efforts have been undertaken based on numerous research results that have shown that organic solvents can improve both conversion and selectivity of biomass to platform molecules. We present an overview of these organic solvent effects, which are harnessed in biomass conversion processes, including conversion of biomass to sugars, conversion of sugars to furanic compounds, and production of lignin monomers. A special emphasis is placed on comparing the solvent effects on conversion and product selectivity in water with those in organic solvents while discussing the origins of the differences that arise. We have categorized results as benefiting from two major types of effects: solvent effects on solubility of biomass components including cellulose and lignin and solvent effects on chemical thermodynamics including those affecting reactants, intermediates, products, and/or catalysts. Finally, the challenges of using organic solvents in industrial processes are discussed from the perspective of solvent cost, solvent stability, and solvent safety. We suggest that a holistic view of solvent effects, the mechanistic elucidation of these effects, and the careful consideration of the challenges associated with solvent use could assist researchers in choosing and designing improved solvent systems for targeted biomass conversion processes.

  10. Polder maps: improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Moriarty, Nigel W; Poon, Billy K; Sobolev, Oleg V; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factors and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. The tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX.

  11. Polder maps: Improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent

    DOE PAGES

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; ...

    2017-02-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factorsmore » and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. As a result, the tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX.« less

  12. Polder maps: improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Poon, Billy K.; Sobolev, Oleg V.; Adams, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factors and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. The tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX. PMID:28177311

  13. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area.

  14. Structure modulation of manganese coordination polymers consisting of 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yongbing; Wang, Jingjing; Tao, Yinhua; Chen, Jinxi; Mishima, Akio; Ohba, Masaaki

    2014-06-14

    Three new manganese coordination polymers, {[Mn2(1,4-NDC)2(phen)2](H2O)}n (1), [Mn2(1,4-NDC)2(phen)(H2O)]n (2) and {[Mn4(1,4-NDC)4(phen)4](DMF)2}n (3) (1,4-H2NDC = 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), have been synthesized solvo/hydrothermally. 1,4-NDC(2-) ligands adopt different coordination modes under different solvents and concentrations which promotes different crystal structure formation. X-ray crystal structural data reveal that compounds 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space groups C2/c, P21/c and C2/c, respectively. Compound 1 has Mn2 dimers connected by 1,4-NDC(2-) linkers, packing into a 2D structure in a grid pattern. Compound 2 has a three-dimensional (3D) structure which is constructed by Mn2 dimers and 1,4-NDC(2-) linkers. Each MnO4N2 node of compound 3 is linked to another by 1,4-NDC(2-) ligands to form a two-dimensional (2D) structure. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities of compounds 1-3 exhibit overall weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Mn(II) ions.

  15. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  16. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  17. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  18. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  19. Insights into the effects of solvent properties in graphene based electric double-layer capacitors with organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Bo, Zheng; Yang, Huachao; Yang, Jinyuan; Duan, Liangping; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-12-01

    Organic electrolytes are widely used in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). In this work, the microstructure of planar graphene-based EDLCs with different organic solvents are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that an increase of solvent polarity could weaken the accumulation of counter-ions nearby the electrode surface, due to the screen of electrode charges and relatively lower ionic desolvation. It thus suggests that solvents with low polarity could be preferable to yield high EDL capacitance. Meanwhile, the significant effects of the size and structure of solvent molecules are reflected by non-electrostatic molecule-electrode interactions, further influencing the adsorption of solvent molecules on electrode surface. Compared with dimethyl carbonate, γ-butyrolactone, and propylene carbonate, acetonitrile with relatively small-size and linear structure owns weak non-electrostatic interactions, which favors the easy re-orientation of solvent molecules. Moreover, the shift of solvent orientation in surface layer, from parallel orientation to perpendicular orientation relative to the electrode surface, deciphers the solvent twin-peak behavior near negative electrode. The as-obtained insights into the roles of solvent properties on the interplays among particles and electrodes elucidate the solvent influences on the microstructure and capacitive behavior of EDLCs using organic electrolytes.

  20. Nitromethane as solvent in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Xavier; Porras, Simo P; Rosés, Martí; Kenndler, Ernst

    2005-06-24

    Nitromethane has several properties that make it an interesting solvent for capillary electrophoresis especially for lipophilic analytes that are not sufficiently soluble in water: freezing and boiling points are suitable for laboratory conditions, low viscosity leads to favourable electrophoretic mobilities, or an intermediate dielectric constant enables dissolution of electrolytes. In the present work we investigate the change of electrophoretically relevant analyte properties - mobilities and pKa values - in nitromethane in dependence on the most important experimental conditions determined by the background electrolyte: the ionic strength, I, and the pH. It was found that the mobility decreases with increasing ionic strength (by, e.g. up to 30% from I = 0 to 50 mmol/L) according to theory. An appropriate pH scale is established by the aid of applying different concentration ratios of a buffer acid with known pKa and its conjugate base. The mobility of the anionic analytes (from weak neutral acids) depends on the pH with the typical sigmoidal curve in accordance with theory. The pKa of neutral acids derived from these curves is shifted by as much as 14 pK units in nitromethane compared to water. Both findings confirm the agreement of the electrophoretic behaviour of the analytes with theories of electrolyte solutions. Separation of several neutral analytes was demonstrated upon formation of charged complexes due to heteroconjugation with chloride as ionic constituent of the background electrolyte.

  1. Framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Jörn; Charoy, François; El Khoury, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Recent disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, have shown several issues for the coordination of human activities in these dynamic situations. Contemporary tools for the coordination used in the disaster response, such as e-mail, Whiteboards or phones, only allow for unstructured coordination, which can cause coordination problems. Hence, we discuss about the current information systems for coordinating the activities in a structured manner and identify their weaknesses in the context of a process modelling effort conducted together with experienced disaster managers. Afterwards, we propose a framework for coordination of activities in dynamic situations. The framework presented in this paper has been implemented as an extension to an open collaboration service. This shows how it can be used in the context of other tools required for disaster response management, such as maps, pictures or videos of the situation. The work described here is the foundation for enabling inter-organisational coordination of activities relevant in other domains, e.g. enterprise support processes, production processes or distributed software development projects. Furthermore, comments by disaster managers show that the concepts are relevant for their work. The expected impact is a more effective and efficient coordination of human activities in dynamic situations by structuring what needs to be coordinated.

  2. One-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay in laboratory coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Galeao, A. P.; Barbero, C.; De Conti, C.; Krmpotic, F.

    2013-05-06

    We present a formalism for the computation of one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic weak hypernuclear decay rates in laboratory coordinates, within an independent-particle shell model framework, with a view to its generalization to the case of two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  3. Weak interactions at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q/sup 2/ at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of ..sqrt.. s,L = 40Tev, 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  4. The weak scale from BBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Pinner, David; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2014-12-01

    The measured values of the weak scale, v, and the first generation masses, m u, d, e , are simultaneously explained in the multiverse, with all these parameters scanning independently. At the same time, several remarkable coincidences are understood. Small variations in these parameters away from their measured values lead to the instability of hydrogen, the instability of heavy nuclei, and either a hydrogen or a helium dominated universe from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In the 4d parameter space of ( m u , m d , m e , v), catastrophic boundaries are reached by separately increasing each parameter above its measured value by a factor of (1.4, 1.3, 2.5, ˜ 5), respectively. The fine-tuning problem of the weak scale in the Standard Model is solved: as v is increased beyond the observed value, it is impossible to maintain a significant cosmological hydrogen abundance for any values of m u, d, e that yield both hydrogen and heavy nuclei stability.

  5. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misono, Yasuhito; Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Limantara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi; Itoh, Koichi

    1995-04-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra were measured for the cation radical of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone, methanol, dichloromethane and mixed solvents of acetone and methanol. The ring-breathing (C a-C m stretching) frequency of the radical (abbreviated as vr+) was observed at 1601 cm -1 in acetone (forming a penta-coordinated monomer), at 1587 cm -1 in a methanol (forming a hexa-coordinated monomer) and at 1600 cm -1 in dichloromethane (forming a penta-coordinated aggregate). The RR spectrum of the radical in dichloromethane is almost identical to the transient RR spectrum ascribed to 'the aggregated T 1 species of Bchl a' formed in the particular solvent by Nishizawa, Limantara, Nanjou, Nagae, Kakuno and Koyama, indicating that their interpretation needs to be revised.

  6. Is Water a Universal Solvent for Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There are strong reasons to believe that the laws, principles and constraints of physics and chemistry are universal. It is much less clear how this universality translates into our understanding of the origins of life. Conventionally, discussions of this topic focus on chemistry that must be sufficiently rich to seed life. Although this is clearly a prerequisite for the emergence of living systems, I propose to focus instead on self-organization of matter into functional structures capable of reproduction, evolution and responding to environmental changes. In biology, most essential functions are largely mediated by noncovalent interactions (interactions that do not involve making or breaking chemical bonds). Forming chemical bonds is only a small part of what living systems do. There are specific implications of this point of view for universality. I will concentrate on one of these implications. Strength of non-covalent interactions must be properly tuned. If they were too weak, the system would exhibit undesired, uncontrolled response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they were too strong kinetics of biological processes would be slow and energetics costly. This balance, however, is not a natural property of complex chemical systems. Instead, it has to be achieved with the aid of an appropriate solvent for life. In particular, potential solvents for life must be characterized by a high dielectric constant to ensure solubility of polar species and sufficient flexibility of biological structures stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Among these solvents, water exhibits a remarkable trait that it also promotes solvophobic (hydrophobic) interactions between non-polar species, typically manifested by a tendency of these species to aggregate and minimize their contacts with the aqueous solvent. Hydrophobic interactions are responsible, at least in part, for many self-organization phenomena in biological systems, such as the formation

  7. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  8. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  9. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  10. New iron(II) spin crossover coordination polymers [Fe(μ-atrz)3]X2·2H2O (X = ClO4¯, BF4¯) and [Fe(μ-atrz)(μ-pyz)(NCS)2]·4H2O with an interesting solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yu-Chun; Liu, Chi-Tsun; Sheu, Chou-Fu; Ho, Wei-Lun; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Wang, Chih-Cheh; Wang, Yu

    2012-04-16

    A potential bridging triazole-based ligand, atrz (trans-4,4'-azo-1,2,4-triazole), is chosen to serve as building sticks and incorporated with a spin crossover metal center to form a metal organic framework. Coordination polymers of iron(II) with the formula [Fe(μ-atrz)(3)]X(2)·2H(2)O (where X = ClO(4)(-) (1·2H(2)O) and BF(4)(-) (2·2H(2)O)) in a 3D framework and [Fe(μ-atrz)(μ-pyz)(NCS)(2)]·4H(2)O (3·4H(2)O) in a 2D layer structure were synthesized and structurally characterized. The magnetic measurements of 1·2H(2)O and 2·2H(2)O reveal spin transitions near room temperature; that of 3 exhibits an abrupt spin transition at ~200 K with a wide thermal hysteresis, and the spin transition behavior of these polymers are apparently correlated with the water content of the sample. Crystal structures have been determined both at high spin and at low spin states for 1·2H(2)O, 2·2H(2)O, and 3·4H(2)O. Each iron(II) center in 1·2H(2)O and 2·2H(2)O is octahedrally coordinated with six μ-atrz ligands, which in turn links the other Fe center forming a strong three-dimensional (3D) network; counteranion and water molecules are located in the voids of the lattice. The FeN(6) octahedron of 3·4H(2)O is formed with two atrz, two pyrazine (pyz) ligands, and two NCS(-) ligands, where the ligands atrz and pyz are bridged between iron centers forming a 2D layer polymer. A zigzag chain of water molecules is found between the layers, and there is a distinct correlation between the thermal hysteresis with the amount of water molecules the exist in the crystal.

  11. Coordination polymer gels with important environmental and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong Hwa; Lee, Ji Ha; Silverman, Julian R; John, George

    2013-02-07

    Coordination Polymer Gels (CPGs) constitute a subset of solid-like metal ion and bridging organic ligand structures (similar to metal-organic frameworks) that form multi-dimensional networks through a trapped solvent as a result of non-covalent interactions. While physical properties of these gels are similar to conventional high molecular weight organic polymer gels, coordination polymer gel systems are often fully reversible and can be assembled and disassembled in the presence of additional energy (heat, sonication, shaking) to give a solution of solvated gelators. Compared to gels resulting from purely organic self-assembled low molecular weight gelators, metal ions incorporated into the fibrilar networks spanning the bulk solvent can impart CPGs with added functionalities. The solid/liquid nature of the gels allows for species to migrate through the gel system and interact with metals, ligands, and the solvent. Chemosensing, catalysis, fluorescence, and drug-delivery applications are some of the many potential uses for these dynamic systems, taking advantage of the metal ion's coordination, the organic polydentate ligand's orientation and functionality, or a combination of these properties. By fine tuning these systems through metal ion and ligand selection and by directing self-assembly with external stimuli the rational synthesis of practical systems can be envisaged.

  12. Quantifying the Molecular Origins of Opposite Solvent Effects on Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Han, Alvin X.; Pek, Han B.; Loo, Bernard L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the nature of solvent-protein interactions is generally weak and non-specific, addition of cosolvents such as denaturants and osmolytes strengthens protein-protein interactions for some proteins, whereas it weakens protein-protein interactions for others. This is exemplified by the puzzling observation that addition of glycerol oppositely affects the association constants of two antibodies, D1.3 and D44.1, with lysozyme. To resolve this conundrum, we develop a methodology based on the thermodynamic principles of preferential interaction theory and the quantitative characterization of local protein solvation from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that changes of preferential solvent interactions at the protein-protein interface quantitatively account for the opposite effects of glycerol on the antibody-antigen association constants. Detailed characterization of local protein solvation in the free and associated protein states reveals how opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions depend on the extent of dewetting of the protein-protein contact region and on structural changes that alter cooperative solvent-protein interactions at the periphery of the protein-protein interface. These results demonstrate the direct relationship between macroscopic solvent effects on protein-protein interactions and atom-scale solvent-protein interactions, and establish a general methodology for predicting and understanding solvent effects on protein-protein interactions in diverse biological environments. PMID:23696727

  13. Effect of the Solvent Temperatures on Dynamics of Serine Protease Proteinase K

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Peng; Yang, Qiong; Du, Xing; Yang, Nan; Yang, Li-Quan; Ji, Xing-Lai; Fu, Yun-Xin; Meng, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about the effect of the solvent temperatures on protein dynamics, multiple long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of serine protease proteinase K with the solute and solvent coupled to different temperatures (either 300 or 180 K) have been performed. Comparative analyses demonstrate that the internal flexibility and mobility of proteinase K are strongly dependent on the solvent temperatures but weakly on the protein temperatures. The constructed free energy landscapes (FELs) at the high solvent temperatures exhibit a more rugged surface, broader spanning range, and higher minimum free energy level than do those at the low solvent temperatures. Comparison between the dynamic hydrogen bond (HB) numbers reveals that the high solvent temperatures intensify the competitive HB interactions between water molecules and protein surface atoms, and this in turn exacerbates the competitive HB interactions between protein internal atoms, thus enhancing the conformational flexibility and facilitating the collective motions of the protein. A refined FEL model was proposed to explain the role of the solvent mobility in facilitating the cascade amplification of microscopic motions of atoms and atomic groups into the global collective motions of the protein. PMID:26907253

  14. A man with worsening weakness.

    PubMed

    Proietti, G; Puliti, M; Tulli, F; Silvestri, M

    1999-01-01

    The contemporary presence of organomegaly, skin manifestations, polyneuropathy, endocrinopathy and monoclonal component characterises the POEMS syndrome, often associated with osteosclerotic myeloma and Castelman's disease and more frequent in the Japanese. Clinical manifestations seem to be related to the production of many interleukins, mainly IL-1, IL-6 and TNF. Several endocrinopathies have been described, the most frequent being diabetes. Only one previous case of hypoparathyroidism associated with the syndrome has been described in medical reviews. Polyneuropathy is often sensitivo-motory and skin disease accounts for Raynaud phenomenon, skin pigmentation, hypertricosis and others. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man who underwent clinical examination for weakness mainly in the legs. Clinical and instrumental data showed rhabdomyolysis due to hypoparathyroidism. The contemporary presence of a monoclonal band of light chains on proteic electrophoresis, organomegaly and distal leg neuropathy allowed us to make a diagnosis of POEMS syndrome.

  15. Weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.M.; Brio, M.; Kruse, M.T.; Zank, G.P.

    1999-06-01

    Equations describing weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interactions in one Cartesian space dimension are discussed. For wave propagation in uniform media, the wave interactions of interest consist of: (a) three-wave resonant interactions in which high frequency waves, may evolve on long space and time scales if the wave phases satisfy the resonance conditions; (b) Burgers self-wave steepening for the magnetoacoustic waves, and (c) mean wave field effects, in which a particular wave interacts with the mean wave field of the other waves. For wave propagation in non-uniform media, further linear wave mixing terms appear in the equations. The equations describe four types of resonant triads: slow-fast magnetosonic wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-entropy wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-magnetosonic wave interaction; and magnetosonic-entropy wave interaction. The formalism is restricted to coherent wave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  17. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F; Venturini, Cristina de G; Machado, Vanderlei G

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy (E(T)) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The E(T) values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  18. Deterministic weak localization in periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Larkin, A

    2005-12-09

    In some perfect periodic structures classical motion exhibits deterministic diffusion. For such systems we present the weak localization theory. As a manifestation for the velocity autocorrelation function a universal power law decay is predicted to appear at four Ehrenfest times. This deterministic weak localization is robust against weak quenched disorders, which may be confirmed by coherent backscattering measurements of periodic photonic crystals.

  19. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Vandergrift, George F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  20. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Parallel Coordinate Axes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Alex; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Several methods of numerical mappings other than the usual cartesian coordinate system are considered. Some examples using parallel axes representation, which are seen to lead to aesthetically pleasing or interesting configurations, are presented. Exercises with alternative representations can stimulate pupil imagination and exploration in…

  2. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  3. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  4. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  5. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  6. Profiling Computing Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sigrid; Morton, Allan

    The people responsible for managing school computing resources in Australia have become known as Computing Coordinators. To date there has been no large systematic study of the role, responsibilities and characteristics of this position. This paper represents a first attempt to provide information on the functions and attributes of the Computing…

  7. Manual for Youth Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Youth Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    This manual was designed primarily for use by coordinators responsible for developing comprehensive community youth opportunity programs of employment, education, and recreation, but the material may also be of assistance to community and business leaders, educators, and others involved in expanding local opportunities for young people. Contents…

  8. Origins of Coordinate Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the origins of post-coordinate searching and emphasizes that the focal point should be on the searcher, not on the item being indexed. Highlights include the history of the term information retrieval; edge notched punch cards; the "peek-a-boo" system; the Uniterm system; and using computers to search for information. (LRW)

  9. Weak D in the Tunisian population

    PubMed Central

    Ouchari, Mouna; Romdhane, Houda; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama; Yacoub, Saloua Jemni

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 90 weak D types have been discovered to date. As there are no published data on the frequencies of weak D types in the Tunisian population, the aim of this study was to determine the composition of weak D alleles in our population. Material and methods Blood samples from 1777 D+ and 223 D− blood donors were tested for markers 809G, 1154C, 8G, 602G, 667G, 446A, and 885T relative to translation start codon by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers to estimate the frequencies of weak D type 1, weak D type 2, weak D type 3, weak D type 4, weak D type 5 and weak D type 11 in our population. Twenty-three samples with positive reactions were re-evaluated by DNA sequencing of RHD exons 1–10 and adjacent intronic sequences. Results Among the D+ donor cohort, weak D type 4 was the most prevalent allele (n=33, 1.2%) followed by weak D type 2 (n=6, 0.17%), weak D type 1 (n=4, 0.11%), and weak D type 5 (n=1, 0.28%) and weak D type 11 (n=1, 0.28%). RHD sequencing identified a weak D type 4.0 allele in all 19 samples tested. Among the D− pool, comprising 223 samples, we detected one sample with weak D type 4.0 associated with a C+c+E−e+ phenotype which had been missed by routine serological methods. Discussion Weak D type 4.0 appears to be the most prevalent weak D in our population. However, all samples must be sequenced in order to determine the exact subtype of weak D type 4, since weak D type 4.2 has considerable clinical importance, being associated with anti-D alloimmunisation. One case of weak D type 4 associated with dCe in trans had been missed by serology, so quality control of serological tests should be developed in our country. PMID:25369614

  10. Assembly of Cerium(III) 2,2'-Bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylate-based Metal–Organic Frameworks by Solvent Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan, Ozan; Malaestean, Iurie L.; Ellern, Arkady; van Leusen, Jan; Baca, Svetlana G.; Kögerler, Paul

    2014-07-02

    Two cerium(III) 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylate-based 3D coordination networks highlight the ability of CeIII ions to adopt different coordination environments upon subtle changes to the reaction conditions, producing metal-organic frameworks that integrate varying crystal solvent contents.

  11. Stabilization of hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles by axial silyloxy groups.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Lee, Way-Zen; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2016-05-04

    We report the stabilization of the hexa-coordination environment for P(v) corroles by using alkyl/aryl substituted silyloxy groups as axial ligands. The P(v) corroles are highly fluorescent in a hexa-coordination environment compared to in a penta-coordination environment. However, P(v) corroles generally undergo axial ligand dissociation to form a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents such as toluene, CH2Cl2, CHCl3. The usage of moderately bulkier and electron-donating silyloxy groups helps to restrict the axial ligand dissociation of silyloxy substituted hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structure confirmed the hexa-coordination geometry for the P(v) corroles. The P(v) corroles strongly absorb and emit in the visible region, with decent quantum yields and singlet state lifetimes. The hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles are highly stable under electrochemical conditions.

  12. Reducing systematic error in weak lensing cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Hamana, Takashi; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-05-10

    Weak lensing provides an important route toward collecting samples of clusters of galaxies selected by mass. Subtle systematic errors in image reduction can compromise the power of this technique. We use the B-mode signal to quantify this systematic error and to test methods for reducing this error. We show that two procedures are efficient in suppressing systematic error in the B-mode: (1) refinement of the mosaic CCD warping procedure to conform to absolute celestial coordinates and (2) truncation of the smoothing procedure on a scale of 10'. Application of these procedures reduces the systematic error to 20% of its original amplitude. We provide an analytic expression for the distribution of the highest peaks in noise maps that can be used to estimate the fraction of false peaks in the weak-lensing κ-signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) maps as a function of the detection threshold. Based on this analysis, we select a threshold S/N = 4.56 for identifying an uncontaminated set of weak-lensing peaks in two test fields covering a total area of ∼3 deg{sup 2}. Taken together these fields contain seven peaks above the threshold. Among these, six are probable systems of galaxies and one is a superposition. We confirm the reliability of these peaks with dense redshift surveys, X-ray, and imaging observations. The systematic error reduction procedures we apply are general and can be applied to future large-area weak-lensing surveys. Our high-peak analysis suggests that with an S/N threshold of 4.5, there should be only 2.7 spurious weak-lensing peaks even in an area of 1000 deg{sup 2}, where we expect ∼2000 peaks based on our Subaru fields.

  13. Weakly relativistic dispersion of Bernstein waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Weakly relativistic effects on the dispersion of Bernstein waves are investigated for waves propagating nearly perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in a Maxwellian plasma. Attention is focused on those large-wave-vector branches that are either weakly damped or join continuously onto weakly damped branches since these are the modes of most interest in applications. The transition between dispersion at perpendicular and oblique propagation is examined and major weakly relativistic effects can dominate even in low-temperature plasmas. A number of simple analytic criteria are obtained which delimit the ranges of harmonic number and propagation angle within which various types of weakly damped Bernstein modes can exist.

  14. Explicit solvent effects on the visible absorption spectrum of a photosynthetic pigment: Chlorophyll-c 2 in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Paula; Coutinho, Kaline; Cabral, Benedito J. C.; Canuto, Sylvio

    2011-11-01

    The explicit solvent effects on the light absorption properties of a photosynthetic pigment are analyzed from a combined study using Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanical Density-Functional Theory calculations. The case considered is chlorophyll-c2 in methanol and excellent results are obtained for both position and intensities in the entire visible region. Explicit solvent molecules are essential for describing the absorption spectrum. Analysis is also made of the coordination of the Mg atom, the influence of solute-solvent hydrogen bonds, the existence and location of dark states for internal conversion mechanisms and the adequacy of the four-state model for classifying the transitions.

  15. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W.; Garland, Marc V.

    2013-12-01

    The partial molar volumes, bar V_i, of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. bar V_i is determined with the direct method, while the composition of bar V_i is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated bar V_i deviate only 3.4 cm3 mol-1 (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental bar V_i variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of bar V_i variations. In all solutions, larger bar V_i are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus bar V_i. Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the bar V_i trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute

  16. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2013-08-01

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation.

  17. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  18. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  19. Weak percolation on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.; Cellai, Davide

    2014-04-01

    Bootstrap percolation is a simple but nontrivial model. It has applications in many areas of science and has been explored on random networks for several decades. In single-layer (simplex) networks, it has been recently observed that bootstrap percolation, which is defined as an incremental process, can be seen as the opposite of pruning percolation, where nodes are removed according to a connectivity rule. Here we propose models of both bootstrap and pruning percolation for multiplex networks. We collectively refer to these two models with the concept of "weak" percolation, to distinguish them from the somewhat classical concept of ordinary ("strong") percolation. While the two models coincide in simplex networks, we show that they decouple when considering multiplexes, giving rise to a wealth of critical phenomena. Our bootstrap model constitutes the simplest example of a contagion process on a multiplex network and has potential applications in critical infrastructure recovery and information security. Moreover, we show that our pruning percolation model may provide a way to diagnose missing layers in a multiplex network. Finally, our analytical approach allows us to calculate critical behavior and characterize critical clusters.

  20. Testing the weak equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, Anna M.; Comandi, Gian Luca; Pegna, Raffaello; Bramanti, Donato; Doravari, Suresh; Maccarone, Francesco; Lucchesi, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of Dark Energy and the fact that only about 5% of the mass of the universe can be explained on the basis of the current laws of physics have led to a serious impasse. Based on past history, physics might indeed be on the verge of major discoveries; but the challenge is enormous. The way to tackle it is twofold. On one side, scientists try to perform large scale direct observations and measurements - mostly from space. On the other, they multiply their efforts to put to the most stringent tests ever the physical theories underlying the current view of the physical world, from the very small to the very large. On the extremely small scale very exciting results are expected from one of the most impressive experiments in the history of mankind: the Large Hadron Collider. On the very large scale, the universe is dominated by gravity and the present impasse undoubtedly calls for more powerful tests of General Relativity - the best theory of gravity to date. Experiments testing the Weak Equivalence Principle, on which General Relativity ultimately lies, have the strongest probing power of them all; a breakthrough in sensitivity is possible with the “Galileo Galilei” (GG) satellite experiment to fly in low Earth orbit.

  1. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from aqueous inorganic acid solutions by the use of a water immiscible organic extractant liquid is described. The plutonium must be in the oxidized state, and the solvents covered by the patent include nitromethane, nitroethane, nitropropane, and nitrobenzene. The use of a salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate in the case of an aqueous nitric acid solution is advantageous. After contacting the aqueous solution with the organic extractant, the resulting extract and raffinate phases are separated. The plutonium may be recovered by any suitable method.

  2. Dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Kim, Yongju; Li, Jingfang; Lee, Myongsoo

    2014-08-07

    The construction of supramolecular polymers has been intensively pursued because the nanostructures formed through weak non-covalent interactions can be triggered by external stimuli leading to smart materials and sensors. Self-assemblies of coordination polymers consisting of metal ions and organic ligands in aqueous solution also provide particular contributions in this area. The main motivation for developing those coordination polymers originates from the value-added combination between metal ions and ligands. This review highlights the recent progress of the dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers that result from the sophisticated molecular design, towards fabricating stimuli-responsive systems and bio-related materials. Dynamic structural changes and switchable physical properties triggered by various stimuli are summarized. Finally, the outlook for aqueous nanostructures originated from the dynamic self-assembly of coordination polymers is also presented.

  3. Supramolecular transformations within discrete coordination-driven supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yu-Xuan; Yang, Hai-Bo

    2016-05-03

    In this review, a comprehensive summary of supramolecular transformations within discrete coordination-driven supramolecular architectures, including helices, metallacycles, metallacages, etc., is presented. Recent investigations have demonstrated that coordination-driven self-assembled architectures provide an ideal platform to study supramolecular transformations mainly due to the relatively rigid yet dynamic nature of the coordination bonds. Various stimuli have been extensively employed to trigger the transformation processes of metallosupramolecular architectures, such as solvents, concentration, anions, guests, change in component fractions or chemical compositions, light, and post-modification reactions, which allowed for the formation of new structures with specific properties and functions. Thus, it is believed that supramolecular transformations could serve as another highly efficient approach for generating diverse metallosupramolecular architectures. Classified by the aforementioned various stimuli used to induce the interconversion processes, the emphasis in this review will be on the transformation conditions, structural changes, mechanisms, and the output of specific properties and functions upon induction of structural transformations.

  4. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Kantardjieff, Katherine; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands. PMID:25945568

  5. Global Coordinate System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Time in hours at Oh UT is GAST (hours) = GMST + E (41) GAST in radians is GASTo (radians) = GAST (hours) L (42) The angle e required for transforming...inertial coordinates to ECEF is- 6(radians) GASTo + 6.3003880.99 (ti - th) (43) o ~ooUT Mod ( E 27) where St.i - tohLjT = (JD -2.4 106). (JDOE -2.4 x

  6. Information Theoretic Causal Coordination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-12

    his 1969 paper, Clive Granger , British economist and Nobel laureate, proposed a statistical def- inition of causality between stochastic processes. It...showed that the directed infor- mation, an information theoretic quantity, quantifies Granger causality . We also explored a more pessimistic setup...Final Technical Report Project Title: Information Theoretic Causal Coordination AFOSR Award Number: AF FA9550-10-1-0345 Reporting Period: July 15

  7. Dynamics around solutes and solute-solvent complexes in mixed solvents.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Sungnam; Fayer, M D

    2007-09-04

    Ultrafast 2D-IR vibrational echo experiments, IR pump-probe experiments, and FT-IR spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of phenol-OD in three solvents, CCl4, mesitylene (1, 3, 5 trimethylbenzene), and the mixed solvent of mesitylene and CCl4 (0.83 mole fraction CCl4), are used to study solute-solvent dynamics via observation of spectral diffusion. Phenol forms a complex with Mesitylene. In the mesitylene solution, there is only complexed phenol; in the CCl4 solution, there is only uncomplexed phenol; and in the mixed solvent, both phenol species are present. Dynamics of the free phenol in CCl4 or the mixed solvent are very similar, and dynamics of the complex in mesitylene and in the mixed solvent are very similar. However, there are differences in the slowest time scale dynamics between the pure solvents and the mixed solvents. The mixed solvent produces slower dynamics that are attributed to first solvent shell solvent composition variations. The composition variations require a longer time to randomize than is required in the pure solvents, where only density variations occur. The experimental results and recent MD simulations indicate that the solvent structure around the solute may be different from the mixed solvent's mole fraction.

  8. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  9. Universal mechatronics coordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Patrick F.

    1999-11-01

    Mechatronic systems incorporate multiple actuators and sensor which must be properly coordinated to achieve the desired system functionality. Many mechatronic systems are designed as one-of-a-kind custom projects without consideration for facilitating future system or alterations and extensions to the current syste. Thus, subsequent changes to the system are slow, different, and costly. It has become apparent that manufacturing processes, and thus the mechatronics which embody them, need to be agile in order to more quickly and easily respond to changing customer demands or market pressures. To achieve agility, both the hardware and software of the system need to be designed such that the creation of new system and the alteration and extension of current system is fast and easy. This paper describes the design of a Universal Mechatronics Coordinator (UMC) which facilitates agile setup and changeover of coordination software for mechatronic systems. The UMC is capable of sequencing continuous and discrete actions that are programmed as stimulus-response pairs, as state machines, or a combination of the two. It facilitates the modular, reusable programing of continuous actions such as servo control algorithms, data collection code, and safety checking routines; and discrete actions such as reporting achieved states, and turning on/off binary devices. The UMC has been applied to the control of a z- theta assembly robot for the Minifactory project and is applicable to a spectrum of widely differing mechatronic systems.

  10. Calculating Robot-Joint Coordinates From Image Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of robot joints not required. Algorithm generates approximate mathematical models of coordinates of joints of robot as functions of coordinates of points in images of work region viewed by television cameras. Joint coordinates necessary to position and orient end effector calculated by mathematical models fitted to experimentally determined data on positions, orientations, and joint coordinates. Generates models as functions of desired location of end effector of robot. Does not require priori knowledge of kinematic equations of robot.

  11. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  12. Asphaltene aggregation in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeongseok; Ring, Terry A; Deo, Milind D

    2004-03-01

    Asphaltenic solids formed in the Rangely field in the course of a carbon dioxide flood and heptane insolubles in the oil from the same field were used in this study. Four different solvents were used to dissolve the asphaltenes. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the onset of asphaltene precipitation by heptane titration. When the onset values were plotted versus asphaltene concentrations, distinct break points (called critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) in this paper) were observed. CACs for the field asphaltenes dissolved in toluene, trichloroethylene, tetrahydrofuran, and pyridine occurred at concentrations of 3.0, 3.7, 5.0, and 8.2 g/l, respectively. CACs are observed at similar concentrations as critical micelle concentrations (CMC) for the asphaltenes in the solvents employed and can be interpreted to be the points at which rates of asphaltene aggregations change. CMC values of asphaltenes determined from surface tension measurements (in pyridine and TCE) were slightly higher than the CAC values measured by NIR onset measurements. The CAC for heptane-insoluble asphaltenes in toluene was 3.1 g/l. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental compositions of the two asphaltenes showed that the H/C ratio of the heptane-insoluble asphaltenes was higher and molecular weight (measured by vapor pressure osmometry) was lower.

  13. Crystal structure of an HgII coordination polymer with an unsymmetrical dipyridyl ligand: catena-poly[[[di­chlorido­mercury(II)]-μ-N-(pyridin-4-ylmeth­yl)pyridin-3-amine-κ2 N:N′] chloro­form hemisolvate

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Suk-Hee; Kang, Donghyun; Park, Ki-Min

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, {[HgLCl2]·0.5CHCl3}n (L = N-(pyridin-4-ylmeth­yl)pyridin-3-amine, C11H11N3), contains one HgII ion, one bridging L ligand, two chloride ligands and a chloro­form solvent mol­ecule with half-occupancy that is disordered about a crystallographic twofold rotation axis. Each HgII ion is coordinated by two pyridine N atoms from two symmetry-related L ligands and two chloride anions in a highly distorted tetra­hedral geometry with bond angles falling in the range 99.05 (17)–142.96 (7)°. Each L ligand bridges two HgII ions, forming polymeric zigzag chains propagating in [010]. In the crystal, the chains are linked by inter­molecular N/C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds together with weak C—H⋯π inter­actions, resulting in the formation of a three-dimensional supra­molecular network, which is further stabilized by C—Cl⋯π inter­actions between the solvent chloro­form mol­ecules and the pyridine rings of L [chloride-to-centroid distances = 3.442 (11) and 3.626 (13) Å]. In addition, weak Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.320 (5) Å] between the chloro­form solvent mol­ecules and the coordinating chloride anions are also observed. PMID:27840697

  14. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  15. Weak gravitational lensing by galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Brainerd, T.G. |; Blandford, R.D.; Smail, I. |

    1996-08-01

    We report a detection of weak, tangential distortion of the images of cosmologically distant, faint galaxies due to gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies. A mean image polarization of ({ital p})=0.011{plus_minus}0.006 (95{percent} confidence bounds) is obtained for 3202 pairs of source (23{lt}{ital r}{sub {ital s}}{le}24) and lens (20{le}{ital r}{sub {ital d}}{le}23) galaxies with projected separations of 5{double_prime}{le}{theta}{le}34{double_prime}. Averaged over annuli of inner radius 5{double_prime} and outer radius {theta}{sub max}, the signal is string for lens-source separations of {theta}{sub max}{approx_lt}90{double_prime} consistent with quasi-isothermal galaxy halos extending to large radii ({approx_gt}100{ital h}{sup {minus}1} kpc). The observed polarization is also consistent with the signal expected on the basis of simulations incorporating measured properties of local galaxies and modest extrapolations of the observed redshift distribution of faint galaxies (to which the results are somewhat sensitive). From the simulations we obtain formal best-fit model parameters for the dark halos of the lens galaxies that consist of a characteristic circular velocity of {ital V}{asterisk}{approximately}220{plus_minus}80 kms{sup {minus}1} and characteristic radial extent of {ital s}{asterisk}{approx_gt}100{ital h}{sup {minus}1} kpc. The predicted polarization based on the model is relatively insensitive to the characteristic radial extent of the halos, {ital s}{asterisk}, and very small halos ({ital s}{asterisk}{approximately}10{ital h}{sup {minus}1} kpc) are excluded only at the 2 {sigma} level. The formal best-fit halo parameters imply typical masses for the lens galaxies within a radius of 100{ital h}{sup -1} kpc on the order of 1.0{sup +1.2}{sub {minus}0.5}{times}10{sup 12} {ital h}{sup {minus}1}{ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} (90% confidence bounds), in agreement with recent dynamical estimates of the masses of local spiral galaxies.

  16. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  17. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak

  18. Solvent recovery system provides timely compliance solution

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Hoechst Celanese Corp. (Coventry, Rhode Island) faced the challenge of meeting an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) deadline for solvent recovery within one year. The company also had to ensure that a new solvent recovery system would satisfy Rhode Island state requirements. An initial search for the required technology was fruitless. Finally, MG Industries (Saint Charles, Missouri), an industrial gas supplier, was chosen for the job. Using CRYOSOLV, as the waste stream cools in the cryogenic condenser (heat exchanger), the solvents condense at temperatures below the dewpoint. The recovered solvent can be recycled into the process, while clean gas is vented to the atmosphere.

  19. Organic solvent use in enterprises in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yasuhiro; Ukai, Hirohiko; Okamoto, Satoru; Samoto, Hajime; Itoh, Kenji; Moriguchi, Jiro; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Ohashi, Fumiko; Takada, Shiro; Kawakami, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to elucidate possible changes in types of organic solvents (to be called solvents in short) used in enterprises in Japan through comparison of current solvent types with historical data since 1983. To investigate current situation in solvent use in enterprises, surveys were conducted during one year of 2009 to 2010. In total, workroom air samples in 1,497 unit workplaces with solvent use were analyzed in accordance with regulatory requirements. Typical use pattern of solvents was as mixtures, accounting for >70% of cases. Adhesives spreading (followed by adhesion) was relatively common in small-scale enterprises, whereas printing and painting work was more common in middle-scale ones, and solvent use for testing and research purpose was basically in large-scaled enterprises. Through-out printing, painting, surface coating and adhesive application, toluene was most common (being detected in 49 to 82% of workplaces depending on work types), whereas isopropyl alcohol was most common (49%) in degreasing, cleaning and wiping workplaces. Other commonly used solvents were methyl alcohol, ethyl acetate and acetone (33 to 37%). Comparison with historical data in Japan and literature-retrieved data outside of Japan all agreed with the observation that toluene is the most commonly used solvent. Application of trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, once common in 1980s, has ceased to exist in recent years.

  20. Special Issue: "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents".

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jonathan; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    To overcome the well-established drawbacks of conventional organic solvents (toxicity, non-biodegradability, flammability, accumulation in the atmosphere) remarkable research efforts have been recently devoted to the replacement of traditional organic reaction media by the so-called Green Solvents. In this sense, the choice of a safe, non-toxic, biorenewable and cheap reaction media is a crucial goal in organic synthesis. Thus, this Special Issue on "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents" has been aimed to showcase a series of stimulating contributions from international experts within different sub-areas of organic synthesis in Green Solvents (ranging from metal- to organo-catalyzed organic reactions).

  1. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  2. A solvent tolerant isolate of Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Singh, Rajni; Khare, S K; Gupta, M N

    2006-01-01

    A solvent tolerant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from soil by cyclohexane enrichment. Presence of cyclohexane (20%) in culture media prolonged the lag phase and caused reduction in biomass. Transmission electron micrographs showed convoluted cell membrane and accumulation of solvent in case of the cells grown in cyclohexane. The Enterobacter isolate was able to grow in the range of organic solvents having log P above 3.2 and also in presence of mercury, thus showing potential for treatment of solvent rich wastes.

  3. Weak point target detection in star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Xiong, Yazhou; Li, Yi; Wang, Li; Li, Chunyan; Yin, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Space weak point targets detection is very useful in non cooperative target detection. Influenced by the chip noise and space environmental noise, weak point targets detection becomes a difficulty. In the paper, firstly the star is extracted from the picture, the background picture is filtered to reduce the noise, and then the moving distance between adjacent pictures is calculated, after picture overlapping between adjacent pictures, the energy of the weak point target is improved, with a appropriate threshold, the weak point target is extracted. The proposed method can be widely utilized in space exploration, space defense etc.

  4. Weak measurements and nonClassical correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekshmi, S.; Shaji, N.; Shaji, Anil

    2017-01-01

    We extend the definition of quantum discord as a quantifier of nonClassical correlations in a quantum state to the case where weak measurements are performed on subsystem A of a bipartite system AB. The properties of weak discord are explored for several families of quantum states. We find that in many cases weak quantum discord is identical to normal discord and in general the values of the two are very close to each other. Weak quantum discord reduces to discord in the appropriate limits as well. We also discuss the implications of these observations on the interpretations of quantum discord.

  5. Solvent-driven chemical motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumata, Tetsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1998-10-01

    A solvent-driven chemical motor using amphiphilic polymer gel has been fabricated. The driving force of the gel originates from the surface tension of spreading organic fluid which is pumped out by osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in the gel. A tetrahydrofurane-swollen gel equipped with a spouting hole made a controlled translational motion with a velocity of 77 mm/s or rotational motion with a maximum speed of 400 rpm and a torque of 10-9-10-7 Nm on the water surface. A generator to produce an electric power with a maximum electromotive force of 15 mV and electric power of 0.2 μW has also been constructed. The successful fabrication of gel motor may produce a new era of soft machine systems which work without pollution and unnecessary intermediates.

  6. Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking.

    PubMed

    Melton, Lula H

    1996-08-01

    The following article is excerpted from the document Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking - Proposed Organizational Structure and Process, which is available from the Technology Transfer Network (TTN), a computer bulletin board. To access the TTN, call (919) 541-5742; to obtain help with the TTN, call (919) 541-5384. The Industrial Combustion Coordinated Rulemaking (ICCR) document is evolving, reflecting an ongoing dialogue with various stakeholders; therefore, there may be changes between this article and the ICCR as it is implemented. EPA would like to thank all stakeholders (e.g., representatives from various companies and trade associations, state and local air pollution control agencies, and environmental organizations) who have offered suggestions and comments on development of the ICCR. As mentioned in the implications statement, the overall goal of the ICCR is to develop a unified set of federal air emissions regulations. The proposed ICCR will achieve this goal by: • Obtaining active participation from stakeholders, including environmental groups, regulated industries, and state and local regulatory agencies in all phases of regulatory development. • Coordinating the schedule and approach for development of regulations under Sections 111, 112, and 129 of the Clean Air Act that affect ICI combustion. • Determining the most effective ways to address the environmental issues associated with toxic and criteria pollutants from the range of combustion sources. • More effectively considering interactions among the regulations by analyzing the combined benefits and economic impacts of the group of Section 111, 112, and 129 regulations. • Considering strategies to simplify the regulations and allow flexibility in the methods of compliance while maintaining full environmental benefits.

  7. Work Coordination Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  8. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the

  9. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-01-01

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method-termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates-is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  10. Organic solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes an organic solvent-stable proteolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Shiotani, Takashi

    1995-12-01

    A bacterial strain which can be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and can secrete a proteolytic enzyme was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain was derived by the following two-step procedures: high proteolytic enzyme producers were first isolated by the usual method, and then the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism was selected from these high-rate proteolytic enzyme producers. The proteolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture was stable in the presence of various organic solvents. The stability of the enzyme in the presence of organic solvents, of which the values of the logarithm of the partition coefficient (log P) were equal to or more than 3.2, was almost the same as that in the absence of organic solvents. It is expected that both the solvent-tolerant microorganism and the solvent-stable enzyme produced by this strain can be used as catalysts for reactions in the presence of organic solvents.

  11. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  12. Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery electrolyte solutions. Specifically, this invention is directed to boron-containing electrolyte solvents and boron-containing electrolyte solutions.

  13. Determination of organic bases in non-aqueous solvents by catalytic thermometric titration.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Kiss, T A; Gaál, F F; Zsigrai, I J

    1968-07-01

    Catalytic thermometric titrations have been developed for bases (brucine, diethylaniline, potassium acetate and triethylamine) in acetic acid by continuous and discontinuous addition of the standard solution and automatic temperature recording. The determination of weak bases, e.g., antipyrine, unsuccessful in acetic acid by catalytic thermometric titration, has been achieved by using nitromethane or acetic anhydride as solvent. Catalytic thermometric titrations were also performed by coulometric generation of hydrogen ions for the determination of micro amounts of weak bases in a mixture of acetic anhyride and acetic acid.

  14. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available.

  15. A Bioinspired Dinickel(II) Hydrolase: Solvent Vapor-Induced Hydrolysis of Carboxyesters under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Barman, Suman K; Lloret, Francesc; Mukherjee, Rabindranath

    2016-12-19

    From the perspective of synthetic metallohydrolases, a phenoxo-bridged dinickel(II) complex [Ni(II)2(L)(H2O)2(CH3OH)][ClO4]·CH3OH (1) (H3L = 2,6-bis[{{(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzyl)(N',N″-(dimethylamino)ethyl)}amino}methyl]-4-methylphenol) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The presence of a vacant coordination site and a weakly bound water molecule provides the scope for substrate binding to act as a metallohydrolase model. Ethyl acetate vapor diffusion at 298 K to a CH3CN/CH3OH solution of 1 results in the formation of a pentanuclear acetato-bridged complex [Ni(II)5(H2L)2(μ3-OH)2(μ-O2CCH3)4][ClO4]2·CH3CO2C2H5 (2), demonstrating for the first time the metal-coordinated water-promoted hydrolysis of a carboxyester at room temperature. When the crystals of 1, moistened with a few drops of ethyl acetate, were kept for ethyl acetate vapor diffusion, it transforms into a monoacetato-bridged complex [Ni(II)2(HL)(μ-O2CCH3)(H2O)2][ClO4]·4H2O (3). This kind of solvent (vapor)-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal structural transformation concomitant with the hydrolysis of external substrate (ethyl acetate) is unprecedented. Reaction of H3L with 2 equiv of Ni(II)(O2CCH3)2·4H2O, followed by the usual workup, and recrystallization from CH2Cl2 led to the isolation of [Ni(II)2(H2L)(μ-O2CCH3)2][ClO4]·CH2Cl2·2H2O (4). Complex 4 is structurally different from 3, confirming that the reaction of Ni(II)(O2CCH3)2·4H2O with H3L is a different phenomenon from the hydrolysis of ethyl acetate, promoted by Ni(II)-coordinated water in 1. Complex 1 is also capable of hydrolyzing ethyl propionate to a propionato-bridged complex [Ni(II)2(HL)(μ-O2CCH2CH3)(H2O)2][ClO4] (5). For the hydrolytic phenomena mentioned above, the coordinated ligand donor sites (phenolate and tertiary amine) provide a microenvironment around the dinickel(II) center to facilitate efficient stoichiometric hydrolysis of ethyl acetate and ethyl propionate under ambient conditions. Temperature

  16. Rapid and enhanced activation of microporous coordination polymers by flowing supercritical CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Matzger, Adam J.; Liu, Baojian; Wong-Foy, Antek G.

    2016-07-19

    Flowing supercritical CO.sub.2 is used to activate metal organic framework materials (MOF). MOFs are activated directly from N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) thus avoiding exchange with a volatile solvent. Most MCPs display increased surface areas directly after treatment although those with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers benefit from additional heating.

  17. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: Enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ''projection'' terms.

  18. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  19. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams, Daniel B.; Haitjema, Henk; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs.

  20. On modeling weak sinks in MODPATH.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel; Haitjema, H; Kauffman, L

    2013-01-01

    Regional groundwater flow systems often contain both strong sinks and weak sinks. A strong sink extracts water from the entire aquifer depth, while a weak sink lets some water pass underneath or over the actual sink. The numerical groundwater flow model MODFLOW may allow a sink cell to act as a strong or weak sink, hence extracting all water that enters the cell or allowing some of that water to pass. A physical strong sink can be modeled by either a strong sink cell or a weak sink cell, with the latter generally occurring in low-resolution models. Likewise, a physical weak sink may also be represented by either type of sink cell. The representation of weak sinks in the particle tracing code MODPATH is more equivocal than in MODFLOW. With the appropriate parameterization of MODPATH, particle traces and their associated travel times to weak sink streams can be modeled with adequate accuracy, even in single layer models. Weak sink well cells, on the other hand, require special measures as proposed in the literature to generate correct particle traces and individual travel times and hence capture zones. We found that the transit time distributions for well water generally do not require special measures provided aquifer properties are locally homogeneous and the well draws water from the entire aquifer depth, an important observation for determining the response of a well to non-point contaminant inputs.

  1. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arboleda, Juan David; Arnache Olmos, Oscar; Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ramos, Rafael; Anadon, Alberto; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  2. Few body hypernuclear systems: Weak decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical situation regarding mesonic and non-mesonic decays of light hypernuclei is reviewed. Although some models give reasonable results for pionic decays as well as the total weak decay rate, no existing approach explains, even qualitatively, the observed spin-isospin dependence of ..lambda..N ..-->.. NN non-mesonic weak decays. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Mechanisms of solute rejection in solvent resistant nanofiltration: the effect of solvent on solute rejection.

    PubMed

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Degrève, Jan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-10-28

    The separation performance of solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membranes was studied in a systematic way to elucidate the complex mechanisms involved in rejection of solutes. Rejection of three dyes (Sudan II, Sudan Black, Sudan 408) from common organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene and n-hexane) through a polyimide based SRNF membrane, STARMEM™122, was studied. It was found that the rejection of the STARMEM™122 membrane was lower than that indicated by the manufacturer. The experimental observations for Sudan II were not promising for the rejection study as they were lower than expected. Sudan Black and Sudan 408, which are larger solutes than Sudan II, provided more interesting insights. The effects of the solvent on the membrane and solute were studied separately. A higher permeation rate of ketones and alcohols was observed, while permeabilities of non-polar solvents were low which shows that this membrane shows higher affinity toward semi-polar solvents (alcohols, ketones). The effect of the solvent on the solute's rejection, based on the results for Sudan Black and Sudan 408, was studied for solvents in the same chemical groups, since the membrane showed a similar separation performance for solvents with similar functional groups (e.g. alcohols). The effect of solvent on solute molecular size was investigated by using simulation with Molecular Dynamics. It was shown that the effective size of a molecule is dependent on the solvent due to solvation and hydration of the solute by the solvent. The size of the solute in the solvent belonging to a similar family was studied separately. It was clear that the rejection was influenced by molecular size of the solute in the same group of solvents. A surprising negative rejection of solutes was achieved for n-hexane. Although solutes in n-hexane have higher volume compared to those in other solvents, the affinity between the solute and membrane increases the solute

  4. Weak-value amplification: state of play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, George C.; Combes, Joshua; Ferrie, Christopher; Gauger, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Weak values arise in quantum theory when the result of a weak measurement is conditioned on a subsequent strong measurement. The majority of the trials are discarded, leaving only very few successful events. Intriguingly those can display a substantial signal amplification. This raises the question of whether weak values carry potential to improve the performance of quantum sensors, and indeed a number of impressive experimental results suggested this may be the case. By contrast, recent theoretical studies have found the opposite: using weak-values to obtain an amplification generally worsens metrological performance. This survey summarises the implications of those studies, which call for a reappraisal of weak values' utility and for further work to reconcile theory and experiment.

  5. Catalyst- and solvent-dependent stereodivergence in the intramolecular Et(2)Zn/Pd(0) -promoted carbonyl propargylation: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Arrate, Mónica; Durana, Aritz; Lorenzo, Paula; de Lera, Ángel R; Álvarez, Rosana; Aurrecoechea, José M

    2013-10-04

    Carbonyl-tethered propargylic benzoates undergo intramolecular carbonylpropargylation upon treatment with Et2 Zn in the presence of a catalytic amount of Pd(0) with the formation of 2-alkynylcyclopentanol products. A ligand/solvent effect on the cis/trans selectivity (referring to the relative positions of alkynyl and OH groups) of ring-closure has been found. In a non-coordinating solvent (benzene), increasing the electron-donating ability of the phosphine ligand (while decreasing its dissociation ability) leads to an increased tendency towards the trans product. On the other hand, the combination of a coordinating solvent (THF) and PPh3 , an easily dissociated phosphine, results in the exclusive formation of cis products. Experimental and computational results are compatible with a divergent behavior of an allenylethylpalladium intermediate that partitions between competitive carbonyl-addition and transmetalation pathways, each leading to a different diastereoisomer. These results also suggest that the dissociating ability of the phosphine regulates that behavior.

  6. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  7. Coal mining with a liquid solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Study suggests carbonated water can dissolve or suspend coal and carry it to surface. Mixture of carbon dioxide and water may be coal solvent that will make unmanned mining reality. When used with proposed process monitoring coal solubility with conventional strain gage, solvent is basis for rapid cost effective extraction of coal from underground seams.

  8. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Cytotoxic effects of gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S V; Burkard, D H; Spångberg, L S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of commonly used gutta-percha solvents was evaluated. Gutta-percha dissolved by chloroform, halothane, or turpentine was evaluated with the radiochromium release method using L929 mouse fibroblast cells. All solvents were toxic. Turpentine was most toxic followed by halothane and chloroform, which caused similar levels of cell injury.

  10. Evaluation of Gutta-percha solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1990-11-01

    Five solvents (rectified white turpentine, oil of melaleuca, eucalyptol, white pine oil, and pine needle oil) were compared with chloroform for their ability to dissolve gutta-percha. All solvents dissolved at least 50% of the gutta-percha in 15 min at 37 degrees C with chloroform and rectified white turpentine dissolving the gutta-percha completely.

  11. SOLVENT DESIGN UNDER VARYING ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently a great need to replace many solvents that are commonly used by industry and the public, but whose continued use entails a number of human health and environmental risks. One issue hampering solvent replacement is the general thought that replacement, particul...

  12. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  13. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  14. A spreadsheet algorithm for stagewise solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  15. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  16. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  17. SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The latest results on microwave-expedited solvent-free approach as applied to the assembly of organic molecules will be presented. The salient features of this expeditious methodology such as solvent conservation and ease of manipulation etc. will be described in the context of r...

  18. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  19. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  20. Arene Selectivity by a Flexible Coordination Polymer Host

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James S.; Vitórica‐Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Thompson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The coordination polymers [Ag4(O2CCF3)4(phen)3]⋅ phen⋅arene (1⋅phen⋅arene) (phen=phenazine; arene=toluene, p‐xylene or benzene) have been synthesised from the solution phase in a series of arene solvents and crystallographically characterised. By contrast, analogous syntheses from o‐xylene and m‐xylene as the solvent yield the solvent‐free coordination polymer [Ag4(O2CCF3)4(phen)2] (2). Toluene, p‐xylene and benzene have been successfully used in mixed‐arene syntheses to template the formation of coordination polymers 1⋅phen⋅arene, which incorporate o‐ or m‐xylene. The selectivity of 1⋅phen⋅arene for the arene guests was determined, through pairwise competition experiments, to be p‐xylene>toluene≈benzene>o‐xylene>m‐xylene. The largest selectivity coefficient was determined as 14.2 for p‐xylene:m‐xylene and the smallest was 1.0 for toluene:benzene. PMID:27483388

  1. Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic properties of two new trinuclear nickel(II) clusters possessing solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen-Kui; Chen, Xiao; Sun, Yin-Xia; Yang, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Li; Xu, Li; Yu, Tian-Zhi

    2009-10-15

    Two solvent-induced trinuclear nickel(II) clusters, [{NiL(CH(3)OH)}(2)(OAc)(2)Ni].2CH(3)OH (I) and [{NiL(C(2)H(5)OH)}(2)(OAc)(2)Ni].2C(2)H(5)OH (II), have been synthesized by the reaction of a new Salen-type bisoxime chelating ligand of 5,5'-di(N,N'-diethylamino)-2,2'-[(1,3-propylene)dioxybis(nitrilomethylidyne)]diphenol (H(2)L) with nickel(II) acetate tetrahydrate in different solvents. Clusters I and II were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, TG-DTA and X-ray diffraction methods. In clusters I (or II), there are two ligand moieties (which provide N(2)O(2) donors), two acetate ions, two coordinated methanol (or ethanol) molecules and two crystallizing methanol (or ethanol) molecules, which result in the formation of three slightly distorted octahedral geometries around Ni(II) ions. Interestingly, nickel(II) ions in the structures of clusters I and II are all six-coordinated geometry, but clusters I and II are grown up in different solvent. Right because of this, solvent effect cause to their different crystal structures.

  2. Thermoplastic composite matrices with improved solvent resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve solvent resistance of aromatic thermoplastic polymers, ethynyl-terminated aromatic sulfone polymers (ETS), sulfone/ester polymers (SEPE) containing pendent ethynyl groups, and phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups are synthesized. Cured polysulfones and phenoxy resins containing ethynyl groups on the ends or pendent on the molecules exhibited systematic behavior in solvent resistance, film flexibility, and toughness as a function of crosslink density. The film and composite properties of a cured solvent-resistant ETS were better than those of a commercially available solvent sensitive polysulfone. The study was part of a NASA program to better understand the trade-offs between solvent resistance, processability and mechanical properties which may be useful in designing composite structures for aerospace vehicles.

  3. METHOD FOR SOLVENT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Archibald, P.B.

    1962-09-18

    This invention provides a method for producing densely compacted bodies having relatively large dimensions. The method comprises the addition of a small quantity of a suitable solvent to a powder which is to be compacted. The solvent- moistened powder is placed inside a flexible bag, and the bag is suspended in an isostatic press. The solvent is squeezed out of the powder by the isostatic pressure, and the resulting compacted body is recovered. The presence of the solvent markedly decreases the proportion of void space in the powder, thereby resulting in a denser, more homogeneous compact. Another effect of the solvent is that it allows the isostatic pressing operation to be conducted at substantially lower pressures than are conventionally employed. (AEC)

  4. Stabilization of Underground Solvent Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, T.R.

    2003-08-15

    The Old Solvent Tanks (OST), located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are comprised of 22 underground storage tanks that were used to store spent radioactive solvent and aqueous wastes generated from the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process. The OSTs were installed at various dates between 1955 and 1968 and used to store the spent solvents until 1974. The spent solvents stored in the OSTs were transferred out from 1976 through 1981 leaving only residual liquids and sludges that could not be pumped out.Final remediation goals include an overlying infiltration control system. If the tanks were to structurally fail, they would collapse causing potential for onsite worker exposure and release of tank contents to the environment. Therefore, as an interim action, methods for stabilizing the tanks were evaluated. This paper will discuss the systems designed to perform and monitor the grouting operation, the grouting process, and the radiological controls and wastes associated with grouting the Old Solvent Tanks.

  5. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  6. Assessment of solvents for cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Tsianou, Marina; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-03-01

    A necessary step in the processing of biomass is the pretreatment and dissolution of cellulose. A good solvent for cellulose involves high diffusivity, aggressiveness in decrystallization, and capability of disassociating the cellulose chains. However, it is not clear which of these factors and under what conditions should be improved in order to obtain a more effective solvent. To this end, a newly-developed phenomenological model has been applied to assess the controlling mechanism of cellulose dissolution. Among the findings, the cellulose fibers remain crystalline almost to the end of the dissolution process for decrystallization-controlled kinetics. In such solvents, decreasing the fiber crystallinity, e.g., via pretreatment, would result in a considerable increase in the dissolution rate. Such insights improve the understanding of cellulose dissolution and facilitate the selection of more efficient solvents and processing conditions for biomass. Specific examples of solvents are provided where dissolution is limited due to decrystallization or disentanglement.

  7. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  8. Solvent-induced high fidelity switching between two discrete supramolecules.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, José E; Martín-Hidalgo, Mariana; Gubala, Vladimir; Rivera, José M

    2009-03-11

    Here we show the reversible high fidelity switching between two discrete self-assembled supramolecules made from a lipophilic 8-phenyl-2'-deoxyguanosine derivative induced by an indirect solvent effect. A hexadecameric supramolecule containing four stacked tetramers is formed in acetonitrile aided by higher potassium concentrations. When the amount of weakly solvated potassium decreases, due the lower activity of potassium iodide in chloroform, an octamer is formed after the dissociation of the two outer tetramers in the hexadecamer. The switching process results from an unprecedented subtle interplay between the activity of potassium iodide and the steric crowding within the self-assembled structure. Besides the possible applications in nanoconstruction, this phenomenon sheds light into the mechanism of formation of self-assembled supramolecules made from guanosine derivatives.

  9. Solvent effects and vibrational dependence in electrochromic spectra of carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, StanisAw; Daniluk, Andrzej

    1995-04-01

    Electrochromic (Stark effect) spectra of three carotenoids, β-carotene, lutein and violaxanthin, were obtained in glassy matrices at low temperature. When analyzed in the framework of the theory of electrochromism they were found to contain a remarkable contribution from the second derivative of the absorption spectrum, equivalent to a substantial change in dipole moment (3-5 D) on electronic excitation, in addition to the usual polarizability term. These dipole moments only weakly depend on solvent polarity; this puts in doubt the induced dipole model. In the case of violaxanthin, a variability of the electro-optical parameters along the electrochromic spectrum was found, which is related to the type of vibration involved in the electronic transition. An analogous effect was also noted for tetradecaheptaene chromophore in amphotericin B. These observations strongly indicate an essential role of vibronic coupling in determining the electro-optical parameters of carotenoids.

  10. Nonlinear response of a linear chain to weak driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, D.; Mulhern, C.; Burbanks, A. D.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study the escape of a chain of coupled units over the barrier of a metastable potential. It is demonstrated that a very weak external driving field with a suitably chosen frequency suffices to accomplish speedy escape. The latter requires passage through a transition state, the formation of which is triggered by permanent feeding of energy from a phonon background into humps of localized energy and elastic interaction of the arising breather solutions. In fact, cooperativity between the units of the chain entailing coordinated energy transfer is shown to be crucial for enhancing the rate of escape in an extremely effective and low-energy cost way where the effects of entropic localization and breather coalescence conspire.

  11. Noncommuting spherical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Bander, Myron

    2004-10-15

    Restricting the states of a charged particle to the lowest Landau level introduces a noncommutativity between Cartesian coordinate operators. This idea is extended to the motion of a charged particle on a sphere in the presence of a magnetic monopole. Restricting the dynamics to the lowest energy level results in noncommutativity for angular variables and to a definition of a noncommuting spherical product. The values of the commutators of various angular variables are not arbitrary but are restricted by the discrete magnitude of the magnetic monopole charge. An algebra, isomorphic to angular momentum, appears. This algebra is used to define a spherical star product. Solutions are obtained for dynamics in the presence of additional angular dependent potentials.

  12. Network Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  13. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  14. Characterization of Ca(2+)-binding sites in the kidney stone inhibitor glycoprotein nephrocalcin using vanadyl ions: different metal binding properties in strong and weak inhibitor proteins revealed by EPR and ENDOR.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, D; Nakagawa, Y

    1996-11-26

    Nephrocalcin (NC), a calcium-binding glycoprotein of 14,000 molecular weight as a monomer, is known to inhibit the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in renal tubules. We have isolated NC from bovine kidney tissue and purified into four isoforms, fractions A-D. NC-A and NC-B strongly inhibit the growth of COM crystals, and NC-C and NC-D inhibit crystal growth weakly. The strongly inhibitor proteins are abundant in normal subjects, whereas stone formers excrete less of NC-A and NC-B and more of NC-C and NC-D. NC-C was characterized with respect to its metal binding sites by using vanadyl ion (VO2+) as a paramagnetic probe in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopic studies. We demonstrated that VO2+ binds to NC-C with a stoichiometry of metal:protein binding of 4:1 and that VO2+ competes with Ca2+ in binding to NC-C. In NC-C, the metal ion is exposed to solvent water molecules and two water molecules are detected in the inner coordination sphere of the metal ion by ENDOR. In the metal binding environment of NC-A, as reported previously (Mustafi, D., & Nakagawa, Y. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 11323-11327), inner sphere coordinated water is completely excluded. Based on the results of the metal binding properties in both strong and weak inhibitor proteins, a probable mechanism of inhibition of COM crystal growth by NC has been outlined.

  15. Coordinating Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  16. ACCELERATED SOLVENT EXTRACTION COMBINED WITH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A research project was initiated to address a recurring problem of elevated detection limits above required risk-based concentrations for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds in high moisture content solid samples. This project was initiated, in cooperation with the EPA Region 1 Laboratory, under the Regional Methods Program administered through the ORD Office of Science Policy. The aim of the project was to develop an approach for the rapid removal of water in high moisture content solids (e.g., wetland sediments) in preparation for analysis via Method 8270. Alternative methods for water removal have been investigated to enhance compound solid concentrations and improve extraction efficiency, with the use of pressure filtration providing a high-throughput alternative for removal of the majority of free water in sediments and sludges. In order to eliminate problems with phase separation during extraction of solids using Accelerated Solvent Extraction, a variation of a water-isopropanol extraction method developed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, CO is being employed. The concentrations of target compounds in water-isopropanol extraction fluids are subsequently analyzed using an automated Solid Phase Extraction (SPE)-GC/MS method developed in our laboratory. The coupled approaches for dewatering, extraction, and target compound identification-quantitation provide a useful alternative to enhance sample throughput for Me

  17. Spectrum of Mathematical Weaknesses: Related Neuropsychological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Perna, Robert; Loughan, Ashlee R; Le, Jessica; Hertza, Jeremy; Cohen, Morris J

    2015-01-01

    Math disorders have been recognized for as long as language disorders yet have received far less research. Mathematics is a complex construct and its development may be dependent on multiple cognitive abilities. Several studies have shown that short-term memory, working memory, visuospatial skills, processing speed, and various language skills relate to and may facilitate math development and performance. The hypotheses explored in this research were that children who performed worse on math achievement than on Full-Scale IQ would exhibit weaknesses in executive functions, memory, and visuoperceptual skills. Participants included 436 children (27% girls, 73% boys; age range = 5-17 years, M(age) = 9.45 years) who were referred for neuropsychological evaluations due to academic and/or behavioral problems. This article specifically focuses on the spectrum of math weakness rather than clinical disability, which has yet to be investigated in the literature. Results suggest that children with relative weakness to impairments in math were significantly more likely to have cognitive weaknesses to impairments on neuropsychological variables, as compared with children without math weaknesses. Specifically, the math-weak children exhibit a weakness to impairment on measures involving attention, language, visuoperceptual skills, memory, reading, and spelling. Overall, our results suggest that math development is multifaceted.

  18. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee due to the Government partial shutdown... INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Program Coordinator; by phone...

  19. Effect of Ligand Structural Isomerism in Formation of Calcium Coordination Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Plonka A. M.; Parise J.; Banerjee, D.

    2012-03-28

    Using different structural isomers (2,5-; 2,4-; 2;6-; 3,4-; 3,5-) of pyridinedicarboxylic acid, nine calcium-based coordination networks were synthesized under hydro-/solvothermal conditions and/or were produced via solvent recrystallization of previously synthesized compounds. The coordination networks reported were characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermal methods. They show diverse structural topologies, depending on the ligand geometry and coordinated solvent molecules, with inorganic connectivity motifs ranging from isolated octahedra to infinite chains, layer and a three-dimensional dense framework. The as-synthesized and desolvated networks further show structural transformation to hydrated phases through dissolution/reformation pathways. The process is likely driven by the high hydration energy of the calcium metal center.

  20. Quantum correlation cost of the weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shao-xiong; Yu, Chang-shui

    2014-12-15

    Quantum correlation cost (QCC) characterizing how much quantum correlation is used in a weak-measurement process is presented based on the trace norm. It is shown that the QCC is related to the trace-norm-based quantum discord (TQD) by only a factor that is determined by the strength of the weak measurement, so it only catches partial quantumness of a quantum system compared with the TQD. We also find that the residual quantumness can be ‘extracted’ not only by the further von Neumann measurement, but also by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. As an example, we demonstrate our outcomes by the Bell-diagonal state.

  1. Differential response of marine diatoms to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Phillips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V.

    1995-06-01

    Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result of discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, only few data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Phytoplankton species vary in their tolerance to trace metals. Diatoms in particular are able to detoxify trace metals by the excretion of organic compounds. A previous study reported that diatoms collected form different sites in the Gulf of Mexico varied in their physiological characteristics. Algae have been considered to be good indicator s of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to marine diatoms. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on seven diatom species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  3. Polar Solvents Trigger Formation of Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-06-09

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and molecular thermodynamics to investigate the formation of reverse micelles in a system of surfactants and nonpolar solvents. Since the early observation of reverse micelles, the question has been whether the existence of polar solvent molecules such as water is the driving force for the formation of reverse micelles in nonpolar solvents. In this work, we use a simple coarse-grained model of surfactants and solvents to show that a small number of polar solvent molecules triggers the formation of large permanent aggregates. In the absence of polar molecules, both the thermodynamic model and molecular simulations show that small aggregates are more populated in the solution and larger ones are less frequent as the system evolves over time. The size and shape of reverse micelles depend on the size of the polar core: the shape is spherical for a large core and ellipsoidal for a smaller one. Using the coarse-grained model, we also investigate the effect of temperature and surfactant tail length. Our results reveal that the number of surfactant molecules in the micelle decreases as the temperature increases, but the average diameter does not change because the size of the polar core remains invariant. A reverse micelle with small polar core attracts fewer surfactants when the tail is long. The uptake of solvent particles by a micelle of longer surfactant tail is less than shorter ones when the polar solvent particles are initially distributed randomly.

  4. Solvent Effect on the Photolysis of Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmed, Sofia; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Bano, Raheela; Hafeez, Ambreen

    2015-10-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in water (pH 7.0) and in organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, ethyl acetate) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrometric method for the assay of RF and its major photoproducts, formylmethylflavin and lumichrome. The apparent first-order rate constants (k obs) for the reaction range from 3.19 (ethyl acetate) to 4.61 × 10(-3) min(-1) (water). The values of k obs have been found to be a linear function of solvent dielectric constant implying the participation of a dipolar intermediate along the reaction pathway. The degradation of this intermediate is promoted by the polarity of the medium. This indicates a greater stabilization of the excited-triplet states of RF with an increase in solvent polarity to facilitate its reduction. The rate constants for the reaction show a linear relation with the solvent acceptor number indicating the degree of solute-solvent interaction in different solvents. It would depend on the electron-donating capacity of RF molecule in organic solvents. The values of k obs are inversely proportional to the viscosity of the medium as a result of diffusion-controlled processes.

  5. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (δ13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  6. Ligand substitution from the (eta5-DMP)Mn(CO)2(Solv) [DMP = 2,5-dimethylpyrrole, Solv = solvent] complexes: to ring slip or not to ring slip?

    PubMed

    Swennenhuis, Bert H G; Poland, Ross; Fan, Wai Yip; Darensbourg, Donald J; Bengali, Ashfaq A

    2010-08-16

    The mechanism and energetics of the displacement of solvent from photolytically generated (eta(5)-DMP)Mn(CO)(2)(Solv) complexes has been studied [DMP = 2,5-dimethylpyrrole, Solv = solvent]. Rate enhancement relative to the eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl (Cp) system is not observed in the displacement of weakly bound solvents. The bond dissociation enthalpies obtained from the kinetic analysis are in good agreement with the values obtained by detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results indicate that for both the Cp and the DMP based systems the displacement of weakly bound solvents proceeds by a dissociative or I(d) mechanism. This is in sharp contrast to CO displacement from (eta(5)-DMP)Mn(CO)(3), which is known to proceed by an associative mechanism by way of an eta(3) ring slip intermediate. The associative substitution pathway only becomes competitive with the dissociative channel when the Mn-Solv bond dissociation enthalpy is more than 33 kcal/mol.

  7. Translational, rotational and vibrational relaxation dynamics of a solute molecule in a non-interacting solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Michael P.; Coulter, Philip M.; Marroux, Hugo J. B.; Hornung, Balazs; McMullen, Ryan S.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopically observing the translational and rotational motion of solute molecules in liquid solutions is typically impeded by their interactions with the solvent, which conceal spectral detail through linewidth broadening. Here we show that unique insights into solute dynamics can be made with perfluorinated solvents, which interact weakly with solutes and provide a simplified liquid environment that helps to bridge the gap in our understanding of gas- and liquid-phase dynamics. Specifically, we show that in such solvents, the translational and rotational cooling of an energetic CN radical can be observed directly using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe that translational-energy dissipation within these liquids can be modelled through a series of classic collisions, whereas classically simulated rotational-energy dissipation is shown to be distinctly faster than experimentally measured. We also observe the onset of rotational hindering from nearby solvent molecules, which arises as the average rotational energy of the solute falls below the effective barrier to rotation induced by the solvent.

  8. Translational, rotational and vibrational relaxation dynamics of a solute molecule in a non-interacting solvent.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Michael P; Coulter, Philip M; Marroux, Hugo J B; Hornung, Balazs; McMullen, Ryan S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopically observing the translational and rotational motion of solute molecules in liquid solutions is typically impeded by their interactions with the solvent, which conceal spectral detail through linewidth broadening. Here we show that unique insights into solute dynamics can be made with perfluorinated solvents, which interact weakly with solutes and provide a simplified liquid environment that helps to bridge the gap in our understanding of gas- and liquid-phase dynamics. Specifically, we show that in such solvents, the translational and rotational cooling of an energetic CN radical can be observed directly using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe that translational-energy dissipation within these liquids can be modelled through a series of classic collisions, whereas classically simulated rotational-energy dissipation is shown to be distinctly faster than experimentally measured. We also observe the onset of rotational hindering from nearby solvent molecules, which arises as the average rotational energy of the solute falls below the effective barrier to rotation induced by the solvent.

  9. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  10. Sodium in weak G-band giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Lambert, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium abundances have been determined for eight weak G-band giants whose atmospheres are greatly enriched with products of the CN-cycling H-burning reactions. Systematic errors are minimized by comparing the weak G-band giants to a sample of similar but normal giants. If, further, Ca is selected as a reference element, model atmosphere-related errors should largely be removed. For the weak-G-band stars (Na/Ca) = 0.16 +/- 0.01, which is just possibly greater than the result (Na/Ca) = 0.10 /- 0.03 from the normal giants. This result demonstrates that the atmospheres of the weak G-band giants are not seriously contaminated with products of ON cycling.

  11. Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Davidovich, Luiz

    2010-11-15

    Entanglement of a system changes due to interactions with the environment. A typical type of interaction is amplitude damping. If we add a detector to monitor the environment and only select the no-damping outcome, this amplitude damping is modified into a weak measurement. Here we show that the entanglement change of a two-qubit state due to amplitude damping or weak measurement can be probabilistically reversed. For the amplitude-damping case, the entanglement partially recovers under most conditions. For the weak-measurement case, the recovery of the initial entangled state is exact. The reversal procedure involves another weak measurement, preceded and followed by bit flips applied to both qubits. We propose a linear optics scheme for the experimental demonstration of these procedures.

  12. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  13. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  14. A Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.

    1993-08-01

    The material balance and equilibrium equations for solvent extraction processes have been combined with computer spreadsheets in a new way so that models for very complex multicomponent multistage operations can be setup and used easily. A part of the novelty is the way in which the problem is organized in the spreadsheet. In addition, to facilitate spreadsheet setup, a new calculational procedure has been developed. The resulting Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) can be used with either IBM or Macintosh personal computers as a simple yet powerful tool for analyzing solvent extraction flowsheets.

  15. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  16. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  17. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  18. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  19. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  20. The Neural Network In Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusan, Ahmet Yucel

    2011-12-01

    In international literature, Coordinate operations is divided into two categories. They are coordinate conversion and coordinate transformation. Coordinates converted from coordinate system A to coordinate system B in the same datum (mean origine, scale and axis directions are same) by coordinate conversion. There are two different datum in coordinate transformation. The basis of each datum to a different coordinate reference system. In Coordinate transformation, coordinates are transformed from coordinate reference system A to coordinate referance system B. Geodetic studies based on physical measurements. Coordinate transformation needs identical points which were measured in each coordinate reference system (A and B). However it is difficult (and need a big reserved budget) to measure in some places like as top of mountain, boundry of countries and seaside. In this study, this sample problem solution was researched. The method of learning which is one of the neural network methods, was used for solution of this problem.

  1. Elastic scattering with weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Testoni, J. E.; Barbara, E. de; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-02-12

    Possible effects of the break-up channel on the elastic scattering threshold anomaly has been investigated. We used the weakly bound 6,7Li nuclei, which is known to undergo break-up, as projectiles in order to study the elastic scattering on a 27Al target. In this contribution we present preliminary results of these experiments, which were analyzed in terms of the Optical Model and compared with other elastic scattering data using weakly bound nuclei as projectile.

  2. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160 K in a non-glass forming organic solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neil, Hugh

    2016-05-03

    In this paper, we have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160 K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamical transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160 K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Finally, our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics.

  3. Microscopic relaxations in a protein sustained down to 160 K in a non-glass forming organic solvent

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neil, Hugh

    2016-05-03

    In this paper, we have studied microscopic dynamics of a protein in carbon disulfide, a non-glass forming solvent, down to its freezing temperature of ca. 160 K. We have utilized quasielastic neutron scattering. A comparison of lysozyme hydrated with water and dissolved in carbon disulfide reveals a stark difference in the temperature dependence of the protein's microscopic relaxation dynamics induced by the solvent. In the case of hydration water, the common protein glass-forming solvent, the protein relaxation slows down in response to a large increase in the water viscosity on cooling down, exhibiting a well-known protein dynamical transition. The dynamicalmore » transition disappears in non-glass forming carbon disulfide, whose viscosity remains a weak function of temperature all the way down to freezing at just below 160 K. The microscopic relaxation dynamics of lysozyme dissolved in carbon disulfide is sustained down to the freezing temperature of its solvent at a rate similar to that measured at ambient temperature. Finally, our results demonstrate that protein dynamical transition is not merely solvent-assisted, but rather solvent-induced, or, more precisely, is a reflection of the temperature dependence of the solvent's glass-forming dynamics.« less

  4. Interaction of organic solvents with protein structures at protein-solvent interface.

    PubMed

    Khabiri, Morteza; Minofar, Babak; Brezovský, Jan; Damborský, Jiří; Ettrich, Rudiger

    2013-11-01

    The effect of non-denaturing concentrations of three different organic solvents, formamide, acetone and isopropanol, on the structure of haloalkane dehalogenases DhaA, LinB, and DbjA at the protein-solvent interface was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of B-factors revealed that the presence of a given organic solvent mainly affects the dynamical behavior of the specificity-determining cap domain, with the exception of DbjA in acetone. Orientation of organic solvent molecules on the protein surface during the simulations was clearly dependent on their interaction with hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface patches, and the simulations suggest that the behavior of studied organic solvents in the vicinity of hyrophobic patches on the surface is similar to the air/water interface. DbjA was the only dimeric enzyme among studied haloalkane dehalogenases and provided an opportunity to explore effects of organic solvents on the quaternary structure. Penetration and trapping of organic solvents in the network of interactions between both monomers depends on the physico-chemical properties of the organic solvents. Consequently, both monomers of this enzyme oscillate differently in different organic solvents. With the exception of LinB in acetone, the structures of studied enzymes were stabilized in water-miscible organic solvents.

  5. General Solvent-dependent Strategy toward Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Graphene/Metal Oxide Nanohybrids: Effects of Nitrogen-containing Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Wei-Yao; Chen, Wei-Quan; Chiu, Yu-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2016-11-01

    A general solvent-dependent protocol directly influencing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in metal oxide/graphene nanohybrids has been demonstrated. We conducted the two-step synthesis of cobalt oxide/N-doped graphene nanohybrids (CNG) with solvents of water, ethanol, and dimethylformamide (DMF), representing tree typical categories of aqueous, polar organic, and organic N-containing solvents commonly adopted for graphene nanocomposites preparation. The superior ORR performance of the DMF-hybrids can be attributed to the high nitrogen-doping, aggregation-free hybridization, and unique graphene porous structures. As DMF is the more effective N-source, the spectroscopic results support a catalytic nitrogenation potentially mediated by cobalt-DMF coordination complexes. The wide-distribution of porosity (covering micro-, meso-, to macro-pore) and micron-void assembly of graphene may further enhance the diffusion kinetics for ORR. As the results, CNG by DMF-synthesis exhibits the high ORR activities close to Pt/C (i.e. only 8 mV difference of half-wave potential with electron transfer number of 3.96) with the better durability in the alkaline condition. Additional graphene hybrids comprised of iron and manganese oxides also show the superior ORR activities by DMF-synthesis, confirming the general solvent-dependent protocol to achieve enhanced ORR activities.

  6. General Solvent-dependent Strategy toward Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Graphene/Metal Oxide Nanohybrids: Effects of Nitrogen-containing Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Wei-Yao; Chen, Wei-Quan; Chiu, Yu-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Hu

    2016-01-01

    A general solvent-dependent protocol directly influencing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in metal oxide/graphene nanohybrids has been demonstrated. We conducted the two-step synthesis of cobalt oxide/N-doped graphene nanohybrids (CNG) with solvents of water, ethanol, and dimethylformamide (DMF), representing tree typical categories of aqueous, polar organic, and organic N-containing solvents commonly adopted for graphene nanocomposites preparation. The superior ORR performance of the DMF-hybrids can be attributed to the high nitrogen-doping, aggregation-free hybridization, and unique graphene porous structures. As DMF is the more effective N-source, the spectroscopic results support a catalytic nitrogenation potentially mediated by cobalt-DMF coordination complexes. The wide-distribution of porosity (covering micro-, meso-, to macro-pore) and micron-void assembly of graphene may further enhance the diffusion kinetics for ORR. As the results, CNG by DMF-synthesis exhibits the high ORR activities close to Pt/C (i.e. only 8 mV difference of half-wave potential with electron transfer number of 3.96) with the better durability in the alkaline condition. Additional graphene hybrids comprised of iron and manganese oxides also show the superior ORR activities by DMF-synthesis, confirming the general solvent-dependent protocol to achieve enhanced ORR activities. PMID:27853187

  7. Ulysses: UVCS Coordinated Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Corti, G.; Simnett, G.; Noci, G.; Romoli, M.; Kohl, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from coordinated observations in which instruments on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Ulysses were used to measure the density and flow speed of plasma at the Sun and to again measure the same properties of essentially the same plasma in the solar wind. Plasma was sampled by Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) at 3.5 and 4.5 solar radii and by Ulysses/SWOOPS at 5 AU. Data were acquired during a nearly 2 week period in May-June 1997 at a latitude of 9-10 degrees north of the equator, on the east limb and, hence, in the streamer belt and the source location of slow wind. Density and outflow speed are compared, in order to check for preservation of the near Sun characteristics in the interplanetary medium. By chance, Ulysses was at the very northern edge of the visible streamer belt. Nevertheless, no evidence of fast wind, or mixing with fast wind coming from the northern polar coronal hole, was evident at Ulysses. The morphology of the streamer belt was similar at the beginning and end of the observation period, but was markedly different during the middle of the period. A corresponding change in density (but not flow speed) was noted at Ulysses.

  8. The role of weak hydrogen-bonds on the formation of short-lived molecular associations.

    PubMed

    Al-Shawabkeh, Ali F; Al-Wahab, Haitham A; Shahab, Yousif A

    2007-03-01

    Weak molecular homo- and hetero-associations among some ethene derivatives and several common solvents are studied using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In connection with the aromatic-solvent induced shifts which is a special case of molecular association between aromatic solvents and polar molecules a model for association was suggested that involves the interaction of the positive end of the solute dipole with the aromatic pi-electrons. This model met with certain difficulties. An alternative model for configuration of associated molecules that explains the literature results and the results obtained in this paper is presented. The model is based on interaction of protons of the acceptor molecules with the lone-pair electrons or pi-electrons of the donor molecules. The present model removes the difficulties met with the former model and extends the concept of aromatic-solvent induced shifts to include non-polar molecules besides polar ones. In all cases, the interaction of protons of acceptor molecules with lone-pair electrons of donor molecules gives rise to a deshielding effect, while interaction with aromatic pi-electrons leads to shielding.

  9. Origin of weak ferroelectricity in semiconductive Sb2S3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigas, Leonardas; Audzijonis, Algirdas; Grigas, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigations of electronic potential dependencies upon the normal co-ordinates of B1u mode in a large temperature range for the Sb2S3 crystal. The results revealed high anharmonicity of Sb and S atoms in this highly covalent semiconductive compound and B1u - mode polar distortion with temperature leading to appearance of weak ferroelectricity.

  10. Cobalt(II) chloride complexes with 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole featuring first- and second-sphere coordination of the ligand.

    PubMed

    Domasevitch, Konstantin V

    2014-03-01

    In catena-poly[[dichloridocobalt(II)]-μ-(1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole-κ(2)N(2):N(2'))], [CoCl2(C8H10N4)]n, (1), two independent bipyrazole ligands (Me2bpz) are situated across centres of inversion and in tetraaquabis(1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole-κN(2))cobalt(II) dichloride-1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole-water (1/2/2), [Co(C8H10N4)2(H2O)4]Cl2·2C8H10N4·2H2O, (2), the Co(2+) cation lies on an inversion centre and two noncoordinated Me2bpz molecules are also situated across centres of inversion. The compounds are the first complexes involving N,N'-disubstituted 4,4'-bipyrazole tectons. They reveal a relatively poor coordination ability of the ligand, resulting in a Co-pyrazole coordination ratio of only 1:2. Compound (1) adopts a zigzag chain structure with bitopic Me2bpz links between tetrahedral Co(II) ions. Interchain interactions occur by means of very weak C-H...Cl hydrogen bonding. Complex (2) comprises discrete octahedral trans-[Co(Me2bpz)2(H2O)4](2+) cations formed by monodentate Me2bpz ligands. Two equivalents of additional noncoordinated Me2bpz tectons are important as `second-sphere ligands' connecting the cations by means of relatively strong O-H...N hydrogen bonding with generation of doubly interpenetrated pcu (α-Po) frameworks. Noncoordinated chloride anions and solvent water molecules afford hydrogen-bonded [(Cl(-))2(H2O)2] rhombs, which establish topological links between the above frameworks, producing a rare eight-coordinated uninodal net of {4(24).5.6(3)} (ilc) topology.

  11. Preparation of weak cation exchange packings for chromatographic separation of proteins using "click chemistry''.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kailou; Bai, Quan; Song, Chao; Wang, Fei; Yang, Fan

    2012-04-01

    "Click chemistry" is defined as a class of robust and selective chemical reactions affording high yields and is tolerant to a variety of solvents (including water), functional groups, and air. In this study, click chemistry was used as an effective strategy for coupling three alkyne-carboxylic acids onto the azide-silica to obtain three novel stationary phases of weak cation exchange chromatography, which were characterized with FTIR and elemental analysis. Six kinds of standard proteins, such as myoglobin, RNase A, RNase B, cytochrome C, α-chymotrypsin A, and lysozyme, were separated completely with the three novel weak cation exchange chromatography stationary phases. Compared with commercial weak cation exchange chromatography columns, the three kinds of novel weak cation exchange chromatography packings prepared by click chemistry approach have better resolution and selectivity. The mass recovery of more than 97% was obtained for all the tested proteins, and the bioactivity recovery of lysozyme on the prepared column was determined to be 96%. In addition, lysozyme was purified successfully from egg white with the novel weak cation exchange chromatography column by one step. The purity was more than 97% and a high specific activity was achieved to be 81 435 U/mg. The results illustrate the potential of click chemistry for preparing stationary phase for ion-exchange chromatography.

  12. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  13. [Shoe factory workers, solvents and health].

    PubMed

    Foà, Vito; Martinotti, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents in footwear manufacturing industry came from the glues used adhering the shoe parts to each other. Benzene was the first solvent used in shoe factories until the evidence of its capacity to cause leukaemia. Then, the demonstration that exposure to n-hexane was related to distal polyneuropathy limited the use of this substance. After that, results of neurotoxicological studies conducted on workers exposed to different mixtures of organic solvents make necessary prevention measure directed to a progressive reduction of air dispersion of these chemicals. Today exposure to solvents in workplaces is regulated by health based exposure limit values that should warranty absence of central nervous system effects. One of the most important rules of occupational medicine is verify that these exposure levels are really health protective also for workers with increased susceptibility.

  14. Deasphalted oil -- A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene, xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various non conventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  15. Deasphalted oil: A natural asphaltene solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Nazarko, T.W.; Sills, S.; Fuhr, B.J.

    1996-08-01

    Asphaltene deposition in the near-wellbore region can block pore throats, change wettability characteristics and relative-permeability relationships, and therefore, reduce oil production. Conventional aromatic solvents (e.g., toluene and xylene) alone or in combination with various dispersants are used to remove asphaltene damage from the near-wellbore region. However, these aromatic solvents are expensive and are not environmentally friendly. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate the asphaltene-solvating power of various nonconventional solvents, including deasphalted oil, using a light-scattering technique. Experimental results suggest that deasphalted oil is a strong asphaltene solvent presumably because of its native resin and aromatic contents. Addition of asphaltene dispersants also increases the solubilizing power of the deasphalted oil. Furthermore, various refinery and heavy oil upgrader streams show strong ability to solubilize asphaltenes.

  16. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  17. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  18. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  19. Used lubricating oil recycling using hydrocarbon solvents.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ahmad; Al-Zubaidy, Essam; Fayed, Muhammad E

    2005-01-01

    A solvent extraction process using new hydrocarbon solvents was employed to treat used lubricant oil. The solvents used were liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) condensate and stabilized condensate. A demulsifier was used to enhance the treatment process. The extraction process using stabilized condensate demonstrated characteristics that make it competitive with existing used oil treatment technologies. The process is able to reduce the asphaltene content of the treated lubricating oil to 0.106% (w/w), the ash content to 0.108%, and the carbon residue to 0.315% with very low levels of contaminant metals. The overall yield of oil is 79%. The treated used oil can be recycled as base lubricating oil. The major disadvantage of this work is the high temperature of solvent recovery. Experimental work and results are presented in detail.

  20. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  1. Wetting of polymers by their solvents.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence; Verneuil, Emilie; Delannoy, Guillaume; Valois, Pauline

    2016-02-01

    We review the studies on the wetting of soluble polymeric substrates by their solvents, both in the literature and conducted in our group in the past decade. When a droplet of solvent spreads on a soluble polymer layer, its wetting angle can strongly vary with the contact line velocity even at capillary numbers smaller than unity, in contrast to non-soluble substrates. The solvent content in the polymer is a key parameter for the spreading dynamics; that content is set by the initial conditions, but also by the transfers occurring from the droplet to the polymer layer during spreading. We focus on hydrophilic amorphous polymers that are glassy at room temperature, and we discuss the consequences on wetting of the very large changes in the polymer physical properties induced by solvent sorption. We finally present new results on polymers of varying molar masses, and show how they open new perspectives for a better understanding of powder dissolution.

  2. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  3. The K-12 Technology Coordinator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesisko, Lee James

    2005-01-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Education requires Technology Coordinators employed by public school districts in the Commonwealth to be properly certified. The Technology Coordinator is responsible to implement instructional technology for the district, provide leadership in the use of technological delivery systems, and routinely work directly…

  4. Sensory Coordination of Insect Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-22

    sources in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. 3) Wing-haltere coordination in the soldier fly, Hermetia illucens . 4) Landing behavior in the housefly...coordination in the soldier fly, Hermetia illucens . 4) Landing behavior in the housefly, Musca domestica. We have also recently established an

  5. Fuzzy coordinator in control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.; Pedrycz, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a hierarchical control structure using a fuzzy system for coordination of the control actions is studied. The architecture involves two levels of control: a coordination level and an execution level. Numerical experiments will be utilized to illustrate the behavior of the controller when it is applied to a nonlinear plant.

  6. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  7. Recovery, Reuse, and Recycle of Solvents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    So. San Francisco, CA 94080 (513) 771-2300 (415) 589-9600 Buflovak Division Safety-Kleen Corp. Blaw - Knox food and Chimical Eq. Co. 655 Big Timber Rd...ing, oil and grease removal for cleanup, protective surface removal, and cleaning of wheel bearings. Both hydrocarbon solvents and halogenated solvents...fluid but it could still be blended and downgraded for use as a metal cleaner, - such as using it to clean wheel bearings. Heptane is also an excellent

  8. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  9. Water as a Solvent for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    "Follow the water" is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.

  10. Competitive solvent-molecule interactions govern primary processes of diphenylcarbene in solvent mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Johannes; Sokkar, Pandian; Schott, Sebastian; Costa, Paolo; Thiel, Walter; Sander, Wolfram; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Nuernberger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical reactions in solution often proceed via competing reaction pathways comprising intermediates that capture a solvent molecule. A disclosure of the underlying reaction mechanisms is challenging due to the rapid nature of these processes and the intricate identification of how many solvent molecules are involved. Here combining broadband femtosecond transient absorption and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we show for one of the most reactive species, diphenylcarbene, that the decision-maker is not the nearest solvent molecule but its neighbour. The hydrogen bonding dynamics determine which reaction channels are accessible in binary solvent mixtures at room temperature. In-depth analysis of the amount of nascent intermediates corroborates the importance of a hydrogen-bonded complex with a protic solvent molecule, in striking analogy to complexes found at cryogenic temperatures. Our results show that adjacent solvent molecules take the role of key abettors rather than bystanders for the fate of the reactive intermediate. PMID:27708264

  11. Enhancing QKD security with weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, Jacob M.; Troupe, James E.

    2016-10-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 10/24/2016, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 11/8/2016. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. In the late 1980s, Aharonov and colleagues developed the notion of a weak measurement of a quantum observable that does not appreciably disturb the system.1, 2 The measurement results are conditioned on both the pre-selected and post-selected state of the quantum system. While any one measurement reveals very little information, by making the same measurement on a large ensemble of identically prepared pre- and post-selected (PPS) states and averaging the results, one may obtain what is known as the weak value of the observable with respect to that PPS ensemble. Recently, weak measurements have been proposed as a method of assessing the security of QKD in the well-known BB84 protocol.3 This weak value augmented QKD protocol (WV-QKD) works by additionally requiring the receiver, Bob, to make a weak measurement of a particular observable prior to his strong measurement. For the subset of measurement results in which Alice and Bob's measurement bases do not agree, the weak measurement results can be used to detect any attempt by an eavesdropper, Eve, to correlate her measurement results with Bob's. Furthermore, the well-known detector blinding attacks, which are known to perfectly correlate Eve's results with Bob's without being caught by conventional BB84 implementations, actually make the eavesdropper more visible in the new WV-QKD protocol. In this paper, we will introduce the WV-QKD protocol and discuss its generalization to the 6-state single qubit protocol. We will discuss the types of weak measurements that are optimal for this protocol, and compare the predicted performance of the 6- and 4-state WV-QKD protocols.

  12. Microencapsulation of advanced solvents for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Ye, Congwang; Oakdale, James S; Baker, Sarah E; Smith, William L; Nguyen, Du T; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Aines, Roger D

    2016-10-20

    Purpose-designed, water-lean solvents have been developed to improve the energy efficiency of CO2 capture from power plants, including CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) and ionic liquids (ILs). Many of these solvents are highly viscous or change phases, posing challenges for conventional process equipment. Such problems can be overcome by encapsulation. Micro-Encapsulated CO2 Sorbents (MECS) consist of a CO2-absorbing solvent or slurry encased in spherical, CO2-permeable polymer shells. The resulting capsules have diameters in the range of 100-600 μm, greatly increasing the surface area and CO2 absorption rate of the encapsulated solvent. Encapsulating these new solvents requires careful selection of shell materials and fabrication techniques. We find several common classes of polymers are not compatible with MECS production, but we develop two custom formulations, a silicone and an acrylate, that show promise for encapsulating water-lean solvents. We make the first demonstration of an encapsulated IL for CO2 capture. The rate of CO2 absorption is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 compared to a liquid film, a value that can be improved by further development of shell materials and fabrication techniques.

  13. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  14. Conformation of a coarse-grained protein chain (an aspartic acid protease) model in effective solvent by a bond-fluctuating Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.

    2008-03-01

    In a coarse-grained description of a protein chain, all of the 20 amino acid residues can be broadly divided into three groups: Hydrophobic (H) , polar (P) , and electrostatic (E) . A protein can be described by nodes tethered in a chain with a node representing an amino acid group. Aspartic acid protease consists of 99 residues in a well-defined sequence of H , P , and E nodes tethered together by fluctuating bonds. The protein chain is placed on a cubic lattice where empty lattice sites constitute an effective solvent medium. The amino groups (nodes) interact with the solvent (S) sites with appropriate attractive (PS) and repulsive (HS) interactions with the solvent and execute their stochastic movement with the Metropolis algorithm. Variations of the root mean square displacements of the center of mass and that of its center node of the protease chain and its gyration radius with the time steps are examined for different solvent strength. The structure of the protease swells on increasing the solvent interaction strength which tends to enhance the relaxation time to reach the diffusive behavior of the chain. Equilibrium radius of gyration increases linearly on increasing the solvent strength: A slow rate of increase in weak solvent regime is followed by a faster swelling in stronger solvent. Variation of the gyration radius with the time steps suggests that the protein chain moves via contraction and expansion in a somewhat quasiperiodic pattern particularly in strong solvent.

  15. Effect of organic solvents on Li+ ion solvation and transport in ionic liquid electrolytes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Borodin, Oleg; Smith, Grant D; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2015-02-19

    Molecular dynamics simulations of N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium (pyr13) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Ntf2) ionic liquid [pyr13][Ntf2] doped with [Li][Ntf2] salt and mixed with acetonitrile (AN) and ethylene carbonate (EC) organic solvents were conducted using polarizable force field. Structural and transport properties of ionic liquid electrolytes (ILEs) with 20 and 40 mol % of organic solvents have been investigated and compared to properties of neat ILEs. Addition of AN and EC solvents to ILEs resulted in the partial displacement of the Ntf2 anions from the Li(+) first coordination shell by EC and AN and shifting the Li-Ntf2 coordination from bidentate to monodentate. The presence of organic solvents in ILE has increased the ion mobility, with the largest effect observed for the Li(+) cation. The Li(+) conductivity has doubled with addition of 40 mol % of AN. The Li(+)-N(Ntf2) residence times were dramatically reduced with addition of solvents, indicating an increasing contribution from structural diffusion of the Li(+) cations.

  16. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  17. Effect of Organic Solvents on the Yield of Solvent-Tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    PubMed Central

    Isken, Sonja; Derks, Antoine; Wolffs, Petra F. G.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Solvent-tolerant microorganisms are useful in biotransformations with whole cells in two-phase solvent-water systems. The results presented here describe the effects that organic solvents have on the growth of these organisms. The maximal growth rate of Pseudomonas putida S12, 0.8 h−1, was not affected by toluene in batch cultures, but in chemostat cultures the solvent decreased the maximal growth rate by nearly 50%. Toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, xylene, hexane, and cyclohexane reduced the biomass yield, and this effect depended on the concentration of the solvent in the bacterial membrane and not on its chemical structure. The dose response to solvents in terms of yield was linear up to an approximately 200 mM concentration of solvent in the bacterial membrane, both in the wild type and in a mutant lacking an active efflux system for toluene. Above this critical concentration the yield of the wild type remained constant at 0.2 g of protein/g of glucose with increasing concentrations of toluene. The reduction of the yield in the presence of solvents is due to a maintenance higher by a factor of three or four as well as to a decrease of the maximum growth yield by 33%. Therefore, energy-consuming adaptation processes as well as the uncoupling effect of the solvents reduce the yield of the tolerant cells. PMID:10347053

  18. Weak crystallization theory of metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ivar; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Demler, Eugene A.

    2016-06-01

    Crystallization is one of the most familiar, but hardest to analyze, phase transitions. The principal reason is that crystallization typically occurs via a strongly first-order phase transition, and thus rigorous treatment would require comparing energies of an infinite number of possible crystalline states with the energy of liquid. A great simplification occurs when crystallization transition happens to be weakly first order. In this case, weak crystallization theory, based on unbiased Ginzburg-Landau expansion, can be applied. Even beyond its strict range of validity, it has been a useful qualitative tool for understanding crystallization. In its standard form, however, weak crystallization theory cannot explain the existence of a majority of observed crystalline and quasicrystalline states. Here we extend the weak crystallization theory to the case of metallic alloys. We identify a singular effect of itinerant electrons on the form of weak crystallization free energy. It is geometric in nature, generating strong dependence of free energy on the angles between ordering wave vectors of ionic density. That leads to stabilization of fcc, rhombohedral, and icosahedral quasicrystalline (iQC) phases, which are absent in the generic theory with only local interactions. As an application, we find the condition for stability of iQC that is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules known empirically for the majority of stable iQC; namely, the length of the primary Bragg-peak wave vector is approximately equal to the diameter of the Fermi sphere.

  19. Experimental noiseless linear amplification using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joseph; Boston, Allen; Palsson, Matthew; Pryde, Geoff

    2016-09-01

    The viability of quantum communication schemes rely on sending quantum states of light over long distances. However, transmission loss can degrade the signal strength, adding noise. Heralded noiseless amplification of a quantum signal can provide a solution by enabling longer direct transmission distances and by enabling entanglement distillation. The central idea of heralded noiseless amplification—a conditional modification of the probability distribution over photon number of an optical quantum state—is suggestive of a parallel with weak measurement: in a weak measurement, learning partial information about an observable leads to a conditional back-action of a commensurate size. Here we experimentally investigate the application of weak, or variable-strength, measurements to the task of heralded amplification, by using a quantum logic gate to weakly couple a small single-optical-mode quantum state (the signal) to an ancilla photon (the meter). The weak measurement is carried out by choosing the measurement basis of the meter photon and, by conditioning on the meter outcomes, the signal is amplified. We characterise the gain of the amplifier as a function of the measurement strength, and use interferometric methods to show that the operation preserves the coherence of the signal.

  20. Weak turbulence theory for reactive instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.

    2010-11-15

    In the present paper, the customary weak turbulence theory is generalized to include reactive instabilities. For the sake of simplicity, the formalism assumes electrostatic perturbation propagating in one-dimensional uniform unmagnetized plasmas. By weak turbulence theory it is meant as the perturbative nonlinear theory based upon Vlasov equation, truncated at the second (or up to third) order nonlinearity and ensemble averaged. By reactive instability it is meant as the plasma instability whose growth rate is not necessarily exceedingly small. The traditional weak turbulence theory found in the literature is applicable only to weakly growing plasma instabilities whose real frequency {omega}{sub k} can be determined from the real part of the dispersion relation, Re {epsilon}(k,{omega}{sub k})=0, while the growth rate may be determined by the Landau formula, {gamma}{sub k}=-Im {epsilon}(k,{omega}{sub k})[{partial_derivative} Re {epsilon}(k,{omega}{sub k})/{partial_derivative}{omega}{sub k}]{sup -1}. This implies the assumption that |{gamma}{sub k}|<<{omega}{sub k}. On the other hand, for reactive instabilities for which {gamma}{sub k}/{omega}{sub k} is not necessarily small, the real frequency and growth/damping rate must be determined from the complex roots of the dispersion relation, {epsilon}(k,{omega}{sub k}+i{gamma}{sub k})=0. The present paper extends the textbook weak turbulence theory to deal with such a situation.

  1. Generalized Equations for the Inertial Tensor of a Weakly Bound Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, Kenneth R.

    2013-06-01

    A variety of methods have been employed for deriving intermolecular structural parameters from observed rotational constants of weakly bound complexes. Among these are methods that use formulas expressing the moments of inertia of the complex in terms of intermolecular coordinates and the known moments of inertia of the free monomers. While such formulas are available for a number of specific geometries, general forms have not been given. In this talk, equations are presented for the inertial tensor components of a weakly bound complex in terms of intermolecular coordinates and moments of inertia of the individual moieties. The result is a generalization of similar equations existing in the literature and allows for the use of up to three angles to specify the orientation of an asymmetric rotor within a complex. The angles used are well suited to treating the large amplitude motion characteristic of weakly bound systems and the resulting expressions should be useful in the analysis of the rotational constants of weakly bound systems with complicated geometries.

  2. Disturbance in weak measurements and the difference between quantum and classical weak values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, Asger C.

    2015-06-01

    The role of measurement-induced disturbance in weak measurements is of central importance for the interpretation of the weak value. Uncontrolled disturbance can interfere with the postselection process and make the weak value dependent on the details of the measurement process. Here we develop the concept of a generalized weak measurement for classical and quantum mechanics. The two cases appear remarkably similar, but we point out some important differences. A priori it is not clear what the correct notion of disturbance should be in the context of weak measurements. We consider three different notions and get three different results: (1) For a "strong" definition of disturbance, we find that weak measurements are disturbing. (2) For a weaker definition we find that a general class of weak measurements is nondisturbing, but that one gets weak values which depend on the measurement process. (3) Finally, with respect to an operational definition of the "degree of disturbance," we find that the AAV weak measurements are the least disturbing, but that the disturbance is always nonzero.

  3. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  4. Keep meaning in conversational coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cuffari, Elena C.

    2014-01-01

    Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making). These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination. PMID:25520693

  5. Immunization in vitro and production of monoclonal antibodies specific to insoluble and weakly immunogenic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, J; Laemmli, U K; Pettijohn, D E

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is described for immunizing in vitro and stimulating proliferation of specific B-cell lymphocytes. The method is applicable to production of monoclonal antibodies against proteins that are soluble only in denaturing solvents. An induction period is described in which antigen is presented to the B-cell population in the absence of serum. Also, antigen is coupled to mitogenic silica, which allows the effective presentation of both soluble and insoluble antigens. The results indicate hybridomas can be obtained that secrete IgMs directed against highly conserved or weakly immunogenic antigens. Images PMID:6083563

  6. Solvent, anion, and structural effects on the redox potentials and UV-visible spectral properties of mononuclear manganese corroles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; El Ojaimi, Maya; Chkounda, Mohammed; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Shao, Jianguo; Guilard, Roger; Kadish, Karl M

    2008-09-01

    A series of manganese(III) corroles were investigated as to their electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry in nonaqueous solvents. Up to three oxidations and one reduction were obtained for each complex depending on the solvents. The main compound discussed in this paper is the meso-substituted manganese corrole, (Mes 2PhCor)Mn, and the main points are how changes in axially coordinated anion and solvent will affect the redox potentials and UV-vis spectra of each electrogenerated species in oxidation states of Mn(III), Mn(IV), or Mn(II). The anions OAc (-), Cl (-), CN (-), and SCN (-) were found to form five-coordinate complexes with the neutral Mn(III) corrole while two OH (-) or F (-) anions were shown to bind axially in a stepwise addition to give the five- and six-coordinate complexes in nonaqueous media. In each case, complexation with one or two anionic axial ligands led to an easier oxidation and a harder reduction as compared to the uncomplexed four-coordinate species.

  7. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1−yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality. PMID:28327622

  8. Continuously Varying Critical Exponents Beyond Weak Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Sarkar, P.; Midya, A.; Mandal, P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Renormalization group theory does not restrict the form of continuous variation of critical exponents which occurs in presence of a marginal operator. However, the continuous variation of critical exponents, observed in different contexts, usually follows a weak universality scenario where some of the exponents (e.g., β, γ, ν) vary keeping others (e.g., δ, η) fixed. Here we report ferromagnetic phase transition in (Sm1‑yNdy)0.52Sr0.48MnO3 (0.5 ≤ y ≤ 1) single crystals where all three exponents β, γ, δ vary with Nd concentration y. Such a variation clearly violates both universality and weak universality hypothesis. We propose a new scaling theory that explains the present experimental results, reduces to the weak universality as a special case, and provides a generic route leading to continuous variation of critical exponents and multi-criticality.

  9. Phase slips in superconducting weak links

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting vortices and phase slips are primary mechanisms of dissipation in superconducting, superfluid, and cold-atom systems. While the dynamics of vortices is fairly well described, phase slips occurring in quasi-one- dimensional superconducting wires still elude understanding. The main reason is that phase slips are strongly nonlinear time-dependent phenomena that cannot be cast in terms of small perturbations of the superconducting state. Here we study phase slips occurring in superconducting weak links. Thanks to partial suppression of superconductivity in weak links, we employ a weakly nonlinear approximation for dynamic phase slips. This approximation is not valid for homogeneous superconducting wires and slabs. Using the numerical solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and bifurcation analysis of stationary solutions, we show that the onset of phase slips occurs via an infinite period bifurcation, which is manifested in a specific voltage-current dependence. Our analytical results are in good agreement with simulations.

  10. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  11. Precision cosmology with weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearin, Andrew P.

    In recent years, cosmological science has developed a highly predictive model for the universe on large scales that is in quantitative agreement with a wide range of astronomical observations. While the number and diversity of successes of this model provide great confidence that our general picture of cosmology is correct, numerous puzzles remain. In this dissertation, I analyze the potential of planned and near future galaxy surveys to provide new understanding of several unanswered questions in cosmology, and address some of the leading challenges to this observational program. In particular, I study an emerging technique called cosmic shear, the weak gravitational lensing produced by large scale structure. I focus on developing strategies to optimally use the cosmic shear signal observed in galaxy imaging surveys to uncover the physics of dark energy and the early universe. In chapter 1 I give an overview of a few unsolved mysteries in cosmology and I motivate weak lensing as a cosmological probe. I discuss the use of weak lensing as a test of general relativity in chapter 2 and assess the threat to such tests presented by our uncertainty in the physics of galaxy formation. Interpreting the cosmic shear signal requires knowledge of the redshift distribution of the lensed galaxies. This redshift distribution will be significantly uncertain since it must be determined photometrically. In chapter 3 I investigate the influence of photometric redshift errors on our ability to constrain dark energy models with weak lensing. The ability to study dark energy with cosmic shear is also limited by the imprecision in our understanding of the physics of gravitational collapse. In chapter 4 I present the stringent calibration requirements on this source of uncertainty. I study the potential of weak lensing to resolve a debate over a long-standing anomaly in CMB measurements in chapter 5. Finally, in chapter 6 I summarize my findings and conclude with a brief discussion of my

  12. Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; García, Julián; Hauert, Christoph; Traulsen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By “qualitatively valid” we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more) strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies . In particular, rank changes are almost certain for , which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection. PMID:24339769

  13. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Goenner, Hubert

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  14. Critical level statistics for weakly disordered graphene.

    PubMed

    Amanatidis, E; Kleftogiannis, I; Katsanos, D E; Evangelou, S N

    2014-04-16

    In two dimensions chaotic level statistics with the Wigner spacing distribution P(S) is expected for massless fermions in the Dirac region. The obtained P(S) for weakly disordered finite graphene samples with zigzag edges turns out, however, to be neither chaotic (Wigner) nor localized (Poisson). It is similar to the intermediate statistics at the critical point of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The quantum transport of finite graphene for weak disorder, with critical level statistics can occur via edge states as in topological insulators, and for strong disorder, graphene behaves as an ordinary Anderson insulator with Poisson statistics.

  15. Landau Weak Crystallization Theory and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    Aim of this lecture is to explain main features and ingredients of weak first order phase transitions between liquid-like (uniform in space) and solid-like (non-uniform with characteristic wave vector q0) states. We illustrate how this theory (traditionally termed as Landau weak crystallization theory) works. We consider two examples describing universal temperature dependence of shear viscosity in liquids, and so-called main phase transition in membranes. Our results are in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data, offering a deeper understanding of this kind of phase transitions. We discuss also why and where predicted universal effects can be masked.

  16. Simple understanding of quantum weak values

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lupei; Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this work we revisit the important and controversial concept of quantum weak values, aiming to provide a simplified understanding to its associated physics and the origin of anomaly. Taking the Stern-Gerlach setup as a working system, we base our analysis on an exact treatment in terms of quantum Bayesian approach. We also make particular connection with a very recent work, where the anomaly of the weak values was claimed from the pure statistics in association with “disturbance” and “post-selection”, rather than the unique quantum nature. Our analysis resolves the related controversies through a clear and quantitative way. PMID:26838670

  17. Measuring the dark side (with weak lensing)

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, Luca

    2008-04-15

    We introduce a convenient parameterization of dark energy models that is general enough to include several modified gravity models and generalized forms of dark energy. In particular we take into account the linear perturbation growth factor, the anisotropic stress and the modified Poisson equation. We discuss the sensitivity of large-scale weak lensing surveys like the proposed DUNE satellite to these parameters (assuming systematic errors can be controlled). We find that a large-scale weak lensing tomographic survey is able to easily distinguish the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model from {Lambda}CDM and to determine the perturbation growth index to an absolute error of 0.02-0.04.

  18. Geometric Integration of Weakly Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modin, K.; Führer, C.; Soöderlind, G.

    2009-09-01

    Some problems in mechanics, e.g. in bearing simulation, contain subsystems that are conservative as well as weakly dissipative subsystems. Our experience is that geometric integration methods are often superior for such systems, as long as the dissipation is weak. Here we develop adaptive methods for dissipative perturbations of Hamiltonian systems. The methods are "geometric" in the sense that the form of the dissipative perturbation is preserved. The methods are linearly explicit, i.e., they require the solution of a linear subsystem. We sketch an analysis in terms of backward error analysis and numerical comparisons with a conventional RK method of the same order is given.

  19. Scale-up of recovery process for waste solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carey, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Recycling of spent cleaning solvents, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and trichlorotrifluoroethane at KCP was evaluated. Gas chromatography was used to identify stabilization levels in virgin and recycled solvent. Segregation, pretreatment and distillation processes were defined. Existing distillation equipment was modified and a solvent drying process was added. Recycled solvent quality of several production lots is also presented. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Solvent disperser for removing oil from sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Di Foggio, R.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes method for dispersing solvent for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, comprising: (a) receiving solvent dripping downwardly, and (b) conducting the received solvent by means of capillary action to an application zone located and dimensioned for passing such solvent to the sponge in a sponge core barrel.

  1. Local pH and effective pKA of weak polyelectrolytes - insights from computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Nová, Lucie; Uhlík, Filip; Košovan, Peter

    2017-03-09

    In this work we study the titration behavior of weak polyelectrolytes by computer simulations. We analyze the local pH near the chains at various conditions and provide molecular-level insight which complements the recent experimental determination of this quantity. Next, we analyze the non-ideal titration behaviour of weak polyelectrolytes in solution, calculate the effective ionization constant and compare the simulation results with theoretical predictions. In contrast with the universal behaviour with respect to chain length, we find non-universality and deviations from theory with respect to polymer concentration and permittivity of the solvent. The latter we explain in terms of counterion condensation and ion correlation effects, which lead to reversal of the non-ideal titration behaviour at very low permittivities. We discuss the impact of these findings on the interpretation of experimental results.

  2. Towards safer sodium-ion batteries via organic solvent/ionic liquid based hybrid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Damien; Ponrouch, Alexandre; Palacín, M. Rosa; Johansson, Patrik

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid electrolytes aimed at application in sodium-ion batteries (SIB) consisting of an organic solvent mixture (EC:PC) and different ionic liquids (ILs); EMImTFSI, BMImTFSI, and Pyr13TFSI, and with the NaTFSI salt providing the Na+ charge carriers have here been extensively studied. The physico-chemical and electrochemical characterisation includes ionic conductivity, viscosity, density, cation coordination and solvation, various safety measures, and electrochemical stability window (ESW). Hybrid electrolytes with 10-50% of IL content were found to have ionic conductivities on par with comparable organic solvent based electrolytes, but with highly enhanced safety properties. A systematic Raman spectroscopy study of the cation coordination and solvation before and after electrolyte safety tests by ignition suggest that IL cations and TFSI remain stable when ignited while organic solvents are consumed. Finally, the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed when using hybrid electrolytes has both better mechanical and electrochemical stability than the SEI derived from pure IL based electrolytes. For a half-cell with a hard carbon (HC) electrode and a hybrid electrolyte with a composition of 0.8 m NaTFSI in EC0.45:PC0.45:Pyr13TFSI0.10 encouraging results were obtained for IL based electrolytes - ca. 182 mAhg-1 at C/10 over 40 cycles.

  3. Organic-solvent-tolerant bacterium which secretes organic-solvent-stable lipolytic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruo )

    1994-10-01

    A bacterial strain which could be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and which could secrete lipolytic enzyme was isolated. The stability of the lipolytic activity of the supernatant of the culture increased significantly in the presence of organic solvents such as toluene, cyclohexane, ethanol, and acetone. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Effect of solvents, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye.

    PubMed

    Thipperudrappa, J; Deepa, H R; Raghavendra, U P; Hanagodimath, S M; Melavanki, R M

    2017-02-01

    The effect of solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen bonding ability, solvent mixture and silver nanoparticles on the photophysical properties of a ketocyanine dye, 2,5-di[(E)-1-(4-diethylaminophenyl) methylidine]-1-cyclopentanone (2,5-DEAPMC), is investigated at room temperature. Solvent effect is analyzed using Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function, Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter, and Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches. The spectral properties better follow Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter than the Lippert-Mataga bulk polarity function. This indicates that both general and specific solute-solvent interactions are operative. Kamlet's and Catalan's multiple linear regression approaches indicate that polarizability/dipolarity solvent influences are greater than hydrogen bond donor and hydrogen bond acceptor solvent influences. The solvatochromic correlations are used to estimate excited state dipole moment using the experimentally determined ground state dipole moment. The excited state dipole moment of the dye is found to be larger than its corresponding ground state dipole moment and ground and excited state dipole moments are not parallel, but subtend an angle of 77°. The absorption and emission spectra are modulated in the presence silver nanoparticles. The fluorescence of 2,5-DEAPMC is quenched by silver nanoparticles. The possible fluorescence quenching mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Changes in psychological performances of solvent-poisoned and solvent-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in psychological performances associated with long-term exposure to organic solvents and solvent mixtures were studied in a group of 56 male workers diagnosed as having an occupational disease caused by solvents. Their mean duration of exposure was 9.1 +/- SD 8.3 years, and they were exposed mainly to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons and to mixtures of paint solvents. The psychological performances of these solvent-exposed patients were compared with those of 98 styrene-exposed workers and a nonexposed group of 43 construction workers. The applied psychological test variables were factor analyzed, before other statistical analysis, in order to clarify what they measured in the present study. The solvent-exposed group was characterized by a decline in visuomotor performance and decreased freedom from distractibility. The poor visuomotor performances were also related to the long duration of solvent exposure in this group of patients. The index applied for the exposure level revealed no significant relationships to psychological performances among the solvent-exposed patients. The psychological performances of the styrene-exposed group differed only very slightly from those of the nonexposed workers.

  6. Towards ultra-fast solvent evaporation, the development of a computer controlled solvent vapor annealing chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gunnar; Wong, J.; Drapes, C.; Grant, M.; Baruth, A.

    Despite the promise of cheap and fast nanoscale ordering of block polymer thin films via solvent vapor annealing, a standardized, scalable production scheme remains elusive. Solvent vapor annealing exposes a nano-thin film to the vapors of one or more solvents with the goal of forming a swollen and mobile state to direct the self-assembly process by tuning surface energies and mediating unfavorable chain interactions. We have shown that optimized annealing conditions, where kinetic and thermal properties for crystal growth are extremely fast (<1s), exist at solvent concentrations just below the order-disorder transition of the film. However, when investigating the propagation of a given morphology into the bulk of a film during drying, the role of solvent evaporation comes under great scrutiny. During this process, the film undergoes a competition between two fronts; phase separation and kinetic trapping. Recent results in both theory and experiment point toward this critical element in controlling the resultant morphologies; however, no current method includes a controllable solvent evaporation rate at ultra-fast time scales. We report on a computer-controlled, pneumatically actuated chamber that provides control over solvent evaporation down to 15 ms. Furthermore, in situ spectral reflectance monitors solvent concentration with 10 ms temporal resolution and reveals several possible evaporation trajectories, ranging from linear to exponential to logarithmic. Funded by Dr. Randolph Ferlic Summer Research Scholarship and NASA Nebraska Space Grant.

  7. Solvent System Selection Strategies in Countercurrent Separation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Friesen, J. Brent; McAlpine, James B.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of applications in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography, collectively known as countercurrent separation, are dedicated to medicinal plant and natural product research. In countercurrent separation, the selection of the appropriate solvent system is of utmost importance as it is the equivalent to the simultaneous choice of column and eluent in liquid chromatography. However, solvent system selection is often laborious, involving extensive partition and/or analytical trials. Therefore, simplified solvent system selection strategies that predict the partition coefficients and, thus, analyte behavior are in high demand and may advance both the science of countercurrent separation and its applications. The last decade of solvent system selection theory and applications are critically reviewed, and strategies are classified according to their data input requirements. This offers the practitioner an up-to-date overview of rationales and methods for choosing an efficient solvent system, provides a perspective regarding their accuracy, reliability, and practicality, and discusses the possibility of combining multiple methods for enhanced prediction power. PMID:26393937

  8. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  9. Solvent extraction of phenols from water

    SciTech Connect

    Greminger, D.C.; Burns, G.P.; Lynn, S.; Hanson, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE) have been evaluated as solvents for extraction of phenols, at high dilution, from water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (K/sub D/) have been measured for phenol, dihydroxybenzenes and trihydroxybenzenes in both solvents as a function of pH. Particularly for the multihydric phenols, MIBK gives substantially higher values of K/sub D/ than does DIPE. The effect of pH can be described quantitatively through a simple ionization model, using published values of dissociation constants for the various phenols. Some method for removal of residual dissolved solvent must ordinarily be included in any extraction process for phenols. Possibilities include atmospheric-steam or inert-gas stripping, vacuum-steam stripping, and extraction with a second solvent. Vacuum-steam stripping is a particularly attractive choice for removal of MIBK; this reinforces the utility of MIBK as a solvent. The optimal temperature for vacuum stripping is generally the temperature of the extraction operation, which in turn is related to the effect of temperature on K/sub D/. Values of K/sub D/ for phenol-water-MIBK were determined at 30, 50, and 75/sup 0/C, and were found to decrease with increasing temperature at all concentrations.

  10. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Solvent response of mixed polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kai; Chapman, Walter G.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed classical density functional theory calculations to study the behavior of mixed polymer brushes tethered to a planar surface. We assume no lateral segregation of the polymer at the grafting density studied and consider an implicit solvent. For a binary mixture of short and long athermal polymer chains, the short chain is compressed while the long chain is stretched compared with corresponding pure polymer chains at the same grafting density, which is consistent with simulation. This results from configurational entropy effects. Furthermore, we add a mean-field interaction for each polymer brush to simulate their different response towards a solvent. The long chain is forced to dislike the solvent more than the short chain. Through the interplay between the solvent effects and configurational entropy effects, a switch of the polymer brush surface (or outer) layer is found with increasing chain length of the long chain. The transition chain length (long chain) increases with increasing the solvent selectivity, and decreases with increasing the grafting density of the long chain. These results can provide guidance for the design of smart materials based on mixed polymer brushes.

  12. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.

  13. A protein molecule in an aqueous mixed solvent: fluctuation theory outlook.

    PubMed

    Shulgin, Ivan L; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2005-08-01

    In the present paper a procedure to calculate the properties of proteins in aqueous mixed solvents, particularly the excesses of the constituents of the mixed solvent near the protein molecule and the preferential binding parameters, is suggested. Expressions for the Kirkwood-Buff integrals in ternary mixtures and for the preferential binding parameter were derived and used to calculate various properties of infinitely dilute proteins in aqueous mixed solvents. The derived expressions and experimental information regarding the partial molar volumes and the preferential binding parameters were used to calculate the excesses (deficits) of water and cosolvent (in comparison with the bulk concentrations of protein-free mixed solvent) in the vicinity of ribonuclease A, ribonuclease T1, and lysozyme molecules. The calculations showed that water was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease A for water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixtures, and the cosolvent urea was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease T1 and lysozyme. The derivative of the activity coefficient of the protein with respect to the mole fraction of water was also calculated. This derivative was negative for the water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixed solvents and positive for the water/urea mixture. The mixture of lysozyme in the water/urea solvent is of particular interest, because the lysozyme at pH 7.0 is in its native state up to 9.3M urea, while at pH 2.0 it is denaturated between 2.5 and 5M and higher concentrations of urea. Our results demonstrated a striking similarity in the hydration of lysozyme at both pHs. It is worthwhile to note that the excesses of urea were only weakly composition dependent on both cases.

  14. A protein molecule in an aqueous mixed solvent: Fluctuation theory outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Ivan L.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2005-08-01

    In the present paper a procedure to calculate the properties of proteins in aqueous mixed solvents, particularly the excesses of the constituents of the mixed solvent near the protein molecule and the preferential binding parameters, is suggested. Expressions for the Kirkwood-Buff integrals in ternary mixtures and for the preferential binding parameter were derived and used to calculate various properties of infinitely dilute proteins in aqueous mixed solvents. The derived expressions and experimental information regarding the partial molar volumes and the preferential binding parameters were used to calculate the excesses (deficits) of water and cosolvent (in comparison with the bulk concentrations of protein-free mixed solvent) in the vicinity of ribonuclease A, ribonuclease T1, and lysozyme molecules. The calculations showed that water was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease A for water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixtures, and the cosolvent urea was in excess in the vicinity of ribonuclease T1 and lysozyme. The derivative of the activity coefficient of the protein with respect to the mole fraction of water was also calculated. This derivative was negative for the water/glycerol and water/trehalose mixed solvents and positive for the water/urea mixture. The mixture of lysozyme in the water/urea solvent is of particular interest, because the lysozyme at pH 7.0 is in its native state up to 9.3M urea, while at pH 2.0 it is denaturated between 2.5 and 5M and higher concentrations of urea. Our results demonstrated a striking similarity in the hydration of lysozyme at both pHs. It is worthwhile to note that the excesses of urea were only weakly composition dependent on both cases.

  15. Development of deep eutectic solvents applied in extraction and separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Row, Kyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents, as an alternative to ionic liquids, have greener credentials than ionic liquids, and have attracted considerable attention in related chemical research. Deep eutectic solvents have attracted increasing attention in chemistry for the extraction and separation of various target compounds from natural products. This review highlights the preparation of deep eutectic solvents, unique properties of deep eutectic solvents, and synthesis of deep-eutectic-solvent-based materials. On the other hand, application in the extraction and separation of deep eutectic solvents is also included in this report. In this paper, the available data and references in this field are reviewed to summarize the applications and developments of deep eutectic solvents. Based on the development of deep eutectic solvents, an exploitation of new deep eutectic solvents and deep eutectic solvents-based materials is expected to diversify into extraction and separation.

  16. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. ); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  17. Coordination effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okuyama, Orio; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2012-04-01

    The CuA site is the electron mediator in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), providing an appropriate electronic structure for rapid electron transfer. We have studied the coordinating effects of His, Met, and the peptide carbonyl group of Glu of the CuA site, using the density functional theory. Our computation demonstrates that the His ligation provides strong orbital and electrostatic effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site, while that the Met coordination gives weak orbital and electrostatic effects. A coordination of the peptide carbonyl group affects the electronic structure of the CuA site only electrostatically.

  18. Sensory Coordination of Insect Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-29

    flies ( Hermetia Illucens ) to elicit controlled take-off and landing in free flight (Pilot experiments completed. Follow- up experiments in progress...neerii. 2) Location of odor sources in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. 3) Wing-haltere coordination in the soldier fly, Hermetia illucens ...coordination in the soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (Tanvi Deora): One of the key sensory inputs for flight stability in Diptera comes from the haltere

  19. Molecular Handshake: Recognition through Weak Noncovalent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthy, Parvathi S.

    2006-01-01

    The weak noncovalent interactions between substances, the handshake in the form of electrostatic interactions, van der Waals' interactions or hydrogen bonding is universal to all living and nonliving matter. They significantly influence the molecular and bulk properties and behavior of matter. Their transient nature affects chemical reactions and…

  20. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  1. Engineering molecular crystals with abnormally weak cohesion.

    PubMed

    Maly, Kenneth E; Gagnon, Eric; Wuest, James D

    2011-05-14

    Adding astutely placed methyl groups to hexaphenylbenzene increases molecular weight but simultaneously weakens key C-H···π interactions, thereby leading to decreased enthalpies of sublimation and showing that materials with abnormally weak cohesion can be made by identifying and then obstructing interactions that help control association.

  2. Resource Letter WI-1: Weak Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstein, Barry R.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a listing of sources of literature and teaching aids to improve course content in the fields of: weak interactions, beta decay, orbital electron capture, muon capture, semileptonic decay, nonleptonic processes, parity violation in nuclei, neutrino physics, and parity violation in atomic physics. (SL)

  3. [A strong man with a weak shoulder].

    PubMed

    Henket, Marjolijn; Lycklama á Nijeholt, Geert J; van der Zwaal, Peer

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old former olympic athlete had pain and weakness of his left shoulder. There was no prior trauma. He had full range-of-motion and a scapular dyskinesia. There was atrophy of the trapezius and sternocleidomastoideus muscles. He was diagnosed with 'idiopathic neuritis of the accessorius nerve'.

  4. Musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture and shoulder weakness.

    PubMed

    Lipford, Melissa C; Bond, Jeffrey R; Steinmann, Scott P; Kumar, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    We report a patient with bilateral simultaneous onset of weakness of shoulder lateral rotation due to musculotendinous infraspinatus rupture that occurred after shoulder steroid injections. Disruption of the musculotendinous junction of the infraspinatus is a rare recently described entity. Electromyography is normal, and magnetic resonance image findings are characteristic.

  5. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Gloe, Karsten; Tasker, Peter A; Oshima, Tatsuya; Watarai, Hitoshi; Nilsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Preface The theme of supramolecular chemistry (SC), entailing the organization of multiple species through noncovalent interactions, has permeated virtually all aspects of chemical endeavor over the past several decades. Given that the observed behavior of discrete molecular species depends upon their weak interactions with one another and with matrix components, one would have to conclude that SC must indeed form part of the fabric of chemistry itself. A vast literature now serves to categorize SC phenomena within a body of consistent terminology. The word supramolecular itself appears in the titles of dozens of books, several journals, and a dedicated encyclopedia. Not surprisingly, the theme of SC also permeates the field of solvent extraction (SX), inspiring the framework for this volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. It is attempted in the six chapters of this volume to identify both how supramolecular behavior occurs and is studied in the context of SX and how SC is influencing the current direction of SX. Researchers and practitioners have long dealt with supramolecular interactions in SX. Indeed, the use of polar extractant molecules in nonpolar media virtually assures that aggregative interactions will dominate the solution behavior of SX. Analytical chemists working in the 1930s to the 1950s with simple mono- and bidentate chelating ligands as extractants noted that extraction of metal ions obeyed complicated mass-action equilibria involving complex stoichiometries. As chemists and engineers developed processes for nuclear and hydrometallurgical applications in the 1950s and 1960s, the preference for aliphatic diluents only enhanced the complexity and supramolecular nature of extraction chemistry. Use of physical techniques such as light scattering and vapor-pressure measurements together with various spectroscopic methods revealed organic-phase aggregates from well-defined dimers to small aggregates containing a few extractant molecules to large

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  7. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  10. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  11. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  15. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  17. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the...: Solvent/Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  2. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  5. Photochemistry of 5-aminoquinoline in protic and aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Bridhkoti, Jagat P; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Joshi, H C; Pant, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Photophysical properties of 5-aminoquinoline (5AQ) have been investigated in various non-polar and polar (protic and aprotic) solvents using steady state and time resolved fluorescence. In aprotic solvents, the spectral maxima depend on the polarity. However, in protic solvents both the fluorescence intensity as well decay time show decrease depending on the hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. The results suggest that photochemistry 5AQ is quite sensitive towards the polarity as well as protic character of the solvent.

  6. The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding: phosphorylated azoles.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, Kirill A; Larina, Ludmila I; Chirkina, Elena A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2012-02-01

    The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding have been investigated in the series of tetracoordinated, pentacoordinated and hexacoordinated N-vinylpyrazoles and intermolecular complexes of N-vinylimidazole and 1-allyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole with phosphorous pentachloride both experimentally and theoretically. It was shown that either intramolecular or intermolecular coordination involving phosphorous results in a dramatic (31)P nuclear shielding amounting to approximately 150 ppm on changing the phosphorous coordination number by one. A major importance of solvent effects on (31)P nuclear shielding of intramolecular and intermolecular complexes involving N → P coordination bond has been demonstrated. It was found that the zeroth-order regular approximation-gauge-including atomic orbital-B1PW91/DZP method was sufficiently accurate for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts, provided relativistic corrections are taken into account, the latter being of crucial importance in the description of (31)P nuclear shielding.

  7. Improving the Efficiency of Non-equilibrium Sampling in the Aqueous Environment via Implicit-Solvent Simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Fu; Sun, Huiyong; Li, Dan; Hou, Tingjun

    2017-04-11

    By means of estimators based on non-equilibrium work, equilibrium free energy differences or potentials of mean force (PMFs) of a system of interest can be computed from biased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach, however, is often plagued by slow conformational sampling and poor convergence, especially when the solvent effects are taken into account. Here, as a possible way to alleviate the problem, several widely used implicit-solvent models, which are derived from the analytic generalized Born (GB) equation and implemented in the AMBER suite of programs, were employed in free energy calculations based on non-equilibrium work and evaluated for their abilities to emulate explicit water. As a test case, pulling MD simulations were carried out on an alanine polypeptide with different solvent models and protocols, followed by comparisons of the reconstructed PMF profiles along the unfolding coordinate. The results show that when employing the non-equilibrium work method, sampling with an implicit-solvent model is several times faster and, more importantly, converges more rapidly than that with explicit water due to reduction of dissipation. Among the assessed GB models, the Neck variants outperform the OBC and HCT variants in terms of accuracy, whereas their computational costs are comparable. In addition, for the best-performing models, the impact of the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) dependent nonpolar solvation term was also examined. The present study highlights the advantages of implicit-solvent models for non-equilibrium sampling.

  8. Cosmological model discrimination with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Teyssier, R.

    2009-10-01

    Weak gravitational lensing provides a unique way of mapping directly the dark matter in the Universe. The majority of lensing analyses use the two-point statistics of the cosmic shear field to constrain the cosmological model, a method that is affected by degeneracies, such as that between σ8 and Ωm which are respectively the rms of the mass fluctuations on a scale of 8 Mpc/h and the matter density parameter, both at z = 0. However, the two-point statistics only measure the Gaussian properties of the field, and the weak lensing field is non-Gaussian. It has been shown that the estimation of non-Gaussian statistics for weak lensing data can improve the constraints on cosmological parameters. In this paper, we systematically compare a wide range of non-Gaussian estimators to determine which one provides tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters. These statistical methods include skewness, kurtosis, and the higher criticism test, in several sparse representations such as wavelet and curvelet; as well as the bispectrum, peak counting, and a newly introduced statistic called wavelet peak counting (WPC). Comparisons based on sparse representations indicate that the wavelet transform is the most sensitive to non-Gaussian cosmological structures. It also appears that the most helpful statistic for non-Gaussian characterization in weak lensing mass maps is the WPC. Finally, we show that the σ8 - Ωm degeneracy could be even better broken if the WPC estimation is performed on weak lensing mass maps filtered by the wavelet method, MRLens.

  9. Cosmological model discrimination from weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Teyssier, R.

    2010-06-01

    Weak gravitational lensing provides a unique way of mapping directly the dark matter in the Universe. The majority of lensing analyses use the two-point statistics of the cosmic shear field to constrain the cosmological model, a method that is affected by degeneracies, such as that between σ8 and Ωm which are respectively the rms of the mass fluctuations on a scale of 8 Mpc/h and the matter density parameter, both at z = 0. However, the two-point statistics only measure the Gaussian properties of the field, and the weak lensing field is non-Gaussian. It has been shown that the estimation of non-Gaussian statistics for weak lensing data can improve the constraints on cosmological parameters. In this paper, we systematically compare a wide range of non-Gaussian estimators to determine which one provides tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters. These statistical methods include skewness, kurtosis, and the higher criticism test, in several sparse representations such as wavelet and curvelet; as well as the bispectrum, peak counting, and a newly introduced statistic called wavelet peak counting (WPC). Comparisons based on sparse representations indicate that the wavelet transform is the most sensitive to non-Gaussian cosmological structures. It also appears that the most helpful statistic for non-Gaussian characterization in weak lensing mass maps is the WPC. Finally, we show that the σ8-Ωm degeneracy could be even better broken if the WPC estimation is performed on weak lensing mass maps filtered by the wavelet method, MRLens.

  10. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  11. Relative efficiency of solvents used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M G

    1998-01-01

    A root canal model was used to test the relative efficiency of various commonly used endodontic solvents including eucalyptol, eucalyptus oil, orange oil, chloroform, and xylene to dissolve or soften gutta-percha and several different types of sealers (Proco-Sol, AH26, and Sealapex). There was no significant difference in the ability of the solvents to dissolve gutta-percha and the zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer Proco-Sol. The resin-based sealer, AH26, was only dissolved in chloroform and took considerable time (> 30 min). The calcium hydroxide-based sealer, Sealapex, could not be tested because it was found not to set at all unless in contact with air. All of the solvents for both Proco-Sol and gutta-percha produced clinically acceptable dissolving times.

  12. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  13. Investigation of aggregation in solvent extraction of lanthanides by acidic extractants (organophosphorus and naphthenic acid)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, N.; Wu, J.; Yu, Z.; Neuman, R.D.; Wang, D.; Xu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Three acidic extractants (I) di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), (II) 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEHPEHE) and (III) naphthenic acid were employed in preparing the samples for the characterization of the coordination structure of lanthanide-extractant complexes and the physicochemical nature of aggregates formed in the organic diluent of the solvent extraction systems. Photo correlation spectroscopy (PCS) results on the aggregates formed by the partially saponified HDEHP in n-heptane showed that the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates was comparable to the molecular dimensions of HDEHP. The addition of 2-octanol into the diluent, by which the mixed solvent was formed, increased the dimensions of the corresponding aggregates. Aggregates formed from the lanthanide ions and HDEHP in the organic phase of the extraction systems were found very unstable. In the case of naphthenic acid, PCS data showed the formation of w/o microemulsion from the saponified naphthenic acid in the mixed solvent. The extraction of lanthanides by the saponified naphthenic acid in the mixed solvent under the given experimental conditions was a process of destruction of the w/o microemulsion. A possible mechanism of the breakdown of the w/o microemulsion droplets is discussed.

  14. Solvent and temperature effects on the reduction and amination reactions of electrophiles by lithium dialkylaminoborohydrides.

    PubMed

    Pasumansky, Lubov; Collins, Christopher J; Pratt, Lawrence M; Nguyên, Ngân Van; Ramachandran, B; Singaram, Bakthan

    2007-02-02

    The influence of temperature and solvent effects on the reduction and amination mechanisms of iodomethane by lithium N,N-diisopropylaminoborohydride (iPr-LAB) was examined in varying concentrations of THF and dioxane. The reactions of benzyl chloride and trimethylsilyl chloride with iPr-LAB in THF were also studied. The amination of iodomethane is favored over reduction at low and room temperatures in pure THF and with increasing the amount of dioxane in THF. At higher temperatures, the reduction reaction appears to compete with the amination. In dioxane solvent, however, iodomethane yields exclusively the amination product regardless of temperature. On the other hand, reduction by iPr-LAB to the aminoborane is the only product observed in THF when benzyl chloride and trimethylsilyl chloride are used. To understand the solvent effects on the product distribution, ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to examine the mechanisms of reduction and amination of chloromethane and bromomethane by lithium dimethylaminoborohydride (LAB) in THF and dioxane. The results of these calculations show that the relative reaction barrier heights are significantly affected by the nature of the coordinated solvent molecule and thus lend support to the experimental observations.

  15. Fluorescence properties and dipole moments of novel fused thienobenzofurans. Solvent and structural effects.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Párkányi, Cyril; Adenier, Alain; Potin, Caroline; Zajíčková, Zuzana; Martínez, Omar R; Svoboda, Jiří; Pihera, Pavel; Váchal, Petr

    2011-11-01

    The electronic absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, and fluorescence quantum yields of novel fused thienobenzofurans, including thieno[3,2-b][1]benzofuran (1), [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]furan (2), and [1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzofuran (3), were recorded in fourteen solvents of different polarities at room temperature. Compound 2 was not fluorescent. Experimental ground-state dipole moments of compounds 1-3 were measured in benzene at 298 K and compared with the corresponding theoretical dipole moment values. The solvent effects on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of these thienobenzofurans were quantitatively investigated by means of solvatochromic correlations based on the Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and McRae equations. A weak negative solvatochromic behavior was found for these compounds, showing that their dipole moments are slightly lower in the excited singlet-state than in the ground-state. Kamlet-Abboud-Taft multiparameter relationships were also established for electronic absorption and fluorescence wavenumbers, and fluorescence quantum yields in most solvents, demonstrating the occurrence of specific solute-solvent interactions.

  16. Surface adsorption of colloidal brushes at good solvents conditions.

    PubMed

    Striolo, Alberto

    2012-09-14

    Monte Carlo simulations are presented for a minimal model of one spherical colloidal particle as it interacts with one attractive flat substrate. The colloidal particle is decorated by either 6 or 14 grafted polymer chains. The chains are always rather short, with their radius of gyration, estimated at infinite dilution in good solvent conditions, never larger than the spherical colloid diameter. Although all simulations are conducted under "good-solvent" conditions for the grafted polymer chains, we find that small changes in the polymer segment-polymer segment energetic interaction parameter can lead to significantly different scenarios. When the Lennard-Jones attraction is weak, 0.12 k(B)T, increasing the polymer length decreases the likelihood of colloidal adsorption, as expected. On the contrary, when the attraction is 0.18 k(B)T, increasing the length of the grafted polymer chains promotes the adsorption of the colloidal brush onto the surface. When the Lennard-Jones energetic parameter that describes polymer segment-polymer segment interactions is 0.15 k(B)T, as the length of the grafted polymer chains increases the probability of colloidal adsorption decreases to a minimum, and then increases. The results, explained in terms of a competition between entropic (due to the reduction in degrees of freedom available to the grafted polymer chains upon colloidal brush adsorption) and enthalpic driving forces (due to favorable colloid-surface and polymer segment-surface interactions), could be useful for controlling the circulation lifetime of liposomes within the blood stream, and optimizing solar energy harvesting by depositing colloidal particles on solid surfaces.

  17. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Acuña, A. Ulises

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  18. The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(iii) and europium(iii) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Christian; Löfström-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Geist, Andreas; Lundberg, Daniel; Denecke, Melissa; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-11-14

    Separation of trivalent actinoid (An(iii)) and lanthanoid (Ln(iii)) ions is extremely challenging due to their similar ionic radii and chemical properties. Poly-aromatic nitrogen compounds acting as tetradentate chelating ligands to the metal ions in the extraction, have the ability to sufficiently separate An(iii) from Ln(iii). One of these compounds, 6,6'-bis(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-benzol[1,2,4]triazin-3-yl)[2,2]bipyridine, CyMe4-BTBP, has proven to be resistant towards acidic environments and strong radiation from radioactive decomposition. EXAFS studies of the dicomplexes of CyMe4-BTBP with americium(iii) and europium(iii) in nitrobenzene, cyclohexanone, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol and malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in 1-octanol have been carried out to get a deeper understanding of the parameters responsible for the separation. The predominating complexes independent of solvent used are [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) and [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+), respectively, which are present as outer-sphere ion-pairs with nitrate ions in the studied solvents with low relative permittivity. The presence of a nitrate ion in the first coordination sphere of the americium(iii) complex compensates the charge density of the complex considerably in comparison when only outer-sphere ion-pairs are formed as for the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex. The stability and solubility of a complex in a solvent with low relative permittivity increase with decreasing charge density. The [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) complex will therefore be increasingly soluble and stabilized over the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex in solvents with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent. The separation of americium(iii) from europium(iii) with CyMe4-BTBP as extraction agent will increase with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent, and thereby also with decreasing solubility of CyMe4-BTBP. The choice of solvent is therefore a balance of a high separation factor and sufficient solubility of the CyMe4-BTBP

  19. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Warren K.; McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  20. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.K.; McCray, S.B.; Friesen, D.T.

    1998-03-10

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.